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Sample records for pylori products nod1

  1. In vivo accumulation of Helicobacter pylori products, NOD1, ubiquitinated proteins and proteasome in a novel cytoplasmic structure.

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    Vittorio Necchi

    Full Text Available Cell internalization and intracellular fate of H. pylori products/virulence factors in vivo by human gastric epithelium, the main target of H. pylori-induced pathologies (i.e., peptic ulcer and cancer, are still largely unknown. Investigating gastric endoscopic biopsies from dyspeptic patients by means of ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, here we show that, in human superficial-foveolar epithelium and its metaplastic or dysplastic foci, H. pylori virulence factors accumulated in a discrete cytoplasmic structure characterized by 13-nm-thick cylindrical particles of regular punctate-linear substructure resembling the proteasome complex in size and structure. Inside this particle-rich cytoplasmic structure (PaCS we observed colocalization of VacA, CagA, urease and outer membrane proteins with NOD1 receptor, ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, polyubiquitinated proteins, proteasome components and potentially oncogenic proteins like SHP2 and ERKs in human gastric epithelium. By means of electron and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that the in vivo findings were reproduced in vitro by incubating human epithelial cell lines with H. pylori products/virulence factors. PaCSs differed from VacA-induced vacuoles, phagosomes, aggresomes or related bodies. Our data suggest that PaCS is a novel, proteasome-enriched structure arising in ribosome-rich cytoplasm at sites of H. pylori products accumulation. As a site of selective concentration of bacterial virulence factors, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and interactive proteins, PaCS is likely to modulate immune-inflammatory and proliferative responses of the gastric epithelium of potential pathologic relevance.

  2. In vivo accumulation of Helicobacter pylori products, NOD1, ubiquitinated proteins and proteasome in a novel cytoplasmic structure.

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    Necchi, Vittorio; Sommi, Patrizia; Ricci, Vittorio; Solcia, Enrico

    2010-03-16

    Cell internalization and intracellular fate of H. pylori products/virulence factors in vivo by human gastric epithelium, the main target of H. pylori-induced pathologies (i.e., peptic ulcer and cancer), are still largely unknown. Investigating gastric endoscopic biopsies from dyspeptic patients by means of ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, here we show that, in human superficial-foveolar epithelium and its metaplastic or dysplastic foci, H. pylori virulence factors accumulated in a discrete cytoplasmic structure characterized by 13-nm-thick cylindrical particles of regular punctate-linear substructure resembling the proteasome complex in size and structure. Inside this particle-rich cytoplasmic structure (PaCS) we observed colocalization of VacA, CagA, urease and outer membrane proteins with NOD1 receptor, ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, polyubiquitinated proteins, proteasome components and potentially oncogenic proteins like SHP2 and ERKs in human gastric epithelium. By means of electron and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that the in vivo findings were reproduced in vitro by incubating human epithelial cell lines with H. pylori products/virulence factors. PaCSs differed from VacA-induced vacuoles, phagosomes, aggresomes or related bodies. Our data suggest that PaCS is a novel, proteasome-enriched structure arising in ribosome-rich cytoplasm at sites of H. pylori products accumulation. As a site of selective concentration of bacterial virulence factors, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and interactive proteins, PaCS is likely to modulate immune-inflammatory and proliferative responses of the gastric epithelium of potential pathologic relevance.

  3. In Vivo Accumulation of Helicobacter pylori Products, NOD1, Ubiquitinated Proteins and Proteasome in a Novel Cytoplasmic Structure

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    Necchi, Vittorio; Sommi, Patrizia; Ricci, Vittorio; Solcia, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Cell internalization and intracellular fate of H. pylori products/virulence factors in vivo by human gastric epithelium, the main target of H. pylori-induced pathologies (i.e., peptic ulcer and cancer), are still largely unknown. Investigating gastric endoscopic biopsies from dyspeptic patients by means of ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, here we show that, in human superficial-foveolar epithelium and its metaplastic or dysplastic foci, H. pylori virulence factors accumulated in a discrete cytoplasmic structure characterized by 13-nm-thick cylindrical particles of regular punctate-linear substructure resembling the proteasome complex in size and structure. Inside this particle-rich cytoplasmic structure (PaCS) we observed colocalization of VacA, CagA, urease and outer membrane proteins with NOD1 receptor, ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, polyubiquitinated proteins, proteasome components and potentially oncogenic proteins like SHP2 and ERKs in human gastric epithelium. By means of electron and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that the in vivo findings were reproduced in vitro by incubating human epithelial cell lines with H. pylori products/virulence factors. PaCSs differed from VacA-induced vacuoles, phagosomes, aggresomes or related bodies. Our data suggest that PaCS is a novel, proteasome-enriched structure arising in ribosome-rich cytoplasm at sites of H. pylori products accumulation. As a site of selective concentration of bacterial virulence factors, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and interactive proteins, PaCS is likely to modulate immune-inflammatory and proliferative responses of the gastric epithelium of potential pathologic relevance. PMID:20300534

  4. NOD1-Mediated Mucosal Host Defense against Helicobacter pylori

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    Tomohiro Watanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the stomach with Helicobacter pylori is an important risk factor for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Although it has been well established that persistent colonization by H. pylori is associated with adaptive Th1 responses, the innate immune responses leading to these Th1 responses are poorly defined. Recent studies have shown that the activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 in gastric epithelial cells plays an important role in innate immune responses against H. pylori. The detection of H. pylori-derived ligands by cytosolic NOD1 induces several host defense factors, including antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and chemokines. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanisms by which NOD1 contributes to mucosal host defense against H. pylori infection of the stomach.

  5. In Vivo Accumulation of Helicobacter pylori Products, NOD1, Ubiquitinated Proteins and Proteasome in a Novel Cytoplasmic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Cell internalization and intracellular fate of H. pylori products/virulence factors in vivo by human gastric epithelium, the main target of H. pylori-induced pathologies (i.e., peptic ulcer and cancer), are still largely unknown. Investigating gastric endoscopic biopsies from dyspeptic patients by means of ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, here we show that, in human superficial-foveolar epithelium and its metaplastic or dysplastic foci, H. pylori virulence factors accumulated in a discret...

  6. Association of NOD1 and NOD2 genes polymorphisms with Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer in a Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang; Chun-Jie Liu; Li Zhang; Jian-Ming Jiang; Dan Ma; Hao-Xia Tao; Sheng-Ling Yuan; Yan-Chun Wang; Ling-Chun Wang; Hao Liang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between the tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs) of NOD1 and NOD2 and the risk of developing gastric cancer.METHODS:We conducted a hospital-based case-control study including 296 incident gastric cancer patients and 160 gastritis controls.Eight TagSNPs in the NOD1 and NOD2 genes were selected from the Hapmap database using the haploview software and genotyped by the Sequenom MassArray system.The serum levels of anti-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to indicate H.pylori infection.The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by unconditional logistic regression,including sex and age as confounding factors.RESULTS:The NOD1 rs2907749 GG genotype showed a decreased risk for gastric cancer (OR 0.50,95% CI:0.26-0.95,P =0.04) while the rs7789045 TT genotype showed an increased risk (OR 2.14,95% CI:1.20-3.82,P =0.01).An elevated susceptibility to gastric cancer was observed in the subjects with H.pylori infection and the NaOD1 rs7789045 TT genotype (OR 2.05,95% CI:1.07-3.94,P =0.03) or the NOD2 rs7205423 GC genotype (OR 2.52,95% CI:1.05-6.04,P =0.04).Haplotype analysis suggested that the distribution of AGT (rs2907749,rs2075820 and rs7789045) in NOD1 between the cases and control groups was significantly different (P corrected:0.04),and the diplotype AGT/AGT was associated with an elevated gastric cancer risk (OR 1.98,95%CI:1.04-3.79,P =0.04).The association of the NOD1 rs7789045 Tr genotype and the diplotype AGT/AGT was significant with H.pylori-related diffuse-type gastric cancer (OR 3.00,95% CI:1.38-6.53,P =0.01; OR 4.02,95% CI:1.61-10.05,P < 0.01,respectively).CONCLUSION:Genetic polymorphisms in NOD1 and NOD2 may interact with H.pylori infection and may play important roles in promoting the development of gastric cancer in the Chinese population.

  7. Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI involved in bacterial internalization and IL-8 induced responses via NOD1- and MyD88-dependent mechanisms in human biliary epithelial cells.

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    Wongwarut Boonyanugomol

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection has been proposed to be associated with various diseases of the hepatobiliary tract, including cancer of the bile duct epithelial cells (cholangiocarcinoma, CCA. The ability of H. pylori bacteria to cause pathogenic effects in these cells has, however, yet to be investigated. Given that the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI is required for H. pylori pathogenesis in gastric epithelial cells, we investigated wild-type and cag mutant strains for their ability to adhere, be internalized and induce pro-inflammatory responses in two bile duct epithelial cell lines derived from cases of CCA. The findings from these experiments were compared to results obtained with the well-characterized AGS gastric cancer cell line. We showed that the cagPAI encodes factors involved in H. pylori internalization in CCA cells, but not for adhesion to these cells. Consistent with previous studies in hepatocytes, actin polymerization and α5β1 integrin may be involved in H. pylori internalization in CCA cells. As for AGS cells, we observed significantly reduced levels of NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in CCA cells stimulated with either cagA, cagL or cagPAI bacteria, when compared with wild-type bacteria. Importantly, these IL-8 responses could be inhibited via either pre-treatment of cells with antibodies to α5β1 integrins, or via siRNA-mediated knockdown of the innate immune signaling molecules, nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 and myeloid differentiation response gene 88 (MyD88. Taken together, the data demonstrate that the cagPAI is critical for H. pylori pathogenesis in bile duct cells, thus providing a potential causal link for H. pylori in biliary tract disease.

  8. The Role of the p38-MNK-eIF4E Signaling Axis in TNF Production Downstream of the NOD1 Receptor.

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    Pashenkov, Mikhail V; Balyasova, Lyudmila S; Dagil, Yulia A; Pinegin, Boris V

    2017-02-15

    Activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) 1 and NOD2 by muropeptides triggers a complex transcriptional program in innate immune cells. However, little is known about posttranscriptional regulation of NOD1- and NOD2-dependent responses. When stimulated with a prototypic NOD1 agonist, N-acetylglucosaminyl-N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanyl-d-isoglutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (GM-triDAP), human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) produced an order of magnitude more TNF, IL-6, and pro-IL-1β than did monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC), despite similar NOD1 expression, similar cytokine mRNA kinetics, and comparable responses to LPS. TNF production by GM-triDAP-activated MDM was independent of autocrine IL-1. However, GM-triDAP-activated MDM translated TNF mRNA more efficiently than did MDDC. As an underlying mechanism, NOD1 triggering in MDM caused a more potent and long-lasting activation of the signaling axis involving p38 MAPK, MAPK-interacting kinase (MNK), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, which is a critical regulator of translation. Furthermore, MNK controlled TNF mRNA abundance in MDDC and MDM upon NOD1 triggering. NOD1-dependent responses were more sensitive to MNK inhibition than were TLR4-dependent responses. These results demonstrate the importance of the p38-MNK-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E axis in TNF production downstream of NOD1.

  9. Exopolysaccharide production by Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a widespread Gram-negative bacterium that infects the stomach of humans leading to the onset of several gastric disorders, such as, gastritis, gastric ulcers, and cancers. Studies from developing countries with low socioeconomic status and poor management of the drinking water suggest that it may serve as an environmental reservoir of H. pylori and therefore contribute to human infection. It has been reported that H. pylori has the ability to form microbi...

  10. Coupling of Nod1D and HOTCHANNEL: static case; Acoplamiento de Nod1D y HOTCHANNEL: caso estatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez T, A.M. [IPN-ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ovando C, R. [IIE-Gcia. de Energia Nuclear, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: rovando@iie.org.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work the joining of the programs Nod1D and HOTCHANNEL, developed in the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) and in the Electrical Research Institute (IIE) respectively is described. The first one allows to study the neutronic of a nuclear reactor and the second one allows to carry out the analysis of hot channel of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Nod1 D is a program that it solves by nodal methods type finite element those diffusion equations in multigroup, and it is the static part of Nod Kin that it solves the diffusion equation in their time dependent part. For another side HOTCHANNEL is based on a mathematical model constituted by four conservation equations (two of mass conservation, one of motion quantity and one of energy), which are solved applying one discretization in implicit finite differences. Both programs have been verified in independent form using diverse test problems. In this work the modifications that were necessary to carry out to both for obtaining a coupled program that it provides the axial distribution of the neutron flux, the power, the burnup and the void fraction, among others parameters as much as neutronic as thermal hydraulics are described. Those are also mentioned limitations, advantages and disadvantages of the final product to which has been designated Nod1 D-HotChn. Diverse results for the Cycle 1 of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 reactor of the Nucleo electric central comparing them with those obtained directly with the CoreMasterPresto code are provided. (Author)

  11. Functional Roles of NOD1 in Odontoblasts on Dental Pulp Innate Immunity

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    Yuki Hosokawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caries-related pathogens are first recognized by odontoblasts and induce inflammatory events that develop to pulpitis. Generally, initial sensing of microbial pathogens is mediated by pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD; however, little is known about NODs in odontoblasts. In this study, the levels of NODs expressed in rat odontoblastic cell line, KN-3, were assessed by flow cytometry and the levels of chemokines in NOD-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells were analyzed by real-time PCR and ELISA. The signal transduction pathway activated with NOD-specific ligand was assessed by blocking assay with specific inhibitors and reporter assay. In KN-3 cells, the expression level of NOD1 was stronger than that of NOD2 and the production of chemokines, such as CINC-1, CINC-2, CCL20, and MCP-1, was upregulated by stimulation with NOD1-specific ligand, but not with NOD2-specific ligand. CINC-2 and CCL20 production by stimulation with NOD1-specific ligand was reduced by p38 MAPK and AP-1 signaling inhibitors. Furthermore, the reporter assay demonstrated AP-1 activation in NOD1-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells. These findings indicated that NOD1 expressed in odontoblasts functions to upregulate the chemokines expression via p38-AP-1 signaling pathway and suggested that NOD1 may play important roles in the initiation and progression of pulpitis.

  12. Nod1/Nod2-mediated recognition plays a critical role in induction of adaptive immunity to anthrax after aerosol exposure.

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    Loving, Crystal L; Osorio, Manuel; Kim, Yun-Gi; Nuñez, Gabriel; Hughes, Molly A; Merkel, Tod J

    2009-10-01

    Toll-like receptors and Nod-like receptors (NLR) play an important role in sensing invading microorganisms for pathogen clearance and eliciting adaptive immunity for protection against rechallenge. Nod1 and Nod2, members of the NLR family, are capable of detecting bacterial peptidoglycan motifs in the host cytosol for triggering proinflammatory cytokine production. In the current study, we sought to determine if Nod1/Nod2 are involved in sensing Bacillus anthracis infection and eliciting protective immune responses. Using mice deficient in both Nod1 and Nod2 proteins, we showed that Nod1/Nod2 are involved in detecting B. anthracis for production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, CCL5, IL-6, and KC. Proinflammatory responses were higher when cells were exposed to viable spores than when they were exposed to irradiated spores, indicating that recognition of vegetative bacilli through Nod1/Nod2 is significant. We also identify a critical role for Nod1/Nod2 in priming responses after B. anthracis aerosol exposure, as mice deficient in Nod1/Nod2 were impaired in their ability to mount an anamnestic antibody response and were more susceptible to secondary lethal challenge than wild-type mice.

  13. NOD1 and NOD2 Genetic Variants in Association with Risk of Gastric Cancer and Its Precursors in a Chinese Population.

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    Zhe-Xuan Li

    Full Text Available Genetic variants of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD may influence the outcome of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis. To explore genetic variants of NOD1 and NOD2 in association with gastric cancer (GC and its precursors, a population-based study was conducted in Linqu County, China.TagSNPs of NOD1 and NOD2 were genotyped by Sequenom MASS array in 132 GCs, and 1,198 subjects with precancerous gastric lesions, and were correlated with evolution of gastric lesions in 766 subjects with follow-up data.Among seven tagSNPs, NOD1 rs2709800 and NOD2 rs718226 were associated with gastric lesions. NOD1 rs2709800 TG genotype carriers had a decreased risk of intestinal metaplasia (IM, OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.31-0.92, while NOD2 rs718226 G allele (AG/GG showed increased risks of dysplasia (DYS, OR: 2.96; 95% CI: 1.86-4.71 and GC (OR: 2.35; 95% CI: 1.24-4.46. Moreover, an additive interaction between rs718226 and H. pylori was found in DYS or GC with synergy index of 3.08 (95% CI: 1.38-6.87 or 3.99 (95% CI: 1.55-10.22, respectively. The follow-up data indicated that NOD2 rs2111235 C allele (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.32-0.83 and rs7205423 G allele (OR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.35-0.89 were associated with decreased risk of progression in H. pylori-infected subjects.NOD1 rs2709800, NOD2 rs718226, rs2111235, rs7205423 and interaction between rs718226 and H. pylori infection may be related to risk of gastric lesions.

  14. Nod1 signaling overcomes resistance of S. pneumoniae to opsonophagocytic killing.

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    Elena S Lysenko

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Airway infection by the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp leads to recruitment of neutrophils but limited bacterial killing by these cells. Co-colonization by Sp and a Gram-negative species, Haemophilus influenzae (Hi, provides sufficient stimulus to induce neutrophil and complement-mediated clearance of Sp from the mucosal surface in a murine model. Products from Hi, but not Sp, also promote killing of Sp by ex vivo neutrophil-enriched peritoneal exudate cells. Here we identify the stimulus from Hi as its peptidoglycan. Enhancement of opsonophagocytic killing was facilitated by signaling through nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-1 (Nod1, which is involved in recognition of gamma-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (meso-DAP contained in cell walls of Hi but not Sp. Neutrophils from mice treated with Hi or compounds containing meso-DAP, including synthetic peptidoglycan fragments, showed increased Sp killing in a Nod1-dependent manner. Moreover, Nod1(-/- mice showed reduced Hi-induced clearance of Sp during co-colonization. These observations offer insight into mechanisms of microbial competition and demonstrate the importance of Nod1 in neutrophil-mediated clearance of bacteria in vivo.

  15. The role of NOD1 and NOD2 in host defense against chlamydial infection.

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    Zou, Yan; Lei, Wenbo; He, Zhansheng; Li, Zhongyu

    2016-09-01

    Chlamydial species are common intracellular parasites that cause various diseases, mainly characterized by persistent infection, which lead to inflammatory responses modulated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The best understood PRRs are the extracellular Toll-like receptors, but recent significant advances have focused on two important proteins, NOD1 and NOD2, which are members of the intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor family and are capable of triggering the host innate immune signaling pathways. This results in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which is vital for an adequate host defense against intracellular chlamydial infection. NOD1/2 ligands are known to derive from peptidoglycan, and the latest research has resolved the paradox of whether chlamydial species possess this bacterial cell wall component; this finding is likely to promote in-depth investigations into the interaction between the NOD proteins and chlamydial pathogens. In this review, we summarize the basic characteristics and signal transduction functions of NOD1 and NOD2 and highlight the new research on the roles of NOD1 and NOD2 in the host defense against chlamydial infection.

  16. Cyclosporine A impairs nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (Nod1-mediated innate antibacterial renal defenses in mice and human transplant recipients.

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    Emilie Tourneur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pyelonephritis (APN, which is mainly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, is the most common bacterial complication in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. However, it remains unclear how immunosuppressive drugs, such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, decrease renal resistance to UPEC. Here, we investigated the effects of CsA in host defense against UPEC in an experimental model of APN. We show that CsA-treated mice exhibit impaired production of the chemoattractant chemokines CXCL2 and CXCL1, decreased intrarenal recruitment of neutrophils, and greater susceptibility to UPEC than vehicle-treated mice. Strikingly, renal expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1, neutrophil migration capacity, and phagocytic killing of E. coli were significantly reduced in CsA-treated mice. CsA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced, Tlr4-mediated production of CXCL2 by epithelial collecting duct cells. In addition, CsA markedly inhibited Nod1 expression in neutrophils, macrophages, and renal dendritic cells. CsA, acting through inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATs, also markedly downregulated Nod1 in neutrophils and macrophages. Silencing the NFATc1 isoform mRNA, similar to CsA, downregulated Nod1 expression in macrophages, and administration of the 11R-VIVIT peptide inhibitor of NFATs to mice also reduced neutrophil bacterial phagocytosis and renal resistance to UPEC. Conversely, synthetic Nod1 stimulating agonists given to CsA-treated mice significantly increased renal resistance to UPEC. Renal transplant recipients receiving CsA exhibited similar decrease in NOD1 expression and neutrophil phagocytosis of E. coli. The findings suggest that such mechanism of NFATc1-dependent inhibition of Nod1-mediated innate immune response together with the decrease in Tlr4-mediated production of chemoattractant chemokines caused by Cs

  17. Cyclosporine A Impairs Nucleotide Binding Oligomerization Domain (Nod1)-Mediated Innate Antibacterial Renal Defenses in Mice and Human Transplant Recipients

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    Tourneur, Emilie; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Chassin, Cécilia; Bens, Marcelle; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Charles, Nicolas; Pellefigues, Christophe; Aloulou, Meryem; Hertig, Alexandre; Monteiro, Renato C.; Girardin, Stephen E.; Philpott, Dana J.; Rondeau, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Acute pyelonephritis (APN), which is mainly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), is the most common bacterial complication in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. However, it remains unclear how immunosuppressive drugs, such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA), decrease renal resistance to UPEC. Here, we investigated the effects of CsA in host defense against UPEC in an experimental model of APN. We show that CsA-treated mice exhibit impaired production of the chemoattractant chemokines CXCL2 and CXCL1, decreased intrarenal recruitment of neutrophils, and greater susceptibility to UPEC than vehicle-treated mice. Strikingly, renal expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1), neutrophil migration capacity, and phagocytic killing of E. coli were significantly reduced in CsA-treated mice. CsA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced, Tlr4-mediated production of CXCL2 by epithelial collecting duct cells. In addition, CsA markedly inhibited Nod1 expression in neutrophils, macrophages, and renal dendritic cells. CsA, acting through inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATs), also markedly downregulated Nod1 in neutrophils and macrophages. Silencing the NFATc1 isoform mRNA, similar to CsA, downregulated Nod1 expression in macrophages, and administration of the 11R-VIVIT peptide inhibitor of NFATs to mice also reduced neutrophil bacterial phagocytosis and renal resistance to UPEC. Conversely, synthetic Nod1 stimulating agonists given to CsA-treated mice significantly increased renal resistance to UPEC. Renal transplant recipients receiving CsA exhibited similar decrease in NOD1 expression and neutrophil phagocytosis of E. coli. The findings suggest that such mechanism of NFATc1-dependent inhibition of Nod1-mediated innate immune response together with the decrease in Tlr4-mediated production of chemoattractant chemokines caused by CsA may

  18. Bacterial peptidoglycan stimulates adipocyte lipolysis via NOD1.

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    Chi, Wendy; Dao, Dyda; Lau, Trevor C; Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Cavallari, Joseph F; Foley, Kevin P; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation that can drive metabolic defects such as hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Specific metabolites can contribute to inflammation, but nutrient intake and obesity are also associated with altered bacterial load in metabolic tissues (i.e. metabolic endotoxemia). These bacterial cues can contribute to obesity-induced inflammation. The specific bacterial components and host receptors that underpin altered metabolic responses are emerging. We previously showed that Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) activation with bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) caused insulin resistance in mice. We now show that PGN induces cell-autonomous lipolysis in adipocytes via NOD1. Specific bacterial PGN motifs stimulated lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) explants from WT, but not NOD1⁻/⁻mice. NOD1-activating PGN stimulated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK),protein kinase A (PKA), and NF-κB in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The NOD1-mediated lipolysis response was partially reduced by inhibition of ERK1/2 or PKA alone, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). NOD1-stimulated lipolysis was partially dependent on NF-κB and was completely suppressed by inhibiting ERK1/2 and PKA simultaneously or hormone sensitive lipase (HSL). Our results demonstrate that bacterial PGN stimulates lipolysis in adipocytes by engaging a stress kinase, PKA, NF-κB-dependent lipolytic program. Bacterial NOD1 activation is positioned as a component of metabolic endotoxemia that can contribute to hyperlipidemia, systemic inflammation and insulin resistance by acting directly on adipocytes.

  19. Bacterial peptidoglycan stimulates adipocyte lipolysis via NOD1.

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    Wendy Chi

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with inflammation that can drive metabolic defects such as hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Specific metabolites can contribute to inflammation, but nutrient intake and obesity are also associated with altered bacterial load in metabolic tissues (i.e. metabolic endotoxemia. These bacterial cues can contribute to obesity-induced inflammation. The specific bacterial components and host receptors that underpin altered metabolic responses are emerging. We previously showed that Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 activation with bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN caused insulin resistance in mice. We now show that PGN induces cell-autonomous lipolysis in adipocytes via NOD1. Specific bacterial PGN motifs stimulated lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT explants from WT, but not NOD1⁻/⁻mice. NOD1-activating PGN stimulated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK,protein kinase A (PKA, and NF-κB in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The NOD1-mediated lipolysis response was partially reduced by inhibition of ERK1/2 or PKA alone, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. NOD1-stimulated lipolysis was partially dependent on NF-κB and was completely suppressed by inhibiting ERK1/2 and PKA simultaneously or hormone sensitive lipase (HSL. Our results demonstrate that bacterial PGN stimulates lipolysis in adipocytes by engaging a stress kinase, PKA, NF-κB-dependent lipolytic program. Bacterial NOD1 activation is positioned as a component of metabolic endotoxemia that can contribute to hyperlipidemia, systemic inflammation and insulin resistance by acting directly on adipocytes.

  20. Effector responses of bovine blood neutrophils against Escherichia coli: Role of NOD1/NF-κB signalling pathway.

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    Tan, Xun; Wei, Liang-Jun; Fan, Guo-Juan; Jiang, Ya-Nan; Yu, Xu-Ping

    2015-11-15

    Neutrophils use a broad array of pattern recognition receptors to sense and respond to invading pathogens and are important in the early control of acute bacterial infections. Nucleotide-binding oligomerizing domain-1 (NOD1) is a cytoplasmic receptor involved in recognizing bacterial peptidoglycan. Reduced neutrophil NOD1 expression has been reported in periparturient dairy cows. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of NOD1 signalling in the early responses of bovine neutrophils to bacterial infections. Blood neutrophils from healthy heifers were preincubated for 2h with ML130, a selective inhibitor of NOD1-dependent nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Thereafter, cells were cultured with live Escherichia coli for additional 30 min or subjected to Boyden chamber cell migration assay with E. coli in the lower chamber. Results showed that ML130 inhibited E. coli-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation. There was an indication, although not significant, that ML130 down-regulated gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, chemokines IL-8 and C-X-C motif ligand 2 (CXCL2), and adhesion molecule CD62L, in E. coli-challenged neutrophils. Flow cytometry-based Annexin V staining revealed a considerable increase in neutrophil survival upon E. coli infection, an effect that was attenuated in the presence of ML130. Additionally, inhibition of NOD1/NF-κB signalling resulted in reduced migration of neutrophils to E. coli, and impaired phagocytosis, intracellular bacterial killing and reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils. These results indicate that NOD1/NF-κB pathway plays a crucial role in modulating neutrophil responses that are important for early control of infections. Approaches aiming at restoring neutrophil NOD1 function could be beneficial for prevention or treatment of coliform mastitis.

  1. NOD1 and NOD2 receptors in mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala): Inductive expression and downstream signalling in ligand stimulation and bacterial infections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Banikalyan Swain; Madhubanti Basu; Mrinal Samanta

    2013-09-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)1 and NOD2 are important cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and key members of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family. They sense a wide range of bacteria or their products and play a key role in inducing innate immunity. This report describes the role of NOD1 and NOD2 receptors signalling in innate immunity in the Indian major carp, mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala). Tissue-specific expression analysis of NOD1 and NOD2 genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed their wide distribution in various organs/tissues. In the untreated fish, the highest expression of NOD1 and NOD2 was detected in liver and blood, respectively. Stimulation with NOD1- and NOD2-specific ligands, i.e. iE-DAP and MDP, activated NOD1 and NOD2 receptor signalling in vivo and in vitro resulting in significant ( < 0.05) induction of downstream signalling molecule RICK, and the effector molecules IL-1, IL-8 and IFN- in the treated group as compared to their controls. In response to both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial infections, NOD1 and NOD2 receptors signalling were activated and IL-1, IL-8 and IFN- were induced. These findings highlight the important role of NOD receptors in eliciting innate immune response during the pathogenic invasion to the fish.

  2. NOD1 and NOD2 signalling links ER stress with inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keestra-Gounder, A Marijke; Byndloss, Mariana X; Seyffert, Núbia; Young, Briana M; Chávez-Arroyo, Alfredo; Tsai, April Y; Cevallos, Stephanie A; Winter, Maria G; Pham, Oanh H; Tiffany, Connor R; de Jong, Maarten F; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Ravindran, Resmi; Luciw, Paul A; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J; Tsolis, Renée M

    2016-04-21

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a major contributor to inflammatory diseases, such as Crohn disease and type 2 diabetes. ER stress induces the unfolded protein response, which involves activation of three transmembrane receptors, ATF6, PERK and IRE1α. Once activated, IRE1α recruits TRAF2 to the ER membrane to initiate inflammatory responses via the NF-κB pathway. Inflammation is commonly triggered when pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors or nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors, detect tissue damage or microbial infection. However, it is not clear which PRRs have a major role in inducing inflammation during ER stress. Here we show that NOD1 and NOD2, two members of the NOD-like receptor family of PRRs, are important mediators of ER-stress-induced inflammation in mouse and human cells. The ER stress inducers thapsigargin and dithiothreitol trigger production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in a NOD1/2-dependent fashion. Inflammation and IL-6 production triggered by infection with Brucella abortus, which induces ER stress by injecting the type IV secretion system effector protein VceC into host cells, is TRAF2, NOD1/2 and RIP2-dependent and can be reduced by treatment with the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholate or an IRE1α kinase inhibitor. The association of NOD1 and NOD2 with pro-inflammatory responses induced by the IRE1α/TRAF2 signalling pathway provides a novel link between innate immunity and ER-stress-induced inflammation.

  3. Helicobacter pylori environmental interactions: effect of acidic conditions on H. pylori-induced gastric mucosal interleukin-8 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Il Ju; Fujimoto, Saori; Yamauchi, Kazuyoshi; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    Summary To explore the interactions between the host, environment and bacterium responsible for the different manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection, we examined the effect of acidic conditions on H. pylori-induced interleukin (IL)-8 expression. AGS gastric epithelial cells were exposed to acidic pH and infected with H. pylori [wild-type strain, its isogenic cag pathogenicity island (PAI) mutant or its oipA mutant]. Exposure of AGS cells to acidic pH alone did not enhance IL-8 production. However, following exposure to acidic conditions, H. pylori infection resulted in marked enhancement of IL-8 production which was independent of the presence of the cag PAI and OipA, indicating that H. pylori and acidic conditions act synergistically to induce gastric mucosal IL-8 production. In neutral pH environments H. pylori-induced IL-8 induction involved the NF-κB pathways, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)→ c-Fos/c-Jun→activating protein (AP-1) pathways, JNK→c-Jun→AP-1 pathways and the p38 pathways. At acidic pH H. pylori-induced augmentation of IL-8 production involved markedly upregulated the NF-κB pathways and the ERK→c-Fos→AP-1 pathways. In contrast, activation of the JNK→c-Jun→AP-1 pathways and p38 pathways were pH independent. These results might explain the clinical studies in which patients with duodenal ulcers had higher levels of IL-8 in the antral gastric mucosa than patients with simple H. pylori gastritis. PMID:17517062

  4. Phenotyping of Nod1/2 double deficient mice and characterization of Nod1/2 in systemic inflammation and associated renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Stroo

    2012-10-01

    It is indispensable to thoroughly characterize each animal model in order to distinguish between primary and secondary effects of genetic changes. The present study analyzed Nod1 and Nod2 double deficient (Nod1/2 DKO mice under physiological and inflammatory conditions. Nod1 and Nod2 are members of the Nucleotide-binding domain and Leucine-rich repeat containing Receptor (NLR family. Several inflammatory disorders, such as Crohn's disease and asthma, are linked to genetic changes in either Nod1 or Nod2. These associations suggest that Nod1 and Nod2 play important roles in regulating the immune system. Three-month-old wildtype (Wt and Nod1/2 DKO mice were sacrificed, body and organ weight were determined, and blood was drawn. Except for lower liver weight in Nod1/2 DKO mice, no differences were found in body/organ weight between both strains. Leukocyte count and composition was comparable. No significant changes in analyzed plasma biochemical markers were found. Additionally, intestinal and vascular permeability was determined. Nod1/2 DKO mice show increased susceptibility for intestinal permeability while vascular permeability was not affected. Next we induced septic shock and organ damage by administering LPS+PGN intraperitoneally to Wt and Nod1/2 DKO mice and sacrificed animals after 2 and 24 hours. The systemic inflammatory and metabolic response was comparable between both strains. However, renal response was different as indicated by partly preserved kidney function and tubular epithelial cell damage in Nod1/2 DKO at 24 hours. Remarkably, renal inflammatory mediators Tnfα, KC and Il-10 were significantly increased in Nod1/2 DKO compared with Wt mice at 2 hours. Systematic analysis of Nod1/2 DKO mice revealed a possible role of Nod1/2 in the development of renal disease during systemic inflammation.

  5. Role for nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) in pericyte-mediated vascular inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, Rocio; Delgado-Wicke, Pablo; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    for C12-iE-DAP-dependent signaling. Finally, we could discriminate NOD1 and TLR4 pathways in pericytes by pharmacological targeting of RIPK2, a kinase involved in NOD1 but not in TLR4 signaling cascade. p38 MAPK, and NFκB at a lower extent, appear to be downstream mediators in the NOD1 pathway...

  6. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of duck nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Jin, Hui; Li, Yaqian; Liu, Dejian; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Jiang, Yunbo; Luo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an imperative cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and considered as a key member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family which plays a critical role in innate immunity through sensing microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In the current study, the full-length of duck NOD1 (duNOD1) cDNA from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs) was cloned. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that duNOD1 exhibited a strong evolutionary relationship with chicken and rock pigeon NOD1. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that duNOD1 was widely distributed in various organs, with the highest expression observed in the liver. Furthermore, duNOD1 overexpression induced NF-κB activation in DEFs and the CARD domain is crucial for duNOD1-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, silencing the duNOD1 decreased the activity of NF-κB in DEFs stimulated by iE-DAP. Overexpression of duNOD1 significantly increased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES in DEFs. These findings highlight the crucial role of duNOD1 as an intracellular sensor in duck innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of NOD1 in Heart Failure Progression via Regulation of Ca(2+) Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val-Blasco, Almudena; Piedras, María Jose G M; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Suarez, Natalia; Prieto, Patricia; Gonzalez-Ramos, Silvia; Gómez-Hurtado, Nieves; Delgado, Carmen; Pereira, Laetitia; Benito, Gemma; Zaragoza, Carlos; Domenech, Nieves; Crespo-Leiro, María Generosa; Vasquez-Echeverri, Daniel; Nuñez, Gabriel; Lopez-Collazo, Eduardo; Boscá, Lisardo; Fernández-Velasco, María

    2017-01-31

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome associated with a maladaptive innate immune system response that leads to deleterious cardiac remodeling. However, the underlying mechanisms of this syndrome are poorly understood. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) is a newly recognized innate immune sensor involved in cardiovascular diseases. This study evaluated the role of NOD1 in HF progression. NOD1 was examined in human failing myocardium and in a post-myocardial infarction (PMI) HF model evaluated in wild-type (wt-PMI) and Nod1(-/-) mice (Nod1(-/-)-PMI). The NOD1 pathway was up-regulated in human and murine failing myocardia. Compared with wt-PMI, hearts from Nod1(-/-)-PMI mice had better cardiac function and attenuated structural remodeling. Ameliorated cardiac function in Nod1(-/-)-PMI mice was associated with prevention of Ca(2+) dynamic impairment linked to HF, including smaller and longer intracellular Ca(2+) concentration transients and a lesser sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load due to a down-regulation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase pump and by augmented levels of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Increased diastolic Ca(2+) release in wt-PMI cardiomyocytes was related to hyperphosphorylation of ryanodine receptors, which was blunted in Nod1(-/-)-PMI cardiomyocytes. Pharmacological blockade of NOD1 also prevented Ca(2+) mishandling in wt-PMI mice. Nod1(-/-)-PMI mice showed significantly fewer ventricular arrhythmias and lower mortality after isoproterenol administration. These effects were associated with lower aberrant systolic Ca(2+) release and with a prevention of the hyperphosphorylation of ryanodine receptors under isoproterenol administration in Nod1(-/-)-PMI mice. NOD1 modulated intracellular Ca(2+) mishandling in HF, emerging as a new target for HF therapy. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential regulation of amidase- and formamidase-mediated ammonia production by the Helicobacter pylori fur repressor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); J. Stoof (Jeroen); S.W. Poppelaars (Sophie); S. Bereswill (Stefan); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Kist (Manfred); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); J.G. Kusters (Johannes)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe production of high levels of ammonia allows the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori to survive the acidic conditions in the human stomach. H. pylori produces ammonia through urease-mediated degradation of urea, but it is also able to convert a range of amide

  9. NOD1和NOD2介导的信号通路及其抗病毒免疫应答研究进展%Research progress on the signal pathway and antiviral immune response mediated by NOD1 and NOD2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明发; 吴珺; 杨东亮

    2013-01-01

    NOD1 and NOD2 are two intracellular pattern recognition receptors.They sense the major component of bacterial cell walls and their degradated products,then mediate NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways to produce the effector molecules involved in the antipathogenic immune response.Furthermore,it has been found in the recent years that NOD1 induces the production of type I interferon through ISGF3 signaling pathways and that NOD2 could recognise virus RNA and activate the MAVs-IRF3 signaling pathways to produce type I interferon.Type Ⅰ interferon could also positively regulate NOD1 and NOD2 functional expression.There-fore,NOD1 and NOD2 induce to large amounts of interferon to mediate innate immune antiviral responses by the aforementioned signaling pathways.Collectively,further understanding the antiviral immune responses mediated by NOD1 and NOD2 may provide new opportunities and strategies for the prevention and treatment of viral infections.%NOD1和NOD 2蛋白为胞浆内模式识别受体,其识别进入胞内的细菌胞壁及其降解产物,介导NF-κB和MAPKs信号途径,产生相关效应分子,介导了抗病原微生物免疫应答.近年来的最新研究发现,NOD1受体还通过ISGF3信号途径诱导产生1型干扰素,NOD2受体能识别ssRNA和病毒基因组ssRNA,通过MAVs信号途径激活IRF3,诱导产生1型干扰素,1型干扰素又可正向调控NOD1和NOD2功能性表达.NOD1和NOD2通过介导新的信号途径诱导产生大量的1型干扰素,并参与抗病毒固有免疫应答.因而,对NOD1和NOD2介导的抗病毒免疫应答新认识,将为防治病毒感染性疾病的研究提供新策略.

  10. TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta} are mediated by both TLR4 and Nod1 pathways in the cultured HAPI cells stimulated by LPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wenwen; Zheng, Xuexing [College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun 130062, Jilin Province (China); Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Liu, Shue [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Ouyang, Hongsheng [College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun 130062, Jilin Province (China); Levitt, Roy C.; Candiotti, Keith A. [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Hao, Shuanglin, E-mail: shao@med.miami.edu [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS induces proinflammatory cytokine release in HAPI cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK pathway is dependent on TLR4 signaling to release cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B pathway is dependent on Nod1 signaling to release cytokines. -- Abstract: A growing body of evidence recently suggests that glial cell activation plays an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases and neuropathic pain. Microglia in the central nervous system express toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) that is traditionally accepted as the primary receptor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS activates TLR4 signaling pathways to induce the production of proinflammatory molecules. In the present studies, we verified the LPS signaling pathways using cultured highly aggressively proliferating immortalized (HAPI) microglial cells. We found that HAPI cells treated with LPS upregulated the expression of TLR4, phospho-JNK (pJNK) and phospho-NF-{kappa}B (pNF-{kappa}B), TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}. Silencing TLR4 with siRNA reduced the expression of pJNK, TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}, but not pNF-{kappa}B in the cells. Inhibition of JNK with SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) decreased the expression of TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}. Unexpectedly, we found that inhibition of Nod1 with ML130 significantly reduced the expression of pNF-{kappa}B. Inhibition of NF-{kappa}B also reduced the expression of TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}. Nod1 ligand, DAP induced the upregulation of pNF-{kappa}B which was blocked by Nod1 inhibitor. These data indicate that LPS-induced pJNK is TLR4-dependent, and that pNF-{kappa}B is Nod1-dependent in HAPI cells treated with LPS. Either TLR4-JNK or Nod1-NF-{kappa}B pathways is involved in the expression of TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}.

  11. DMPD: Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031249 Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. Le Bour...w Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. PubmedID 18031249 Title Nod1 and Nod2 i...n innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. Authors Le Bourhis L, Benko S

  12. NOD1和NOD2基因多态性与胃癌遗传易感性的研究%Association of variants of NOD1 and NOD2 genes with susceptibility to gastric cancer in a Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路滟; 徐耀初; 沈洪兵

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypotheses that the genetic variants of NOD1 and NOD2 were associated with H. pylori-related gastric cancer susceptibility. Methods A case-control study of 1 053 patients with incident gastric cancer and 1 100 cancer-free controls in a high-risk Chinese Han population was performed to detect the associations of functional polymorphisms in NOD1 and NOD2 with gastric cancer risk in Chinese population, and to clarify the mechanism and risk genotypes of gastric cancer. Results Stratified analyses indicated that NOD1 rs2906766 C allele had significantly in-creased risk of gastric cancer among older (adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.02-1.65), smoker (adjusted OR = 1.38, 95% C/ = 1.05~1.82) and individuals without H.pylori (adjusted OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.03~1.79). However, no significant association was found between NOD2 rs3135500 A>G genotypes and gastric cancer risk. Conclusions Our results indicate that the genetic variant in NOD1 rs2906766 OT, may modulate the risk of gastric cancer in the Chinese population. However, further studies with functional evaluation of the SNP are warranted to replicate and extend the sig-nificance of the findings.%目的 探索NOD1和NOD2功能性单核苷酸多态性(single nucleotide polymorphisms,SNPs)位点与胃癌易感性的关系.方法 采用病例对照研究设计,比较病例组与对照组先天免疫反应信号通路相关基因NOD1和NOD2功能SNPs的频率差异.结果 携带NOD1 rs2906766 C等位基因,可显著增加60岁及以上的个体(调整OR=1.30,95% CI=1.02~1.65)、吸烟者(调整OR=1.38,95% CI=1.05~1.82)和H.pylori阴性者(调整OR=1.36,95% CI=1.03~1.79)发生胃癌的风险,但没有发现NOD2 rs3135500位点A>G的改变与中国人群胃癌的发生有关联.结论 NOD1基因rs2906766位点C>T的改变与中国人群胃癌的遗传易感性有关联,但需要在更大样本中验证这一结果,并开展功能学研究以揭示其潜在的生物学机制.

  13. A commensal Helicobacter sp. of the rodent intestinal flora activates TLR2 and NOD1 responses in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouche-Drider, Nadia; Kaparakis, Maria; Karrar, Abdulgader; Fernandez, Maria-Isabel; Carneiro, Letitia A M; Viala, Jérôme; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Moran, Anthony P; Philpott, Dana J; Ferrero, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter spp. represent a proportionately small but significant component of the normal intestinal microflora of animal hosts. Several of these intestinal Helicobacter spp. are known to induce colitis in mouse models, yet the mechanisms by which these bacteria induce intestinal inflammation are poorly understood. To address this question, we performed in vitro co-culture experiments with mouse and human epithelial cell lines stimulated with a selection of Helicobacter spp., including known pathogenic species as well as ones for which the pathogenic potential is less clear. Strikingly, a member of the normal microflora of rodents, Helicobacter muridarum, was found to be a particularly strong inducer of CXC chemokine (Cxcl1/KC, Cxcl2/MIP-2) responses in a murine intestinal epithelial cell line. Time-course studies revealed a biphasic pattern of chemokine responses in these cells, with H. muridarum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediating early (24-48 h) responses and live bacteria seeming to provoke later (48-72 h) responses. H. muridarum LPS per se was shown to induce CXC chemokine production in HEK293 cells stably expressing Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), but not in those expressing TLR4. In contrast, live H. muridarum bacteria were able to induce NF-kappaB reporter activity and CXC chemokine responses in TLR2-deficient HEK293 and in AGS epithelial cells. These responses were attenuated by transient transfection with a dominant negative construct to NOD1, and by stable expression of NOD1 siRNA, respectively. Thus, the data suggest that both TLR2 and NOD1 may be involved in innate immune sensing of H. muridarum by epithelial cells. This work identifies H. muridarum as a commensal bacterium with pathogenic potential and underscores the potential roles of ill-defined members of the normal flora in the initiation of inflammation in animal hosts. We suggest that H. muridarum may act as a confounding factor in colitis model studies in rodents.

  14. A key role for the endothelium in NOD1 mediated vascular inflammation: comparison to TLR4 responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Gatheral

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms by which pathogens induce vascular inflammation and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets in sepsis and related conditions. The intracellular receptor NOD1 recognises peptidoglycan which features in the cell wall of gram negative and some gram positive bacteria. NOD1 engagement generates an inflammatory response via activation of NFκB and MAPK pathways. We have previously shown that stimulation of NOD1 directly activates blood vessels and causes experimental shock in vivo. In this study we have used an ex vivo vessel-organ culture model to characterise the relative contribution of the endothelium in the response of blood vessels to NOD1 agonists. In addition we present the novel finding that NOD1 directly activates human blood vessels. Using human cultured cells we confirm that endothelial cells respond more avidly to NOD1 agonists than vascular smooth muscle cells. Accordingly we have sought to pharmacologically differentiate NOD1 and TLR4 mediated signalling pathways in human endothelial cells, focussing on TAK1, NFκB and p38 MAPK. In addition we profile novel inhibitors of RIP2 and NOD1 itself, which specifically inhibit NOD1 ligand induced inflammatory signalling in the vasculature. This paper is the first to demonstrate activation of whole human artery by NOD1 stimulation and the relative importance of the endothelium in the sensing of NOD1 ligands by vessels. This data supports the potential utility of NOD1 and RIP2 as therapeutic targets in human disease where vascular inflammation is a clinical feature, such as in sepsis and septic shock.

  15. A key role for the endothelium in NOD1 mediated vascular inflammation: comparison to TLR4 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatheral, Timothy; Reed, Daniel M; Moreno, Laura; Gough, Peter J; Votta, Bart J; Sehon, Clark A; Rickard, David J; Bertin, John; Lim, Eric; Nicholson, Andrew G; Mitchell, Jane A

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which pathogens induce vascular inflammation and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets in sepsis and related conditions. The intracellular receptor NOD1 recognises peptidoglycan which features in the cell wall of gram negative and some gram positive bacteria. NOD1 engagement generates an inflammatory response via activation of NFκB and MAPK pathways. We have previously shown that stimulation of NOD1 directly activates blood vessels and causes experimental shock in vivo. In this study we have used an ex vivo vessel-organ culture model to characterise the relative contribution of the endothelium in the response of blood vessels to NOD1 agonists. In addition we present the novel finding that NOD1 directly activates human blood vessels. Using human cultured cells we confirm that endothelial cells respond more avidly to NOD1 agonists than vascular smooth muscle cells. Accordingly we have sought to pharmacologically differentiate NOD1 and TLR4 mediated signalling pathways in human endothelial cells, focussing on TAK1, NFκB and p38 MAPK. In addition we profile novel inhibitors of RIP2 and NOD1 itself, which specifically inhibit NOD1 ligand induced inflammatory signalling in the vasculature. This paper is the first to demonstrate activation of whole human artery by NOD1 stimulation and the relative importance of the endothelium in the sensing of NOD1 ligands by vessels. This data supports the potential utility of NOD1 and RIP2 as therapeutic targets in human disease where vascular inflammation is a clinical feature, such as in sepsis and septic shock.

  16. Differential expression analysis of nuclear oligomerization domain proteins NOD1 and NOD2 in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qing-Hua; Yi, Shi-Bai; Ding, Xu; Zhang, Hui-Xian; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Dan-Qi; Lin, Hao-Ran

    2012-11-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins-1 and -2 (NOD1 and NOD2) are members of the NOD-like receptors (NLRs) family. They are both cytoplasmic receptors, and sense microbial infections/danger molecules to induce host innate immune response. In this study, the full-length ORF sequences of NOD1 and NOD2 were cloned, and the putative amino acid sequences were identified in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). The complete open reading frame (ORF) of grouper NOD1 contained 2823 bp encoding a 940 amino acid protein. Grouper NOD2 cDNA contained a 2967 bp ORF, encoding a protein of 988 amino acid residues. Both grouper NOD1 and NOD2 had similar domains to human and fish counterparts. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that grouper NOD1 clustered with grass carp, zebrafish and channel catfish, while NOD2 was most closely related to fugu. Expression patterns of grouper NOD1 and NOD2 were next studied. NOD1 had the highest level of expression in skin while NOD2 in trunk kidney. Post Vibrio alginolyticus (strain EcGS020401), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PolyI:C challenges, gene expression of grouper NOD1 and NOD2 was stimulated to different extents. NOD1 showed a significant enhancement after LPS stimulation, but NOD2 increased more significantly after PolyI:C invasion, indicating that NOD1 and NOD2 may exert different effects on the eradication of bacteria and virus. The adaptor protein RIP-like-interacting CLARP kinase (RICK) and downstream molecule interleukin-8 (IL-8) were also induced at different levels after stimulation, which indicated that NOD1 and NOD2 signal transduction was involved in grouper innate immune protection against bacterial and viral infections.

  17. Current knowledge on alleviating Helicobacter pylori infections through the use of some commonly known natural products: bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliga Raman Murali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium, has been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization and recognized as the causative agent for peptic ulcers, duodenal ulcer, gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas, and gastric cancer. Owing to their alarming rate of drug resistance, eradication of H. pylori remains a global challenge. Triple therapy consisting of a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and either amoxicillin or metronidazole, is generally the recommended standard for the treatment of H. pylori infection. Complementary and alternative medicines have a long history in the treatment of gastrointestinal ailments and various compounds has been tested for anti-H. pylori activity both in vitro and in vivo; however, their successful use in human clinical trials is sporadic. Hence, the aim of this review is to analyze the role of some well-known natural products that have been tested in clinical trials in preventing, altering, or treating H. pylori infections. Whereas some in vitro and in vivo studies in the literature have demonstrated the successful use of a few potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections, others indicate a need to consider natural products, with or without triple therapy, as a useful alternative in treating H. pylori-related infections. Thus, the reported mechanisms include killing of H. pylori urease inhibition, induction of bacterial cell damage, and immunomodulatory effect on the host immune system. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the successful use of some potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections. Nevertheless, the routine prescription of potential complementary and alternative medicines continues to be restrained, and evidence on the safety and efficacy of the active compounds remains a subject of ongoing debate.

  18. Comparative genomic analysis of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis NOD1 and NOD2 receptors and their functional role in in-vitro cellular immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Brahma

    Full Text Available Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptors (NLRs are innate immune receptors that recognize bacterial cell wall components and initiate host immune response. Structure and function of NLRs have been well studied in human and mice, but little information exists on genetic composition and role of these receptors in innate immune system of water buffalo--a species known for its exceptional disease resistance. Here, a comparative study on the functional domains of NOD1 and NOD2 was performed across different species. The NOD mediated in-vitro cellular responses were studied in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells, resident macrophages, mammary epithelial, and fibroblast cells. Buffalo NOD1 (buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed conserved domain architectures as found in other mammals. The domains of buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed analogy in secondary and tertiary conformations. Constitutive expressions of NODs were ubiquitous in different tissues. Following treatment with NOD agonists, peripheral lymphocytes showed an IFN-γ response along-with production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Alveolar macrophages and mammary epithelial cells showed NOD mediated in-vitro immune response through NF-κB dependent pathway. Fibroblasts showed pro-inflammatory cytokine response following agonist treatment. Our study demonstrates that both immune and non-immune cells could generate NOD-mediated responses to pathogens though the type and magnitude of response depend on the cell types. The structural basis of ligand recognition by buffalo NODs and knowledge of immune response by different cell types could be useful for development of non-infective innate immune modulators and next generation anti-inflammatory compounds.

  19. Implication of NOD1 and NOD2 for the differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Sik Kim

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs and Nod-like receptors (NLRs are known to trigger an innate immune response against microbial infection. Although studies suggest that activation of TLRs modulate the function of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, little is known about the role of NLRs on the MSC function. In this study, we investigated whether NOD1 and NOD2 regulate the functions of human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs. The genes of TLR2, TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 were expressed in hUCB-MSCs. Stimulation with each agonist (Pam(3CSK(4 for TLR2, LPS for TLR4, Tri-DAP for NOD1, and MDP for NOD2 led to IL-8 production in hUCB-MSC, suggesting the expressed receptors are functional in hUCB-MSC. CCK-8 assay revealed that none of agonist influenced proliferation of hUCB-MSCs. We next examined whether TLR and NLR agonists affect osteogenic-, adipogenic-, and chondrogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs. Pam(3CSK(4 and Tri-DAP strongly enhanced osteogenic differentiation and ERK phosphorylation in hUCB-MSCs, and LPS and MDP also slightly did. Treatment of U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor restored osteogenic differentiation enhanced by Pam(3CSK(4. Tri-DAP and MDP inhibited adipogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs, but Pam(3CSK(4 and LPS did not. On chondrogenic differentiation, all TLR and NLR agonists could promote chondrogenesis of hUCB-MSCs with difference in the ability. Our findings suggest that NOD1 and NOD2 as well as TLRs are involved in regulating the differentiation of MSCs.

  20. Deletion of cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori by PCR products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun Zeng; Li-Hua He; Yan Yin; Mao-Jun Zhang; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cytotoxin-associated protein (antigen) A (CagA)plays an important role in Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)pathogenesis. Our aim was to obtain cagA mutant strains by a new mutation method so as to better understand the mechanism of CagA in epithelial cells. METHODS: In contrast with the traditional method using suicide plasmid, we constructed cagA- mutant strains directly with PCR products. The constructed mutant clones grew on selective media and allelic exchange was confirmed by Southern blot. Furthermore, two different transformation methods, electroporation, and natural transformation, were compared with regard to the efficiency of recombination.RESULTS: The mutation by PCR products could be completed within 3-5 d, and the recombination rate by electroporation and natural transformation was 4.02×10-8 and 1.03x 10-9 respectively. Mutation rate by electroporation (4.02× 10-8) was far higher than by natural transformation (1.03× 10-9) (P = 0.000<0.005).CONCLUSION: cagA- mutant strains have been constructed,which is important for further study on the function of CagA in epithelial cells. A mutation method by directly using PCR products has been proved successful with a much higher mutation rate, and is easier, especially when in combination with electroporation. This method could be widely used in gene deletion of H pylori.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the caspase-recruitment domain of human Nod1

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    Srimathi, Thiagarajan; Robbins, Sheila L.; Dubas, Rachel L. [Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Seo, Jang-Hoon [Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Shinheung College, Uijeongbu, Kyungki-Do 480-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Chul, E-mail: young.park@fccc.edu [Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The caspase-recruitment domain of the cytosolic pathogen receptor Nod1 was crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) is known to play an important role in apoptosis and inflammation as an essential protein–protein interaction domain. The CARD of the cytosolic pathogen receptor Nod1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and gel filtration. The purified CARD was crystallized at 277 K using the microseeding method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1} or P3{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.1, c = 80.9 Å. Preliminary analysis indicates that there is one dimeric CARD molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  2. Pathogen sensing pathways in human embryonic stem cell derived-endothelial cells: role of NOD1 receptors.

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    Daniel M Reed

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hESC-EC, as well as other stem cell derived endothelial cells, have a range of applications in cardiovascular research and disease treatment. Endothelial cells sense Gram-negative bacteria via the pattern recognition receptors (PRR Toll-like receptor (TLR-4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein (NOD-1. These pathways are important in terms of sensing infection, but TLR4 is also associated with vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Here, we have compared TLR4 and NOD1 responses in hESC-EC with those of endothelial cells derived from other stem cells and with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. HUVEC, endothelial cells derived from blood progenitors (blood outgrowth endothelial cells; BOEC, and from induced pluripotent stem cells all displayed both a TLR4 and NOD1 response. However, hESC-EC had no TLR4 function, but did have functional NOD1 receptors. In vivo conditioning in nude rats did not confer TLR4 expression in hESC-EC. Despite having no TLR4 function, hESC-EC sensed Gram-negative bacteria, a response that was found to be mediated by NOD1 and the associated RIP2 signalling pathways. Thus, hESC-EC are TLR4 deficient but respond to bacteria via NOD1. This data suggests that hESC-EC may be protected from unwanted TLR4-mediated vascular inflammation, thus offering a potential therapeutic advantage.

  3. The immune receptor NOD1 and kinase RIP2 interact with bacterial peptidoglycan on early endosomes to promote autophagy and inflammatory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Aaron T; Mimuro, Hitomi; Kufer, Thomas A; Lo, Camden; Wheeler, Richard; Turner, Lorinda J; Thomas, Belinda J; Malosse, Christian; Gantier, Michael P; Casillas, Linda N; Votta, Bartholomew J; Bertin, John; Boneca, Ivo G; Sasakawa, Chihiro; Philpott, Dana J; Ferrero, Richard L; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria

    2014-05-14

    The intracellular innate immune receptor NOD1 detects Gram-negative bacterial peptidoglycan (PG) to induce autophagy and inflammatory responses in host cells. To date, the intracellular compartment in which PG is detected by NOD1 and whether NOD1 directly interacts with PG are two questions that remain to be resolved. To address this, we used outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from pathogenic bacteria as a physiological mechanism to deliver PG into the host cell cytosol. We report that OMVs induced autophagosome formation and inflammatory IL-8 responses in epithelial cells in a NOD1- and RIP2-dependent manner. PG contained within OMVs colocalized with both NOD1 and RIP2 in EEA1-positive early endosomes. Further, we provide evidence for direct interactions between NOD1 and PG. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that NOD1 detects PG within early endosomes, thereby promoting RIP2-dependent autophagy and inflammatory signaling in response to bacterial infection.

  4. Expression of the CagA gene of H. pylori and application of its product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Chan Han; Xiao Jun Yan; Cheng Zhi Su

    2000-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Helicobacter pylori (Hp) plays an important role in the upper digestive tract diseases. It can be divided into two main groups (toxic and non-toxic Hp )according to the production of vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA). The toxic bacteria also produce cytotoxin associated protein A (CagA) which might have something to do with the transcription, folding,transportation or the function of VacA. Studies showed that CagA positive Hp ( CagA+ Hp )accounted for more than 50% of all kinds of Hp,and peptic ulcer and gastric cancer were closely related to their infection[1-7].

  5. Helicobacter pylori induces vascular endothelial growth factor production in gastric epithelial cells through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Jung; Song, Eun-Jung; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-12-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori have been known to induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in gastric epithelial cells, the precise mechanism for cellular signaling is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of bacterial virulence factor and host cellular signaling in VEGF production of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. We evaluated production of VEGF, activation of nuclear factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization in gastric epithelial cells infected with H. pylori WT or isogenic mutants deficient in type IV secretion system (T4SS). H. pylori induced VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells via both T4SS-dependent and T4SS-independent pathways, although T4SS-independent pathway seems to be the dominant signaling. The inhibitor assay implicated that activation of NF-κB and MAPKs is dispensable for H. pylori-induced VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori led to HIF-1α stabilization in gastric epithelial cells independently of T4SS, NF-κB, and MAPKs, which was essential for VEGF production in these cells. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor, treatment impaired H. pylori-induced HIF-1α stabilization and VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells. We defined the important role of ROS-HIF-1α axis in VEGF production of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells, and bacterial T4SS has a minor role in H. pylori-induced VEGF production of gastric epithelial cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD susceptibility genes NOD1 and NOD2 have conserved anti-bacterial roles in zebrafish

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    Stefan H. Oehlers

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, in the form of Crohn’s disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC, is a debilitating chronic immune disorder of the intestine. A complex etiology resulting from dysfunctional interactions between the intestinal immune system and its microflora, influenced by host genetic susceptibility, makes disease modeling challenging. Mutations in NOD2 have the highest disease-specific risk association for CD, and a related gene, NOD1, is associated with UC. NOD1 and NOD2 encode intracellular bacterial sensor proteins acting as innate immune triggers, and represent promising therapeutic targets. The zebrafish has the potential to aid in modeling genetic and environmental aspects of IBD pathogenesis. Here, we report the characterization of the Nod signaling components in the zebrafish larval intestine. The nod1 and nod2 genes are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and neutrophils together with the Nod signaling pathway genes ripk2, a20, aamp, cd147, centaurin b1, erbin and grim-19. Using a zebrafish embryo Salmonella infection model, morpholino-mediated depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 reduced the ability of embryos to control systemic infection. Depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 decreased expression of dual oxidase in the intestinal epithelium and impaired the ability of larvae to reduce intracellular bacterial burden. This work highlights the potential use of zebrafish larvae in the study of components of IBD pathogenesis.

  7. NOD1 cooperates with TLR2 to enhance T cell receptor-mediated activation in CD8 T cells.

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    Blandine C Mercier

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, like Toll-like receptors (TLR and NOD-like receptors (NLR, are involved in the detection of microbial infections and tissue damage by cells of the innate immune system. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that TLR2 can additionally function as a costimulatory receptor on CD8 T cells. Here, we establish that the intracytosolic receptor NOD1 is expressed and functional in CD8 T cells. We show that C12-iEDAP, a synthetic ligand for NOD1, has a direct impact on both murine and human CD8 T cells, increasing proliferation and effector functions of cells activated via their T cell receptor (TCR. This effect is dependent on the adaptor molecule RIP2 and is associated with an increased activation of the NF-κB, JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NOD1 stimulation can cooperate with TLR2 engagement on CD8 T cells to enhance TCR-mediated activation. Altogether our results indicate that NOD1 might function as an alternative costimulatory receptor in CD8 T cells. Our study provides new insights into the function of NLR in T cells and extends to NOD1 the recent concept that PRR stimulation can directly control T cell functions.

  8. VacA and cagA genotypes status and antimicrobial resistance properties of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from meat products in Isfahan province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, A; Razavilar, V; Rokni, N; Rahimi, E

    2017-01-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori has a significant impact on the occurrence of severe clinical syndromes, its exact ways of transmission and origin have not been identified. According to the results of some previously published articles, foods with animal origins play a substantial role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. The present investigation was carried out to study the vacuolating cytotoxin A (vacA) and cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA) genotypes status and antibiotic resistance properties of H. pylori strains recovered from minced-meat and hamburger samples. A total of 150 meat product samples were collected from supermarkets. All samples were cultured and the susceptive colonies were then subjected to nested-PCR, PCR-based genotyping and disk diffusion methods. 11 out of 150 samples (7.33%) were positive for H. pylori. All the isolates were further identified using the nested-PCR assay. Prevalence of H. pylori in hamburger and minced-meat samples was 1.42% and 12.5%, respectively. S1a, m1a and cagA were the most commonly detected genotypes. The most commonly detected combined genotypes in the H. pylori strains of minced-meat were s1am1a (10%), s1am1b (10%) and s2m1a (10%). Helicobacter pylori strains of meat products harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (90.90%), erythromycin (72.72%), amoxicillin (72.72%), trimethoprim (63.63%), tetracycline (63.63%), and clarithromycin (63.63%). Hamburger and minced-meat samples may be the sources of virulent and resistant strains of H. pylori. Meat products are possible sources of resistant and virulent strains of H. pylori similar to those vacA and cagA genotypes. Using healthy raw materials and observation of personal hygiene can reduce the risk of H. pylori in meat products.

  9. Lactobacilli inhibit interleukin-8 production induced by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide-activated Toll-like receptor 4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhou; Feng-Zhen Ma; Xue-Jie Deng; Hong Yuan; Hong-Sheng Ma

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Lactobacillus bulgaricus (LBG) on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in SGC-7901 cells treated with Helicobacter pyloriSydney strain 1 lipopolysaccharide (H pyloriSS1-LPS).METHODS: SGC-7901 cells were treated with H pyIoriSS1-LPS in the presence or absence of pretreatment for 1 h with viable LBG or supematant recovered from LBG culture MRS broth (LBG-s). Cellular lysates were prepared for Western blot with anti-TLR4,anti-transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), anti-phospho-TAK1, anti-nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), anti-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and anti-phospho-p38MAPK antibodies.The amount of IL-8 in cell culture medium was measured by ELISA.RESULTS: H pyloriSS1-LPS up-regulated the expression of TLR4, stimulated the phosphorylation of TAK1, subsequently enhanced the activation of NFκB and the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in a timedependent manner, leading to augmentation of IL-8 production in SGC-7901 cells. Viable LBG or LBG-s pretreatment attenuated the expression of TLR4,inhibited the phosphorylation of TAK1 and p38MAPK,prevented the activation of NF-κB, and consequently blocked IL-8 production.CONCLUSION: H pyloriSS1-LPS induces IL-8production through activating TLR4 signaling in SGC-7901 cells and viable LBG or LBG-s prevents H pyloriSS1-LPS-mediated IL-8 production via inhibition of the TLR4 pathway.

  10. The protein ATG16L1 suppresses inflammatory cytokines induced by the intracellular sensors Nod1 and Nod2 in an autophagy-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbara, Matthew T; Ellison, Lisa K; Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Travassos, Leonardo H; Jones, Nicola L; Girardin, Stephen E; Philpott, Dana J

    2013-11-14

    The peptidoglycan sensor Nod2 and the autophagy protein ATG16L1 have been linked to Crohn's disease (CD). Although Nod2 and the related sensor, Nod1, direct ATG16L1 to initiate anti-bacterial autophagy, whether ATG16L1 affects Nod-driven inflammation has not been examined. Here, we uncover an unanticipated autophagy-independent role for ATG16L1 in negatively regulating Nod-driven inflammatory responses. Knockdown of ATG16L1 expression, but not that of ATG5 or ATG9a, specifically enhanced Nod-driven cytokine production. In addition, autophagy-incompetent truncated forms of ATG16L1 regulated Nod-driven cytokine responses. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that ATG16L1 interfered with poly-ubiquitination of the Rip2 adaptor and recruitment of Rip2 into large signaling complexes. The CD-associated allele of ATG16L1 was impaired in its ability to regulate Nod-driven inflammatory responses. Overall, these results suggest that ATG16L1 is critical for Nod-dependent regulation of cytokine responses and that disruption of this Nod1- or Nod2-ATG16L1 signaling axis could contribute to the chronic inflammation associated with CD.

  11. Association of NOD1 (CARD4) insertion/deletion polymorphism with susceptibility to IBD: A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To find evidences about whether NOD1/CARD4 insertion/deletion polymorphism is associated with inflammatory bowel disease by meta-analysis. METHODS: We surveyed the studies on the association of NOD1/CARD4 insertion/deletion polymorphism with inflammatory bowel disease in PubMed. Meta-analysis was performed for genotypes GG/T vs T/T, GG/GG vs T/T, GG/T + GG/GG vs T/T, GG/GG vs T/T + GG/T, and GG allele vs T allele in a fixed/random effect model. RESULTS: We identified 8 studies (6439 cases and 4798 cont...

  12. Does the antibody production ability affect the serum anti-Helicobacter pylori Ig G titer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun Ah Chung; Sun-Young Lee; Hee Won Moon; Jeong Hwan Kim; In-Kyung Sung; Hyung Seok Park; Chan Sup Shim; Hye Seung Han

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between serum titers of anti-Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) immunoglobulin G(IgG) and hepatitis B virus surface antibody(HBsA b).METHODS: Korean adults were included whose samples had positive Giemsa staining on endoscopic biopsy and were studied in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen(HBsA g)/HBsA b serologic assay,pepsinogen(PG) assay,and H.pylori serologic test on the same day.Subjects were excluded if they were positive for HBs Ag,had a recent history of medication,or had other medical condition(s).We analyzed the effects of the following factors on serum titers of HBsA b and the anti-H.pylori IgG : Age,density of H.pylori infiltration in biopsy samples,serum concentrations of PG Ⅰ and PG Ⅱ,PG Ⅰ/Ⅱ ratio,and white blood cell count.RESULTS: Of 111 included subjects,74(66.7%) exhibited a positive HBsA b finding.The serum anti-H.pylori IgG titer did not correlate with the serum HBsA b titer(P = 0.185); however,it correlated with the degree of H.pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy(P < 0.001) and serum PG Ⅱ concentration(P = 0.042).According to the density of H.pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy,subjects could be subdivided into those with a marked(median: 3.95,range 0.82-4.00)(P = 0.458),moderate(median: 3.37,range 1.86-4.00),and mild H.pylori infiltrations(median: 2.39,range 0.36-4.00)(P < 0.001).Subjects with a marked H.pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy had the highest serological titer,whereas in subjects with moderate and mild H.pylori infiltrations titers were correspondingly lower(P < 0.001).After the successful eradication,significant decreases of the degree of H.pylori infiltration(P < 0.001),serum anti-H.pylori IgG titer(P < 0.001),and serum concentrations of PG I(P = 0.028) and PG Ⅱ(P = 0.028) were observed.CONCLUSION: The anti-H.pylori IgG assay can be used to estimate the burden of bacteria in immunocompetent hosts with H.pylori infection,regardless of the HBsA b titer after HBV vaccination.

  13. Autoantibody production in chronic idiopathic urticaria is not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Atta A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU is a dermatological syndrome, characterized by raised erythematous skin lesions, that affects 20% of the general population and has been associated with autoimmunity. However, some reports have also suggested a close relationship between CIU and Helicobacter pylori infection, which is endemic in developing countries and associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of autoantibodies in sera from 23 CIU subjects infected with H. pylori and from 23 CIU subjects without this infection. The presence of anti-thyroid antibodies was determined by indirect hemagglutination assay and the presence of autoantibodies to IgE and C1INH was determined by ELISA. Antibodies to thyroid antigens were detected at low titers from 100 to 400 in three of 23 (13% CIU-infected subjects and in four of 23 (17% CIU-noninfected subjects. The titers of anti-IgE autoantibodies were similar in these CIU groups, presenting absorbances of 1.16 ± 0.09 and 1.07 ± 0.16, respectively, while a titer of 1.14 ± 0.15 was detected in the healthy control group. The concentration of anti-C1INH autoantibodies was the same in the CIU-infected and -noninfected subjects (7.28 ± 1.31 and 7.91 ± 2.45 ng/ml, respectively, and was 7.20 ± 2.25 ng/ml in the healthy control group. However, the serum levels of complexed anti-C1INH antibodies were increased in CIU-infected subjects compared to CIU-noninfected subjects and healthy controls with an absorbance of 1.51 ± 0.21 vs 1.36 ± 0.16 and 1.26 ± 0.23, respectively (P < 0.05, indicating an impaired clearance of immune complexes in CIU-infected patients. In conclusion, no correlation was observed between H. pylori infection and autoantibody production in CIU patients consistent with reports of clinical studies.

  14. IL10 single nucleotide polymorphisms are related to upregulation of constitutive IL-10 production and susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Shirleide; Marques, Cintia Rodrigues; Silva, Thiago Magalhães; Costa, Ryan Santos; Alcantara-Neves, Neuza Maria; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Barnes, Kathleen Carole; Figueiredo, Camila Alexandrina

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, likely due to the extensive inflammation in the stomach mucosa caused by these bacteria. Many studies have reported an association between IL10 polymorphisms, the risk of gastric cancer, and IL-10 production. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between IL10 genetic variants, Helicobacter pylori infection, and IL-10 production by peripheral blood leukocytes in children. We genotyped a total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL10 in 1259 children aged 4-11 years living in a poor urban area in Salvador, Brazil, using TaqMan probe based, 5' nuclease assay minor groove binder chemistry. Association tests were performed by logistic regression for Helicobacter pylori infection and linear regression for IL-10 spontaneous production (whole-blood cultures) including sex, age, and principal components for informative ancestry markers as covariates, using PLINK. Our results shown that IL10 single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1800896 (OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.11-2.39), rs3024491 (OR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.14-2.57), rs1878672 (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.19-2.68), and rs3024496 (OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.05-2.08) were positively associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with spontaneous production of IL-10 in culture, of which three (rs1800896 and rs1878672, p = .04; rs3024491, p = .01) were strongly associated with infection by Helicobacter pylori. Our results indicate that IL10 variants rs1800896, rs3024491, rs1878672, and rs3024496 are more consistently associated with the presence of anti-H. pylori IgG by inducing increased production of IL-10. Further studies are underway to elucidate the role of additional genetic variants and to investigate their impact on the occurrence of gastric cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Influence of a nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) polymorphism and NOD2 mutant alleles on Crohn's disease phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine genetic variation of nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) and NOD2, their respective influences on Crohn's disease phenotype and gene-gene interactions.METHODS: (ND1+32656*1) NOD1 polymorphism and SNP8, SNP12 and SNP13 of NOD2 were analyzed in 97 patients and 50 controls. NOD2 variants were determined by reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. NOD1 genotyping and NOD2 variant confirmation were performed by specific amplification and sequencing.RESULTS: The distribution of NOD1 polymorphism in patients was different from controls (P = 0.045) and not altered by existence of NOD2 mutations. In this cohort, 30.92% patients and 6% controls carried at least one NOD2 variant (P < 0.001) with R702W being the most frequent variant. Presence of at least one NOD2 mutation was inversely associated with colon involvement (9.09% with colon vs 36.4% with ileal or ileocolonic involvement, P = 0.04) and indicative of risk of penetrating disease (52.63% with penetrating vs 25.64% with non-penetrating or stricturing behavior,P = 0.02). L1007finsC and double NOD2 mutation conferred the highest risk for severity of disease (26.3% with penetrating disease vs 3.8% with non-penetrating or stricturing behavior presented L1007finsC, P = 0.01 and 21.0% with penetrating disease vs 2.5% with non-penentrating or stricturing behavior carried double NOD2 mutation, P = 0.007). Exclusion of patients with NOD2 mutations from phenotype/NOD1-genotype analysis revealed higher prevalence of *1*1 genotype in groups of younger age at onset and colonic location.CONCLUSION: This study suggests population differences in the inheritance of risk NOD1 polymorphism and NOD2 mutations. Although no interaction between NOD1-NOD2 was noticed, a relationship between disease location and Nod-like receptor molecules was established.

  16. NOD1CARD Might Be Using Multiple Interfaces for RIP2-Mediated CARD-CARD Interaction: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation

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    Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2017-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-containing protein 1 (NOD1) plays the pivotal role in host-pathogen interface of innate immunity and triggers immune signalling pathways for the maturation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Upon the recognition of iE-DAP, NOD1 self-oligomerizes in an ATP-dependent fashion and interacts with adaptor molecule receptor-interacting protein 2 (RIP2) for the propagation of innate immune signalling and initiation of pro-inflammatory immune responses. This interaction (mediated by NOD1 and RIP2) helps in transmitting the downstream signals for the activation of NF-κB signalling pathway, and has been arbitrated by respective caspase-recruitment domains (CARDs). The so-called CARD-CARD interaction still remained contradictory due to inconsistent results. Henceforth, to understand the mode and the nature of the interaction, structural bioinformatics approaches were employed. MD simulation of modelled 1:1 heterodimeric complexes revealed that the type-Ia interface of NOD1CARD and the type-Ib interface of RIP2CARD might be the suitable interfaces for the said interaction. Moreover, we perceived three dynamically stable heterotrimeric complexes with an NOD1:RIP2 ratio of 1:2 (two numbers) and 2:1. Out of which, in the first trimeric complex, a type-I NOD1-RIP2 heterodimer was found interacting with an RIP2CARD using their type-IIa and IIIa interfaces. However, in the second and third heterotrimer, we observed type-I homodimers of NOD1 and RIP2 CARDs were interacting individually with RIP2CARD and NOD1CARD (in type-II and type-III interface), respectively. Overall, this study provides structural and dynamic insights into the NOD1-RIP2 oligomer formation, which will be crucial in understanding the molecular basis of NOD1-mediated CARD-CARD interaction in higher and lower eukaryotes. PMID:28114344

  17. Ubiquitin regulates caspase recruitment domain-mediated signaling by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins NOD1 and NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ver Heul, Aaron M; Fowler, C Andrew; Ramaswamy, S; Piper, Robert C

    2013-03-08

    NOD1 and NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammation and autophagy. These pathways rely on the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) within the receptors, which serve as protein interaction platforms that coordinately regulate immune signaling. We show that NOD1 CARD binds ubiquitin (Ub), in addition to directly binding its downstream targets receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2) and autophagy-related protein 16-1 (ATG16L1). NMR spectroscopy and structure-guided mutagenesis identified a small hydrophobic surface of NOD1 CARD that binds Ub. In vitro, Ub competes with RIP2 for association with NOD1 CARD. In vivo, we found that the ligand-stimulated activity of NOD1 with a mutant CARD lacking Ub binding but retaining ATG16L1 and RIP2 binding is increased relative to wild-type NOD1. Likewise, point mutations in the tandem NOD2 CARDs at positions analogous to the surface residues defining the Ub interface on NOD1 resulted in loss of Ub binding and increased ligand-stimulated NOD2 signaling. These data suggest that Ub binding provides a negative feedback loop upon NOD-dependent activation of RIP2.

  18. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

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    Jitendra Maharana

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds and Aspartic acid (Walker B formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2 interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2.

  19. NapA protects Helicobacter pylori from oxidative stress damage, and its production is influenced by the ferric uptake regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksley, Clare; Jenks, Peter J; Green, Andrew; Cockayne, Alan; Logan, Robert P H; Hardie, Kim R

    2003-06-01

    The Helicobacter pylori protein NapA has been identified as a homologue of the Escherichia coli protein Dps. It is shown in this study that, like Dps, NapA is produced maximally in stationary phase cells and contributes to the ability of H. pylori to survive under oxidative stress conditions. Moreover, NapA co-localizes with the nuclear material, suggesting that it can interact with DNA in vivo. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that repression of NapA production by iron starvation was not so pronounced in a H. pylori fur mutant, suggesting that the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is involved in napA regulation, and a potential fur box by which this control could be mediated is identified. This finding is consistent with the regulation of iron-binding proteins by Fur and also the modulation of Fur during oxidative stress, thus allowing NapA levels to be increased in the environmental conditions under which its ability to protect DNA from attack by toxic free radicals is most beneficial to the cell.

  20. Refractoriness of interferon-beta signaling through NOD1 pathway in mouse respiratory epithelial cells using the anticancer xanthone compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zaifang; Yu; Jarrod; D; Predina; Guanjun; Cheng

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To explore the possibility that nucleotide oligomerization domain 1(NOD1) pathway involved in refractoriness of interferon-β signaling in mouse respiratory epithelial cells induced by the anticancer xanthone compound,5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid(DMXAA).METHODS:C10 mouse bronchial epithelial cells were grown in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum,2 mmol/L glutamine,100 units/mL penicillin,100 g/mL streptomycin.Pathogen-free female BALB/c mice were used to explore the mechanisms of refractoriness of interferon-signaling.Mouse thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages,bone marrow derived macrophages and bone marrow derived dendritic cells were collected and cultured.The amount of interferon(IFN)-inducible protein-10(IP10/CXCL10),macrophage chemotactic protein(MCP1/CCL2) and interleukin(IL)-6 secreted by cells activated by DMXAA was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits according to the instructions of the manufacturers.Total RNA was isolated from cells or nasal epithelium with RNeasy Plus Mini Kit,and cDNA was synthesized.Gene expression was checked using Applied Biosystems StepOne Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction System.Transfection of small interfering RNA(siRNA) control,NOD1 duplexed RNA oligonucleotides,and high-mobility group box 1/2/3(HMGB1/2/3) siRNA was performed using siRNA transfection reagent.RESULTS:DMXAA activates IFN-β pathway with high level of IFN-β dependent antiviral genes including 2’,5’-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 and myxovirus resistance 1 in mouse thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages,bone marrow derived macrophages and bone marrow derived dendritic cells.Activation of IFN-β by DMXAA involved in NOD1,but not HMGB1/2/3 signal pathway demonstrated by siRNA.NOD1 pathway plays an important role in refractoriness of IFN-β signaling induced by DMXAA in mouse C10 respiratory epithelial cells and BALB/c mice nasal epithelia.These data indicate that DMXAA

  1. Natural product juglone targets three key enzymes from Helicobacter pylori: inhibition assay with crystal structure characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-hua KONG; Liang ZHANG; Zheng-yi YANG; Cong HAN; Li-hong HU; Hua-liang JIANG; Xu SHEN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the inhibition features of the natural product juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) against the three key enzymes from Helicobacter pylori (cystathionine γ-synthase [HpCGS], malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase [HpFabD], and β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase [HpFabZ]). Methods: An enzyme inhibition assay against HpCGS was carded out by using a continuous coupled spectrophotometric assay approach. The inhibition assay of HpFabD was performed based on the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase-coupled system, while the inhibition assay for HpFabZ was monitored by detecting the decrease in absorbance at 260 nm with crotonoyl-CoA conversion to βhydroxybutyryl-CoA. The juglone/FabZ complex crystal was obtained by soaking juglone into the HpFabZ crystal, and the X-ray crystal structure of the complex was analyzed by molecular replacement approach. Results: Juglone was shown to potently inhibit HpCGS, HpFabD, and HpFabZ with the half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 values of 7.0±0.7, 20±1, and 30±4 μmol/L, respectively. An inhibition-type study indicated that juglone was a non-competitive inhibitor of HpCGS against O-succi-nyl-L-homoserine (KI=αKI=24 μmol/L), an uncompetitive inhibitor of HpFabD against malonyl-CoA (αKI=7.4 μmol/L), and a competitive inhibitor of HpFabZ against crotonoyl-CoA (K,1=6.8 μtmol/L). Moreover, the crystal structure of the HpFabZ/juglone complex further revealed the essential binding pattern ofjuglone against HpFabZ at the atomic level. Conclusion: HpCGS, HpFabD, and HpFabZ are potential targets ofjuglone.

  2. Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    BATESON, M

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer disease, and its detection and eradication are now an important part of gastroenterology. Effective regimes are available which will eliminate the organism in about 90% of cases in developed countries.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori

  3. The HP0256 gene product is involved in motility and cell envelope architecture of Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Douillard, Francois P

    2010-04-08

    Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent for gastritis, and peptic and duodenal ulcers. The bacterium displays 5-6 polar sheathed flagella that are essential for colonisation and persistence in the gastric mucosa. The biochemistry and genetics of flagellar biogenesis in H. pylori has not been fully elucidated. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the gene HP0256, annotated as hypothetical, was a FliJ homologue. In Salmonella, FliJ is a chaperone escort protein for FlgN and FliT, two proteins that themselves display chaperone activity for components of the hook, the rod and the filament. Results Ablation of the HP0256 gene in H. pylori significantly reduced motility. However, flagellin and hook protein synthesis was not affected in the HP0256 mutant. Transmission electron transmission microscopy revealed that the HP0256 mutant cells displayed a normal flagellum configuration, suggesting that HP0256 was not essential for assembly and polar localisation of the flagella in the cell. Interestingly, whole genome microarrays of an HP0256 mutant revealed transcriptional changes in a number of genes associated with the flagellar regulon and the cell envelope, such as outer membrane proteins and adhesins. Consistent with the array data, lack of the HP0256 gene significantly reduced adhesion and the inflammatory response in host cells. Conclusions We conclude that HP0256 is not a functional counterpart of FliJ in H. pylori. However, it is required for full motility and it is involved, possibly indirectly, in expression of outer membrane proteins and adhesins involved in pathogenesis and adhesion.

  4. TIFA Signaling in Gastric Epithelial Cells Initiates the cag Type 4 Secretion System-Dependent Innate Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Alevtina; Gaudet, Ryan G; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Salama, Nina R

    2017-08-15

    Helicobacter pylori is a bacterial pathogen that colonizes the human stomach, causing inflammation which, in some cases, leads to gastric ulcers and cancer. The clinical outcome of infection depends on a complex interplay of bacterial, host genetic, and environmental factors. Although H. pylori is recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems, this rarely results in bacterial clearance. Gastric epithelial cells are the first line of defense against H. pylori and alert the immune system to bacterial presence. Cytosolic delivery of proinflammatory bacterial factors through the cag type 4 secretion system (cag-T4SS) has long been appreciated as the major mechanism by which gastric epithelial cells detect H. pylori Classically attributed to the peptidoglycan sensor NOD1, recent work has highlighted the role of NOD1-independent pathways in detecting H. pylori; however, the bacterial and host factors involved have remained unknown. Here, we show that bacterially derived heptose-1,7-bisphosphate (HBP), a metabolic precursor in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, is delivered to the host cytosol through the cag-T4SS, where it activates the host tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-interacting protein with forkhead-associated domain (TIFA)-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway. This response, which is independent of NOD1, drives robust NF-κB-dependent inflammation within hours of infection and precedes NOD1 activation. We also found that the CagA toxin contributes to the NF-κB-driven response subsequent to TIFA and NOD1 activation. Taken together, our results indicate that the sequential activation of TIFA, NOD1, and CagA delivery drives the initial inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells, orchestrating the subsequent recruitment of immune cells and leading to chronic gastritis.IMPORTANCEH. pylori is a globally prevalent cause of gastric and duodenal ulcers and cancer. H. pylori antibiotic resistance is rapidly

  5. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  6. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  7. Expression of Helicobacter pylori TonB protein in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana: toward production of vaccine antigens in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbina, Irina; Engstrand, Lars; Andersson, Sören; Strid, Ake

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a recombinant version of the highly antigenic Helicobacter pylori TonB (iron-dependent siderophore transporter protein HP1341) in transgenic plants as a candidate oral vaccine antigen. Using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer, we introduced three different constructs of the tonB gene into the genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We investigated transgene insertion by PCR, produced TonB antibodies for analysis of the production of the recombinant protein in plants, verified the identity of the protein produced by mass spectrometry analysis, and analyzed the number of genetic inserts in the plants by Southern blotting. Three different constructs of the expression cassette (full-length tonB, tonB truncated in the 5' end removing the codons for a transmembrane helix, and the latter construct with codons for the endoplasmic reticulum SEKDEL retention signal added to the 3' end) were used to find the most effective way to express the TonB antigen. Production of TonB protein was detected in plants transformed with each of the constructs, confirmed by both Western blotting and mass spectrometry analysis. No considerable differences in protein expression from the three different constructs were observed. The protein concentration in the plants was at least 0.05% of the total soluble proteins. The Helicobacter pylori TonB protein can be produced in Arabidopsis thaliana plants in a form that is recognizable by rabbit anti-TonB antiserum. These TonB-expressing plants are highly suitable for animal studies of oral administration as a route for immunization against Helicobacter infections. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Effect of propolis in gastric disorders: inhibition studies on the growth of Helicobacter pylori and production of its urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltas, Nimet; Karaoglu, Sengul Alpay; Tarakci, Cemre; Kolayli, Sevgi

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in alternative approaches to inhibit Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and thus treat many stomach diseases. Propolis is a pharmaceutical mixture containing many natural bioactive substances. The aim of this study was to use propolis samples to treat H. pylori. The anti-H. pylori and anti-urease activities of 15 different ethanolic propolis extracts (EPEs) were tested. The total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents of the EPE were also measured. The agar-well diffusion assay was carried out on H. pylori strain J99 and the inhibition zones were measured and compared with standards. All propolis extracts showed high inhibition of H. pylori J99, with inhibition diameters ranging from 31.0 to 47.0 mm. Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitory activity was measured using the phenol-hypochlorite assay; all EPEs showed significant inhibition against the enzyme, with inhibition concentrations (IC50; mg/mL) ranging from 0.260 to 1.525 mg/mL. The degree of inhibition was related to the phenolic content of the EPE. In conclusion, propolis extract was found to be a good inhibitor that can be used in H. pylori treatment to improve human health.

  9. Frequencies of the expression of main protein antigens from Helicobacter pylori isolates and production of specific serum antibodies in infected patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie; Mao, Ya-Fei; Shao, Zhe-Xin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the frequencies of the expression of main protein antigens of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) isolates, such as UreB, VacA, CagA1, HpaA, NapA, FlaA and FlaB and the production of specific antibodies in sera from H pylori-infected patients, and to understand the correlations among the different clinical types of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and the infection and virulence of H pylori. METHODS: H pylori strains in biopsy specimens from 157 patients with chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer were isolated and serum samples from the patients were also collected. The target recombinant proteins rUreB, rVacA, rCagA1, rHpaA, rNapA, rFlaA and rFlaB expressed by the prokaryotic expression systems constructed in our previous studies were collected through Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Rabbit antisera against rUreB, rVacA, rCagA1, rHpaA, rNapA, rFlaA and rFlaB were prepared by using routine subcutaneous immunization. By using ultrasonic lysates of the isolates as coated antigens, and the self-prepared rabbit antisera as the first antibodies and commercial HRP-labeling sheep anti-rabbit IgG as the second antibody, expression frequencies of the seven antigens in the isolates were detected by ELISA. Another ELISA was established to detect antibodies against the seven antigens in sera of the patients by using the corresponding recombinant proteins as coated antigens, and the sera as the first antibody and HRP-labeling sheep anti-human IgG as the second antibody respectively. Correlations among the different clinical types of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and the infection and virulence of H pylori were statistically analysed. RESULTS: In the 125 isolates of H pylori, the positive rates of UreB, VacA, CagA1, HpaA, NapA, FlaA and FlaB were 100%, 65.6%, 92.8%, 100%, 93.6%, 100% and 99.2% respectively. In the 125 serum samples from the H pylori-infected patients, the positive rates of antibodies against recombinant UreB, VacA, CagA1, HpaA, NapA, FlaA and

  10. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal name: Helicobacter pylori Related tests: Gastrin At a Glance Test Sample ... else I should know? How is it used? Helicobacter pylori testing is used to diagnose an infection due ...

  11. Tip-alpha (hp0596 gene product) is a highly immunogenic Helicobacter pylori protein involved in colonization of mouse gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Renata; Pawlowski, Marcin; Dzwonek, Artur; Mikula, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Drela, Nadzieja; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2008-03-01

    A product of the Helicobacter pylori hp0596 gene (Tip-alpha) is a highly immunogenic homodimeric protein, unique for this bacterium. Cell fractionation experiments indicate that Tip-alpha is anchored to the inner membrane. In contrast, the three-dimensional model of the protein suggests that Tip-alpha is soluble or, at least, largely exposed to the solvent. hp0596 gene knockout resulted in a significant decrease in the level of H. pylori colonization as measured by real-time PCR assay. In addition, the Tip-alpha recombinant protein was determined to stimulate macrophage to produce IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha. Both results imply that Tip-alpha is rather loosely connected to the inner membrane and potentially released during infection.

  12. IRAK-M expression limits dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine production in response to Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Shiu

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infects the gastric mucosa and persists for the life of the host. Bacterial persistence may be due to the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs whichmay have protective effects against other diseases such as asthma. It has been shown that H. pylori modulates the T cell response through dendritic cell reprogramming but the molecular pathways involved are relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to identify critical elements of dendritic cell (DC activation and evaluate potential influence on immune activation. Microarray analysis was used to demonstrate limited gene expression changes in H. pylori stimulated bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs compared to the BMDCs stimulated with E. coli. IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, was upregulated and we selectedit for investigation of its role in modulating the DC and T cell responses. IRAK-M(-/- and wild type BMDC were compared for their response to H. pylori. Cells lacking IRAK-M produced significantly greater amounts of proinflammatory MIP-2 and reduced amounts of immunomodulatory IL-10 than wild type BMDC. IRAK-M(-/- cells also demonstrated increased MHC II expression upon activation. However, IRAK-M(-/- BMDCs were comparable to wild type BMDCs in inducing T-helper 17 (TH17 and Treg responses as demonstrated in vitro using BMDC CD4+ T cells co-culture assays,and in vivo though the adoptive transfer of CD4(+ FoxP3-GFP T cells into H. pylori infected IRAK-M(-/- mice. These results suggest that H. pylori infection leads to the upregulation of anti-inflammatory molecules like IRAK-M and that IRAK-M has a direct impact on innate functions in DCs such as cytokine and costimulation molecule upregulation but may not affect T cell skewing.

  13. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 1 (NOD1 haplotypes and single nucleotide polymorphisms modify susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases in a New Zealand caucasian population: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barclay Murray L

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 1 (NOD1 gene encodes a pattern recognition receptor that senses pathogens, leading to downstream responses characteristic of innate immunity. We investigated the role of NOD1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on IBD risk in a New Zealand Caucasian population, and studied Nod1 expression in response to bacterial invasion in the Caco2 cell line. Findings DNA samples from 388 Crohn's disease (CD, 405 ulcerative colitis (UC, 27 indeterminate colitis patients and 201 randomly selected controls, from Canterbury, New Zealand were screened for 3 common SNPs in NOD1, using the MassARRAY® iPLEX Gold assay. Transcriptional activation of the protein produced by NOD1 (Nod1 was studied after infection of Caco2 cells with Escherichia coli LF82. Carrying the rs2075818 G allele decreased the risk of CD (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.50–0.88, p Conclusion The NOD1 gene is important in signalling invasion of colonic cells by pathogenic bacteria, indicative of its' key role in innate immunity. Carrying specific SNPs in this gene significantly modifies the risk of CD and/or UC in a New Zealand Caucasian population.

  14. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Osawa

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primar-ily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lym-phoid tissue lymphorna. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in Hpylori injected sub-jects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in associa-tion with atrophic gastritis induced by Hpylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentra-tion. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may re-sult from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations be-fore and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels.

  15. Innate immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan K; Trombly, Melanie I; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune receptors detect Helicobacter pylori infection and trigger downstream signaling events that result in the production of cytokines and interferon-β. This chapter gives an overview of the receptors and their roles in responding to H. pylori infection and details the downstream signaling events. The tools that have been developed to study the innate immune response to H. pylori are also discussed. Understanding the immune response to H. pylori is critical to develop better treatments for H. pylori-induced disease states including gastric malignancies and cancer.

  16. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection.

  17. 重组疫苗E.coli LLO/OVA促进小鼠树突状细胞NOD1受体活化并表达IFN-γ%Recombinant E. Coil LLO/OVA promote NOD1 receptor activation and IFN-γ expression of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐曼; 王渝琦; 徐光绪; 蒋小卫; 刘明燊

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨重组疫苗E.coli LLO/OVA诱导树突状细胞的细胞内受体NOD(nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain)活化及表达IFN-γ的作用.方法 采用基因芯片杂交分析经E.coli LLO/OVA刺激后小鼠骨髓树突状细胞(bone marrow-derived dendritic cells,BMDC)Card4/NOD1及其下游NF-κB信号通路相关分子mRNA的表达,RT-PCR检测BMDC的NOD1、NOD2和IFN-γ mRNA表达,ELISA测定BMDC培养上清液内IFN-γ含量.结果 经E.coli LLO/OVA刺激后4 h至8 h,BMDC出现Card4/NOD1基因表达上调,其下游信号途径相关分子基因Rip2、Ikkα、Ikkβ、Nfκb1、Nfκb2和IFN-γ均出现表达上调.RT-PCR结果显示该疫苗刺激后BMDC的NOD1与IFN-γ基因表达时段一致.经E.coli LLO/OVA刺激后24 h,BMDC培养上清液内IFN-γ含量明显高于E.coli OVA刺激后的BMDC.结论 重组疫苗E.coli LLO/OVA诱导小鼠骨髓树突状细胞NOD1受体信号途径活化并促进了IFN-γ表达.

  18. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Man [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Li, Fu-gang [Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China); Xie, Xi-sheng [Department of Nephrology, Second Clinical Medical Institution of North Sichuan Medical College (Nanchong Central Hospital), Nanchong City 637400 (China); Wang, Shao-qing [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Fan, Jun-ming, E-mail: junmingfan@163.com [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  19. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  20. Frequencies of the expression of main protein antigens from Helicobacter pylori isolates and production of specific serum antibodies in infected patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yan; Ya-Fei Mao; Zhe-Xin Shao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the frequencies of the expression of main protein antigens of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)isolates, such as UreB, VacA, CagA1, HpaA, NapA, FlaA and FlaB and the production of specific antibodies in sera from H pylori-infected patients, and to understand the correlations among the different clinical types of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and the infection and virulence of H pylori.METHODS: H pylori strains in biopsy specimens from 157patients with chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer were isolated and serum samples from the patients were also collected.The target recombinant proteins rUreB, rVacA, rCagA1,rHpaA, rNapA, rFlaA and rFlaB expressed by the prokaryotic expression systems constructed in our previous studies were collected through Ni-NTA affinity chromatography.Rabbit antisera against rUreB, rVacA, rCagA1, rHpaA,rNapA, rFlaA and rFlaB were prepared by using routine subcutaneous immunization. By using ultrasonic lysates of the isolates as coated antigens, and the self-prepared rabbit antisera as the first antibodies and commercial HRP-labeling sheep anti-rabbit IgG as the second antibody,expression frequencies of the seven antigens in the isolates were detected by ELISA. Another ELISA was established to detect antibodies against the seven antigens in sera of the patients by using the corresponding recombinant proteins as coated antigens, and the sera as the first antibody and HRP-labeling sheep anti-human IgG as the second antibody respectively. Correlations among the different clinical types of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and the infection and virulence of H pylori were statistically analysed.RESULTS: In the 125 isolates of H pylori, the positive rates of UreB, VacA, CagA1, HpaA, NapA, FlaA and Flab were 100%, 65.6%, 92.8%, 100%, 93.6%, 100% and 99.2%respectively. In the 125 serum samples from the H pyloriinfected patients, the positive rates of antibodies against recombinant UreB, VacA, CagA1, HpaA, NapA, FlaA and Flab were

  1. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases...

  2. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases......Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...

  3. Lack of association between gene polymorphisms of Angiotensin converting enzyme, Nod-like receptor 1, Toll-like receptor 4, FAS/FASL and the presence of Helicobacter pylori-induced premalignant gastric lesions and gastric cancer in Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupcinskas Juozas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several polymorphisms of genes involved in the immunological recognition of Helicobacter pylori and regulating apoptosis and proliferation have been linked to gastric carcinogenesis, however reported data are partially conflicting. The aim of our study was to evaluate potential associations between the presence of gastric cancer (GC and high risk atrophic gastritis (HRAG and polymorphisms of genes encoding Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, Nod-like receptor 1 (NOD1, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and FAS/FASL. Methods Gene polymorphisms were analyzed in 574 subjects (GC: n = 114; HRAG: n = 222, controls: n = 238 of Caucasian origin. ACE I/D (rs4646994, NOD1 796G>A (rs5743336, TLR4 3725G>C (rs11536889, FAS 1377G>A (rs2234767, FAS 670A>G (rs1800682 and FASL 844T>C (rs763110 were genotyped by different PCR approaches and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results Frequencies of genotypes in our study are similar to the data reported on subjects of Caucasian ethnicity. There was a tendency for NOD1 796G/G genotype to be associated with increased risk of HRAG (62.4% vs. 54.5% in controls, p = 0.082. FAS 670G/G genotype was more frequent in HRAG when compared to controls, 23.9% and 17.2% respectively, however it failed to reach significance level (p = 0.077. We did not find any significant associations for all polymorphisms in relation to GC or HRAG. NOD1 796G>A and TLR4 3725G>C gene polymorphisms were also not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Conclusions ACE, NOD1, TRL4 and FAS/FASL gene polymorphisms are not linked with gastric carcinogenesis in Caucasians, and therefore they should not be considered as potential biomarkers for identifying individuals with higher risk for GC.

  4. H. pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... think you may have a high risk of stomach cancer, talk to your doctor. Together you can decide whether you may benefit from H. pylori screening. References H. pylori and peptic ulcers. National Institute ...

  5. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  6. [Production of a recombinant CagA protein for the detection of Helicobacter pylori CagA antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgüç, Miray; Karatayli, Ersin; Çelik, Esra; Koyuncu, Duygu; Çelik, İnci; Karatayli, Senem Ceren; Özden, Ali; Bozdayi, A Mithat

    2014-07-01

    At present, Helicobacter pylori infections affect approximately 50% of the world population. It is known that H.pylori is related with several gastric diseases including chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic and gastric ulcers as well as gastric carcinomas. CagA (Cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein which is one of the most important virulence factors of H.pylori, is thought to be responsible for the development of gastric cancer. CagA is a 128 kDa hydrophilic protein which binds to the epitelial stomach cells and is known to be phosphorylated on its EPIYA regions. The EPIYA regions are highly variable and carry a higher risk of developing gastric cancer than CagA negative strains. The aim of this study was to construct a prokaryotic expression system expressing a recombinant CagA protein, which can be used for the detection of anti-CagA antibodies. For the isolation of H.pylori genomic DNA, a total of 112 gastric biopsy samples obtained from patients who were previously found positive for rapid urease (CLO) test, were used. H.pylori DNAs were amplified from 57 of those samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and of them 35 were found positive in terms of cagA gene. Different EPIYA motifs were detected in 25 out of 35 cagA positive samples, and one of those samples that contained the highest number of EPIYA motif, was chosen for the cloning procedure. Molecular cloning and expression of the recombinant fragment were performed with Champion Pet151/D expression vector (Invitrogen, USA), the expression of which was induced by the addition of IPTG (Isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) into the E.coli culture medium. Expression was observed with anti-histidin HRP (Horse Radish Peroxidase) antibodies by SDS-PAGE and Western Blot (WB) analysis. In our study, two clones possessing different fragments from the same H.pylori strain with three different EPIYA motifs were succesfully expressed. Since CagA antigen plays a signicant role in the pathogenesis of H.pylori

  7. Comparative expression profile of NOD1/2 and certain acute inflammatory cytokines in thermal-stressed cell culture model of native and crossbred cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanuprakash, V.; Singh, Umesh; Sengar, Gyanendra Singh; Raja, T. V.; Sajjanar, Basavraj; Alex, Rani; Kumar, Sushil; Alyethodi, R. R.; Kumar, Ashish; Sharma, Ankur; Kumar, Suresh; Bhusan, Bharat; Deb, Rajib

    2017-05-01

    Thermotolerance depends mainly on the health and immune status of the animals. The variation in the immune status of the animals may alter the level of tolerance of animals exposed to heat or cold stress. The present study was conducted to investigate the expression profile of two important nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain receptors (NLRs) (NOD1 and NOD2) and their central signalling molecule RIP2 gene during in vitro thermal-stressed bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of native (Sahiwal) and crossbred (Sahiwal X HF) cattle. We also examined the differential expression profile of certain acute inflammatory cytokines in in vitro thermal-stressed PBMC culture among native and its crossbred counterparts. Results revealed that the expression profile of NOD1/2 positively correlates with the thermal stress, signalling molecule and cytokines. Present findings also highlighted that the expression patterns during thermal stress were comparatively superior among indigenous compared to crossbred cattle which may add references regarding the better immune adaptability of Zebu cattle.

  8. Comparative expression profile of NOD1/2 and certain acute inflammatory cytokines in thermal-stressed cell culture model of native and crossbred cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanuprakash, V.; Singh, Umesh; Sengar, Gyanendra Singh; Raja, T. V.; Sajjanar, Basavraj; Alex, Rani; Kumar, Sushil; Alyethodi, R. R.; Kumar, Ashish; Sharma, Ankur; Kumar, Suresh; Bhusan, Bharat; Deb, Rajib

    2016-11-01

    Thermotolerance depends mainly on the health and immune status of the animals. The variation in the immune status of the animals may alter the level of tolerance of animals exposed to heat or cold stress. The present study was conducted to investigate the expression profile of two important nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain receptors (NLRs) (NOD1 and NOD2) and their central signalling molecule RIP2 gene during in vitro thermal-stressed bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of native (Sahiwal) and crossbred (Sahiwal X HF) cattle. We also examined the differential expression profile of certain acute inflammatory cytokines in in vitro thermal-stressed PBMC culture among native and its crossbred counterparts. Results revealed that the expression profile of NOD1/2 positively correlates with the thermal stress, signalling molecule and cytokines. Present findings also highlighted that the expression patterns during thermal stress were comparatively superior among indigenous compared to crossbred cattle which may add references regarding the better immune adaptability of Zebu cattle.

  9. Recombinant Helicobacter pylori catalase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Ya-Li Zhang; Jian-Feng Jin; Ji-De Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant strain which highly expresses catalase of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) and assay the activity of H. pylori catalase.METHODS: The catalase DNA was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA with PCR techniques and inserted into the prokaryotie expression vector pET-22b (+), and then was transformed into the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain which expressed catalase recombinant protein. The activity of H.pylori catalase was assayed by the Beers & Sizers.RESULTS: DNA sequence analysis showed that the sequence of catalase DNA was the same as GenBank's research. The catalase recombinant protein amounted to 24.4 % of the total bacterial protein after induced with IPTG for 3 hours at 37 ℃ and the activity of H. pylori catalase was high in the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain.CONCLUSION: A clone expressing high activity H. pylori catalase is obtained, laying a good foundation for further studies.

  10. Innate immune receptors in human airway smooth muscle cells: activation by TLR1/2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and NOD1 agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Månsson Kvarnhammar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs, NOD-like receptors (NLRs and RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, recognize microbial components and trigger a host defense response. Respiratory tract infections are common causes of asthma exacerbations, suggesting a role for PRRs in this process. The present study aimed to examine the expression and function of PRRs on human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs. METHODS: Expression of TLR, NLR and RLR mRNA and proteins was determined using real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The functional responses to ligand stimulation were investigated in terms of cytokine and chemokine release, cell surface marker expression, proliferation and proteins regulating the contractile state. RESULTS: HASMCs expressed functional TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and NOD1. Stimulation with the corresponding agonists Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C, LPS, R-837 and iE-DAP, respectively, induced IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF release and up-regulation of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR, while poly(I:C also affected the release of eotaxin and RANTES. The proliferative response was slightly increased by LPS. Stimulation, most prominently with poly(I:C, down-regulated myosin light chain kinase and cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor expression and up-regulated β2-adrenoceptor expression. No effects were seen for agonist to TLR2/6, TLR5, TLR8, TLR9, NOD2 or RIG-I/MDA-5. CONCLUSION: Activation of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and NOD1 favors a synthetic phenotype, characterized by an increased ability to release inflammatory mediators, acquire immunomodulatory properties by recruiting and interacting with other cells, and reduce the contractile state. The PRRs might therefore be of therapeutic use in the management of asthma and infection-induced disease exacerbations.

  11. Helicobacter pylori induces in-vivo expansion of human regulatory T cells through stimulating interleukin-1β production by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P J; Afzali, B; Fazekasova, H; Chen, D; Ali, N; Powell, N; Lord, G M; Lechler, R I; Lombardi, G

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common infections in the world. Despite inciting inflammation, immunological clearance of the pathogen is often incomplete. CD4(+) CD25(hi) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+)) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) are potent suppressors of different types of immune responses and have been implicated in limiting inflammatory responses to H. pylori. Investigating the influence of H. pylori on T(reg) function and proliferation, we found that H. pylori-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) induced proliferation in T(regs) and impaired their suppressive capability. This effect was mediated by interleukin (IL)-1β produced by H. pylori-stimulated DCs. These data correlated with in-vivo observations in which H. pylori(+) gastric mucosa contained more T(regs) in active cell division than uninfected stomachs. Inciting local proliferation of T(regs) and inhibiting their suppressive function may represent a mechanism for the chronic gastritis and carcinogenesis attributable to H. pylori.

  12. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Harris

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Using an evidence-based approach this review discusses the current treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcer disease, functional (non-ulcer)dyspepsia or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).It also briefly addresses the potential role of eradication of H . pylori in preventing gastric cancer .

  13. Multiple peptidoglycan modification networks modulate Helicobacter pylori's cell shape, motility, and colonization potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Sycuro

    Full Text Available Helical cell shape of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to promote virulence through viscosity-dependent enhancement of swimming velocity. However, H. pylori csd1 mutants, which are curved but lack helical twist, show normal velocity in viscous polymer solutions and the reason for their deficiency in stomach colonization has remained unclear. Characterization of new rod shaped mutants identified Csd4, a DL-carboxypeptidase of peptidoglycan (PG tripeptide monomers and Csd5, a putative scaffolding protein. Morphological and biochemical studies indicated Csd4 tripeptide cleavage and Csd1 crosslinking relaxation modify the PG sacculus through independent networks that coordinately generate helical shape. csd4 mutants show attenuation of stomach colonization, but no change in proinflammatory cytokine induction, despite four-fold higher levels of Nod1-agonist tripeptides in the PG sacculus. Motility analysis of similarly shaped mutants bearing distinct alterations in PG modifications revealed deficits associated with shape, but only in gel-like media and not viscous solutions. As gastric mucus displays viscoelastic gel-like properties, our results suggest enhanced penetration of the mucus barrier underlies the fitness advantage conferred by H. pylori's characteristic shape.

  14. Role of AmiA in the morphological transition of Helicobacter pylori and in immune escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Chaput

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is responsible for peptic ulcers and neoplasia. Both in vitro and in the human stomach it can be found in two forms, the bacillary and coccoid forms. The molecular mechanisms of the morphological transition between these two forms and the role of coccoids remain largely unknown. The peptidoglycan (PG layer is a major determinant of bacterial cell shape, and therefore we studied H. pylori PG structure during the morphological transition. The transition correlated with an accumulation of the N-acetyl-D-glucosaminyl-beta(1,4-N-acetylmuramyl-L-Ala-D-Glu (GM-dipeptide motif. We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the GM-dipeptide motif accumulation, and studied the role of various putative PG hydrolases in this process. Interestingly, a mutant strain with a mutation in the amiA gene, encoding a putative PG hydrolase, was impaired in accumulating the GM-dipeptide motif and transforming into coccoids. We investigated the role of the morphological transition and the PG modification in the biology of H. pylori. PG modification and transformation of H. pylori was accompanied by an escape from detection by human Nod1 and the absence of NF-kappaB activation in epithelial cells. Accordingly, coccoids were unable to induce IL-8 secretion by AGS gastric epithelial cells. amiA is, to our knowledge, the first genetic determinant discovered to be required for this morphological transition into the coccoid forms, and therefore contributes to modulation of the host response and participates in the chronicity of H. pylori infection.

  15. Probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in a fermented milk product with added fruit preparation reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea and Helicobacter pylori activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrese, Michael; Kristen, Holger; Rautenberg, Peter; Laue, Christiane; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    To investigate matrix-specifity of probiotic effects and particularly of the reduction of antibiotics-associated diarrhea, a controlled, randomized, double-blind study was performed, in which 88 Helicobacter pylori-infected but otherwise healthy subjects were given for eight weeks either a) a probiotic fruit yoghurt "mild" containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 plus Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12, n = 30), b) the same product but pasteurized after fermentation (n = 29) or c) milk acidified with lactic acid (control, n = 29). During week five, a Helicobacter eradication therapy was performed. Helicobacter activity was measured via 13C-2-urea breath tests and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and other gastrointestinal complaints were recorded by validated questionnaires. In intervention group a, b and c the mean number of days with diarrhoea was 4, 10 and 10 (Pantibiotics treatment was -1·4 ± 1·1, -1·2 ± 1·1, 2·6 ± 1·1 points/four weeks (Pprobiotic bacteria but (rather) to components of acidified milk (most probably lactic acid). Fruit-yogurt-like fermented milk products with living probiotic bacteria significantly shorten the duration of antibiotics-associated diarrhoea and improve gastrointestinal complaints. Fruit yogurt-like fermented milk is a matrix suitable for probiotic bacteria.

  16. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  17. Antimicrobial Characterization of Inula britannica against Helicobacter pylori on Gastric Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Hwan; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2016-06-28

    The antimicrobial effects of methanol and ethanol extracts of Inula britannica against several Helicobacter pylori strains (26695, J99, and SS1) were evaluated in vitro, to determine their applicability as functional foods. In the paper disc diffusion method, the antimicrobial effects of the I. britannica extracts against the H. pylori strains were apparent. Viable cell counting also showed that the extracts at 100 μg/ml concentration dramatically decreased the viability of the H. pylori strains. In particular, the methanol and ethanol extracts at a concentration of 100 μg/ml reduced the H. pylori SS1 cell number to 2.46 log CFU/ml and 1.08 log CFU/ml, respectively. In the presence of 100 μg/ml extracts, the urease production of H. pylori SS1 was decreased to more than 30%, whereas that of H. pylori J99 and H. pylori 26695 was decreased to about 20%, relative to the controls. The extracts inhibited the attachment of the H. pylori strains to human gastric AGS cells as well as caused the detachment of already attached H. pylori cells. In addition, the H. pylori morphology was changed to a coccoidal shape in the presence of the extracts. In conclusion, the I. britannica extracts were effective against H. pylori strains in vitro, irrespective of genotype status, and could therefore be used as novel functional foods.

  18. Helicobacter pylori vaccine: from past to future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Kanishtha; Agarwal, Shvetank

    2008-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide and is an important cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma), and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is usually acquired during childhood and tends to persist unless treated. Because eradication requires treatment with multidrug regimens, prevention of initial infection by a suitable vaccine is attractive. Although immunization with H pylori protein subunits has been encouraging in animals, similar vaccine trials in humans have shown adjuvant-related adverse effects and only moderate effectiveness. Newer immunization approaches (use of DNA, live vectors, bacterial ghosts, and microspheres) are being developed. Several questions about when and whom to vaccinate will need to be appropriately answered, and a cost-effective vaccine production and delivery strategy will have to be useful for developing countries. For this review, we searched MEDLINE using the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms Helicobacter pylori and vaccines for articles in English from 1990 to 2007.

  19. In vitro antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus casei against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enany, Shymaa; Abdalla, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic infections in humans. Curing H. pylori infection is difficult because of the habitat of the organism below the mucus adherent layer of gastric mucosa. Lactobacilli are known as acid-resistant bacteria and can remain in stomach for a long time than any other organism, we aimed in this study to examine the efficacy of Lactobacillus casei as a probiotic against H. pylori in humans. Particularly, L. casei was opted as it is considered to be one of the widely used probiotics in dairy products. One hundred and seven strains of H. pylori were isolated from dyspeptic patients and were tested for their antibiotic susceptibility to metronidazole (MTZ), clarithromycin (CLR), tetracycline (TET), and amoxicillin (AMX) by the disc diffusion method. The strains were examined for their susceptibility toward L. casei - present in fermented milk products - by well diffusion method. It was found that 74.7% strains were resistant to MTZ; 1.8% to MTZ, TET, and CLR; 3.7% to MTZ and CLR; 4.6% to MTZ and TET; and 0.9% were resistant to MTZ, TET, and AMX. The antibacterial activity of L. casei against H. pylori was determined on all the tested H. pylori isolates including antibiotic resistant strains with different patterns. Our study proposed the use of probiotics for the treatment of H. pylori infection as an effective approach.

  20. Helicobacter pylori in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Matjaž; Hojsak, Iva; Kolaček, Sanja

    2012-09-01

    This review summarizes important pediatric studies published from April 2011 up to March 2012. Proteomics profile of ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains was defined in the most interesting study of the last year. The antigen stool test is becoming the "gold standard" in prevalence studies, and according to the last epidemiologic studies, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in childhood is not decreasing any more in the developed world. The resistance rate of H. pylori strains is high in children. Therefore, among other important issues concerning H. pylori in pediatrics, guidelines published by ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN last year also recommended culture and susceptibility testing before first-line treatment in areas with high or unknown antibiotic resistance rates.

  1. Immunity and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Harris

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria called Helicobacter pylori arrived to the American continent 12,000 years ago (1, reaching South America roughly 5,400-4,600 years AC according to research by Pelayo Correa, a Colombian pathologist who found Helicobacter in stool next to Chinchorro mummies in the North of Arica close to the Pacific Ocean. In 2005, Barry Marshall was awarded the Nobel Prize for his studies on Helicobacter pylori together with Robin Warren.

  2. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  3. Helicobacter pylori-related immunoglobulins in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Betty L; Vlach, Victoria; Dew, Michelle; Willsie, Sandra K

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine serum antibody titers against a common bacterial antigen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylon), in subjects with sarcoidosis, comparing those titers to those present in a healthy population. With the approval of the Institutional Review Board of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, patients with sarcoidosis (pulmonary and extrapulmonary) who visited the Truman Medical Center-Hospital Hill pulmonary clinic were recruited to enter the study. A serum sample was frozen at -70 degrees C for later testing (n = 20). Specific information collected on subjects included corticosteroid use, use of histamine2 blockers and antacids, date of first diagnosis, and stage of sarcoidosis. Normal controls and demographically matched individuals who lacked pulmonary diseases, including sarcoidosis, were also recruited. Serum samples were processed as above. Antibody capture enzyme immunoassay was completed for H. pylori and urease antigens by serum dilution assay for each subject, from which titers for antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA were calculated. Nonspecific serum IgE was also measured. An increased incidence of high-titer IgG antibody directed against H. pylori antigens was found in subjects with sarcoidosis compared with controls. The sarcoidosis and control groups were significantly different with respect to IgG and IgA against H. pylori, both at p = .001. IgG directed against urease was also significantly different between sarcoidosis and control patients (p = .001), but IgA directed against urease was very low in all subjects and did not yield significant differences between groups. Specific H. pylori and urease IgG antibodies exceeded those expected in the population studied. The data suggest that in pulmonary sarcoidosis, the relationship of H. pylori and its products to sarcoid granuloma formation warrants further investigation.

  4. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection on nutrition and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Francesco; Annalisa, Tortora; Teresa, Di Rienzo; Giovanna, D’Angelo; Ianiro, Gianluca; Franco, Scaldaferri; Viviana, Gerardi; Valentina, Tesori; Riccardo, Lopetuso Loris; Antonio, Gasbarrini

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative pathogen that is widespread all over the world, infecting more than 50% of the world’s population. It is etiologically associated with non-atrophic and atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer and shows a deep association with primary gastric B-cell lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Recently, the medical research focused on the modification of the gastric environment induced by H. pylori infection, possibly affecting the absorption of nutrients and drugs as well as the production of hormones strongly implicated in the regulation of appetite and growth. Interestingly, the absorption of iron and vitamin B12 is impaired by H. pylori infection, while infected subjects have lower basal and fasting serum levels of ghrelin and higher concentration of leptin compared to controls. Since leptin is an anorexigenic hormone, and ghrelin stimulates powerfully the release of growth hormone in humans, H. pylori infection may finally induce growth retardation if acquired very early in the childhood and in malnourished children. This review is focused on the nutritional effects of H. pylori infection, such as the reduced bioavailability or the malabsorbption of essential nutrients, and of gastrointestinal hormones, as well as on the relationship between H. pylori and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25278679

  5. Alterations in gastric mucin synthesis by Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James C, Byrd; Robert S, Bresalier

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the role of Helicobacter pylori in altering gastric mucin synthesis and define how thprocess relates to H. pylori-related diseases.METHODS Analyses of human gastric tissues using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridizatiodocument the role of H. pylori in altering the composition and distribution of gastric mucins.RESULTS These data indicate a decrease in the product of the MUC5 (MUC5AC) gene and aberraexpression of MUC6 in the surface epithelium of H. pylori-infected patients. A normal pattern was restorby H. pylori eradication. Inhibition of mucin synthesis including MUC5AC and MUCl mucins by H. pvlohas been established in vitro using biochemical and Western blot analyses. This effect is not due to inhibitiof glycosylation, but results from inhibition of synthesis of mucin core structures. In vitro experiments usiinhibitors of mucin synthesis indicate that cell surface mucins decrease adhesion of H. pylori to gastepithelial cells.CONCLUSION Inhibition of mucin synthesis by H. pylori in vivo can disrupt the protective mucous layand facilitate bacterial adhesion, which may lead to increased inflammation in thc gastric epithelium.

  6. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detec

  7. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  8. Signal transduction of Helicobacter pylori during interaction with host cell protein receptors of epithelial and immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachathundikandi, Suneesh Kumar; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections can induce pathologies ranging from chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration to gastric cancer. Bacterial isolates harbor numerous well-known adhesins, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, protease HtrA, urease, peptidoglycan, and type IV secretion systems (T4SS). It appears that H. pylori targets more than 40 known host protein receptors on epithelial or immune cells. A series of T4SS components such as CagL, CagI, CagY, and CagA can bind to the integrin α5β1 receptor. Other targeted membrane-based receptors include the integrins αvβ3, αvβ5, and β2 (CD18), RPTP-α/β, GP130, E-cadherin, fibronectin, laminin, CD46, CD74, ICAM1/LFA1, T-cell receptor, Toll-like receptors, and receptor tyrosine kinases EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and c-Met. In addition, H. pylori is able to activate the intracellular receptors NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3 with important roles in innate immunity. Here we review the interplay of various bacterial factors with host protein receptors. The contribution of these interactions to signal transduction and pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:24280762

  9. Expression of cytokines in murine BMDCs induced by recombinant E.coli LLO/OVA via TLR4 and NOD1 receptors%重组疫苗E.coli LLO/OVA经TLR4和NOD1受体诱导树突状细胞表达细胞因子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐曼; 戴明燊; 米粲

    2009-01-01

    目的:探讨树突状细胞(DC)的模式识别受体(PPBs)活化与细胞因子表达的关系.方法:采用基因芯片及RT-PCR检测经E.coli LLO/OVA刺激后小鼠骨髓树突状细胞(bone marrw-derived dendritic cell,BMDC)的PPRs及其下游NF-KB信号通路相关分子mRNA的表达水平,并观察BMDC的活化状况及培养上清液内细胞因子含量.结果:经E.coliLLO/OVA刺激后2 h,BMDC出现短暂的TLR4 mRNA表达上调,其下游信号途径相关的Myd88、Rip2、Irak1、Imk2、Ikkα、NF-KB1和NF-KB2 mRNA均出现表达上调,黏附分子Icam1、细胞因子IL-1α、IL-1b、IL-6和TNF-α的mRNA也表达上调;经E.coli LLO/OVA刺激后4 h,BMDC出现Card4(NOD1)mRNA表达上调,其下游信号途径相关的Rip2、Ikkβ、NFkB1和NF-KB2 mRNA均出现表达上调,IFN-γ、TNF-β和CD40 mRNA也上调表达.经E.coli LLO/OVA刺激后24 h,BMDC表达共刺激分子及MHC-Ⅱ类分子上调;且培养上清液内IL-12和IFN-γ含量增高.结论:重组疫苗E.coli LLO/OVA经TLR4和NOD1受体激活NF-KB信号通路,诱导了小鼠BMDC成熟并表达一系列细胞因子尤其是IL-12和IFN-γ.

  10. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Osborn, John F.; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the human stomach for many decades without adverse consequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children wit...

  11. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia; Pacifico; Caterina; Anania; John; F; Osborn; Flavia; Ferraro; Claudio; Chiesa

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the hu-man stomach for many decades without adverse con-sequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent a...

  12. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  13. Cloning and Expression of Helicobacter Pylori CagA Gene Antigenic Regions in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdye maleki

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study proved the successful cloning of the epitope area. The recombinant protein can probably be introduced as a good candidate for the production of IgY from the chickenimmunized and the control of Helicobacter pylori infection in humans. It could also be possibly used for the design of diagnostic kits and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

  14. Human gastric mucins differently regulate Helicobacter pylori proliferation, gene expression and interactions with host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Skoog

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcers and cancer. The main components of the mucus layer are heavily glycosylated mucins, to which H. pylori can adhere. Mucin glycosylation differs between individuals and changes during disease. Here we have examined the H. pylori response to purified mucins from a range of tumor and normal human gastric tissue samples. Our results demonstrate that mucins from different individuals differ in how they modulate both proliferation and gene expression of H. pylori. The mucin effect on proliferation varied significantly between samples, and ranged from stimulatory to inhibitory, depending on the type of mucins and the ability of the mucins to bind to H. pylori. Tumor-derived mucins and mucins from the surface mucosa had potential to stimulate proliferation, while gland-derived mucins tended to inhibit proliferation and mucins from healthy uninfected individuals showed little effect. Artificial glycoconjugates containing H. pylori ligands also modulated H. pylori proliferation, albeit to a lesser degree than human mucins. Expression of genes important for the pathogenicity of H. pylori (babA, sabA, cagA, flaA and ureA appeared co-regulated in response to mucins. The addition of mucins to co-cultures of H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells protected the viability of the cells and modulated the cytokine production in a manner that differed between individuals, was partially dependent of adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric cells, but also revealed that other mucin factors in addition to adhesion are important for H. pylori-induced host signaling. The combined data reveal host-specific effects on proliferation, gene expression and virulence of H. pylori due to the gastric mucin environment, demonstrating a dynamic interplay between the bacterium and its host.

  15. Use of PCR and culture to detect Helicobacter pylori in naturally infected cats following triple antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, S E; Yan, L L; Shen, Z; Hayward, A; Murphy, J C; Fox, J G

    1996-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes gastritis and peptic ulcers and is linked to gastric cancer. Domestic cats from a commercial source were found to be naturally infected with H. pylori, and studies were undertaken to eradicate H. pylori from infected cats by using triple antimicrobial therapy. Eight cats infected with H. pylori were used in the study. Six cats received a 21-day course of oral amoxicillin, metronidazole, and omeprazole, and two cats served as controls. Two weeks and 4 weeks posttreatment (p.t.), all six treated cats were negative at several sites (saliva, gastric juice, and gastric mucosa) for H. pylori by culture. However, as determined by PCR with primers specific for the 26-kDa product, the majority of cats at 2 and 4 weeks p.t. had gastric fluid samples which were positive for H. pylori and three of three cats at 2 weeks p.t. had dental plaque which was positive for H. pylori. At 6 weeks p.t., all six cats had H. pylori-negative cultures for samples from several gastric sites taken at necropsy, and only one cat had H. pylori cultured from gastric juice. PCR analysis revealed that five of six cats had H. pylori DNA amplification products from plaque, saliva, and/or gastric fluid samples. Negative bacterial cultures for cats for which there was demonstrable PCR amplification of H. pylori DNA may reflect the inability of in vitro culture techniques to isolate small numbers of H. pylori organisms, focal colonization at sites not cultured, or a failure of the antibiotics to successfully eradicate H. pylori from extragastric sites which allowed subsequent recolonization of the stomach after cessation of therapy. Alternatively, the treatment strategy may have induced in vivo viable but nonculturable coccoid forms of H. pylori. The H. pylori cat model should allow further studies to test these hypotheses as well as the efficacies of other combined therapeutic regimens. Also, because 100% of these cats were naturally infected with H.pylori, this model should

  16. Cloning and Expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Farshchian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinomaand gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. Antibiotictherapies do not protect from potential re-infection and have a risk for development of drugresistance. Therefore, prophylactic vaccine mediated protection against H. pylori is an attractiveclinical interest. H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA is a conserved surface lipoprotein and playsimportant roles in the pathogenesis of infection. In this study the recombinant protein (rHpaAwas over-expressed in E.coli.Materials and Methods: The hpaA gene was amplified by PCR. Prokaryote expression vectorpET28a-hpaA was constructed, and used to transform E.coli BL21DE3. The expressionof recombinant protein induced by IPTG was examined by SDS-PAGE. Western blot wereused to determine immunoreactivity of rHpaA by a rabbit polyclonal antibodies against wholecell of H. pylori.Results: The hpaA gene nucleotide sequence in the recombinant plasmid vector of pET-28-a-hpaA was consistent with that of H.pylori hpaA as published in the GenBank. SDS-PAGEdemonstrated that the constructed prokaryotic expression efficiently produced rHpaA at the1.5 mmol/L of IPTG. HpaA fusion protein was able to react with the rabbit polyclonal antibodyagainst whole cells of H. pylori.Conclusion: A prokaryotic expression system pET-28a-hpaA-BL21 with high efficiency of H.pylori hpaA gene was successfully established and the HpaA fusion protein showed satisfactoryimmunoreactivity. These results indicate that production of a specific recombinant proteinis an alternative and potentially more expeditious strategy for development of H. pylori vaccine.

  17. Role of food in environmental transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Mohammad; Vahedi, Amin; Maghdouri, Zahra; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a gram-negative bacterium that has infected more than half of the world's population. This pathogen colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is usually acquired during childhood. It is an important cause of peptic ulcers, chronic gastritis and stomach cancer. Among the risk factors for acquisition of H. pylori infection, poor socioeconomic status, poor sanitization and hygiene practices, and contaminated food and water, are the most significant ones. The main route of H. pylori transmission is still unknown. Studies show that H.pylori bacteria can spread directly from one person to the other, or indirectly from an infected person to the environment. Person to person transmission is divided into fecal-oral, gastric-oral, oral-oral, sexual routes. Presently, interpersonal pathways are more acceptable than environmental exposure routes. Literatures indicate the presence and survival of H. pylori in food samples, such as milk, vegetables and meat, and suggest these foods may play an important role in the environmental transmission of this pathogen. In addition, other studies report the presence of H. pylori in the gastric tissue of some animals (e.g. sheep and cow) and therefore, it is likely they participate in the food chain transmission as reservoirs besides human. Although there are findings which indicate the probable role of food products in the environmental transmission of H. pylori, there is still not enough direct evidence to confirm this and more studies are needed. However, attention to food contamination sources (unhygienic water) and controlling them may prevent transmission of pathogens associated with health.

  18. Evaluation of Salivary Antibodies to Detect Infection with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B Loeb

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and chronic gastritis. Infection with this bacterium stimulates the production of immunoglobulin (Ig G antibody. Salivary IgG antibody tests to detect H pylori infection offer a convenient and noninvasive method of diagnosis. To evaluate an IgG salivary antibody kit, saliva was collected from 157 out-patients with dyspepsia referred for endoscopy to a tertiary centre. A salivary IgG ELISA antibody assay was performed using the Helisal Helicobacter pylori (IgG assay kit, and at least four gastric biopsies were obtained. H pylori infection was confirmed by demonstration of the organism on Warthin-Starry silver stain (sensitivity 85%, specificity 55%. The prevalence of infection with H pylori was 30%. When the analysis was redone, excluding those treated with eradication therapy, the results were similar (sensitivity 86%, specificity 58%. The positive predictive value of the assay was 45% and the negative predictive value was 90%. Despite the ease of sampling, the assay used has limited diagnostic utility, lacking the predictive value to indicate which patients referred with dyspeptic symptoms to a tertiary care setting are infected with H pylori.

  19. Effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastric epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Shatha; Lina, Taslima T; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium has cells with features that make them a powerful line of defense in innate mucosal immunity. Features that allow gastrointestinal epithelial cells to contribute in innate defense include cell barrier integrity, cell turnover, autophagy, and innate immune responses. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a spiral shape gram negative bacterium that selectively colonizes the gastric epithelium of more than half of the world’s population. The infection invariably becomes persistent due to highly specialized mechanisms that facilitate H. pylori’s avoidance of this initial line of host defense as well as adaptive immune mechanisms. The host response is thus unsuccessful in clearing the infection and as a result becomes established as a persistent infection promoting chronic inflammation. In some individuals the associated inflammation contributes to ulcerogenesis or neoplasia. H. pylori has an array of different strategies to interact intimately with epithelial cells and manipulate their cellular processes and functions. Among the multiple aspects that H. pylori affects in gastric epithelial cells are their distribution of epithelial junctions, DNA damage, apoptosis, proliferation, stimulation of cytokine production, and cell transformation. Some of these processes are initiated as a result of the activation of signaling mechanisms activated on binding of H. pylori to cell surface receptors or via soluble virulence factors that gain access to the epithelium. The multiple responses by the epithelium to the infection contribute to pathogenesis associated with H. pylori. PMID:25278677

  20. Statin Decreases Helicobacter pylori Burden in Macrophages by Promoting Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Chih; Huang, Mei-Zi; Wang, Michelle Lily; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lu, Tzu-Li; Lo, Horng-Ren; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Sun, Yu-Chen; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lim, Hui-Jing; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been found to provide protective effects against several bacterial infectious diseases. Although the use of statins has been shown to enhance antimicrobial treated Helicobacter pylori eradication and reduce H. pylori-mediated inflammation, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear. In this study, in vitro and ex vivo macrophage models were established to investigate the molecular pathways involved in statin-mediated inhibition of H. pylori-induced inflammation. Our study showed that statin treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intracellular H. pylori burden in both RAW264.7 macrophage cells and murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). Furthermore, statin yielded enhanced early endosome maturation and subsequent activation of the autophagy pathway, which promotes lysosomal fusion resulting in degradation of sequestered bacteria, and in turn attenuates interleukin (IL)-1β production. These results indicate that statin not only reduces cellular cholesterol but also decreases the H. pylori burden in macrophages by promoting autophagy, consequently alleviating H. pylori-induced inflammation. PMID:28144585

  1. Analysis of the urinary peptidome associated with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Xiao; Fan-Liang Meng; Li-Hua He; Yi-Xin Gu; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between urinary peptide changes and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection using urinary peptidome profiling.METHODS: The study was performed in volunteers (n= 137) who gave informed consent. Urinary peptides were enriched by magnetic beads based weak cation exchange chromatography and spectrums acquired by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). ClinProTools bioinformatics software was used for statistical analysis and the recognition of peptide patterns. The marker peptides were identified by LTQ Obitrap XL tandem MS.RESULTS: Approximately 50 proteins or peptides which loaded onto the magnetic beads were detected by MALDI-TOF MS. By optimizing the parameters of the model,the Genetic Algorithm model had good recognition capability (97%) and positive predictive value (94%).Based on the model, 2 markers with molecular masses of 6788 and 1912 Da were found that differentiated between H. pylori positive and negative volunteers.The m/z 1912 sequence was parsed as SKQFTSSTSYNRGDSTF.The peptide was identified as isoform 1 of the fibrinogen α chain precursor, whose concentration in urine was markedly higher in H. pylori infected volunteers than in H. pylori non-infected ones.CONCLUSION: The appearance of urinary fibrinogen degradation products is caused by an active H. pylori -induced process.

  2. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  4. Biopatologia do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeira Marcelo Sady Plácido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori induz inflamação persistente na mucosa gástrica com diferentes lesões orgânicas em humanos, tais como gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. Os fatores determinantes desses diferentes resultados incluem a intensidade e a distribuição da inflamação induzida pelo H. pylori na mucosa gástrica. Evidências recentes demonstram que cepas do H. pylori apresentam diversidade genotípica, cujos produtos acionam o processo inflamatório por meio de mediadores e citocinas, que podem levar a diferentes graus de resposta inflamatória do hospedeiro, resultando em diferentes destinos patológicos. Cepas H. pylori com a ilha de patogenicidade cag induzem resposta inflamatória mais grave, através da ativação da transcrição de genes, aumentando o risco para desenvolvimento de úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. O estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo induzido pela inflamação desempenha importante papel na carcinogênese gástrica como mediador da formação ou ativação de cancerígenos, danos no DNA, bem como de alterações da proliferação celular e da apoptose.

  5. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  6. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  7. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  8. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  9. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; de Laat, L; van Oijen, A H; de Boer, W A

    2012-03-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detect halitosis. In this study a possible relation between H. pylori and halitosis was evaluated, using an objective method (gas chromatography, GC) to detect the VSCs, responsible for the halitosis. The levels of the VSCs hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in mouth breath and in stomach air of 11 H. pylori positive patients and of 38 H. pylori negative patients, all with gastric pathology. Halitosis was also established by organoleptic scoring (OLS) of mouth-breath. The levels of H(2)S, MM and DMS in the mouth-breath and stomach air of the H. pylori positive patients did not differ significantly from those of the H. pylori negative patients. OLS of the mouth-breath resulted in 9 patients with halitosis, 1 out of the H. pylori positive group and 8 out of the H. pylori negative group, which is not statistically different. The concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach. The patients with gastric pathology were also compared with control patients without gastric pathology and with normal volunteers. No significant differences in VSCs in mouth breath were observed between these groups. Thus, in this study no association between halitosis and H. pylori infection was found. Halitosis, as established by GC and OLS, nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach.

  10. Overview of the phytomedicine approaches against Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) successfully colonizes the human stomach of the majority of the human population. This infection always causes chronic gastritis, but may evolve to serious outcomes, such as peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori first line therapy recommended by the Maastricht-4 Consensus Report comprises the use of two antibiotics and a proton-pomp inhibitor, but in some regions failure associated with this treatment is already undesirable high. Indeed, treatment failure is one of the major problems associated with H. pylori infection and is mainly associated with bacterial antibiotic resistance. In order to counteract this situation, some effort has been allocated during the last years in the investigation of therapeutic alternatives beyond antibiotics. These include vaccines, probiotics, photodynamic inactivation and phage therapy, which are briefly revisited in this review. A particular focus on phytomedicine, also described as herbal therapy and botanical therapy, which consists in the use of plant extracts for medicinal purposes, is specifically addressed, namely considering its history, category of performed studies, tested compounds, active principle and mode of action. The herbs already experienced are highly diverse and usually selected from products with a long history of employment against diseases associated with H. pylori infection from each country own folk medicine. The studies demonstrated that many phytomedicine products have an anti-H. pylori activity and gastroprotective action. Although the mechanism of action is far from being completely understood, current knowledge correlates the beneficial action of herbs with inhibition of essential H. pylori enzymes, modulation of the host immune system and with attenuation of inflammation. PMID:24914319

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2000-01-01

    @@ IS THERE ANYTHING NEW? Helicobacter pylori has been for many years a forgotten bacterium, since the first report on this spiral organism dated from the 19th century[1]. As early as in 1906, an association between a spiral organism and gastric carcinoma was suggested[2].Doenges reported in 1938 that on autopsy not less than 40% of human stomachs were found to be invaded by spiral organisms[3].

  12. Nitroimidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wouden, EJ; Thijs, JC; Van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a nitroimidazole-containing regimen for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection is decreased by nitroimidazole resistance. Nitroimidazoles are metabolized by H. pylori by several nitro-reductases of which an oxygen-insensitive NADPH nitroreductase encoded by the rdxA gene is t

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  14. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  15. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Kusters (Johannes); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection

  16. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event.

  17. A comparative study of clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa.

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    Di Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been isolated from 10%-20% of human chronic cholecystitis specimens but the characteristics of "Helicobacter pylori positive cholecystitis" remains unclear. This study aims to compare the clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa. METHODS: Three hundred and twenty-six chronic cholecystitis patients were divided into two groups according to whether Helicobacter pylori could be detected by culture, staining or PCR for Helicobacter 16s rRNA gene in gallbladder mucosa. Positive samples were sequenced for Helicobacter pylori-specific identification. Clinical parameters as well as pathological characteristics including some premalignant lesions and the expression levels of iNOS and ROS in gallbladder were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa was detected in 20.55% of cholecystitis patients. These patients had a higher prevalence of acid regurgitation symptoms (p = 0.001, more histories of chronic gastritis (p = 0.005, gastric ulcer (p = 0.042, duodenal ulcer (p = 0.026 and higher presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach as compared to patients without Helicobacter pylori infection in the gallbladder mucosa. Helicobacter pylori 16s rRNA in gallbladder and gastric-duodenal mucosa from the same individual patient had identical sequences. Also, higher incidences of adenomyomatosis (p = 0.012, metaplasia (p = 0.022 and higher enhanced expressions of iNOS and ROS were detected in Helicobacter pylori infected gallbladder mucosa (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori existed in stomach. Helicobacter pylori is also correlated with gallbladder premalignant lesions including metaplasia and adenomyomatosis. The potential mechanism might be related with higher ROS

  18. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells

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    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases. PMID:27667993

  19. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

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    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases.

  20. Helicobacter pylori does not use spermidine synthase to produce spermidine.

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    Zhang, Huawei; Au, Shannon Wing Ngor

    2017-08-26

    Helicobacter pylori is the primary pathogen associated to gastritis and gastric cancer. Growth of H. pylori depends on the availability of spermidine in vivo. Interestingly, the genome of H. pylori contains an incomplete set of genes for the classical pathway of spermidine biosynthesis. It is thus not clear whether some other genes remained in the pathway would have any functions in spermidine biosynthesis. Here, we study spermidine synthase, which is responsible for the final catalytic process in the classical route. Protein sequence alignment reveals that H. pylori SpeE (HpSpeE) lacks key residues for substrate binding. By using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that purified recombinant HpSpeE does not interact with the putative substrates putrescine and decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine, and the product spermidine. High performance liquid chromatography analysis further demonstrates that HpSpeE has no detectable in vitro enzymatic activity. Additionally, intracellular spermidine level in speE-null mutant strain is comparable to that in the wild type strain. Collectively, our results suggest that HpSpeE is functionally distinct from spermidine production. H. pylori may instead employ the alternative pathway for spermidine synthesis which is dominantly exploited by other human gut microbes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

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    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  2. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori cagA genotype among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sueptrakool Wisessombat; Chatruthai Meethai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in dyspepsia patients and its relation to virulence factor cagA gene. Methods: In total, 110 gastric biopsies from dyspeptic patients were comparatively studied using rapid urease test and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Multiplex PCR detected three genes of 16S rRNA, cagA, and ureC. H. pylori was detected in 14 gastric biopsies (13%). Significantly higher numbers of female were infected. Furthermore,cag A gene was found in all H. pylori-positive specimens. In addition, the result indicated that the multiplex PCR with annealing temperature at 57 oC was able to effectively amplify specific products. Conclusions:The results confirmed high prevalence of cagA gene in H. pylori among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand.

  3. Multiple Acid Sensors Control Helicobacter pylori Colonization of the Stomach.

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    Huang, Julie Y; Goers Sweeney, Emily; Guillemin, Karen; Amieva, Manuel R

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori's ability to respond to environmental cues in the stomach is integral to its survival. By directly visualizing H. pylori swimming behavior when encountering a microscopic gradient consisting of the repellent acid and attractant urea, we found that H. pylori is able to simultaneously detect both signals, and its response depends on the magnitudes of the individual signals. By testing for the bacteria's response to a pure acid gradient, we discovered that the chemoreceptors TlpA and TlpD are each independent acid sensors. They enable H. pylori to respond to and escape from increases in hydrogen ion concentration near 100 nanomolar. TlpD also mediates attraction to basic pH, a response dampened by another chemoreceptor TlpB. H. pylori mutants lacking both TlpA and TlpD (ΔtlpAD) are unable to sense acid and are defective in establishing colonization in the murine stomach. However, blocking acid production in the stomach with omeprazole rescues ΔtlpAD's colonization defect. We used 3D confocal microscopy to determine how acid blockade affects the distribution of H. pylori in the stomach. We found that stomach acid controls not only the overall bacterial density, but also the microscopic distribution of bacteria that colonize the epithelium deep in the gastric glands. In omeprazole treated animals, bacterial abundance is increased in the antral glands, and gland colonization range is extended to the corpus. Our findings indicate that H. pylori has evolved at least two independent receptors capable of detecting acid gradients, allowing not only survival in the stomach, but also controlling the interaction of the bacteria with the epithelium.

  4. Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

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    A Zare Javid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped, microaerophilic organism that colonizes the stomach of humans and causes chronic-active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancers, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach and MALT (mucosal-associated lymphoid tumor lymphomas. H. pylori colonizes the stomach of over 50 % the world’s human population, primarily those who reside in developing nations. Infection is generally first acquired in children, who may be entirely asymptomatic, and then persists for life, unless specific eradication therapy is initiated. All infected individuals have mucosal inflammation in the stomach in response to the organism, but only a subset will develop disease complications, such as an ulcer in the stomach or proximal duodenum and cancer in either the body or the antrum of the stomach. It is estimated that the lifetime risk of developing peptic ulceration is roughly 15%. However, this is an exceedingly important disease, because it has serious morbidity and mortality. Eradication of H. pylori infection is not successful when using antibiotics as monotherapy or dual therapy using combinations of an acid-suppressing agent and an antibiotic or two antibiotics without acid blockage. Multiple studies show that some probiotic strains can inhibit the growth of H. pylori. To date, probiotics do not appear to have a role as sole therapy for use in the prevention or treatment of H. pylori infection. However, there is increasing evidence that a variety of probiotic agents are useful as adjunctive therapy, which can both enhance the success of eradicating the gastric pathogen while, reduce the frequency and severity of adverse effects arising from the other agents that are employed in current combination treatment regimens. Future studies should assess the role of prebiotics and synbiotics and products derived from probiotics as additional options for use in the prevention and treatment of H. pylori infection

  5. Cloning and sequencing of cagA gene fragment of Helicobacter pylori with coccoid form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Xue-Feng Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and sequence the cagA gene fragment of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) with coccoid form.METHODS: H pylori strain NCTC11637 were transformed to coccoid form by exposure to antibiotics in subinhibitory concentrations. The coccoid H pyloriwas collected. cagA gene of the coccoid H pylori strain was amplified by PCR.After purified, the target fragment was cloned into plasmid pMD-18T. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-cagA was transformed into E. coli JM109. Positive clones were screened and identified by PCR and digestion with restriction endonucleases. The sequence of inserted fragment was then analysed.RESULTS: cagA gene of 3 444 bp was obtained from the coccoid H pylori genome DNA. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-cagA was constructed, then it was digested by BamH Ⅰ+Sac Ⅰ, and the product of digestion was identical with the predicted one. Sequence analysis showed that the homology of coccoid and the reported original sequence H pylori was 99.7%.CONCLUSION: The recombinant plasmid containing cagA gene from coccoid H pylori has been constructed successfully.The coccoid H pylori contain completed cagA gene, which may be related to pathogenicity of them.

  6. Alterations in Helicobacter pylori triggered by contact with gastric epithelial cells

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    Elizabeth M. Johnson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori lives within the mucus layer of the human stomach, in close proximity to gastric epithelial cells. While a great deal is known about the effects of H. pylori on human cells and the specific bacterial products that mediate these effects, relatively little work has been done to investigate alterations in H. pylori that may be triggered by bacterial contact with human cells. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of changes in bacterial physiology and morphology that occur when H. pylori is in contact with gastric epithelial cells. Several studies have reported that cell contact causes alterations in H. pylori gene transcription. In addition, H. pylori contact with gastric epithelial cells promotes the formation of pilus-like structures at the bacteria-host cell interface. The formation of these structures requires multiple genes in the cag pathogenicity island, and these structures are proposed to have an important role in the type IV secretion system-dependent process through which CagA enters host cells. Finally, H. pylori contact with epithelial cells can promote bacterial replication and the formation of microcolonies, phenomena that are facilitated by the acquisition of iron and other nutrients from infected cells. In summary, the gastric epithelial cell surface represents an important niche for H. pylori, and upon entry into this niche, the bacteria alter their behavior in a manner that optimizes bacterial proliferation and persistent colonization of the host.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Study of Helicobacter pylori Urease.

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    Minkara, Mona S; Ucisik, Melek N; Weaver, Michael N; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-05-13

    Helicobacter pylori have been implicated in an array of gastrointestinal disorders including, but not limited to, gastric and duodenal ulcers and adenocarcinoma. This bacterium utilizes an enzyme, urease, to produce copious amounts of ammonia through urea hydrolysis in order to survive the harsh acidic conditions of the stomach. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on the H. pylori urease enzyme have been employed in order to study structural features of this enzyme that may shed light on the hydrolysis mechanism. A total of 400 ns of MD simulation time were collected and analyzed in this study. A wide-open flap state previously observed in MD simulations on Klebsiella aerogenes [Roberts et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2012, 134, 9934] urease has been identified in the H. pylori enzyme that has yet to be experimentally observed. Critical distances between residues on the flap, contact points in the closed state, and the separation between the active site Ni(2+) ions and the critical histidine α322 residue were used to characterize flap motion. An additional flap in the active site was elaborated upon that we postulate may serve as an exit conduit for hydrolysis products. Finally we discuss the internal hollow cavity and present analysis of the distribution of sodium ions over the course of the simulation.

  8. Crosstalk between Helicobacter pylori and gastric epithelial cells is impaired by docosahexaenoic acid.

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    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori colonizes half of the world's population leading to gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori strains resistant to antibiotics are increasing which raises the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been shown to decrease H. pylori growth and its associated-inflammation through mechanisms poorly characterized. We aimed to explore DHA action on H. pylori-mediated inflammation and adhesion to gastric epithelial cells (AGS and also to identify bacterial structures affected by DHA. H. pylori growth and metabolism was assessed in liquid cultures. Bacterial adhesion to AGS cells was visualized by transmission electron microscopy and quantified by an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Inflammatory proteins were assessed by immunoblotting in infected AGS cells, previously treated with DHA. Bacterial total and outer membrane protein composition was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Concentrations of 100 µM of DHA decreased H. pylori growth, whereas concentrations higher than 250 µM irreversibly inhibited bacteria survival. DHA reduced ATP production and adhesion to AGS cells. AGS cells infected with DHA pre-treated H. pylori showed a 3-fold reduction in Interleukin-8 (IL-8 production and a decrease of COX2 and iNOS. 2D electrophoresis analysis revealed that DHA changed the expression of H. pylori outer membrane proteins associated with stress response and metabolism and modified bacterial lipopolysaccharide phenotype. As conclusions our results show that DHA anti-H. pylori effects are associated with changes of bacteria morphology and metabolism, and with alteration of outer membrane proteins composition, that ultimately reduce the adhesion of bacteria and the burden of H. pylori-related inflammation.

  9. Identification of Helicobacter pylori genes that contribute to stomach colonization.

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    Baldwin, David N; Shepherd, Benjamin; Kraemer, Petra; Hall, Michael K; Sycuro, Laura K; Pinto-Santini, Delia M; Salama, Nina R

    2007-02-01

    Chronic infection of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori leads to a variety of pathological sequelae, including peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, resulting in significant human morbidity and mortality. Several genes have been implicated in disease related to H. pylori infection, including the vacuolating cytotoxin and the cag pathogenicity island. Other factors important for the establishment and maintenance of infection include urease enzyme production, motility, iron uptake, and stress response. We utilized a C57BL/6 mouse infection model to query a collection of 2,400 transposon mutants in two different bacterial strain backgrounds for H. pylori genetic loci contributing to colonization of the stomach. Microarray-based tracking of transposon mutants allowed us to monitor the behavior of transposon insertions in 758 different gene loci. Of the loci measured, 223 (29%) had a predicted colonization defect. These included previously described H. pylori virulence genes, genes implicated in virulence in other pathogenic bacteria, and 81 hypothetical proteins. We have retested 10 previously uncharacterized candidate colonization gene loci by making independent null alleles and have confirmed their colonization phenotypes by using competition experiments and by determining the dose required for 50% infection. Of the genetic loci retested, 60% have strain-specific colonization defects, while 40% have phenotypes in both strain backgrounds for infection, highlighting the profound effect of H. pylori strain variation on the pathogenic potential of this organism.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of Northwestern Mexican plants against Helicobacter pylori.

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    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos A; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan C; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiologic agent of such gastric disorders as chronic active gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Over the past few years, the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to the development of better treatments, such as the use of natural products. This study evaluated the anti-H. pylori activity of 17 Mexican plants used mainly in the northwestern part of Mexico (Sonora) for the empirical treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The anti-H. pylori activity of methanolic extracts of the plants was determined by using the broth microdilution method. The 50% minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from less than 200 to 400 μg/mL for Castella tortuosa, Amphipterygium adstringens, Ibervillea sonorae, Pscalium decompositum, Krameria erecta, Selaginella lepidophylla, Pimpinella anisum, Marrubium vulgare, Ambrosia confertiflora, and Couterea latiflora and were greater than 800 μg/mL for Byophyllum pinnatum, Tecoma stans linnaeus, Kohleria deppena, Jatropha cuneata, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Taxodium macronatum. Only Equisetum gigantum showed no activity against H. pylori. This study suggests the important role that these plants may have in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori. The findings set the groundwork for further characterization and elucidation of the active compounds responsible for such activity.

  11. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

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    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  12. Oxyntic gastric atrophy in Helicobacter pylori gastritis is distinct from autoimmune gastritis.

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    Venerito, Marino; Varbanova, Mariya; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Reinhold, Dirk; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Jechorek, Doerthe; Weigt, Jochen; Link, Alexander; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To assess characteristics of oxyntic gastric atrophy (OGA) in autoimmune gastritis (AIG) compared with OGA as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients undergoing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy from July 2011 to October 2014 were prospectively included (N=452). Gastric biopsies were obtained for histology and H. pylori testing. Serum gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII and antibodies against H. pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A protein were determined in all patients. Antibodies against parietal cells and intrinsic factor were determined in patients with advanced (moderate to severe) OGA. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were calculated for serum biomarkers and compared with histology. Overall, 34 patients (8.9%) had advanced OGA by histology (22 women, age 61±15 years). Current or past H. pylori infection and AIG were present in 14/34 and 22/34 patients, respectively. H. pylori-negative AIG patients (N=18) were more likely to have another autoimmune disease (OR 6.3; 95% CI 1.3 to 29.8), severe corpus atrophy (OR 10.1; 95% CI 1.9 to 54.1) and corpus intestinal metaplasia (OR 26.9; 95% CI 5.3 to 136.5) compared with H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA. Antrum atrophy was present in 39% of H. pylori-negative AIG patients. The diagnostic performance of G17, PG I and PGI/II was excellent for AIG patients (AUC=0.83, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively), but limited for H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA (AUC=0.62, 0.75 and 0.67, respectively). H. pylori-negative AIG has a distinct clinical, morphological and serological phenotype compared with advanced OGA in H. pylori gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Anti-bacterial effects of enzymatically-isolated sialic acid from glycomacropeptide in a Helicobacter pylori-infected murine model

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    Noh, Hye-Ji; Koh, Hong Bum; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Cho, Hyang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization of the stomach mucosa and duodenum is the major cause of acute and chronic gastroduodenal pathology in humans. Efforts to find effective anti-bacterial strategies against H. pylori for the non-antibiotic control of H. pylori infection are urgently required. In this study, we used whey to prepare glycomacropeptide (GMP), from which sialic acid (G-SA) was enzymatically isolated. We investigated the anti-bacterial effects of G-SA against H. pylori in vitro and in an H. pylori-infected murine model. MATERIALS/METHODS The anti-bacterial activity of G-SA was measured in vitro using the macrodilution method, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production was measured in H. pylori and AGS cell co-cultures by ELISA. For in vivo study, G-SA 5 g/kg body weight (bw)/day and H. pylori were administered to mice three times over one week. After one week, G-SA 5 g/kg bw/day alone was administered every day for one week. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of G-SA. In addition, real-time PCR was performed to measure the genetic expression of cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). RESULTS G-SA inhibited the growth of H. pylori and suppressed IL-8 production in H. pylori and in AGS cell co-cultures in vitro. In the in vivo assay, administration of G-SA reduced levels of IL-1β and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines whereas IL-10 level increased. Also, G-SA suppressed the expression of cagA in the stomach of H. pylori-infected mice. CONCLUSION G-SA possesses anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect in an experimental H. pylori-infected murine model. G-SA has potential as an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of H. pylori infection and H. pylori-induced gastric disease prevention. PMID:28194260

  14. Helicobacter pylori Activates IL-6-STAT3 Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells: Potential Roles for Reactive Oxygen Species.

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    Piao, Juan-Yu; Lee, Hee Geum; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Han, Hyeong-Jun; Ngo, Hoang-Kieu-Chi; Park, Sin-Aye; Woo, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Jeong-Sang; Na, Hye-Kyung; Cha, Young-Nam; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying H. pylori-mediated STAT3 activation is still not fully understood. In this study, we investigated H. pylori-induced activation of STAT3 signaling in AGS human gastric cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. AGS cells were cocultured with H. pylori, and STAT3 activation was assessed by Western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and immunocytochemistry. To demonstrate the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in H. pylori-activated STAT3 signaling, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was utilized. The expression and production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The interaction between IL-6 and IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) was determined by the immunoprecipitation assay. H. pylori activates STAT3 as evidenced by increases in phosphorylation on Tyr(705) , nuclear localization, DNA binding and transcriptional activity of this transcription factor. The nuclear translocation of STAT3 was also observed in H. pylori-inoculated mouse stomach. In the subsequent study, we found that H. pylori-induced STAT3 phosphorylation was dependent on IL-6. Notably, the increased IL-6 expression and the IL-6 and IL-6R binding were mediated by ROS produced as a consequence of H. pylori infection. H. pylori-induced STAT3 activation is mediated, at least in part, through ROS-induced upregulation of IL-6 expression. These findings provide a novel molecular mechanism responsible for H. pylori-induced gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and immunostimulatory effect of extracts from Byrsonima crassa Nied. (Malpighiaceae

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    Vilegas Wagner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several in vitro studies have looked at the effect of medicinal plant extracts against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Regardless of the popular use of Byrsonima crassa (B. crassa as antiemetic, diuretic, febrifuge, to treat diarrhea, gastritis and ulcers, there is no data on its effects against H. pylori. In this study, we evaluated the anti-H. pylori of B. crassa leaves extracts and its effects on reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates induction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Methods The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by broth microdilution method and the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO by the horseradish peroxidase-dependent oxidation of phenol red and Griess reaction, respectively. Results The methanolic (MeOH and chloroformic (CHCl3 extracts inhibit, in vitro, the growth of H. pylori with MIC value of 1024 μg/ml. The MeOH extract induced the production H2O2 and NO, but CHCl3 extract only NO. Conclusion Based in our results, B. crassa can be considered a source of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity, but its use should be done with caution in treatment of the gastritis and peptic ulcers, since the reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by ulcerogenic agents and H. pylori infections.

  16. Effect of Di(2-ethylhexylphthalate on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Apoptosis in AGS Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Hao Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic products are wildly used in human life. Di(2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP is an essential additive in plastic manufacturing and is used as plasticizer for many products including plastic food packaging. DEHP is a teratogenic compound and can cause potent reproductive toxicity. DEHP can also cause liver damage, peroxisome proliferation, and carcinogenesis. DEHP is also strongly associated with peptic ulcers and gastric cancer; however, the underlying effect and mechanism of DEHP on the gastrointestinal tract are not entirely clear. The oral infection route of H. pylori parallels the major ingestion route of DEHP into the human body. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of DEHP and H. pylori exposure on the human gastric epithelial cell line, AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma. The viability of the AGS cell line was significantly lower in 80 μM-DEHP and H. pylori (MOI = 100 : 1 coexposure than DEHP or H. pylori alone. DEHP and H. pylori coexposure also induced caspase-3 activation, and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and DNA fragmentation in AGS cells. These results indicate that DEHP can enhance H. pylori cytotoxicity and induce gastric epithelial cell apoptosis. Therefore, it is possible that DEHP and H. pylori coexposure might enhance the disruption of the gastric mucosa integrity and potentially promote the pathogenesis of gastric carcinogenesis.

  17. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-02-08

    The author reviews the main achievements in Helicobacter pylori research in the past 2 years. Of the more than 1000 microRNAs described thus far, sets of over- and underexpressed samples were identified that are associated with either gastric cancer or precancerous lesions, and some of them could be either markers or therapeutic targets in the near future. Meta-analyses involved 95 new publications: the association between infection and oesophageal, colorectal, pancreatic and liver carcinomas is supported by the increased odds ratios, but the results do not reach the strength seen in gastric carcinoma. Epstein-Barr virus is an emerging pathogen: 10% of gastric cancers are virus-associated; the prevalence of the virus in normal mucosa, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently being studied. Current Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens frequently achieve suboptimal results: a few optimisation methods are presented, although not all are supported by the meta-analyses. In 2013, the European Helicobacter Study Group proposed the development of a pan-European registry; data from 5792 patients registered so far indicated that many therapeutic regimens resulted in a low eradication rate. In 2013, the Healthy Stomach Initiative was started with the aim of supporting and disseminating research performed in the field of healthy and diseased stomachs.

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  19. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  20. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  1. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Paul; Waidner, Barbara; Hofman, Véronique; Bereswill, Stefan; Brest, Patrick; Kist, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    Research in the last year has provided new insights into the function of the the cag-associated type IV secretion system and the vacuolating toxin VacA. A quite new aspect was disclosed by the finding that Helicobacter pylori in Mongolian gerbils colonizes a very distinct topology in the gastric mucous layer, obviously providing optimal conditions for long-term survival. Further research activities focused on H. pylori ammonia and metal metabolism as well as on bacterial stress defence mechanisms. Differential expression of approximately 7% of the bacterial genome was found at low pH suggesting that H. pylori has evolved a multitude of acid-adaptive mechanisms. VacA was shown to interrupt phagosome maturation in macrophage cell lines as well as to modulate and interfere with T lymphocyte immunological functions. Gastric mucosa as well as the H. pylori-infected epithelial cell line AGS strongly express IL-8 receptor A and B, which might contribute to the augmentation of the inflammatory response. Accumulating evidence implicates genetic variation in the inflammatory response to H. pylori in the etiology of the increased risk of gastric cancer after H. pylori infection. The chronic imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation is the first step of gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard, it was demonstrated that coexpression of two H. pylori proteins, CagA and HspB, in AGS cells, caused an increase in E2F transcription factor, cyclin D3, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Taken together, we now have a better understanding of the role of different virulence factors of H. pylori. There is still a lot to be learned, but the promising discoveries summarized here, demonstrate that the investigation of the bacterial survival strategies will give novel insights into pathogenesis and disease development.

  2. Synthesis and activity of Helicobacter pylori urease and catalase at low pH.

    OpenAIRE

    Bauerfeind, P; Garner, R; Dunn, B E; Mobley, H L

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori produces large amounts of urease presumably to be prepared for the rare event of a sudden acid exposure. The hypothesis that H pylori is acid sensitive and protein production is inhibited by low pH was examined. METHODS: H pylori or its soluble enzymes were incubated buffered or unbuffered at a pH ranging from 2-7 in the presence of 5 mM urea for 30 minutes. After exposure, urease and catalase activities of whole cells, supernatants, and soluble enzyme preparat...

  3. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  4. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Qing Wang; Ying-Nin Xin; Ni Li; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic sequences have been determined for a number of strains of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and related bacteria.With the development of microarray analysis and the wide use of subtractive hybridization techniques,comparative studies have been carried out with respect to the interstrain differences between H pylori and inter-species differences in the genome of related bacteria.It was found that the core genome of H pylori constitutes 1111 genes that are determinants of the species properties.A great pool of auxillary genes are mainly from the categories of cag pathogenicity islands,outer membrane proteins,restriction-modification system and hypothetical proteins of unknown function.Persistence of H pylori in the human stomach leads to the diversification of the genome.Comparative genomics suggest that a host jump has occurs from humans to felines.Candidate genes specific for the development of the gastric diseases were identified.With the aid of proteomics,population genetics and other molecular methods,future comparative genomic studies would dramatically promote our understanding of the evolution,pathogenesis and microbiology of H pylori.

  5. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  6. Does Helicobacter pylori affect portal hypertensive gastropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major etiological factor of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. It is supposed to be a risk factor for the more frequently encountered PUD in patients with liver cirrhosis. Several investigators have evaluated the effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis, portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG and encephalopathy with controversial results. Some reports have shown a higher seroprevalence and suggested a synergistic effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis and PHG. However, this increased prevalence is associated with a negative histology and is not influenced by the cause of cirrhosis, PHG, Child class or gender. Most studies have not found any correlation between H. pylori and PHG. In contrast, other studies have reported a markedly lower prevalence of H. pylori in cirrhotics with duodenal ulcer compared to controls. The aim of this article is to review the relationship between H. pylori infection and portal hypertensive gastropathy and the role of H. pylori eradication in cirrhotic patients.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection- recent developments in diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Isabel Lopes Filipa F Vale Mónica Oleastro

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods,a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication...

  8. Analysis of immune responses against H pylori in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khademul Islam; Ibrahim Khalil; Chowdhury Rafiqul Ahsan; Mahmuda Yasmin; Jamalun Nessa

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the immunogenicity of H pylori proteins, to evaluate the production rate of anti H pylori IgG antibodies in relation to time and to demonstrate the fidelity of newly optimized in-house enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique as an alternative for H pylori infection assay.METHODS: In the present study, 100 μg of formalinfixed H pylori whole cell antigens was injected into an experimental animal (New Zealand white female rabbit) intramuscularly on d 0, 16, 27 and 36. The first two doses were injected with adjuvants. On d 0,a serum sample was collected from the rabbit before immunization and this pre-immunized serum was used as a negative control for the whole study. To evaluate the immunogenic responses of the injected antigen,serum samples were collected from the rabbit at regular intervals up to d 42. The sera were analyzed using inhouse ELISA and Western blot techniques.RESULTS: The production of anti H pylori IgG antibodies in the rabbit in response to the injected antigen increased almost exponentially up to d 14 and after that it was maintained at the same level until the last day (d 42). By analyzing the immune profiles of immunized sera, 11 proteins were identified to be immunogenic,among them 2 (approximately 100 kDa and 85 kDa)were most prominent.CONCLUSION: Analysis of the immune responses against pathogenic microorganisms like H pylori is necessary for the development of various diagnostic and preventive approaches. The results of this experiment reveal that the formalin-fixed H pylori whole cell antigens injected into the rabbit are highly immunogenic. These prominent proteins (approximately 100 kDa and 85 kDa)might have higher immunogenic effects among humans infected with H pylori and some of these immunogenic proteins can be included in diagnostic approaches based on serology and also for vaccine formulation. The inhouse ELISA is a promising alternative compared to invasive techniques.

  9. Helicobacter pylori VacA enhances prostaglandin E2 production through induction of cyclooxygenase 2 expression via a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/activating transcription factor 2 cascade in AZ-521 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Yamasaki, Eiki; Nakayama, Masaaki;

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of AZ-521 cells with Helicobacter pylori VacA increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, SB203580, blocked elevation of COX-2 mRNA levels, whereas PD98059, which blocks the Erk1/2 cascade......A-induced COX-2 expression. In parallel with COX-2 expression, VacA increased prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production, which was inhibited by SB203580 and NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor. VacA-induced PGE(2) production was markedly attenuated in AZ-521 cells stably expressing DN-p38. VacA increased transcription...... promoter activation. The reduction of ATF-2 expression in AZ-521 cells transformed with ATF-2-small interfering RNA duplexes resulted in suppression of COX-2 expression. Thus, VacA enhances PGE(2) production by AZ-521 cells through induction of COX-2 expression via the p38 MAPK/ATF-2 cascade, leading...

  10. Multiple Acid Sensors Control Helicobacter pylori Colonization of the Stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Julie Y.; Goers Sweeney, Emily; Guillemin, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori’s ability to respond to environmental cues in the stomach is integral to its survival. By directly visualizing H. pylori swimming behavior when encountering a microscopic gradient consisting of the repellent acid and attractant urea, we found that H. pylori is able to simultaneously detect both signals, and its response depends on the magnitudes of the individual signals. By testing for the bacteria’s response to a pure acid gradient, we discovered that the chemoreceptors TlpA and TlpD are each independent acid sensors. They enable H. pylori to respond to and escape from increases in hydrogen ion concentration near 100 nanomolar. TlpD also mediates attraction to basic pH, a response dampened by another chemoreceptor TlpB. H. pylori mutants lacking both TlpA and TlpD (ΔtlpAD) are unable to sense acid and are defective in establishing colonization in the murine stomach. However, blocking acid production in the stomach with omeprazole rescues ΔtlpAD’s colonization defect. We used 3D confocal microscopy to determine how acid blockade affects the distribution of H. pylori in the stomach. We found that stomach acid controls not only the overall bacterial density, but also the microscopic distribution of bacteria that colonize the epithelium deep in the gastric glands. In omeprazole treated animals, bacterial abundance is increased in the antral glands, and gland colonization range is extended to the corpus. Our findings indicate that H. pylori has evolved at least two independent receptors capable of detecting acid gradients, allowing not only survival in the stomach, but also controlling the interaction of the bacteria with the epithelium. PMID:28103315

  11. What Do We Do about Helicobacter pylori?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Hawkey

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs cause ulcers by different mechanisms. Under some circumstances, patients infected with H pylori may be less prone to NSAID-associated ulcers than those who are H pylori-negative. Eradication trials have yielded differing results. However, those who have studied patients who have a past history of ulcer disease and are already established on NSAIDs have shown no benefit from H pylori eradication.

  12. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haim Shmuely; Noam Domniz; Jacob Yahav

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro antiHelicobacter pylori(H.pylori)activity,but are less effective in vivo.The anti-H.pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane,anti-adhesion,inhibition of bacterial enzymes andbacterial grown.We,herein,review treatment effects of cranberry,garlic,curcumin,ginger and pistacia gum against H.pylori in both in vitro,animal studies and in vivo studies.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Children With Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefichaijan; Mosayebi; Sharafkhah; Kahbazi; Heydarbagi; Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have reported an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization and the occurrence of asthma or other allergies. However, data are inconsistent, and few studies have been performed in children. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate H. pylori seropositivity in children with and without asthma. Patients and Methods This cross-sect...

  14. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces th...... vaccine for H. pylori that will represent a novel and very important bullet against both infection and gastric cancer....

  15. Helicobacter pylori filtrate impairs spatial learning and memory in rats and increases β-amyloid by enhancing expression of presenilin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Lian eWang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection is related with a high risk of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, but the intrinsic link between H.pylori infection and AD development is still missing. In the present study, we explored the effect of H.pylori infection on cognitive function and β-amyloid production in rats. We found that intraperitoneal injection of H.pylori filtrate induced spatial learning and memory deficit in rats with a simultaneous retarded dendritic spine maturation in hippocampus. Injection of H.pylori filtrate significantly increased Aβ42 both in the hippocampus and cortex, together with an increased level of presenilin-2 (PS-2, one key component of γ-secretase involved in Aβ production. Incubation of H.pylori filtrate with N2a cells which over-express APP also resulted in increased PS-2 expression and Aβ42 overproduction. Injection of Escherichia coli (E.coli filtrate, another common intestinal bacterium, had no effect on cognitive function in rats and Aβ production in rats and cells. These data suggest a specific effect of H.pylori on cognition and Aβ production. We conclude that soluble surface fractions of H.pylori may promote Aβ42 formation by enhancing the activity of γ-secretase, thus induce cognitive impairment through interrupting the synaptic function.

  16. Lactobacillus acidophilus ameliorates H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inactivating the Smad7 and NFκB pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yao-Jong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background H. pylori infection may trigger Smad7 and NFκB expression in the stomach, whereas probiotics promote gastrointestinal health and improve intestinal inflammation caused by pathogens. This study examines if probiotics can improve H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inactivating the Smad7 and NFκB pathways. Results Challenge with H. pylori increased IL-8 and TNF-α expressions but not TGF-β1 in MKN45 cells. The RNA levels of Smad7 in AGS cells increased after H. pylori infection in a dose-dependent manner. A higher dose (MOI 100 of L. acidophilus pre-treatment attenuated the H. pylori-induced IL-8 expressions, but not TGF-β1. Such anti-inflammatory effect was mediated via increased cytoplasmic IκBα and depletion of nuclear NFκB. L. acidophilus also inhibited H. pylori-induced Smad7 transcription by inactivating the Jak1 and Stat1 pathways, which might activate the TGF-β1/Smad pathway. L. acidophilus pre-treatment ameliorated IFN-γ-induced Smad7 translation level and subsequently reduced nuclear NF-κB production, as detected by western blotting. Conclusions H. pylori infection induces Smad7, NFκB, IL-8, and TNF-α production in vitro. Higher doses of L. acidophilus pre-treatment reduce H. pylori-induced inflammation through the inactivation of the Smad7 and NFκB pathways.

  17. Impact of Helicobacter pylori on the healing process of the gastric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnich, Eliza; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicińska, Paulina; Hinc, Krzysztof; Obuchowski, Michał; Gajewski, Adrian; Moran, Anthony P; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the impact of selected well defined Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antigens on gastric barrier cell turnover. METHODS In this study, using two cellular models of gastric epithelial cells and fibroblasts, we have focused on exploring the effects of well defined H. pylori soluble components such as glycine acid extract antigenic complex (GE), subunit A of urease (UreA), cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on cell turnover by comparing the wound healing capacity of the cells in terms of their proliferative and metabolic activity as well as cell cycle distribution. Toxic effects of H. pylori components have been assessed in an association with damage to cell nuclei and inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. RESULTS We showed that H. pylori GE, CagA and UreA promoted regeneration of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which is necessary for effective tissue healing. However, in vivo increased proliferative activity of these cells may constitute an increased risk of gastric neoplasia. In contrast, H. pylori LPS showed a dose-dependent influence on the process of wound healing. At a low concentration (1 ng/mL) H. pylori LPS accelerated of healing epithelial cells, which was linked to significantly enhanced cell proliferation and MTT reduction as well as lack of alterations in cell cycle and downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) production as well as cell nuclei destruction. By comparison, H. pylori LPS at a high concentration (25 ng/mL) inhibited the process of wound repair, which was related to diminished proliferative activity of the cells, cell cycle arrest, destruction of cell nuclei and downregulation of the EGF/STAT3 signalling pathway. CONCLUSION In vivo H. pylori LPS driven effects might lead to the maintenance of chronic inflammatory response and pathological disorders on the level of the gastric mucosal barrier. PMID:27672275

  18. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A pro-inflammatory role for Th22 cells in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Cheng, Ping; Liu, Xiao-fei; Peng, Liu-sheng; Li, Bo-sheng; Wang, Ting-ting; Chen, Na; Li, Wen-hua; Shi, Yun; Chen, Weisan; Pang, Ken C; Zeng, Ming; Mao, Xu-hu; Yang, Shi-ming; Guo, Hong; Guo, Gang; Liu, Tao; Zuo, Qian-fei; Yang, Hui-jie; Yang, Liu-yang; Mao, Fang-yuan; Lv, Yi-pin; Zou, Quan-ming

    2015-09-01

    Helper T (Th) cell responses are critical for the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis. Th22 cells represent a newly discovered Th cell subset, but their relevance to H. pylori-induced gastritis is unknown. Flow cytometry, real-time PCR and ELISA analyses were performed to examine cell, protein and transcript levels in gastric samples from patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Gastric tissues from interleukin (IL)-22-deficient and wild-type (control) mice were also examined. Tissue inflammation was determined for pro-inflammatory cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory protein production. Gastric epithelial cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were isolated, stimulated and/or cultured for Th22 cell function assays. Th22 cells accumulated in gastric mucosa of both patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Th22 cell polarisation was promoted via the production of IL-23 by dendritic cells (DC) during H. pylori infection, and resulted in increased inflammation within the gastric mucosa. This inflammation was characterised by the CXCR2-dependent influx of MDSCs, whose migration was induced via the IL-22-dependent production of CXCL2 by gastric epithelial cells. Under the influence of IL-22, MDSCs, in turn, produced pro-inflammatory proteins, such as S100A8 and S100A9, and suppressed Th1 cell responses, thereby contributing to the development of H. pylori-associated gastritis. This study, therefore, identifies a novel regulatory network involving H. pylori, DCs, Th22 cells, gastric epithelial cells and MDSCs, which collectively exert a pro-inflammatory effect within the gastric microenvironment. Efforts to inhibit this Th22-dependent pathway may therefore prove a valuable strategy in the therapy of H. pylori-associated gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Effect of the Vacuolation of Helicobacter Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic test in vitro combined with cytochemical stain, fluorescent stain, transmission electronmicrograph was used to study the vacuolated effect by helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) (Toxin+) and its pathological mechanism. 78.26 % patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori was infected with H.pylori (Toxin+), while 42.86 % patients with gastritis was infected with H.pylori (Toxin+). It was positive in vacuole with acridine orange and acid phosphatase stain. Transmission electronmicrograph of vacuole revealed the presence of abounding membrane. There was a closed relationship between infection with H.pylori (Toxin+) and peptic ulcer disease. The vacuole induced by H.pylori (Toxin+) was autophagosome, which was pathological phenomenon induced by toxin.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been linked to peptic ulcer disease, gastric lymphoma, and gastric carcinoma. Apart from its well-demonstrated role in gastroduodenal diseases, some authors have suggested a potential role of Helicobacter pylori infection in several extra-intestinal pathologies including haematological, cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic, autoimmune, and dermatological diseases. Some studies suggest an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and skin diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria and rosacea. There have also been few case reports documenting association between Helicobacter pylori and psoriasis vulgaris, Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases; most of the studies do not show relevant relationships of these diseases with Helicobacter pylori infections. This review discusses skin diseases that are believed to be associated with Helicobacter pylori.

  2. Potential mechanism of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in Helicobacter pylori-positive patients with GERD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hagiwara, Tadashi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-14

    The long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) exacerbates corpus atrophic gastritis in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. To identify a potential mechanism for this change, we discuss interactions between pH, bile acids, and H. pylori. Duodenogastric reflux, which includes bile, occurs in healthy individuals, and bile reflux is increased in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diluted human plasma and bile acids have been found to be significant chemoattractants and chemorepellents, respectively, for the bacillus H. pylori. Although only taurine conjugates, with a pKa of 1.8-1.9, are soluble in an acidic environment, glycine conjugates, with a pKa of 4.3-5.2, as well as taurine-conjugated bile acids are soluble in the presence of PPI therapy. Thus, the soluble bile acid concentrations in the gastric contents of patients with GERD after continuous PPI therapy are considerably higher than that in those with intact acid production. In the distal stomach, the high concentration of soluble bile acids is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori. In contrast, the mucous layer in the proximal stomach has an optimal bile concentration that forms chemotactic gradients with plasma components required to direct H. pylori to the epithelial surface. H. pylori may then colonize in the stomach body rather than in the pyloric antrum, which may explain the occurrence of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in H. pylori-positive patients with GERD.

  3. Rebamipide, a novel antiulcer agent, attenuates Helicobacter pylori induced gastric mucosal cell injury associated with neutrophil derived oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Miura, S; Mori, M; Kai, A; Suzuki, H; Fukumura, D; Suematsu, M; Tsuchiya, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a novel antiulcer compound, on Helicobacter pylori activated neutrophil dependent in vitro gastric epithelial cell injury was investigated. Luminol dependent chemiluminescence (ChL), which detects toxic oxidants from neutrophils exhibited a 12-fold increase when the bacterial suspension of H pylori was added to the isolated human neutrophils. This change was significantly attenuated by rebamipide at a concentration less than 1 mM, showing that rebamipide may inhibit oxidant production from H pylori elicited neutrophils. To assess whether rebamipide attenuates gastric mucosal injury, we tested its inhibitory action on H pylori induced gastric mucosal damage associated with neutrophils in vitro. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were monolayered in culture wells and coincubated with human neutrophils and H pylori, and the cytotoxicity index was then calculated. Cultured gastric cells were significantly damaged when they were incubated with human neutrophils activated by H pylori. This cellular damage was attenuated by rebamipide in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, spectrophotometrical measurement showed that rebamipide (1 mM) inhibits urease activity by 21.7%. As monochloramine (an oxidant yielded by reaction of neutrophil derived chlorinated oxidant and ammonia) is proposed as an important toxic molecule in this model, the current findings suggest that the preventive effect of rebamipide on H pylori elicited neutrophil induced gastric mucosal injury may result from its inhibitory actions on the neutrophilic oxidative burst as well as H pylori derived urease activity. PMID:7959190

  4. Astaxanthin and β-carotene in Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Inflammation: A Mini-review on Action Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a dominant bacterium living in the human gastric tissues. In H. pylori-infected tissues, the infiltrated inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to gastric inflammation with production of various mediators. According to numerous epidemiological studies, dietary carotenoids may prevent gastric inflammation due to their antioxidant properties. Recent studies showed that antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of astaxanthin and β-carotene may contribute to inhibition of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation. Astaxanthin changes H. pylori-induced activation of T helper cell type 1 response towards T helper cell type 2 response in the infected tissues. Astaxanthin inhibits the growth of H. pylori. Even though astaxanthin reduces H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation, it does not reduce cytokine levels in the infected tissues. β-Carotene suppresses ROS-mediated inflammatory signaling, including mitogen-activated protein kinases and redox-sensitive transcription factors, and reduces expression of inflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in the infected tissues. Therefore, consumption of astaxanthin- and β-carotene-rich foods may be beneficial to prevent H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation. This review will summarize anti-inflammatory mechanisms of astaxanthin and β-carotene in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation.

  5. Nickel trafficking system responsible for urease maturation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Rui-Guang; Wang, Dong-Xian; Hao, Ming-Cong; Sun, Xue-Song

    2013-12-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a common human pathogen responsible for various gastric diseases. This bacterium relies on the production of urease and hydrogenase to inhabit the acidic environment of the stomach. Nickel is an essential cofactor for urease and hydrogenase. H. pylori has to uptake sufficient nickel ions for the maturation of urease, and on the other way, to prevent the toxic effects of excessive nickel ions. Therefore, H. pylori has to strike a delicate balance between the import of nickel ions, its efficient intracellular storage, and delivery to nickel-dependent metalloenzymes when required. The assembly and maturation of the urease enzyme is a complex and timely ordered process, requiring various regulatory, uptake, chaperone and accessory proteins. In this review, we focus on several nickel trafficking proteins involved in urease maturation: NikR, NixA, HypAB, UreEFGH, HspA, Hpn and Hpnl. The work will deepen our understanding of how this pathogenic bacterium adapts to severe habitant environments in the host.

  6. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

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    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  7. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. A diagnosis of infection is thus an important part of a treatment strategy of many gastrointestinal tract diseases. Many diagnostic tests are available but all have some limitations in different clinical situations and laboratory settings. A single gold standard cannot available, but be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in daily clinical practice in all areas, so several techniques have been developed to give reliable results, especially focusing on real time endoscopic features. The narrow band imaging system (NBI) and high resolution endoscopy are imaging techniques for enhanced visualization of infected mucosa and premalignant gastric lesions. The aim of this article is to review the current diagnostic options and possible future developments detection of Helicobacter pylori infection.

  8. Cytotoxic isolates of Helicobacter pylori from Peptic Ulcer Diseases decrease K+-dependent ATPase Activity in HeLa cells

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    Archana Ayyagari

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a Gram negative bacterium that plays a central role in the etiology of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases. However, not all H. pylori positive cases develop advanced disease. This discriminatory behavior has been attributed to the difference in virulence of the bacteria. Among all virulence factors, cytotoxin released by H. pylori is the most important factor. In this work, we studied variation in H. pylori isolates from Indian dyspeptic patients on the basis of cytotoxin production and associated changes in K+-dependent ATPase (one of its targets enzyme activity in HeLa cells. Methods The patients were retrospectively grouped on the basis of endoscopic and histopathological observation as having gastritis or peptic ulcer. The HeLa cells were incubated with the broth culture filtrates (BCFs of H. pylori isolates from patients of both groups and observed for the cytopathic effects: morphological changes and viability. In addition, the K+-dependent ATPase activity was measured in HeLa cells extracts. Results The cytotoxin production was observed in 3/7 (gastritis and 4/4 (peptic ulcer H. pylori isolates. The BCFs of cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains reduced the ATPase activity of HeLa cells to 40% of that measured with non-cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains (1.33 μmole Pi/mg protein and 3.36 μmole Pi/mg protein, respectively, p Conclusions Our results suggest that the isolation of cytotoxic H. pylori is more common in severe form of acid peptic diseases (peptic ulcer than in gastritis patients from India. Also the cytotoxin released by H. pylori impairs the ion-transporting ATPase and is a measure of cytotoxicity.

  9. In Vitro Comparison of the Antimicrobial Effect of Turmeric and Cinnamon Water and Ether Extracts on the Growth Rate of Helicobacter Pylori

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    E Norizadeh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, it has been known that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is causative agent of the most common GI infection in world; at least half of the populations of many communities are affected by this bacterium. H. pylori infection plays an important role in progression of gastritis and especially in the peptic ulcers of duodenum. Eradication of H. pylori has lead to a significant decrease in the prevalence of PUD world-wide. At present, due to various reasons, such as to overcome bacterial resistances, it seems that the investigation for production of new antibacterial products is a necessity. So, this study was designed to evaluate the "in vitro" inhibitory effects of ether and water extracts of turmeric and cinnamon on the growth of H. pylori. Methods: Ether and water extracts of Turmeric and cinnamon was investigated by agar dilution and disc diffusion methods on five strains of H. pylori. Results: Ether and water extracts obtained from the studied plants have antibacterial effects and water extract of turmeric represented the most potent antibacterial effect. Conclusion: The results showed that the investigated plants have antibacterial capacity; in this case, cinnamon water extracts have a considerable antibacterial effect on H. pylori. Therefore, more investigation on this plant is recommended, by extraction of its effective materials. Abbreviations: H. pylori, Helicobacter pylori; ASR, age standardized rate; MIC, minimum inhibitory concentration; GI, gastrointestinal; PUD, peptic ulcer disease; DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid

  10. Presence of Helicobacter pylori in a Mexican Pre-Columbian Mummy

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    Cerbón Marco A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies showed that Helicobacter pylori existed in the New World prior to the arrival of Columbus. The purpose of the present study was to detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori in pre-Columbian mummies from Northern Mexico. Methods Six samples were studied (four samples of gastric remains, tongue-soft palate, and brain remained as negative controls from two of the six naturally mummified corpses studied (adult male and infant male. Samples were taken from tissues suitable for DNA amplification by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR. DNA was extracted and H. pylori detection was carried out by PCR and hybridized with the pHp probe from 16S rRNA gene. The purified PCR products were cloned and sequenced in both directions. DNA sequences were analyzed with ALIGN and BLAST software. A second amplification was performed using ureB gene by real-time PCR. Results From four samples of gastric remnant, only two were H. pylori-positive for amplification of a 109 bp DNA fragment; the remaining two were negative, as were the tongue-soft palate and the brain biopsies as well. These PCR products were hybridized with a pHp probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed homology with H. pylori in 98 of 99% when compared with the gene bank nucleotide sequence. Only one sample of gastric remnant H. pylori-positive with 16S rRNA gene was also positive for ureB gene from H. pylori. Conclusion This data supported infection with H. pylori in Mexican pre-Columbian mummies dating from approximately 1,350 AC.

  11. Enterohepatic Helicobacter other than Helicobacter pylori

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    Beatriz Mateos Muñoz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Helicobacter genus includes Gram negative bacteria which were originally considered to belong to the Campylobacter genus. They have been classified in a separate genus since 1989 because they have different biochemical characteristics, with more than 24 species having been identified and more still being studied. H. pylori is the best known. It has an important etiopathogenic role in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Enterohepatic Helicobacter s (EHH other than H. pylori colonize the bowel, biliary tree and liver of animals and human beings with pathogenic potential. The difficulties existing to correctly isolate these microorganisms limit the description of their true prevalence and of the diseases they cause. Many studies have tried to discover the different clinical implications of EHH. Diseases like chronic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, hepatocarcinoma, autoimmune hepatobiliary disease, biliary lithiasis, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, Meckel's diverticulum, acute appendicitis and inflammatory bowel disease have been related with different EHH species with different results, although their prevalence is greater than in healthy subjects. However, these data are currently not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Finally, the best known role of EHH in bowel disease is production of acute and chronic diarrhea pictures initially referred to as Campylobacter. H. pullorum has been identified in patients with acute gastroenteritis. The correct identification of EHH as producers of infectious gastroenteritis is found in its antibiotic susceptibility. It is generally macrolide-susceptible and quinolone-resistant.

  12. Dispepsia ed Helicobacter pylori

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    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Helicobacter pylori (HP eradication on functional dyspepsia has been analysed in several clinical trials, including large, controlled and well-designed studies as well as small, flowed studies. The results of these studies indicate that HP infection does not play a major role in the aetiology of this disease and that HP eradication improves dyspeptic symptoms in no more than 15% of patients as compared to placebo. From a practical point of view 15 patients need to be treated for one to benefit while, in duodenal ulcer, 1.4 patient need to be treated for one to benefit. It remains to be elucidated if HP eradication in functional dyspepsia is useful to reduce the risk of developing organic dyspepsia (namely peptic ulcer in functional dyspepsia. In uninvestigated dyspepsia the management of HP infection in primary care has been fully debated.Two therapeutics strategies have been proposed: test and scope and test and treat. The value of test and treat strategy over alternative strategies has been demonstrated in several decision analyses. HP test and scope increases costs in primary care without improving symptoms and saves only 15% of endoscopies.

  13. VacA, CagA, IceA and OipA Genotype Status of Helicobacter pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A total of 240 gastric biopsy samples were taken from 240 dogs using .... epidemiological aspects of H. pylori in pets and ..... are usually fed healthy and probably cooked .... isolated from raw milk and unpasteurized dairy products.

  14. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide is synthesized via a novel pathway with an evolutionary connection to protein N-glycosylation.

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    Isabelle Hug

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a major component on the surface of Gram negative bacteria and is composed of lipid A-core and the O antigen polysaccharide. O polysaccharides of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori contain Lewis antigens, mimicking glycan structures produced by human cells. The interaction of Lewis antigens with human dendritic cells induces a modulation of the immune response, contributing to the H. pylori virulence. The amount and position of Lewis antigens in the LPS varies among H. pylori isolates, indicating an adaptation to the host. In contrast to most bacteria, the genes for H. pylori O antigen biosynthesis are spread throughout the chromosome, which likely contributed to the fact that the LPS assembly pathway remained uncharacterized. In this study, two enzymes typically involved in LPS biosynthesis were found encoded in the H. pylori genome; the initiating glycosyltransferase WecA, and the O antigen ligase WaaL. Fluorescence microscopy and analysis of LPS from H. pylori mutants revealed that WecA and WaaL are involved in LPS production. Activity of WecA was additionally demonstrated with complementation experiments in Escherichia coli. WaaL ligase activity was shown in vitro. Analysis of the H. pylori genome failed to detect a flippase typically involved in O antigen synthesis. Instead, we identified a homolog of a flippase involved in protein N-glycosylation in other bacteria, although this pathway is not present in H. pylori. This flippase named Wzk was essential for O antigen display in H. pylori and was able to transport various glycans in E. coli. Whereas the O antigen mutants showed normal swimming motility and injection of the toxin CagA into host cells, the uptake of DNA seemed to be affected. We conclude that H. pylori uses a novel LPS biosynthetic pathway, evolutionarily connected to bacterial protein N-glycosylation.

  15. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  16. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanggang; Wulan, Hasi; Song, Zongchang; Paik, Paul A; Tsao, Ming L; Goodman, Gary M; MacEachern, Paul T; Downey, Robert S; Jankowska, Anna J; Rabinowitz, Yaron M; Learch, Thomas B; Song, David Z; Yuan, Ji J; Zheng, Shihang; Zheng, Zhendong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  17. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

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    Guanggang Li

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  18. The influence of mucus microstructure and rheology in H. pylori infection

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    Rama eBansil

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has evolved to survive in the highly acidic environment of the stomach and colonize on the epithelial surface of the gastric mucosa. Its pathogenic effects are well known to cause gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In order to infect the stomach and establish colonies on the mucus epithelial surface, the bacterium has to move across the gel-like gastric mucus lining of the stomach under acidic conditions. In this review we address the question of how the bacterium gets past the protective mucus barrier from a biophysical perspective. We begin by reviewing the molecular structure of gastric mucin and discuss the current state of understanding concerning mucin polymerization and low pH induced gelation. We then focus on the viscoelasticity of mucin in view of its relevance to the transport of particles and bacteria across mucus, the key first step in H. pylori infection. The second part of the review focuses on the motility of H. pylori in mucin solutions and gels, and how infection with H. pylori in turn impacts the viscoelastic properties of mucin. We present recent microscopic results tracking the motion of H. pylori in mucin solutions and gels. We then discuss how the biochemical strategy of urea hydrolysis required for survival in the acid is also relevant to the mechanism that enables flagella driven swimming across the mucus gel layer. Other aspects of the influence of H. pylori infection such as, altering gastric mucin expression, its rate of production and its composition, and the influence of mucin on factors controlling H. pylori virulence and proliferation are briefly discussed with references to relevant literature.

  19. [A single strand comformation polymorphism of vacuolating cytotoxin gene in H. pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, H; Pan, G; Chao, S

    1999-03-01

    To use PCR/SSCP analysis of the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) of H. pylori for differentiation of various strains of H. pylori. PCR was performed using the primers amplifing vacA gene of the bacteria embeded in the gastric mucosa of 159 patients with various gastric duodenal diseases. The products of PCR were further processed for SSCP analysis and southern blot hybridization. In the meantime, vacA genes of three different SSCP-patterns from three patients with duodenal ulcers were sequenced. The rate of detection of H. pylori with the method was 100%. vacA1 and vacA2, the two subtypes of vacA, were 76.5% (114/149) and 23.5%(35/149), respectively. Eight different SSCP-patterns were distributed in various gastroduodenal diseases, and that 80% of duodenal ulcers was predominated with B pattern. Sequencing of DNA indicated a diversity of vacA gene structure. PCR/SSCP can be used in the differentiation of different strains of H. pylori in epidemology, and in the follow up study after H. pylori eradication, especially in the differentiation between H. pylori recrudescence and reinfection.

  20. Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Exert Immunostimulatory Effect on H. pylori-Induced Dendritic Cells

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    Małgorzata Wiese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find out if selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains (antagonistic or nonantagonistic against H. pylori in vitro would differ in their abilities to modulate the DCs maturation profiles reflected by their phenotype and cytokine expression patterns. Methods. Monocyte-derived DCs maturation was elicited by their direct exposure to the LAB strains of L. rhamnosus 900 or L. paracasei 915 (antagonistic and nonantagonistic to H. pylori, resp., in the presence or absence of H. pylori strain cagA+. The DCs maturation profile was assessed on the basis of surface markers expression and cytokines production. Results. We observed that the LAB strains and the mixtures of LAB with H. pylori are able to induce mature DCs. At the same time, the L. paracasei 915 leads to high IL-10/IL-12p70 cytokine ratio, in contrast to L. rhamnosus 900. Conclusions. This study showed that the analyzed lactobacilli strains are more potent stimulators of DC maturation than H. pylori. Interestingly from the two chosen LAB strains the antagonistic to H. pylori-L. rhamnosus strain 900 has more proinflammatory and probably antibactericidal properties.

  1. Interplay of the Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori with Toll-Like Receptors

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    Suneesh Kumar Pachathundikandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are crucial for pathogen recognition and downstream signaling to induce effective immunity. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is a paradigm of persistent bacterial infections and chronic inflammation in humans. The chronicity of inflammation during H. pylori infection is related to the manipulation of regulatory cytokines. In general, the early detection of H. pylori by TLRs and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs is believed to induce a regulatory cytokine or chemokine profile that eventually blocks the resolution of inflammation. H. pylori factors such as LPS, HSP-60, NapA, DNA, and RNA are reported in various studies to be recognized by specific TLRs. However, H. pylori flagellin evades the recognition of TLR5 by possessing a conserved N-terminal motif. Activation of TLRs and resulting signal transduction events lead to the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators through activation of NF-κB, MAP kinases, and IRF signaling pathways. The genetic polymorphisms of these important PRRs are also implicated in the varied outcome and disease progression. Hence, the interplay of TLRs and bacterial factors highlight the complexity of innate immune recognition and immune evasion as well as regulated processes in the progression of associated pathologies. Here we will review this important aspect of H. pylori infection.

  2. Involvement of Toll-like receptors on Helicobacter pylori-induced immunity.

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    Romy Käbisch

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a major role in the innate immune response since they recognize a broad repertoire of PAMPs mainly via Toll-like receptors (TLRs. During Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, TLRs have been shown to be important to control cytokine response particularly in murine DCs. In the present study we analyzed the effect of blocking TLRs on human DCs. Co-incubation of human DCs with H. pylori resulted in the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12p70, IL-6 and IL-10. Release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 was predominantly influenced when TLR4 signaling was blocked by adding specific antibodies, suggesting a strong influence on subsequent T cell responses through TLR4 activation on DCs. Co-incubation of H. pylori-primed DC with allogeneic CD4+ T cells resulted in the production of IFN-γ and IL-17A as well as the expression of Foxp3, validating a mixed Th1/Th17 and Treg response in vitro. Neutralization of TLR4 during H. pylori infection resulted in significantly decreased amounts of IL-17A and IFN-γ and reduced levels of Foxp3-expressing and IL-10-secreting T cells. Our findings suggest that DC cytokine secretion induced upon TLR4-mediated recognition of H. pylori influences inflammatory and regulatory T cell responses, which might facilitate the chronic bacterial persistence.

  3. Lack of association between gastric cancer and hopQ alleles in Helicobacter pylori

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    Kazemi Elham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen. The presence of these bacteria in the stomach can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid production. Acute inflammation can directly damage to the peripheral cells that are responsible for the secretion of acid. The risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors (such as cagA. The HopQ is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. This gene has been shown in two types. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQ alleles (types I and II and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies the of patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy individuals were collected. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR for was done for desired genes via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed by PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+ genotypes were determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotypes hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+.

  4. Helicobacter pylori and Its Virulence Factors' Effect on Serum Oxidative DNA Damages in Adults With Dyspepsia

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    Heshmat Shahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter Pylori infection is a common gastrointestinal infection that can cause pathological effects, increase oxidative stress and induce an inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Inflammatory aspects may prompt the production of radical oxygen substance (ROS which may damage cells and release 8-hydroxydyoxyguanosine (8-OHdG to serum. In this study, we evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors and the association between serum level of 8-OHdG, H. pylori infection, and its various virulence factors. The presence of H. pylori and prevalence of cagA, babA and oipA genes in samples were determined by rapid urease test (RUT, histopathological exam (HE and polymerase chain reaction (PCR and oxidative DNA damage situation were assessed by using serum level of 8-OHdG. There was not any direct relation between H. pylori negative and H. pylori oipA+specimens by 8-OHdG serum level (P>0.05. In all clinical observations, the presence of cagA and oipA genes was common. There was a statistical relationship between the presence of cagA, babA factors, and high serum level of 8-OHdG (P<0.05. The presence of cagA and babA virulence factors may be associated with increased serum 8-OHdG in dyspeptic patients and may induce the damage to gastric cells.

  5. Helicobacter pylori and Its Virulence Factors' Effect on Serum Oxidative DNA Damages in Adults With Dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Heshmat; Bahreiny, Rasoul; Reiisi, Somayeh

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter Pylori infection is a common gastrointestinal infection that can cause pathological effects, increase oxidative stress and induce an inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Inflammatory aspects may prompt the production of radical oxygen substance (ROS) which may damage cells and release 8-hydroxydyoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) to serum. In this study, we evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors and the association between serum level of 8-OHdG, H. pylori infection, and its various virulence factors. The presence of H. pylori and prevalence of cagA, babA and oipA genes in samples were determined by rapid urease test (RUT), histopathological exam (HE) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and oxidative DNA damage situation were assessed by using serum level of 8-OHdG. There was not any direct relation between H. pylori negative and H. pylori oipA+specimens by 8-OHdG serum level (P>0.05). In all clinical observations, the presence of cagA and oipA genes was common. There was a statistical relationship between the presence of cagA, babA factors, and high serum level of 8-OHdG (P<0.05). The presence of cagA and babA virulence factors may be associated with increased serum 8-OHdG in dyspeptic patients and may induce the damage to gastric cells.

  6. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  7. Comparison PCR Method and Rapid Urease Test to Detect Helicobacter Pylori in the Gastric Biopsy Tissue Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parastoo Chamanrokh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as a major risk factor in gastric and duodenum ulcers and gastric cancer. Some laboratory tests, such as culture, are not entirely satisfying. The aim of this study is to compare RUT with PCR in identifying H. pylori in the gastric biopsy tissue samples.Materials & Methods: First, the standard H.pylori sample (N:oC30 was provided. primers or the glmM (ureC gene were used In PCR method The PCR test was optimized by sensitivity and specificity methods. Then 100 clinical samples composed of stomach tissue biopsy were prepared. The rapid urease test was conducted on all obtained samples to identify H.pylori. DNA was extracted from samples using DNG plus technique. Then, samples were studied using PCR method.  Results: The 294 bp product was amplified in the optimized PCR test. The PCR test sensitivity was obtained at 10 CFU. Any unwanted products were not seen in the specificity test with the exception of H. pylori DNA samples. Of 100 stomach biopsy samples, 64% were reported as positive by RUT and 76% by the PCR test.Conclusion: Given that the PCR test has higher sensitivity and specificity to detect H.pylori comparing rapid ureaas test, therefore this method could be used to detect H.pylori.  

  8. H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study whether H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis.METHODS:The subjects were divided into three groups:H pylori-infected cholecystitis group,H pylorinegative cholecystitis group and control group.Pathologic changes of the gallbladder were observed by optic and electronic microscopes and the levels of interleukin-1,6 and 8(IL-1,6 and 8)were detected by radioimmunoassay.RESULTS:Histological evidence of chronic cholecystitis including degeneration,necrosis,inflammatory cell infiltration,were found in the region where H pylori-colonized.Levels of IL-1,6 and 8 in gallbladder mucosa homogenates were significantly higher in H pylori-infected cholecystitis group than those in H pylori-negative cholecystitis group and control group.CONCLUSION:H pylori infection may be related to cholecystitis.

  9. Ammonium Metabolism Enzymes Aid Helicobacter pylori Acid Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori possesses a highly active urease to support acid tolerance. Urea hydrolysis occurs inside the cytoplasm, resulting in the production of NH3 that is immediately protonated to form NH4+. This ammonium must be metabolized or effluxed because its presence within the cell is counterproductive to the goal of raising pH while maintaining a viable proton motive force (PMF). Two compatible hypotheses for mitigating intracellular ammonium toxicity include (i) th...

  10. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori urease with non and semi fermented Camellia sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoae Hassani A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent in duodenal and peptic ulcers. The growing problem of antibiotic resistance by the organism demands the search for novel compounds, especially from natural sources. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Camellia sinensis extracts on the urease enzyme that is a major colonization factor for H. pylori. Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations of nonfermented and semifermented C. sinensis methanol: water extracts were assessed by broth dilution method. Examination of the urease function was performed by Mc Laren method, and urease production was detected on 12% SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from whole cell and membrane bound proteins. Results: Both extracts had inhibitory effects against H. pylori and urease production. At a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml of nonfermented extract and 3.5 mg/ml of semifermented extract the production of Ure A and Ure B subunits of the urease enzyme were inhibited completely. A concentration of 4 mg/ml of nonfermented and 5.5 mg/ml of semifermented extract were bactericidal for H. pylori. Conclusions: C. sinensis extracts, especially the nonfermented, could reduce H. pylori population and inhibit urease production at lower concentrations. The superior effect of nonfermented extract is due to its rich polyphenolic compounds and catechin contents.

  11. Helicobacter Pylori Seropostivity of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tugba Kos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Until now many researches have showed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be etiological factor of colorectal cancer. The aim of current study was to investigate the frequency of H.pylori infection seropositivity of colorectal cancer patients and compare the clinicopathological features of H.pylori positive patients with negative ones. Material and Method: Seventy four colorectal patients were included in study. Retrospectively, patients clinical features, surgery history and pathological characteristics were screened. Patients group serum samples were collected. H.pylori Ig G level were quantitatively measured with ELISA method and levels above 5 arbU/ml were accepted as seropositive. Results: Patients median age was 60.5 ( range 26-83 and 56.8% (n=42 were male. H.pylori Ig G was positive in 37.8% (n=28 and negative in 62.2% (n=46 of patient group. H.pylori serpositive and negative patients median age of diagnosis were 56 and 64 respectively (p=0.01. There were no significant difference between H.pylori seropositive group when compared with negative group according to age, level of CEA and Ca 19-9, stage, lymph node involvement, perineural and vascular invasion, presence of polyps, differantion, localisation of tumours. Discussion: H.pylori seropositive patients were diagnosed at younger age. Association of this finding with etiology was confusing. Further studies with healthy controls may provide detailed information about whether H.pylori seropositivity is associated with colorectal cancer etiology.

  12. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  13. 3rd Brazilian Consensus on Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga; Maguinilk, Ismael; Zaterka, Schlioma; Parente, José Miguel; do Carmo Friche Passos, Maria; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2013-04-01

    Signicant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  14. Increased Outer Membrane Vesicle Formation in a Helicobacter pylori tolB Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lorinda; Praszkier, Judyta; Hutton, Melanie L; Steer, David; Ramm, Georg; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria; Ferrero, Richard L

    2015-08-01

    Multiple studies have established the importance of the tol-pal gene cluster in bacterial cell membrane integrity and outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in Escherichia coli. In contrast, the functions of Tol-Pal proteins in pathogenic organisms, including those of the Epsilonproteobacteria, remain poorly if at all defined. The aim of this study was to characterize the roles of two key components of the Tol-Pal system, TolB and Pal, in OMV formation in the pathogenic bacterium, Helicobacter pylori. H. pylori ΔtolB, Δpal and ΔtolBpal mutants, as well as complemented strains, were generated and assessed for changes in morphology and OMV production by scanning electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), respectively. The protein content and pro-inflammatory properties of OMVs were determined by mass spectroscopy and interleukin-8 (IL-8) ELISA on culture supernatants from OMV-stimulated cells, respectively. H. pylori ΔtolB and Δpal bacteria exhibited aberrant cell morphology and/or flagella biosynthesis. Importantly, the disruption of H. pylori tolB but not pal resulted in a significant increase in OMV production. The OMVs from H. pylori ΔtolB and Δpal bacteria harbored many of the major outer membrane and virulence proteins observed in wild-type (WT) OMVs. Interestingly, ΔtolB, Δpal and ΔtolBpal OMVs induced significantly higher levels of IL-8 production by host cells, compared with WT OMVs. This work demonstrates that TolB and Pal are important for membrane integrity in H. pylori. Moreover, it shows how H. pylori tolB-pal genes may be manipulated to develop "hypervesiculating" strains for vaccine purposes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein as target for new drugs against H.pylori inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodora Choli-Papadopoulou; Filippos Kottakis; Georgios Papadopoulos; Stefanos Pendas

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is among the most common human infections and the major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Within this work we present the implication of C-terminal region of H. pylori neutrophil activating protein in the stimulation of neutrophil activation as well as the evidence that the C-terminal region of H. pylori activating protein is indispensable for neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, a step necessary to H. pylori inflammation. In addition we show that arabino galactan proteins derived from chios mastic gum, the natural resin of the plant Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia inhibit neutrophil activation in vitro .

  16. Helicobacter pylori: epidemiology and routes of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L M

    2000-01-01

    H. pylori is a common bacterium, and approximately 50 percent of the world's population has been estimated to be infected (198). Humans are the principal reservoir. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, race, ethnicity, and SES. Rates appear to be higher in developing than in developed countries, with most of the infections occurring during childhood, and they seem to be decreasing with improvements in hygiene practices. H. pylori causes chronic gastritis and has been associated with several serious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer. Since its "discovery" in 1982 by Warren and Marshall (1), H. pylori has been the topic of extensive research. A number of studies have used questionnaire components to investigate factors possibly related to the etiology of H. pylori infection. The majority of recent studies have not found tobacco use or alcohol consumption to be risk factors for H. pylori infection. Adequate nutritional status, especially frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables and of vitamin C, appears to protect against infection with H. pylori. In contrast, food prepared under less than ideal conditions or exposed to contaminated water or soil may increase the risk. Overall, inadequate sanitation practices, low social class, and crowded or high-density living conditions seem to be related to a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection. This finding suggests that poor hygiene and crowded conditions may facilitate transmission of infection among family members and is consistent with data on intrafamilial and institutional clustering of H. pylori infection. Understanding the route of H. pylori transmission is important if public health measures to prevent its spread are to be implemented. Iatrogenic transmission of H. pylori following endoscopy is the only proven mode. For the general population, the most likely mode of transmission is from person to person, by either the

  17. Spermine oxidase is a regulator of macrophage host response to Helicobacter pylori: enhancement of antimicrobial nitric oxide generation by depletion of spermine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P; Frye, Jeanetta W; Casero, Robert A; Wilson, Keith T

    2014-03-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. We have reported that in H. pylori-activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) can kill the bacterium, iNOS protein expression is dependent on uptake of its substrate L-arginine (L-Arg), the polyamine spermine can inhibit iNOS translation by inhibiting L-Arg uptake, and inhibition of polyamine synthesis enhances NO-mediated bacterial killing. Because spermine oxidase (SMO), which back-converts spermine to spermidine, is induced in macrophages by H. pylori, we determined its role in iNOS-dependent host defense. SMO shRNA knockdown in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resulted in a marked decrease in H. pylori-stimulated iNOS protein, but not mRNA expression, and a 90% reduction in NO levels; NO production was also inhibited in primary murine peritoneal macrophages with SMO knockdown. There was an increase in spermine levels after H. pylori stimulation that rapidly decreased, while SMO knockdown caused a greater increase in spermine that was sustained. With SMO knockdown, L-Arg uptake and killing of H. pylori by macrophages was prevented. The overexpression of SMO by transfection of an expression plasmid prevented the H. pylori-stimulated increase in spermine levels, and led to increased L-Arg uptake, iNOS protein expression and NO production, and H. pylori killing. In two human monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP-1, overexpression of SMO caused a significant enhancement of NO production with H. pylori stimulation. By depleting spermine, SMO can abrogate the inhibitory effect of polyamines on innate immune responses to H. pylori by enhancing antimicrobial NO production.

  18. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John K C

    2016-01-14

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization.

  19. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  20. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Vania; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Touati, Eliette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the most commonly found infection in the world's population. It is the major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Numerous studies published over the last year provide new insights into the strategies employed by H. pylori to adapt to the extreme acidic conditions of the gastric environment, to establish persistent infection and to deregulate host functions, leading to gastric pathogenesis and cancer. In this review, we report recent data on the mechanisms involved in chemotaxis, on the essential role of nickel in acid resistance and gastric colonization, on the importance of adhesins and Hop proteins and on the role of CagPAI-components and CagA. Among the host functions, a special focus has been made on the escape from immune response, the ability of bacteria to induce genetic instability and modulate telomeres, the mechanism of autophagy and the deregulation of micro RNAs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Immune response to H pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes; Ellen J Beswick

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer,attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium.

  2. Monitoring bacterial processes by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy : Helicobacter pylori drug inactivation and plasmid bioproduction in recombinant Escherichia coli cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Teresa; Lopes, Vitor V.; Calado, Cecília R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is evaluated as a tool to monitor two bacterial processes: strain discrimination and drug inactivation studies with the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori and the plasmid production process based on high-density cultures of recombinant Escherichia coli. Results show, that after evaluation of different incubation conditions of H.pylori with the drug model, the application of principal component analysis to the FTIR spectra assembles the samples ...

  3. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane protein Q allele distribution is associated with distinct pathologies in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Khan, Rustam; Salim, Saima Azhar; Awan, Safia; Abrar, Ambar; Jafri, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains expressing outer membrane protein Q (HopQ) promote adherence to the gastric epithelial cell. We characterized HopQ alleles in relation to H. pylori-related disease, histology and virulence markers. Gastric biopsies were obtained at esophagogastroduodenoscopy from patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. H. pylori culture, histology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HopQ types, cagA, cagA-promoter and vacA alleles were performed. DNA extracted was used for PCR. Sequencing of PCR products of HopQ types 1 and 2 was followed by BLAST query. We examined 241 H. pylori isolates. HopQ type 1 was positive in 70 (29%) isolates, type 2 in 60 (25%) isolates, while both type 1 and type 2 in 111 (46%) H. pylori isolates, respectively. Nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was associated with HopQ type 2 in 48 (41%) isolates, while gastric carcinoma (GC) in 37 (53%) (P<0.001) with type 1 isolates. Gastric ulcers (GU) were 39 (46%) (P<0.001) in H. pylori infection with multiple HopQ alleles compared to 6 (23%) in HopQ type 1. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that multiple HopQ alleles were associated with GU OR 2.9 (1.07-7.8) (P=0.03). HopQ type 1 was associated with cagA 58 (84%) (P<0.001) and cagA-promoter 58 (83%) (P<0.001) compared to 14 (23%) and 17 (28%) respectively, in type 2. VacAs1a was associated with HopQ type 1 in 59 (84%) isolates compared to HopQ type 2 in 35 (58%) (P=0.002) isolates. VacAm1 was associated with HopQ type 1 in 53 (76%) isolates compared to HopQ type 2 in 32 (53%) (P=0.004) isolates. H. pylori infection with multiple HopQ alleles was predominant. H. pylori infection with single HopQ type 1 was associated with GC in the presence of other H. pylori virulence markers.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferrit...

  5. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  6. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  7. Helicobacter pylori: From Infection to Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 380 abstracts, presentations and posters of recent advances were highlighted at the European and International Helicobacter pylori meeting held July 7 to 9, 1995 in Edinburgh, Scotland. New advances abound, with major interest focusing on the simple, safe, inexpensive new `gold standard’ for H pylori eradication therapy: a single week of tid omeprazole 20 mg, metronidazole 400 mg and clarithromycin 250 mg, or omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg and clarithromycin 500 mg. To avoid false negative results, two biopsies must be taken from the antrum and two from the gastric body at least four weeks after completion of eradication therapy, and ideally should be supplemented with at least one further H pylori test such as a biopsy for urease activity or culture, or a urea breath test. While most patients with a gastric or duodenal ulcer (DU who do not consume nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are infected with H pylori, the association is much less apparent in those with a DU who present with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. H pylori eradication for nonulcer dyspepsia is not widely recommended, and the patient with a DU given effective H pylori eradication who presents with dyspepsia likely has erosive esophagitis rather than recurrent DU or H pylori. Gastroenterologists are at increased risk of H pylori infection, particularly older gastroenterologists who are very busy endoscopists.

  8. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takahisa; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    It is well known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with many nonmalignant disorders such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric polyp, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin-induced gastric injury, and functional dyspepsia. In 2008, interesting articles on the association of H. pylori infection with these disorders were presented, some of which intended to reveal the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in response to H. pylori infection, and have demonstrated that genetic differences in host and bacterial factors as well as environmental factors account for these differences. A decline in the occurrence of peptic ulcer related to H. pylori was confirmed. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and GERD was also confirmed but the impact of gastric atrophy on the prevention of GERD remained debatable. For NSAID-induced gastric injury, eradication of H. pylori infection has been recommended. During this year, eradication of H. pylori infection was recommended for patients treated with antiplatelet therapy as well as aspirin and NSAID. It was also reported that for patients with functional dyspepsia, eradication of H. pylori offers a modest but significant benefit.

  9. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host. PMID:28652651

  10. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18...

  11. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-06-14

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host.

  12. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang, E-mail: lvguoqiangwuxivip@163.com

    2015-08-07

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity.

  13. Cloning of the Gene Encoding Urease Subunit A in Helicobacter Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施理; 张宜俊; 陈劼; 候晓华

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The gene encoding urease subunit A (ureA) of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was cloned from H. pylori isolate by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sterile distilled water instead of DNA served as negative control. The nucleotide sequence of the amplified product was determined.Homologous analysis of the ureA against that reported by Clayton CL and the GenBank and SwissProt databases were performed with the BLAST program at the Genome Net through the Internet.0.8 kb PCR product was amplified from all H. pylori clinical isolators. The nucleotide sequence of the ureA was determined. The nucleotide sequence of the ureA began with ATG as the initiation codon and terminated in TAA as stop codon. The coding regions had a 44 % G+ C content. The DNA sequence was 98 % homologous to that reported by Clayton CL (688 out of 702 residues were identical). The derived amino-acid sequences of the ureA were 99 % homologous to that reported by Clayton CL (232 out of 234 residues were identical). The nucleotide sequence and the predicted protein showed significant homology to ureA of H. pylori in the NCBI Entrez database.

  14. Photodynamic Treatment versus Antibiotic Treatment on Helicobacter pylori Using RAPD-PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Batanouny, M. H.; Amin, R. M.; Ibrahium, M. K.; El Gohary, S.; Naga, M. I.; Salama, M. S.

    2009-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic bacterial infections in humans and is important in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease, such as duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, Gastric adenocarcinoma, and lymphoma. Gastric adenocarcinoma remains one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of photodynamic treatment and medication treatment of Helicobacter pylori using RAPD-PCR. The lethal photosensitization effect was determined by mixing suspensions of H.pylori with Toluidine blue O (TBO) and plating out on blood agar before irradiation with Helium neon (He-Ne) 632.8 nm. The susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori isolates to metronidazole and azithromycin were examined by E-test. Nine random primers were used to screen genetic polymorphism in DNA of different H.pylori groups. Six of them produced RAPD products while three failed to generate any product. The resulting data showed that, although the overall genetic differences between control groups and laser treated groups was higher than that between control groups and azithromycin treated groups yet it still law genetic variability. The main cause of cell death of PDT using TBO as a photosensitizer was mainly cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane.

  15. Helicobacter pylori therapy:Present and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo; De; Francesco; Enzo; Ierardi; Cesare; Hassan; Angelo; Zullo

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis,peptic ulcer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-lymphoma,and is also involved in carcinogenesis of the stomach.H.pylori treatment still remains a challenge for physicians,since no current first-line therapy is able to cure the infection in all treated patients.Several factors may help in the eradication of therapy failure.We reviewed both bacterial and host factors involved in therapeutic management of the H.pylori infection.In addition,we evaluated data on the most successful therapy regimens-sequential and concomitant therapies-currently available for H.pylori eradication.

  16. Role of Helicobacter pylori in functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colm O'Morain

    2006-01-01

    The aetiology of dyspepsia is unknown in the majority of patients. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) is the cause in a subset of patients. A non invasive test to assess the presence of H pylori is recommended in the management of patients under the age of 50 presenting to a family practitioner with dyspepsia. A urea breath test or a stool antigen test are the most reliable non invasive tests. Eradication of H pylori will reduce the risk to the patient with dyspepsia of developing a peptic ulcer, reduce the complication rate if prescribed nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and later reduce the risk of gastric cancer. The recommended treatment for non ulcer dyspepsia associated with a H pylori infection should be a 10-d course of treatment with a PPI and two antibiotics. Treatment efficacy should be assessed four weeks after completing treatment with a urea breath test or a stool antigen test.

  17. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  18. A Prospective Study of Urinary Prostaglandin E2 Metabolite, Helicobacter pylori Antibodies, and Gastric Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyi; Cai, Hui; Zheng, Wei; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Milne, Ginger; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Li, Hong-Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Epplein, Meira

    2017-05-15

    Previous studies suggest that a stable end-product of prostaglandin E2, the urinary metabolite PGE-M, is associated with colorectal cancer, and 1 study of relatively small sample size found an association with gastric cancer among women. In the present study we further investigate the PGE-M, Helicobacter pylori, and gastric cancer association. The present analysis included 359 prospectively ascertained gastric cancer cases and 700 individually matched controls from the Shanghai Women's and Men's Health Studies. Urinary PGE-M was measured by a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric method. Seropositivity to 15 H. pylori recombinantly expressed fusion proteins was detected by H. pylori multiplex serology. Adjusting for H. pylori, increasing PGE-M was associated with higher risk of gastric cancer (quartile 4 vs 1: odds ratio [OR], 1.76 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.17-2.66], Ptrend = .004). This association remained after excluding those diagnosed within 2 years from sample collection (OR, 1.73 [95% CI, 1.12-2.65], Ptrend = .007). However it was no longer present among individuals with 10 or more years of follow-up (2-4.9 years: OR, 3.15 [95% CI, 1.11-8.91]; 5-9.9 years: OR, 2.23 [95% CI, 1.22-4.06]; ≥10 years: OR, 0.73 [95% CI, .31-1.70]). Compared to H. pylori-negative individuals with below-median PGE-M levels, H. pylori-positive individuals with above-median PGE-M levels had a 5-fold increase in the odds of gastric cancer (OR, 5.08 [95% CI, 2.47-10.43]). In China, higher PGE-M levels may indicate an increased risk of gastric cancer independent of the risk conferred by H. pylori infection status, particularly for cancers diagnosed within 10 years of sample collection.

  19. The gastric acid pocket is attenuated in H. pylori infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David R; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Wirz, Angela A; Orange, Clare; Ballantyne, Stuart A; Going, James J; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2017-09-01

    Gastric acid secretory capacity in different anatomical regions, including the postprandial acid pocket, was assessed in Helicobacter pylori positive and negative volunteers in a Western population. We studied 31 H. pylori positive and 28 H. pylori negative volunteers, matched for age, gender and body mass index. Jumbo biopsies were taken at 11 predetermined locations from the gastro-oesophageal junction and stomach. Combined high-resolution pH metry (12 sensors) and manometry (36 sensors) was performed for 20 min fasted and 90 min postprandially. The squamocolumnar junction was marked with radio-opaque clips and visualised radiologically. Biopsies were scored for inflammation and density of parietal, chief and G cells immunohistochemically. Under fasting conditions, the H. pylori positives had less intragastric acidity compared with negatives at all sensors >1.1 cm distal to the peak lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) pressure (ppylori positives at sensors 2.2, 3.3 and 4.4 cm distal to the peak LES pressure (ppylori positives. The H. pylori positives had a lower density of parietal and chief cells compared with H. pylori negatives in 10 of the 11 gastric locations (ppylori positives were CagA-seropositive and showed a more marked reduction in intragastric acidity and increased mucosal inflammation. In population volunteers, H. pylori positives have reduced intragastric acidity which most markedly affects the postprandial acid pocket. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. A novel chimeric flagellum fused with the multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Lv, Xiaobo; Yang, Jue; Liu, Wei; Yang, Huan; Xi, Tao; Xing, Yingying

    2015-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The eradication of H. pylori might be an effective means of preventing gastric cancer. A dual-antigen epitope and dual-adjuvant vaccine called CTB-UE-CF (CCF) was constructed by combining a multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE with a novel chimeric flagellum (CF) to simultaneously activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5-agonist activity and preserve the immunogenicity of H. pylori flagellum FlaA. The evaluation of efficacy to reduce H. pylori colonization was performed using BALB/c mice by oral immunization with a triple dose of this vaccine strain. Two weeks after the last immunization, mice were sacrificed to determine specific antibody levels and proinflammatory cytokine production. To determine the presence of H. pylori, we detected the number of H. pylori by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and measured the urease activity in the gastric tissue. The results showed that the immunogenicity and mucosal immune responses of CCF performed significantly better than those of CTB-UE. This dual-antigen epitope and dual-adjuvant system might greatly contribute to the development of a safe and efficient therapeutic vaccine for humans against H. pylori infection.

  1. Construction of hpaA gene from a clinical isolate of Helicobacter pylori and identification of fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ya-Fei; Yan, Jie; Li, Li-Wei; Li, Shu-Ping

    2003-07-01

    production in H.pylori infected patients indicate that HpaA is an excellent and ideal antigen for developing H.pylori vaccine.

  2. Helicobacter pylori and pregnancy-related disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaropoli, Simona; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is investigated in gastric diseases even during pregnancy. In particular, this Gram-negative bacterium seems to be associated with hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. During the last decade, the relationship among H. pylori and several extra-gastric diseases strongly emerged in literature. The correlation among H. pylori infection and pregnancy-related disorders was mainly focused on iron deficiency anemia, thrombocytopenia, fetal malformations, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. H. pylori infection may have a role in the pathogenesis of various pregnancy-related disorders through different mechanisms: depletion of micronutrients (iron and vitamin B12) in maternal anemia and fetal neural tube defects; local or systemic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines release and oxidative stress in gastrointestinal disorders and pre-eclampsia; cross-reaction between specific anti-H. pylori antibodies and antigens localized in placental tissue and endothelial cells (pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, miscarriage). Since H. pylori infection is most likely acquired before pregnancy, it is widely believed that hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy could activate latent H. pylori with a negative impact not only on maternal health (nutritional deficiency, organ injury, death), but also on the fetus (insufficient growth, malformation, death) and sometime consequences can be observed later in life. Another important issue addressed by investigators was to determine whether it is possible to transmit H. pylori infection from mother to child and whether maternal anti-H. pylori antibodies could prevent infant’s infection. Studies on novel diagnostic and therapeutic methods for H. pylori are no less important, since these are particularly sensitive topics in pregnancy conditions. It could be interesting to study the possible correlation between H

  3. Inhibitory effect of Raphanobrassica on Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takanori; Wei, Min; Toyoda, Takeshi; Yamano, Shoutaro; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with chronic gastritis and also development of gastric cancer. Raphanobrassica (RB) is an intergeneric hybrid of the genera Raphanus (radish) and Brassica (cabbages) containing appreciable amounts of glucoraphanin (GR) and glucoraphenin (GRe), which are actively hydrolyzed by the enzyme myrosinase to sulforaphane and sulforaphene, respectively. Both of these metabolites exert antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of two freeze-dried products of RB (RB1 and RB2) on H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. Six-week-old male Mongolian gerbils were inoculated orally with H. pylori (ATCC 43504), and 2weeks later were fed diets containing no additives or diets supplemented with 2% RB1 (containing both GR and GRe) or 2% RB2 (containing GR only) for 10weeks. In the RB1, but not the RB2 group, mononuclear cell infiltration, mRNA expression of IL-6, and cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa were significantly suppressed. These results indicate that RB1 containing both GR and GRe exerted significant inhibitory effects on H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils apparently mediated via suppression of IL-6 expression and chronic inflammation.

  4. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Baik Hahm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  5. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Ki Baik, E-mail: hahmkb@gachon.ac.kr [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterology, Gachon Graduate School of Medicine, Gil Hospital, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-25

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  6. Fermented foods: are they tasty medicines for Helicobacter pylori associated peptic ulcer and gastric cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mydhily Nair R B

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases.

  7. Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activity of Isocoumarin Paepalantine: Morphological and Molecular Docking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, João Paulo L; Rodrigues, Ricardo P; Gonçalves, Rita de Cássia R; Kitagawa, Rodrigo R

    2017-05-12

    The Helicobacterpylori bacterium is one of the main causes of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and even gastric cancer. It affects an average of half of the world population. Its difficult eradication depends upon multi-drug therapy. Since its classification as a group 1 carcinogenic by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the importance of H. pylori eradication has obtained a novel meaning. There is considerable interest in alternative therapies for the eradication of H. pylori using compounds from a wide range of natural products. In the present study, we investigated the antibacterial property of the isocoumarin paepalantine against H. pylori and it exhibited significant anti-H. pylori activity at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 128 μg/mL and at a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 256 μg/mL. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed significant morphological changes of the bacterial cell as a response to a sub-MIC of paepalantine, suggesting a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) inhibition. Computational studies were carried out in order to study binding modes for paepalantine in PBP binding sites, exploring the active and allosteric sites. The data from the present study indicates that paepalantine exhibits significant anti-H. pylori activity, most likely by inhibiting membrane protein synthesis.

  8. Campylobacter pylori: clinical, histological, and serological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, C; Bolton, F J; Krypczyk, A M; Temperley, J M; Cairns, S A; Owen, W G; Hutchinson, D N

    1988-01-01

    The presence of Campylobacter pylori, histologically diagnosed gastritis, and antibodies to C pylori were determined in a series of 113 patients undergoing endoscopy. Paired biopsy specimens from the fundus, body, and antrum were collected from 59 patients and from the antrum of 54 patients. The presence of C pylori was confirmed by either culture or silver stain in 30 of 59, 31 of 59, and 54 of 103 biopsy specimens from the fundus, body, and antrum, respectively. Of the specimens which contained C pylori 20 of 30 (66%) from the fundus, 25 of 31 (80%) from the body, and 54 (100%) from the antrum showed gastritis. C pylori and gastritis were shown in seven of nine (78.1%) of patients with gastric ulcers and in nine of 11 (82%) of patients with duodenal ulcers. Using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique to detect IgG antibody to C pylori, all patients with histologically diagnosed gastritis and organisms present had titres of greater than or equal to 640; eight of 39 (21%) of patients without gastritis and without organisms gave similar titres. Hence the presence of C pylori was associated with gastritis and with raised titres of IgG antibody. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:3225334

  9. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  10. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective:to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infection.Methods:Serum soluble antigen of H.pylori was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H.pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test(RUT).histologic examination and serology,Results:The sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46% ,91.07%,91.67% and 76.12%,respectively.The prevalence rate of werum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergong endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT methods(P>0.05).Conclusions:The detection of serum H.pylori soluble antigen(HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate,and convenient,not affected by the memorizing raction of serum antibody;is more sensitive,more specific and suitable for dinical diagriosis,and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H.pylori as well as for detection in children and pregnant women.

  11. Features of Immune Response to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children with Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Kalichevska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The course of bronchial asthma in children is often accompanied by gastrointestinal (GI diseases associated with H.pylori infection. The presence of H.pylori leads to the activation and maintenance of inflammatory process with release of cytokines and mediators of inflammation and subsequent systemic effects. Objective: to study the peculiarities of interferon gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-4, -5 and -13 production as markers of allergic inflammation severity in children with bronchial asthma infected with H.pylori. Materials and methods. There were examined 120 children with bronchial asthma aged 6 to 18 years. Identification of H.pylori was carried out with the help of brea­thing Helic-test (LLC AMA, Russia. Serum concentrations of IFN-γ and IL‑4, -5 and -13 were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay (Diaclone test-kits, France before and 7 days after the end of treatment for GI pathology. Statistical processing was performed using the methods of variation statistics implemented in the software package Statistica 6.1. Results. 78 children with bronchial asthma were diagnosed with GI disease, including 37 cases associated with H.pylori infection. To study the influence of H.pylori on the course of bronchial asthma, children were divided into 3 groups: I group — 37 children with bronchial asthma and GI pathology, infected with H.pylori, II — 41 H.pylori-negative children with bronchial asthma and GI pathology, III — 42 H.pylori-negative children with bronchial asthma without GI disorders. Duration of bronchial asthma in group I was 7.80 ± 0.17 years, in II — 5.90 ± 0.26 years, in group III — 3.90 ± 0.48 years (p < 0.05. The presence of H.pylori infection in children with bronchial asthma was accompanied by lower concentrations of IFN-γ compared to children of group II (8.47 ± 0.14 pg/ml and 9.69 ± 0.32 pg/ml, respectively, p < 0.05. The level of IL‑13 in the blood serum was

  12. Helicobacter pylori and EBV in gastric carcinomas:Methylation status and microsatellite instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adriana; Camargo; Ferrasi; Nídia; Alice; Pinheiro; Silvia; Helena; Barem; Rabenhorst; Otávia; Luisa; Caballero; Maria; Aparecida; Marchesan; Rodrigues; Fabrício; de; Carvalho; Celso; Vieira; de; Souza; Leite; Marcia; Valéria; Pitombeira; Ferreira; Marcos; Aurélio; Pessoa; Barros; Maria; Inês; de; Moura; Campos; Pardini

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To verify the methylation status of CDH1, DAPK, COX2, hMLH1 and CDKN2A genes and to evaluate their association with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-cagA+ and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infections in gastric adenocarcinomas.METHODS: Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay was performed in 89 primary gastric carcinomas (intestinal and diffuse types). Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis was performed using the BAT26 primer set and PCR products were analyzed with the ABI PRISM 3100 Genetic Analyzer using G...

  13. Regulation of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) induced apoptosis by soluble TNF receptors in Helicobacter pylori infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, J; Goto, H.; Arisawa, T.; Niwa, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Nakayama, A.; Mori, N.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a predominant cytokine produced in the gastric mucosa of patients with Helicobacter pylori infection. TNF induces apoptosis in a variety of cells. The soluble TNF receptors (sTNF-Rs) can be divided into sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII, both of which inhibit TNF activity. However, their precise mechanisms remain unclear.
AIM—To investigate the role of sTNF-Rs in H pylori infection.
METHODS—In 40 patients, production of TNF and sTNF-Rs in gastric mucosa was measu...

  14. Dual Roles of Helicobacter pylori NapA in Inducing and Combating Oxidative Stress▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ge; Hong, Yang; Olczak, Adriana; Maier, Susan E.; Maier, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) has been well documented to play roles in human neutrophil recruitment and in stimulating host cell production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). A separate role for NapA in combating oxidative stress within H. pylori was implied by studies of various H. pylori mutant strains. Here, physiological analysis of a napA strain was the approach used to assess the iron-sequestering and stress resistance roles of NapA, its role in preventing oxidative DNA dam...

  15. [Peptic ulcer disease in liver cirrhosis: role of Helicobacter pylori infection and therapeutic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrică, Dana; Constantinescu, R; Drug, V L; Stanciu, C

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer has frequently been associated with liver cirrhosis. The death rate for peptic ulcer in cirrhotics has been reported to be five times higher than in general population. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Different factors have been claimed to be involved, such as alterations in serum gastrin level, gastric acid secretions, mucosal blood flow and decreased prostaglandin production in gastric mucosa. Moreover, Helicobacter pylori infection, when accurately assessed, is detectable in most peptic ulcer cirrhotics. Since the H. pylori infection strongly correlates with peptic ulcer in general population, it is necessary to clarify the role of H. pylori in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer in cirrhosis before eradication can be proposed as a preventive measure.

  16. Persistent colonization of Helicobacter pylori in human gut induces gastroduodenal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Sarker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori are gut bacteria colonize in the epithelial cell lining of the stomach and persist there for long du­ration. Around two-thirds of the world’s populations are infected with H. pylori and cause more than 90 percent of ulcers. The development of persistent inflammation is the main cause of chronic gastritis that finally results in a severe consequence known as stomach cancer. Two major virulence factors cytotoxin-associated gene product (cagA and the vacuolating toxin (vacA are mostly investigated as their close association with gastric carcinoma. In this review, host im­munity against H. pylori infection and their evasion mechanism are intensely explored. It is the fact, that understanding pin point molecular mechanisms of any infection is critical to develop novel strategies to prevent pertinent diseases. .J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(4: 170-176

  17. Dietary and socio-economic factors in relation to Helicobacter pylori re-infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslaw Jarosz; Ewa Rychlik; Magdalena Siuba; Wioleta Respondek; Malgorzata Ry(z)ko-Skiba; Iwona Sajór; Sylwia Gugala; Tomasz Bla(z)ejczyk; Janusz Ciok

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine if dietary and socio-economic factors contribute to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) re-infection.METHODS: The population of patients consisted of subjects in whom H py/or/infection had been successfully treated in the past. Patients were divided into two groups;I-examined group (111 persons with Hpy/or/re-infection) and Ⅱ-control group (175 persons who had not been re-infected). The respondents were interviewed retrospectively on their dietary habits and socio-economic factors.RESULTS: A statistically significant lower frequency of fermented dairy products (P < 0.0001), vegetables (P = 0.02), and fruit (P = 0.008) consumption was noted among patients with H pylori re-infection as compared to those who had not been re-infected.CONCLUSION: High dietary intake of probiotic bacteria, mainly lactobacillus, and antioxidants, mainly vitamin C (contained in fruit and vegetables), might decrease the risk of Hpylori re-infection.

  18. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

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    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  19. Inhibitory Effects of Polaprezine on the Inflammatory Response to Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Handa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori-infected gastrointestinal mucosa is frequently infiltrated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN and monocytes, and these invading cells have been implicated in gastrointestinal mucosal inflammation. To clarify the efficacy of polaprezinc, a chelate compound consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, against H pylori-induced inflammation including PMN infiltration, the in vitro effects of this drug on interleukin (IL-8 production by an established gastric cancer cell line (MKN 45 cells and on PMN-endothelial cell adhesive interactions was investigated. Polaprezinc and zinc sulphate inhibited IL-8 production by MKN 45 cells in response to stimulation with H pylori water extract (HPE in a dose-dependent manner from 10-7 M to 10-5 M. In addition, the expression of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and PMN-dependent adhesion to endothelial cells elicited by HPE was inhibited by polaprezinc and zinc sulphate in a concentration-dependent manner. L-carnosine did not have any effects on IL-8 production or PMN-endothelial cell interactions. These results suggest that polaprezinc, mainly the zinc component, may inhibit H pylori-induced PMN-mediated gastric inflammation by attenuating CD11b/CD18 expression on PMN and IL-8 production from gastric epithelial cells.

  20. QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI BY THE TAQMAN FLUOROGENIC PROBE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culturing of H. pylori from environmental sources continues to be an obstacle in detecting and enumerating this organism. Successful methods of isolation and growth from water samples have not yet been developed. In this study a method involving real tme PCR product detection wit...

  1. QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI BY THE TAQMAN FLUOROGENIC PROBE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culturing of H. pylori from environmental sources continues to be an obstacle in detecting and enumerating this organism. Successful methods of isolation and growth from water samples have not yet been developed. In this study a method involving real tme PCR product detection wit...

  2. Helicobacter pylori Cholesteryl α-Glucosides Contribute to Its Pathogenicity and Immune Response by Natural Killer T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Vela, Jose Luis; Matsumura, Fumiko; Hoshino, Hitomi; Tyznik, Aaron; Lee, Heeseob; Girardi, Enrico; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Liddington, Robert; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Bao, Xingfeng; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Jin, Rongsheng; Zong, Yinong; Seeberger, Peter H.; Nakayama, Jun; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Fukuda, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10–15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer), while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18−/−) or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis. PMID:24312443

  3. Helicobacter pylori cholesteryl α-glucosides contribute to its pathogenicity and immune response by natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Approximately 10-15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer, while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT, which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18(-/- or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis.

  4. Helicobacter pylori susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy differ in the maturation and activation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitar, Andreja N; Skvarc, Miha; Tepes, Bojan; Kos, Janko; Ihan, Alojz

    2013-12-01

    The natural course of Helicobacter pylori infection, as well as the success of antibiotic eradication is determined by the immune response to bacteria. The aim of the study is to investigate how different Helicobacter pylori isolates influence the dendritic cells maturation and antigen-presenting function in order to elucidate the differences between Helicobacter pylori strains, isolated from the patients with successful antibiotic eradication therapy or repeated eradication failure. Dendritic cells maturation and antigen presentation were monitored by flow cytometry analysis of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and costimulatory molecules expression, and by determining cytokine secretion. Dendritic cells stimulated with Helicobacter pylori isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure expressed less human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), CD86, TLR-2, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy; the latter expressed lower production of IL-10. Polymyxin B inhibition of lipopolysaccharide reduces IL-8 secretion in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy. The differences in IL-8 secretion between both groups are lipopolysaccharide dependent, while the differences in secretion of IL-10 remain unchanged after lipopolysaccharide inhibition. Inhibitor of cathepsin X Mab 2F12 reduced the secretion of IL-6, and the secretion was significantly lower in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure. Helicobacter pylori strains, susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy, differ in their capability to induce DCs maturation and antigen-presenting function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition downregulates Helicobacter pylori-induced epithelial inflammatory responses, DNA damage and gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Johanna C; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Delgado, Alberto G; Wroblewski, Lydia E; Barry, Daniel P; Peek, Richard M; Gobert, Alain P; Wilson, Keith T

    2017-05-04

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor. We have reported increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in the H. pylori-induced human carcinogenesis cascade, and association with DNA damage. Our goal was to determine the role of EGFR activation in gastric carcinogenesis. We evaluated gefitinib, a specific EGFR inhibitor, in chemoprevention of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and cancer development. Mice with genetically targeted epithelial cell-specific deletion of Egfr (Efgr(Δepi) mice) were also used. In C57BL/6 mice, gefitinib decreased Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 expression by gastric epithelial cells, myeloperoxidase-positive inflammatory cells in the mucosa and epithelial DNA damage induced by H. pylori infection. Similar reductions in chemokines, inflammatory cells and DNA damage occurred in infected Egfr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) control mice. In H. pylori-infected transgenic insulin-gastrin (INS-GAS) mice and gerbils, gefitinib treatment markedly reduced dysplasia and carcinoma. Gefitinib blocked H. pylori-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 (MAPK1/3) and activator protein 1 in gastric epithelial cells, resulting in inhibition of chemokine synthesis. MAPK1/3 phosphorylation and JUN activation was reduced in gastric tissues from infected wild-type and INS-GAS mice treated with gefitinib and in primary epithelial cells from Efgr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Epithelial EGFR activation persisted in humans and mice after H. pylori eradication, and gefitinib reduced gastric carcinoma in INS-GAS mice treated with antibiotics. These findings suggest that epithelial EGFR inhibition represents a potential strategy to prevent development of gastric carcinoma in H. pylori-infected individuals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Study of Biofilm Formation in C57Bl/6J Mice by Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaran, Bahareh; Falsafi, Tahereh; Moghaddam, Ali N.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Despite the significant number of studies on H. pylori pathogenesis, not much data has been published concerning its ability to form biofilm in the host stomach. This study aims to evaluate the potential of clinical isolates of H. pylori to form biofilm in C57BL/6J mice model. Materials and Methods: Two strains of H. pylori were selected from a collection of clinical isolates; one (19B), an efficient biofilm producer and the other (4B), with weak biofilm-forming ability. Mice infected through gastric avages were examined after one and two weeks. Colonization was determined by CFU and urease activity; the anti-H. pylori IgA was measured by ELISA, and chronic infections were evaluated by histopathology. Bacterial communities within mucosal sections were studied by immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Successful infection was obtained by both test strains. Strain 19B with higher ability to form biofilm in vitro also showed a higher colonization rate in the mice stomach one week after infection. Difference (P < 0.05) in IgA titers was observed between the infected mice and the controls as well as between 19B and 4B infected mice, two weeks after the last challenge. Immunofluorescence and SEM results showed tightly colonizing H. pylori in stomach mucosal sections and in squamous and glandular epithelium. Conclusion: H. pylori is able to form biofilm in the mouse stomach and induce IgA production, reflecting the same potential as in humans. Firm attachment of coccoid form bacteria to host cells suggests the importance of this state in biofilm formation by H. pylori. Occurrence of biofilm in squamous and glandular epithelium of the mouse stomach proposes that H. pylori can all parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26997224

  7. Geographic differences and the role of cagA gene in gastroduodenal diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmaseda Pérez, T; Gisbert, J P; Pajares García, J M

    2001-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major causal agent of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Several bacterium genes seem to be involved in the pathogenicity mechanism. One of them, the cagA gene, has been extensively studied and characterized. In this article we have carried out a study of characteristics and genetic variability of cagA gene in different geographic areas of the world. At the same time, we have summarized several studies that evaluate possible relation of cagA with gastroduodenal diseases associated by H. pylori infection. In our study we found that the presence of the cagA gene has been confirmed in more than 60% H. pylori strains distributed throughout the world. The prevalence of cagA genotype is of 65.4% in gastritis patients, 84.2% in patients with peptic ulcer and 86.5% in those with gastric cancer. It shows a high genetic variability of cagA associated with gastroduodenal diseases that could serve as a virulence marker in H. pylori infected subjects. However, the high prevalence of H. pylori cagA positive strains in some geographic areas does not confirm the strong association between cagA and virulence of strains as described in other countries. Nowadays, cagA gene is considered as a marker for the presence of cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) in H. pylori genoma. This region contains several genes that has been involved with the production of cytokines that results in an increased inflammation of host gastric mucosa, but its function is unknown. Probably, others bacterium factors, such as susceptibility host and environmental cofactors could influence in the risk of developing different gastroduodenal diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erdal Kurtoglu; Ertugrul Kayacetin; Aysegul Ugur

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) infection in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) patients with that of nonthrombocytopenic controls,and to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment in H pylori(+)and H pylori(-) AITP patients.METHODS: The prevalence of gastric H pylori infection in 38 adult AITP patients (29 female and 9 male; median age 27 years; range 18-39 years) who consecutively admitted to our clinic was investagated.RESULTS: H pylori infection was found in 26 of 38 AITP patients (68.5%). H pylori infection was found in 15 of 23control subjects (65.2%). The difference in H pylori infection between the 2 groups was not significant. Thrombocyte count of H pylori-positive AITP patients was significantly lower than that of H pylori-negative AITP patients (P<0.05).Thrombocyte recovery of H pylori-positive group was less than that of H pylori-negative group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: H pylori infection should be considerecd in the treatment of AITP patients with H pylori infection.

  9. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzung-Shiun; Hu, Huang-Ming; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Chao-Hung

    2014-04-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection has become an important issue recently, because this bacterial species cluster can cause many gastrointestinal diseases. Elevated antibiotic resistance is related to an increasing failure rate of H. pylori eradication. Standard triple therapy is still the first-line therapy; however, according to the Maastricht IV Consensus Report, it should be abandoned in areas of high clarithromycin resistance. Alternative first-line therapies include bismuth-containing quadruple therapy, sequential, concomitant, and hybrid therapies. Quinolone-based triple therapy may be considered as first-line therapy in areas of clarithromycin resistance >15-20% and quinolone resistance <10%. Unique second-line therapy is still unclear, and bismuth-containing quadruple therapy or levofloxacin-based triple therapy can be used as rescue treatment. Third-line therapy should be under culture guidance to select the most effective regimens (such as levofloxacin-based, rifabutin-based, or furazolidone-based therapies). Antibiotics resistance, patient compliance, and CYP 2C19 genotypes could influence the outcome. Clinicians should use antibiotics according to local reports.

  10. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  11. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  12. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    variables such as age, sex, socioeconomic status, dietary habits, genetic, and immunological ... Age distribution of H. pylori infection did not show any trend towards increase or .... infection in dyspeptic patients in Iran. Gastroenterol Insights.

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Bacteremia: An Unusual Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Concetta; Mancin, Annalisa; Calabrò, Maria; Daleno, Cristina; Ferrario, Antonella; Renzulli, Raffaella; Scuderi, Cristina; Casari, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent immediately to Laboratory, were positive for a spiral Gram-negative bacterium. This isolate was identified as H. pylori and the specific susceptibility test was performed. One day after the fever was decreased but antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin was continued and it was maintained until discharge. In summary, H. pylori transient bacteremia may occur as a rare complication after stomach surgery. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the potential role of Helicobacter pylori presence in blood.

  14. Helicobacter pylori: Basic Mechanisms to Clinical Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its rediscovery 10 years ago, Helicobacter pylori has reshaped our thinking about the course of peptic ulcer disease. Our approach to the patient with a duodenal ulcer has become one of attempting eradication therapy at the time of first diagnosis, in the hope of curing the ulcer disease. Gastric and duodenal ulceration are only two of the manifestations of this chronic antral infection; other complications of H pylori include gastritis, gastric cancer and possible maltomas. Therapy of H pylori infection is complicated and involves dual therapy with an antibiotic plus a protein pump inhibitor, such as omeprazole 20 mg bid plus amoxicillin 1 g bid for two weeks, triple or quadruple therapy with bismuth, two antibiotics and an H2-receptor antagonist. Vaccination against H pylori is on the far horizon.

  15. Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, Andreas; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2015-09-01

    During the period reviewed, prevalence studies were essentially performed in less economically advanced countries and a high prevalence was found. The traditional risk factors for Helicobacter pylori positivity were mostly found. Transmission studied by molecular typing showed a familial transmission. The eventual role of water transmission was explored in several studies with controversial results. Concerning diagnosis, most of the invasive and noninvasive methods used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection are long standing with efficient performance. The most interesting recent improvements in H. pylori diagnosis include advances in endoscopy, developments in molecular methods, and the introduction of omics-based techniques. Interpretation of old or newer method should take into account the pretest probability and the prevalence of H. pylori in the population under investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and endoscopic findings among patients with dyspepsia in north ... Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences ... Results: Of the 148 subjects studied, 68 (46.0%) were males and 80 (54.0%) females.

  17. Distribution of Helicobacter pylori in north China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Hua Gong; Ying Wang; Yuan Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the distribution of virulence-associatedgenotypes of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) in two areas of north China with different gastric cancer risk and furthermore probe into the pathogenicity of the bacterium. METHODS: Gastric biopsies were taken from 355 subjects from Zhuanghe, a high risk area of gastric cancer, and 136 subjects from Shenyang, a low risk area of gastric cancer. A total of 149 H pylori strains isolated from these patients were studied by PCR for differences in the genotypes of cagA, vac A, and iceA.RESULTS: In patients with high risk for gastric cancer, higher frequencies of vacA s1 or s1m1b genotypes were found as compared to those from the low risk area. CONCLUSION: There is significantly different distribution of H pylori genotypes between Zhuanghe and Shenyang areas in north China.

  18. HELICOBACTER PYLORI: THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF PEPTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    some of the virulence factors possessed by the organism, its metabolism and growth .... lymphoma and some types of gastric adenocarcinoma .... carbon to the lungs, where the patient exhales it. .... pylori as a risk factor for cancer, Bailliere's.

  19. Effectiveness of Citrus Fruits on Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    It is known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Due to the increased side effects of the treatment regimens and the development of antimicrobial resistance, a number of natural compounds have been tested as potential alternatives. In this review, we will examine the current knowledge on the effect of Citrus fruits and their derivatives against H. pylori, highlighting the remaining outstanding questions on the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28408943

  20. Helicobacter pylori : migrations humaines et cancer gastrique

    OpenAIRE

    Breurec, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe gastroduodenal disorders but is also a bacterial genetic marker of human migrations. First, we provide evidence that distinct H. pylori genetic populations accompanied at least four ancient human migrations into Oceania and Southeast Asia: i) an expansion of Austronesian speaking people about 5000 years ago from Taiwan into Oceania, ii) a migration from India into Southeast Asia within the last 2000 years, iii) a migration of Austro-Asiatic speaki...

  1. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 bio...

  2. Changing epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manami

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is known as the most important cause of gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, and socioeconomic status. In Japan, H. pylori infection has been highly correlated with the incidence rate of gastric cancer, and a reduction in H. pylori infection is therefore crucial for decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer, especially at the population level. Infection occurs during childhood, commonly before 5 years of age. In Japan, where gastric cancer has ranked as the most common cancer by incidence and mortality for the last several decades, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has dramatically declined by birth cohort effect, mainly due to improvements in the general hygiene environment in childhood. Older generations born before around 1950 show a high prevalence of around 80-90 %, decreasing with age to reach around 10 % or less in those born around the 1990s, and less than 2 % for children born after the year 2000. This change will have generational effects on gastric cancer prevention strategies, both primary and secondary. The risk-stratified approach to gastric cancer prevention should be considered in Japan and other countries which have similarly experienced rapid economic development.

  3. Relation between Psoriasis and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dursun Türkmen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. It was aimed to detect the role of H. pylori in triggering psoriasis. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 clinically diagnosed psoriatic patients who applied to the dermatology outpatient clinic, were included in the study. As the control group, 57 patients who do not have psoriasis and H. pylori associated dermatologic diseases were included in the study. All patients and control group were tested for H. pylori by the urea-breath test (UBT. Results: Thirty-eight (67.9% of 56 psoriasis patients (mean age 38.4±14.08 years; 32 men, 24 women and 38 (66.7% of 57 control group(men age, 37.9±13.73 years; 26 men, 31 women were positive for H. pylori. There was no statistically significant difference between psoriasis patients and controls with respect to the urea breath test (p=0.89. UBT was positive in all patiens who have gastrointestinal reflux. Conclusion: We could not determine the role of H. pylori in psoriasis. There have been some reports about the association of H. pylori and palmoplantar pustular psoriasis. Therefore, we believe that there is a need for newer studies in a large psoriasis group with tests which have higher specificity and sensitivity.

  4. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobac ter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection. Methods: Serum soluble antigen of H. p ylor i was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H. pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test ( RUT ), histo logi c examination and serology. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive pred ictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46%, 91.07%, 91.67% a nd 76.12 %, respectively. The prevalence rate of serum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergoing endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT met hods ( P>0.05 ). Conclusions: The detection of serum H. pylori solub le antigen( HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate, and convenie nt, not affected by the memorizing reaction of serum antibody; is more sensitive , m ore specific and suitable for clinical diagnosis, and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H. pylori as well as for detection in children and pre gnant women.

  5. Review: clinical management of Helicobacter pylori infection in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been associated with gastric disorders. The situation of H. pylori infection in China-where a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, a high incidence of gastric cancer, and widespread resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin exist-is quite different from that in Western countries. In order for Chinese clinicians to better manage H. pylori infection, a Chinese Study Group on H. pylori published four consensus reports regarding the management of H. pylori infection in China between 1999 and 2012. The eradication rate with standard triple therapy was pylori in China in recent years. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  7. Helicobacter pylori urease activates blood platelets through a lipoxygenase-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, German E; Olivera-Severo, Deiber; Uberti, Augusto F; Carlini, Célia R

    2010-07-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcers and gastric cancer in human beings by mechanisms yet not fully understood. H. pylori produces urease which neutralizes the acidic medium permitting its survival in the stomach. We have previously shown that ureases from jackbean, soybean or Bacillus pasteurii induce blood platelet aggregation independently of their enzyme activity by a pathway requiring platelet secretion, activation of calcium channels and lipoxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We investigated whether H. pylori urease displays platelet-activating properties and defined biochemical pathways involved in this phenomenon. For that the effects of purified recombinant H. pylori urease (HPU) added to rabbit platelets were assessed turbidimetrically. ATP secretion and production of lipoxygenase metabolites by activated platelets were measured. Fluorescein-labelled HPU bound to platelets but not to erythrocytes. HPU induced aggregation of rabbit platelets (ED(50) 0.28 microM) accompanied by ATP secretion. No correlation was found between platelet activation and ureolytic activity of HPU. Platelet aggregation was blocked by esculetin (12-lipoxygenase inhibitor) and enhanced approximately 3-fold by indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor). A metabolite of 12-lipoxygenase was produced by platelets exposed to HPU. Platelet responses to HPU did not involve platelet-activating factor, but required activation of verapamil-inhibitable calcium channels. Our data show that purified H. pylori urease activates blood platelets at submicromolar concentrations. This property seems to be common to ureases regardless of their source (plant or bacteria) or quaternary structure (single, di- or tri-chain proteins). These properties of HPU could play an important role in pathogenesis of gastrointestinal and associated cardiovascular diseases caused by H. pylori.

  8. Helicobacter pylori-coccoid forms and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Rasmussen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    be detected by PCR in water supplies. There is no substantial evidence for viable H. pylori persisting in water supplies. Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental water is a risk factor for H. pylori infection when compared with tap water, and formation of H. pylori biofilm cannot be excluded....... Helicobacter pylori does not seem to take part in biofilm formation in the oral cavity even though the bacterium may be detected....

  9. Extraintestinal manifestations of Helicobacter pylori: A concise review

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Frank; Rayner-Hartley, Erin; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been clearly linked to peptic ulcer disease and some gastrointestinal malignancies. Increasing evidence demonstrates possible associations to disease states in other organ systems, known as the extraintestinal manifestations of H. pylori. Different conditions associated with H. pylori infection include those from hematologic, cardiopulmonary, metabolic, neurologic, and dermatologic systems. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of...

  10. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carini Francesco; Samir Mallat; Cappello Francesco; Zummo Giovani; Jurjus Abdo; Tomasello Giovanni; Leone Angelo; Di Pasquale Roberto; Saniflippo Beatrice; Sinagra Emanuele; Damiani Provvidenza; Rosalyn Jurjus; Alice Gerges-Geagea; Inaya Hajj Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  11. A study of Helicobacter pylori infection in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Khwaja Saifullah Zafar; Vidyasagar Ram; Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori is the most common bacterial infection in human beings. The aim was to study the association of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients of diabetes mellitus. Design of the study was observational analytic cross sectional study. Methods: A total of 69 subjects were studied. Of these 30 were non diabetics and 39 were diabetics, with disease duration more than 1 year. The serological diagnosis of H. pylori was made by Anti- Helicobacter pylori antibody test....

  12. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carini Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  13. Probiotics for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, Lucia; Osborn, John Frederick; Bonci, Enea; Romaggioli, Sara; Baldini, Rossella; Chiesa, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The combination of a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics (clarithromycin plus amoxicillin or metronidazole) has been the recommended first-line therapy since the first guidelines for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in children were published. In recent years, the success of eradication therapies has declined, in part due to the development of H. pylori resistant strains. Alternative anti-H. pylori treatments are currently becoming more popular than the traditional eradication ...

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  15. Helicobacter pylori VacA suppresses Lactobacillus acidophilus-induced interferon beta signaling in macrophages via alterations in the endocytic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Gudrun; Forster, Sam; Irving, Aaron; Tate, Michelle; Ferrero, Richard L; Hertzog, Paul; Frøkiær, Hanne; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria

    2013-06-11

    Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis and avoids elimination by the immune system of the infected host. The commensal bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus has been suggested to exert beneficial effects as a supplement during H. pylori eradication therapy. In the present study, we applied whole-genome microarray analysis to compare the immune responses induced in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with L. acidophilus, H. pylori, or both bacteria in combination. While L. acidophilus induced a Th1-polarizing response characterized by high expression of interferon beta (IFN-β) and interleukin 12 (IL-12), H. pylori strongly induced the innate cytokines IL-1β and IL-1α. In BMDMs prestimulated with L. acidophilus, H. pylori blocked the expression of L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β and IL-12 and suppressed the expression of key regulators of the Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 GTPases. The inhibition of L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β was independent of H. pylori viability and the virulence factor CagPAI; however, a vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) mutant was unable to block IFN-β. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the addition of H. pylori to L. acidophilus-stimulated BMDMs redirects intracellular processing, leading to an accumulation of L. acidophilus in the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. Thus, our findings indicate that H. pylori inhibits the development of a strong Th1-polarizing response in BMDMs stimulated with L. acidophilus by blocking the production of IFN-β in a VacA-dependent manner. We suggest that this abrogation is caused by a redirection of the endocytotic pathway in the processing of L. acidophilus. IMPORTANCE Approximately half of the world's population is infected with Helicobacter pylori. The factors that allow this pathogen to persist in the stomach and cause chronic infections have not yet been fully elucidated. In particular, how H. pylori avoids killing by macrophages, one of the main types of immune cell underlying the

  16. Helicobacter Pylori and the Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is an important cause of stomach cancer that infects a substantial proportion of the Canadian adult population. H pylori can be detected by noninvasive tests and effectively eradicated by medical treatment. Screening for and treatment of H pylori may represent a significant opportunity for preventive oncology.

  17. Furazolidone therapy for Helicobacter pylori: Is it effective and safe?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo De Francesco; Enzo Ierardi; Cesare Hassan; Angelo Zullo

    2009-01-01

    Some aspects related with the use of furazolidone as a rescue therapy for Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection should be remarked, especially regarding its potential oncologic risk. The inclusion of furazolidone in a treatment regimen for H pylori infection is, at least, controversial, and it does not appear to be safe.

  18. In vitro suppression of dendritic cells by Helicobacter pylori OipA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymournejad, Omid; Mobarez, Ashraf M; Hassan, Zuhair M; Moazzeni, Seyed M; Ahmadabad, Hassan N

    2014-04-01

    Outer inflammatory protein A (OipA) has an important role in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis. In this study, we purified the outer membrane protein and evaluated the effects of this protein on maturation and cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs). The oipA gene was inserted into pET28a, and this construct was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Purification of the recombinant protein was performed by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Immature DCs were purified from spleen of C57BL/6 mice with more than 90% purity and were treated with several concentrations of OipA (1-20 μg/mL) overnight. Expression of maturation markers (CD86, CD40, and MHC-II) on the surface of DCs and production of IL-10 and IL-12 were assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. The expression of DC maturation markers CD40, CD86, and MHC-II was downregulated on the surface of OipA-treated DCs at concentrations of 10 and 20 μg/mL compared with negative control. Production of IL-10 decreases with increasing OipA concentration at a concentration of 5 μg/mL, but we detected no change in IL-12 production. Inability to eliminate H. pylori from stomach is partly due to the evasion of the bacteria from the immune response. DCs are central mediators between innate and adaptive immunity, and DC cytokines direct the types of adaptive immune response. This study indicated that OipA of H. pylori is a DC maturation suppression factor. Previous studies have shown that H. pylori manage tolerogenic programming in DCs leading to long-time gastric colonization. In conclusion, H. pylori OipA helps the establishment of chronic infection with reduction in IL-10 and suppression of DC maturation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Two distinct etiologies of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: interactions among pH, Helicobacter pylori, and bile acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi eMukaisho

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer can be classified as cardia and noncardia subtypes according to the anatomic site. Although the gastric cancer incidence has decreased steadily in several countries over the past 50 years, the incidence of cardia cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC continue to increase. The etiological factors involved in the development of both cardia cancers and EACs are associated with high animal fat intake, which causes severe obesity. Central obesity plays roles in cardiac-type mucosa lengthening and partial hiatus hernia development. There are two distinct etiologies of cardia cancer subtypes: one associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER, which predominantly occurs in patients without Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and resembles EAC, and the other associated with H. pylori atrophic gastritis, which resembles noncardia cancer. The former can be developed in the environment of high volume duodenal content reflux, including bile acids and a higher acid production in H. pylori–negative patients. N-nitroso compounds, which are generated from the refluxate that includes a large volume of bile acids and are stabilized in the stomach (which has high levels of gastric acid, play a pivotal role in this carcinogenesis. The latter can be associated with the changing colonization of H. pylori from the distal to the proximal stomach with atrophic gastritis because a high concentration of soluble bile acids in an environment of low acid production is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori in the distal stomach with H. pylori infection. The manuscript introduces new insights in causative factors of adenocarcinoma of the cardia about the role of bile acids in gastro-esophageal refluxate based upon robust evidences supporting interactions among pH, H. pylori, and bile acids.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    . Also noninvasive tests have been studied in children, including serology, 13C-urea breath test and stool antigen test, showing good results in the different age groups as compared to the gold standard. However, the infection often remains asymptomatic in children and the role of this bacterium......A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...... place only after susceptibility testing. The association of a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics for 1 or 2 weeks gives the best eradication rates. The crucial question to elucidate is whether asymptomatic children should be treated to prevent cancer in the future....

  1. Pathogenic diversity of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégraud, F

    1997-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been shown to possess a very heterogeneous genoma despite its common phenotypic properties. Some characteristics relevant to pathogenesis have also been found to be heterogeneous. This is the case for adherence properties and the amount of urease produced, but it was not possible to relate these properties to disease entities. A vacuolating cytotoxin which alters epithelial cells has been found in about 60% of strains isolated from patients with ulcers versus 30% from those with gastritis only. The cagA gene can be used as a marker to detect the cag pathogenicity island. This DNA fragment seems to induce an increased inflammation in the gastric tissue via release of interleukin 8 by the epithelial cells. The association of this marker is strongly linked with ulcers compared with gastritis only (80% vs 55%, respectively). A number of other properties may be heterogeneous, but the low number of strains studied does not allow conclusions to be drawn.

  2. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori by Helicobacter pylori outer membrane proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jiang; Ai-Long Huang; Xiao-Hong Tao; Pi-Long Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the serological response of patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobocter pylori(Hpylori)infection to two H pylori outer membrane proteins (OMPs)(Mr18 000 and Mr26 000) acquired by gene recombinanttechnique, and to determine the diagnostic significance of serological tests derived from these OMPs.METHODS: Recombinant vectors encoding the two H pylori OMPs were used to transform and express in BL21 (DE3)E. coli. After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin, colloid gold kits were prepared with purified recombinant proteins to detect H pylori infection and H pylori-associated diseases by the immunity-marker technology. We selected 150 patients with H pyloriinfection and digestive symptoms without previous treatment, induding chronic gastritis (n = 60), duodenal ulcer (n = 30), gastric ulcer (n = 30), and gastric cancer (n = 30).As controls, 33 H pylori-negative healthy volunteers were also recruited. Serum samples were collected from all subjects, and the antibodies to specific proteins of H pylori were tested with the colloid gold test kits. The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the colloid gold tests were evaluated, by using the combination of standard diagnostic methods (13C urea breath test and bacteria culture) and classic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as reference.RESULTS: After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin,the purity of recombinant fusion proteins was about 95%.The recombinant fusion proteins were recognized by the specific monoclonal antibodies against the two H pylori OMPs,as demonstrated by the ELISA. Of the 150 serum samples from patients infected with H pylori 141 (94.0%) responded positively to the recombinant protein with Mr26 000, while the seropositive rates were 95.0%, 96.7%, 96.7% and 90.0%for patients with H pylori-associated chronic gastritis,duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer respectively.The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the colloid gold kit with Mr26 000

  3. Comparison of IL-6, IL-8 Concentrations in H. pylori- and non-H. pylori-associated Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontar Alamsyah Siregar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is a non-invasive microorganism causing intense gastric mucosal inflammatory and immune reaction. The gastric mucosal levels of the proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin 6 (IL-6 and IL-8 have been reported to be increased in H. pylori infection, but the serum levels in H. pylori infection is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in H. pylori infection. METHODS: A cross sectional study was done on eighty consecutive gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and Permata Bunda Hospital, Medan, Indonesia from May-October 2014. Histopathology was performed for the diagnosis of gastritis. Rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Serum samples were obtained to determine circulating IL-6 and IL-8. Univariate and bivariate analysis (independent t test were done. RESULTS: There were 41.25% patients infected with H. pylori. Circulatory IL-6 levels were significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori negative, but there were no differences between serum levels of IL-8 in H. pylori positive and negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected in an increased level of serum IL-6. Serum levels of IL-8 were not significantly different between H. pylori positive and negative. KEYWORDS: Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, IL-6, IL-8, cytokine.

  4. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy significantly reduces Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal damage in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Chao Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Chen; Gi-Shih Lien; Yuarn-Jang Lee; Horng-Yuan Lou; Ching-Ruey Hsieh; Chia-Lang Fang; Shiann Pan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of 4 d' anti-Helicobacter pyloritherapy on the H pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils based on physiological and pathological changes.METHODS: We used 6-wk-old male gerbils orally inoculated with H pylori (ATCC43504, 2x108 CFU/mL).Seven weeks after H pylori inoculation, the animals of study group received 4 d' anti-H pylori triple therapy (H pylorieradicated group). Seven days later, all animals of the H pylori-eradicated and control groups (H pylori-infected& H pylori-uninfected groups) were sacrificed. We examined gastric mucosal lesions macroscopically, studied gastritis microscopically and determined the stomach weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin (PG) E2 level.RESULTS: The results showed that both macroscopic and histological gastric damages were significantly less in H pylori-eradicated group than H pylori-infected group.Stomach weight ratio, MPO activity and PGE2 levels were significantly higher in H pylori-infected group than those in the other two groups.CONCLUSION: Four days' anti-H pylori therapy was effective in the improvement of H pylori-induced gastric lesions in Mongolian gerbils.

  5. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mar Mar Khin; Jie Song Hua; Hah Cong Ng; Bow Ho; Torkel Wadstrorr

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms.METHODS Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A ),fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas ( Lotus A ) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori-lectin agglutination. Interestingly, heating of H.pylori cells at 60℃ for 1 hour was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during theevents of morphological transformation,resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection.This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease.

  6. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Anna Ingibjorg; Gudjonsson, Hallgrimur; Hardardottir, Hjordis; Jonsdottir, Karen Drofn; Bjornsson, Einar Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Increasing resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to antibiotics calls for constant re-evaluation of multidrug regimens that have been used to eradicate the infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current antibiotic susceptibility of H. pylori in an Icelandic cohort. Patients referred for gastroscopy were recruited prospectively. Those found to have a positive rapid urease test were included in the study. Susceptibility testing was conducted by the Epsilometer test (E-test) method for ampicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole and tetracycline. Results were obtained after three days of incubation in microaerophilic conditions at 37 °C, except for the metronidazole were the first 24 hours were anaerobic. Of the 613 patients who underwent gastroscopy, 138 (23%) had a positive rapid urease test. H. pylori was successfully cultured from 105 (76%) of the urease test positive patients and the isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Five patients had prior H. pylori eradication. Antibiotic resistance for ampicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole and tetracycline was 0%, 9%, 4%, 1% and 0%, respectively. If those who had previously undergone eradication treatment were excluded, the resistance was 0%, 6%, 3%, 1% and 0%, respectively. Clarithromycin resistance was higher amongst women than men, 13% vs. 5%, however, not significantly. Clarithromycin resistance was 60% amongst those who had previously received eradication treatment compared to 6% of those who had not (p pylori isolates can be considered relatively low. Therefore, in the current cohort, standard triple-drug clarithromycin-containing regimen should remain the first-line treatment against H. pylori.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Antibiotic Resistance: Trends Over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond G Lahaie

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to antibiotics can be a major problem in the treatment of bacterial infections. As the use of antibiotics increases, bacterial resistance to these agents is rising and in many cases is responsible for the failure of treatment regimens. Although the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection requires the use of more than one antibiotic to obtain adequate eradication rates, the efficacy of the currently used antibiotic combinations has been shown to be decreased by resistance to one of the antibiotics. The use of antibiotics in regimens for the treatment of H pylori is increasing in many countries, including Canada. This increase is both in the use of these antibiotics alone for the treatment of nongastrointestinal infections and in their use in association with proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of H pylori infection. In several European and Asian countries, where resistance to antibiotics is being monitored, it has been demonstrated that H pylori resistance to metronidazole and to clarithromycin increased throughout the 1990s. Thus far, the data available in Canada do not show increased resistance to either of these antibiotics. As for other antibiotics used in the treatment of H pylori infection, such as tetracycline and amoxicillin, the rate of resistance to these agents is still very low and does not constitute a significant problem. Because the efficacy of the regimens used in the treatment of H pylori infection is compromised by resistance to the antibiotics used, it is important that H pylori resistance rates in Canada and throughout the world continue to be monitored. Only with such reliable data can the most optimal regimens be recommended.

  9. Endocrine impact of Helicobacter pylori : Focus on ghrelin and ghrelin o -acyltransferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Penny L Jeffery; Michael A McGuckin; Sara K Linden

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin is predominantly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment and is octanoylated by the recently discovered ghrelin o -acyltransferase (GOAT) before secretion into the bloodstream. This octanoylation is essential for many of the biological properties of ghrelin including appetite stimulation and anti-inflammatory properties as only the acylated form of ghrelin binds to the ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Given the gastric location of ghrelin production, it is perhaps not surprising that insult to the gastric mucosa affects circulating ghrelin levels in humans. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infects more than fifty percent of the world's population and once established within the gastric mucosa, can persist for life. Infection is associated with chronic gastritis, gastric atrophy and ulceration, reduced appetite and a lower body mass index (BMI). The large majority of studies investigating levels of circulating ghrelin and ghrelin expression in the stomach in patients with H. pylori infection indicate that the bacterium has a negative impact on ghrelin production and/or secretion. Eradication of infection restores ghrelin, improves appetite and increases BMI in some studies, however, a causative relationship between H. pylori -associated serum ghrelin decline and food intake and obesity has not been established. Most studies measure total ghrelin in the circulation although the measurement of the ratio of acyl/total ghrelin gives a clearer indication that the ghrelin acylation process is altered during infection and atrophy. GOAT is essential for the production of biologically-active, acyl ghrelin and the impact of H. pylori on GOAT expression and activity will be highly informative in the future.

  10. [Peptic Ulcer Disease Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Se-Hwan; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2016-06-25

    Although the global prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is decreasing, PUD is still one of the most common upper gastrointestinal diseases in the world due to Helicobacter pylori infection and increased use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Korea, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is also declining, but it is still the major cause of PUD. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are caused by imbalances between bacterial virulence factors, host factors, and environmental influences. In this review, we describe the prevalence trends of H. pylori infection in Korea, the mechanism of H. pylori infection-related PUD, and treatment strategies.

  11. Helicobacter pylori Infection and atherosclerosis: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karbasi-Afshar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a spiral-shaped gram negative bacterium that naturally colonizes the human gastric epithelium. In recent years, large evidence has come to the literature strongly proposing causal link between H. pylori and extra gastric disorders. Cardiovascular system is one of the extra gastric organs that can be affected by H. pylori infection. The first evidence suggestive of such an association comes from seroepidemiological evaluations, but histopathological and eradication studies have strongly confirmed existence of a causal association between H. pylori infection and cardiovascular events.

  12. Pleiotropic actions of Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin, VacA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomoto, Hajime; Moss, Joel; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori produces a vacuolating cytotoxin, VacA, and most virulent H. pylori strains secrete VacA. VacA binds to two types of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP), RPTPalpha and RPTPbeta, on the surface of host cells. VacA bound to RPTPbeta, relocates and concentrates in lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. VacA causes vacuolization, membrane anion-selective channel and pore formation, and disruption of endosomal and lysosomal activity in host cells. Secreted VacA is processed into p33 and p55 fragments. The p55 domain not only plays a role in binding to target cells but also in the formation of oligomeric structures and anionic membrane channels. Oral administration of VacA to wild-type mice, but not to RPTPbeta knockout mice, resulted in gastric ulcers, in agreement with the clinical effect of VacA. VacA with s1/m1 allele has more potent cytotoxic activity in relation to peptic ulcer disease and appears to be associated with human gastric cancer. VacA activates pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, and induces apoptosis via a mitochondria-dependent pathway. VacA can disrupt other signal transduction pathways; VacA activates p38 MAPK, enhancing production of IL-8 and PGE(2), and PI3K/Akt, suppressing GSK-3beta activity. VacA has immunomodulatory actions on T cells and other immune cells, possibly contributing to the chronic infection seen with this organism. H. pylori virulence factors including VacA and CagA, which is encoded by cytotoxin-associated gene A, along with host genetic and environmental factors, constitute a complex network to regulate chronic gastric injury and inflammation, which is involved in a multistep process leading to gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. The internalization of Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the failure of H. pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You-Hua; Lv, Zhi-Fa; Zhong, Yao; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Shu-Ping; Xie, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) internalization involves invasion of cells by the bacterium. Several studies have shown that H. pylori can invade human gastric epithelial cells, immune cells, and Candida yeast in vivo and in vitro. Whether bacterial invasion plays a role in eradication failure is unclear. To investigate the relationship between H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells and H. pylori eradication failure. Forty-two clinical strains isolated from H. pylori-positive patients with different outcomes after treatment with furazolidone-based therapy were examined (17 failures and 25 successes). The H. pylori strains were shown to be susceptible to amoxicillin and furazolidone, and the patients also exhibited good compliance. Genotyping was performed for cagA and vacA (s and m). The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains to amoxicillin, furazolidone, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was determined by E-tests. The levels of H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells were detected by gentamicin colony-forming unit assays. The internalization level in the eradication success group was 5.40±5.78 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell, and the median was 6.194 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell; the internalization level in the eradication failure group was 8.98±5.40 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell, and the median was 10.28 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell. The eradication failure group showed a greater invasion level than the eradication success group (P.05). The results showed that H. pylori invasion of the gastric epithelia might play a role in eradication failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Horizontal versus familial transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Schwarz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of Helicobacter pylori is thought to occur mainly during childhood, and predominantly within families. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining H. pylori isolates from large population samples and to the extensive genetic diversity between isolates, the transmission and spread of H. pylori remain poorly understood. We studied the genetic relationships of H. pylori isolated from 52 individuals of two large families living in a rural community in South Africa and from 43 individuals of 11 families living in urban settings in the United Kingdom, the United States, Korea, and Colombia. A 3,406 bp multilocus sequence haplotype was determined for a total of 142 H. pylori isolates. Isolates were assigned to biogeographic populations, and recent transmission was measured as the occurrence of non-unique isolates, i.e., isolates whose sequences were identical to those of other isolates. Members of urban families were almost always infected with isolates from the biogeographic population that is common in their location. Non-unique isolates were frequent in urban families, consistent with familial transmission between parents and children or between siblings. In contrast, the diversity of H. pylori in the South African families was much more extensive, and four distinct biogeographic populations circulated in this area. Non-unique isolates were less frequent in South African families, and there was no significant correlation between kinship and similarity of H. pylori sequences. However, individuals who lived in the same household did have an increased probability of carrying the same non-unique isolates of H. pylori, independent of kinship. We conclude that patterns of spread of H. pylori under conditions of high prevalence, such as the rural South African families, differ from those in developed countries. Horizontal transmission occurs frequently between persons who do not belong to a core family, blurring the pattern of familial

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  16. Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori in Children

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    F Famouri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Childrenwith Helicobacter infection need treatment. The aim of treatment is elimination of H.Pylori. Most patients with this infection are asymptomatic and without peptic disease. Treatment and management of these patients are controversy. Conventional Treatment: The best treatment for H. pylori eradication regimens should have cure rates of at least 80%, be without major side effects, and induce minimal bacterial resistance. Antibiotics alone have not achieved this. Luminal acidity influences both the effectiveness of some antimicrobial agents and the survival of the bacteri; thus antibiotics have been combined with acid suppression such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, bismuth, or H2 antagonists. The “classic” regimen is treatment twice daily for 7 days with a PPI and clarithromycin plus either amoxicillin or metronidazole Bismuth has been used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease and 1 part o quadruple therapy for H.Pylori but compliance of children for it is low.   Sequential Therapy  Sequential therapyinvolves dual therapy with a PPI and amoxicillin for 5 days followed sequentially by clarithromycin, Tinidazole and omeperazole for 5 days or other triple therapy for 7 days. This treatment has had 97% efficacy.   Adjunctive Therapies A number of studies have showed the potential benefits of probiotic therapy in H. pylori treatment regimens.Consumption of these drugs accompanied with other medications increase H.Pylori eradication.    

  17. Helicobacter pylori: prospettive per un vaccino

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    Giuseppe Del Giudice

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most widespread infections worldwide: it affects more than 50% of the human population, and is responsible for serious gastric pathologies such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, atrophic gastritis and, in some individuals, gastric cancer. Current treatments with antibiotics are efficacious, but encounters several drawbacks at the level of compliance, side effects, antibiotic resistance, etc.The availability of vaccines could contribute in reducing the burden of H. pylori associated diseases. Several bacterial antigens have been identified as virulence factors and proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Some of these antigens have been tested in experimental animal models of challenge with H. pylori. The experiments in animals have shown that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori is indeed feasible. Several open questions still remain concerning the understanding of the host-microbe relationship and the quality of the immune response which should be induced in order to confer protective immunity in man.The answers to these questions will be crucial in helping the preparation of appropriate vaccine formulations able to efficaciously protect humans both prophylactically and therapeutically. A few clinical trials have been carried out so far with still limited results. Other trials in humans are in progress and are planned for the next few years.The final hope is that these new vaccines will show the expected efficacy against H. pylori and will permit the elimination of this pathogen which has cohabited with humans for more than 100,000 years.

  18. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

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    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  19. Regulation of RKIP function by Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer.

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    Erika L Moen

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium that infects more than half of the world's population and is a major cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mechanisms that link H. pylori infection to gastric carcinogenesis are not well understood. In the present study, we report that the Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP has a role in the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. Western blot and luciferase transcription reporter assays demonstrate that the pathogenicity island of H. pylori rapidly phosphorylates RKIP, which then localizes to the nucleus where it activates its own transcription and induces apoptosis. Forced overexpression of RKIP enhances apoptosis in H. pylori-infected cells, whereas RKIP RNA inhibition suppresses the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori infection. While inducing the phosphorylation of RKIP, H. pylori simultaneously targets non-phosphorylated RKIP for proteasome-mediated degradation. The increase in RKIP transcription and phosphorylation is abrogated by mutating RKIP serine 153 to valine, demonstrating that regulation of RKIP activity by H. pylori is dependent upon RKIP's S153 residue. In addition, H. pylori infection increases the expression of Snail, a transcriptional repressor of RKIP. Our results suggest that H. pylori utilizes a tumor suppressor protein, RKIP, to promote apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  20. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-01-01

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability. PMID:28785141

  1. N-acetylcysteine, a novel treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hien Quoc; Couper, Richard T L; Tran, Cuong D; Moore, Lynette; Kelso, Richard; Butler, Ross N

    2004-01-01

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), being both a mucolytic agent and a thiol-containing antioxidant, may affect the establishment and maintenance of H. pylori infection within the gastric mucus layer and mucosa. Agar and broth dilution susceptibility tests determined the MIC of H. pylori strain SSI to NAC. H. pylori load in SSI strain-infected C57BL mice was determined as colony forming units per gram of gastric tissue. Gastritis assessment was scored and gastric surface hydrophobicity was determined by contact angle measurement. MICs of NAC were 5 to 10 and 10 to 15 mg/ml using the agar dilution and broth dilution methods, respectively. NAC (120 mg per day for 14 days) reduced the H. pylori load in mice by almost 1 log compared with sham treatment. Pretreatment with NAC (40 mg/day) also significantly reduced the H. pylori load but did not prevent H. pylori colonization. Both H. pylori infection and NAC reduced the surface hydrophobicity of murine gastric mucosa. No significant differences were observed in the gastritis scores of H. felis- or H. pylori-infected mice receiving either NAC or sham treatments. This study demonstrates that NAC inhibits the growth of H. pylori in both agar and broth susceptibility tests and in H. pylori-infected mice. NAC did not alter the severity of H. pylori- or H. felis-induced gastritis.

  2. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-07-21

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability.

  3. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, ppylori-positive group (ppylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status.

  4. Cloning, expression and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of Helicobacter pylori in Escherichia coli host as a vaccination target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Neda; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Farhangi, Baharak

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a widely distributed gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and duodenum. HpaA is a H. pylori-specific lipoprotein that has been shown to be an effective protective antigen against H. pylori infection. HpaA of H. pylori as a vaccine antigen is fully competent for stimulation of immune responses. The aim of this project is cloning, expression, and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of H. pylori in Escherichia coli host by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) as a vaccination target. The hpaA gene was inserted into pET28a (+) as cloning and expression vectors respectively. The recombinant plasmid (pET-hpaA) was subjected to sequencing other than polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and digestion analysis. Protein expression was induced by adding 1 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside to cultures of E. coli strain BL21 transformed with pET-hpaA. Protein expression assessed with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Protein purification of flagellar sheath adhesion was by FPLC. The restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR amplification analysis showed that the hpaA gene of 730 bp was amplified from H. pylori DNA and sequencing analysis of the pET-hpaA confirmed the cloning accuracy and in frame insertion of hpaA fragment. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the expression of an approximately 29,000 Da protein. Sequencing results along with SDS-PAGE analysis confirms the expression of recombinant hpaA in the heterologous E. coli BL21. Conclusion A prokaryotic expression system for hpaA gene was successfully constructed. These results indicate that production of a specific recombinant protein is an alternative and potentially more expeditious strategy for development of H. pylori vaccine.

  5. Current Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Gold

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infects approximately 50% of the world’s population and is a definitive cause of gastroduodenal disease (ie, gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers in children and adults. Four consensus conferences held around the globe have brought together clinicians, scientists, epidemiologists and health care economists to discuss the role of the gastric pathogen H pylori in human gastroduodenal disease. At each of these conferences, the overriding objective was to reach a consensus on the development of practical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of H pylori-infected individuals. However, it was not until the Canadian H pylori Consensus Conference, held in November 1997, that the issues of H pylori infection in children were addressed. Therapies for H pylori infection in children, presented in part at the First Canadian Paediatric H pylori Consensus Conference, held in Victoria, British Columbia, November 1998, are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... pathways. As such, this review highlights the consequences of H. pylori infection on the integrity of DNA in the host cells. By down-regulating major DNA repair pathways, H. pylori infection has the potential to generate mutations. In addition, H. pylori infection can induce direct changes on the DNA...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  7. Helicobacter pylori's cholesterol uptake impacts resistance to docosahexaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Marta; Casal, Susana; Vinagre, João; Seruca, Raquel; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette; Machado, José C

    2014-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes half of the world population and is associated with gastric cancer. We have previously demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid known for its anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects, directly inhibits H. pylori growth in vitro and in mice. Nevertheless, the concentration of DHA shown to reduce H. pylori mice gastric colonization was ineffective in vitro. Related to the auxotrophy of H. pylori for cholesterol, we hypothesize that other mechanisms, in addition to DHA direct antibacterial effect, must be responsible for the reduction of the infection burden. In the present study we investigated if DHA affects also H. pylori growth, by reducing the availability of membrane cholesterol in the epithelial cell for H. pylori uptake. Levels of cholesterol in gastric epithelial cells and of cholesteryl glucosides in H. pylori were determined by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The consequences of epithelial cells' cholesterol depletion on H. pylori growth were assessed in liquid cultures. We show that H. pylori uptakes cholesterol from epithelial cells. In addition, DHA lowers cholesterol levels in epithelial cells, decreases its de novo synthesis, leading to a lower synthesis of cholesteryl glucosides by H. pylori. A previous exposition of H. pylori to cholesterol influences the bacterium response to the direct inhibitory effect of DHA. Overall, our results suggest that a direct effect of DHA on H. pylori survival is modulated by its access to epithelial cell cholesterol, supporting the notion that cholesterol enhances the resistance of H. pylori. The cholesterol-dependent resistance of H. pylori to antimicrobial compounds raises new important aspects for the development of new anti-bacterial strategies.

  8. Antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts of some Vietnamese medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Dung, Pham Phuong; Nhi, Nguyen Vang Thi Yen; Hoang, Nguyen van Minh; Hieu, Tran Trung

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common human infectious bacteria. The infection is highly associated with a number of the most important disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including gastritis, duodenitis, peptic ulceration, and gastric cancer. In addition, widespread use of antimicrobial agents has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance. Metabolites of plants, particularly higher plants, have been suggested as alternative potential sources for antibacterial products due to their safe. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial activities of crude ethanolic extracts of seventeen Vietnamese medicinal plants toward one reference strain and three clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori using broth micro-dilution bioassay. The antibacterial activities of these extracts were also compared with those of seven antibiotics, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, tetracycline, and metronidazole. The extracts of Ampelopsis cantoniensis and Cleistocalyx operculatus showed highest antibacterial activity with MIC (MBC) values of 0.31 - 0.97 (2.5 - 5) mg/mL, followed by the extracts of Hedyotis diffusa and Ardisia silvestris with MIC (MBC) values of 1.04 - 1.94 (7.5 - 10) mg/mL. The remaining plant extracts exhibited moderate, low and very low or no active to the H. pylori strains. Further studies are needed to determine the active compounds from the extracts that showed high antibacterial activity against H. pylori.

  9. Human and Helicobacter pylori Interactions Determine the Outcome of Gastric Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Alain P.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune response is a critical hallmark of Helicobacter pylori infection. Epithelial and myeloid cells produce effectors, including the chemokine CXCL8, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide (NO), in response to bacterial components. Mechanistic and epidemiologic studies have emphasized that dysregulated and persistent release of these products leads to the development of chronic inflammation and to the molecular and cellular events related to carcinogenesis. Moreover, investigations in H. pylori-infected patients about polymorphisms of the genes encoding CXCL8 and inducible NO synthase, and epigenetic control of the ROS-producing enzyme spermine oxidase, have further proven that overproduction of these molecules impacts the severity of gastric diseases. Lastly, the critical effect of the crosstalk between the human host and the infecting bacterium in determining the severity of H. pylori-related diseases has been supported by phylogenetic analysis of the human population and their H. pylori isolates in geographic areas with varying clinical and pathologic outcomes of the infection. PMID:28124148

  10. Outer Membrane Vesicles of Helicobacter pylori TK1402 are Involved in Biofilm Formation

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    Ochiai Kuniyasu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori forms biofilms on glass surfaces at the air-liquid interface in in vitro batch cultures; however, biofilms of H. pylori have not been well characterized. In the present study, we analyzed the ability of H. pylori strains to form biofilms and characterized the underlying mechanisms of H. pylori biofilm formation. Results Strain TK1402 showed strong biofilm forming ability relative to the other strains in Brucella broth supplemented with 7% FCS. The strong biofilm forming ability of TK1402 is reflected the relative thickness of the biofilms. In addition, outer membrane vesicles (OMV were detected within the matrix of only the TK1402 biofilms. Biofilm formation was strongly correlated with the production of OMV in this strain. We further observed that strain TK1402 did not form thick biofilms in Brucella broth supplemented with 0.2% β-cyclodextrin. However, the addition of the OMV-fraction collected from TK1402 could enhance biofilm formation. Conclusion The results suggested that OMV produced from TK1402 play an important role in biofilm formation in strain TK1402.

  11. Complex T Cell Interactions Contribute to Helicobacter pylori Gastritis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Brian M.; Fontaine, Clinton A.; Poe, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Disease due to the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori varies in severity from asymptomatic to peptic ulcer disease and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that one source of this variation is an abnormal host response. The goal of this study was to use a mouse model of H. pylori gastritis to investigate the roles of regulatory T cells (Treg) as well as proinflammatory T cells (Th1 and Th17) in gastritis, gastric T cell engraftment, and gastric cytokine production. Our results support published data indicating that severe gastritis in T cell recipient mice is due to failure of Treg engraftment, that Treg ameliorate gastritis, and that the proinflammatory response is attributable to interactions between several cell subsets and cytokines. We confirmed that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is essential for induction of gastritis but showed that IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells are not necessary. Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) also contributed to gastritis, but to a lesser extent than IFN-γ. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-17F were also elevated in association with disease. These results indicate that while H. pylori-specific CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ are both essential for induction of gastritis due to H. pylori, IFN-γ production by T cells is not essential. It is likely that other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17F and TNF-α, shown to be elevated in this model, also contribute to the induction of disease. We suggest that gastritis due to H. pylori is associated with loss of immunoregulation and alteration of several cytokines and cell subsets and cannot be attributed to a single immune pathway. PMID:23264048

  12. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  13. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Giardia lamblia and Helicobater pylori Coinfection

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    R Shafie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Giardia lamblia and Helicobacter pylori are two flagellate microorganisms that grow in duodenum and stom­ach. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of them in patients with dyspepsia and other GI disorders. "nMethods: In this cross-sectional study, co-infection of above-mentioned agents was investigated in a group of 130 patients [me­dian age of 40 yr (range=11-79 including 76 males (58.8%] with dyspepsia using three methods of duodenal aspiration sam­ple, duodenal biopsy samples and evaluation of stool samples."nResults: : From 105 patients (59 males, 46 females, median age 40 years, range 11-79 entering this study from 3 hospitals, 4 patients (3.8% had G. lamblia and 61 patients (58% had H. pylori. All 4 patients infected by Giardia had also H. pylori infec­tion. Tenesmus (3 out of 4 patients was the most common symptom in patients with H. pylori infection (48 out of 61 pa­tients was reflux. Other symptoms in patients infected with both organisms (4 patients included diarrhea (2 cases, weight loss (2 cases, and loss of appetite (1 case but no report of vomiting."nConclusion: In patients co-infected with Giardia, H.pylori differentiation by physical examination is not possible. So in those patients with positive Rapid Urease Test (RUT, stool examination for Giardia detection is recommended. In addition, met­ronidazole (broad spectrum, anti-protozoal drug can be useful in H. pylori infection.

  15. Endoscopic faces of Helicobacter Pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geanina Spulber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The infection caused by H. pylori appears secondary after a bacterial colonization of the stomach and the initial portion of the small bowel. H. pylori –infected patients can develop gastritis, peptic ulcer, stomach cancer or MALT lymphoma. H. pylori infection is defined by WHO like a type I carcinogen, its role in gastric carcinogenesis being supported by the greatest researchers. Objectives: In this study our purpose was to determine the endoscopic appearances in H. pylori infection quoted in medical literature until now and the frequency of their appearance in our group of interest. Materials and methods: In this study it was made an analytic study in which it was realized a retrospective cohort investigation at the Emergency Central Military and University Hospital “Dr. Carol Davila” Bucharest, gastroenterology branch –endoscopic department between 18.12.2012- 21.08.2013 on 1694 patients between 18 and 92 years old, with the medium age of 55 years old. As a diagnostic method for H. pylori infection we used superior digestive endoscopy during which were taken biopsies and it was made a fast urease test. Results: Regarding the variation of the endoscopic aspects at the population of study, we have found gastritis with all its aspects (which was Sidney classified in the biggest percentage meaning 59.3% of the cases, followed with a percentage of 18.8% by those without any endoscopic abnormality, and then in 10,33% of the cases we have found peptic ulcer. With a smaller percentage, under 10%, we have found duodenitis at 8.67% of this patients, and finally the most severe lesions represented by gastric cancer and lymphoma were found at 2,7% of the H.pylori infected patients.

  16. Helicobacter pylori: From Bench to Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exponential increase in research in the field of Helicobacter pylori a paradigm shift has occurred. It is now recognized that H pylori is a chronic infection of the stomach causing inflammation. Some patients remain asymptomatic, while others may develop dyspepsia, duodenal or gastric ulcer, gastric cancer or a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. However, the role of H pylori in contributing to nonulcer dyspepsia or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy remains controversial. An effective vaccine against H pylori is years away. Major interest has focused on the questions "who should be investigated and therefore treated" and "what is the latest gold standard for eradication of H pylori"? In Europe, guidelines have been developed to help the practitioner answer these important questions. Canadian guidelines will soon be available. For persons with known peptic ulcer disease there should be unequivocal acceptance that the good clinical practice of eradicating H pylori will result in substantial savings in health care expenses. The original 'classical triple therapy' (bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline [BMT] has now been surpassed by the combination of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI plus two antibiotics (metronidazole plus clarithromycin; amoxicillin plus clarithromycin; or amoxicillin plus metronidazole, each given twice a day for one week. In Canada, the regimen of omeprazole plus one antibiotic (amoxicillin or clarithromycin was approved recently but gives an eradication rate that is lower than the current target of 90%. According to the European (Mäastricht recommendations, if a single treatment attempt with PPI plus two antibiotics fails, PPI plus BMT is recommended.

  17. 3rd Brazilian consensus on Helicobacter pylori 3º Consenso Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter pylori

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    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.Os avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Segundo Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 2004, em São Paulo, justificam este terceiro consenso. O evento foi organizado pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, departamento da Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia, tendo sido realizado em Bento Gonçalves, RS, nos dias 12 a 15 de abril de 2011. Contou com a participação de 30 delegados provenientes das cinco regiões brasileiras e um convidado internacional, incluindo gastroenterologistas

  18. Cloning and expression of Helicobacter pylori GDP-l-fucose synthesizing enzymes (GMD and GMER) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, N; Mäki, M; Räbinä, J; Roos, C; Mattila, P; Renkonen, R

    2001-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative gastric pathogen causing diseases from mild gastric infections to gastric cancer. The difference in clinical outcome has been suggested to be due to strain differences. H. pylori undergoes phase variation by changing its lipopolysaccharide structure according to the environmental conditions. The O-antigen of H. pylori contains fucosylated glycans, similar to Lewis structures found in human gastric epithelium. These Lewis glycans of H. pylori have been suggested to play a role in pathogenesis in the adhesion of the bacterium to gastric epithelium. In the synthesis of fucosylated structures, GDP-l-fucose is needed as a fucose donor. Here, we cloned the two key enzymes of GDP-l-fucose synthesis, H. pylori gmd coding for GDP-d-mannose dehydratase (GMD), and gmer coding for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose-3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) and expressed them in an enzymatically active form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The end product of these enzymes, GDP-l-fucose was used as a fucose donor in a fucosyltransferase assay converting sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine to sialyl Lewis X.

  19. Binary and Tertiary Mixtures of Satureja hortensis and Origanum vulgare Essential Oils as Potent Antimicrobial Agents Against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesjak, Marija; Simin, Natasa; Orcic, Dejan; Franciskovic, Marina; Knezevic, Petar; Beara, Ivana; Aleksic, Verica; Svircev, Emilija; Buzas, Krisztina; Mimica-Dukic, Neda

    2016-03-01

    Essential oils possess strong antimicrobial activity, even against multiresistant Helicobacter pylori. Available therapies against H. pylori infection have multiple disadvantages, indicating a great need for a development of new therapeutics. The purpose of this study was to develop a potent natural product based anti-H. pylori formulation. First, anti-H. pylori activity of nine essential oils was determined, after which the most active oils were mixed in various ratios for further testing. Satureja hortensis, Origanum vulgare subsp. vulgare and O. vulgare subsp. hirtum essential oils expressed the highest activity (MIC = 2 μL mL(-1)). Their binary and ternary mixtures exhibited notably higher antimicrobial activity (MIC ≤ 2 μL mL(-1)). The most active was the mixture of S. hortensis and O. vulgare subsp. hirtum oils in volume ratio 2:1, which expressed 4 times higher activity than individual oils (MIC = 0.5 μL mL(-1)). According to GC-MS, both oils in the mixture were characterized by high content of phenols (48-73%), with carvacrol as the main carrier of antimicrobial activity. Presented in vitro study pointed out binary mixture of S. hortensis and O. vulgare subsp. hirtum essential oils in volume ratio 2:1 as promising candidate for further in vivo studies targeting H. pylori infection.

  20. L-forms of H. Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Chao-Pin Li; Yu-Bao Cui; Ye Tian; Qing-Gui Yang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the occurrence of L-forms of H. pyloriinfection in patients with peptic ulcers and its association with possible changes of cellular immune function in the patients.METHODS: Endoscopic biopsy specimens of gastric antrum and gastric corpus were taken from 228 patients with peptic ulcers and inoculated into Skirrow selective medium for H.pylorivegetative forms and special medium for H. pylori Lforms, followed by bacterial isolation and identification. And peripheral venous blood of the patients was taken to detect the percentage of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ with biotin-streptavidin (BSA) and the level of IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 with ElISA.RESULTS: (1) The detection rates of H. pyloriL-forms and vegetative forms in the patients were 50.88 % (116/228)and 64.91 % (148/228) respectively, and the co-infection rate of H. pyloriL-forms and vegetative forms was 78.38 % (116/148). To be more exact, the detection rates of H. pylori L-forms in male and female patients were 57.04 % (77/135) and 41.94 % (39/93) respectively, and statistics found significant difference between them (P<0.05). Furthermore, the detection rates of H. pyloriL-forms in patients aged 14 years-, 30 years-, 40 years- and 50 years- were 31.91%(15/47), 42.86 % (24/56), 56.94 % (41/72) and 67.92 %(36/53) respectively, and there was significant difference between them (P<0.011). (2) The percentages of CD3+, CD4+,CD8+, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and the level of IL-2, IL-6,IL-8 in H. pylori-positive patients were (52.59±5.44) %,(35.51±5.74) %, (27.77±8.64) %, (1.56±0.51), (2.66±0.47)mg/L, (108.62±5.85) ng/L and (115.79±7.18) ng/Lrespectively, compared with those in H. pylori-negative patients, the percentages of CD3+, CD4+ and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ decreased, but the level of IL-2, IL-6 increased, and the difference was significant (P<0.001-P<0.011).Moreover, the percentages of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and the level of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 in the patients with mixed infection of

  1. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  2. Helicobacter pylori in humans: Where are we now?

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    Syed Arshad Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been associated with colonization of gastro duodenal mucosa of humans from millions of years. The main burden of the disese is in the developing countries, due to overcrowding and poor hygiene. If left untreated it leads to lot of sequlae from minor to sinister diseases over a period of time. The main challenges that remain are prevention of H. pylori-related diseases by effective treatment and screening procedures and development of a vaccine, which can address all these issues including beneficial aspects of H. pylori. The literature pertaining to different aspects of H. pylori were scrutinized from Pubmed. Material on clinical behavior, complications of chronic gastric involvement, and prevention besides role of H. pylori in nongastric diseases and the latest trends of management was collected for research and review. We continue to face many challenges.The prevention of cancer of the stomach, a worst sequlae of H. pylori continues to be a big challenge despite population screening and prevention surveys being underway in many countries. On the other hand continued scientific work has now unfolded involvement of H. pylori in extragastric diseases like cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, idiopathic thrombocytopenia, sideroblastic anemia, mental diseases, and collagen vascular diseases. In contrast, the beneficial effects of H. pylori with respect to allergic diseases and obesity are now clear. Moreover, problem of drug resistance for eradication of H. pylori has arisen for which novel treatments are being tried. Lactobacillus reuteri having anti H. pylori action is emerging as one of the promising treatment.

  3. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and risk of lung cancer.

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    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a risk factor for distal stomach cancer, and a few small studies have suggested that H. pylori may be a potential risk factor for lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study of 350 lung adenocarcinoma cases, 350 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 700 controls nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC cohort of male Finnish smokers. Controls were one-to-one matched by age and date of baseline serum draw. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori whole-cell and cytotoxin-associated gene (CagA antigens, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for associations between H. pylori seropositivity and lung cancer risk using conditional logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was detected in 79.7% of cases and 78.5% of controls. After adjusting for pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with either adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.75-1.6 or squamous cell carcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.77-1.7. Results were similar for CagA-negative and CagA-positive H. pylori seropositivity. Despite earlier small studies suggesting that H. pylori may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, H. pylori seropositivity does not appear to be associated with lung cancer.

  4. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: Updates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is highly prevalentin human, affecting nearly half of the world'spopulation; however, infection remains asymptomaticin majority of population. During its co-existence withhumans, H. pylori has evolved various strategies tomaintain a mild gastritis and limit the immune responseof host. On the other side, presence of H. pylori is alsoassociated with increased risk for the development ofvarious gastric pathologies including gastric cancer (GC).A complex combination of host genetics, environmentalagents, and bacterial virulence factors are consideredto determine the susceptibility as well as the severityof outcome in a subset of individuals. GC is one of themost common cancers and considered as the third mostcommon cause of cancer related death worldwide. Manystudies had proved H. pylori as an important risk factorin the development of non-cardia GC. Although both H.pylori infection and GC are showing decreasing trendsin the developed world, they still remain a major threatto human population in the developing countries. Thecurrent review attempts to highlight recent progress inthe field of research on H. pylori induced GC and aimsto provide brief insight into H. pylori pathogenesis,the role of major virulence factors of H. pylori thatmodulates the host environment and transform thenormal gastric epithelium to neoplastic one. This reviewalso emphasizes on the mechanistic understanding ofhow colonization and various virulence attributes of H.pylori as well as the host innate and adaptive immuneresponses modulate the diverse signaling pathways thatleads to different disease outcomes including GC.

  5. Is duodenal biopsy appropriate in areas endemic for Helicobacter pylori?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Abdurrahman; Cihangiroglu, Gulcin; Bilgic, Yilmaz; Calhan, Turan; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The primary reason for obtaining duodenal biopsy sample is to diagnose celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and drug injury are common causes of duodenitis. The aim of this retrospective study was to explore effects of H. pylori and drugs on duodenal mucosa. Duodenal biopsy samples of patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE) between February 2014 and December 2014 were retrospectively examined. Clinical symptoms, referral indications, endoscopic findings, H. pylori status, and drug history were recorded. Duodenal biopsy findings were compared based on presence of H. pylori and drug history. Of 2389 patients who underwent UGIE, 206 had duodenal biopsy. Eight patients (3.9%) were diagnosed with celiac disease. After excluding cases with celiac disease, 76 patients of remaining 198 patients (36.9%) had duodenal histopathological abnormality. H. pylori was found in 95 (47.9%) patients. Drug usage was less common (42%). Of patients who had histopathological duodenitis, 59% were H. pylori-infected. Rate of duodenitis was higher in H. pylori (+) group than in H. pylori (-) group (45% vs 27.1%; odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.4; p=0.005). There was no difference between groups regarding drug use in terms of histopathological duodenitis. H. pylori is the major contributor to duodenitis in high prevalence regions. Serological testing may be more appropriate before performing duodenal biopsy in patients with suspected celiac disease.

  6. Autophagy-related genes in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uotani, Takahiro; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces autophagy in gastric epithelial cells. However, prolonged exposure to H. pylori reduces autophagy by preventing maturation of the autolysosome. The alterations of the autophagy-related genes in H. pylori infection are not yet fully understood. We analyzed autophagy-related gene expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from 136 Bhutanese volunteers with mild dyspeptic symptoms. We also studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of autophagy-related gene in 283 Bhutanese participants to identify the influence on susceptibility to H. pylori infection. Microarray analysis of 226 autophagy-related genes showed that 16 genes were upregulated (7%) and nine were downregulated (4%). We used quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to measure mRNA levels of the downregulated genes (ATG16L1, ATG5, ATG4D, and ATG9A) that were core molecules of autophagy. ATG16L1 and ATG5 mRNA levels in H. pylori-positive specimens (n=86) were significantly less than those in H. pylori-negative specimens (n=50). ATG16L1 mRNA levels were inversely related to H. pylori density. We also compared SNPs of ATG16L1 (rs2241880) among 206 H. pylori-positive and 77 H. pylori-negative subjects. The odds ratio for the presence of H. pylori in the GG genotype was 0.40 (95% CI: 0.18-0.91) relative to the AA/AG genotypes. Autophagy-related gene expression profiling using high-throughput microarray analysis indicated that downregulation of core autophagy machinery genes may depress autophagy functions and possibly provide a better intracellular habit for H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A positive assay for identification of cagA negative strains of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicinschi, Liviu A; Correa, Pelayo; Bravo, Luis E; Schneider, Barbara G

    2003-12-01

    A new PCR protocol was developed for the positive identification of cagA negative Helicobacter pylori strains. Amplification of a portion of the genome across the insertion point of the cag pathogenicity island (the ES-"empty site") generated a 106-bp fragment, which produces a positive signal for cagA negative strains. Combined with the results of the cagA assay, the signals for ES allowed the complete characterization of the patients' cagA status. DNA sequencing analysis confirmed the identity of the ES fragment. The new protocol and cagA assay were applied to 22 DNA preparations isolated from stools from H. pylori infected adult patients and to 21 DNA preparations isolated from stools from H. pylori infected children. The same analysis was also performed on nine colonies of H. pylori derived from gastric biopsies of nine of the adult patients. The total number of cagA positive cases from adult patients was 14 or 63.6% (11 mono- and 3 mixed) and of the cagA negative cases (or ES positive) was 9 or 40.9% (6 mono- and 3 mixed). Of the 21 stool DNA samples from children, 6 (28.6%) were cagA positive, 12 (57.1%) were cagA negative and 3 (14.3%) were positive for cagA and for the ES simultaneously. The proportions of mixed cagA positive and cagA negative H. pylori infections were almost equal in adults and children (13.6% and 14.3%, respectively). No reaction products of the proper fragment sizes for cagA or the empty site (ES) were obtained from any of the stool DNA samples of 10 H. pylori uninfected subjects (100% specificity). This noninvasive assay discriminates consistently cagA negative cases from cagA positive strains and from amplification failures. It can be a useful tool for clinical and epidemiological studies of H. pylori infection.

  8. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

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    Leila Hasanzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity.   Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis .

  9. One-step chromatographic purification of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein expressed in Bacillus subtilis.

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    Kuo-Shun Shih

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, is capable of activating human neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and secrete inammatory mediators. HP-NAP is a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential in vitro diagnostic marker for H. pylori infection. HP-NAP has also been shown to be a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic asthma and bladder cancer. Hence, an efficient way to obtain pure HP-NAP needs to be developed. In this study, one-step anion-exchange chromatography in negative mode was applied to purify the recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis. This purification technique was based on the binding of host cell proteins and/or impurities other than HP-NAP to DEAE Sephadex resins. At pH 8.0, almost no other proteins except HP-NAP passed through the DEAE Sephadex column. More than 60% of the total HP-NAP with purity higher than 91% was recovered in the flow-through fraction from this single-step DEAE Sephadex chromatography. The purified recombinant HP-NAP was further demonstrated to be a multimeric protein with a secondary structure of α-helix and capable of activating human neutrophils to stimulate ROS production. Thus, this one-step negative chromatography using DEAE Sephadex resin can efficiently yield functional HP-NAP from B. subtilis in its native form with high purity. HP-NAP purified by this method could be further utilized for the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics for H. pylori infection.

  10. Construction of an oral recombinant DNA vaccine from H pylori neutrophil activating protein and its immunogenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Sun; Zhao-Shen Li; Zhen-Xing Tu; Guo-Ming Xu; Yi-Qi Du

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct a live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S.typhimurium) strain harboring the H pylori neutrophil activating protein (HP-NAP) gene as an oral recombinant DNA vaccine, and to evaluate its immunogenicity.METHODS: By genetic engineering methods, the genomic DNA of H pylori was extracted as a template. The total length of the HP-NAP gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pBT vector for sequencing and BLAST analysis, then subcloned into a eukaryotic expression vector pIRES followed by PCR identification and restriction enzyme digestion. The identified recombinant plasmid pIRES-NAP was transfected into COS-7 cells for target fusion protein expression, and its antigenicity was detected by Western blotting. Then the recombinant plasmid was transformed into a live attenuated S. typhimurium strain SL7207 as an oral vaccine strain, and its immunogenicity was evaluated with animal experiments.RESULTS: A 435 bp product was cloned using high homology with HP-NAP gene in GenBank (more than 98%). With identification by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion, a recompinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pIRES-NAP containing the HP-NAP gene of H pylori was successfully constructed. The expressed target protein had a specific reaction with H pylor(i) whole cell antibody and showed a single strip result detected by Western blotting. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant DNA vaccine strain SL7207 (pIRES-NAP) also induced a specific immune response.CONCLUSION: The successful construction of HP-NAP oral DNA vaccine with good immunogenicity may help to further investigate its immunoprotection effects and develop vaccine against H pylori infection.

  11. Lymphotoxin β receptor signalling executes Helicobacter pylori-driven gastric inflammation in a T4SS-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Zöller, Jessica; Anderl, Florian; Loew-Gil, Elena; Vieth, Michael; Adler, Thure; Engler, Daniela B; Urban, Sabine; Browning, Jeffrey L; Müller, Anne; Gerhard, Markus; Heikenwalder, Mathias

    2017-08-01

    Lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) signalling has been implicated in inflammation-associated tumour development in different tissues. We have analysed the role of LTβR and alternative NF-κB signalling in Helicobacter pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and pathology. We analysed several ligands and receptors of the alternative NF-κB pathway, RelB, p52 nuclear translocation and target genes in tissue samples of H. pylori-infected patients with different degrees of gastritis or early gastric tumours by in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR analyses. Molecular mechanisms involved in LTβR activation by H. pylori were assessed in vitro using human gastric cancer cell lines and distinct H. pylori isolates. The effects of blocking or agonistically activating LTβR on gastric pathology during challenge with a human pathogenic H. pylori strain were studied in a mouse model. Among the tested candidates, LT was significantly increased and activated alternative NF-κB signalling was observed in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected patients. H. pyloriinduced LTβR-ligand expression in a type IV secretion system-dependent but CagA-independent manner, resulting in activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway, which was further enhanced by blocking canonical NF-κB during infection. Blocking LTβR signalling in vivo suppressed H. pylori-driven gastritis, whereas LTβR activation in gastric epithelial cells of infected mice induced a broadened pro-inflammatory chemokine milieu, resulting in exacerbated pathology. LTβR-triggered activation of alternative NF-κB signalling in gastric epithelial cells executes H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis, representing a novel target to restrict gastric inflammation and pathology elicited by H. pylori, while exclusively targeting canonical NF-κB may aggravate pathology by enhancing the alternative pathway. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  12. Catechins and Sialic Acid Attenuate Helicobacter pylori-Triggered Epithelial Caspase-1 Activity and Eradicate Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Jyh-Chin Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammasome/caspase-1 signaling pathway in immune cells plays a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis; however, the regulation of this pathway in the gastric epithelium during Helicobacter pylori infection is yet to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of catechins (CAs, sialic acid (SA, or combination of CA and SA (CASA on H. pylori-induced caspase-1-mediated epithelial damage, as well as H. pylori colonization in vitro (AGS cells and in vivo (BALB/c mice. Our results indicate that the activity of caspase-1 and the expression of its downstream substrate IL-1β were upregulated in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. In addition, we observed increased oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase gp91phox, CD68, caspase-1/IL-1β, and apoptosis, but decreased autophagy, in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected mice. We have further demonstrated that treatment with CASA led to synergistic anti-H. pylori activity and was more effective than treatment with CA or SA alone. In particular, treatment with CASA for 10 days eradicated H. pylori infection in up to 95% of H. pylori-infected mice. Taken together, we suggest that the pathogenesis of H. pylori involves a gastric epithelial inflammasome/caspase-1 signaling pathway, and our results show that CASA was able to attenuate this pathway and effectively eradicate H. pylori infection.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-07-28

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance. PMID:25071324

  16. Effects of Community Screening for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, Maria; Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication improves the prognosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), dyspepsia, and possibly gastric cancer. Hp screening tests are accurate and eradication therapy is effective. Hp population screening seems attractive. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  17. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  18. Natural transformation and recombination in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, L.C.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriën kennen geen geslachtelijke voortplanting, ze hebben altijd één “ouder” in plaats van twee. Ze kunnen dus tijdens de voortplanting niet kruisen. Om toch erfelijke eigenschappen te kunnen uitwisselen hebben ze andere methoden. De maagbacterie Helicobacter pylori kan dit bijvoorbeeld doen doo

  19. Natural Diversity in the N Terminus of the Mature Vacuolating Cytotoxin of Helicobacter pylori Determines Cytotoxin Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Letley, D. P.; Atherton, J C

    2000-01-01

    Naturally occurring noncytotoxic vacA type s2 strains of Helicobacter pylori have a 12-residue extension to the vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) compared with cytotoxic type s1 strains. We show that adding the region encoding this extension to type s1 vacA completely abolishes vacuolating cytotoxin activity but has no effect on VacA production.

  20. Characterization of flgK gene and FlgK protein required for H pylori Colonization-from cloning to clinical relevance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiunn-Jong Wu; Bor-Shyang Sheu; Ay-Huey Huang; Shin-Ting Lin; Hsiao-Bai Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the role of flgK and its protein product in H pylori colonization.METHODS: The PCR cloning method identified the flgK gene. An isogenic flgK mutant was constructed by gene replacement and confirmed by Southern blot analysis and PCR analysis. The recombinant FlgK protein (r-FlgK) was purified. Electron microscopy (EM) was applied to demonstrate the flagella of H pylori. An in vitro motility test was assessed in semisolid medium. The densities of H pylori colonization with either the wild-type strain or its flgK mutant were compared among BALB/c mice with or without pre-immunization with r-FlgK. The serological responses to r-FlgK were analyzed for 70 clinical patients with different densities of H pylori colonization.RESULTS: From a duodenal ulcer strain, the flgK gene was cloned and it contained 1821 bp, with a 95.7% identity to the published sequences. No flagella were observed under EM for the mutant strain, which had a loss of motility. H pylori density was lower in the BALB/c mice inoculated by the mutant or with pre-immunization with r-FlgK compared to unimmunized mice or mice inoculated by the wild-type strain (P < 0.05). In the H pylori-infected patients, the serological responses to r-FlgK were uniformly low in titer.CONCLUSION: FlgK encoded by flgK is important for flagella formation and H pylori motility. Deficiency in FlgK or an enhanced serological response to r-FlgK can interfere with H pylori colonization. FlgK of Hpylori could be a novel target for vaccination.

  1. High Frequency of cagA and vacA s1a/m2 Genotype among Helicobacter pylori Infected Gastric Biopsies of Pakistani Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vacuolating cytotoxin VacA and cytotoxin associated gene product CagA, encoded by vacA and cagA are major virulence determinants associated with pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori. The presence and prevalence of two major H. pylori virulence associated genes among gastric biopsies of Pakistani children were investigated in the current study. Fifty one gastric biopsy specimens of children were analysed for 16S rRNA, vacA and cagA genes using PCR. The results showed that 21 (41.2% biopsies were positive for H. pylori as determined by 16S rRNA PCR. In the 21 H. pylori positive gastric biopsies, 19 (90.5% showed vacA s1a, 1 (4.75% was vacA s1b and 1 (4.75% was vacA s2 whereas, 5 (23.8% were vacA m1 and 16 (76.2% were vacA m2. None of the H. pylori positive biopsies carried vacA s1c subtype. The cagA gene was found in 13 (61.9% of H. pylori infected biopsies and different vacA combinations were found with or without cagA gene. H. pylori was detected with high frequency of cagA while vacA s1a and vacA m2 regions with vacA s1a/m2 genotype were predominant in H. pylori infected gastric biopsies of children.

  2. Helicobacter pylori cholesteryl glucosides interfere with host membrane phase and affect type IV secretion system function during infection in AGS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Jung; Cheng, Wen-Chi; Cheng, Hsin-Hung; Lai, Chih-Ho; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an aetiological cause of gastric disorders worldwide. H. pylori has been shown to assimilate and convert host cholesterol into cholesteryl glucosides (CGs) by cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase encoded by capJ. Here, we show that CapJ-deficient (ΔcapJ) H. pylori resulted in greatly reduced type IV secretion system (TFSS)-associated activities, including the hummingbird phenotype of AGS cells, IL-8 production, CagA translocation/phosphorylation and CagA-mediated signalling events. Complementation of the ΔcapJ mutation with wild type cagJ or by adding CGs-containing lysates or exogenous fluorophore-tagged CGs reversed the mutant phenotypes. We also show that the wild-type but not ΔcapJ H. pylori recruited raft-associated components to sites of bacterial attachment. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis of AGS cells treated with fluorescence-tagged cholesterol/CGs revealed that there was a higher proportion of CGs associated with immobile fractions. CGs-associated membranes were also more resistant to a cold detergent extraction. Thus, we propose that CGs synthesized by H. pylori around host-pathogen contact sites partition in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), alters lateral-phase segregation in membrane and reorganizes membrane architecture. These processes together promote the formation of a functional TFSS and H. pylori infection.

  3. Helicobacter pylori promotes invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer cells through activation of AP-1 and up-regulation of CACUL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ying; Ma, Li-qing; Bai, Pei-song; Da, Rong; Sun, Hong; Qi, Xiao-gai; Ma, Jie-qun; Zhao, Ru-ming; Chen, Nan-zheng; Nan, Ke-jun

    2013-11-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is important in the development and progression of gastric cancer. However, the mechanisms that regulate this activation in gastric tumors remain elusive. CACUL1 has been cloned and identified as a novel gene that is expressed in many types of cancer and is involved in cell cycle regulation and tumor growth. The current study aimed to examine the expression of CACUL1 in gastric cancer samples and analyze its correlation with H. pylori infection. We found that CACUL1 was highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues and negatively correlated with gastric cancer differentiation and TNM stage. In addition, CACUL1 expression was high in H. pylori-infected tissues compared with H. pylori non-infected tissue. We found that H. pylori could up-regulate CACUL1 expression through activating protein 1. The up-regulation of CACUL1 expression could promote matrix metalloproteinase 9 and Slug expression to increase invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. These results suggested that H. pylori-triggered CACUL1 production occurred in an activating protein 1-dependent manner and regulated matrix metalloproteinase 9 and Slug expression to affect the invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. Therefore, CACUL1 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of aggressive gastric cancer.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  5. Chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP have recently emerged as a novel eliciting factor for chronic urticaria (CU. The possible association between HP and CU has enormous potential, as eradicating HP could cure CU. Aims and Objectives: We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of HP infection and effect of bacterium eradication on skin lesions in patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU. Settings and Design: Four hundred sixty patients of CU attending the allergy clinic, SMS hospital, Jaipur during the period February 6, 2004, to February 6, 2006, were screened for possible eliciting factors. Patients with CIU were enrolled and others were excluded. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight patients of CIU and similar number of age and sex matched controls, attending the allergy clinic, SMS Hospital, Jaipur were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endoscopy with antral biopsy for urease and histopathology to identify HP-associated gastritis. Infected patients were given HP eradication therapy. Eradication of bacterium was confirmed by fecal antigen assay. Subjective response to treatment was judged using chronic urticaria quality-of-life questionnaire (CU-Q 2 oL while objective response to treatment was judged by need for ′rescue medication′ (antihistaminics. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi square and paired′t′ test for their level of significance. Results: HP associated gastritis was present in 48 (70.58% patients, out of which 39 (81.25% patients responded to eradication therapy. Ten (50.00% patients without HP associated gastritis showed response to symptomatic therapy. Overall 49 (72.05% patients responded and 19 (27.94% showed no response. The value of χ2 was 28.571 (P = 0.003, which showed significant association between presence of HP and response to eradication regimen. Conclusion: The response of HP eradication therapy in infected patients of CIU is significant. HP should be included in diagnostic

  6. Dyslipidemia and H pylori in gastric xanthomatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Young Yi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship among gastric xanthomatosis (GX),H pylori, dyslipidemia, and gastritis in Korea, a well-known H pylori endemic area.METHODS: A total of 771 patients who had undergone gastroduodenoscopy by one endoscopist were included in this study. Among them, 54 patients with GX were assessed for H pylori infection and their endoscopic characteristics and serum lipid profiles. The findings were compared with 54 age- and sex-matched control subjects without GX.RESULTS: The prevalence of GX was 7% (54/771) with no sex difference. GX was mainly single (64.8%) and located in the antrum (53.7%). The mean diameter was 7 ± 3 mm. Mean body mass index (BMI) of patients with GX was 23.1 ± 2.8 and no one was above 30.Compared with the controls, lipid profiles of GX group showed significantly lower HDL-cholesterol (48.8 ± 12.3vs 62.9 ± 40.5, P = 0.028) and higher LDL-cholesterol (112.9 ± 29.9 vs 95.9 ± 22.4, P = 0.032). The level of total serum cholesterol, triglyceride and the existence of dyslipoproteinemia were not related to the presence of GX. However, GX showed a close relationship with endoscopically determined atrophic gastritis and histologic severity (24/53, 44.4% vs 8/54, 14.8%, P =0.0082). H pylori infection and bile reflux gastritis were not significantly related with GX.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of GX is 7% and it may be an increasing entity in Korea. Moreover, dyslipidemia and atrophic gastritis are found to be related to GX, but H pylori infection is not.

  7. Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigro Casimiro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nature of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and reflux oesophagitis is still not clear. To investigate the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and GERD taking into account endoscopic, pH-metric and histopathological data. Methods Between January 2001 and January 2003 a prospective study was performed in 146 patients with GERD in order to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection at gastric mucosa; further the value of the De Meester score endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric parameters, i.e. reflux episodes, pathological reflux episodes and extent of oesophageal acid exposure, of the patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection were studied and statistically compared. Finally, univariate analysis of the above mentioned data were performed in order to evaluate the statistical correlation with reflux esophagitis. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups, HP infected and HP negative patients, regarding age, gender and type of symptoms. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding severity of symptoms and manometric parameters. The value of the De Meester score and the ph-metric parameters were similar in both groups. On univariate analysis, we observed that hiatal hernia (p = 0,01, LES size (p = 0,05, oesophageal wave length (p = 0,01 and pathological reflux number (p = 0,05 were significantly related to the presence of reflux oesophagitis. Conclusion Based on these findings, it seems that there is no significant evidence for an important role for H. pylori infection in the development of GERD and erosive esophagitis. Nevertheless, current data do not provide sufficient evidence to define the relationship between HP and GERD. Further assessments in prospective large studies are warranted.

  8. Challenges in Diagnosis of H. Pylori Infection in Children

    OpenAIRE

    M Sobhani Shahmirzadi

    2014-01-01

    H. pylori infection is usually acquired in early childhood. Its role in gastrointestinal and extra intestinal complaints and serious consequences in adulthood make it as challenging issues. Despite different clinical presentations, in most children, the presence of H. pylori infection does not lead to clinically apparent disease, even when it causes chronic active gastritis. Some of most important recommendations for managing H. pylori infection in children based on Guidelines from ESPGHAN an...

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been wel...

  10. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    OpenAIRE

    Wroblewski Lydia E; Peek Richard M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gas...

  11. Management and response to treatment of Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, M J; Wyatt, J I; Littlewood, J M

    1992-01-01

    Gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori was present in gastric biopsies from 24/95 (25%) children and adolescents undergoing endoscopy for recurrent abdominal pain and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. H pylori associated gastritis occurred mainly in older children (8-16 years) and was significantly associated with low socioeconomic class and a family history of peptic ulcer disease. Antral nodularity was a common endoscopic finding in H pylori positive children. Eighteen children, all o...

  12. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Patients and methods Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. Results A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, pgastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status. PMID:28860835

  13. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wroblewski Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gastric epithelial barrier.

  14. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Ontario: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Naja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been classified by the World Health Organization as a type I carcinogen. Nearly 50% of the world’s population is estimated to be infected with H pylori. Prevalence patterns of the infection are different between developing and developed countries. The present study had two objectives – to estimate the prevalence of H pylori infection in Ontario, and to evaluate the relationship between the infection and various demographic characteristics and selected lifestyle factors.

  15. Cloning and Expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Moein Farshchian; Saman Hoseinkhani; Javad Atoofi; Shahin Najar Peerayeh

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinomaand gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Antibiotictherapies do not protect from potential re-infection and have a risk for development of drugresistance. Therefore, prophylactic vaccine mediated protection against H. pylori is an attractiveclinical interest. H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA) is a conserved surface lipoprotein and playsimportant roles in the pathogenesis of...

  16. Precise role of H pylori in duodenal ulceration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Hobsley; Frank I Tovey; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    The facts that H pylori infection is commoner in duodenal ulcer (DU) patients than in the normal population, and that eradication results in most cases being cured,have led to the belief that it causes DU. However, early cases of DU are less likely than established ones to be infected. H pylori-negative cases are usually ascribed to specific associated factors such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), Crohn's disease,and hypergastrinaemia, but even after excluding these, several H pylori-negative cases remain and are particularly common in areas of low prevalence of H pylori infection. Moreover, this incidence of H pylori negative DU is not associated with a fall in overall DU prevalence when compared with countries with a higher H pylori prevalence. In countries with a high H pylori prevalence there are regional differences in DU prevalence, but no evidence of an overall higher prevalence of DU than in countries with a low H pylori prevalence. There is no evidence that virulence factors are predictive of clinical outcome. After healing following eradication of H pylori infection DU can still recur.Medical or surgical measures to reduce acid output can lead to long-term healing despite persistence of H pylori infection. Up to half of cases of acute DU perforation are H pylori negative. These findings lead to the conclusion that H pylori infection does not itself cause DU, but leads to resistance to healing, i.e., chronicity. This conclusion is shown not to be incompatible with the universally high prevalence of DU compared with controls.

  17. [On the rating of Helicobacter pylori in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedichkina, T P; Solenova, L G; Zykova, I E

    2014-01-01

    There are considered the issues related to the possibility to rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) content in drinking water. There is described the mechanism of of biofilm formation. The description refers to the biofilm formation mechanism in water supply systems and the existence of H. pylori in those systems. The objective premises of the definition of H. pylori as a potential limiting factor for assessing the quality of drinking water have been validated as follows: H. pylori is an etiologic factor associated to the development of chronic antral gastritis, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer either, in the Russian population the rate of infection with H. pylori falls within range of 56 - 90%, water supply pathway now can be considered as a source of infection of the population with H. pylori, the existence of WHO regulatory documents considering H. pylori as a candidate for standardization of the quality of the drinking water quite common occurrence of biocorrosion, the reduction of sanitary water network reliability, that creates the possibility of concentrating H. pylori in some areas of the water system and its delivery to the consumer of drinking water, and causes the necessity of the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology of the population. A comprehensive and harmonized approach to H. pylori is required to consider it as a candidate to its rating in drinking water. Bearing in mind the large economic losses due to, on the one hand, the prevalence of disease caused by H. pylori, and, on the other hand, the biocorrosion of water supply system, the problem is both relevant in terms of communal hygiene and economy.

  18. Helicobacter pylori damages human gallbladder epithelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori (Hpy/orO damages human gallbladder epithelial cells (HGBEC).METHODS: H pylori isolated from gallbladder were cultured in a liquid medium. Different concentration supernatants and sonicated extracts of H pylori cells were then added to HGBEC in a primary culture. The morphological changes in HGBEC as well as changes in the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutamyltransferase (GGT)were measured.RESULTS: According to the culture curve of HGBEC,it was convenient to study the changes in HGBEC by adding H pylori sonicated extracts and H pylori culture supernatants. Both H pylori sonicated extracts and H pylori culture supernatants had a significant influence on HGBEC morphology, i.e. HGBEC grew more slowly, their viability decreased and their detachment increased. Furthermore, HGBEC ruptured and died. The levels of ALP (33.84 ± 6.00 vs 27.01± 4.67, P < 0.05), LDH (168.37 ± 20.84 vs 55.51 ±17.17, P < 0.01) and GGT (42.01 ± 6.18 vs 25.34 ±4.33, P < 0.01) significantly increased in the HGBEC culture supernatant in a time- and concentrationdependent. The damage to HGBEC in Hpylori culture liquid was more significant than that in H pylori sonicated extracts.CONCLUSION: H pylori induces no obvious damage to HGBEC.

  19. Celecoxib inhibits Helicobacter pylori colonization-related factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of celecoxib,a selective COX-2 inhibitor,on Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) colonization-related factors and its mechanism.METHODS:After co-incubation with celecoxib,morphology of H.pylori strain 26695 was observed under a transmission electron microscope.Flagella motility was assessed by stab agar motility test.Adherence of H.pylori to AGS cells was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Levels of mRNA expression in flagellar genes(flaA,flaB),urease genes(ureA,ureB)and ...

  20. Chronic Gastritis and its Association with H. Pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatema, J; Khan, A H; Uddin, M J; Rahman, M H; Saha, M; Safwath, S A; Alam, M J; Mamun, M A

    2015-10-01

    This cross sectional study was designed to see association of chronic gastritis including its type with H. pylori infection. Consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic examination having histopathological evidence of chronic gastritis were enrolled in the study and was done in Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College from July 2011 to June 2012. Biopsies were taken from antrum, body and fundus in all patients. Histopathological examinations were done using H-E stain and for detection of H. pylori, rapid urease test, anti-H.pylori antibody test and histopathological test with modified Giemsa stain were done. Patients having results positive in at least two methods were considered infected by H. pylori. Total 80 dyspeptic patients having chronic gastritis were evaluated. Out of them 67(83.8%) had H. pylori infection and 13(16.2%) were H. pylori negative. Among all patients 57(71.2%) had pangastritis and 23(28.8%) had antral gastritis with female and male predominance respectively. H. pylori infection was present in 49(86.0%) cases of pangastritis and 18(78.3%) cases of antral gastritis. H. pylori infection was a little higher among males (34, 50.7%) females (33, 49.3%). H. pylori infection is the predominant cause of chronic gastritis and pangastritis is the major type.

  1. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamori, Satoshi; Higashida, Akihiro; Kawara, Fumiaki; Ohnishi, Katsuhiro; Takeda, Akihiko; Senda, Eri; Ashida, Cho; Yamada, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H. pylori infection, underwent gastro-endoscopy, and were treated with H. pylori eradication therapy. Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d. All of the patients underwent a 13C urea breath test at least 1 mo after the completion of eradication therapy. The current study investigated the independent factors associated with successful H. pylori eradication using a multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The overall success rate in the patients was 85.8%. Among the general factors examined in the multivariate analyses, only having an age less than 50 years was found to be significantly associated with a poor response to H. pylori eradication. Moreover, side effects were the only clinical factors in the patients who were under 50 years of age that significantly influenced the poor response to H. pylori eradication. CONCLUSION: H. pylori-positive elderly patients should undergo eradication therapy. In addition, it is necessary to improve H. pylori eradication therapy in younger patients. PMID:20806435

  2. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Mi; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Eui Young; Jang, Eun Kyung; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims There have been controversial reports linking Helicobacter pylori infection to autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). However, data regarding the relationship are limited for Asian populations, which have an extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. We performed this study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and AITD in Koreans. Methods This study involved adults aged 30 to 70 years who had visited a health promotion center. A total of 5,502 subjects were analysed. Thyroid status was assessed by free thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to H. pylori were measured as an indication of H. pylori infection. We compared the prevalence of TPO-Ab in subjects with and without H. pylori infection. Results H. pylori IgG antibodies were found in 2,875 subjects (52.3%), and TPO-Ab were found in 430 (7.8%). Individuals positive for H. pylori Ab were older than those negative for H. pylori Ab (p thyroiditis. PMID:28092700

  3. Helicobacter pylori vs coronary heart disease- searching for connections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena; Chmiela; Adrian; Gajewski; Karolina; Rudnicka

    2015-01-01

    In this review,we discussed the findings and concepts underlying the potential role of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infections in the initiation,development or persistence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease(CHD).This Gram-negative bacterium was described by Marshall and Warren in 1984.The majority of infected subjects carries and transmits H.pylori with no symptoms; however,in some individuals these bacteria may cause peptic ulcers,and even gastric cancers.The widespread prevalence of H.pylori infections and the fact that frequently they remain asymptomatic may suggest that,similarly to intestinal microflora,H.pylori may deliver antigens that stimulate not only local,but also systemic inflammatory response.Recently,possible association between H.pylori infection and extragastric disorders has been suggested.Knowledge on the etiology of atherosclerosis together with current findings in the area of H.pylori infections constitute the background for the newly proposed hypothesis that those two processes may be related.Many research studies confirm the indirect association between the prevalence of H.pylori and the occurrence of CHD.According to majority of findings the involvement of H.pylori in this process is based on the chronic inflammation which might facilitate the CHDrelated pathologies.It needs to be elucidated,if the infection initiates or just accelerates the formation of atheromatous plaque.

  4. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  5. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection: Bacterium and host relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of a half of the mankind. Duodenal ulcer is found in 15-25%, t gastric ulcer in 13%, while gastric adenocarcinoma develops in 1% of all infected individuals. Pathogenesis of H. pylori infection is related to the virulence factors of the bacterium, environmental (dietary habits, hygiene, stress and host factors (age, sex, blood type. Colonization of the gastric mucosa is related to the motility of the bacterium, presence of lipopolysacharide (LPS and various bacterial enzymes. Gastric mucosal injury is the result of H. pylori LPS, vacuolization cytotoxin (vacA, cytotoxin associated protein (cagA, heat shock proteins and factors responsible for neutrophil chemotaxis and activity. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa and zones of ectopic gastric epithelium. H. pylori infection is transmitted via oral-oral, fecal-oral and iatrogenic way (during endoscopy. Higher prevalence of the infection is associated with lower socioeconomic level, lack of drinking water, and living in a community. Acute H. pylori gastritis is superficial pangastritis progressing into the chronic phase after 7-10 days. Gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia can develop during the course of H. pylori infection. Clearly defined factors that influence the outcome of H. pylori infection include bacterial strain, distribution of gastritis, acid secretion and gastric mucosal atrophy.

  6. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  7. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi; Mamori; Akihiro; Higashida; Fumiaki; Kawara; Katsuhiro; Ohnishi; Akihiko; Takeda; Eri; Senda; Cho; Ashida; Hajime; Yamada

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)infection.METHODS:The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H.pylori infection,underwent gastroendoscopy,and were treated with H.pylori eradication therapy.Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d.All of the patients underwent a 13 C urea breath test at least 1 mo...

  8. Construction and characterization of bivalent vaccine candidate expressing HspA and Mr18000 OMP from Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jiang; Ai-Long Huang; Xiao-Hong Tao; Pi-Long Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant vector which can express outer membrane protein (OMP) with Mr18 000 and heat shock protein A (HspA) from Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)in E.coli BL21, and to exploit the possibility for obtaining the vaccine conferring protection from H. pylori infection.METHODS: The target gene of HspA was amplified from H.pylori chromosome by PCR, and then inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a (+) by restrictive endonuclease enzyme kpn Ⅰ, BamH Ⅰ simultaneously. The recombinant vector was used to sequence, and then together with pET32a (+)/Omp18, digested by restrictive endonuclease enzyme Hind Ⅲ and BamH Ⅰ simultaneously. pET32a(+)/HspA and Omp18 were recovered from 1% agarose gel by gel kit, and ligated with T4 ligase by BarmH Ⅰ digested viscidity end. The recombinant plasmid of pET32a(+)/HspA/Omp18 was transformed and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) under induction of IPTG. After purification, its antigenicity of the fusion protein was detected by Western blot.RESULTS: Enzyme digestion analysis and sequencing showed that the target genes were inserted into the recombinant vector, composed of 891 base pairs, encoded objective polypeptides of 297 amino acid residues. Compared with GenBank reported by Tomb et al, there were 1.3 %and 1.4 % differences in obtained H. pylori nucleotide sequence and amino acid residues, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that relative molecule mass (Mr) of the expressed product was Mr 51 000,Mr of protein expressed by pET32a (+) was about Mr 20 000, and soluble expression product accounted for 18.96 % of total bacterial protein.After purification with Ni+2-NTA agarose resins, the purification of recombinant fusion protein was about 95 %. Western blot showed that recombinant fusion protein could be recognized by the patients′ serum infected with H. pylori and anti-Omp18 monoclone, suggesting that this protein had good antigenicity.CONCLUSION: The gene coding for H. pylori Mr18 000OMP and

  9. Inflammatory cytokine and microRNA responses of primary human dendritic cells cultured with Helicobacter pylori strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs eHocès De La Guardia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary human dendritic cells (DC were used to explore the inflammatory effectors, including cytokines and microRNAs, regulated by Helicobacter pylori. In a 48 h ex-vivo co-culture system, both H. pylori B38 and B45 strains activated human DCs and promoted a strong inflammatory response characterized by the early production of pro-inflammatory TNF and IL-6 cytokines, followed by IL-10, IL-1ß and IL-23 secretion. IL-23 was the only cytokine dependent on the cag pathogenicity island status of the bacterial strains. DC activation and cytokine production were accompanied by an early miR-146a upregulation followed by a strong miR-155 induction, which mainly controlled TNFα production. These results pave the way for further investigations into the nature of H. pylori antigens and the subsequently activated signaling pathways involved in the inflammatory response to H. pylori infection, the deregulation of which may likely contribute to gastric lymphomagenesis.

  10. Binary mixture of Satureja hortensis and Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum essential oils: in vivo therapeutic efficiency against Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmati, Maria; Gyukity-Sebestyen, Edina; Dobra, Gabriella; Terhes, Gabriella; Urban, Edit; Decsi, Gabor; Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Lesjak, Marija; Simin, Nataša; Pap, Bernadett; Nemeth, Istvan B; Buzas, Krisztina

    2017-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori can cause many gastrointestinal and also extra-gastrointestinal disorders and is a major risk factor for gastric carcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Currently, numerous antibiotic-based therapies are available; however, these therapies have numerous drawbacks, mainly due to increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic agents against H. pylori infections. In this study, the anti-H. pylori activity of 2:1 mixture of Satureja hortensis and Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum essential oils (2MIX) was investigated in vivo. After screening in vitro cytotoxicity of 2MIX on mammalian cell lines, the therapeutic efficiency was studied in a mouse model, where changes in H. pylori colonization were detected by PCR and histology of gastric samples. The immune reaction of mice was tested based on cytokine and chemokine production, and the in vivo toxicity of 2MIX was also investigated by measuring ALT and AST enzyme activities and Cyp3a11 and HO-1 mRNA levels in livers of mice. 2MIX had not shown in vitro cytotoxicity against cell lines, only the highest concentration caused significant decrease in their survival rates. In the in vivo experiments, 2MIX successfully eradicated the pathogen in 70% of the mice. We could not detect toxicity or altered cytokine and chemokine balance after in vivo treatments in mice. These results show that 2MIX is effective in reducing H. pylori colonization suggesting that this essential oil mixture has great potential as a new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent against H. pylori. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Helicobacter pylori may induce bile reflux: link between H pylori and bile induced injury to gastric epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, S D; Katsogridakis, J; Malamou, H; Giannopoulou, H; Kesse-Elia, M; Raptis, S A

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and duodenogastric reflux are both recognised as playing aetiological roles in chronic gastritis. This study investigated whether H pylori colonisation of the antral mucosa and duodenogastric reflux are independent phenomena or have a causal relationship. Thirty eight patients (15 men, 23 women) aged (mean (SD)) 48 (17) years participated. Each patient underwent gastroscopy. Antral biopsy specimens were taken to investigate H pylori colonisation. In addition BrIDA-99mTc/111In-DTPA scintigraphy was used to quantify duodenogastric reflux. H pylori positive patients who were found to have duodenogastric reflux were treated with amoxycillin (1 g/d) and metronidazole (1.5 g/d) for seven days and four tablets of bismuth subcitrate daily for four weeks. Follow up antral biopsies and scintigraphy were repeated at six months. Duodenogastric reflux could not be found in 18 patients, including eight (44%) who were H pylori positive. Ten of the 11 patients who had duodenogastric reflux (reflux % 11.6 (9.2)), however, were H pylori positive (chi 2 = 6.26, p = 0.01). These 10 patients were given eradication treatment. At six months, in six patients who became H pylori negative, duodenogastric reflux was significantly reduced from a pretreatment value of 14.3% to 3.3% (two tail, paired t = 2.57, p = 0.016). These data suggest that H pylori may induced duodenogastric reflux which may be important in the pathogenesis of H pylori gastritis or carcinogenesis, or both. PMID:8566844

  12. Helicobacter pylori: recent advances in the study of its pathogenicity and prevention Helicobacter pylori: avances recientes en el estudio de su prevención y patogenicidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán R. Aguilar

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has acquired great importance during the last two decades, after being recognized as an important pathogen that infects a great portion of the human population. This microorganism is recognized as the main causal agent of chronic gastritis and duodenal ulcers, and it is associated with the subsequent development of gastric carcinoma. The pathogenic mechanisms of H. pylori and their relation to gastric ailments have not been clearly defined. However, at present it is well established that urease, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, and the pathogenicity island (cag PAI gene products, are the main factors of virulence of this organism. Thus, individuals infected with strains that express these virulence factors probably develop a severe local inflammation that may induce the development of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. The way the infection spreads throughout the world suggests the possibility that there are multiple pathways of transmission. Due to the importance that H. pylori has acquired as a human pathogen, laboratories worldwide are attempting to develop a vaccine that confers long-term immunological protection against infection by this microorganism. Hence, the objective of this review is to present the most relevant findings of the biology of H. Pylori and its interaction with the human host. The full version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlHelicobacter pylori ha adquirido gran importancia durante las últimas dos décadas, al ser reconocido como un importante patógeno que infecta una gran porción de la población humana. Este microrganismo es reconocido como el principal agente que causa la gastritis crónica y la úlcera duodenal, además de que se ha asociado con el subsecuente desarrollo del carcinoma gástrico. Los mecanismos patogénicos de H. pylori y su relación con los padecimientos gástricos no se han definido en forma clara. Sin embargo, actualmente está bien establecido

  13. Helicobacter pylori-induced modulation of the promoter methylation of Wnt antagonist genes in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyo-Joon; Kim, Sang Gyun; Lim, Joo Hyun; Choi, Ji Min; Kim, Woo Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2017-06-22

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in the promoter methylation and gene expression of multiple Wnt antagonists between the chronic infection and eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in gastric carcinogenesis. The levels of methylation and corresponding mRNA expression of seven Wnt antagonist genes (SFRP1, -2, -5, DKK1, -2, -3, WIF1) were compared among the patients with H. pylori-positive gastric cancers (GCs), and H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative controls, by quantitative MethyLight assay and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. The changes of the methylation and expression levels of the genes were also compared between the H. pylori eradication and H. pylori-persistent groups 1 year after endoscopic resection of GCs. The methylation levels of SFRP and DKK family genes were significantly increased in the patients with H. pylori-positive GCs and followed by H. pylori-positive controls compared with H. pylori-negative controls (P pylori-negative controls, H. pylori-positive controls, and to H. pylori-positive GCs (P pylori eradication (P pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. The epigenetic field may not be reversed even after H. pylori eradication except by DKK3 methylation.

  14. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  15. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  16. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Systems modeling of the role of interleukin-21 in the maintenance of effector CD4+ T cell responses during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbo, Adria; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Delgado, Alberto; Washington, M Kay; Wilson, Keith T; Algood, Holly M Scott

    2014-07-22

    The development of gastritis during Helicobacter pylori infection is dependent on an activated adaptive immune response orchestrated by T helper (Th) cells. However, the relative contributions of the Th1 and Th17 subsets to gastritis and control of infection are still under investigation. To investigate the role of interleukin-21 (IL-21) in the gastric mucosa during H. pylori infection, we combined mathematical modeling of CD4(+) T cell differentiation with in vivo mechanistic studies. We infected IL-21-deficient and wild-type mice with H. pylori strain SS1 and assessed colonization, gastric inflammation, cellular infiltration, and cytokine profiles. Chronically H. pylori-infected IL-21-deficient mice had higher H. pylori colonization, significantly less gastritis, and reduced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines compared to these parameters in infected wild-type littermates. These in vivo data were used to calibrate an H. pylori infection-dependent, CD4(+) T cell-specific computational model, which then described the mechanism by which IL-21 activates the production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-17 during chronic H. pylori infection. The model predicted activated expression of T-bet and RORγt and the phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT1 and suggested a potential role of IL-21 in the modulation of IL-10. Driven by our modeling-derived predictions, we found reduced levels of CD4(+) splenocyte-specific tbx21 and rorc expression, reduced phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3, and an increase in CD4(+) T cell-specific IL-10 expression in H. pylori-infected IL-21-deficient mice. Our results indicate that IL-21 regulates Th1 and Th17 effector responses during chronic H. pylori infection in a STAT1- and STAT3-dependent manner, therefore playing a major role controlling H. pylori infection and gastritis. Importance: Helicobacter pylori is the dominant member of the gastric microbiota in more than 50% of the world's population. H. pylori colonization has

  18. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in benign gastric ulcers in a cohort of Sri Lankan patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijetunge, S; Kotakadeniya, R; Noordeen, F; Buharideen, S M; Samarasinghe, B; Dharmapala, A; Galketiya, K B

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence is decreasing globally and prevalence of non H. pylori gastric ulcers is increasing. The following study was conducted to assess the prevalence of H. pylori in benign gastric ulcers in a sample of Sri Lankan patients. This was a cross-sectional study of 59 dyspeptic patients with benign gastric ulcers. Multiple endoscopic gastric biopsies were obtained and histology, immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction were performed for H. pylori detection. An immunochromatography assay was performed to detect blood anti H. pylori antibodies. Four (6.8%) were positive for H. pylori. Therefore, it is likely that most benign gastric ulcers are of non-H. pylori aetiology.

  19. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  20. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  1. Helicobacter pylori and gastric or duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, treatment of the infection improves healing and prevents complications and recurrences. The drug regimen generally consists of a high-dose proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole plus antibiotics. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we conducted a review of the literature in order to determine the standard empirical antibiotic regimen for H. pylori infection in adults with gastric or duodenal ulcer in France. In 2015, due to an increase in H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, a 7-day course of the PPI + clarithromycin + amoxicillin combination is effective in only about 70% of cases. A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of trials involving thousands of patients suggests that prolonging treatment with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin or a PPI + amoxicillin + metronidazole to 10 or 14 days improves the rate of H. pylori eradication by 5% to 10%. A metanalysis of seven trials including a total of about 1000 patients showed that combination therapy with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days eradicates H. pylori in about 90% of cases, compared to about 80% of cases with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin given for 7 days. Sequential treatment with amoxicillin for 5 days, followed by clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days, has also been tested in thousands of patients. Efficacy and adverse effects were similar to those observed when the same antibiotics were taken simultaneously for 5 days. In randomised trials, replacing clarithromycin or amoxicillin with a fluoroquinolone yielded conflicting results. In 2009, nearly 20% of H. pylori isolates were resistant to levofloxacin in France. Tetracycline has only been evaluated in combination with bismuth. The few available data on doxycycline suggest that its efficacy is similar to that of tetracycline. A fixed-dose combination of bismuth subcitrate potassium + metronidazole

  2. Dual Roles of Helicobacter pylori NapA in inducing and combating oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Hong, Yang; Olczak, Adriana; Maier, Susan E; Maier, Robert J

    2006-12-01

    Neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) has been well documented to play roles in human neutrophil recruitment and in stimulating host cell production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). A separate role for NapA in combating oxidative stress within H. pylori was implied by studies of various H. pylori mutant strains. Here, physiological analysis of a napA strain was the approach used to assess the iron-sequestering and stress resistance roles of NapA, its role in preventing oxidative DNA damage, and its importance to mouse colonization. The napA strain was more sensitive to oxidative stress reagents and to oxygen, and it contained fourfold more intracellular free iron and more damaged DNA than the parent strain. Pure, iron-loaded NapA bound to DNA, but native NapA did not, presumably linking iron levels sensed by NapA to DNA damage protection. Despite its in vitro phenotype of sensitivity to oxidative stress, the napA strain showed normal (like that of the wild type) mouse colonization efficiency in the conventional in vivo assay. By use of a modified mouse inoculation protocol whereby nonviable H. pylori is first inoculated into mice, followed by (live) bacterial strain administration, an in vivo role for NapA in colonization efficiency could be demonstrated. NapA is the critical component responsible for inducing host-mediated ROI production, thus inhibiting colonization by the napA strain. An animal colonization experiment with a mixed-strain infection protocol further demonstrated that the napA strain has significantly decreased ability to survive when competing with the wild type. H. pylori NapA has unique and separate roles in gastric pathogenesis.

  3. Systems analysis of metabolism in Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric diseases, such as gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinomas. Despite more than half of the global population being infected with this bacterium, not all individuals will develop clinical symptoms. Nevertheless, its association with gastric cancer, the high infection rate, as well as the failures on eradication ...

  4. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Karimi; Koroush Fakhimi Derakhshan; Farid Imanzadeh; Mohamad Rezaei; Zahra Cavoshzadeh; Saeid Maham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and ...

  5. H. PYLORI AND GASTROPATHY IN DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Koval V. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 11 years the prevalence of diabetes in Ukraine has increased rapidly – from 1.8 to 2.8%. This especially concerns children and adolescents. The progression and compensation of the diabetes depend on many factors. In today’s medical literature the role of Helicobacter рylori in the development and progression of diabetic gastroparesis is widely discussed. In addition, the issue of the necessity and feasibility of H. Pylori eradication in these patients is ...

  6. Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori and Acid Peptic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sigmund Kradjen; Philip Sherman

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacteria implicated as a cause of histological gastritis, contributing to peptic ulcer disease and perhaps playing a role in gastric cancer in humans. The organism is found worldwide; the prevalence of infection increases with age; and colonization probably persists for life. Diagnostic approaches chat have been used include tissue stains, culture of stomach biopsy specimens, labelled-urea breath tests and serology. It is ...

  7. [Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Zaterka, Schlioma

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one the five main topics of the meeting: H. pylori and dyspepsia, H. pylori and NSAIDs, H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, H. pylori treatment, and H. pylori retreatment. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. The results were presented during a special session on the VI Brazilian Week of Digestive System, in Recife, PE (October 2004), and this publication represents the summary of the main recommendations and conclusions emerged from the meeting.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection and typhoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Verspaget, H.W.; Ali, S.; Visser, L.G.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the association between typhoid fever and Helicobacter pylori infection, as the latter microorganism may influence gastric acid secretion and consequently increase susceptibility to Salmonella typhi infection. Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibody titres (ELISA) and gastrin concentration

  9. Helicobacter pylori and cancer among adults in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens Marilyn

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Data from Africa on infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are sparse. Therefore, as part of an epidemiological study of cancer in Uganda, we investigated the prevalence and determinants of antibodies against H. pylori among 854 people with different cancer types and benign tumours. Patients were recruited from hospitals in Kampala, Uganda, interviewed about various demographic and lifestyle factors and tested for antibodies against H. pylori. In all patients combined, excluding those with stomach cancer (which has been associated with H. pylori infection, the prevalence of antibodies was 87% (723/833 overall, but declined with increasing age (p = 0.02 and was lower among people who were HIV seropositive compared to seronegative (p H. pylori antibodies (odds ratio 0.8, 95% confidence intervals 0.2–2.9, p = 0.7; estimated using all other patients as controls, with adjustment for age, sex and HIV serostatus. No other cancer site or type was significantly associated with anti-H. pylori antibodies. The prevalence of H. pylori reported here is broadly in accord with results from other developing countries, although the determinants of infection and its' role in the aetiology of gastric cancer in Uganda remain unclear.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gerrits (Monique)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAn estimated 4 to 5 million individuals in the Netherlands are actively infected with Helicobacter pylori. Eradication of this bacterium becomes more difficult as the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide. Most H. pylori infections are now diagnosed by non-invasi

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection and typhoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Verspaget, H.W.; Ali, S.; Visser, L.G.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the association between typhoid fever and Helicobacter pylori infection, as the latter microorganism may influence gastric acid secretion and consequently increase susceptibility to Salmonella typhi infection. Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibody titres (ELISA) and gastrin concentration

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Céu; Seruca, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...

  13. Helicobacter pylori in out-patients of a general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G; Winz, T

    1997-01-01

    Data on prevalence and determinants of Helicobacter pylori infection in well-defined populations are scarce. We investigated the prevalence and determinants of active H. pylori infection in a population of out-patients attending a general practitioner in Southern Germany. Infection status...

  14. Epidemiology of the Antibiotic Resistance of Helicobacter pylori in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo A Fallone

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rate of Helicobacter pylori resistance to antibiotics determines the cure rate of treatment regimens containing such antibiotics. AIMS: To review the literature to determine the rates of H pylori resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin in Canada, and whether these rates vary in different regions of Canada.

  15. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in female Vietnamese immigrants to Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Jung Baik; Sun Young Yi; Hye Sook Park; Bo Hyun Park

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its relationship to nutritional factors in ^emale Vietnamese immigrants to Korea.METHODS: A total of 390 female immigrants from Vietnam and 206 Korean male spouses participated in the study. Blood samples from 321 female immigrants and 201 Korean male spouses were analyzed for H. pylori antibodies. Data on age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking status, dietary nutritional factors and gastrointestinal symptoms were collected using questionnaires. The daily intakes of the following nutrients were estimated: energy, protein, niacin, lipid, fiber, calcium, iron, sodium, potassium, zinc, folate, cholesterol, and vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, C and E.RESULTS: The prevalence of H. pylori positivity was lower in the immigrants than in age-matched Korean females (55.7% vs 71.4%, respectively; P < 0.0001) and the domestic population of Vietnam. The prevalence of H. pylori positivity among married couples was 31.7% for both spouses. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of smoking, amount of alcohol consumed, or nutritional factors between the H. pylori-positive and negative groups.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H. pylori positivity was lower among female Vietnamese immigrants than among Korean females. Nutritional factors did not differ between the H. pylori-positive and negative groups.

  16. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in HIV-infected patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Daniel T; Morgan, Christopher J; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    The risk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are different: H. pylori is transmitted by gastro- or fecal-oral routes and is associated with low socioeconomic conditions, while HIV is transmitted through sexual intercourse, infected body fluids, and transplacentally. If the host responses to these infections were independent, the prevalence of H. pylori should be similar in HIV-infected and non-infected patients. Yet, several studies have detected a lower prevalence of H. pylori in patients with HIV infection, whereas other studies found either no differences or greater rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-positive subjects. To review studies that addressed the issue of these two simultaneous infections and attempt to determine whether reliable conclusions can be drawn from this corpus of often contrasting evidence. Electronic literature search for relevant publications, followed by manual search of additional citations from extracted articles. The initial search yielded 44 publications; after excluding case reports, reviews, narrowly focused articles, and duplicate reports, there remained 29 articles, which are the corpus of this review. With one exception, all studies reported higher rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-negative subjects. Five studies also examined the CD4 lymphocyte counts and found an inverse correlation between the degree of immunosuppression and the prevalence of active H. pylori infection. Current evidence suggests that it is likely that H. pylori needs a functional immune system to successfully and persistently colonize the human gastric mucosa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: Relationship with the gastric infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available. PMID:25110422

  18. Flocculation of venereal disease research laboratory reagent by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K D; von Recklinghausen, G; Heintschel von Heinegg, E; Ansorg, R

    1991-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains flocculated with Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) reagent in a glass slide test. Other pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains were nonreactive. The specific VDRL reaction property of Helicobacter pylori indicates an affinity of the cells for lipoidal substances, and can be used as a diagnostic aid for species identification.

  19. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: relationship with the gastric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-08-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available.

  20. Natural maternal transmission of H pylori in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Uk Lee; Okjin Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate maternal H pylori infection status to determine the potential of maternal transmission.METHODS: In the present study, we examined these issues in an experimental murine model, which is a Mongolian gerbil model that has been reported as an optimal laboratory animal model to study H pylori.Pregnant Mongolian gerbils, infected experimentally with H pylori, were divided into as four groups. Following the experimental design, the stomachs of the mother and litters were isolated and assessed for transmission of H pylori at the prenatal period, parturition day, 1-wk old and 3-wk old respectively. Bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to examine the presence of transmitted H pylori.RESULTS: All litters showed no transmission of H pylori during pregnancy and at parturition day. However, they revealed 33.3% and 69.6% at 1-wk and 3-wk of age respectively by PCR.CONCLUSION: These results suggested that vertical infection during the prenatal period or delivery procedure is unlikely as a route of mother-to-child H pylori infection.It may be that H pylori is acquired through breastfeeding, contaminated saliva and fecal-oral transmission during co-habitation.

  1. RECOVERY OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI FROM WATER BY IMMUNOMAGNETIC CAPTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A few reports have been written stating that H. pylori can be found in waters. However, detection and identification of H. pylori from water samples remains a very difficult task. One method that seems to work successfully is immunomagnetic capture. Water samples were concentr...

  2. What constitutes an Arabian Helicobacter pylori? Lessons from comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narender; Albert, M John; Al Abkal, Hanan; Siddique, Iqbal; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori, the human gastric pathogen, causes a variety of gastric diseases ranging from mild gastritis to gastric cancer. While the studies on H. pylori are dominated by those based on either East Asian or Western strains, information regarding H. pylori strains prevalent in the Middle East remains scarce. Therefore, we carried out whole-genome sequencing and comparative analysis of three H. pylori strains isolated from three native Arab, Kuwaiti patients. H. pylori strains were sequenced using Illumina platform. The sequence reads were filtered and draft genomes were assembled and annotated. Various pathogenicity-associated regions and phages present within the genomes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out to determine the genetic relatedness of Kuwaiti strains to various lineages of H. pylori. The core genome content and virulence-related genes were analyzed to assess the pathogenic potential. The three genomes clustered along with HpEurope strains in the phylogenetic tree comprising various H. pylori lineages. A total of 1187 genes spread among various functional classes were identified in the core genome analysis. The three genomes possessed a complete cagPAI and also retained most of the known outer membrane proteins as well as virulence-related genes. The cagA gene in all three strains consisted of an AB-C type EPIYA motif. The comparative genomic analysis of Kuwaiti H. pylori strains revealed a European ancestry and a high pathogenic potential. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Public Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Khean-Lee; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Shiota, Seiji; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes studies on the epidemiology and public health implications of Helicobacter pylori published in peer-reviewed journals from April 2010 through March 2011. Prevalence rates vary widely between different geographical regions and ethnic groups. An interesting study from the USA identified the degree of African ancestry as an independent predictor of H. pylori infection. Two studies have demonstrated early childhood as the period of transmission of infection and identified an infected sibling as an important risk factor. An oral–oral route of spread has been substantiated with several studies showing the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity. Studies have shown the presence of H. pylori in drinking water and the role of poor living conditions and sanitation in H. pylori infection, supporting an oral–fecal route of spread. Screening for H. pylori as a gastric cancer prescreening strategy has been described in Japan, and the importance of H. pylori eradication as a gastric cancer–prevention strategy has now been further emphasized in Japanese guidelines. Two studies have shown a decrease in the burden of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer disease with H. pylori eradication. PMID:21896079

  4. SURVIVAL OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN A NATURAL FRESHWATER ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode by which Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of most gastric ulcers, is transmitted remains undetermined. Epidemiological evidence suggests these organisms are waterborne; however, H. pylori has rarely been grown from potential water sources. This may be due to th...

  5. The impact of Helicobacter pylori on atopic disorders in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); A.J. Vila (Anne J.); D. Caudri (Daan); C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); G.I. Perez; M.J. Blaser (Martin J.); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Western populations has steadily decreased. This has been suggested as one of the factors involved in the recent increase of asthma and allergy. Some studies have reported a negative association between H. pylori and asthma and

  6. RECOVERY OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI FROM WATER BY IMMUNOMAGNETIC CAPTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A few reports have been written stating that H. pylori can be found in waters. However, detection and identification of H. pylori from water samples remains a very difficult task. One method that seems to work successfully is immunomagnetic capture. Water samples were concentr...

  7. SURVIVAL OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN A NATURAL FRESHWATER ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode by which Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of most gastric ulcers, is transmitted remains undetermined. Epidemiological evidence suggests these organisms are waterborne; however, H. pylori has rarely been grown from potential water sources. This may be due to th...

  8. Biofilm formation enhances Helicobacter pylori survivability in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chow Goon; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Ho, Bow

    2017-04-01

    To date, the exact route and mode of transmission of Helicobacter pylori remains elusive. The detection of H. pylori in food using molecular approaches has led us to postulate that the gastric pathogen may survive in the extragastric environment for an extended period. In this study, we show that H. pylori prolongs its survival by forming biofilm and micro-colonies on vegetables. The biofilm forming capability of H. pylori is both strain and vegetable dependent. H. pylori strains were classified into high and low biofilm formers based on their highest relative biofilm units (BU). High biofilm formers survived longer on vegetables compared to low biofilm formers. The bacteria survived better on cabbage compared to other vegetables tested. In addition, images captured on scanning electron and confocal laser scanning microscopes revealed that the bacteria were able to form biofilm and reside as micro-colonies on vegetable surfaces, strengthening the notion of possible survival of H. pylori on vegetables for an extended period of time. Taken together, the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm on vegetables (a common food source for human) potentially plays an important role in its survival, serving as a mode of transmission of H. pylori in the extragastric environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. OVERVIEW: DISINFECTION OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI AND AEROMONAS SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori and Aeromonas hydrophila are contaminants listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL).The sensitivity of H. pylori to chlorine and of Aeromonas spp. to inactivation by free chlorine, chloramine and ultraviolet (UV) was examined. Selective and...

  10. Validation of string test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velapatiño, Billie; Balqui, Jacqueline; Gilman, Robert H; Bussalleu, Alejandro; Quino, Willi; Finger, S Alison; Santivañez, Livia; Herrera, Phabiola; Piscoya, Alejandro; Valdivia, Jose; Cok, Jaime; Berg, Douglas E

    2006-03-01

    The method of recovering Helicobacter pylori DNA or viable cells absorbed on a string that a person has swallowed and that is retrieved an hour later (string test) should be a useful alternative to traditional analysis of cells or DNA obtained by endoscopy, which is invasive, uncomfortable, relatively costly, and ill-suited for community-based and pediatric studies. Here we assayed the sensitivity and validity of the string test versus conventional endoscopic biopsy for detecting and analyzing H. pylori infection. Forty-four people with gastric complaints were studied using both H. pylori culture and urease gene (ureB) PCR. H. pylori organisms cultured from strings and biopsy specimens from the same patients were fingerprinted by the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Biopsy sections were also hematoxylin and eosin and silver stained for H. pylori detection. H. pylori was cultured from 80% of strings and detected by PCR from 91% of strings from participants whose biopsies had been H. pylori positive by culture, PCR, and/or histology. Strains recovered from strings and biopsy specimens yielded identical or closely related RAPD profiles in each of the 24 cases tested. We conclude that the string test is a useful method for H. pylori recovery and analysis when relatively noninvasive procedures are needed.

  11. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of adhesin gene hpaA from different Helicobacter pylori strains of Chongqing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hong; Xu-Hu Mao; Wei-Kun Zeng; Li-Ming Ma; Shen-Rong Jing; Quan-Ming Zou

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the variability of adhesin gene hpaA between different Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) strains with PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). METHODS: Twelve different H pylori strains were chosento amplify the 710-bp segments of gene hpaA. These strains were NCTC11637, SS1; Chongqing clinical isolates CCS9801, CCS9802, CCS9803, CCS9806, CCS9809,CCS9810, CCS9813, which were gained from patients of gastritis; Mongolia gerbil adapted H pylori strains (abbreviation MG), which were gained from the following steps: gastric mucosal specimens of Mongolia gerbils infected by clinical isolate CCS9803 were cultured and detected, the positive H pylori strains were named as the first generation of Mongolia gerbil adapted H pylori strains(abbreviation MG1) and then were subcultured with healthy Mongolia gerbil to generate MG2, in turn to gain the ninth generation (abbreviation MG9). All hpaA segments, obtained from 12 different H pylori strains,were digested by HhaⅠ and HaeⅢ individually and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. RESULTS: In all 12 strains, the 710-bp PCR products were successfully amplified and products were cloned to pMD18T vector respectively, then the recombinant plasmids were digested simultaneously with NcoⅠ and XhoⅠ to recover the small fragments. The objective fragments from 12 different H pylori strains digested with Hae Ⅲ could be seen as 4 types of bands and 5 types with Hha Ⅰ. According to the hpaA RFLP patterns, the 12 H pylori strains could be divided into 5 groups: group Ⅰ, NCTC11637 and SS1; group Ⅱ, CCS9809, which RFLP type digested with HaeⅢ wasthe same as strains of group Ⅰ, but HhaⅠ RFLP showeddifference compared with the other groups; group Ⅲ,CCS9810; group Ⅳ, CCS9803; group Ⅴ: CCS9801,CCS9802, CCS9806, CCS9813, MG1, MG3 and MG9. The sequence data of 12 hpaA segments were analyzed by DNAsis software and it was observed that: (1) The homologies of base pair and amino acid sequence

  12. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of adhesin gene hpaA from different Helicobacter pylori strains of Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu; Mao, Xu-Hu; Zeng, Wei-Kun; Ma, Li-Ming; Jing, Shen-Rong; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2005-05-07

    To assess the variability of adhesin gene hpaA between different Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) strains with PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Twelve different H pylori strains were chosen to amplify the 710-bp segments of gene hpaA. These strains were NCTC11637, SS1; Chongqing clinical isolates CCS9801, CCS9802, CCS9803, CCS9806, CCS9809, CCS9810, CCS9813, which were gained from patients of gastritis; Mongolia gerbil adapted H pylori strains (abbreviation MG), which were gained from the following steps: gastric mucosal specimens of Mongolia gerbils infected by clinical isolate CCS9803 were cultured and detected, the positive H pylori strains were named as the first generation of Mongolia gerbil adapted H pylori strains (abbreviation MG1) and then were subcultured with healthy Mongolia gerbil to generate MG2, in turn to gain the ninth generation (abbreviation MG9). All hpaA segments, obtained from 12 different H pylori strains, were digested by HhaI and HaeIII individually and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. In all 12 strains, the 710-bp PCR products were successfully amplified and products were cloned to pMD18-T vector respectively, then the recombinant plasmids were digested simultaneously with NcoI and XhoI to recover the small fragments. The objective fragments from 12 different H pylori strains digested with Hae III could be seen as 4 types of bands and 5 types with Hha I. According to the hpaA RFLP patterns, the 12 H pylori strains could be divided into 5 groups: group I, NCTC11637 and SS1; group II, CCS9809, which RFLP type digested with HaeIII was the same as strains of group I, but HhaI RFLP showed difference compared with the other groups; group III, CCS9810; group IV, CCS9803; group V: CCS9801, CCS9802, CCS9806, CCS9813, MG1, MG3 and MG9. The sequence data of 12 hpaA segments were analyzed by DNAsis software and it was observed that: (1) The homologies of base pair and amino acid sequence between strains NCTC11637, SS1, CCS

  13. Exploring alternative treatments for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy Itzel; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos Felipe; Romero, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a successful pathogen that can persist in the stomach of an infected person for their entire life. It provokes chronic gastric inflammation that leads to the development of serious gastric diseases such as peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. It is known that these ailments can be avoided if the infection by the bacteria can be prevented or eradicated. Currently, numerous antibiotic-based therapies are available. However, these therapies have several inherent problems, including the appearance of resistance to the antibiotics used and associated adverse effects, the risk of re-infection and the high cost of antibiotic therapy. The delay in developing a vaccine to prevent or eradicate the infection has furthered research into new therapeutic approaches. This review summarises the most relevant recent studies on vaccine development and new treatments using natural resources such as plants, probiotics and nutraceuticals. In addition, novel alternatives based on microorganisms, peptides, polysaccharides, and intragastric violet light irradiation are presented. Alternative therapies have not been effective in eradicating the bacteria but have been shown to maintain low bacterial levels. Nevertheless, some of them are useful in preventing the adverse effects of antibiotics, modulating the immune response, gastroprotection, and the general promotion of health. Therefore, those agents can be used as adjuvants of allopathic anti-H. pylori eradication therapy. PMID:24587621

  14. Helicobacter spp. other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Cinthia G; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2010-09-01

    Over the last 12 months, new insights into the association of non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacters with a range of human diseases in children and adults, including hepatobiliary disease, Crohn's disease, sepsis, and gastric disease were published. Studies investigating the presence of non-H. pylori Helicobacters in domestic animals reinforce previous findings that cats and dogs harbor gastric Helicobacter species and thus may be an important source of these organisms in humans. The confounding effect of enterohepatic Helicobacters on the outcome of biomedical research was investigated in several studies and led to recommendations that animals should be screened prior to performing experiments. A number of important and novel investigations regarding pathogenic mechanisms and immune responses to enterohepatic Helicobacters were conducted. Genomic advances in non-H. pylori Helicobacters included description of the complete genome of Helicobacter canadensis, delineation of two Helicobacter bilis genomospecies, and identification of a novel cis-regulatory RNA. New insights concerning growth conditions, biochemical characterization, and the effect of certain dietary compounds on Helicobacter spp. have also been reported. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Rescue Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier P. Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. After 30 years of experience in H. pylori treatment, however, the ideal regimen to treat this infection has still to be found. Nowadays, apart from having to know well first-line eradication regimens, we must also be prepared to face treatment failures. In designing a treatment strategy, we should not only focus on the results of primary therapy alone but also on the final—overall—eradication rate. The choice of a “rescue” treatment depends on which treatment is used initially. If a first-line clarithromycin-based regimen was used, a second-line metronidazole-based treatment (quadruple therapy may be used afterwards, and then a levofloxacin-based combination would be a third-line “rescue” option. Alternatively, it has recently been suggested that levofloxacin-based “rescue” therapy constitutes an encouraging 2nd-line strategy, representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure, with the advantage of efficacy, simplicity and safety. In this case, quadruple regimen may be reserved as a 3rd-line “rescue” option. Even after two consecutive failures, several studies have demonstrated that H. pylori eradication can finally be achieved in almost all patients if several “rescue” therapies are consecutively given.

  16. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Karimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causesof childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood.Methods: This cross-sectionalstudy recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group and 98 healthy (control group individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and H. pyloriinfection was compared between the two groups according to the urea breath test results.Results:Urea breath test was positive in 18 asthmatic (18.36 and 23 (23.36 healthy subjects but was not significantly different between the case and controls(p=0.380.Furtheranalysis in the asthmatic group revealed association ofH. pyloriinfection withage (p<0.001 and duration of asthma (p=0.010. However, no significant correlation was found between sex, severity of asthma, controledasthma or abnormal pulmonary function testswith H. pyloriinfection (p= 0.804, 0.512 ,0.854 and 0.292, respectively.Conclusion:Given the results of the study, H. pylori infection was not significantly differentbetween asthmatic and healthy children.In asthmatic patients, there wasnosignificant association between H.pyloriinfection andsex,severity of disease, control status of disease andnormal or abnormal pulmonary function tests.H. Pylori infection had a significant association withincreasing age and duration of asthma.

  17. H pylori recurrence after successful eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaron Niv

    2008-01-01

    Recurrence of H pylori after eradication is rare in developed countries and more frequent in developing countries.Recrudescence(recolonization of the same strain within 12 mo after eradication)rather than reinfection(colonization with a new strain,more than 12 mo after eradication)is considered to be responsiblefor most of the cases.This observation was confirmed only in developed countries,while in developing countries a recent meta-analysis demonstrated a high rate of reinfection.The proportion of H pylori annual recurrence was 2.67% and 13.00% in developed and developing countries,respectively.Nested meta-analysis(only cases with a longer follow-up and a negative 13CUBT a year after eradication)revealed annual recurrence rate of 1.45%[relative risk(RR),0.54]and 12.00%(RR,0.92)in developed and developing countries,respectively.These findings support the notion that in developed countries many cases of recurrence are due to recrudescence within the first year after eradication,with a 46% drop in the recurrence rate after the first year post eradication,while in developing countries reinfection is more pronounced,and continue at the same rate since eradication.A different approach for follow-up after H pylori eradication is probably needed in patients of developing countries,since reinfection is highly prevalent.

  18. Diagnosis and epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier; Ramírez Lázaro, María-José; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2013-09-01

    A limited amount of new information was published in the field of diagnosis and epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori this last year. Besides some improvement in current tests, it is interesting to note the attempts to identify severe disease, for example gastric cancer, by breath analysis using nanomaterial-based sensors. In contrast, the predictive value for gastric cancer and atrophy of pepsinogen determinations was found inadequate. Prevalence studies of H. pylori infection have been carried out in adults and children around the world in the general population but also in specific communities. The usual risk factors were found. In addition, a Japanese study highlighted the role of grandmothers in the familial transmission of H. pylori. A study showed that the infection may not always readily establish itself in children, given the number of transient infections observed. It was also noted that after eradication, a first-year relapse is likely to be a recurrence of the previous infection, while later on it is probably a reinfection with a new strain.

  19. Serum Prohepcidin Levels in Helicobacter Pylori Infected Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Young; Song, Eun Young; Yun, Yeo Min; Yoon, So Young; Cho, Yo Han; Kim, Sung-Yong; Lee, Mark Hong

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection appears to subvert the human iron regulatory mechanism and thus upregulates hepcidin, resulting in unexplained iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). We evaluated serum prohepcidin levels before and after eradication of H. pylori in IDA patients to assess whether it plays a role in IDA related to H. pylori infection. Methods Subjects diagnosed with unexplained IDA underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy to confirm H. pylori i...

  20. A Unique Feature of Iron Loss via Close Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Host Erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiwei Wang; Lijuan Zhang; Zhi Guo; Lei Liu; Jun Ji; Jianian Zhang; Xuehua Chen; Bingya Liu; Jun Zhang(UT Austin); Qiulan Ding; Xuefeng Wang; Wei Zhao; Zhenggang Zhu; Yingyan Yu

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is an extra-stomach disease experienced in H. pylori carriers. Individuals with type A blood are more prone to suffering from H. pylori infection than other individuals. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying H. pylori-associated anemia, we collected erythrocytes from A, B, O, and AB blood donors and analyzed morphology, the number of erythrocytes with H. pylori colonies attached to them, and iron contents in erythrocytes and H. pylori (NCTC11637 and SS1 strains...

  1. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted in 22 identified studies through Chinese literature searching which were published after 1995 and evaluated diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Results: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) had the best performance with diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 6.7 (5.5-7.8), followed by 13C urea breath test and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) quantitative serological test, with DOR being 6.4 (5.4-7.4) and 4.5 (3.8-5.2), respectively. Conclusion: Non-invasive tests are the appropriate methods for screening H. pylori infection, whereas invasive tests are the best methods for ascertaining the suspected patients.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection and endocrine disorders: Is there a link?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos X Papamichael; Garyphallia Papaioannou; Helen Karga; Anastasios Roussos; Gerassimos J Mantzaris

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is a leading world-wide infectious disease as it affects more than half of the world population and causes chronic gastritis,peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies.The infection elicits a chronic cellular inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa.However,the effects of this local inflammation may not be confined solely to the digestive tract but may spread to involve extraintestinal tissues and/or organs.Indeed,H pylori infection has been epidemiologically linked to extra-digestive conditions and diseases.In this context,it has been speculated that H pylori infection may be responsible for various endocrine disorders,such as autoimmune thyroid diseases,diabetes mellitus,dyslipidemia,obesity,osteoporosis and primary hyperparathyroidism.This is a review of the relationship between H pylori infection and these endocrine disorders.

  3. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Tsukamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents.

  4. Clinical Profile in H. Pylori Positive Patients in Jammu

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    Rajesh Kumar, G. Bano, B. Kapoor, Sunil Sharma*, Yudhvir Gupta**

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective one year, study enrolled 265 symptomatic patients of acid peptic disease, out of which 92patients were found H. pylori positive (by biopsy urease test and histopathological test giving a prevalence of34.71% . Among H. pylori positive patients, 64.13% were males and 35.86% were females. Age wise distributionshowed maximum prevalence of H. pylori infection in the age group of 36-45 years and minimum in the age group of66-75 years. Pain upper abdomen was the most frequent symptom in 49 (54.20% patients followed by fullness aftermeals and retrosternal burning. Endoscopic and histopathological examination of H. pylori positive patients revealedchronic superficial gastritis in 87 (94.56% patients followed by duodenitis in 11 (11.95% and oesophagitis 8 (8.6%.All the positive patients were given anti-H. pylori treatment.

  5. Roles of Helicobacter pylori BabA in gastroduodenal pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between BabA and Lewis b (Leb) related antigens are the best characterized adhesin-receptor interactions in Helicobacter pylori (H pylori). Several mechanisms for the regulation of BabA expression are predicted, including at both transcriptional and translational levels. The formation of chimeric proteins (babA/B or babB/A chimeras) seems to play an especially important role in translational regulation. Chimeric BabB/A protein had the potential to bind Leb;however, protein production was subject to phase variation through slipped strand mispairing. The babA gene was cloned initially from strain CCUG17875, which contains a silent babA1 gene and an expressed babA2 gene. The sequence of these two genes differs only by the presence of a 10 bp deletion in the signal peptide sequence of babA1 that eliminates its translational initiation codon. However, the babA1 type deletion was found only in strain CCUG17875. A few studies evaluated BabA status by immunoblot and confirmed that BabA-positive status in Western strains was closely associated with severe clinical outcomes. BabA-positive status also was associated with the presence of other virulence factors (e.g. cagA-positive status and vacA s1 genotype). A small class of strains produced low levels of the BabA protein and lacked Leb binding activity. These were more likely to be associated with increased mucosal inflammation and severe clinical outcomes than BabA-positive strains that exhibited Leb binding activity. The underlying mechanism is unclear, and further studies will be necessary to investigate how the complex BabA-receptor network is functionally coordinated during the interaction of Hpylori with the gastric mucosa.

  6. Helicobacter pylori with the Intact dupA Cluster is more Virulent than the Strains with the Incomplete dupA Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-yi; Shao, Chen; Li, Jie; Yang, Ya-Chao; Wang, Shao-bo; Hao, Jun-ling; Wu, Chun-mei; Gao, Xiao-zhong; Shao, Shi-he

    2015-07-01

    The duodenal ulcer promoting gene (dupA), located in the plasticity region of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), is predicted to form a type IV secretory system (T4SS) with vir genes around dupA. In the study, we investigated the association between the dupA cluster status and the virulence of H. pylori in a littoral region of Northeast China. Two hundred and sixty-two H. pylori strains isolated from the chronic gastritis were examined to evaluate the dupA cluster status, cag PAI genes and vacA genotype using PCR and Western blot. Histopathologic evaluations of biopsy specimens were performed to analysis the association between the dupA cluster and the inflammatory response. IL-8 productions in gastric mucosa and from GES-1 cells co-cultured with H. pylori were measured, respectively, to analysis the association between the dupA cluster status and IL-8 production. We found that gastric mucosal inflammatory cell infiltration was significantly higher in patients with dupA-positive H. pylori, including H. pylori with complete dupA cluster (2.71 ± 0.79) and incomplete dupA cluster (2.09 ± 0.61) than in patients with dupA-negative strain (1.73 ± 0.60, p < 0.01), whereas no significant difference in the gastric mucosal atrophy was found according to the status of dupA cluster. Gastric mucosal IL-8 levels were higher in the complete dupA cluster group than in other groups (p < 0.01), and IL-8 production from GES-1 cells was also significantly higher in strains with a complete dupA cluster (1527.9 ± 180.0 pg/ml) than in those with an incomplete dupA cluster (1229.4 ± 75.3 pg/ml, p < 0.01) or those with dupA negative (1201.9 ± 92.3 pg/ml, p < 0.01). In conclusion, the complete dupA cluster in H. pylori is associated with inflammatory cell infiltration and IL-8 secretion, and H. pylori strain with a complete dupA cluster seems to be more virulent than other strains with the incomplete dupA cluster or dupA negative.

  7. The accuracy of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test in diagnosing H-pylori in treated and untreated patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arents, NL; van Zwet, AA; Thijs, JC; de Jong, A; Pool, MO; Kleibeuker, JH

    Objective and design To evaluate the performance of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA test) in detecting H. pylori infection and monitoring the effect of treatment. This was done in two separate studies using either a biopsy or the C-13-urea breath test based 'gold standard' (in

  8. Epidemiological study on food intake and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyonaga, A; Okamatsu, H; Sasaki, K; Kimura, H; Saito, T; Shimizu, S; Fukuizumi, K; Tsuruta, O; Tanikawa, K; Sata, M

    2000-01-01

    We conducted an epidemiological study to investigate the relation of food intake to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in an area endemic for H. pylori. In this study, 365 subjects, 104 men and 261 women, were randomly selected from 7,389 adult (over age 20) inhabitants of town A, Japan. The prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) class antibody to H. pylori (anti-H. pylori) was 83.7% and the prevalence of anti-H. pylori increased with age significantly (P gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer and gastric cancer tended to have a higher anti-H. pylori positive ratio (93.5%) than those without (81.0%). But there was no relationship between anti-H. pylori prevalence and sex, blood type, smoking or drinking habits. Daily intake of foods by food groups, nutrients and the concentrations of serum ingredients were compared between 37 anti-H. pylori-positive and 40 negative subjects selected from 365 inhabitants by matching up according to sex and age. The daily intake of cereals, potatoes and starches, and milks tended to be higher in positive than negative subjects, while the daily intake of algae and tea appeared to be a little higher in negative than in positive subjects. The daily zinc intake of antibody-positive subjects was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in antibody negative subjects. On the other hand, the daily iron intake in negative subjects was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in positive subjects. The serum concentrations of copper, zinc, and vitamin E tended to be higher in positive than negative subjects. But there were no significant differences in serum ingredients concentrations between antibody negative and positive subjects. Our findings suggest that iron and zinc intakes may effect on H. pylori infection.

  9. Helicobacter pylori impairs murine dendritic cell responses to infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric malignancies, is generally viewed as an extracellular microorganism. Here, we show that H. pylori replicates in murine bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (BMDCs within autophagosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A 10-fold increase of CFU is found between 2 h and 6 h p.i. in H. pylori-infected BMDCs. Autophagy is induced around the bacterium and participates at late time points of infection for the clearance of intracellular H. pylori. As a consequence of infection, LC3, LAMP1 and MHC class II molecules are retained within the H. pylori-containing vacuoles and export of MHC class II molecules to cell surface is blocked. However, formalin-fixed H. pylori still maintain this inhibitory activity in BMDC derived from wild type mice, but not in from either TLR4 or TLR2-deficient mice, suggesting the involvement of H. pylori-LPS in this process. TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 expression was also modulated upon infection showing a TLR2-specific dependent IL-10 secretion. No IL-12 was detected favoring the hypothesis of a down modulation of DC functions during H. pylori infection. Furthermore, antigen-specific T cells proliferation was also impaired upon infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori can infect and replicate in BMDCs and thereby affects DC-mediated immune responses. The implication of this new finding is discussed for the biological life cycle of H. pylori in the host.

  10. Helicobacter pylori arginase mutant colonizes arginase Ⅱ knockout mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songhee H Kim; Melanie L Langford; Jean-Luc Boucher; Traci L Testerman; David J McGee

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of host and bacterial argi-nases in the colonization of mice by Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori).METHODS: H. Pylori produces a very powerful urease that hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which neutralizes acid. Urease is absolutely essential to H. Pylori pathogenesis; therefore, the urea substrate must be in ample supply for urease to work efficiently. The urea substrate is most likely provided by arginase activity, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. Previous work has demonstrated that H. Pylori arginase is surprisingly not required for colonization of wild-type mice. Hence, another in vivo source of the critical urea substrate must exist. We hypothesized that the urea source was provided by host arginase Ⅱ, since this enzyme is expressed in the stomach, and H. Pylori has previously been shown to induce the expres-sion of murine gastric arginase Ⅱ. To test this hypoth-esis, wild-type and arginase (rocF) mutant H. Pylori strain SS1 were inoculated into arginase Ⅱ knockout mice. RESULTS: Surprisingly, both the wild-type and rocF mutant bacteria still colonized arginase Ⅱ knock-out mice. Moreover, feeding arginase Ⅱ knockout mice the host arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC), while inhibiting > 50% of the host arginase Ⅰactivity in several tissues, did not block the ability of the rocF mutant H. Pylori to colonize. In con-trast, BEC poorly inhibited H. Pylori arginase activity. CONCLUSION: The in vivo source for the essential urea utilized by H. Pylori urease is neither bacterial arginase nor host arginase Ⅱ; instead, either residual host arginase Ⅰor agmatinase is probably responsible.

  11. Strategies used by helicobacter pylori to establish persistent infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative and motile bacterium that colonizes the hostile microniche of the human stomach, then persists for the host’s entire life, if not effectively treated. Clinically, H. pylori plays a causative role in the development of a wide spectrum of diseases including chronic active gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Due to the global distribution of H. pylori, it is no exaggeration to conclude that smart strategies are contributing to adaptation of the bacterium to its permanent host. Thirty-four years after the discovery of this bacterium, there are still many unanswered questions. For example, which strategies help the bacterium to survive in this inhospitable microniche? This question is slightly easier to answer if we presume the same clinical concept for both persistent infection and disease. Understanding the mechanisms governing H. pylori persistence will improve identification of the increased risk of diseases such as gastric cancer in patients infected with this bacterium. A well-defined and long-term equilibrium between the human host and H. pylori allows bacterial persistence in the gastric microniche; although this coexistence leads to a high risk of severe diseases such as gastric cancer. To escape the bactericidal activity of stomach acid, H. pylori secretes large amounts of surface-associated and cytosolic urease. The potential to avoid acidic conditions and immune evasion are discussed in order to explain the persistence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric mucosa, and data on bacterial genetic diversity are included. Information on the mechanisms related to H. pylori persistence can also provide the direction for future research concerning effective therapy and management of gastroduodenal disorders. The topics presented in the current review are important for elucidating the strategies used by H. pylori to help the bacterium

  12. Helicobacter pylori in Cholecystectomy Specimens-Morphological and Immunohistochemical Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Venkatarami; Jena, Amitabh; Gavini, Siva; Thota, Asha; Nandyala, Rukamangadha; Chowhan, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Current literature describes presence of H.pylori in various extra-gastric locations and its association with many diseases. Apart from the conventional location of gastric and duodenal mucosa, H.pylori have been isolated and cultured from gallbladder. Aim Analysis of cholecystectomy specimens to detect H.pylori by means of immunohistochemical staining. Materials and Methods There were a total of 118 cholecystectomy specimens received in the Department of Pathology in three months duration. We have performed immunostaining for H.pylori in 45 consecutive cases of cholecystectomy specimen. Clinical and other investigational information were retrieved from the medical records department. For each case, routine Haematoxylin and Eosin stain was studied. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was done using purified polyclonal Helicobacter pylori antiserum. Results Majority of the patients had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy for the presenting complaint of right hypochondrial pain. Multiple pigmented stones were present in majority (27/45) of them. Immunostain for H.pylori was positive in ten cases. Six of these cases had pigmented gall stones, two had stones not specified and in two of the cases there were no stones. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori is present in gall bladder and is commonly seen in association with stones. A more detailed study of cholecystectomy cases (both neoplastic and non-neoplastic) with serological, culture and molecular data of H.pylori is desirable to study the pathogenesis of cholecystitis, its association with gall stones and other gall bladder disorders. PMID:27437221

  13. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Helicobacter pylori-Induced Oncogene Expression and Hyperproliferation by Suppressing the Activation of NADPH Oxidase in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunyoung Byun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperproliferation and oncogene expression are observed in the mucosa of Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori- infected patients with gastritis or adenocarcinoma. Expression of oncogenes such as β-catenin and c-myc is related to oxidative stress. α-Lipoic acid (α-LA, a naturally occurring thiol compound, acts as an antioxidant and has an anticancer effect. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of α-LA on H. pylori-induced hyperproliferation and oncogene expression in gastric epithelial AGS cells by determining cell proliferation (viable cell numbers, thymidine incorporation, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, NADPH oxidase activation (enzyme activity, subcellular levels of NADPH oxidase subunits, activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1, expression of oncogenes (β-catenin, c-myc, and nuclear localization of β-catenin. Furthermore, we examined whether NADPH oxidase mediates oncogene expression and hyperproliferation in H. pylori-infected AGS cells using treatment of diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. As a result, α-LA inhibited the activation of NADPH oxidase and, thus, reduced ROS production, resulting in inhibition on activation of NF-κB and AP-1, induction of oncogenes, nuclear translocation of β-catenin, and hyperproliferation in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. DPI inhibited H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, oncogene expression and hyperproliferation by reducing ROS levels in AGS cells. In conclusion, we propose that inhibiting NADPH oxidase by α-LA could prevent oncogene expression and hyperproliferation occurring in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

  14. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotype is a predominant determinant of immune response to Helicobacter pylori CagA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Alexander; Langner, Cosima; Schirrmeister, Wiebke; Habendorf, Wiebke; Weigt, Jochen; Venerito, Marino; Tammer, Ina; Schlüter, Dirk; Schlaermann, Philipp; Meyer, Thomas F; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-07-14

    To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA antibodies in H. pylori infected subjects and to identify potential histopathological and bacterial factors related to H. pylori CagA-immune response. Systematic data to H. pylori isolates, blood samples, gastric biopsies for histological and molecular analyses were available from 99 prospectively recruited subjects. Serological profile (anti-H. pylori, anti-CagA) was correlated with H. pylori isolates (cagA, EPIYA, vacA s/m genotype), histology (Sydney classification) and mucosal interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and protein expression. Selected H. pylori strains were assessed for H. pylori CagA protein expression and IL-8 induction in co-cultivation model with AGS cells. Thirty point three percent of microbiologically confirmed H. pylori infected patients were seropositive for CagA. Majority of H. pylori isolates were cagA gene positive (93.9%) with following vacA polymorphisms: 42.4% vacA s1m1, 23.2% s1m2 and 34.3% s2m2. Anti-CagA-IgG seropositivity was strongly associated with atrophic gastritis, increased mucosal inflammation according to the Sydney score, IL-8 and cagA mRNA expression. VacA s and m polymorphisms were the major determinants for positive (vacA s1m1) or negative (vacA s2m2) anti-CagA serological immune response, which also correlated with the in vitro inflammatory potential in AGS cells. In vitro co-cultivation of representative H. pylori strains with AGS cells confirmed functional CagA translocation, which showed only partial correlation with CagA seropositivity in patients, supporting vacA as major co-determinant of the immune response. Serological immune response to H. pylori cagA+ strain in H. pylori infected patients is strongly associated with vacA polymorphism, suggesting the crucial role of bacterial factors in immune and clinical phenotype of the infection.

  15. Dominant cagA/vacA genotypes and coinfection frequency of H. Pylori in peptic ulcer or chronic gastritis patients in Zhejiang Province and correlations among different genotypes, coinfection and severity of the diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue-jun; YAN Jie; SHEN Yue-fang

    2005-01-01

    83 strains isolated from the antrum specimens were 7.2%, 61.5%, 30.1% and 1.2%, respectively, while those in the other 84 strains isolated from the corpus specimens were 9.5%, 58.3%, 28.6% and 3.6%, respectively. S1a/m2 (58.3% vs 30.1%, χ2=13.47, P0.05). Similarities of the nucleotide sequences from vacA gene s region PCR products of six isolates and from vacA gene m region PCR products of four isolates were 93.2% to 98.3% and 93.8% to 97.6%, respectively, compared to the reported corresponding sequences.Conclusions The dominant genotypes of H. Pylori in PU or CG patients in Zhejiang area may be cagA+ s1a/m2 and cagA+ s1a/m1b. Numerous coinfections with different H. Pylori strains in PU or CG patients indicate diversity of the infected H. Pylori origins. S and m regions of vacA gene from different H. Pylori isolates show high nucleotide sequence similarities. cagA gene positive rate, different vacA gene subtypes and coinfection with different H. Pylori strains are not closely associated with severity of the diseases.

  16. Restriction fragment length polymorphism in the adhesin gene hpaA of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Lampert, H C; Graham, D Y

    1995-08-01

    To assess the degree of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the Helicobacter pylori adhesin gene hpaA and to determine the molecular basis of RFLP in this gene. A 375-bp, polymerase chain reaction-amplified internal sequence of hpaA, obtained from 50 different H. pylori isolates, was restricted with Sau3A and HinfI, individually. Polymerase chain reaction products representing different RFLP types were sequenced. Seven different polymorphic types were found in hpaA. Base substitutions at only four positions, two in Sau3A and two in HinfI sites, account for all of the RFLP types, including the size of the restriction fragments determined by gel electrophoresis. Most, 90%, of the base substitutions are very conservative, i.e., either do not change the encoded amino acid or substitute a homologous amino acid, and cause no detectable antigenic or functional effect on hpaA. The region of hpaA encoding the receptor-binding motif was particularly well conserved. RFLP typing of hpaA using Sau3A and HinfI provides an additional tool for comparing the genetic relatedness of H. pylori isolates collected during epidemiological and/or treatment studies.

  17. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication therapy in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masanori Ito; Shinji Tanaka; Tomoari Kamada; Ken Haruma; Kazuaki Chayama

    2006-01-01

    Many epidemiological reports indicate that Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the initiation, promotion, and progression of the cancer cells in a multi-step manner.H pyloriis known to induce chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa. Its products, including superoxides,participate in the DNA damage followed by initiation, and the inflammation-derived cytokines and growth factors contribute to the promotion of gastric carcinogenesis.By eradicating H pylori, gastric inflammation can be cured; the therapy diminishes the levels not only of inflammatory cell infiltration, but also atrophyl intestinal metaplasia in part. A randomized controlled trial revealed that the eradication therapy diminished the gastric cancer prevalence in cases without precancerous conditions. In addition, recent epidemiological studies from Japanese groups demonstrated that the development of gastric cancer, especially of the intestinal type, was decreased by successful eradication therapy, although these were designed in a nonrandomized manner. However, it should be mentioned that endoscopic detection is the only way to evaluate the degree of gastric carcinogenesis. We have reported that the endoscopic and histological morphologies could be modified by eradication therapy and it might contribute to the prevalence of gastric cancer development.Considering the biological nature of cancer cell proliferation, it is considered that a sufficiently long-term follow-up would be essential to discuss the anticancer effect of eradication therapy.

  18. Effect of total secondary carotenoids extracts from Chlorococcum sp on Helicobacter pylori-infected BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B H; Lee, Y K

    2003-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human pathogen associated with type B gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. A high intake of carotenoids has been suggested to prevent development of gastric malignancies. Microalgae Chlorococcum sp. could accumulate secondary carotenoids under stress conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether dietary cell extract of Chlorococcum sp. could affect the bacterial load of H. pylori infected BALB/c mice and whether it could induce modulation of cytokine production. BALB/c mice were infected with H. pylori three times at 2-day intervals. Two weeks later, they were orally fed with cell extract of Chlorococcum sp. for the following 2 weeks. Animals were killed at the end of the experiments. Stomachs were removed and paraffin sections were stained for histology examination. Splenocytes were obtained and cultured in vitro with H. pylori sonicate to evaluate induction of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) secretion. Mice treated with carotenoids-rich algal meal showed significantly reduced bacterial load and gastric inflammation. These changes were associated with a shift of the T-lymphocytes response from a predominant T helper type 1 (Th1) response dominated by IFN-gamma to a Th1/Th2 response with IFN-gamma and IL-4.

  19. The vacuolating cytotoxin of Helicobacter pylori%幽门螺杆菌空泡毒素研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘纯杰; 陶好霞; 张兆山

    2001-01-01

    幽门螺杆菌空泡毒素是该菌产生的与已知其它细菌毒素无明显同源性的唯一蛋白毒素。该毒素是幽门螺杆菌重要的毒力致病因子,它的产生与感染者胃肠上皮损伤和溃疡形成密切相关。本文就幽门螺杆菌空泡毒素的结构与功能研究进展以及在未来免疫预防与免疫治疗中的作用进行了简述。%The vacuolating cytotoxin is a unique proteinous cytotoxin producted by H. pylori that showed no striking primary sequence homology with other known baterial toxins. The cytotoxin is an important fator in the pathogenesis of H. pylori, which induces vacuolation of epithelial cells and plays an important role in gastric epithelial necrosis and peptic ulceration. In the paper, the progress on structure and function of the vacuolating cytotoxin of H. pylori and the roles of the H. pylori vacuolating cytotoxin in the future immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy were reviewed.

  20. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes and cagA status and their relationship to associated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Hou; Zhen Xing Tu; Guo Ming Xu; Yan Fang Gong; Xu Hui Ji; Zhao Shen Li

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) is a major causativebacterium of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans, and associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer[1 -8]. An important virulant factor of H. pylori is the vacuolating cytotoxin ( VacA ) encoded by vacA that induces cytoplasmic vacuolation in target cells both in vitro and in vivo[9-11]. VacA is produced as a 140 kDa precursor which contains an N-terminal signal peptide and an approximately 33 kDa C-terminal outer membrance exporter. The precursor is cleaved at both N-terminal and C-terminal and secreted into the extracellular milieu as a 95 kDa mature protein. The mature protein futher undergoes specific cleavage to yield 37 kDa and 58 kDa subunits[12-14] Although vacA is present in all H. pylori strains, only about 50% to 60% of strains can induce vacuolation of epithelial cells as assessed by the HeLa cell assay. vacA shows considerable genetic variation in H. pylori isolated from all over the world and contains at least two variable regions. The s region exists as sl or s2 allelic types. Among type sl strains, subtypes sla and slb have been identified. The m region occurs as ml or m2 allelic types. Specific vacA genotype of H. pylori strains are associated with the production of the cytotoxin in vitro, epithelial damage in vivo, and clinical consequences[15-27]. The other virulant factor is the cytotoxin-associated protein (CagA) encoded by the cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA). The cagA gene is present in about 60% to 70% of strains and all of these strains express the cagA. The presence of cagA is also associated with the production of the cytotoxin in vitro, and clinical outcome[24-30]. The aim of this study was (i) to identify vacA genotypes and cagA status of H. pylori isolated from Chinese patients; (ii) to evaluation the relatioship beween vacA genotypes, cagA status and related gastroenterological disorders.

  1. (ID 1688), contribution to normal muscle function (ID 1685), and “immune system” (ID 1689, 1919, 1980) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006, EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to astaxanthin and protection of the skin from UV-induced damage (ID 1687, 1979), defence against Helicobacter pylori (ID 1686), contribution to normal spermatogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to astaxanthin and protection of the skin from UV-induced damage, defence against Helicobacter pylori, contribution to normal spermatogenesis, contribution to normal muscle function, and “immune system”. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member......Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of health...... States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claims is astaxanthin. The Panel considers that astaxanthin is sufficiently characterised....

  2. Helicobacter pylori as a zoonotic infection: the detection of H. pylori antigens in the milk and faeces of cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Zandi, Ashkan; Rashidipour, Alireza

    2011-02-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, which may increase the risk of gastritis, peptic ulcers, and cancer, has increased worldwide. This number is estimated to be around 70-90% in developing countries and 25-50% in developed countries. It is possible that the bacterium can be transmitted via food and water as well as zoonotically and iatrogenically. Because of high prevalence of this infection in Iran, the aim of this study is to examine whether H. pylori infection might be transmitted from cow's milk and faeces. The existence of the H. pylori antibody and antigen was investigated in samples of serum, milk, and faeces from 92 lactating Holstein cows in Shahrekord, Iran. The H. pylori antigen and antibody were detected using ELISA and were confirmed by PCR. It was found that out of 92 serum specimens, 25 (27%) of the cows were positive for the H. pylori antibody and 67 specimens were negative. From these 25 seropositive cows, 10 (40%) faeces samples and four (16%) milk samples were antigen positive for H. pylori. Four of the antigen-positive milk specimens were also antigen positive for faeces. The existence of the UreC gene was also confirmed in positive samples of milk and faeces. There is a possibility that cow's milk is a transmission mode in H. pylori infection and faecal contamination and inappropriate management processes could transfer H. pylori to humans. The awareness of the H. pylori epidemiology and its method of distribution are necessary for public health measures and controlling the spread of this bacterium. Further investigation with a greater sample number is necessary to verify the ability of H. pylori transmission via milk consumption.

  3. High rate of Helicobacter pylori reinfection in Lithuanianpeptic ulcer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori ) reinfection in peptic ulcer patients during 9 yearsafter H. pylori eradication.METHODS: We invited 117 peptic ulcer patients inwhom eradication of H. pylori was confirmed 1 yearafter eradication treatment both by histology and byrapid urease test. In total, 57 patients were availablefor the study procedures: 34 (59.6%) male, 23 (40.4%)female; mean age 52.3 ± 13.0 years. There were 45(78.9%) patients with duodenal ulcer and 12 (21.1%)with gastric ulcer. H. pylori was diagnosed by a rapidurease test and histology if endoscopy was performed.If endoscopy was refused, H. pylori was diagnosed bythe C14-urea breath test and serology. H. pylori wasestablished if at least one of the tests was positive.RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 8.9 ± 1.0 years(range, 6-12). H. pylori was established in 15 patients.In 2 H. pylori -negative patients, H. pylori was establishedduring the follow-up period and eradicated. Therefore,we consider that reinfection occurred in 17 patients. Inthe per protocol analysis, reinfection was established in17 of 57 (29.8%; 95%CI: 19.2-42.2) patients during thefollow-up period. The annual rate of infection was 3.36%.If all non-responders were considered H. pylori -negative,reinfection would be 14.5% (17/117), the annual rate being 1.63%. The mean age of patients with reinfectionwas 51.8 ± 14.0 years, and without reinfection was52.5 ± 13.0 years, P 〉 0.05; the mean body massindex of patients with reinfection was 27.2 ± 4.1 kg/m2,and without reinfection was 25.7 ± 4.2 kg/m2, P 〉0.05. There were no differences in the reinfection ratesaccording the location of the peptic ulcer, the eradicationregimen used, and smoking status.CONCLUSION: The reinfection rate of H. pylori isrelatively high in Lithuania and probably related to thehigh prevalence of H. pylori , what may reflect differencesin the socioeconomic status between Western and

  4. The Helicobacter pylori theory and duodenal ulcer disease. A case study of the research process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Gjørup, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the medical research process from the time of the generation of a new theory to its implementation in clinical practice. The Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) theory, i.e. the theory that H. pylori plays a significant causal role in duodenal ulcer disease was chosen as a case....... MATERIAL: Abstracts from 1984 to 1993, identified in the CD-Rom, Medline system, ("Silverplatter"), using the search terms Campylobacter pylori and Helicobacter pylori, and reviews and editorials about H. pylori in some of the most widespread clinical journals. RESULTS: 2204 papers on H. pylori were....... pylori in duodenal ulcer disease had been published in some of the most widespread clinical journals. In half of the papers the authors were convinced of the causal role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer disease, while in the remainder they were sceptical. In seven cases the authors stated which patients...

  5. H pylori: Treatment for the patient only or the whole family?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effects of treatment of H pyIori infected individuals with the effects of treatment of individuals as well as all HpyIori-infected family members. METHODS: H pylori-positive patients with similar demographic specifications were prospectively randomized with respect to treatment, with a triple regimen of either patients and all H pylori-positive family members living together (group) or patients only (group ).Nine months after treatment, all patients were assessed for H pylori positivity. RESULTS: There were 70 H pylori-positive patients in each group; patients in groups and lived with 175and 190 H pylori-positive relatives, respectively. Age, sex and H pylori positivity rate were similar in both groups of relatives. Nine months after 14 d standard triple therapy, H pylori positivity was 7.1% in group patients and 38.6% in group patients [P < 0.01,OR = 8.61 95%confidence interval (CI):2.91-22.84=. CONCLUSION: The present results indicate bad environmental hygienic conditions and close intra-familial relationships are important in H pylori contamination. These findings indicate all family members of H pylori positive individuals should be assessed for H pylori positivity, particularly in developing countries where H pylori prevalence is high; they also suggest patients, their spouses and all H pylori-positive family members of H pylori-positive individuals should be treated for H pylori infection.

  6. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on Bax protein expression in patients with gastric precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Feng Liu; Wei-Wen Liu; Guo-An Wang; Xiao-Chun Teng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection on Bax protein expression, and explore the role of H pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: H pylori was assessed by rapid urease test and Warthin-Starry method, and expression of Bax protein was examined immunohistochemically in 72 patients with pre-malignant lesions.RESULTS: Bax protein was differently expressed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric dysplasia, and showed 63.99% positivity. The positivity of Bax protein expression in H pylori-positive gastric precancerous lesions (72.3%) was significantly higher than that in H pylori-negative gastric precancerous lesions (48.0%, χ2 = 4.191, P<0.05).H pylori infection was well correlated with the expression of Bax protein in gastric precancerous lesions (r = 0.978,P<0.01). After eradication of H pylori, the positivity of Bax protein expression significantly decreased in H pylori-positive gastric precancerous lesions (χ2= 5.506,P<0.05). In the persisting H pylori-infected patients,the positivity of Bax protein expression was not changed.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection may be involved in the upregulation of Bax gene, which might be one of the mechanisms of H pylori infection-induced gastric epithelial cell apoptosis. H pylori might act as a tumor promoter in the genesis of gastric carcinoma and eradication of H pylori could inhibit gastric carcinogenesis.

  7. Construction of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain expressing a fusion protein of Omp22 and HpaA from Helicobacter pylori for oral vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongguang; Duan, Guangcai; Shi, Qingfeng; Chen, Shuaiyin; Fan, Qingtang; Sun, Nan; Xi, Yuanlin

    2016-11-01

    To develop orally administrated anti-Helicobacter pylori vaccination, a Lactococcus lactis strain was genetically constructed for fusion expression of H. pylori protective antigens HpaA and Omp22. The fusion gene of omp22 and hpaA with an adapter encoding three glycines was cloned from a plasmid pMAL-c2x-omp22-hpaA into Escherichia coli MC1061 and L. lactis NZ3900 successively using a shutter vector pNZ8110. Expression of the fusion gene in L. lactis was induced with nisin resulting in production of proteins with molecular weights of 50 and 28 kDa. Both of them were immunoreactive with mouse anti-H. pylori sera as determined via western blotting. Oral vaccination of BALB/c mice using the L. lactis strain carrying pNZ8110-omp22-hpaA elicited significant systematic humoral immune response (P < 0.05). This is the first report showing that a fusion protein of two H. pylori antigens was efficiently expressed in L. lactis with immunogenicity. This is a considerable step towards H. pylori vaccines.

  8. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  9. Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikiphoros Philippou; Panagiotis Koursarakos; Evgenia Anastasakou; Vasiliki Krietsepi; Stavroula Mavrea; Anastasios Roussos; Dionissia Alepopoulou; Irineos Iliopoulos

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess