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Sample records for pylori lipopolysaccharide modification

  1. Structural modifications of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: An idea for how to live in peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Miszczyk, Eliza; Rudnicka, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the findings and concepts underlying the “persistence mechanisms” of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a spiral-shaped, Gram-negative rod bacterium that was discovered as a gastric pathogen by Marshall and Warren in 1984. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of nearly half of the human population. Infections appear in early childhood and, if not treated, persist for life. The presence or absence of symptoms and their severity depend on multiple bacterial components, host susceptibility and environmental factors, which allow H. pylori to switch between pathogenicity and commensalism. Many studies have shown that H. pylori components may facilitate the colonization process and the immune response of the host during the course of H. pylori infection. These H. pylori-driven interactions might result from positive or negative modulation. Among the negative immunomodulators, a prominent position is occupied by a vacuolating toxin A (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) protein. However, in light of the recent studies that are presented in this review, it is necessary to enrich this panel with H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Together with CagA and VacA, LPS suppresses the elimination of H. pylori bacteria from the gastric mucosa by interfering with the activity of innate and adaptive immune cells, diminishing the inflammatory response, and affecting the adaptive T lymphocyte response, thus facilitating the development of chronic infections. The complex strategy of H. pylori bacteria for survival in the gastric mucosa of the host involves both structural modifications of LPS lipid A to diminish its endotoxic properties and the expression and variation of Lewis determinants, arranged in O-specific chains of H. pylori LPS. By mimicking host components, this phenomenon leaves these bacteria “invisible” to immune cells. Together, these mechanisms allow H. pylori to survive and live for many years within their hosts. PMID:25110419

  2. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide modification, Lewis antigen expression, and gastric colonization are cholesterol-dependent

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    McGee David J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori specifically takes up cholesterol and incorporates it into the bacterial membrane, yet little is currently known about cholesterol's physiological roles. We compared phenotypes and in vivo colonization ability of H. pylori grown in a defined, serum-free growth medium, F12 with 1 mg/ml albumin containing 0 to 50 μg/ml cholesterol. Results While doubling times were largely unaffected by cholesterol, other overt phenotypic changes were observed. H. pylori strain SS1 grown in defined medium with cholesterol successfully colonized the stomach of gerbils, whereas SS1 grown without cholesterol failed to colonize. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide often displays Lewis X and/or Y antigens. Expression of these antigens measured by whole-cell ELISA was markedly enhanced in response to growth of strain SS1, 26695, or G27 in cholesterol. In addition, electrophoretic analysis of lipopolysaccharide in wild type G27 and in mutants lacking the O-chain revealed structural changes within the oligosaccharide core/lipid A moieties. These responses in Lewis antigen levels and in lipopolysaccharide profiles to cholesterol availability were highly specific, because no changes took place when cholesterol was substituted by β-sitosterol or bile salts. Disruption of the genes encoding cholesterol α-glucosyltransferase or lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase had no effect on Lewis expression, nor on lipopolysaccharide profiles, nor on the cholesterol responsiveness of these properties. Disruption of the lipid A 1-phosphatase gene eliminated the effect of cholesterol on lipopolysaccharide profiles but not its effect on Lewis expression. Conclusions Together these results suggest that cholesterol depletion leads to aberrant forms of LPS that are dependent upon dephosphorylation of lipid A at the 1-position. A tentative model for the observed effects of cholesterol is discussed in which sequential steps of lipopolysaccharide biogenesis

  3. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide modification, Lewis antigen expression, and gastric colonization are cholesterol-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Ellen; McGee, David J

    2009-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori specifically takes up cholesterol and incorporates it into the bacterial membrane, yet little is currently known about cholesterol's physiological roles. We compared phenotypes and in vivo colonization ability of H. pylori grown in a defined, serum-free growth medium, F12 with 1 mg/ml albumin containing 0 to 50 mug/ml cholesterol. While doubling times were largely unaffected by cholesterol, other overt phenotypic changes were observed. H. pylori strain SS1 grown in defined medium with cholesterol successfully colonized the stomach of gerbils, whereas SS1 grown without cholesterol failed to colonize. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide often displays Lewis X and/or Y antigens. Expression of these antigens measured by whole-cell ELISA was markedly enhanced in response to growth of strain SS1, 26695, or G27 in cholesterol. In addition, electrophoretic analysis of lipopolysaccharide in wild type G27 and in mutants lacking the O-chain revealed structural changes within the oligosaccharide core/lipid A moieties. These responses in Lewis antigen levels and in lipopolysaccharide profiles to cholesterol availability were highly specific, because no changes took place when cholesterol was substituted by beta-sitosterol or bile salts. Disruption of the genes encoding cholesterol alpha-glucosyltransferase or lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase had no effect on Lewis expression, nor on lipopolysaccharide profiles, nor on the cholesterol responsiveness of these properties. Disruption of the lipid A 1-phosphatase gene eliminated the effect of cholesterol on lipopolysaccharide profiles but not its effect on Lewis expression. Together these results suggest that cholesterol depletion leads to aberrant forms of LPS that are dependent upon dephosphorylation of lipid A at the 1-position. A tentative model for the observed effects of cholesterol is discussed in which sequential steps of lipopolysaccharide biogenesis and, independently, presentation of Lewis antigen at

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

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    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  5. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains

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    Debowski, Aleksandra W.; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A.; Marshall, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  6. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tiandi; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Haslam, Stuart M; Mulloy, Barbara; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  7. Insights from the redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tiandi; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2017-04-25

    H. pylori is a Gram-negative extracellular bacterium, first discovered by the Australian physicians Barry Marshall and Robin Warren in 1982, that colonises the human stomach mucosa. It is the leading cause of peptic ulcer and commonly infects humans worldwide with prevalence as high as 90% in some countries. H. pylori infection usually results in asymptomatic chronic gastritis, however 10-15% of cases develop duodenal or gastric ulcers and 1-3% develop stomach cancer. Infection is generally acquired during childhood and persists for life in the absence of antibiotic treatment. H. pylori has had a long period of co-evolution with humans, going back to human migration out of Africa. This prolonged relationship is likely to have shaped the overall host-pathogen interactions and repertoire of virulence strategies which H. pylori employs to establish robust colonisation, escape immune responses and persist in the gastric niche. In this regard, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key surface determinant in establishing colonisation and persistence via host mimicry and resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Thus, elucidation of the H. pylori LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway represents an important step towards better understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis and the development of novel therapeutic interventions.

  8. Unusual fatty acid substitution in lipids and lipopolysaccharides of Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Geis, G; Leying, H; Suerbaum, S; Opferkuch, W

    1990-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids, phospholipid fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharide fatty acids of four strains of Helicobacter pylori were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The presence of myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, 19-carbon cyclopropane fatty acid, beta-hydroxypalmitic acid, and beta-hydroxystearic acid was confirmed. In phospholipids, myristic acid and 19-carbon cyclopropane fatty acid were the major fatty acids. Hydroxy fatty acids and unsaturated fatt...

  9. A Changing Gastric Environment Leads to Adaptation of Lipopolysaccharide Variants in Helicobacter pylori Populations during Colonization

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    Nilsson, Christina; Björkholm, Britta; Normark, Staffan; Engstrand, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of half of the human population, and causes development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG) with loss of the acid-producing parietal cells, is correlated with an increased risk for development of gastric adenocarinoma. The majority of H. pylori isolates produce lipopolysaccharides (LPS) decorated with human-related Lewis epitopes, which have been shown to phase-vary in response to different environmental conditions. We have characterized the adaptations of H. pylori LPS and Lewis antigen expression to varying gastric conditions; in H. pylori isolates from mice with low or high gastric pH, respectively; in 482 clinical isolates from healthy individuals and from individuals with ChAG obtained at two time points with a four-year interval between endoscopies; and finally in isolates grown at different pH in vitro. Here we show that the gastric environment can contribute to a switch in Lewis phenotype in the two experimental mouse models. The clinical isolates from different human individuals showed that intra-individual isolates varied in Lewis antigen expression although the LPS diversity was relatively stable within each individual over time. Moreover, the isolates demonstrated considerable diversity in the levels of glycosylation and in the sizes of fucosylated O-antigen chains both within and between individuals. Thus our data suggest that different LPS variants exist in the colonizing H. pylori population, which can adapt to changes in the gastric environment and provide a means to regulate the inflammatory response of the host during disease progression. PMID:19517017

  10. A changing gastric environment leads to adaptation of lipopolysaccharide variants in Helicobacter pylori populations during colonization.

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    Anna Skoglund

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of half of the human population, and causes development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG with loss of the acid-producing parietal cells, is correlated with an increased risk for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. The majority of H. pylori isolates produce lipopolysaccharides (LPS decorated with human-related Lewis epitopes, which have been shown to phase-vary in response to different environmental conditions. We have characterized the adaptations of H. pylori LPS and Lewis antigen expression to varying gastric conditions; in H. pylori isolates from mice with low or high gastric pH, respectively; in 482 clinical isolates from healthy individuals and from individuals with ChAG obtained at two time points with a four-year interval between endoscopies; and finally in isolates grown at different pH in vitro. Here we show that the gastric environment can contribute to a switch in Lewis phenotype in the two experimental mouse models. The clinical isolates from different human individuals showed that intra-individual isolates varied in Lewis antigen expression although the LPS diversity was relatively stable within each individual over time. Moreover, the isolates demonstrated considerable diversity in the levels of glycosylation and in the sizes of fucosylated O-antigen chains both within and between individuals. Thus our data suggest that different LPS variants exist in the colonizing H. pylori population, which can adapt to changes in the gastric environment and provide a means to regulate the inflammatory response of the host during disease progression.

  11. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide is synthesized via a novel pathway with an evolutionary connection to protein N-glycosylation.

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    Isabelle Hug

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a major component on the surface of Gram negative bacteria and is composed of lipid A-core and the O antigen polysaccharide. O polysaccharides of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori contain Lewis antigens, mimicking glycan structures produced by human cells. The interaction of Lewis antigens with human dendritic cells induces a modulation of the immune response, contributing to the H. pylori virulence. The amount and position of Lewis antigens in the LPS varies among H. pylori isolates, indicating an adaptation to the host. In contrast to most bacteria, the genes for H. pylori O antigen biosynthesis are spread throughout the chromosome, which likely contributed to the fact that the LPS assembly pathway remained uncharacterized. In this study, two enzymes typically involved in LPS biosynthesis were found encoded in the H. pylori genome; the initiating glycosyltransferase WecA, and the O antigen ligase WaaL. Fluorescence microscopy and analysis of LPS from H. pylori mutants revealed that WecA and WaaL are involved in LPS production. Activity of WecA was additionally demonstrated with complementation experiments in Escherichia coli. WaaL ligase activity was shown in vitro. Analysis of the H. pylori genome failed to detect a flippase typically involved in O antigen synthesis. Instead, we identified a homolog of a flippase involved in protein N-glycosylation in other bacteria, although this pathway is not present in H. pylori. This flippase named Wzk was essential for O antigen display in H. pylori and was able to transport various glycans in E. coli. Whereas the O antigen mutants showed normal swimming motility and injection of the toxin CagA into host cells, the uptake of DNA seemed to be affected. We conclude that H. pylori uses a novel LPS biosynthetic pathway, evolutionarily connected to bacterial protein N-glycosylation.

  12. Helicobacter pylori modulates the T helper cell 1/T helper cell 2 balance through phase-variable interaction between lipopolysaccharide and DC-SIGN.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, M.P.; Engering, A.J.; Smits, HH; Vliet, van SJ; Bodegraven, van A.A.; Wirth, HP; Kapsenberg, ML; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.J.E.; Kooijk, van Y.; Appelmelk, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori spontaneously switches lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Lewis (Le) antigens on and off (phase-variable expression), but the biological significance of this is unclear. Here, we report that Le+ H. pylori variants are able to bind to the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and

  13. Structural modifications of bacterial lipopolysaccharide that facilitate Gram-negative bacteria evasion of host innate immunity

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    Motohiro eMatsuura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a cell wall component characteristic of Gram-negative bacteria, is a representative pathogen-associated molecular pattern that allows mammalian cells to recognize bacterial invasion and trigger innate immune responses. The polysaccharide moiety of LPS primary plays protective roles for bacteria such as prevention from complement attacks or camouflage with common host carbohydrate residues. The lipid moiety, termed lipid A, is recognized by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/MD-2 complex, which transduces signals for activation of host innate immunity. The basic structure of lipid A is a glucosamine disaccharide substituted by phosphate groups and acyl groups. Lipid A with 6 acyl groups (hexa-acylated form has been indicated to be a strong stimulator of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. This type of lipid A is conserved among a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria, and those bacteria are easily recognized by host cells for activation of defensive innate immune responses. Modifications of the lipid A structure to less-acylated forms have been observed in some bacterial species, and those forms are poor stimulators of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. Such modifications are thought to facilitate bacterial evasion of host innate immunity, thereby enhancing pathogenicity. This hypothesis is supported by studies of Yersinia pestis LPS, which contains hexa-acylated lipid A when the bacterium grows at 27ºC (the temperature of the vector flea, and shifts to contain less-acylated forms when grown at the human body temperature of 37ºC. This alteration of lipid A forms following transmission of Y. pestis from fleas to humans contributes predominantly to the virulence of this bacterium over other virulence factors. A similar role for less-acylated lipid A forms has been indicated in some other bacterial species, such as Francisella tularensis, Helicobacter pylori, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, and further studies to explore this concept are

  14. Uptake and modification of 125I-lipopolysaccharide by isolated rat Kupffer cells.

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    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1988-01-01

    While it is generally believed that hepatic clearance of lipopolysaccharide involves Kupffer cells, the mechanism involved has not been fully elucidated. This study assesses this phenomenon in terms of in vitro uptake and post-uptake modification experiments with an 125I-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide. 125I-Lipopolysaccharide was added to Kupffer cells in suspension cultures under a variety of conditions. In vitro uptake of 125I-Lipopolysaccharide was not saturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms per ml. Kinetics experiments performed at 16.67 micrograms per ml demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation. The kinetics of uptake could be inhibited, however, by incubation in the presence of a 10-fold excess of unlabeled lipopolysaccharide, indicating that a component of the uptake process may be limited. Energy dependence in this process was demonstrated by incubation in the presence of 1 mM 2-deoxyglucose which inhibited 125I-lipopolysaccharide uptake by approximately 30%. Pretreatment with 7.5 x 10(-5) M colchicine had no effect on kinetics, implying no role for the cell cytoskeleton in lipopolysaccharide uptake. These results are inconsistent with a receptor-mediated process as previously suggested. Modification of internalized label has been demonstrated by changes in buoyant density in CsCl isopyknic density gradients following overnight incubation with Kupffer cells. These results indicate that Kupffer cells clear bacterial endotoxin in vitro and post-uptake degradation occurs within 20 hr of incubation.

  15. Lactobacilli inhibit interleukin-8 production induced by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide-activated Toll-like receptor 4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhou; Feng-Zhen Ma; Xue-Jie Deng; Hong Yuan; Hong-Sheng Ma

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Lactobacillus bulgaricus (LBG) on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in SGC-7901 cells treated with Helicobacter pyloriSydney strain 1 lipopolysaccharide (H pyloriSS1-LPS).METHODS: SGC-7901 cells were treated with H pyIoriSS1-LPS in the presence or absence of pretreatment for 1 h with viable LBG or supematant recovered from LBG culture MRS broth (LBG-s). Cellular lysates were prepared for Western blot with anti-TLR4,anti-transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), anti-phospho-TAK1, anti-nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), anti-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and anti-phospho-p38MAPK antibodies.The amount of IL-8 in cell culture medium was measured by ELISA.RESULTS: H pyloriSS1-LPS up-regulated the expression of TLR4, stimulated the phosphorylation of TAK1, subsequently enhanced the activation of NFκB and the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in a timedependent manner, leading to augmentation of IL-8 production in SGC-7901 cells. Viable LBG or LBG-s pretreatment attenuated the expression of TLR4,inhibited the phosphorylation of TAK1 and p38MAPK,prevented the activation of NF-κB, and consequently blocked IL-8 production.CONCLUSION: H pyloriSS1-LPS induces IL-8production through activating TLR4 signaling in SGC-7901 cells and viable LBG or LBG-s prevents H pyloriSS1-LPS-mediated IL-8 production via inhibition of the TLR4 pathway.

  16. Multiple peptidoglycan modification networks modulate Helicobacter pylori's cell shape, motility, and colonization potential.

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    Laura K Sycuro

    Full Text Available Helical cell shape of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to promote virulence through viscosity-dependent enhancement of swimming velocity. However, H. pylori csd1 mutants, which are curved but lack helical twist, show normal velocity in viscous polymer solutions and the reason for their deficiency in stomach colonization has remained unclear. Characterization of new rod shaped mutants identified Csd4, a DL-carboxypeptidase of peptidoglycan (PG tripeptide monomers and Csd5, a putative scaffolding protein. Morphological and biochemical studies indicated Csd4 tripeptide cleavage and Csd1 crosslinking relaxation modify the PG sacculus through independent networks that coordinately generate helical shape. csd4 mutants show attenuation of stomach colonization, but no change in proinflammatory cytokine induction, despite four-fold higher levels of Nod1-agonist tripeptides in the PG sacculus. Motility analysis of similarly shaped mutants bearing distinct alterations in PG modifications revealed deficits associated with shape, but only in gel-like media and not viscous solutions. As gastric mucus displays viscoelastic gel-like properties, our results suggest enhanced penetration of the mucus barrier underlies the fitness advantage conferred by H. pylori's characteristic shape.

  17. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide:Biological activities in vitro and in vivo, pathological correlation to human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Hui Luo; Jie Yan; Ya-Fei Mao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the biological activity of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) lipopolysaccharide (H-LPS) and understand pathological correlation between H-LPS and human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer.METHODS: H-LPS of a clinical Hpylori strain and LPS of Escherichia coli strain O55:B5 (E-LPS) were extracted by phenol-water method. Biological activities of H-LPS and E-LPS were detected by limulus lysate assay, pyrogen assay,blood pressure test and PBMC induction test in rabbits,cytotoxicity test in NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells and lethality test in NIH mice. By using self-prepared rabbit anti-H-LPS serum as the first antibody and commercial HRP-labeled sheep anti-rabbit sera as the second antibody, H-LPS in biopsy specimens from 126 patients with chronic gastritis (68 cases) or gastric ulcer (58 cases) were examined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Fibroblast cytotoxicity and mouse lethality of H-LPS were weaker than those of E-LPS. But the ability of coagulating limulus lysate of the two LPSs was similar (+/0.5 ng/mL). At 0.5 h after H-LPS injection, the blood pressures of the 3 rabbits rapidly declined. At 1.0 h after H-LPS injection, the blood pressures in 2 of the 3 rabbits fell to zero causing death of the 2 animals. For the other one rabbit in the same group, its blood pressure gradually elevated. At 0.5 h after E-LPS injection, the blood pressures of the three rabbits also quickly declined and then maintained at low level for approximately 1.0 h. At 0.5 h after injection with H-LPS or E-LPS, PBMC numbers of the rabbits showed a remarkable increase. The total positivity rate of H-LPS from 126 biopsy specimens was 60.3%(76/126). H-LPS positivity rate in the biopsy specimens from chronic gastritis (50/68, 73.5%) was significantly higher than that from gastric ulcer (26/58, 44.8%) (X2=10.77,P<0.01). H-LPS positivity rates in biopsy specimens from chronic superficial gastritis (38/48, 79.2%) and chronic active gastritis (9/10, 90.0%) were significantly higher than

  18. A functional polymorphism T309G in MDM2 gene promoter, intensified by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide, is associated with both an increased susceptibility and poor prognosis of gastric carcinoma in Chinese patients.

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    Pan, Xiaolin; Li, Yuqin; Feng, Jin; Wang, Xiaoyong; Hao, Bo; Shi, Ruihua; Zhang, Guoxin

    2013-03-18

    Studies on the association between MDM2 SNP309 (T > G) and gastric cancer have reported conflicting results. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether MDM2 SNP309 is associated with susceptibility and prognosis of gastric carcinoma in Chinese patients. Total of 574 gastric carcinoma cases and 574 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. MDM2 polymorphism was detected by PCR- RFLP and infection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) by a validated serology test. The functionality of MDM2 SNP309, with or without H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by dual-luciferase assay. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to evaluate survival. Additional, a meta-analysis was conducted to verity the findings. MDM2 SNP309G/G genotype was associated with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma when compared with T/T genotype or T carriers (both P gastric carcinoma risk. SNP309G/G was identified as an independent marker of poor overall survival of carcinoma. In vitro, the luciferase assay further showed an increased transcriptional activity of SNP309G allele compared with SNP309T allele, and the function of polymorphism T309G in MDM2 gene promoter was intensified by H. pylori LPS. Pooled results from the meta-analysis confirmed that SNP309G/G genotype had a significantly increased risk of gastric carcinoma compared with T/T genotype or T carriers, consistent with the case-control findings. MDM2 SNP309G allele is associated with an increased risk and poor prognosis of gastric carcinoma in Chinese patients. Additional, there is a joint effect of MDM2 SNP309G/G allele and H. pylori infection on gastric carcinoma development, which may attribute to H. pylori LPS.

  19. Modulating the bacterial surface with small RNAs: a new twist on PhoP/Q-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Summary In recent years, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as important regulatory components in bacterial stress responses and in bacterial virulence. Many of these are conserved in related species and act on target mRNAs by sequence complementarity. They are tightly controlled...... of bacterial surface properties by regulating lipopolysaccharide modification. The small RNA is expressed as part of the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system that plays a major role in virulence of pathogenic species. This work expands the list of global regulators known to control small RNA expression...... at the transcription level, and are frequently elements of global regulatory systems. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella, almost one-third of the functional characterized small RNAs participate in control of outer membrane protein production. A subset of these genes is under the control of the sigma...

  20. Is there a link between the lipopolysaccharide of Helicobacter pylori gastric MALT lymphoma associated strains and lymphoma pathogenesis?

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    Philippe Lehours

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the Lewis antigen expression in Helicobacter pylori gastric MALT lymphoma associated strains in comparison to chronic gastritis only strains. Forty MALT strains (19 cagPAI (- and 21 cagPAI (+ and 39 cagPAI frequency-matched gastritis strains (17 cagPAI (- and 22 cagPAI (+ were included in this study. The lipopolyssacharide for each strain was extracted using a hot phenol method and the expression of Le(x and Le(y were investigated using Western Blot. The data were analyzed according to the strains' cagPAI status and vacA genotype. Le(x was identified in 21 (52.5% MALT strains and 29 (74.3% gastritis strains. Le(y was identified in 30 (75% MALT strains and 31 (79.5% gastritis strains. There was an association between cagPAI positivity and Le(x expression among MALT strains (p<0.0001, but not in gastritis strains (p = 0.64. Among cagPAI (- strains, isolates expressing solely Le(y were associated with MALT with an odds ratio of 64.2 (95% CI 4.9-841.0 when compared to strains expressing both Le(x and Le(y. vacA genotypes did not modify the association between Lewis antigen expression and disease status. In conclusion, cagPAI (- MALT strains have a particular Lewis antigen profile which could represent an adaptive mechanism to the host response or participate in MALT lymphomagenesis.

  1. Novel Coordination of Lipopolysaccharide Modifications in Vibrio cholerae promotes CAMP resistance.

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    Herrera, Carmen M; Henderson, Jeremy C; Crofts, Alexander A; Trent, M Stephen

    2017-09-14

    In the environment and during infection, the human intestinal pathogen Vibrio cholerae must overcome noxious compounds that damage the bacterial outer membrane. The El Tor and classical biotypes of O1 V. cholerae show striking differences in their resistance to membrane disrupting cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs), such as polymyxins. The classical biotype is susceptible to CAMPs, but current pandemic El Tor biotype isolates gain CAMP resistance by altering the net charge of their cell surface through glycine modification of lipid A. Here we report a second lipid A modification mechanism that only functions in the V. cholerae El Tor biotype. We identify a functional EptA ortholog responsible for the transfer of the amino-residue phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) to the lipid A of V. cholerae El Tor that is not functional in the classical biotype. We previously reported that mildly acidic growth conditions (pH 5.8) downregulate expression of genes encoding the glycine modification machinery. In this report, growth at pH 5.8 increases expression of eptA with concomitant pEtN modification suggesting coordinated regulation of these LPS modification systems. Similarly, efficient pEtN lipid A substitution is seen in the absence of lipid A glycinylation. We further demonstrate EptA orthologs from non-cholerae Vibrio species are functional. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Unique Structural Modifications Are Present in the Lipopolysaccharide from Colistin-Resistant Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    twice more, and all aqueous layers were pooled. Two milliliters of ethyl ether was added to the harvested aqueous layers. This mixture was then vor...potentially initiates a cascade of inflammatory cy- tokine production that, if unchecked, can lead to septic shock. Modifications of lipid A can...texed and centrifuged at 3,000 rpm for 5 min. The lower (organic) phase was then collected, and 2 ml of ether was added back to the remaining aqueous

  3. The effects of helicobacter pylori eradication on modification of metabolic syndrome parameters in patients with functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtare, Marjan; Mirfakhraee, Hosna; Arshad, Mahmoud; Samadani Fard, Seyed Hossein; Bahardoust, Mansour; Movahed, Alireza; Masoodi, Mohsen

    2017-07-27

    Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) have the potential role in the pathogenesis of various extra-gastric disorders such as metabolic disorders. But, it is now questioned about whether H. pylori eradication reduces or induces the risk for metabolic disorders especially in patients with dyspepsia. Hence, the present study aimed to assess the effects of H. pylori eradication on criteria of metabolic syndrome. H. pylori infected patients with dyspepsia were included. The patients were treated with omeprazole (20mg, q12h), amoxicillin (1g, q12h), and clarithromycin (500mg, q12h) for two weeks, then H. pylori eradication was evaluated by C(14) Breathing test (UBT) 6 weeks after the end of the treatment. Demographic data, clinical manifestation and metabolic parameters were recorded before and three months after completing treatment regimen. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 16.0. Of 110 patients were initially enrolled, 91 patients completed the study. Overall eradication rate was 61.5%. Significant differences in the serum level of total cholesterol(180.7±34 vs. 172.1±28, p=0.001), LDL(107.0±25 vs. 100.8±20, ppylori eradication could relatively reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome criteria such as fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, lipid profile and waist circumference. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Radiation induced gram negative bacteremia and endotoxemia in rabbits: modification by anti-lipopolysaccharide hyperimmune equine plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Well, M.T.; Gaffin, S.L.; Jordaan, J.P.

    1987-06-29

    Lethal whole-body irradiation damages the gut mucosa and leads to leakage of endotoxin or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) into the systemic circulation. Sixteen rabbits, irradiated with 900 rads /sup 60/Co, were randomly divided on day 4 into 2 groups, one of which received an intraperitoneal injection of normal saline (control) and the other (experimental) an equal volume of anti-LPS hyperimmune plasma. The time course of endotoxemia and bacteremia were determined for the duration of the experiment. While rabbits in both groups died within 13 days after irradiation, rabbits given saline died on average 2 days earlier, than rabbits given anti-LPS plasma. Plasma LPS concentrations rose to a small peak on day 2 prior to treatment. Thereafter plasma LPS in rabbits given saline increased forty fold by day 9. In contrast, in rabbits given anti-LPS plasma, LPS concentrations in the plasma remained within pretreatment limits. By day 12 after irradiation, plasma anti-LPS IgG had declined to 5.8% of pretreatment levels in rabbits given saline as compared to 46% in rabbits given anti-LPS plasma (p 0.005). While both groups developed gram-positive bacteremia, rabbits given saline in addition also developed gram-negative bacteremia. No rabbits treated with Anti-LPS showed gram-negative bacteremia.

  5. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: advances and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wenbo; Bai, Bing; Sheng, Liang; Li, Yan; Yue, Ping; Li, Xun; Qiao, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers of digestive system globally and Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is believed to be a major risk factor. HP can be classified into different types based on the presence and expression level of CagA and VacA, and, when exposed to adverse environment, HP changes its phenotype from helical type to coccoid type, with each having different pathogenicity. The mechanisms of HP-induced gastric carcinogenesis and progression are complicated, including DNA nitration and oxidation induced by mutagenic factors, HP-induced epigenetic modifications, HP-induced disruption of the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, and HP-induced cancer cell invasion and metastasis. HP may also affect the biological function of cancer stem cells and induction of cell autophagy. The lipopolysaccharide produced by HP can act through toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) to induce gastric mucosal inflammation and is thereby linked to the development of gastric cancer.

  6. Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    BATESON, M

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer disease, and its detection and eradication are now an important part of gastroenterology. Effective regimes are available which will eliminate the organism in about 90% of cases in developed countries.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori

  7. 幽门螺杆菌及其脂多糖与刺猬蛋白信号通路关系的研究进展%Research Progress of the Relationship between Helicobacter Pylori Lipopolysaccharide and the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈菲菲

    2012-01-01

    近年来,多项研究表明Shh信号通路与消化道肿瘤密切相关,并发现幽门螺旋杆菌(Hp)感染对Shh信号通路的表达有影响.Hp脂多糖在Hp相关疾病中发挥着重要作用,亦可能影响Shh信号通路的表达,但它们之间具体作用机制尚需进一步明确.现主要对Hp及其脂多糖的功能,Shh信号通路构成及其功能,Hp及其脂多糖与Shh信号通路间的关系予以综述.%Recent studies indicate that Sonic hedgehog( Shh )signaling pathway has been closely linked to gastrointestinal tumors, and some studies show that Helicobacter pylori( lip )infection has an effect on the expression of Shh signaling pathway, lip lipopolysaccharide plays an important role in lip related diseases, which may also affect the expression of Shh signaling pathway,but the specific mechanism need to be clarified. Here is to make a review' on the function of lip and its lipopolysaccharide, the constitution and function of Shh signaling pathway,and the relationship between the two.

  8. Influence of Lewis Antigen Expression by Helicobacter pylori on Bacterial Internalization by Gastric Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lozniewski, Alain; Haristoy, Xavier; Rasko, David A.; Hatier, Renée; Plénat, François; Diane E Taylor; Angioi-Duprez, Karine

    2003-01-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Lewis antigens in infection is still not well known. We investigated the influence of Lewis antigen expression by H. pylori on its internalization by AGS cells and the epithelium of human gastric xenografts in nude mice using isogenic mutants in LPS biosynthetic genes. In vivo, colonization rates were unaffected by the change in H. pylori Lewis antigen expression, whereas the number of viable intracellular bacteria was significantly hig...

  9. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  10. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  11. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Qing Wang; Ying-Nin Xin; Ni Li; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic sequences have been determined for a number of strains of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and related bacteria.With the development of microarray analysis and the wide use of subtractive hybridization techniques,comparative studies have been carried out with respect to the interstrain differences between H pylori and inter-species differences in the genome of related bacteria.It was found that the core genome of H pylori constitutes 1111 genes that are determinants of the species properties.A great pool of auxillary genes are mainly from the categories of cag pathogenicity islands,outer membrane proteins,restriction-modification system and hypothetical proteins of unknown function.Persistence of H pylori in the human stomach leads to the diversification of the genome.Comparative genomics suggest that a host jump has occurs from humans to felines.Candidate genes specific for the development of the gastric diseases were identified.With the aid of proteomics,population genetics and other molecular methods,future comparative genomic studies would dramatically promote our understanding of the evolution,pathogenesis and microbiology of H pylori.

  12. Genetic and Functional Analysis of a PmrA-PmrB-Regulated Locus Necessary for Lipopolysaccharide Modification, Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance, and Oral Virulence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, John S.; Ryan, Sara S.; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Ernst, Robert K.; Miller, Samuel I

    2000-01-01

    The two-component regulatory system PmrA-PmrB confers resistance of Salmonella spp. to cationic antimicrobial peptides (AP) such as polymyxin (PM), bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and azurocidin. This resistance occurs by transcriptional activation of two loci termed pmrE and pmrHFIJKLM. Both pmrE and pmrHFIJKLM produce products required for the biosynthesis of lipid A with 4-aminoarabinose (Ara4N). Ara4N addition creates a more positively charged lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and th...

  13. Modification of a synthetic LPS-binding domain of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor from shrimp reveals strong structure-activity relationship in their antimicrobial characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuyue; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-08-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is a small protein with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and certain antiviral property. Its putative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding domain was deduced to be important for its activities. However, there is still no report revealing how the structure of the LPS-binding domain affects its biological function until now. In the present study, we designed and synthesized a peptide corresponding to the LPS-binding domain of ALF from the Chinese shrimp (designated as FcALF-LBDc) and its structure-modified isoforms in order to analyze the relationship between its structure and antimicrobial activities. Results showed that FcALF-LBDc exhibited apparent antibacterial activities against both Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Vibrio anguillarum and Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus and Micrococcus lysodeikticus with MIC ranges of 32-64, 2-4, 1-2, and 32-64μM, respectively. The disulfide loop and the basic amino acids in the LPS-binding domain (LBD) of ALF played key roles in its antibacterial activities. In addition, FcALF-LBDc could reduce the propagation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in vivo, and its lysine residue is indispensable for its antiviral property. This is the first attempt to testify the effects of the sequence features of the LPS-binding domain on its antimicrobial activities.

  14. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal name: Helicobacter pylori Related tests: Gastrin At a Glance Test Sample ... else I should know? How is it used? Helicobacter pylori testing is used to diagnose an infection due ...

  15. Improvement of outer membrane-permeabilizing and lipopolysaccharide-binding activities of an antimicrobial cationic peptide by C-terminal modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piers, K L; Brown, M H; Hancock, R E

    1994-10-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides have been discovered in many different organisms and often possess a broad range of activity. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of actions of melittin and two synthetic peptides, CEME (a cecropin-melittin hybrid) and CEMA, against gram-negative bacteria. CEMA was produced by recombinant DNA procedures and is an analog of CEME with a modified C terminus resulting in two additional positive charges. All three peptides showed good antimicrobial activity against four different gram-negative bacteria, but only CEMA was able to somewhat augment the activity of some conventional antibiotics in synergy studies. Studies using the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae showed that the peptides all possessed the ability to permeabilize bacterial outer membranes to the hydrophobic fluorophor 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine and the protein lysozyme, with CEMA being the most active. CEMA also had the strongest relative binding affinity for bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). These data collectively indicated that these peptides all cross the outer membrane by the self-promoted uptake pathway and that CEMA is the peptide most effective at accessing this pathway.

  16. Structural and Functional Characterization of PseC, an Aminotransferase Involved in the Biosynthesis of Pseudaminic Acid, an Essential Flagellar Modification in Helicobacter Pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenhofen,I.; Lunin, V.; Julien, J.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Matte, A.; Cygler, M.; Brisson, J.; Aubry, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori flagellin is heavily glycosylated with the novel sialic acid-like nonulosonate, pseudaminic acid (Pse). The glycosylation process is essential for assembly of functional flagellar filaments and consequent bacterial motility. As motility is a key virulence factor for this and other important pathogens, the Pse biosynthetic pathway offers potential for novel therapeutic targets. From recent NMR analyses, we determined that the conversion of UDP-a-D-GlcNAc to the central intermediate in the pathway, UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-AltNAc, proceeds by formation of UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-arabino-4-hexulose by the dehydratase/epimerase PseB (HP0840) followed with amino transfer by the aminotransferase, PseC (HP0366). The central role of PseC in the H. pylori Pse biosynthetic pathway prompted us to determine crystal structures of the native protein, its complexes with pyridoxal phosphate alone and in combination with the UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-AltNAc product, the latter being converted to the external aldimine form in the enzyme's active site. In the binding site, the AltNAc sugar ring adopts a 4C1 chair conformation which is different from the predominant 1C4 form found in solution. The enzyme forms a homodimer where each monomer contributes to the active site, and these structures have permitted the identification of key residues involved in stabilization, and possibly catalysis, of the {beta}-L-arabino intermediate during the amino transfer reaction. The essential role of Lys183 in the catalytic event was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. This work presents for the first time a nucleotide-sugar aminotransferase co-crystallized with its natural ligand, and in conjunction with the recent functional characterization of this enzyme, will assist in elucidating the aminotransferase reaction mechanism within the Pse biosynthetic pathway.

  17. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases...

  18. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases......Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...

  19. H. pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... think you may have a high risk of stomach cancer, talk to your doctor. Together you can decide whether you may benefit from H. pylori screening. References H. pylori and peptic ulcers. National Institute ...

  20. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  1. Recombinant Helicobacter pylori catalase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Ya-Li Zhang; Jian-Feng Jin; Ji-De Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant strain which highly expresses catalase of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) and assay the activity of H. pylori catalase.METHODS: The catalase DNA was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA with PCR techniques and inserted into the prokaryotie expression vector pET-22b (+), and then was transformed into the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain which expressed catalase recombinant protein. The activity of H.pylori catalase was assayed by the Beers & Sizers.RESULTS: DNA sequence analysis showed that the sequence of catalase DNA was the same as GenBank's research. The catalase recombinant protein amounted to 24.4 % of the total bacterial protein after induced with IPTG for 3 hours at 37 ℃ and the activity of H. pylori catalase was high in the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain.CONCLUSION: A clone expressing high activity H. pylori catalase is obtained, laying a good foundation for further studies.

  2. Copper promotes TFF1-mediated Helicobacter pylori colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Montefusco

    Full Text Available The trefoil peptides (TFF1, TFF2 and TFF3 are a family of small highly conserved proteins that play an essential role in epithelial regeneration within the gastrointestinal tract, where they are mainly expressed. TFF1 expression is strongly induced after mucosal injury and it has been proposed that tff1 functions as a gastric tumor suppressor gene. Several studies confirm that tff1 expression is frequently lost in gastric cancer because of deletions, mutations or methylation of the tff1 promoter. Infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori results in chronic gastritis and it can lead to the development of gastric or duodenal ulcers. Moreover, it is known that there is a strong link to the development of gastric cancer. It has been shown that H. pylori interacts with the dimeric form of TFF1 and that the rough form of lipopolysaccharide mediates this interaction. We have previously reported that the carboxy-terminus of TFF1 is able to specifically bind copper ions (Cu and that Cu binding favours the homodimerization of the peptide, thus enhancing its motogenic activity. Here, we report that the Cu-TFF1 cuprocomplex promotes adherence of H. pylori to epithelial cells. Adherence of H. pylori to gastric adenocarcinoma cells, AGS AC1 cells, induced to hyper-express TFF1 was enhanced compared to noninduced cells. Copper further promoted this interaction. A H. pylori mutant unable to bind TFF1 did not show enhanced infection of induced cells. Cu treatment induced a thickening of the mucus layer produced by the colorectal adenocarcinoma mucus secreting, goblet cells, HT29-E12 and promoted H. pylori colonisation. Finally, SPR analysis shows that the C-terminus of TFF1, involved in the binding of copper, is also able to selectively bind H. pylori RF-LPS.

  3. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection on nutrition and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Francesco; Annalisa, Tortora; Teresa, Di Rienzo; Giovanna, D’Angelo; Ianiro, Gianluca; Franco, Scaldaferri; Viviana, Gerardi; Valentina, Tesori; Riccardo, Lopetuso Loris; Antonio, Gasbarrini

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative pathogen that is widespread all over the world, infecting more than 50% of the world’s population. It is etiologically associated with non-atrophic and atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer and shows a deep association with primary gastric B-cell lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Recently, the medical research focused on the modification of the gastric environment induced by H. pylori infection, possibly affecting the absorption of nutrients and drugs as well as the production of hormones strongly implicated in the regulation of appetite and growth. Interestingly, the absorption of iron and vitamin B12 is impaired by H. pylori infection, while infected subjects have lower basal and fasting serum levels of ghrelin and higher concentration of leptin compared to controls. Since leptin is an anorexigenic hormone, and ghrelin stimulates powerfully the release of growth hormone in humans, H. pylori infection may finally induce growth retardation if acquired very early in the childhood and in malnourished children. This review is focused on the nutritional effects of H. pylori infection, such as the reduced bioavailability or the malabsorbption of essential nutrients, and of gastrointestinal hormones, as well as on the relationship between H. pylori and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25278679

  4. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Harris

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Using an evidence-based approach this review discusses the current treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcer disease, functional (non-ulcer)dyspepsia or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).It also briefly addresses the potential role of eradication of H . pylori in preventing gastric cancer .

  5. Fallacy of the Unique Genome: Sequence Diversity within Single Helicobacter pylori Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lori M.; Bernick, David L.; Abedrabbo, Samar; Underwood, Jason G.; Kong, Nguyet; Huang, Bihua C.; Weis, Allison M.; Pourmand, Nader

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacterial genomes are highly variable but nonetheless are typically published as a single assembled genome. Experiments tracking bacterial genome evolution have not looked at the variation present at a given point in time. Here, we analyzed the mouse-passaged Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 and its parent PMSS1 to assess intra- and intergenomic variability. Using high sequence coverage depth and experimental validation, we detected extensive genome plasticity within these H. pylori isolates, including movement of the transposable element IS607, large and small inversions, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms, and variation in cagA copy number. The cagA gene was found as 1 to 4 tandem copies located off the cag island in both SS1 and PMSS1; this copy number variation correlated with protein expression. To gain insight into the changes that occurred during mouse adaptation, we also compared SS1 and PMSS1 and observed 46 differences that were distinct from the within-genome variation. The most substantial was an insertion in cagY, which encodes a protein required for a type IV secretion system function. We detected modifications in genes coding for two proteins known to affect mouse colonization, the HpaA neuraminyllactose-binding protein and the FutB α-1,3 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) fucosyltransferase, as well as genes predicted to modulate diverse properties. In sum, our work suggests that data from consensus genome assemblies from single colonies may be misleading by failing to represent the variability present. Furthermore, we show that high-depth genomic sequencing data of a population can be analyzed to gain insight into the normal variation within bacterial strains. PMID:28223462

  6. Fallacy of the Unique Genome: Sequence Diversity within Single Helicobacter pylori Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny L. Draper

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial genomes are highly variable but nonetheless are typically published as a single assembled genome. Experiments tracking bacterial genome evolution have not looked at the variation present at a given point in time. Here, we analyzed the mouse-passaged Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 and its parent PMSS1 to assess intra- and intergenomic variability. Using high sequence coverage depth and experimental validation, we detected extensive genome plasticity within these H. pylori isolates, including movement of the transposable element IS607, large and small inversions, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms, and variation in cagA copy number. The cagA gene was found as 1 to 4 tandem copies located off the cag island in both SS1 and PMSS1; this copy number variation correlated with protein expression. To gain insight into the changes that occurred during mouse adaptation, we also compared SS1 and PMSS1 and observed 46 differences that were distinct from the within-genome variation. The most substantial was an insertion in cagY, which encodes a protein required for a type IV secretion system function. We detected modifications in genes coding for two proteins known to affect mouse colonization, the HpaA neuraminyllactose-binding protein and the FutB α-1,3 lipopolysaccharide (LPS fucosyltransferase, as well as genes predicted to modulate diverse properties. In sum, our work suggests that data from consensus genome assemblies from single colonies may be misleading by failing to represent the variability present. Furthermore, we show that high-depth genomic sequencing data of a population can be analyzed to gain insight into the normal variation within bacterial strains.

  7. Horizontally acquired glycosyltransferase operons drive salmonellae lipopolysaccharide diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mark R; Broadbent, Sarah E; Harris, Simon R; Thomson, Nicholas R; van der Woude, Marjan W

    2013-06-01

    The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr) operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Crosstalk between Helicobacter pylori and gastric epithelial cells is impaired by docosahexaenoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori colonizes half of the world's population leading to gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori strains resistant to antibiotics are increasing which raises the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been shown to decrease H. pylori growth and its associated-inflammation through mechanisms poorly characterized. We aimed to explore DHA action on H. pylori-mediated inflammation and adhesion to gastric epithelial cells (AGS and also to identify bacterial structures affected by DHA. H. pylori growth and metabolism was assessed in liquid cultures. Bacterial adhesion to AGS cells was visualized by transmission electron microscopy and quantified by an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Inflammatory proteins were assessed by immunoblotting in infected AGS cells, previously treated with DHA. Bacterial total and outer membrane protein composition was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Concentrations of 100 µM of DHA decreased H. pylori growth, whereas concentrations higher than 250 µM irreversibly inhibited bacteria survival. DHA reduced ATP production and adhesion to AGS cells. AGS cells infected with DHA pre-treated H. pylori showed a 3-fold reduction in Interleukin-8 (IL-8 production and a decrease of COX2 and iNOS. 2D electrophoresis analysis revealed that DHA changed the expression of H. pylori outer membrane proteins associated with stress response and metabolism and modified bacterial lipopolysaccharide phenotype. As conclusions our results show that DHA anti-H. pylori effects are associated with changes of bacteria morphology and metabolism, and with alteration of outer membrane proteins composition, that ultimately reduce the adhesion of bacteria and the burden of H. pylori-related inflammation.

  9. Helicobacter pylori susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy differ in the maturation and activation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitar, Andreja N; Skvarc, Miha; Tepes, Bojan; Kos, Janko; Ihan, Alojz

    2013-12-01

    The natural course of Helicobacter pylori infection, as well as the success of antibiotic eradication is determined by the immune response to bacteria. The aim of the study is to investigate how different Helicobacter pylori isolates influence the dendritic cells maturation and antigen-presenting function in order to elucidate the differences between Helicobacter pylori strains, isolated from the patients with successful antibiotic eradication therapy or repeated eradication failure. Dendritic cells maturation and antigen presentation were monitored by flow cytometry analysis of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and costimulatory molecules expression, and by determining cytokine secretion. Dendritic cells stimulated with Helicobacter pylori isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure expressed less human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), CD86, TLR-2, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy; the latter expressed lower production of IL-10. Polymyxin B inhibition of lipopolysaccharide reduces IL-8 secretion in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy. The differences in IL-8 secretion between both groups are lipopolysaccharide dependent, while the differences in secretion of IL-10 remain unchanged after lipopolysaccharide inhibition. Inhibitor of cathepsin X Mab 2F12 reduced the secretion of IL-6, and the secretion was significantly lower in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure. Helicobacter pylori strains, susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy, differ in their capability to induce DCs maturation and antigen-presenting function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Specific Antibodies in Sera and Gastric Aspirates of Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Helicobacter pylori-Infected Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, A.; Tinnert, A.; Hamlet, A.; Lönroth, H.; Bölin, I.; Svennerholm, A.-M.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we have determined systemic and local antibody responses against different Helicobacter pylori antigens in H. pylori-infected and noninfected subjects. In addition, we studied whether differences in antibody responses between patients with duodenal ulcers and asymptomatic H. pylori carriers might explain the different outcomes of infection. Sera and in most instances gastric aspirates were collected from 19 duodenal ulcer patients, 15 asymptomatic H. pylori carriers, and 20 noninfected subjects and assayed for specific antibodies against different H. pylori antigens, i.e., whole membrane proteins (MP), lipopolysaccharides, flagellin, urease, the neuraminyllactose binding hemagglutinin HpaA, and a 26-kDa protein, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The H. pylori-infected subjects had significantly higher antibody titers against MP, flagellin, and urease in both sera and gastric aspirates compared with the noninfected subjects. Furthermore, the antibody titers against HpaA were significantly elevated in sera but not in gastric aspirates from the infected subjects. However, no differences in antibody titers against any of the tested antigens could be detected between the duodenal ulcer patients and the asymptomatic H. pylori carriers, either in sera or in gastric aspirates. PMID:9605978

  11. Helicobacter pylori in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Matjaž; Hojsak, Iva; Kolaček, Sanja

    2012-09-01

    This review summarizes important pediatric studies published from April 2011 up to March 2012. Proteomics profile of ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains was defined in the most interesting study of the last year. The antigen stool test is becoming the "gold standard" in prevalence studies, and according to the last epidemiologic studies, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in childhood is not decreasing any more in the developed world. The resistance rate of H. pylori strains is high in children. Therefore, among other important issues concerning H. pylori in pediatrics, guidelines published by ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN last year also recommended culture and susceptibility testing before first-line treatment in areas with high or unknown antibiotic resistance rates.

  12. Immunity and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Harris

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria called Helicobacter pylori arrived to the American continent 12,000 years ago (1, reaching South America roughly 5,400-4,600 years AC according to research by Pelayo Correa, a Colombian pathologist who found Helicobacter in stool next to Chinchorro mummies in the North of Arica close to the Pacific Ocean. In 2005, Barry Marshall was awarded the Nobel Prize for his studies on Helicobacter pylori together with Robin Warren.

  13. Metabolic Interaction of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Jong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a barrier, gut commensal microbiota can protect against potential pathogenic microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Crosstalk between gut microbes and immune cells promotes human intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been implicated in the development of many human metabolic disorders like obesity, hepatic steatohepatitis, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Certain microbes, such as butyrate-producing bacteria, are lower in T2D patients. The transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but the exact pathogenesis remains unclear. H. pylori in the human stomach cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancers. H. pylori infection also induces insulin resistance and has been defined as a predisposing factor to T2D development. Gastric and fecal microbiota may have been changed in H. pylori-infected persons and mice to promote gastric inflammation and specific diseases. However, the interaction of H. pylori and gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism also remains unknown. Further studies aim to identify the H. pylori-microbiota-host metabolism axis and to test if H. pylori eradication or modification of gut microbiota can improve the control of human metabolic disorders.

  14. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  15. Impact of Helicobacter pylori on the healing process of the gastric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnich, Eliza; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicińska, Paulina; Hinc, Krzysztof; Obuchowski, Michał; Gajewski, Adrian; Moran, Anthony P; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the impact of selected well defined Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antigens on gastric barrier cell turnover. METHODS In this study, using two cellular models of gastric epithelial cells and fibroblasts, we have focused on exploring the effects of well defined H. pylori soluble components such as glycine acid extract antigenic complex (GE), subunit A of urease (UreA), cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on cell turnover by comparing the wound healing capacity of the cells in terms of their proliferative and metabolic activity as well as cell cycle distribution. Toxic effects of H. pylori components have been assessed in an association with damage to cell nuclei and inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. RESULTS We showed that H. pylori GE, CagA and UreA promoted regeneration of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which is necessary for effective tissue healing. However, in vivo increased proliferative activity of these cells may constitute an increased risk of gastric neoplasia. In contrast, H. pylori LPS showed a dose-dependent influence on the process of wound healing. At a low concentration (1 ng/mL) H. pylori LPS accelerated of healing epithelial cells, which was linked to significantly enhanced cell proliferation and MTT reduction as well as lack of alterations in cell cycle and downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) production as well as cell nuclei destruction. By comparison, H. pylori LPS at a high concentration (25 ng/mL) inhibited the process of wound repair, which was related to diminished proliferative activity of the cells, cell cycle arrest, destruction of cell nuclei and downregulation of the EGF/STAT3 signalling pathway. CONCLUSION In vivo H. pylori LPS driven effects might lead to the maintenance of chronic inflammatory response and pathological disorders on the level of the gastric mucosal barrier. PMID:27672275

  16. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detec

  17. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  18. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Osborn, John F.; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the human stomach for many decades without adverse consequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children wit...

  19. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia; Pacifico; Caterina; Anania; John; F; Osborn; Flavia; Ferraro; Claudio; Chiesa

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the hu-man stomach for many decades without adverse con-sequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent a...

  20. Helicobacter pylori genome variability in a framework of familial transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tindberg Ylva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori infection is exceptionally prevalent and is considered to be acquired primarily early in life through person-to-person transmission within the family. H. pylori is a genetically diverse bacterial species, which may facilitate adaptation to new hosts and persistence for decades. The present study aimed to explore the genetic diversity of clonal isolates from a mother and her three children in order to shed light on H. pylori transmission and host adaptation. Results Two different H. pylori strains and strain variants were identified in the family members by PCR-based molecular typing and sequencing of five loci. Genome diversity was further assessed for 15 isolates by comparative microarray hybridizations. The microarray consisted of 1,745 oligonucleotides representing the genes of two previously sequenced H. pylori strains. The microarray analysis detected a limited mean number (± standard error of divergent genes between clonal isolates from the same and different individuals (1 ± 0.4, 0.1%, and 3 ± 0.3, 0.2%, respectively. There was considerable variability between the two different strains in the family members (147 ± 4, 8% and for all isolates relative to the two sequenced reference strains (314 ± 16, 18%. The diversity between different strains was associated with gene functional classes related to DNA metabolism and the cell envelope. Conclusion The present data from clonal H. pylori isolates of family members do not support that transmission and host adaptation are associated with substantial sequence diversity in the bacterial genome. However, important phenotypic modifications may be determined by additional genetic mechanisms, such as phase-variation. Our findings can aid further exploration of H. pylori genetic diversity and adaptation.

  1. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  2. Horizontally acquired glycosyltransferase operons drive salmonellae lipopolysaccharide diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Davies

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

  3. Horizontally Acquired Glycosyltransferase Operons Drive Salmonellae Lipopolysaccharide Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mark R.; Broadbent, Sarah E.; Harris, Simon R.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; van der Woude, Marjan W.

    2013-01-01

    The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr) operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23818865

  4. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  6. Biopatologia do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeira Marcelo Sady Plácido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori induz inflamação persistente na mucosa gástrica com diferentes lesões orgânicas em humanos, tais como gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. Os fatores determinantes desses diferentes resultados incluem a intensidade e a distribuição da inflamação induzida pelo H. pylori na mucosa gástrica. Evidências recentes demonstram que cepas do H. pylori apresentam diversidade genotípica, cujos produtos acionam o processo inflamatório por meio de mediadores e citocinas, que podem levar a diferentes graus de resposta inflamatória do hospedeiro, resultando em diferentes destinos patológicos. Cepas H. pylori com a ilha de patogenicidade cag induzem resposta inflamatória mais grave, através da ativação da transcrição de genes, aumentando o risco para desenvolvimento de úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. O estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo induzido pela inflamação desempenha importante papel na carcinogênese gástrica como mediador da formação ou ativação de cancerígenos, danos no DNA, bem como de alterações da proliferação celular e da apoptose.

  7. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  8. Exopolysaccharide production by Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a widespread Gram-negative bacterium that infects the stomach of humans leading to the onset of several gastric disorders, such as, gastritis, gastric ulcers, and cancers. Studies from developing countries with low socioeconomic status and poor management of the drinking water suggest that it may serve as an environmental reservoir of H. pylori and therefore contribute to human infection. It has been reported that H. pylori has the ability to form microbi...

  9. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  10. Brain-gut axis in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, Jacek; Kłopocka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the main pathogenic factor for upper digestive tract organic diseases. In addition to direct cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects, H. pylori infection may also induce abnormalities indirectly by affecting the brain-gut axis, similar to other microorganisms present in the alimentary tract. The brain-gut axis integrates the central, peripheral, enteric and autonomic nervous systems, as well as the endocrine and immunological systems, with gastrointestinal functions and environmental stimuli, including gastric and intestinal microbiota. The bidirectional relationship between H. pylori infection and the brain-gut axis influences both the contagion process and the host’s neuroendocrine-immunological reaction to it, resulting in alterations in cognitive functions, food intake and appetite, immunological response, and modification of symptom sensitivity thresholds. Furthermore, disturbances in the upper and lower digestive tract permeability, motility and secretion can occur, mainly as a form of irritable bowel syndrome. Many of these abnormalities disappear following H. pylori eradication. H. pylori may have direct neurotoxic effects that lead to alteration of the brain-gut axis through the activation of neurogenic inflammatory processes, or by microelement deficiency secondary to functional and morphological changes in the digestive tract. In digestive tissue, H. pylori can alter signaling in the brain-gut axis by mast cells, the main brain-gut axis effector, as H. pylori infection is associated with decreased mast cell infiltration in the digestive tract. Nevertheless, unequivocal data concerning the direct and immediate effect of H. pylori infection on the brain-gut axis are still lacking. Therefore, further studies evaluating the clinical importance of these host-bacteria interactions will improve our understanding of H. pylori infection pathophysiology and suggest new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24833851

  11. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vassoler Serrato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2 is transformed into ammonia (NH3 by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS, anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  12. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  13. Isocitrate dehydrogenase of Helicobacter pylori potentially induces humoral immune response in subjects with peptic ulcer disease and gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abid Hussain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: H. pylori causes gastritis and peptic ulcers and is a risk factor for the development of gastric carcinoma. Many of the proteins such as urease, porins, flagellins and toxins such as lipo-polysaccharides have been identified as potential virulence factors which induce proinflammatory reaction. We report immunogenic potentials of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD, an important house keeping protein of H. pylori. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Amino acid sequences of H. pylori ICD were subjected to in silico analysis for regions with predictably high antigenic indexes. Also, computational modelling of the H. pylori ICD as juxtaposed to the E. coli ICD was carried out to determine levels of structure similarity and the availability of surface exposed motifs, if any. The icd gene was cloned, expressed and purified to a very high homogeneity. Humoral response directed against H. pylori ICD was detected through an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in 82 human subjects comprising of 58 patients with H. pylori associated gastritis or ulcer disease and 24 asymptomatic healthy controls. The H. pylori ICD elicited potentially high humoral immune response and revealed high antibody titers in sera corresponding to endoscopically-confirmed gastritis and ulcer disease subjects. However, urea-breath-test negative healthy control samples and asymptomatic control samples did not reveal any detectable immune responses. The ELISA for proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 did not exhibit any significant proinflammatory activity of ICD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ICD of H. pylori is an immunogen which interacts with the host immune system subsequent to a possible autolytic-release and thereby significantly elicits humoral responses in individuals with invasive H. pylori infection. However, ICD could not significantly stimulate IL8 induction in a cultured macrophage cell line (THP1 and therefore, may not be a notable proinflammatory agent.

  14. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  15. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  16. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; de Laat, L; van Oijen, A H; de Boer, W A

    2012-03-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detect halitosis. In this study a possible relation between H. pylori and halitosis was evaluated, using an objective method (gas chromatography, GC) to detect the VSCs, responsible for the halitosis. The levels of the VSCs hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in mouth breath and in stomach air of 11 H. pylori positive patients and of 38 H. pylori negative patients, all with gastric pathology. Halitosis was also established by organoleptic scoring (OLS) of mouth-breath. The levels of H(2)S, MM and DMS in the mouth-breath and stomach air of the H. pylori positive patients did not differ significantly from those of the H. pylori negative patients. OLS of the mouth-breath resulted in 9 patients with halitosis, 1 out of the H. pylori positive group and 8 out of the H. pylori negative group, which is not statistically different. The concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach. The patients with gastric pathology were also compared with control patients without gastric pathology and with normal volunteers. No significant differences in VSCs in mouth breath were observed between these groups. Thus, in this study no association between halitosis and H. pylori infection was found. Halitosis, as established by GC and OLS, nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach.

  17. Role of childhood infection in the sequelae of H. pylori disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul R; Smythies, Lesley E; Smith, Phillip D; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of Helicobacter pylori infection plays a fundamental role in the development of H. pylori-associated complications. Since the majority of infected persons acquire the bacteria during early childhood, an examination of the immunobiology of H. pylori infection in children compared with that of adults may help identify host factors that contribute to persistent infection. Therefore, we begin our review of the role of persistence in H. pylori disease with an assessment of the clinical features of H. pylori infection in children. We next review the bacterial factors that promote colonization and evasion of host defense mechanisms. We then focus our attention on the early host immunological factors that promote persistence of the infection and its complications in humans and mouse models. We also highlight topics in which further research is needed. An examination of how immunological factors cause divergent manifestations of H. pylori infection in children compared with adults may provide new insight for therapeutic modification or prevention of persistent H. pylori infection and its complications. PMID:24275060

  18. [Genomic diversity and population structure of Helicobacter pylori isolates in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y H; He, L H; Peng, X H; Sun, L; Zhang, J Z

    2016-10-10

    Objective: To learn about the overall genomic characteristics and population structure of Helicobacter pylori isolated in China. Methods: In this study, we used 10 public available genome sequences of H. pylori strains isolated in China, combined with other H. pylori sequences from GenBank, to analyzed the overall genomic characteristics of H. pylori isolated in China. Core genes and strain specific genes were determined for a further function definition. Results: A total of 1 203 core genes were found among all sequenced China H. pylori isolates. The number of strain specific genes ranged from 19 to 32. These genes mainly encodes hypothetical proteins which might play an important role in adaption to different hosts. Genomic variation regions were mainly in genes encoding type four secretion systems and restriction modification systems. All the China isolates belong to hpEastAsia group, hspEAsia subgroup. Prophages sequences were found in three China H. pylori strains, carrying key elements required for phage assembly. Conclusion: China H. pylori isolates belong to hpEastAsia group, hspEAsia subgroup, and some isolates contain prophages.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2000-01-01

    @@ IS THERE ANYTHING NEW? Helicobacter pylori has been for many years a forgotten bacterium, since the first report on this spiral organism dated from the 19th century[1]. As early as in 1906, an association between a spiral organism and gastric carcinoma was suggested[2].Doenges reported in 1938 that on autopsy not less than 40% of human stomachs were found to be invaded by spiral organisms[3].

  20. Nitroimidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wouden, EJ; Thijs, JC; Van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a nitroimidazole-containing regimen for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection is decreased by nitroimidazole resistance. Nitroimidazoles are metabolized by H. pylori by several nitro-reductases of which an oxygen-insensitive NADPH nitroreductase encoded by the rdxA gene is t

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  2. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  3. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Kusters (Johannes); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection

  4. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event.

  5. Identification of Markers for Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Children with Peptic Ulcer Disease by Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleastro, Mónica; Monteiro, Lurdes; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis; Ménard, Armelle

    2006-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) occurs after a long-term Helicobacter pylori infection. However, the disease can develop earlier, and rare cases have been observed in children, suggesting that these H. pylori strains may be more virulent. We used suppressive subtractive hybridization for comparative genomics between H. pylori strains isolated from a 5-year-old child with duodenal ulcer and from a sex- and age-matched child with gastritis only. The prevalence of the 30 tester-specific subtracted sequences was determined on a collection of H. pylori strains from children (15 ulcers and 30 gastritis) and from adults (46 ulcers and 44 gastritis). Two of these sequences, jhp0562 (80.0% versus 33.3%, P = 0.008) and jhp0870 (80.0% versus 36.7%, P = 0.015), were highly associated with PUD in children and a third sequence, jhp0828, was less associated (40.0% versus 10.0%, P = 0.048). Among adult strains, none of the 30 sequences was associated with PUD. However, both jhp0562 and jhp0870 were less prevalent in adenocarcinoma strains than in PUD strains from children and adults, the difference being statistically significant for jhp0870. In conclusion, two H. pylori genes were identified as being strongly associated with PUD in children, and their putative roles as an outer membrane protein for jhp0870 and in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis for jhp0562, suggest that they may be novel virulence factors of H. pylori. PMID:16790780

  6. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  7. Usefulness of Housekeeping Genes for the Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection, Strain Discrimination and Detection of Multiple Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, Montserrat; Kulmann, Marcos; Ramírez-Lázaro, María José; Lario, Sergio; Quilez, María Elisa; Campo, Rafael; Piqué, Núria; Calvet, Xavier; Miñana-Galbis, David

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects human stomachs of over half the world's population, evades the immune response and establishes a chronic infection. Although most people remains asymptomatic, duodenal and gastric ulcers, MALT lymphoma and progression to gastric cancer could be developed. Several virulence factors such as flagella, lipopolysaccharide, adhesins and especially the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA and the oncoprotein CagA have been described for H. pylori. Despite the extensive published data on H. pylori, more research is needed to determine new virulence markers, the exact mode of transmission or the role of multiple infection. Amplification and sequencing of six housekeeping genes (amiA, cgt, cpn60, cpn70, dnaJ, and luxS) related to H. pylori pathogenesis have been performed in order to evaluate their usefulness for the specific detection of H. pylori, the genetic discrimination at strain level and the detection of multiple infection. A total of 52 H. pylori clones, isolated from 14 gastric biopsies from 11 patients, were analyzed for this purpose. All genes were specifically amplified for H. pylori and all clones isolated from different patients were discriminated, with gene distances ranged from 0.9 to 7.8%. Although most clones isolated from the same patient showed identical gene sequences, an event of multiple infection was detected in all the genes and microevolution events were showed for amiA and cpn60 genes. These results suggested that housekeeping genes could be useful for H. pylori detection and to elucidate the mode of transmission and the relevance of the multiple infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  9. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-02-08

    The author reviews the main achievements in Helicobacter pylori research in the past 2 years. Of the more than 1000 microRNAs described thus far, sets of over- and underexpressed samples were identified that are associated with either gastric cancer or precancerous lesions, and some of them could be either markers or therapeutic targets in the near future. Meta-analyses involved 95 new publications: the association between infection and oesophageal, colorectal, pancreatic and liver carcinomas is supported by the increased odds ratios, but the results do not reach the strength seen in gastric carcinoma. Epstein-Barr virus is an emerging pathogen: 10% of gastric cancers are virus-associated; the prevalence of the virus in normal mucosa, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently being studied. Current Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens frequently achieve suboptimal results: a few optimisation methods are presented, although not all are supported by the meta-analyses. In 2013, the European Helicobacter Study Group proposed the development of a pan-European registry; data from 5792 patients registered so far indicated that many therapeutic regimens resulted in a low eradication rate. In 2013, the Healthy Stomach Initiative was started with the aim of supporting and disseminating research performed in the field of healthy and diseased stomachs.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  11. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  12. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  13. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Paul; Waidner, Barbara; Hofman, Véronique; Bereswill, Stefan; Brest, Patrick; Kist, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    Research in the last year has provided new insights into the function of the the cag-associated type IV secretion system and the vacuolating toxin VacA. A quite new aspect was disclosed by the finding that Helicobacter pylori in Mongolian gerbils colonizes a very distinct topology in the gastric mucous layer, obviously providing optimal conditions for long-term survival. Further research activities focused on H. pylori ammonia and metal metabolism as well as on bacterial stress defence mechanisms. Differential expression of approximately 7% of the bacterial genome was found at low pH suggesting that H. pylori has evolved a multitude of acid-adaptive mechanisms. VacA was shown to interrupt phagosome maturation in macrophage cell lines as well as to modulate and interfere with T lymphocyte immunological functions. Gastric mucosa as well as the H. pylori-infected epithelial cell line AGS strongly express IL-8 receptor A and B, which might contribute to the augmentation of the inflammatory response. Accumulating evidence implicates genetic variation in the inflammatory response to H. pylori in the etiology of the increased risk of gastric cancer after H. pylori infection. The chronic imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation is the first step of gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard, it was demonstrated that coexpression of two H. pylori proteins, CagA and HspB, in AGS cells, caused an increase in E2F transcription factor, cyclin D3, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Taken together, we now have a better understanding of the role of different virulence factors of H. pylori. There is still a lot to be learned, but the promising discoveries summarized here, demonstrate that the investigation of the bacterial survival strategies will give novel insights into pathogenesis and disease development.

  14. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates. Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis.

  15. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  16. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  17. Does Helicobacter pylori affect portal hypertensive gastropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major etiological factor of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. It is supposed to be a risk factor for the more frequently encountered PUD in patients with liver cirrhosis. Several investigators have evaluated the effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis, portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG and encephalopathy with controversial results. Some reports have shown a higher seroprevalence and suggested a synergistic effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis and PHG. However, this increased prevalence is associated with a negative histology and is not influenced by the cause of cirrhosis, PHG, Child class or gender. Most studies have not found any correlation between H. pylori and PHG. In contrast, other studies have reported a markedly lower prevalence of H. pylori in cirrhotics with duodenal ulcer compared to controls. The aim of this article is to review the relationship between H. pylori infection and portal hypertensive gastropathy and the role of H. pylori eradication in cirrhotic patients.

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection- recent developments in diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Isabel Lopes Filipa F Vale Mónica Oleastro

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods,a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication...

  19. Chlamydial hemagglutinin identified as lipopolysaccharide.

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, N G; Caldwell, H D; Hackstadt, T

    1987-01-01

    Chlamydial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) agglutinated mouse and rabbit erythrocytes but not human, guinea pig, or pronghorn antelope erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was not specific for Chlamydia spp., as rough LPSs from Coxiella burnetii and Escherichia coli also agglutinated erythrocytes from the same animal species. Nonagglutinated and agglutinated erythrocytes bound equivalent amounts of LPS, indicating that hemagglutination was not due to a specific interaction of chlamydial LPS with erythrocy...

  20. Pan-genomic analyses identify key Helicobacter pylori pathogenic loci modified by carcinogenic host microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Jennifer M; Chopra, Abha; Loh, John T; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Watson, Mark; Leary, Shay; Beckett, Amber C; Wilson, Keith T; Cover, Timothy L; Mallal, Simon; Israel, Dawn A; Peek, Richard M

    2017-09-18

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer; however, the majority of infected individuals do not develop disease. Pathological outcomes are mediated by complex interactions among bacterial, host and environmental constituents, and two dietary factors linked with gastric cancer risk are iron deficiency and high salt. We hypothesised that prolonged adaptation of H. pylori to in vivo carcinogenic microenvironments results in genetic modification important for disease. Whole genome sequencing of genetically related H. pylori strains that differ in virulence and targeted H. pylori sequencing following prolonged exposure of bacteria to in vitro carcinogenic conditions were performed. A total of 180 unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified among the collective genomes when compared with a reference H. pylori genome. Importantly, common SNPs were identified in isolates harvested from iron-depleted and high salt carcinogenic microenvironments, including an SNP within fur (FurR88H). To investigate the direct role of low iron and/or high salt, H. pylori was continuously cultured in vitro under low iron or high salt conditions to assess fur genetic variation. Exposure to low iron or high salt selected for the FurR88H variant after only 5 days. To extend these results, fur was sequenced in 339 clinical H. pylori strains. Among the isolates examined, 17% (40/232) of strains isolated from patients with premalignant lesions harboured the FurR88H variant, compared with only 6% (6/107) of strains from patients with non-atrophic gastritis alone (p=0.0034). These results indicate that specific genetic variation arises within H. pylori strains during in vivo adaptation to conditions conducive for gastric carcinogenesis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. What Do We Do about Helicobacter pylori?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Hawkey

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs cause ulcers by different mechanisms. Under some circumstances, patients infected with H pylori may be less prone to NSAID-associated ulcers than those who are H pylori-negative. Eradication trials have yielded differing results. However, those who have studied patients who have a past history of ulcer disease and are already established on NSAIDs have shown no benefit from H pylori eradication.

  2. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haim Shmuely; Noam Domniz; Jacob Yahav

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro antiHelicobacter pylori(H.pylori)activity,but are less effective in vivo.The anti-H.pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane,anti-adhesion,inhibition of bacterial enzymes andbacterial grown.We,herein,review treatment effects of cranberry,garlic,curcumin,ginger and pistacia gum against H.pylori in both in vitro,animal studies and in vivo studies.

  3. Cloning and expression of Helicobacter pylori GDP-l-fucose synthesizing enzymes (GMD and GMER) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, N; Mäki, M; Räbinä, J; Roos, C; Mattila, P; Renkonen, R

    2001-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative gastric pathogen causing diseases from mild gastric infections to gastric cancer. The difference in clinical outcome has been suggested to be due to strain differences. H. pylori undergoes phase variation by changing its lipopolysaccharide structure according to the environmental conditions. The O-antigen of H. pylori contains fucosylated glycans, similar to Lewis structures found in human gastric epithelium. These Lewis glycans of H. pylori have been suggested to play a role in pathogenesis in the adhesion of the bacterium to gastric epithelium. In the synthesis of fucosylated structures, GDP-l-fucose is needed as a fucose donor. Here, we cloned the two key enzymes of GDP-l-fucose synthesis, H. pylori gmd coding for GDP-d-mannose dehydratase (GMD), and gmer coding for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose-3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) and expressed them in an enzymatically active form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The end product of these enzymes, GDP-l-fucose was used as a fucose donor in a fucosyltransferase assay converting sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine to sialyl Lewis X.

  4. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Children With Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefichaijan; Mosayebi; Sharafkhah; Kahbazi; Heydarbagi; Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have reported an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization and the occurrence of asthma or other allergies. However, data are inconsistent, and few studies have been performed in children. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate H. pylori seropositivity in children with and without asthma. Patients and Methods This cross-sect...

  5. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces th...... vaccine for H. pylori that will represent a novel and very important bullet against both infection and gastric cancer....

  6. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Helicobacter pylori Antibody Reactivities and Colorectal Cancer Risk in a Case-control Study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Fernández de Larrea-Baz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC, while others have not confirmed this hypothesis. This work aimed to assess the relation of CRC with H. pylori seropositivity and with seropositivity to 16 H. pylori proteins, in the MultiCase-Control study, MCC-Spain.Methods: MCC-Spain is a multicase-control study carried out in Spain from 2008 to 2013. In total, 2,140 histologically-confirmed incident CRC cases and 4,098 population-based controls were recruited. Controls were frequency-matched by sex, age, and province. Epidemiological data were collected through a questionnaire fulfilled by face-to-face interviews and a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire. Seroreactivities against 16 H. pylori proteins were determined in 1,488 cases and 2,495 controls using H. pylori multiplex serology. H. pylori seropositivity was defined as positivity to ≥4 proteins. Multivariable logistic regression mixed models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI.Results:H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with increased CRC risk (OR = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.71–1.16. Among H. pylori seropositive subjects, seropositivity to Cagδ showed a lower CRC risk, and risk decreased with increasing number of proteins seropositive. Seropositivity to the most recognized virulence factors, CagA and VacA, was not associated with a higher CRC risk. No statistically significant heterogeneity was identified among tumor sites, although inverse relations were stronger for left colon cancer. An interaction with age and sex was found: H. pylori seropositivity was associated with a lower CRC risk in men younger than 65 and with a higher risk in older women.Conclusions: Our results suggest that neither H. pylori seropositivity, nor seropositivity to the virulence factor CagA are associated with a higher CRC risk. A possible effect modification by age and sex was

  8. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Osawa

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primar-ily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lym-phoid tissue lymphorna. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in Hpylori injected sub-jects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in associa-tion with atrophic gastritis induced by Hpylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentra-tion. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may re-sult from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations be-fore and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels.

  9. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effect of the Vacuolation of Helicobacter Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic test in vitro combined with cytochemical stain, fluorescent stain, transmission electronmicrograph was used to study the vacuolated effect by helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) (Toxin+) and its pathological mechanism. 78.26 % patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori was infected with H.pylori (Toxin+), while 42.86 % patients with gastritis was infected with H.pylori (Toxin+). It was positive in vacuole with acridine orange and acid phosphatase stain. Transmission electronmicrograph of vacuole revealed the presence of abounding membrane. There was a closed relationship between infection with H.pylori (Toxin+) and peptic ulcer disease. The vacuole induced by H.pylori (Toxin+) was autophagosome, which was pathological phenomenon induced by toxin.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been linked to peptic ulcer disease, gastric lymphoma, and gastric carcinoma. Apart from its well-demonstrated role in gastroduodenal diseases, some authors have suggested a potential role of Helicobacter pylori infection in several extra-intestinal pathologies including haematological, cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic, autoimmune, and dermatological diseases. Some studies suggest an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and skin diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria and rosacea. There have also been few case reports documenting association between Helicobacter pylori and psoriasis vulgaris, Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases; most of the studies do not show relevant relationships of these diseases with Helicobacter pylori infections. This review discusses skin diseases that are believed to be associated with Helicobacter pylori.

  12. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  13. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. A diagnosis of infection is thus an important part of a treatment strategy of many gastrointestinal tract diseases. Many diagnostic tests are available but all have some limitations in different clinical situations and laboratory settings. A single gold standard cannot available, but be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in daily clinical practice in all areas, so several techniques have been developed to give reliable results, especially focusing on real time endoscopic features. The narrow band imaging system (NBI) and high resolution endoscopy are imaging techniques for enhanced visualization of infected mucosa and premalignant gastric lesions. The aim of this article is to review the current diagnostic options and possible future developments detection of Helicobacter pylori infection.

  14. Dispepsia ed Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Helicobacter pylori (HP eradication on functional dyspepsia has been analysed in several clinical trials, including large, controlled and well-designed studies as well as small, flowed studies. The results of these studies indicate that HP infection does not play a major role in the aetiology of this disease and that HP eradication improves dyspeptic symptoms in no more than 15% of patients as compared to placebo. From a practical point of view 15 patients need to be treated for one to benefit while, in duodenal ulcer, 1.4 patient need to be treated for one to benefit. It remains to be elucidated if HP eradication in functional dyspepsia is useful to reduce the risk of developing organic dyspepsia (namely peptic ulcer in functional dyspepsia. In uninvestigated dyspepsia the management of HP infection in primary care has been fully debated.Two therapeutics strategies have been proposed: test and scope and test and treat. The value of test and treat strategy over alternative strategies has been demonstrated in several decision analyses. HP test and scope increases costs in primary care without improving symptoms and saves only 15% of endoscopies.

  15. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  16. Helicobacter pylori induces miR-155 in T cells in a cAMP-Foxp3-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Fassi Fehri

    Full Text Available Amongst the most severe clinical outcomes of life-long infections with Helicobacter pylori is the development of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma--diseases often associated with an increase of regulatory T cells. Understanding H. pylori-driven regulation of T cells is therefore of crucial clinical importance. Several studies have defined mammalian microRNAs as key regulators of the immune system and of carcinogenic processes. Hence, we aimed here to identify H. pylori-regulated miRNAs, mainly in human T cells. MicroRNA profiling of non-infected and infected human T cells revealed H. pylori infection triggers miR-155 expression in vitro and in vivo. By using single and double H. pylori mutants and the corresponding purified enzymes, the bacterial vacuolating toxin A (VacA and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS tested positive for their ability to regulate miR-155 and Foxp3 expression in human lymphocytes; the latter being considered as the master regulator and marker of regulatory T cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD of the Foxp3 transcription factor in T cells abolished miR-155 expression. Using adenylate cyclase inhibitors, the miR-155 induction cascade was shown to be dependent on the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP. Furthermore, we found that miR-155 directly targets the protein kinase A inhibitor alpha (PKIalpha mRNA in its 3'UTR, indicative of a positive feedback mechanism on the cAMP pathway. Taken together, our study describes, in the context of an H. pylori infection, a direct link between Foxp3 and miR-155 in human T cells and highlights the significance of cAMP in this miR-155 induction cascade.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  18. H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study whether H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis.METHODS:The subjects were divided into three groups:H pylori-infected cholecystitis group,H pylorinegative cholecystitis group and control group.Pathologic changes of the gallbladder were observed by optic and electronic microscopes and the levels of interleukin-1,6 and 8(IL-1,6 and 8)were detected by radioimmunoassay.RESULTS:Histological evidence of chronic cholecystitis including degeneration,necrosis,inflammatory cell infiltration,were found in the region where H pylori-colonized.Levels of IL-1,6 and 8 in gallbladder mucosa homogenates were significantly higher in H pylori-infected cholecystitis group than those in H pylori-negative cholecystitis group and control group.CONCLUSION:H pylori infection may be related to cholecystitis.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Does Not Require Lewis X or Lewis Y Expression To Colonize C3H/HeJ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tohru; El-Omar, Emad; Camorlinga, Margarita; Thompson, Stuart A.; Minohara, Yutaka; Ernst, Peter B.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains frequently express Lewis X (Lex) and/or Ley on their cell surfaces as constituents of the O antigens of their lipopolysaccharide molecules. To assess the effect of Lex and Ley expression on the ability of H. pylori to colonize the mouse stomach and to adhere to epithelial cells, isogenic mutants were created in which fucT1 alone or fucT1 and fucT2, which encode the fucosyl transferases necessary for Lex and Ley expression, were deleted. C3H/HeJ mice were experimentally challenged with either wild-type 26695 H. pylori or its isogenic mutants. All strains, whether passaged in the laboratory or recovered after mouse passage, colonized the mice well and without consistent differences. During colonization by the mutants, there was no reversion to wild type. Similarly, adherence to AGS and KatoIII cells was unaffected by the mutations. Together, these findings indicate that Le expression is not necessary for mouse gastric colonization or for H. pylori adherence to epithelial cells. PMID:12011000

  20. Helicobacter Pylori Seropostivity of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tugba Kos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Until now many researches have showed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be etiological factor of colorectal cancer. The aim of current study was to investigate the frequency of H.pylori infection seropositivity of colorectal cancer patients and compare the clinicopathological features of H.pylori positive patients with negative ones. Material and Method: Seventy four colorectal patients were included in study. Retrospectively, patients clinical features, surgery history and pathological characteristics were screened. Patients group serum samples were collected. H.pylori Ig G level were quantitatively measured with ELISA method and levels above 5 arbU/ml were accepted as seropositive. Results: Patients median age was 60.5 ( range 26-83 and 56.8% (n=42 were male. H.pylori Ig G was positive in 37.8% (n=28 and negative in 62.2% (n=46 of patient group. H.pylori serpositive and negative patients median age of diagnosis were 56 and 64 respectively (p=0.01. There were no significant difference between H.pylori seropositive group when compared with negative group according to age, level of CEA and Ca 19-9, stage, lymph node involvement, perineural and vascular invasion, presence of polyps, differantion, localisation of tumours. Discussion: H.pylori seropositive patients were diagnosed at younger age. Association of this finding with etiology was confusing. Further studies with healthy controls may provide detailed information about whether H.pylori seropositivity is associated with colorectal cancer etiology.

  1. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  2. 3rd Brazilian Consensus on Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga; Maguinilk, Ismael; Zaterka, Schlioma; Parente, José Miguel; do Carmo Friche Passos, Maria; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2013-04-01

    Signicant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  3. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein as target for new drugs against H.pylori inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodora Choli-Papadopoulou; Filippos Kottakis; Georgios Papadopoulos; Stefanos Pendas

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is among the most common human infections and the major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Within this work we present the implication of C-terminal region of H. pylori neutrophil activating protein in the stimulation of neutrophil activation as well as the evidence that the C-terminal region of H. pylori activating protein is indispensable for neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, a step necessary to H. pylori inflammation. In addition we show that arabino galactan proteins derived from chios mastic gum, the natural resin of the plant Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia inhibit neutrophil activation in vitro .

  4. Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn) inhibits lipopolysaccharide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extract on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide ... suppressed LPS-induced NO as well as ROS compared to untreated cells. ... the human diet, supplying many nutrients. Okra.

  5. Immunoelectron microscopy of lipopolysaccharide in Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Lundemose, AG; Christiansen, Gunna

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) specific for Chlamydia trachomatis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP) were used for immunoelectron microscopy analysis. MAb specific for MOMP showed strong reaction with the chlamydial surface, whereas MAb specific for LPS showed strong...

  6. Helicobacter pylori: epidemiology and routes of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L M

    2000-01-01

    H. pylori is a common bacterium, and approximately 50 percent of the world's population has been estimated to be infected (198). Humans are the principal reservoir. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, race, ethnicity, and SES. Rates appear to be higher in developing than in developed countries, with most of the infections occurring during childhood, and they seem to be decreasing with improvements in hygiene practices. H. pylori causes chronic gastritis and has been associated with several serious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer. Since its "discovery" in 1982 by Warren and Marshall (1), H. pylori has been the topic of extensive research. A number of studies have used questionnaire components to investigate factors possibly related to the etiology of H. pylori infection. The majority of recent studies have not found tobacco use or alcohol consumption to be risk factors for H. pylori infection. Adequate nutritional status, especially frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables and of vitamin C, appears to protect against infection with H. pylori. In contrast, food prepared under less than ideal conditions or exposed to contaminated water or soil may increase the risk. Overall, inadequate sanitation practices, low social class, and crowded or high-density living conditions seem to be related to a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection. This finding suggests that poor hygiene and crowded conditions may facilitate transmission of infection among family members and is consistent with data on intrafamilial and institutional clustering of H. pylori infection. Understanding the route of H. pylori transmission is important if public health measures to prevent its spread are to be implemented. Iatrogenic transmission of H. pylori following endoscopy is the only proven mode. For the general population, the most likely mode of transmission is from person to person, by either the

  7. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John K C

    2016-01-14

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization.

  8. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  9. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Vania; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Touati, Eliette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the most commonly found infection in the world's population. It is the major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Numerous studies published over the last year provide new insights into the strategies employed by H. pylori to adapt to the extreme acidic conditions of the gastric environment, to establish persistent infection and to deregulate host functions, leading to gastric pathogenesis and cancer. In this review, we report recent data on the mechanisms involved in chemotaxis, on the essential role of nickel in acid resistance and gastric colonization, on the importance of adhesins and Hop proteins and on the role of CagPAI-components and CagA. Among the host functions, a special focus has been made on the escape from immune response, the ability of bacteria to induce genetic instability and modulate telomeres, the mechanism of autophagy and the deregulation of micro RNAs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Immune response to H pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes; Ellen J Beswick

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer,attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium.

  11. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori outer membrane vesicles by gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heather; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2010-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori bacteria colonize the human stomach where they stimulate a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori is considered noninvasive; however, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enriched outer membrane vesicles (OMV), continuously shed from the surface of this bacterium, are observed within gastric epithelial cells. The mechanism of vesicle uptake is poorly understood, and this study was undertaken to examine the roles of bacterial VacA cytotoxin and LPS in OMV binding and cholesterol and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in vesicle uptake by gastric epithelial cells. OMV association was examined using a fluorescent membrane dye to label OMV, and a comparison was made between the associations of vesicles from a VacA(+) strain and OMV from a VacA(-) isogenic mutant strain. Within 20 min, essentially all associated OMV were intracellular, and vesicle binding appeared to be facilitated by the presence of VacA cytotoxin. Uptake of vesicles from the VacA(+) strain was inhibited by H. pylori LPS (58% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS), while uptake of OMV from the VacA(-) mutant strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS). Vesicle uptake did not require cholesterol. However, uptake of OMV from the VacA(-) mutant strain was inhibited by a reduction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (42% with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine), while uptake of OMV from the VacA(+) strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine). We conclude that VacA toxin enhances the association of H. pylori OMV with cells and that the presence of the toxin may allow vesicles to exploit more than one pathway of internalization.

  12. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Vesicles by Gastric Epithelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heather; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori bacteria colonize the human stomach where they stimulate a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori is considered noninvasive; however, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enriched outer membrane vesicles (OMV), continuously shed from the surface of this bacterium, are observed within gastric epithelial cells. The mechanism of vesicle uptake is poorly understood, and this study was undertaken to examine the roles of bacterial VacA cytotoxin and LPS in OMV binding and cholesterol and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in vesicle uptake by gastric epithelial cells. OMV association was examined using a fluorescent membrane dye to label OMV, and a comparison was made between the associations of vesicles from a VacA+ strain and OMV from a VacA− isogenic mutant strain. Within 20 min, essentially all associated OMV were intracellular, and vesicle binding appeared to be facilitated by the presence of VacA cytotoxin. Uptake of vesicles from the VacA+ strain was inhibited by H. pylori LPS (58% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS), while uptake of OMV from the VacA− mutant strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS). Vesicle uptake did not require cholesterol. However, uptake of OMV from the VacA− mutant strain was inhibited by a reduction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (42% with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine), while uptake of OMV from the VacA+ strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine). We conclude that VacA toxin enhances the association of H. pylori OMV with cells and that the presence of the toxin may allow vesicles to exploit more than one pathway of internalization. PMID:20876296

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferrit...

  14. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  15. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  16. Helicobacter pylori: From Infection to Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 380 abstracts, presentations and posters of recent advances were highlighted at the European and International Helicobacter pylori meeting held July 7 to 9, 1995 in Edinburgh, Scotland. New advances abound, with major interest focusing on the simple, safe, inexpensive new `gold standard’ for H pylori eradication therapy: a single week of tid omeprazole 20 mg, metronidazole 400 mg and clarithromycin 250 mg, or omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg and clarithromycin 500 mg. To avoid false negative results, two biopsies must be taken from the antrum and two from the gastric body at least four weeks after completion of eradication therapy, and ideally should be supplemented with at least one further H pylori test such as a biopsy for urease activity or culture, or a urea breath test. While most patients with a gastric or duodenal ulcer (DU who do not consume nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are infected with H pylori, the association is much less apparent in those with a DU who present with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. H pylori eradication for nonulcer dyspepsia is not widely recommended, and the patient with a DU given effective H pylori eradication who presents with dyspepsia likely has erosive esophagitis rather than recurrent DU or H pylori. Gastroenterologists are at increased risk of H pylori infection, particularly older gastroenterologists who are very busy endoscopists.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takahisa; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    It is well known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with many nonmalignant disorders such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric polyp, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin-induced gastric injury, and functional dyspepsia. In 2008, interesting articles on the association of H. pylori infection with these disorders were presented, some of which intended to reveal the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in response to H. pylori infection, and have demonstrated that genetic differences in host and bacterial factors as well as environmental factors account for these differences. A decline in the occurrence of peptic ulcer related to H. pylori was confirmed. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and GERD was also confirmed but the impact of gastric atrophy on the prevention of GERD remained debatable. For NSAID-induced gastric injury, eradication of H. pylori infection has been recommended. During this year, eradication of H. pylori infection was recommended for patients treated with antiplatelet therapy as well as aspirin and NSAID. It was also reported that for patients with functional dyspepsia, eradication of H. pylori offers a modest but significant benefit.

  18. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host. PMID:28652651

  19. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18...

  20. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-06-14

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host.

  1. Coccoid Form of Helicobacter pylori as a Morphological Manifestation of Cell Adaptation to the Environment▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, N. F.; Almeida, C.; Cerqueira, L.; Dias, S.; Keevil, C. W.; Vieira, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    After characterization of preferred conditions for Helicobacter pylori survival in the sessile state, it was observed that the bacterium transforms from spiral to coccoid under mild circumstances, whereas under extreme ones it is unable to undergo shape modification. This strongly supports the view that transformation into the coccoid form is an active, biologically led process, switched on by the bacterium as a protection mechanism. PMID:17400788

  2. Helicobacter pylori therapy:Present and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo; De; Francesco; Enzo; Ierardi; Cesare; Hassan; Angelo; Zullo

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis,peptic ulcer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-lymphoma,and is also involved in carcinogenesis of the stomach.H.pylori treatment still remains a challenge for physicians,since no current first-line therapy is able to cure the infection in all treated patients.Several factors may help in the eradication of therapy failure.We reviewed both bacterial and host factors involved in therapeutic management of the H.pylori infection.In addition,we evaluated data on the most successful therapy regimens-sequential and concomitant therapies-currently available for H.pylori eradication.

  3. Role of Helicobacter pylori in functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colm O'Morain

    2006-01-01

    The aetiology of dyspepsia is unknown in the majority of patients. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) is the cause in a subset of patients. A non invasive test to assess the presence of H pylori is recommended in the management of patients under the age of 50 presenting to a family practitioner with dyspepsia. A urea breath test or a stool antigen test are the most reliable non invasive tests. Eradication of H pylori will reduce the risk to the patient with dyspepsia of developing a peptic ulcer, reduce the complication rate if prescribed nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and later reduce the risk of gastric cancer. The recommended treatment for non ulcer dyspepsia associated with a H pylori infection should be a 10-d course of treatment with a PPI and two antibiotics. Treatment efficacy should be assessed four weeks after completing treatment with a urea breath test or a stool antigen test.

  4. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  5. Age-Dependent Association among Helicobacter pylori Infection, Serum Pepsinogen Levels and Immune Response of Children to Live Oral Cholera Vaccine CVD 103-HgR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen, Khitam; Lagos, Rosanna; Reymann, Mardi K.; Graham, David Y.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Levine, Myron M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Through its effects on gastric secretion, we hypothesized that Helicobacter pylori infection may influence oral immunization. Accordingly, we examined the association between H. pylori infection, serum pepsinogen (PG) (measures for H. pylori gastritis) and vibriocidal antibody (a correlate of protection) seroconversion following oral immunization with CVD 103-HgR live cholera vaccine among children of different ages. Methods Sera from 422 Chilean children who were vaccinated with a single dose of CVD 103-HgR were tested by ELISA for serum IgG antibodies to H. pylori, PG I and PG II levels and antibodies to Shigella flexneri 2a lipopolysaccharide and hepatitis A virus (as markers of low socioeconomic status and exposure to enteric pathogens). Results The likelihood of vibriocidal antibody seroconversion following vaccination with CVD 103-HgR was significantly decreased in H. pylori-seropositive children age 6 months to 4 years with PG II>8 µg/L (adjusted OR 0.14 (95% CI 0.03–0.61; P = 0.009), and also in H. pylori seropositives with lower PG II level (adjusted OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14–0.83; P = 0.017), compared to H. pylori-seronegatives. H. pylori-seropositive children aged 5–9 years with serum PG I>30 µg/L (indicating more severe gastritis) had higher odds of vibriocidal seroconversion than those with lower PG I levels (adjusted OR 4.41, 95%CI 1.26–15.38; P = 0.02). There was no significant association between exposures to S. flexneri 2a or hepatitis A virus and vibriocidal seroconversion. Conclusions As H. pylori gastritis progresses with increasing pediatric age in developing country venues, changes in gastric secretion ensue that we believe explain the observed differences in age-related immune responses to immunization with live oral cholera vaccine. The effect of H. pylori and changes of gastric acid secretion on the immunogenicity of various oral vaccines should be studied in different developing, transitional and industrialized

  6. Microevolution of Virulence-Related Genes in Helicobacter pylori Familial Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Furuta

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that can infect human stomach causing gastritis, ulcers and cancer, is known to have a high degree of genome/epigenome diversity as the result of mutation and recombination. The bacteria often infect in childhood and persist for the life of the host. One of the reasons of the rapid evolution of H. pylori is that it changes its genome drastically for adaptation to a new host. To investigate microevolution and adaptation of the H. pylori genome, we undertook whole genome sequencing of the same or very similar sequence type in multi-locus sequence typing (MLST with seven genes in members of the same family consisting of parents and children in Japan. Detection of nucleotide substitutions revealed likely transmission pathways involving children. Nonsynonymous (amino acid changing mutations were found in virulence-related genes (cag genes, vacA, hcpDX, tnfα, ggt, htrA and the collagenase gene, outer membrane protein (OMP genes and other cell surface-related protein genes, signal transduction genes and restriction-modification genes. We reconstructed various pathways by which H. pylori can adapt to a new human host, and our results raised the possibility that the mutational changes in virulence-related genes have a role in adaptation to a child host. Changes in restriction-modification genes might remodel the methylome and transcriptome to help adaptation. This study has provided insights into H. pylori transmission and virulence and has implications for basic research as well as clinical practice.

  7. Role of AmiA in the morphological transition of Helicobacter pylori and in immune escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Chaput

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is responsible for peptic ulcers and neoplasia. Both in vitro and in the human stomach it can be found in two forms, the bacillary and coccoid forms. The molecular mechanisms of the morphological transition between these two forms and the role of coccoids remain largely unknown. The peptidoglycan (PG layer is a major determinant of bacterial cell shape, and therefore we studied H. pylori PG structure during the morphological transition. The transition correlated with an accumulation of the N-acetyl-D-glucosaminyl-beta(1,4-N-acetylmuramyl-L-Ala-D-Glu (GM-dipeptide motif. We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the GM-dipeptide motif accumulation, and studied the role of various putative PG hydrolases in this process. Interestingly, a mutant strain with a mutation in the amiA gene, encoding a putative PG hydrolase, was impaired in accumulating the GM-dipeptide motif and transforming into coccoids. We investigated the role of the morphological transition and the PG modification in the biology of H. pylori. PG modification and transformation of H. pylori was accompanied by an escape from detection by human Nod1 and the absence of NF-kappaB activation in epithelial cells. Accordingly, coccoids were unable to induce IL-8 secretion by AGS gastric epithelial cells. amiA is, to our knowledge, the first genetic determinant discovered to be required for this morphological transition into the coccoid forms, and therefore contributes to modulation of the host response and participates in the chronicity of H. pylori infection.

  8. Helicobacter pylori and pregnancy-related disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaropoli, Simona; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is investigated in gastric diseases even during pregnancy. In particular, this Gram-negative bacterium seems to be associated with hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. During the last decade, the relationship among H. pylori and several extra-gastric diseases strongly emerged in literature. The correlation among H. pylori infection and pregnancy-related disorders was mainly focused on iron deficiency anemia, thrombocytopenia, fetal malformations, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. H. pylori infection may have a role in the pathogenesis of various pregnancy-related disorders through different mechanisms: depletion of micronutrients (iron and vitamin B12) in maternal anemia and fetal neural tube defects; local or systemic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines release and oxidative stress in gastrointestinal disorders and pre-eclampsia; cross-reaction between specific anti-H. pylori antibodies and antigens localized in placental tissue and endothelial cells (pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, miscarriage). Since H. pylori infection is most likely acquired before pregnancy, it is widely believed that hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy could activate latent H. pylori with a negative impact not only on maternal health (nutritional deficiency, organ injury, death), but also on the fetus (insufficient growth, malformation, death) and sometime consequences can be observed later in life. Another important issue addressed by investigators was to determine whether it is possible to transmit H. pylori infection from mother to child and whether maternal anti-H. pylori antibodies could prevent infant’s infection. Studies on novel diagnostic and therapeutic methods for H. pylori are no less important, since these are particularly sensitive topics in pregnancy conditions. It could be interesting to study the possible correlation between H

  9. Campylobacter pylori: clinical, histological, and serological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, C; Bolton, F J; Krypczyk, A M; Temperley, J M; Cairns, S A; Owen, W G; Hutchinson, D N

    1988-01-01

    The presence of Campylobacter pylori, histologically diagnosed gastritis, and antibodies to C pylori were determined in a series of 113 patients undergoing endoscopy. Paired biopsy specimens from the fundus, body, and antrum were collected from 59 patients and from the antrum of 54 patients. The presence of C pylori was confirmed by either culture or silver stain in 30 of 59, 31 of 59, and 54 of 103 biopsy specimens from the fundus, body, and antrum, respectively. Of the specimens which contained C pylori 20 of 30 (66%) from the fundus, 25 of 31 (80%) from the body, and 54 (100%) from the antrum showed gastritis. C pylori and gastritis were shown in seven of nine (78.1%) of patients with gastric ulcers and in nine of 11 (82%) of patients with duodenal ulcers. Using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique to detect IgG antibody to C pylori, all patients with histologically diagnosed gastritis and organisms present had titres of greater than or equal to 640; eight of 39 (21%) of patients without gastritis and without organisms gave similar titres. Hence the presence of C pylori was associated with gastritis and with raised titres of IgG antibody. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:3225334

  10. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  11. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective:to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infection.Methods:Serum soluble antigen of H.pylori was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H.pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test(RUT).histologic examination and serology,Results:The sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46% ,91.07%,91.67% and 76.12%,respectively.The prevalence rate of werum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergong endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT methods(P>0.05).Conclusions:The detection of serum H.pylori soluble antigen(HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate,and convenient,not affected by the memorizing raction of serum antibody;is more sensitive,more specific and suitable for dinical diagriosis,and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H.pylori as well as for detection in children and pregnant women.

  12. Helicobacter pylori CagA: from pathogenic mechanisms to its use as an anti-cancer vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eStein

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population, causing chronic inflammation, which however is largely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, H. pylori-infected subjects can develop chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Chronic exposure to the pathogen and its ability to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT through the injection of CagA into gastric epithelial cells may be key triggers of carcinogenesis. By deregulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as DNA methylation, histone modifications, expression of micro RNAs, and resistance to apoptosis, EMT can actively contribute to early stages of the cancer formation. Host response to the infection significantly contributes to disease development and the concomitance of particular genotypes of both pathogen and host may turn into the most severe outcomes. T regulatory cells (Treg have been recently demonstrated to play an important role in H. pylori-related disease development and at the same time the Treg-induced tolerance has been proposed as a possible mechanism that leads to less severe disease. Efficacy of antibiotic therapies of H. pylori infection has significantly dropped. Unfortunately, no vaccine against H. pylori is currently licensed, and protective immunity mechanisms against H. pylori are only partially understood. In spite of promising results obtained in animal models of infection with a number of vaccine candidates, few clinical trials have been conducted so far and with no satisfactory outcomes. However, prophylactic vaccination may be the only means to efficiently prevent H. pylori-associated cancers.

  13. Helicobacter pylori CagA: From Pathogenic Mechanisms to Its Use as an Anti-Cancer Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Markus; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rappuoli, Rino; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population, causing chronic inflammation, which however is largely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, H. pylori-infected subjects can develop chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Chronic exposure to the pathogen and its ability to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the injection of cytotoxin-associated gene A into gastric epithelial cells may be key triggers of carcinogenesis. By deregulating cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions as well as DNA methylation, histone modifications, expression of micro RNAs, and resistance to apoptosis, EMT can actively contribute to early stages of the cancer formation. Host response to the infection significantly contributes to disease development and the concomitance of particular genotypes of both pathogen and host may turn into the most severe outcomes. T regulatory cells (Treg) have been recently demonstrated to play an important role in H. pylori-related disease development and at the same time the Treg-induced tolerance has been proposed as a possible mechanism that leads to less severe disease. Efficacy of antibiotic therapies of H. pylori infection has significantly dropped. Unfortunately, no vaccine against H. pylori is currently licensed, and protective immunity mechanisms against H. pylori are only partially understood. In spite of promising results obtained in animal models of infection with a number of vaccine candidates, few clinical trials have been conducted so far and with no satisfactory outcomes. However, prophylactic vaccination may be the only means to efficiently prevent H. pylori-associated cancers. PMID:24133496

  14. Transformation of Human Erythrocyte Shape by Endotoxic Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were observed to undergo a discocyte to echinocyte to spheroechinocyte shape transformation during brief incubation with endotoxic lipopolysaccharide. It was concluded that lipopolysaccharide-membrane interactions alter the curvature of erythrocyte membranes.

  15. Transformation of human erythrocyte shape by endotoxic lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J R; Harris, A S; Wallas, C H

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were observed to undergo a discocyte to echinocyte to spheroechinocyte shape transformation during brief incubation with endotoxic lipopolysaccharide. It was concluded that lipopolysaccharide-membrane interactions alter the curvature of erythrocyte membranes.

  16. Diet, H pylori infection and gastric cancer: evidence and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Alba; Nardone, Gerardo

    2007-06-07

    Despite decreasing incidence and mortality rates, gastric cancer (GC) still remains the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Due to the limited treatment options, at present, prevention is likely to be the only effective means of controlling this disease. The success of a prevention strategy depends upon the understanding of etiological and pathogenic mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis. The etiology of GC is multi-factorial, however, in the recent years, mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors play a key role. The most important environmental factors implicated in the pathogenesis of GC are diet and H pylori infection. Thus, modifications in lifestyle and dietary habit associated with eradication of H pylori infection could hypothetically represent the most promising potential targets for GC prevention. In this review we will address the evidence and the controversies on the role of these agents in non-cardia GC by focusing on retrospective and prospective observational studies and interventional trials.

  17. Diet, H pylori infection and gastric cancer: Evidence and controversies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alba Rocco; Gerardo Nardone

    2007-01-01

    Despite decreasing incidence and mortality rates, gastric cancer (GC) still remains the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Due to the limited treatment options,at present, prevention is likely to be the only effective means of controlling this disease. The success of a prevention strategy depends upon the understanding of etiological and pathogenic mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis. The etiology of GC is multi-factorial,however, in the recent years, mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors play a key role. The most important environmental factors implicated in the pathogenesis of GC are diet and H pylori infection. Thus,modifications in lifestyle and dietary habit associated with eradication of H pylori infection could hypothetically represent the most promising potential targets for GC prevention. In this review we will address the evidence and the controversies on the role of these agents in noncardia GC by focusing on retrospective and prospective observational studies and interventional trials.

  18. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erdal Kurtoglu; Ertugrul Kayacetin; Aysegul Ugur

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) infection in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) patients with that of nonthrombocytopenic controls,and to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment in H pylori(+)and H pylori(-) AITP patients.METHODS: The prevalence of gastric H pylori infection in 38 adult AITP patients (29 female and 9 male; median age 27 years; range 18-39 years) who consecutively admitted to our clinic was investagated.RESULTS: H pylori infection was found in 26 of 38 AITP patients (68.5%). H pylori infection was found in 15 of 23control subjects (65.2%). The difference in H pylori infection between the 2 groups was not significant. Thrombocyte count of H pylori-positive AITP patients was significantly lower than that of H pylori-negative AITP patients (P<0.05).Thrombocyte recovery of H pylori-positive group was less than that of H pylori-negative group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: H pylori infection should be considerecd in the treatment of AITP patients with H pylori infection.

  20. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzung-Shiun; Hu, Huang-Ming; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Chao-Hung

    2014-04-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection has become an important issue recently, because this bacterial species cluster can cause many gastrointestinal diseases. Elevated antibiotic resistance is related to an increasing failure rate of H. pylori eradication. Standard triple therapy is still the first-line therapy; however, according to the Maastricht IV Consensus Report, it should be abandoned in areas of high clarithromycin resistance. Alternative first-line therapies include bismuth-containing quadruple therapy, sequential, concomitant, and hybrid therapies. Quinolone-based triple therapy may be considered as first-line therapy in areas of clarithromycin resistance >15-20% and quinolone resistance <10%. Unique second-line therapy is still unclear, and bismuth-containing quadruple therapy or levofloxacin-based triple therapy can be used as rescue treatment. Third-line therapy should be under culture guidance to select the most effective regimens (such as levofloxacin-based, rifabutin-based, or furazolidone-based therapies). Antibiotics resistance, patient compliance, and CYP 2C19 genotypes could influence the outcome. Clinicians should use antibiotics according to local reports.

  1. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  2. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  3. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    variables such as age, sex, socioeconomic status, dietary habits, genetic, and immunological ... Age distribution of H. pylori infection did not show any trend towards increase or .... infection in dyspeptic patients in Iran. Gastroenterol Insights.

  4. Helicobacter Pylori Bacteremia: An Unusual Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Concetta; Mancin, Annalisa; Calabrò, Maria; Daleno, Cristina; Ferrario, Antonella; Renzulli, Raffaella; Scuderi, Cristina; Casari, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent immediately to Laboratory, were positive for a spiral Gram-negative bacterium. This isolate was identified as H. pylori and the specific susceptibility test was performed. One day after the fever was decreased but antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin was continued and it was maintained until discharge. In summary, H. pylori transient bacteremia may occur as a rare complication after stomach surgery. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the potential role of Helicobacter pylori presence in blood.

  5. Helicobacter pylori: Basic Mechanisms to Clinical Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its rediscovery 10 years ago, Helicobacter pylori has reshaped our thinking about the course of peptic ulcer disease. Our approach to the patient with a duodenal ulcer has become one of attempting eradication therapy at the time of first diagnosis, in the hope of curing the ulcer disease. Gastric and duodenal ulceration are only two of the manifestations of this chronic antral infection; other complications of H pylori include gastritis, gastric cancer and possible maltomas. Therapy of H pylori infection is complicated and involves dual therapy with an antibiotic plus a protein pump inhibitor, such as omeprazole 20 mg bid plus amoxicillin 1 g bid for two weeks, triple or quadruple therapy with bismuth, two antibiotics and an H2-receptor antagonist. Vaccination against H pylori is on the far horizon.

  6. Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, Andreas; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2015-09-01

    During the period reviewed, prevalence studies were essentially performed in less economically advanced countries and a high prevalence was found. The traditional risk factors for Helicobacter pylori positivity were mostly found. Transmission studied by molecular typing showed a familial transmission. The eventual role of water transmission was explored in several studies with controversial results. Concerning diagnosis, most of the invasive and noninvasive methods used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection are long standing with efficient performance. The most interesting recent improvements in H. pylori diagnosis include advances in endoscopy, developments in molecular methods, and the introduction of omics-based techniques. Interpretation of old or newer method should take into account the pretest probability and the prevalence of H. pylori in the population under investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and endoscopic findings among patients with dyspepsia in north ... Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences ... Results: Of the 148 subjects studied, 68 (46.0%) were males and 80 (54.0%) females.

  8. Distribution of Helicobacter pylori in north China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Hua Gong; Ying Wang; Yuan Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the distribution of virulence-associatedgenotypes of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) in two areas of north China with different gastric cancer risk and furthermore probe into the pathogenicity of the bacterium. METHODS: Gastric biopsies were taken from 355 subjects from Zhuanghe, a high risk area of gastric cancer, and 136 subjects from Shenyang, a low risk area of gastric cancer. A total of 149 H pylori strains isolated from these patients were studied by PCR for differences in the genotypes of cagA, vac A, and iceA.RESULTS: In patients with high risk for gastric cancer, higher frequencies of vacA s1 or s1m1b genotypes were found as compared to those from the low risk area. CONCLUSION: There is significantly different distribution of H pylori genotypes between Zhuanghe and Shenyang areas in north China.

  9. HELICOBACTER PYLORI: THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF PEPTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    some of the virulence factors possessed by the organism, its metabolism and growth .... lymphoma and some types of gastric adenocarcinoma .... carbon to the lungs, where the patient exhales it. .... pylori as a risk factor for cancer, Bailliere's.

  10. The mechanism of lipopolysaccharide infiltration through HUVEC membrane surface in direct endotoxin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Cai, Shao-Xi; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Yang, Zong-Cheng

    2005-09-01

    In this study, the HUVEC's cellular biomechanical properties of HUVEC (elastic modulus K1, K2 and viscoefficient mu) were determined with micropipette aspiration system and analyzed after being directly damaged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The phospholipid compositions of HUVEC membrane were analyzed with high-performance capillary electrophoresis and PLA2 activity was determined to research the modification and metabolism of HUVEC membrane phospholipid. Infiltration of LPS on HUVEC membrane was studied by observation with confocal microscopy and fluorescent microscopy. Results showed that LPS direct injuring HUVEC can cause the changes of HUVEC biomechanical properties and membrane lipid contents; HUVEC directly damage by LPS could also activate HUVEC phospholipase A2 (PLA2), influencing membrane lipid metabolism; LPS could directly infiltrate and intercalate HUVEC membrane, causing and membrane contents variation. Based on these experimental results, the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide infiltration VEC membrane surface in direct LPS injury was studied and analyzed in view of the cellular biomechanical mechanism.

  11. Effectiveness of Citrus Fruits on Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    It is known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Due to the increased side effects of the treatment regimens and the development of antimicrobial resistance, a number of natural compounds have been tested as potential alternatives. In this review, we will examine the current knowledge on the effect of Citrus fruits and their derivatives against H. pylori, highlighting the remaining outstanding questions on the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28408943

  12. Helicobacter pylori : migrations humaines et cancer gastrique

    OpenAIRE

    Breurec, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe gastroduodenal disorders but is also a bacterial genetic marker of human migrations. First, we provide evidence that distinct H. pylori genetic populations accompanied at least four ancient human migrations into Oceania and Southeast Asia: i) an expansion of Austronesian speaking people about 5000 years ago from Taiwan into Oceania, ii) a migration from India into Southeast Asia within the last 2000 years, iii) a migration of Austro-Asiatic speaki...

  13. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 bio...

  14. Changing epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manami

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is known as the most important cause of gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, and socioeconomic status. In Japan, H. pylori infection has been highly correlated with the incidence rate of gastric cancer, and a reduction in H. pylori infection is therefore crucial for decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer, especially at the population level. Infection occurs during childhood, commonly before 5 years of age. In Japan, where gastric cancer has ranked as the most common cancer by incidence and mortality for the last several decades, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has dramatically declined by birth cohort effect, mainly due to improvements in the general hygiene environment in childhood. Older generations born before around 1950 show a high prevalence of around 80-90 %, decreasing with age to reach around 10 % or less in those born around the 1990s, and less than 2 % for children born after the year 2000. This change will have generational effects on gastric cancer prevention strategies, both primary and secondary. The risk-stratified approach to gastric cancer prevention should be considered in Japan and other countries which have similarly experienced rapid economic development.

  15. Relation between Psoriasis and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dursun Türkmen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. It was aimed to detect the role of H. pylori in triggering psoriasis. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 clinically diagnosed psoriatic patients who applied to the dermatology outpatient clinic, were included in the study. As the control group, 57 patients who do not have psoriasis and H. pylori associated dermatologic diseases were included in the study. All patients and control group were tested for H. pylori by the urea-breath test (UBT. Results: Thirty-eight (67.9% of 56 psoriasis patients (mean age 38.4±14.08 years; 32 men, 24 women and 38 (66.7% of 57 control group(men age, 37.9±13.73 years; 26 men, 31 women were positive for H. pylori. There was no statistically significant difference between psoriasis patients and controls with respect to the urea breath test (p=0.89. UBT was positive in all patiens who have gastrointestinal reflux. Conclusion: We could not determine the role of H. pylori in psoriasis. There have been some reports about the association of H. pylori and palmoplantar pustular psoriasis. Therefore, we believe that there is a need for newer studies in a large psoriasis group with tests which have higher specificity and sensitivity.

  16. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobac ter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection. Methods: Serum soluble antigen of H. p ylor i was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H. pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test ( RUT ), histo logi c examination and serology. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive pred ictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46%, 91.07%, 91.67% a nd 76.12 %, respectively. The prevalence rate of serum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergoing endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT met hods ( P>0.05 ). Conclusions: The detection of serum H. pylori solub le antigen( HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate, and convenie nt, not affected by the memorizing reaction of serum antibody; is more sensitive , m ore specific and suitable for clinical diagnosis, and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H. pylori as well as for detection in children and pre gnant women.

  17. Review: clinical management of Helicobacter pylori infection in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been associated with gastric disorders. The situation of H. pylori infection in China-where a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, a high incidence of gastric cancer, and widespread resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin exist-is quite different from that in Western countries. In order for Chinese clinicians to better manage H. pylori infection, a Chinese Study Group on H. pylori published four consensus reports regarding the management of H. pylori infection in China between 1999 and 2012. The eradication rate with standard triple therapy was pylori in China in recent years. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  19. Helicobacter pylori-coccoid forms and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Rasmussen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    be detected by PCR in water supplies. There is no substantial evidence for viable H. pylori persisting in water supplies. Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental water is a risk factor for H. pylori infection when compared with tap water, and formation of H. pylori biofilm cannot be excluded....... Helicobacter pylori does not seem to take part in biofilm formation in the oral cavity even though the bacterium may be detected....

  20. Extraintestinal manifestations of Helicobacter pylori: A concise review

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Frank; Rayner-Hartley, Erin; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been clearly linked to peptic ulcer disease and some gastrointestinal malignancies. Increasing evidence demonstrates possible associations to disease states in other organ systems, known as the extraintestinal manifestations of H. pylori. Different conditions associated with H. pylori infection include those from hematologic, cardiopulmonary, metabolic, neurologic, and dermatologic systems. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of...

  1. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carini Francesco; Samir Mallat; Cappello Francesco; Zummo Giovani; Jurjus Abdo; Tomasello Giovanni; Leone Angelo; Di Pasquale Roberto; Saniflippo Beatrice; Sinagra Emanuele; Damiani Provvidenza; Rosalyn Jurjus; Alice Gerges-Geagea; Inaya Hajj Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  2. A study of Helicobacter pylori infection in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Khwaja Saifullah Zafar; Vidyasagar Ram; Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori is the most common bacterial infection in human beings. The aim was to study the association of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients of diabetes mellitus. Design of the study was observational analytic cross sectional study. Methods: A total of 69 subjects were studied. Of these 30 were non diabetics and 39 were diabetics, with disease duration more than 1 year. The serological diagnosis of H. pylori was made by Anti- Helicobacter pylori antibody test....

  3. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carini Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  4. Probiotics for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, Lucia; Osborn, John Frederick; Bonci, Enea; Romaggioli, Sara; Baldini, Rossella; Chiesa, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The combination of a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics (clarithromycin plus amoxicillin or metronidazole) has been the recommended first-line therapy since the first guidelines for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in children were published. In recent years, the success of eradication therapies has declined, in part due to the development of H. pylori resistant strains. Alternative anti-H. pylori treatments are currently becoming more popular than the traditional eradication ...

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  6. Outer membrane biogenesis in Helicobacter pylori: A deviation from the paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Liechti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is capable of colonizing the gastric mucosa of the human stomach using a variety of factors associated with or secreted from its outer membrane (OM. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS and numerous outer membrane proteins have been shown to be involved in adhesion and immune stimulation/evasion. Many of these factors are essential for colonization and/or pathogenesis in a variety of animal models. Despite this wide array of potential targets present on the bacterial surface, the ability of H. pylori to vary its outer membrane profile limits the effectiveness of vaccines that use any single one of these components. However, it has become evident that the proteins comprising the complexes that transport the majority of these molecules to the OM are highly conserved and often essential. The field of membrane biogenesis has progressed remarkably in the last few years, and the possibility now exists for targeting the mechanisms by which β-barrel proteins, lipoproteins, and LPS are transported to the OM, resulting in loss of bacterial fitness and significant altering of membrane permeability. In this review, the OM transport machinery for LPS, lipoproteins, and outer membrane proteins are discussed. While the principal investigations of these transport mechanisms have been conducted in Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, here these systems will be presented in the genetic context of ε- proteobacteria. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that minimalist genomes, such as that of Helicobacter pylori, offer insight into the smallest number of components required for these essential pathways to function. Interestingly, in the majority of ε-proteobacteria, while the inner and outer membrane associated apparatus of LPS, lipoprotein, and OM protein transport pathways appear to all be intact, most of the components associated with the periplasmic compartment are either missing or are almost unrecognizable when compared to

  7. Helicobacter Pylori and the Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is an important cause of stomach cancer that infects a substantial proportion of the Canadian adult population. H pylori can be detected by noninvasive tests and effectively eradicated by medical treatment. Screening for and treatment of H pylori may represent a significant opportunity for preventive oncology.

  8. Furazolidone therapy for Helicobacter pylori: Is it effective and safe?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo De Francesco; Enzo Ierardi; Cesare Hassan; Angelo Zullo

    2009-01-01

    Some aspects related with the use of furazolidone as a rescue therapy for Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection should be remarked, especially regarding its potential oncologic risk. The inclusion of furazolidone in a treatment regimen for H pylori infection is, at least, controversial, and it does not appear to be safe.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    . Also noninvasive tests have been studied in children, including serology, 13C-urea breath test and stool antigen test, showing good results in the different age groups as compared to the gold standard. However, the infection often remains asymptomatic in children and the role of this bacterium......A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...... place only after susceptibility testing. The association of a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics for 1 or 2 weeks gives the best eradication rates. The crucial question to elucidate is whether asymptomatic children should be treated to prevent cancer in the future....

  10. Pathogenic diversity of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégraud, F

    1997-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been shown to possess a very heterogeneous genoma despite its common phenotypic properties. Some characteristics relevant to pathogenesis have also been found to be heterogeneous. This is the case for adherence properties and the amount of urease produced, but it was not possible to relate these properties to disease entities. A vacuolating cytotoxin which alters epithelial cells has been found in about 60% of strains isolated from patients with ulcers versus 30% from those with gastritis only. The cagA gene can be used as a marker to detect the cag pathogenicity island. This DNA fragment seems to induce an increased inflammation in the gastric tissue via release of interleukin 8 by the epithelial cells. The association of this marker is strongly linked with ulcers compared with gastritis only (80% vs 55%, respectively). A number of other properties may be heterogeneous, but the low number of strains studied does not allow conclusions to be drawn.

  11. Helicobacter pylori: focus on CagA and VacA major virulence factors Helicobacter pylori: enfoque sobre los factores de virulencia CagA y VacA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available After colonizing the human gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori can remain within the host for years and even decades, and is associated with several, highly significant gastric pathologies. In Mexico, the seroprevalence at 1 year of age is 20% and the estimated increment in seropositivity per year is 5% for children aged 1-10 years. More than 80% of adults are infected by the time they are 18-20 years old. Bacterial virulence factors have been proposed for H. pylori, such as urease, flagella, heat-shock protein, lipopolysaccharide, adhesions, vacuolating cytotoxin, cag pathogenicity island and the cytotoxin-associated protein, the latter being the most studied mechanism to date.Después de colonizar la mucosa gástrica humana, Helicobacter pylori puede permanecer por años e incluso décadas en el humano, y se asocia a varias patologías gástricas. En México, la seroprevalencia estimada es de 20% en niños de un año de edad, con una tasa de incremento en seropositividad de 5% anual durante los primeros 10 años de vida hasta alcanzar 80% en adultos jóvenes entre los 18 y 20 años de edad. Los factores bacterianos de virulencia propuestos para H. pylori son ureasa, flagelos, proteínas de choque térmico, lipopolisacárido, adhesinas, citotoxina vacuolizante, isla de patogenicidad y la proteína asociada a la citoxina; este último factor es el más estudiado hasta la fecha.

  12. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori by Helicobacter pylori outer membrane proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jiang; Ai-Long Huang; Xiao-Hong Tao; Pi-Long Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the serological response of patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobocter pylori(Hpylori)infection to two H pylori outer membrane proteins (OMPs)(Mr18 000 and Mr26 000) acquired by gene recombinanttechnique, and to determine the diagnostic significance of serological tests derived from these OMPs.METHODS: Recombinant vectors encoding the two H pylori OMPs were used to transform and express in BL21 (DE3)E. coli. After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin, colloid gold kits were prepared with purified recombinant proteins to detect H pylori infection and H pylori-associated diseases by the immunity-marker technology. We selected 150 patients with H pyloriinfection and digestive symptoms without previous treatment, induding chronic gastritis (n = 60), duodenal ulcer (n = 30), gastric ulcer (n = 30), and gastric cancer (n = 30).As controls, 33 H pylori-negative healthy volunteers were also recruited. Serum samples were collected from all subjects, and the antibodies to specific proteins of H pylori were tested with the colloid gold test kits. The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the colloid gold tests were evaluated, by using the combination of standard diagnostic methods (13C urea breath test and bacteria culture) and classic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as reference.RESULTS: After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin,the purity of recombinant fusion proteins was about 95%.The recombinant fusion proteins were recognized by the specific monoclonal antibodies against the two H pylori OMPs,as demonstrated by the ELISA. Of the 150 serum samples from patients infected with H pylori 141 (94.0%) responded positively to the recombinant protein with Mr26 000, while the seropositive rates were 95.0%, 96.7%, 96.7% and 90.0%for patients with H pylori-associated chronic gastritis,duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer respectively.The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the colloid gold kit with Mr26 000

  13. Comparison of IL-6, IL-8 Concentrations in H. pylori- and non-H. pylori-associated Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontar Alamsyah Siregar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is a non-invasive microorganism causing intense gastric mucosal inflammatory and immune reaction. The gastric mucosal levels of the proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin 6 (IL-6 and IL-8 have been reported to be increased in H. pylori infection, but the serum levels in H. pylori infection is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in H. pylori infection. METHODS: A cross sectional study was done on eighty consecutive gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and Permata Bunda Hospital, Medan, Indonesia from May-October 2014. Histopathology was performed for the diagnosis of gastritis. Rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Serum samples were obtained to determine circulating IL-6 and IL-8. Univariate and bivariate analysis (independent t test were done. RESULTS: There were 41.25% patients infected with H. pylori. Circulatory IL-6 levels were significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori negative, but there were no differences between serum levels of IL-8 in H. pylori positive and negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected in an increased level of serum IL-6. Serum levels of IL-8 were not significantly different between H. pylori positive and negative. KEYWORDS: Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, IL-6, IL-8, cytokine.

  14. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy significantly reduces Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal damage in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Chao Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Chen; Gi-Shih Lien; Yuarn-Jang Lee; Horng-Yuan Lou; Ching-Ruey Hsieh; Chia-Lang Fang; Shiann Pan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of 4 d' anti-Helicobacter pyloritherapy on the H pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils based on physiological and pathological changes.METHODS: We used 6-wk-old male gerbils orally inoculated with H pylori (ATCC43504, 2x108 CFU/mL).Seven weeks after H pylori inoculation, the animals of study group received 4 d' anti-H pylori triple therapy (H pylorieradicated group). Seven days later, all animals of the H pylori-eradicated and control groups (H pylori-infected& H pylori-uninfected groups) were sacrificed. We examined gastric mucosal lesions macroscopically, studied gastritis microscopically and determined the stomach weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin (PG) E2 level.RESULTS: The results showed that both macroscopic and histological gastric damages were significantly less in H pylori-eradicated group than H pylori-infected group.Stomach weight ratio, MPO activity and PGE2 levels were significantly higher in H pylori-infected group than those in the other two groups.CONCLUSION: Four days' anti-H pylori therapy was effective in the improvement of H pylori-induced gastric lesions in Mongolian gerbils.

  15. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mar Mar Khin; Jie Song Hua; Hah Cong Ng; Bow Ho; Torkel Wadstrorr

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms.METHODS Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A ),fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas ( Lotus A ) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori-lectin agglutination. Interestingly, heating of H.pylori cells at 60℃ for 1 hour was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during theevents of morphological transformation,resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection.This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease.

  16. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  17. Antibiotic susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Anna Ingibjorg; Gudjonsson, Hallgrimur; Hardardottir, Hjordis; Jonsdottir, Karen Drofn; Bjornsson, Einar Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Increasing resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to antibiotics calls for constant re-evaluation of multidrug regimens that have been used to eradicate the infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current antibiotic susceptibility of H. pylori in an Icelandic cohort. Patients referred for gastroscopy were recruited prospectively. Those found to have a positive rapid urease test were included in the study. Susceptibility testing was conducted by the Epsilometer test (E-test) method for ampicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole and tetracycline. Results were obtained after three days of incubation in microaerophilic conditions at 37 °C, except for the metronidazole were the first 24 hours were anaerobic. Of the 613 patients who underwent gastroscopy, 138 (23%) had a positive rapid urease test. H. pylori was successfully cultured from 105 (76%) of the urease test positive patients and the isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Five patients had prior H. pylori eradication. Antibiotic resistance for ampicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole and tetracycline was 0%, 9%, 4%, 1% and 0%, respectively. If those who had previously undergone eradication treatment were excluded, the resistance was 0%, 6%, 3%, 1% and 0%, respectively. Clarithromycin resistance was higher amongst women than men, 13% vs. 5%, however, not significantly. Clarithromycin resistance was 60% amongst those who had previously received eradication treatment compared to 6% of those who had not (p pylori isolates can be considered relatively low. Therefore, in the current cohort, standard triple-drug clarithromycin-containing regimen should remain the first-line treatment against H. pylori.

  18. Helicobacter pylori Antibiotic Resistance: Trends Over Time

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    Raymond G Lahaie

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to antibiotics can be a major problem in the treatment of bacterial infections. As the use of antibiotics increases, bacterial resistance to these agents is rising and in many cases is responsible for the failure of treatment regimens. Although the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection requires the use of more than one antibiotic to obtain adequate eradication rates, the efficacy of the currently used antibiotic combinations has been shown to be decreased by resistance to one of the antibiotics. The use of antibiotics in regimens for the treatment of H pylori is increasing in many countries, including Canada. This increase is both in the use of these antibiotics alone for the treatment of nongastrointestinal infections and in their use in association with proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of H pylori infection. In several European and Asian countries, where resistance to antibiotics is being monitored, it has been demonstrated that H pylori resistance to metronidazole and to clarithromycin increased throughout the 1990s. Thus far, the data available in Canada do not show increased resistance to either of these antibiotics. As for other antibiotics used in the treatment of H pylori infection, such as tetracycline and amoxicillin, the rate of resistance to these agents is still very low and does not constitute a significant problem. Because the efficacy of the regimens used in the treatment of H pylori infection is compromised by resistance to the antibiotics used, it is important that H pylori resistance rates in Canada and throughout the world continue to be monitored. Only with such reliable data can the most optimal regimens be recommended.

  19. Ubiquitin modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Swatek, Kirby N.; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic multifaceted post-translational modification involved in nearly all aspects of eukaryotic biology. Once attached to a substrate, the 76-amino acid protein ubiquitin is subjected to further modifications, creating a multitude of distinct signals with distinct cellular outcomes, referred to as the 'ubiquitin code'. Ubiquitin can be ubiquitinated on seven lysine (Lys) residues or on the N-terminus, leading to polyubiquitin chains that can encompass complex top...

  20. [Peptic Ulcer Disease Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Se-Hwan; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2016-06-25

    Although the global prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is decreasing, PUD is still one of the most common upper gastrointestinal diseases in the world due to Helicobacter pylori infection and increased use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Korea, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is also declining, but it is still the major cause of PUD. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are caused by imbalances between bacterial virulence factors, host factors, and environmental influences. In this review, we describe the prevalence trends of H. pylori infection in Korea, the mechanism of H. pylori infection-related PUD, and treatment strategies.

  1. Innate immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan K; Trombly, Melanie I; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune receptors detect Helicobacter pylori infection and trigger downstream signaling events that result in the production of cytokines and interferon-β. This chapter gives an overview of the receptors and their roles in responding to H. pylori infection and details the downstream signaling events. The tools that have been developed to study the innate immune response to H. pylori are also discussed. Understanding the immune response to H. pylori is critical to develop better treatments for H. pylori-induced disease states including gastric malignancies and cancer.

  2. Helicobacter pylori Infection and atherosclerosis: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karbasi-Afshar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a spiral-shaped gram negative bacterium that naturally colonizes the human gastric epithelium. In recent years, large evidence has come to the literature strongly proposing causal link between H. pylori and extra gastric disorders. Cardiovascular system is one of the extra gastric organs that can be affected by H. pylori infection. The first evidence suggestive of such an association comes from seroepidemiological evaluations, but histopathological and eradication studies have strongly confirmed existence of a causal association between H. pylori infection and cardiovascular events.

  3. The internalization of Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the failure of H. pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You-Hua; Lv, Zhi-Fa; Zhong, Yao; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Shu-Ping; Xie, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) internalization involves invasion of cells by the bacterium. Several studies have shown that H. pylori can invade human gastric epithelial cells, immune cells, and Candida yeast in vivo and in vitro. Whether bacterial invasion plays a role in eradication failure is unclear. To investigate the relationship between H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells and H. pylori eradication failure. Forty-two clinical strains isolated from H. pylori-positive patients with different outcomes after treatment with furazolidone-based therapy were examined (17 failures and 25 successes). The H. pylori strains were shown to be susceptible to amoxicillin and furazolidone, and the patients also exhibited good compliance. Genotyping was performed for cagA and vacA (s and m). The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains to amoxicillin, furazolidone, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was determined by E-tests. The levels of H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells were detected by gentamicin colony-forming unit assays. The internalization level in the eradication success group was 5.40±5.78 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell, and the median was 6.194 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell; the internalization level in the eradication failure group was 8.98±5.40 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell, and the median was 10.28 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell. The eradication failure group showed a greater invasion level than the eradication success group (P.05). The results showed that H. pylori invasion of the gastric epithelia might play a role in eradication failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Horizontal versus familial transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

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    Sandra Schwarz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of Helicobacter pylori is thought to occur mainly during childhood, and predominantly within families. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining H. pylori isolates from large population samples and to the extensive genetic diversity between isolates, the transmission and spread of H. pylori remain poorly understood. We studied the genetic relationships of H. pylori isolated from 52 individuals of two large families living in a rural community in South Africa and from 43 individuals of 11 families living in urban settings in the United Kingdom, the United States, Korea, and Colombia. A 3,406 bp multilocus sequence haplotype was determined for a total of 142 H. pylori isolates. Isolates were assigned to biogeographic populations, and recent transmission was measured as the occurrence of non-unique isolates, i.e., isolates whose sequences were identical to those of other isolates. Members of urban families were almost always infected with isolates from the biogeographic population that is common in their location. Non-unique isolates were frequent in urban families, consistent with familial transmission between parents and children or between siblings. In contrast, the diversity of H. pylori in the South African families was much more extensive, and four distinct biogeographic populations circulated in this area. Non-unique isolates were less frequent in South African families, and there was no significant correlation between kinship and similarity of H. pylori sequences. However, individuals who lived in the same household did have an increased probability of carrying the same non-unique isolates of H. pylori, independent of kinship. We conclude that patterns of spread of H. pylori under conditions of high prevalence, such as the rural South African families, differ from those in developed countries. Horizontal transmission occurs frequently between persons who do not belong to a core family, blurring the pattern of familial

  5. Lipopolysaccharides from Yersinia pestis. Studies on lipid A of lipopolysaccharides I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Venezia, N; Minka, S; Bruneteau, M; Mayer, H; Michel, G

    1985-09-01

    The chemical structure of the lipid A of lipopolysaccharide I and II from Yersinia pestis, strain EV 40, was studied. It consists of a (1 ---- 6), beta-linked D-glucosamine disaccharide which carries two phosphate groups; one phosphate is linked glycosidically with a glucosamine unit, the other one is linked to the non-reducing glucosamine. Various degradation methods combined with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that the ester-bound phosphate group is linked to a 4-aminoarabinosyl residue and the glycosidically linked phosphate group is linked to a D-arabinofuranosyl residue in lipopolysaccharide II and to the phosphorylethanolamine in lipopolysaccharide I. The hydroxyl groups of the disaccharide are acylated by dodecanoic, hexadecenoic, 3-hydroxytetradecanoic and 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids. The amino groups of the disaccharide carry 3-hydroxytetradecanoic and 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids. In addition smaller amounts of 3-tetradecanoyloxyltetradecanoic and 3-hexadecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids are present in ester linkage.

  6. Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Famouri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Childrenwith Helicobacter infection need treatment. The aim of treatment is elimination of H.Pylori. Most patients with this infection are asymptomatic and without peptic disease. Treatment and management of these patients are controversy. Conventional Treatment: The best treatment for H. pylori eradication regimens should have cure rates of at least 80%, be without major side effects, and induce minimal bacterial resistance. Antibiotics alone have not achieved this. Luminal acidity influences both the effectiveness of some antimicrobial agents and the survival of the bacteri; thus antibiotics have been combined with acid suppression such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, bismuth, or H2 antagonists. The “classic” regimen is treatment twice daily for 7 days with a PPI and clarithromycin plus either amoxicillin or metronidazole Bismuth has been used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease and 1 part o quadruple therapy for H.Pylori but compliance of children for it is low.   Sequential Therapy  Sequential therapyinvolves dual therapy with a PPI and amoxicillin for 5 days followed sequentially by clarithromycin, Tinidazole and omeperazole for 5 days or other triple therapy for 7 days. This treatment has had 97% efficacy.   Adjunctive Therapies A number of studies have showed the potential benefits of probiotic therapy in H. pylori treatment regimens.Consumption of these drugs accompanied with other medications increase H.Pylori eradication.    

  7. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  8. Helicobacter pylori: prospettive per un vaccino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Del Giudice

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most widespread infections worldwide: it affects more than 50% of the human population, and is responsible for serious gastric pathologies such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, atrophic gastritis and, in some individuals, gastric cancer. Current treatments with antibiotics are efficacious, but encounters several drawbacks at the level of compliance, side effects, antibiotic resistance, etc.The availability of vaccines could contribute in reducing the burden of H. pylori associated diseases. Several bacterial antigens have been identified as virulence factors and proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Some of these antigens have been tested in experimental animal models of challenge with H. pylori. The experiments in animals have shown that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori is indeed feasible. Several open questions still remain concerning the understanding of the host-microbe relationship and the quality of the immune response which should be induced in order to confer protective immunity in man.The answers to these questions will be crucial in helping the preparation of appropriate vaccine formulations able to efficaciously protect humans both prophylactically and therapeutically. A few clinical trials have been carried out so far with still limited results. Other trials in humans are in progress and are planned for the next few years.The final hope is that these new vaccines will show the expected efficacy against H. pylori and will permit the elimination of this pathogen which has cohabited with humans for more than 100,000 years.

  9. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  10. Regulation of RKIP function by Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika L Moen

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium that infects more than half of the world's population and is a major cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mechanisms that link H. pylori infection to gastric carcinogenesis are not well understood. In the present study, we report that the Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP has a role in the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. Western blot and luciferase transcription reporter assays demonstrate that the pathogenicity island of H. pylori rapidly phosphorylates RKIP, which then localizes to the nucleus where it activates its own transcription and induces apoptosis. Forced overexpression of RKIP enhances apoptosis in H. pylori-infected cells, whereas RKIP RNA inhibition suppresses the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori infection. While inducing the phosphorylation of RKIP, H. pylori simultaneously targets non-phosphorylated RKIP for proteasome-mediated degradation. The increase in RKIP transcription and phosphorylation is abrogated by mutating RKIP serine 153 to valine, demonstrating that regulation of RKIP activity by H. pylori is dependent upon RKIP's S153 residue. In addition, H. pylori infection increases the expression of Snail, a transcriptional repressor of RKIP. Our results suggest that H. pylori utilizes a tumor suppressor protein, RKIP, to promote apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  11. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-01-01

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability. PMID:28785141

  12. N-acetylcysteine, a novel treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hien Quoc; Couper, Richard T L; Tran, Cuong D; Moore, Lynette; Kelso, Richard; Butler, Ross N

    2004-01-01

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), being both a mucolytic agent and a thiol-containing antioxidant, may affect the establishment and maintenance of H. pylori infection within the gastric mucus layer and mucosa. Agar and broth dilution susceptibility tests determined the MIC of H. pylori strain SSI to NAC. H. pylori load in SSI strain-infected C57BL mice was determined as colony forming units per gram of gastric tissue. Gastritis assessment was scored and gastric surface hydrophobicity was determined by contact angle measurement. MICs of NAC were 5 to 10 and 10 to 15 mg/ml using the agar dilution and broth dilution methods, respectively. NAC (120 mg per day for 14 days) reduced the H. pylori load in mice by almost 1 log compared with sham treatment. Pretreatment with NAC (40 mg/day) also significantly reduced the H. pylori load but did not prevent H. pylori colonization. Both H. pylori infection and NAC reduced the surface hydrophobicity of murine gastric mucosa. No significant differences were observed in the gastritis scores of H. felis- or H. pylori-infected mice receiving either NAC or sham treatments. This study demonstrates that NAC inhibits the growth of H. pylori in both agar and broth susceptibility tests and in H. pylori-infected mice. NAC did not alter the severity of H. pylori- or H. felis-induced gastritis.

  13. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-07-21

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability.

  14. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, ppylori-positive group (ppylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status.

  15. Current Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Gold

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infects approximately 50% of the world’s population and is a definitive cause of gastroduodenal disease (ie, gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers in children and adults. Four consensus conferences held around the globe have brought together clinicians, scientists, epidemiologists and health care economists to discuss the role of the gastric pathogen H pylori in human gastroduodenal disease. At each of these conferences, the overriding objective was to reach a consensus on the development of practical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of H pylori-infected individuals. However, it was not until the Canadian H pylori Consensus Conference, held in November 1997, that the issues of H pylori infection in children were addressed. Therapies for H pylori infection in children, presented in part at the First Canadian Paediatric H pylori Consensus Conference, held in Victoria, British Columbia, November 1998, are reviewed in this paper.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... pathways. As such, this review highlights the consequences of H. pylori infection on the integrity of DNA in the host cells. By down-regulating major DNA repair pathways, H. pylori infection has the potential to generate mutations. In addition, H. pylori infection can induce direct changes on the DNA...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  17. Effect of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on structurization properties of bacterial lipopolysaccharide

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    Brill G.E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the effects of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on the process of dehydration self-organization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Materials and Methods. The method of wedge dehydration has been used to study the structure formation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Image-phases analysis included their qualitative characteristics, as well as the calculation of quantitative indicators, followed by statistical analysis. Results. UHF-Radiation (1GHz, 0,1 uW/cm2, 10 min has led to the changes in the suspension system of the LPS-saline reflected in the kinetics of structure formation. Conclusion. 1 GHz corresponds to the natural frequency of oscillation of water clusters and, presumably, the effect of UHF on structure of LPS mediates through the changes in water-salt environment. Under these conditions, properties of water molecules of hydration and possibly the properties of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the molecule of LPS, which can affect the ability of toxin molecules to form aggregates change. Therefore the lipopolysaccharide structure modification may result in the change of its toxic properties.

  18. Helicobacter pylori's cholesterol uptake impacts resistance to docosahexaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Marta; Casal, Susana; Vinagre, João; Seruca, Raquel; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette; Machado, José C

    2014-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes half of the world population and is associated with gastric cancer. We have previously demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid known for its anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects, directly inhibits H. pylori growth in vitro and in mice. Nevertheless, the concentration of DHA shown to reduce H. pylori mice gastric colonization was ineffective in vitro. Related to the auxotrophy of H. pylori for cholesterol, we hypothesize that other mechanisms, in addition to DHA direct antibacterial effect, must be responsible for the reduction of the infection burden. In the present study we investigated if DHA affects also H. pylori growth, by reducing the availability of membrane cholesterol in the epithelial cell for H. pylori uptake. Levels of cholesterol in gastric epithelial cells and of cholesteryl glucosides in H. pylori were determined by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The consequences of epithelial cells' cholesterol depletion on H. pylori growth were assessed in liquid cultures. We show that H. pylori uptakes cholesterol from epithelial cells. In addition, DHA lowers cholesterol levels in epithelial cells, decreases its de novo synthesis, leading to a lower synthesis of cholesteryl glucosides by H. pylori. A previous exposition of H. pylori to cholesterol influences the bacterium response to the direct inhibitory effect of DHA. Overall, our results suggest that a direct effect of DHA on H. pylori survival is modulated by its access to epithelial cell cholesterol, supporting the notion that cholesterol enhances the resistance of H. pylori. The cholesterol-dependent resistance of H. pylori to antimicrobial compounds raises new important aspects for the development of new anti-bacterial strategies.

  19. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  20. Helicobacter pylori vaccine: from past to future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Kanishtha; Agarwal, Shvetank

    2008-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide and is an important cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma), and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is usually acquired during childhood and tends to persist unless treated. Because eradication requires treatment with multidrug regimens, prevention of initial infection by a suitable vaccine is attractive. Although immunization with H pylori protein subunits has been encouraging in animals, similar vaccine trials in humans have shown adjuvant-related adverse effects and only moderate effectiveness. Newer immunization approaches (use of DNA, live vectors, bacterial ghosts, and microspheres) are being developed. Several questions about when and whom to vaccinate will need to be appropriately answered, and a cost-effective vaccine production and delivery strategy will have to be useful for developing countries. For this review, we searched MEDLINE using the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms Helicobacter pylori and vaccines for articles in English from 1990 to 2007.

  1. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Giardia lamblia and Helicobater pylori Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shafie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Giardia lamblia and Helicobacter pylori are two flagellate microorganisms that grow in duodenum and stom­ach. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of them in patients with dyspepsia and other GI disorders. "nMethods: In this cross-sectional study, co-infection of above-mentioned agents was investigated in a group of 130 patients [me­dian age of 40 yr (range=11-79 including 76 males (58.8%] with dyspepsia using three methods of duodenal aspiration sam­ple, duodenal biopsy samples and evaluation of stool samples."nResults: : From 105 patients (59 males, 46 females, median age 40 years, range 11-79 entering this study from 3 hospitals, 4 patients (3.8% had G. lamblia and 61 patients (58% had H. pylori. All 4 patients infected by Giardia had also H. pylori infec­tion. Tenesmus (3 out of 4 patients was the most common symptom in patients with H. pylori infection (48 out of 61 pa­tients was reflux. Other symptoms in patients infected with both organisms (4 patients included diarrhea (2 cases, weight loss (2 cases, and loss of appetite (1 case but no report of vomiting."nConclusion: In patients co-infected with Giardia, H.pylori differentiation by physical examination is not possible. So in those patients with positive Rapid Urease Test (RUT, stool examination for Giardia detection is recommended. In addition, met­ronidazole (broad spectrum, anti-protozoal drug can be useful in H. pylori infection.

  3. Endoscopic faces of Helicobacter Pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geanina Spulber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The infection caused by H. pylori appears secondary after a bacterial colonization of the stomach and the initial portion of the small bowel. H. pylori –infected patients can develop gastritis, peptic ulcer, stomach cancer or MALT lymphoma. H. pylori infection is defined by WHO like a type I carcinogen, its role in gastric carcinogenesis being supported by the greatest researchers. Objectives: In this study our purpose was to determine the endoscopic appearances in H. pylori infection quoted in medical literature until now and the frequency of their appearance in our group of interest. Materials and methods: In this study it was made an analytic study in which it was realized a retrospective cohort investigation at the Emergency Central Military and University Hospital “Dr. Carol Davila” Bucharest, gastroenterology branch –endoscopic department between 18.12.2012- 21.08.2013 on 1694 patients between 18 and 92 years old, with the medium age of 55 years old. As a diagnostic method for H. pylori infection we used superior digestive endoscopy during which were taken biopsies and it was made a fast urease test. Results: Regarding the variation of the endoscopic aspects at the population of study, we have found gastritis with all its aspects (which was Sidney classified in the biggest percentage meaning 59.3% of the cases, followed with a percentage of 18.8% by those without any endoscopic abnormality, and then in 10,33% of the cases we have found peptic ulcer. With a smaller percentage, under 10%, we have found duodenitis at 8.67% of this patients, and finally the most severe lesions represented by gastric cancer and lymphoma were found at 2,7% of the H.pylori infected patients.

  4. Helicobacter pylori: From Bench to Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exponential increase in research in the field of Helicobacter pylori a paradigm shift has occurred. It is now recognized that H pylori is a chronic infection of the stomach causing inflammation. Some patients remain asymptomatic, while others may develop dyspepsia, duodenal or gastric ulcer, gastric cancer or a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. However, the role of H pylori in contributing to nonulcer dyspepsia or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy remains controversial. An effective vaccine against H pylori is years away. Major interest has focused on the questions "who should be investigated and therefore treated" and "what is the latest gold standard for eradication of H pylori"? In Europe, guidelines have been developed to help the practitioner answer these important questions. Canadian guidelines will soon be available. For persons with known peptic ulcer disease there should be unequivocal acceptance that the good clinical practice of eradicating H pylori will result in substantial savings in health care expenses. The original 'classical triple therapy' (bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline [BMT] has now been surpassed by the combination of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI plus two antibiotics (metronidazole plus clarithromycin; amoxicillin plus clarithromycin; or amoxicillin plus metronidazole, each given twice a day for one week. In Canada, the regimen of omeprazole plus one antibiotic (amoxicillin or clarithromycin was approved recently but gives an eradication rate that is lower than the current target of 90%. According to the European (Mäastricht recommendations, if a single treatment attempt with PPI plus two antibiotics fails, PPI plus BMT is recommended.

  5. Helicobacter pylori-related immunoglobulins in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Betty L; Vlach, Victoria; Dew, Michelle; Willsie, Sandra K

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine serum antibody titers against a common bacterial antigen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylon), in subjects with sarcoidosis, comparing those titers to those present in a healthy population. With the approval of the Institutional Review Board of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, patients with sarcoidosis (pulmonary and extrapulmonary) who visited the Truman Medical Center-Hospital Hill pulmonary clinic were recruited to enter the study. A serum sample was frozen at -70 degrees C for later testing (n = 20). Specific information collected on subjects included corticosteroid use, use of histamine2 blockers and antacids, date of first diagnosis, and stage of sarcoidosis. Normal controls and demographically matched individuals who lacked pulmonary diseases, including sarcoidosis, were also recruited. Serum samples were processed as above. Antibody capture enzyme immunoassay was completed for H. pylori and urease antigens by serum dilution assay for each subject, from which titers for antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA were calculated. Nonspecific serum IgE was also measured. An increased incidence of high-titer IgG antibody directed against H. pylori antigens was found in subjects with sarcoidosis compared with controls. The sarcoidosis and control groups were significantly different with respect to IgG and IgA against H. pylori, both at p = .001. IgG directed against urease was also significantly different between sarcoidosis and control patients (p = .001), but IgA directed against urease was very low in all subjects and did not yield significant differences between groups. Specific H. pylori and urease IgG antibodies exceeded those expected in the population studied. The data suggest that in pulmonary sarcoidosis, the relationship of H. pylori and its products to sarcoid granuloma formation warrants further investigation.

  6. 3rd Brazilian consensus on Helicobacter pylori 3º Consenso Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter pylori

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    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.Os avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Segundo Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 2004, em São Paulo, justificam este terceiro consenso. O evento foi organizado pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, departamento da Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia, tendo sido realizado em Bento Gonçalves, RS, nos dias 12 a 15 de abril de 2011. Contou com a participação de 30 delegados provenientes das cinco regiões brasileiras e um convidado internacional, incluindo gastroenterologistas

  7. DMPD: Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106784 Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Carof...html) (.csml) Show Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. PubmedID 12106784 Ti...tle Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Authors

  8. L-forms of H. Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Chao-Pin Li; Yu-Bao Cui; Ye Tian; Qing-Gui Yang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the occurrence of L-forms of H. pyloriinfection in patients with peptic ulcers and its association with possible changes of cellular immune function in the patients.METHODS: Endoscopic biopsy specimens of gastric antrum and gastric corpus were taken from 228 patients with peptic ulcers and inoculated into Skirrow selective medium for H.pylorivegetative forms and special medium for H. pylori Lforms, followed by bacterial isolation and identification. And peripheral venous blood of the patients was taken to detect the percentage of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ with biotin-streptavidin (BSA) and the level of IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 with ElISA.RESULTS: (1) The detection rates of H. pyloriL-forms and vegetative forms in the patients were 50.88 % (116/228)and 64.91 % (148/228) respectively, and the co-infection rate of H. pyloriL-forms and vegetative forms was 78.38 % (116/148). To be more exact, the detection rates of H. pylori L-forms in male and female patients were 57.04 % (77/135) and 41.94 % (39/93) respectively, and statistics found significant difference between them (P<0.05). Furthermore, the detection rates of H. pyloriL-forms in patients aged 14 years-, 30 years-, 40 years- and 50 years- were 31.91%(15/47), 42.86 % (24/56), 56.94 % (41/72) and 67.92 %(36/53) respectively, and there was significant difference between them (P<0.011). (2) The percentages of CD3+, CD4+,CD8+, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and the level of IL-2, IL-6,IL-8 in H. pylori-positive patients were (52.59±5.44) %,(35.51±5.74) %, (27.77±8.64) %, (1.56±0.51), (2.66±0.47)mg/L, (108.62±5.85) ng/L and (115.79±7.18) ng/Lrespectively, compared with those in H. pylori-negative patients, the percentages of CD3+, CD4+ and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ decreased, but the level of IL-2, IL-6 increased, and the difference was significant (P<0.001-P<0.011).Moreover, the percentages of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and the level of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 in the patients with mixed infection of

  9. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  10. Helicobacter pylori in humans: Where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Arshad Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been associated with colonization of gastro duodenal mucosa of humans from millions of years. The main burden of the disese is in the developing countries, due to overcrowding and poor hygiene. If left untreated it leads to lot of sequlae from minor to sinister diseases over a period of time. The main challenges that remain are prevention of H. pylori-related diseases by effective treatment and screening procedures and development of a vaccine, which can address all these issues including beneficial aspects of H. pylori. The literature pertaining to different aspects of H. pylori were scrutinized from Pubmed. Material on clinical behavior, complications of chronic gastric involvement, and prevention besides role of H. pylori in nongastric diseases and the latest trends of management was collected for research and review. We continue to face many challenges.The prevention of cancer of the stomach, a worst sequlae of H. pylori continues to be a big challenge despite population screening and prevention surveys being underway in many countries. On the other hand continued scientific work has now unfolded involvement of H. pylori in extragastric diseases like cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, idiopathic thrombocytopenia, sideroblastic anemia, mental diseases, and collagen vascular diseases. In contrast, the beneficial effects of H. pylori with respect to allergic diseases and obesity are now clear. Moreover, problem of drug resistance for eradication of H. pylori has arisen for which novel treatments are being tried. Lactobacillus reuteri having anti H. pylori action is emerging as one of the promising treatment.

  11. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and risk of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a risk factor for distal stomach cancer, and a few small studies have suggested that H. pylori may be a potential risk factor for lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study of 350 lung adenocarcinoma cases, 350 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 700 controls nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC cohort of male Finnish smokers. Controls were one-to-one matched by age and date of baseline serum draw. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori whole-cell and cytotoxin-associated gene (CagA antigens, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for associations between H. pylori seropositivity and lung cancer risk using conditional logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was detected in 79.7% of cases and 78.5% of controls. After adjusting for pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with either adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.75-1.6 or squamous cell carcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.77-1.7. Results were similar for CagA-negative and CagA-positive H. pylori seropositivity. Despite earlier small studies suggesting that H. pylori may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, H. pylori seropositivity does not appear to be associated with lung cancer.

  12. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: Updates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is highly prevalentin human, affecting nearly half of the world'spopulation; however, infection remains asymptomaticin majority of population. During its co-existence withhumans, H. pylori has evolved various strategies tomaintain a mild gastritis and limit the immune responseof host. On the other side, presence of H. pylori is alsoassociated with increased risk for the development ofvarious gastric pathologies including gastric cancer (GC).A complex combination of host genetics, environmentalagents, and bacterial virulence factors are consideredto determine the susceptibility as well as the severityof outcome in a subset of individuals. GC is one of themost common cancers and considered as the third mostcommon cause of cancer related death worldwide. Manystudies had proved H. pylori as an important risk factorin the development of non-cardia GC. Although both H.pylori infection and GC are showing decreasing trendsin the developed world, they still remain a major threatto human population in the developing countries. Thecurrent review attempts to highlight recent progress inthe field of research on H. pylori induced GC and aimsto provide brief insight into H. pylori pathogenesis,the role of major virulence factors of H. pylori thatmodulates the host environment and transform thenormal gastric epithelium to neoplastic one. This reviewalso emphasizes on the mechanistic understanding ofhow colonization and various virulence attributes of H.pylori as well as the host innate and adaptive immuneresponses modulate the diverse signaling pathways thatleads to different disease outcomes including GC.

  13. Is duodenal biopsy appropriate in areas endemic for Helicobacter pylori?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Abdurrahman; Cihangiroglu, Gulcin; Bilgic, Yilmaz; Calhan, Turan; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The primary reason for obtaining duodenal biopsy sample is to diagnose celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and drug injury are common causes of duodenitis. The aim of this retrospective study was to explore effects of H. pylori and drugs on duodenal mucosa. Duodenal biopsy samples of patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE) between February 2014 and December 2014 were retrospectively examined. Clinical symptoms, referral indications, endoscopic findings, H. pylori status, and drug history were recorded. Duodenal biopsy findings were compared based on presence of H. pylori and drug history. Of 2389 patients who underwent UGIE, 206 had duodenal biopsy. Eight patients (3.9%) were diagnosed with celiac disease. After excluding cases with celiac disease, 76 patients of remaining 198 patients (36.9%) had duodenal histopathological abnormality. H. pylori was found in 95 (47.9%) patients. Drug usage was less common (42%). Of patients who had histopathological duodenitis, 59% were H. pylori-infected. Rate of duodenitis was higher in H. pylori (+) group than in H. pylori (-) group (45% vs 27.1%; odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.4; p=0.005). There was no difference between groups regarding drug use in terms of histopathological duodenitis. H. pylori is the major contributor to duodenitis in high prevalence regions. Serological testing may be more appropriate before performing duodenal biopsy in patients with suspected celiac disease.

  14. Autophagy-related genes in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uotani, Takahiro; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces autophagy in gastric epithelial cells. However, prolonged exposure to H. pylori reduces autophagy by preventing maturation of the autolysosome. The alterations of the autophagy-related genes in H. pylori infection are not yet fully understood. We analyzed autophagy-related gene expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from 136 Bhutanese volunteers with mild dyspeptic symptoms. We also studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of autophagy-related gene in 283 Bhutanese participants to identify the influence on susceptibility to H. pylori infection. Microarray analysis of 226 autophagy-related genes showed that 16 genes were upregulated (7%) and nine were downregulated (4%). We used quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to measure mRNA levels of the downregulated genes (ATG16L1, ATG5, ATG4D, and ATG9A) that were core molecules of autophagy. ATG16L1 and ATG5 mRNA levels in H. pylori-positive specimens (n=86) were significantly less than those in H. pylori-negative specimens (n=50). ATG16L1 mRNA levels were inversely related to H. pylori density. We also compared SNPs of ATG16L1 (rs2241880) among 206 H. pylori-positive and 77 H. pylori-negative subjects. The odds ratio for the presence of H. pylori in the GG genotype was 0.40 (95% CI: 0.18-0.91) relative to the AA/AG genotypes. Autophagy-related gene expression profiling using high-throughput microarray analysis indicated that downregulation of core autophagy machinery genes may depress autophagy functions and possibly provide a better intracellular habit for H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  16. Using macro-arrays to study routes of infection of Helicobacter pylori in three families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josette Raymond

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of the evolutionary dynamics of Helicobacter pylori allowed tracing the spread of infection through populations on different continents but transmission pathways between individual humans have not been clearly described. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To investigate person-to-person transmission, we studied three families each including one child with persistence of symptoms after antibiotic treatment. Ten isolates from the antrum and corpus of stomach of each family member were analyzed both by sequencing of two housekeeping genes and macroarray tests. RESULTS: A total of 134 (8.4% out of the 1590 coding sequences (CDSs tested, including cag PAI and insertion sequences, were present in some but not all isolates (and are therefore defined as variable CDSs. Most of the variable CDSs encoded proteins of unknown function (76/134 or were selfish DNA including that encoding restriction/modification enzymes (13/134. Isolates colonizing the stomach of one individual can vary by point mutations, as seen in hspA, or by the gain or loss of one to five CDSs. They were considered as (genetic variants. The phylogenetic clustering of gene profiles obtained on macro-arrays allowed identifying the different strains infecting families. Two to five strains circulated within a family. Identical strains were present in at least two members of all three families supporting the accepted model of intrafamilial transmission. Surprisingly, the mother was not implicated in the transmission of H. pylori in the two French families. Sibling-to-sibling transmission and acquisition of H. pylori from outside the family appeared to be probable in the transmission pathways. CONCLUSION: Macroarray analysis based on previously selected CDSs gives a comprehensive view of the genome diversity of a pathogen. This approach combined with information on the origin of the hspA and glmM alleles revealed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be acquired by more diverse routes

  17. Catechins and Sialic Acid Attenuate Helicobacter pylori-Triggered Epithelial Caspase-1 Activity and Eradicate Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Chin Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammasome/caspase-1 signaling pathway in immune cells plays a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis; however, the regulation of this pathway in the gastric epithelium during Helicobacter pylori infection is yet to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of catechins (CAs, sialic acid (SA, or combination of CA and SA (CASA on H. pylori-induced caspase-1-mediated epithelial damage, as well as H. pylori colonization in vitro (AGS cells and in vivo (BALB/c mice. Our results indicate that the activity of caspase-1 and the expression of its downstream substrate IL-1β were upregulated in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. In addition, we observed increased oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase gp91phox, CD68, caspase-1/IL-1β, and apoptosis, but decreased autophagy, in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected mice. We have further demonstrated that treatment with CASA led to synergistic anti-H. pylori activity and was more effective than treatment with CA or SA alone. In particular, treatment with CASA for 10 days eradicated H. pylori infection in up to 95% of H. pylori-infected mice. Taken together, we suggest that the pathogenesis of H. pylori involves a gastric epithelial inflammasome/caspase-1 signaling pathway, and our results show that CASA was able to attenuate this pathway and effectively eradicate H. pylori infection.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-07-28

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance. PMID:25071324

  1. Effects of Community Screening for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, Maria; Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication improves the prognosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), dyspepsia, and possibly gastric cancer. Hp screening tests are accurate and eradication therapy is effective. Hp population screening seems attractive. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  2. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  3. Natural transformation and recombination in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, L.C.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriën kennen geen geslachtelijke voortplanting, ze hebben altijd één “ouder” in plaats van twee. Ze kunnen dus tijdens de voortplanting niet kruisen. Om toch erfelijke eigenschappen te kunnen uitwisselen hebben ze andere methoden. De maagbacterie Helicobacter pylori kan dit bijvoorbeeld doen doo

  4. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-08-01

    Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2-2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1(GFP/+) mice. Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS.

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  6. Chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP have recently emerged as a novel eliciting factor for chronic urticaria (CU. The possible association between HP and CU has enormous potential, as eradicating HP could cure CU. Aims and Objectives: We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of HP infection and effect of bacterium eradication on skin lesions in patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU. Settings and Design: Four hundred sixty patients of CU attending the allergy clinic, SMS hospital, Jaipur during the period February 6, 2004, to February 6, 2006, were screened for possible eliciting factors. Patients with CIU were enrolled and others were excluded. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight patients of CIU and similar number of age and sex matched controls, attending the allergy clinic, SMS Hospital, Jaipur were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endoscopy with antral biopsy for urease and histopathology to identify HP-associated gastritis. Infected patients were given HP eradication therapy. Eradication of bacterium was confirmed by fecal antigen assay. Subjective response to treatment was judged using chronic urticaria quality-of-life questionnaire (CU-Q 2 oL while objective response to treatment was judged by need for ′rescue medication′ (antihistaminics. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi square and paired′t′ test for their level of significance. Results: HP associated gastritis was present in 48 (70.58% patients, out of which 39 (81.25% patients responded to eradication therapy. Ten (50.00% patients without HP associated gastritis showed response to symptomatic therapy. Overall 49 (72.05% patients responded and 19 (27.94% showed no response. The value of χ2 was 28.571 (P = 0.003, which showed significant association between presence of HP and response to eradication regimen. Conclusion: The response of HP eradication therapy in infected patients of CIU is significant. HP should be included in diagnostic

  7. TIFA Signaling in Gastric Epithelial Cells Initiates the cag Type 4 Secretion System-Dependent Innate Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Alevtina; Gaudet, Ryan G; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Salama, Nina R

    2017-08-15

    Helicobacter pylori is a bacterial pathogen that colonizes the human stomach, causing inflammation which, in some cases, leads to gastric ulcers and cancer. The clinical outcome of infection depends on a complex interplay of bacterial, host genetic, and environmental factors. Although H. pylori is recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems, this rarely results in bacterial clearance. Gastric epithelial cells are the first line of defense against H. pylori and alert the immune system to bacterial presence. Cytosolic delivery of proinflammatory bacterial factors through the cag type 4 secretion system (cag-T4SS) has long been appreciated as the major mechanism by which gastric epithelial cells detect H. pylori Classically attributed to the peptidoglycan sensor NOD1, recent work has highlighted the role of NOD1-independent pathways in detecting H. pylori; however, the bacterial and host factors involved have remained unknown. Here, we show that bacterially derived heptose-1,7-bisphosphate (HBP), a metabolic precursor in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, is delivered to the host cytosol through the cag-T4SS, where it activates the host tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-interacting protein with forkhead-associated domain (TIFA)-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway. This response, which is independent of NOD1, drives robust NF-κB-dependent inflammation within hours of infection and precedes NOD1 activation. We also found that the CagA toxin contributes to the NF-κB-driven response subsequent to TIFA and NOD1 activation. Taken together, our results indicate that the sequential activation of TIFA, NOD1, and CagA delivery drives the initial inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells, orchestrating the subsequent recruitment of immune cells and leading to chronic gastritis.IMPORTANCEH. pylori is a globally prevalent cause of gastric and duodenal ulcers and cancer. H. pylori antibiotic resistance is rapidly

  8. Dyslipidemia and H pylori in gastric xanthomatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Young Yi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship among gastric xanthomatosis (GX),H pylori, dyslipidemia, and gastritis in Korea, a well-known H pylori endemic area.METHODS: A total of 771 patients who had undergone gastroduodenoscopy by one endoscopist were included in this study. Among them, 54 patients with GX were assessed for H pylori infection and their endoscopic characteristics and serum lipid profiles. The findings were compared with 54 age- and sex-matched control subjects without GX.RESULTS: The prevalence of GX was 7% (54/771) with no sex difference. GX was mainly single (64.8%) and located in the antrum (53.7%). The mean diameter was 7 ± 3 mm. Mean body mass index (BMI) of patients with GX was 23.1 ± 2.8 and no one was above 30.Compared with the controls, lipid profiles of GX group showed significantly lower HDL-cholesterol (48.8 ± 12.3vs 62.9 ± 40.5, P = 0.028) and higher LDL-cholesterol (112.9 ± 29.9 vs 95.9 ± 22.4, P = 0.032). The level of total serum cholesterol, triglyceride and the existence of dyslipoproteinemia were not related to the presence of GX. However, GX showed a close relationship with endoscopically determined atrophic gastritis and histologic severity (24/53, 44.4% vs 8/54, 14.8%, P =0.0082). H pylori infection and bile reflux gastritis were not significantly related with GX.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of GX is 7% and it may be an increasing entity in Korea. Moreover, dyslipidemia and atrophic gastritis are found to be related to GX, but H pylori infection is not.

  9. Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigro Casimiro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nature of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and reflux oesophagitis is still not clear. To investigate the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and GERD taking into account endoscopic, pH-metric and histopathological data. Methods Between January 2001 and January 2003 a prospective study was performed in 146 patients with GERD in order to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection at gastric mucosa; further the value of the De Meester score endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric parameters, i.e. reflux episodes, pathological reflux episodes and extent of oesophageal acid exposure, of the patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection were studied and statistically compared. Finally, univariate analysis of the above mentioned data were performed in order to evaluate the statistical correlation with reflux esophagitis. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups, HP infected and HP negative patients, regarding age, gender and type of symptoms. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding severity of symptoms and manometric parameters. The value of the De Meester score and the ph-metric parameters were similar in both groups. On univariate analysis, we observed that hiatal hernia (p = 0,01, LES size (p = 0,05, oesophageal wave length (p = 0,01 and pathological reflux number (p = 0,05 were significantly related to the presence of reflux oesophagitis. Conclusion Based on these findings, it seems that there is no significant evidence for an important role for H. pylori infection in the development of GERD and erosive esophagitis. Nevertheless, current data do not provide sufficient evidence to define the relationship between HP and GERD. Further assessments in prospective large studies are warranted.

  10. Challenges in Diagnosis of H. Pylori Infection in Children

    OpenAIRE

    M Sobhani Shahmirzadi

    2014-01-01

    H. pylori infection is usually acquired in early childhood. Its role in gastrointestinal and extra intestinal complaints and serious consequences in adulthood make it as challenging issues. Despite different clinical presentations, in most children, the presence of H. pylori infection does not lead to clinically apparent disease, even when it causes chronic active gastritis. Some of most important recommendations for managing H. pylori infection in children based on Guidelines from ESPGHAN an...

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been wel...

  12. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    OpenAIRE

    Wroblewski Lydia E; Peek Richard M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gas...

  13. Management and response to treatment of Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, M J; Wyatt, J I; Littlewood, J M

    1992-01-01

    Gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori was present in gastric biopsies from 24/95 (25%) children and adolescents undergoing endoscopy for recurrent abdominal pain and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. H pylori associated gastritis occurred mainly in older children (8-16 years) and was significantly associated with low socioeconomic class and a family history of peptic ulcer disease. Antral nodularity was a common endoscopic finding in H pylori positive children. Eighteen children, all o...

  14. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Patients and methods Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. Results A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, pgastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status. PMID:28860835

  15. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wroblewski Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gastric epithelial barrier.

  16. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Ontario: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Naja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been classified by the World Health Organization as a type I carcinogen. Nearly 50% of the world’s population is estimated to be infected with H pylori. Prevalence patterns of the infection are different between developing and developed countries. The present study had two objectives – to estimate the prevalence of H pylori infection in Ontario, and to evaluate the relationship between the infection and various demographic characteristics and selected lifestyle factors.

  17. Cloning and Expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Moein Farshchian; Saman Hoseinkhani; Javad Atoofi; Shahin Najar Peerayeh

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinomaand gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Antibiotictherapies do not protect from potential re-infection and have a risk for development of drugresistance. Therefore, prophylactic vaccine mediated protection against H. pylori is an attractiveclinical interest. H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA) is a conserved surface lipoprotein and playsimportant roles in the pathogenesis of...

  18. Precise role of H pylori in duodenal ulceration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Hobsley; Frank I Tovey; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    The facts that H pylori infection is commoner in duodenal ulcer (DU) patients than in the normal population, and that eradication results in most cases being cured,have led to the belief that it causes DU. However, early cases of DU are less likely than established ones to be infected. H pylori-negative cases are usually ascribed to specific associated factors such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), Crohn's disease,and hypergastrinaemia, but even after excluding these, several H pylori-negative cases remain and are particularly common in areas of low prevalence of H pylori infection. Moreover, this incidence of H pylori negative DU is not associated with a fall in overall DU prevalence when compared with countries with a higher H pylori prevalence. In countries with a high H pylori prevalence there are regional differences in DU prevalence, but no evidence of an overall higher prevalence of DU than in countries with a low H pylori prevalence. There is no evidence that virulence factors are predictive of clinical outcome. After healing following eradication of H pylori infection DU can still recur.Medical or surgical measures to reduce acid output can lead to long-term healing despite persistence of H pylori infection. Up to half of cases of acute DU perforation are H pylori negative. These findings lead to the conclusion that H pylori infection does not itself cause DU, but leads to resistance to healing, i.e., chronicity. This conclusion is shown not to be incompatible with the universally high prevalence of DU compared with controls.

  19. [On the rating of Helicobacter pylori in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedichkina, T P; Solenova, L G; Zykova, I E

    2014-01-01

    There are considered the issues related to the possibility to rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) content in drinking water. There is described the mechanism of of biofilm formation. The description refers to the biofilm formation mechanism in water supply systems and the existence of H. pylori in those systems. The objective premises of the definition of H. pylori as a potential limiting factor for assessing the quality of drinking water have been validated as follows: H. pylori is an etiologic factor associated to the development of chronic antral gastritis, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer either, in the Russian population the rate of infection with H. pylori falls within range of 56 - 90%, water supply pathway now can be considered as a source of infection of the population with H. pylori, the existence of WHO regulatory documents considering H. pylori as a candidate for standardization of the quality of the drinking water quite common occurrence of biocorrosion, the reduction of sanitary water network reliability, that creates the possibility of concentrating H. pylori in some areas of the water system and its delivery to the consumer of drinking water, and causes the necessity of the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology of the population. A comprehensive and harmonized approach to H. pylori is required to consider it as a candidate to its rating in drinking water. Bearing in mind the large economic losses due to, on the one hand, the prevalence of disease caused by H. pylori, and, on the other hand, the biocorrosion of water supply system, the problem is both relevant in terms of communal hygiene and economy.

  20. {sup 14}C urea breath test kit- an evaluation of a compact, cost-effective kit for the detection of H. pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellon, M.S. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia). Dept of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa causes active chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. Carbon-14 urea breath testing has been well documented in its ability to detect the presence of H. pylori. The aims of this study were to evaluate and refine the test to substantially reduce costs and improve its simplicity, availability and accuracy. We reviewed the results of 138 patients who underwent {sup 14}C urea breath testing for the detection of H. pylori utilising a kit developed at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Modifications to the standard technique that were assessed included the relevance of buccal cleansing, single sample v multiple sampling, use of alternative CO{sub 2} absorbers and sampling techniques. In those patients with positive biopsy results, a test sensitivity of 100% was achieved. No buccal cleansing is necessary (45% oral contamination without brushing teeth v 41% with). A single breath sample only at 15 min resulted in 100% sensitivity. Alternative (cheaper and safer) CO{sub 2} absorbers such as KOH can be used. Based on these results, modifications to this well documented test have enabled us to substantially reduce costs, improve simplicity and safety and increase accuracy and availability of the test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori.

  1. Helicobacter pylori damages human gallbladder epithelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori (Hpy/orO damages human gallbladder epithelial cells (HGBEC).METHODS: H pylori isolated from gallbladder were cultured in a liquid medium. Different concentration supernatants and sonicated extracts of H pylori cells were then added to HGBEC in a primary culture. The morphological changes in HGBEC as well as changes in the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutamyltransferase (GGT)were measured.RESULTS: According to the culture curve of HGBEC,it was convenient to study the changes in HGBEC by adding H pylori sonicated extracts and H pylori culture supernatants. Both H pylori sonicated extracts and H pylori culture supernatants had a significant influence on HGBEC morphology, i.e. HGBEC grew more slowly, their viability decreased and their detachment increased. Furthermore, HGBEC ruptured and died. The levels of ALP (33.84 ± 6.00 vs 27.01± 4.67, P < 0.05), LDH (168.37 ± 20.84 vs 55.51 ±17.17, P < 0.01) and GGT (42.01 ± 6.18 vs 25.34 ±4.33, P < 0.01) significantly increased in the HGBEC culture supernatant in a time- and concentrationdependent. The damage to HGBEC in Hpylori culture liquid was more significant than that in H pylori sonicated extracts.CONCLUSION: H pylori induces no obvious damage to HGBEC.

  2. Celecoxib inhibits Helicobacter pylori colonization-related factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of celecoxib,a selective COX-2 inhibitor,on Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) colonization-related factors and its mechanism.METHODS:After co-incubation with celecoxib,morphology of H.pylori strain 26695 was observed under a transmission electron microscope.Flagella motility was assessed by stab agar motility test.Adherence of H.pylori to AGS cells was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Levels of mRNA expression in flagellar genes(flaA,flaB),urease genes(ureA,ureB)and ...

  3. Chronic Gastritis and its Association with H. Pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatema, J; Khan, A H; Uddin, M J; Rahman, M H; Saha, M; Safwath, S A; Alam, M J; Mamun, M A

    2015-10-01

    This cross sectional study was designed to see association of chronic gastritis including its type with H. pylori infection. Consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic examination having histopathological evidence of chronic gastritis were enrolled in the study and was done in Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College from July 2011 to June 2012. Biopsies were taken from antrum, body and fundus in all patients. Histopathological examinations were done using H-E stain and for detection of H. pylori, rapid urease test, anti-H.pylori antibody test and histopathological test with modified Giemsa stain were done. Patients having results positive in at least two methods were considered infected by H. pylori. Total 80 dyspeptic patients having chronic gastritis were evaluated. Out of them 67(83.8%) had H. pylori infection and 13(16.2%) were H. pylori negative. Among all patients 57(71.2%) had pangastritis and 23(28.8%) had antral gastritis with female and male predominance respectively. H. pylori infection was present in 49(86.0%) cases of pangastritis and 18(78.3%) cases of antral gastritis. H. pylori infection was a little higher among males (34, 50.7%) females (33, 49.3%). H. pylori infection is the predominant cause of chronic gastritis and pangastritis is the major type.

  4. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamori, Satoshi; Higashida, Akihiro; Kawara, Fumiaki; Ohnishi, Katsuhiro; Takeda, Akihiko; Senda, Eri; Ashida, Cho; Yamada, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H. pylori infection, underwent gastro-endoscopy, and were treated with H. pylori eradication therapy. Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d. All of the patients underwent a 13C urea breath test at least 1 mo after the completion of eradication therapy. The current study investigated the independent factors associated with successful H. pylori eradication using a multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The overall success rate in the patients was 85.8%. Among the general factors examined in the multivariate analyses, only having an age less than 50 years was found to be significantly associated with a poor response to H. pylori eradication. Moreover, side effects were the only clinical factors in the patients who were under 50 years of age that significantly influenced the poor response to H. pylori eradication. CONCLUSION: H. pylori-positive elderly patients should undergo eradication therapy. In addition, it is necessary to improve H. pylori eradication therapy in younger patients. PMID:20806435

  5. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Mi; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Eui Young; Jang, Eun Kyung; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims There have been controversial reports linking Helicobacter pylori infection to autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). However, data regarding the relationship are limited for Asian populations, which have an extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. We performed this study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and AITD in Koreans. Methods This study involved adults aged 30 to 70 years who had visited a health promotion center. A total of 5,502 subjects were analysed. Thyroid status was assessed by free thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to H. pylori were measured as an indication of H. pylori infection. We compared the prevalence of TPO-Ab in subjects with and without H. pylori infection. Results H. pylori IgG antibodies were found in 2,875 subjects (52.3%), and TPO-Ab were found in 430 (7.8%). Individuals positive for H. pylori Ab were older than those negative for H. pylori Ab (p thyroiditis. PMID:28092700

  6. Helicobacter pylori vs coronary heart disease- searching for connections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena; Chmiela; Adrian; Gajewski; Karolina; Rudnicka

    2015-01-01

    In this review,we discussed the findings and concepts underlying the potential role of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infections in the initiation,development or persistence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease(CHD).This Gram-negative bacterium was described by Marshall and Warren in 1984.The majority of infected subjects carries and transmits H.pylori with no symptoms; however,in some individuals these bacteria may cause peptic ulcers,and even gastric cancers.The widespread prevalence of H.pylori infections and the fact that frequently they remain asymptomatic may suggest that,similarly to intestinal microflora,H.pylori may deliver antigens that stimulate not only local,but also systemic inflammatory response.Recently,possible association between H.pylori infection and extragastric disorders has been suggested.Knowledge on the etiology of atherosclerosis together with current findings in the area of H.pylori infections constitute the background for the newly proposed hypothesis that those two processes may be related.Many research studies confirm the indirect association between the prevalence of H.pylori and the occurrence of CHD.According to majority of findings the involvement of H.pylori in this process is based on the chronic inflammation which might facilitate the CHDrelated pathologies.It needs to be elucidated,if the infection initiates or just accelerates the formation of atheromatous plaque.

  7. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  8. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection: Bacterium and host relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of a half of the mankind. Duodenal ulcer is found in 15-25%, t gastric ulcer in 13%, while gastric adenocarcinoma develops in 1% of all infected individuals. Pathogenesis of H. pylori infection is related to the virulence factors of the bacterium, environmental (dietary habits, hygiene, stress and host factors (age, sex, blood type. Colonization of the gastric mucosa is related to the motility of the bacterium, presence of lipopolysacharide (LPS and various bacterial enzymes. Gastric mucosal injury is the result of H. pylori LPS, vacuolization cytotoxin (vacA, cytotoxin associated protein (cagA, heat shock proteins and factors responsible for neutrophil chemotaxis and activity. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa and zones of ectopic gastric epithelium. H. pylori infection is transmitted via oral-oral, fecal-oral and iatrogenic way (during endoscopy. Higher prevalence of the infection is associated with lower socioeconomic level, lack of drinking water, and living in a community. Acute H. pylori gastritis is superficial pangastritis progressing into the chronic phase after 7-10 days. Gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia can develop during the course of H. pylori infection. Clearly defined factors that influence the outcome of H. pylori infection include bacterial strain, distribution of gastritis, acid secretion and gastric mucosal atrophy.

  9. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  10. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi; Mamori; Akihiro; Higashida; Fumiaki; Kawara; Katsuhiro; Ohnishi; Akihiko; Takeda; Eri; Senda; Cho; Ashida; Hajime; Yamada

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)infection.METHODS:The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H.pylori infection,underwent gastroendoscopy,and were treated with H.pylori eradication therapy.Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d.All of the patients underwent a 13 C urea breath test at least 1 mo...

  11. Helicobacter pylori may induce bile reflux: link between H pylori and bile induced injury to gastric epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, S D; Katsogridakis, J; Malamou, H; Giannopoulou, H; Kesse-Elia, M; Raptis, S A

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and duodenogastric reflux are both recognised as playing aetiological roles in chronic gastritis. This study investigated whether H pylori colonisation of the antral mucosa and duodenogastric reflux are independent phenomena or have a causal relationship. Thirty eight patients (15 men, 23 women) aged (mean (SD)) 48 (17) years participated. Each patient underwent gastroscopy. Antral biopsy specimens were taken to investigate H pylori colonisation. In addition BrIDA-99mTc/111In-DTPA scintigraphy was used to quantify duodenogastric reflux. H pylori positive patients who were found to have duodenogastric reflux were treated with amoxycillin (1 g/d) and metronidazole (1.5 g/d) for seven days and four tablets of bismuth subcitrate daily for four weeks. Follow up antral biopsies and scintigraphy were repeated at six months. Duodenogastric reflux could not be found in 18 patients, including eight (44%) who were H pylori positive. Ten of the 11 patients who had duodenogastric reflux (reflux % 11.6 (9.2)), however, were H pylori positive (chi 2 = 6.26, p = 0.01). These 10 patients were given eradication treatment. At six months, in six patients who became H pylori negative, duodenogastric reflux was significantly reduced from a pretreatment value of 14.3% to 3.3% (two tail, paired t = 2.57, p = 0.016). These data suggest that H pylori may induced duodenogastric reflux which may be important in the pathogenesis of H pylori gastritis or carcinogenesis, or both. PMID:8566844

  12. Helicobacter pylori-induced modulation of the promoter methylation of Wnt antagonist genes in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyo-Joon; Kim, Sang Gyun; Lim, Joo Hyun; Choi, Ji Min; Kim, Woo Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2017-06-22

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in the promoter methylation and gene expression of multiple Wnt antagonists between the chronic infection and eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in gastric carcinogenesis. The levels of methylation and corresponding mRNA expression of seven Wnt antagonist genes (SFRP1, -2, -5, DKK1, -2, -3, WIF1) were compared among the patients with H. pylori-positive gastric cancers (GCs), and H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative controls, by quantitative MethyLight assay and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. The changes of the methylation and expression levels of the genes were also compared between the H. pylori eradication and H. pylori-persistent groups 1 year after endoscopic resection of GCs. The methylation levels of SFRP and DKK family genes were significantly increased in the patients with H. pylori-positive GCs and followed by H. pylori-positive controls compared with H. pylori-negative controls (P pylori-negative controls, H. pylori-positive controls, and to H. pylori-positive GCs (P pylori eradication (P pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. The epigenetic field may not be reversed even after H. pylori eradication except by DKK3 methylation.

  13. Reducing the bioactivity of Tannerella forsythia lipopolysaccharide by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Tannerella forsythia is considered a pathogen of periodontitis and forms a biofilm with multi-species bacteria in oral cavity. Lipopolysaccharide is a powerful immunostimulator and induces inflammation and shock. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of T. forsythia LPS in its co-cultivation with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Porphyromonas gingivalis. T. forsythia was co-cultured in the presence and absence of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and then T. forsythia LPS was extracted. The extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and NF-κB reporter CHO cell lines. THP-1 cells were treated with the LPS and evaluated induction of cytokine expression by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. For analysis of the bioactivity of T. forsythia LPS, the binding assay on LPS-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 was processed. The extracts did not contaminate other molecules except LPS and showed TLR4 agonists. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower level of induction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression than single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum in the conditions of human serum. However, the three T. forsythia LPS did not show difference of cytokine induction in the serum free conditions. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower affinity to LBP and CD14 as binding site of O-antigen and attached at a lower level to THP-1 cells compared to single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum. The virulence of T. forsythia LPS was decreased by co-culturing with P. gingivalis and their affinity to LBP and CD14 was reduced, which may due to modification of O-antigen chain by P. gingivalis.

  14. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  15. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  16. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in benign gastric ulcers in a cohort of Sri Lankan patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijetunge, S; Kotakadeniya, R; Noordeen, F; Buharideen, S M; Samarasinghe, B; Dharmapala, A; Galketiya, K B

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence is decreasing globally and prevalence of non H. pylori gastric ulcers is increasing. The following study was conducted to assess the prevalence of H. pylori in benign gastric ulcers in a sample of Sri Lankan patients. This was a cross-sectional study of 59 dyspeptic patients with benign gastric ulcers. Multiple endoscopic gastric biopsies were obtained and histology, immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction were performed for H. pylori detection. An immunochromatography assay was performed to detect blood anti H. pylori antibodies. Four (6.8%) were positive for H. pylori. Therefore, it is likely that most benign gastric ulcers are of non-H. pylori aetiology.

  18. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  19. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  20. Helicobacter pylori and gastric or duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, treatment of the infection improves healing and prevents complications and recurrences. The drug regimen generally consists of a high-dose proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole plus antibiotics. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we conducted a review of the literature in order to determine the standard empirical antibiotic regimen for H. pylori infection in adults with gastric or duodenal ulcer in France. In 2015, due to an increase in H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, a 7-day course of the PPI + clarithromycin + amoxicillin combination is effective in only about 70% of cases. A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of trials involving thousands of patients suggests that prolonging treatment with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin or a PPI + amoxicillin + metronidazole to 10 or 14 days improves the rate of H. pylori eradication by 5% to 10%. A metanalysis of seven trials including a total of about 1000 patients showed that combination therapy with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days eradicates H. pylori in about 90% of cases, compared to about 80% of cases with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin given for 7 days. Sequential treatment with amoxicillin for 5 days, followed by clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days, has also been tested in thousands of patients. Efficacy and adverse effects were similar to those observed when the same antibiotics were taken simultaneously for 5 days. In randomised trials, replacing clarithromycin or amoxicillin with a fluoroquinolone yielded conflicting results. In 2009, nearly 20% of H. pylori isolates were resistant to levofloxacin in France. Tetracycline has only been evaluated in combination with bismuth. The few available data on doxycycline suggest that its efficacy is similar to that of tetracycline. A fixed-dose combination of bismuth subcitrate potassium + metronidazole

  1. Anti-CagA positivity in duodenal ulcer and functional dyspepsia patients infected with Helicobacter pylori and its effect on the outcome of eradication treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Nazlıgül

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: CagA positive H. pylori strains are considered to be more virulent than other strains. In this study, we aimed to investigate the rate of CagA positivity in duodenal ulcer (DU and functional dyspepsia (FD, and its effect on H. pylori eradication response.Materials and methods: The study was performed on H. pylori positive 60 patients with DU and 50 patients with FD, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. H. pylori infection was identified by histology. All patients received a quadriple therapy consisted of esomeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., colloidal bismuth subcitrate 600 mg b.i.d., tetracycline 500 mg q.i.d. and metronidazole 500 mg t.i.d. for 7 days. H.pylori status was rechecked using C14-urea breath test 6 weeks after the end of treatment to confirm cure. Specific IgG antibodies for CagA status were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Results: CagA positivities in the patients with DU and FD were calculated respectivily 70% and 68% (P>0.05. H. pylori was eradicated in 85.5% of the patients infected with CagA (+ strains, in 50% of those infected with CagA (- strains (P=0.001. The eradication rates were 95.2% and 55.6% in CagA positive and negative DU subgroups (P=0.001, and 73.5% and 43.8% in CagA positive and negative FD subgroups (P=0.04.Conclusion: CagA positivities were not different in duodenal ulcer and functional dyspepsia. CagA (+ strains was susceptible to the eradication treatment. The titres of serum anti-CagA antibodies may be used in the prediction of eradication outcome, and the modification of eradication therapy.

  2. Systems analysis of metabolism in Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric diseases, such as gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinomas. Despite more than half of the global population being infected with this bacterium, not all individuals will develop clinical symptoms. Nevertheless, its association with gastric cancer, the high infection rate, as well as the failures on eradication ...

  3. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Karimi; Koroush Fakhimi Derakhshan; Farid Imanzadeh; Mohamad Rezaei; Zahra Cavoshzadeh; Saeid Maham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and ...

  4. H. PYLORI AND GASTROPATHY IN DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Koval V. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 11 years the prevalence of diabetes in Ukraine has increased rapidly – from 1.8 to 2.8%. This especially concerns children and adolescents. The progression and compensation of the diabetes depend on many factors. In today’s medical literature the role of Helicobacter рylori in the development and progression of diabetic gastroparesis is widely discussed. In addition, the issue of the necessity and feasibility of H. Pylori eradication in these patients is ...

  5. Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori and Acid Peptic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sigmund Kradjen; Philip Sherman

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacteria implicated as a cause of histological gastritis, contributing to peptic ulcer disease and perhaps playing a role in gastric cancer in humans. The organism is found worldwide; the prevalence of infection increases with age; and colonization probably persists for life. Diagnostic approaches chat have been used include tissue stains, culture of stomach biopsy specimens, labelled-urea breath tests and serology. It is ...

  6. [Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Zaterka, Schlioma

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one the five main topics of the meeting: H. pylori and dyspepsia, H. pylori and NSAIDs, H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, H. pylori treatment, and H. pylori retreatment. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. The results were presented during a special session on the VI Brazilian Week of Digestive System, in Recife, PE (October 2004), and this publication represents the summary of the main recommendations and conclusions emerged from the meeting.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and typhoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Verspaget, H.W.; Ali, S.; Visser, L.G.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the association between typhoid fever and Helicobacter pylori infection, as the latter microorganism may influence gastric acid secretion and consequently increase susceptibility to Salmonella typhi infection. Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibody titres (ELISA) and gastrin concentration

  8. Helicobacter pylori and cancer among adults in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens Marilyn

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Data from Africa on infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are sparse. Therefore, as part of an epidemiological study of cancer in Uganda, we investigated the prevalence and determinants of antibodies against H. pylori among 854 people with different cancer types and benign tumours. Patients were recruited from hospitals in Kampala, Uganda, interviewed about various demographic and lifestyle factors and tested for antibodies against H. pylori. In all patients combined, excluding those with stomach cancer (which has been associated with H. pylori infection, the prevalence of antibodies was 87% (723/833 overall, but declined with increasing age (p = 0.02 and was lower among people who were HIV seropositive compared to seronegative (p H. pylori antibodies (odds ratio 0.8, 95% confidence intervals 0.2–2.9, p = 0.7; estimated using all other patients as controls, with adjustment for age, sex and HIV serostatus. No other cancer site or type was significantly associated with anti-H. pylori antibodies. The prevalence of H. pylori reported here is broadly in accord with results from other developing countries, although the determinants of infection and its' role in the aetiology of gastric cancer in Uganda remain unclear.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gerrits (Monique)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAn estimated 4 to 5 million individuals in the Netherlands are actively infected with Helicobacter pylori. Eradication of this bacterium becomes more difficult as the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide. Most H. pylori infections are now diagnosed by non-invasi

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection and typhoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Verspaget, H.W.; Ali, S.; Visser, L.G.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the association between typhoid fever and Helicobacter pylori infection, as the latter microorganism may influence gastric acid secretion and consequently increase susceptibility to Salmonella typhi infection. Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibody titres (ELISA) and gastrin concentration

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Céu; Seruca, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...

  12. Helicobacter pylori in out-patients of a general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G; Winz, T

    1997-01-01

    Data on prevalence and determinants of Helicobacter pylori infection in well-defined populations are scarce. We investigated the prevalence and determinants of active H. pylori infection in a population of out-patients attending a general practitioner in Southern Germany. Infection status...

  13. Epidemiology of the Antibiotic Resistance of Helicobacter pylori in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo A Fallone

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rate of Helicobacter pylori resistance to antibiotics determines the cure rate of treatment regimens containing such antibiotics. AIMS: To review the literature to determine the rates of H pylori resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin in Canada, and whether these rates vary in different regions of Canada.

  14. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in female Vietnamese immigrants to Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Jung Baik; Sun Young Yi; Hye Sook Park; Bo Hyun Park

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its relationship to nutritional factors in ^emale Vietnamese immigrants to Korea.METHODS: A total of 390 female immigrants from Vietnam and 206 Korean male spouses participated in the study. Blood samples from 321 female immigrants and 201 Korean male spouses were analyzed for H. pylori antibodies. Data on age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking status, dietary nutritional factors and gastrointestinal symptoms were collected using questionnaires. The daily intakes of the following nutrients were estimated: energy, protein, niacin, lipid, fiber, calcium, iron, sodium, potassium, zinc, folate, cholesterol, and vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, C and E.RESULTS: The prevalence of H. pylori positivity was lower in the immigrants than in age-matched Korean females (55.7% vs 71.4%, respectively; P < 0.0001) and the domestic population of Vietnam. The prevalence of H. pylori positivity among married couples was 31.7% for both spouses. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of smoking, amount of alcohol consumed, or nutritional factors between the H. pylori-positive and negative groups.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H. pylori positivity was lower among female Vietnamese immigrants than among Korean females. Nutritional factors did not differ between the H. pylori-positive and negative groups.

  15. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in HIV-infected patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Daniel T; Morgan, Christopher J; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    The risk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are different: H. pylori is transmitted by gastro- or fecal-oral routes and is associated with low socioeconomic conditions, while HIV is transmitted through sexual intercourse, infected body fluids, and transplacentally. If the host responses to these infections were independent, the prevalence of H. pylori should be similar in HIV-infected and non-infected patients. Yet, several studies have detected a lower prevalence of H. pylori in patients with HIV infection, whereas other studies found either no differences or greater rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-positive subjects. To review studies that addressed the issue of these two simultaneous infections and attempt to determine whether reliable conclusions can be drawn from this corpus of often contrasting evidence. Electronic literature search for relevant publications, followed by manual search of additional citations from extracted articles. The initial search yielded 44 publications; after excluding case reports, reviews, narrowly focused articles, and duplicate reports, there remained 29 articles, which are the corpus of this review. With one exception, all studies reported higher rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-negative subjects. Five studies also examined the CD4 lymphocyte counts and found an inverse correlation between the degree of immunosuppression and the prevalence of active H. pylori infection. Current evidence suggests that it is likely that H. pylori needs a functional immune system to successfully and persistently colonize the human gastric mucosa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: Relationship with the gastric infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available. PMID:25110422

  17. Flocculation of venereal disease research laboratory reagent by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K D; von Recklinghausen, G; Heintschel von Heinegg, E; Ansorg, R

    1991-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains flocculated with Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) reagent in a glass slide test. Other pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains were nonreactive. The specific VDRL reaction property of Helicobacter pylori indicates an affinity of the cells for lipoidal substances, and can be used as a diagnostic aid for species identification.

  18. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: relationship with the gastric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-08-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available.

  19. Natural maternal transmission of H pylori in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Uk Lee; Okjin Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate maternal H pylori infection status to determine the potential of maternal transmission.METHODS: In the present study, we examined these issues in an experimental murine model, which is a Mongolian gerbil model that has been reported as an optimal laboratory animal model to study H pylori.Pregnant Mongolian gerbils, infected experimentally with H pylori, were divided into as four groups. Following the experimental design, the stomachs of the mother and litters were isolated and assessed for transmission of H pylori at the prenatal period, parturition day, 1-wk old and 3-wk old respectively. Bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to examine the presence of transmitted H pylori.RESULTS: All litters showed no transmission of H pylori during pregnancy and at parturition day. However, they revealed 33.3% and 69.6% at 1-wk and 3-wk of age respectively by PCR.CONCLUSION: These results suggested that vertical infection during the prenatal period or delivery procedure is unlikely as a route of mother-to-child H pylori infection.It may be that H pylori is acquired through breastfeeding, contaminated saliva and fecal-oral transmission during co-habitation.

  20. RECOVERY OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI FROM WATER BY IMMUNOMAGNETIC CAPTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A few reports have been written stating that H. pylori can be found in waters. However, detection and identification of H. pylori from water samples remains a very difficult task. One method that seems to work successfully is immunomagnetic capture. Water samples were concentr...

  1. What constitutes an Arabian Helicobacter pylori? Lessons from comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narender; Albert, M John; Al Abkal, Hanan; Siddique, Iqbal; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori, the human gastric pathogen, causes a variety of gastric diseases ranging from mild gastritis to gastric cancer. While the studies on H. pylori are dominated by those based on either East Asian or Western strains, information regarding H. pylori strains prevalent in the Middle East remains scarce. Therefore, we carried out whole-genome sequencing and comparative analysis of three H. pylori strains isolated from three native Arab, Kuwaiti patients. H. pylori strains were sequenced using Illumina platform. The sequence reads were filtered and draft genomes were assembled and annotated. Various pathogenicity-associated regions and phages present within the genomes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out to determine the genetic relatedness of Kuwaiti strains to various lineages of H. pylori. The core genome content and virulence-related genes were analyzed to assess the pathogenic potential. The three genomes clustered along with HpEurope strains in the phylogenetic tree comprising various H. pylori lineages. A total of 1187 genes spread among various functional classes were identified in the core genome analysis. The three genomes possessed a complete cagPAI and also retained most of the known outer membrane proteins as well as virulence-related genes. The cagA gene in all three strains consisted of an AB-C type EPIYA motif. The comparative genomic analysis of Kuwaiti H. pylori strains revealed a European ancestry and a high pathogenic potential. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Public Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Khean-Lee; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Shiota, Seiji; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes studies on the epidemiology and public health implications of Helicobacter pylori published in peer-reviewed journals from April 2010 through March 2011. Prevalence rates vary widely between different geographical regions and ethnic groups. An interesting study from the USA identified the degree of African ancestry as an independent predictor of H. pylori infection. Two studies have demonstrated early childhood as the period of transmission of infection and identified an infected sibling as an important risk factor. An oral–oral route of spread has been substantiated with several studies showing the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity. Studies have shown the presence of H. pylori in drinking water and the role of poor living conditions and sanitation in H. pylori infection, supporting an oral–fecal route of spread. Screening for H. pylori as a gastric cancer prescreening strategy has been described in Japan, and the importance of H. pylori eradication as a gastric cancer–prevention strategy has now been further emphasized in Japanese guidelines. Two studies have shown a decrease in the burden of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer disease with H. pylori eradication. PMID:21896079

  3. SURVIVAL OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN A NATURAL FRESHWATER ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode by which Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of most gastric ulcers, is transmitted remains undetermined. Epidemiological evidence suggests these organisms are waterborne; however, H. pylori has rarely been grown from potential water sources. This may be due to th...

  4. The impact of Helicobacter pylori on atopic disorders in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); A.J. Vila (Anne J.); D. Caudri (Daan); C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); G.I. Perez; M.J. Blaser (Martin J.); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Western populations has steadily decreased. This has been suggested as one of the factors involved in the recent increase of asthma and allergy. Some studies have reported a negative association between H. pylori and asthma and

  5. RECOVERY OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI FROM WATER BY IMMUNOMAGNETIC CAPTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A few reports have been written stating that H. pylori can be found in waters. However, detection and identification of H. pylori from water samples remains a very difficult task. One method that seems to work successfully is immunomagnetic capture. Water samples were concentr...

  6. SURVIVAL OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN A NATURAL FRESHWATER ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode by which Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of most gastric ulcers, is transmitted remains undetermined. Epidemiological evidence suggests these organisms are waterborne; however, H. pylori has rarely been grown from potential water sources. This may be due to th...

  7. Biofilm formation enhances Helicobacter pylori survivability in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chow Goon; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Ho, Bow

    2017-04-01

    To date, the exact route and mode of transmission of Helicobacter pylori remains elusive. The detection of H. pylori in food using molecular approaches has led us to postulate that the gastric pathogen may survive in the extragastric environment for an extended period. In this study, we show that H. pylori prolongs its survival by forming biofilm and micro-colonies on vegetables. The biofilm forming capability of H. pylori is both strain and vegetable dependent. H. pylori strains were classified into high and low biofilm formers based on their highest relative biofilm units (BU). High biofilm formers survived longer on vegetables compared to low biofilm formers. The bacteria survived better on cabbage compared to other vegetables tested. In addition, images captured on scanning electron and confocal laser scanning microscopes revealed that the bacteria were able to form biofilm and reside as micro-colonies on vegetable surfaces, strengthening the notion of possible survival of H. pylori on vegetables for an extended period of time. Taken together, the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm on vegetables (a common food source for human) potentially plays an important role in its survival, serving as a mode of transmission of H. pylori in the extragastric environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. OVERVIEW: DISINFECTION OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI AND AEROMONAS SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori and Aeromonas hydrophila are contaminants listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL).The sensitivity of H. pylori to chlorine and of Aeromonas spp. to inactivation by free chlorine, chloramine and ultraviolet (UV) was examined. Selective and...

  9. Validation of string test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velapatiño, Billie; Balqui, Jacqueline; Gilman, Robert H; Bussalleu, Alejandro; Quino, Willi; Finger, S Alison; Santivañez, Livia; Herrera, Phabiola; Piscoya, Alejandro; Valdivia, Jose; Cok, Jaime; Berg, Douglas E

    2006-03-01

    The method of recovering Helicobacter pylori DNA or viable cells absorbed on a string that a person has swallowed and that is retrieved an hour later (string test) should be a useful alternative to traditional analysis of cells or DNA obtained by endoscopy, which is invasive, uncomfortable, relatively costly, and ill-suited for community-based and pediatric studies. Here we assayed the sensitivity and validity of the string test versus conventional endoscopic biopsy for detecting and analyzing H. pylori infection. Forty-four people with gastric complaints were studied using both H. pylori culture and urease gene (ureB) PCR. H. pylori organisms cultured from strings and biopsy specimens from the same patients were fingerprinted by the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Biopsy sections were also hematoxylin and eosin and silver stained for H. pylori detection. H. pylori was cultured from 80% of strings and detected by PCR from 91% of strings from participants whose biopsies had been H. pylori positive by culture, PCR, and/or histology. Strains recovered from strings and biopsy specimens yielded identical or closely related RAPD profiles in each of the 24 cases tested. We conclude that the string test is a useful method for H. pylori recovery and analysis when relatively noninvasive procedures are needed.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Study of Helicobacter pylori Urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkara, Mona S; Ucisik, Melek N; Weaver, Michael N; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-05-13

    Helicobacter pylori have been implicated in an array of gastrointestinal disorders including, but not limited to, gastric and duodenal ulcers and adenocarcinoma. This bacterium utilizes an enzyme, urease, to produce copious amounts of ammonia through urea hydrolysis in order to survive the harsh acidic conditions of the stomach. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on the H. pylori urease enzyme have been employed in order to study structural features of this enzyme that may shed light on the hydrolysis mechanism. A total of 400 ns of MD simulation time were collected and analyzed in this study. A wide-open flap state previously observed in MD simulations on Klebsiella aerogenes [Roberts et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2012, 134, 9934] urease has been identified in the H. pylori enzyme that has yet to be experimentally observed. Critical distances between residues on the flap, contact points in the closed state, and the separation between the active site Ni(2+) ions and the critical histidine α322 residue were used to characterize flap motion. An additional flap in the active site was elaborated upon that we postulate may serve as an exit conduit for hydrolysis products. Finally we discuss the internal hollow cavity and present analysis of the distribution of sodium ions over the course of the simulation.

  11. Exploring alternative treatments for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy Itzel; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos Felipe; Romero, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a successful pathogen that can persist in the stomach of an infected person for their entire life. It provokes chronic gastric inflammation that leads to the development of serious gastric diseases such as peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. It is known that these ailments can be avoided if the infection by the bacteria can be prevented or eradicated. Currently, numerous antibiotic-based therapies are available. However, these therapies have several inherent problems, including the appearance of resistance to the antibiotics used and associated adverse effects, the risk of re-infection and the high cost of antibiotic therapy. The delay in developing a vaccine to prevent or eradicate the infection has furthered research into new therapeutic approaches. This review summarises the most relevant recent studies on vaccine development and new treatments using natural resources such as plants, probiotics and nutraceuticals. In addition, novel alternatives based on microorganisms, peptides, polysaccharides, and intragastric violet light irradiation are presented. Alternative therapies have not been effective in eradicating the bacteria but have been shown to maintain low bacterial levels. Nevertheless, some of them are useful in preventing the adverse effects of antibiotics, modulating the immune response, gastroprotection, and the general promotion of health. Therefore, those agents can be used as adjuvants of allopathic anti-H. pylori eradication therapy. PMID:24587621

  12. Helicobacter spp. other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Cinthia G; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2010-09-01

    Over the last 12 months, new insights into the association of non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacters with a range of human diseases in children and adults, including hepatobiliary disease, Crohn's disease, sepsis, and gastric disease were published. Studies investigating the presence of non-H. pylori Helicobacters in domestic animals reinforce previous findings that cats and dogs harbor gastric Helicobacter species and thus may be an important source of these organisms in humans. The confounding effect of enterohepatic Helicobacters on the outcome of biomedical research was investigated in several studies and led to recommendations that animals should be screened prior to performing experiments. A number of important and novel investigations regarding pathogenic mechanisms and immune responses to enterohepatic Helicobacters were conducted. Genomic advances in non-H. pylori Helicobacters included description of the complete genome of Helicobacter canadensis, delineation of two Helicobacter bilis genomospecies, and identification of a novel cis-regulatory RNA. New insights concerning growth conditions, biochemical characterization, and the effect of certain dietary compounds on Helicobacter spp. have also been reported. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Rescue Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection 2012

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    Javier P. Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. After 30 years of experience in H. pylori treatment, however, the ideal regimen to treat this infection has still to be found. Nowadays, apart from having to know well first-line eradication regimens, we must also be prepared to face treatment failures. In designing a treatment strategy, we should not only focus on the results of primary therapy alone but also on the final—overall—eradication rate. The choice of a “rescue” treatment depends on which treatment is used initially. If a first-line clarithromycin-based regimen was used, a second-line metronidazole-based treatment (quadruple therapy may be used afterwards, and then a levofloxacin-based combination would be a third-line “rescue” option. Alternatively, it has recently been suggested that levofloxacin-based “rescue” therapy constitutes an encouraging 2nd-line strategy, representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure, with the advantage of efficacy, simplicity and safety. In this case, quadruple regimen may be reserved as a 3rd-line “rescue” option. Even after two consecutive failures, several studies have demonstrated that H. pylori eradication can finally be achieved in almost all patients if several “rescue” therapies are consecutively given.

  14. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

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    Abdullah Karimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causesof childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood.Methods: This cross-sectionalstudy recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group and 98 healthy (control group individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and H. pyloriinfection was compared between the two groups according to the urea breath test results.Results:Urea breath test was positive in 18 asthmatic (18.36 and 23 (23.36 healthy subjects but was not significantly different between the case and controls(p=0.380.Furtheranalysis in the asthmatic group revealed association ofH. pyloriinfection withage (p<0.001 and duration of asthma (p=0.010. However, no significant correlation was found between sex, severity of asthma, controledasthma or abnormal pulmonary function testswith H. pyloriinfection (p= 0.804, 0.512 ,0.854 and 0.292, respectively.Conclusion:Given the results of the study, H. pylori infection was not significantly differentbetween asthmatic and healthy children.In asthmatic patients, there wasnosignificant association between H.pyloriinfection andsex,severity of disease, control status of disease andnormal or abnormal pulmonary function tests.H. Pylori infection had a significant association withincreasing age and duration of asthma.

  15. H pylori recurrence after successful eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaron Niv

    2008-01-01

    Recurrence of H pylori after eradication is rare in developed countries and more frequent in developing countries.Recrudescence(recolonization of the same strain within 12 mo after eradication)rather than reinfection(colonization with a new strain,more than 12 mo after eradication)is considered to be responsiblefor most of the cases.This observation was confirmed only in developed countries,while in developing countries a recent meta-analysis demonstrated a high rate of reinfection.The proportion of H pylori annual recurrence was 2.67% and 13.00% in developed and developing countries,respectively.Nested meta-analysis(only cases with a longer follow-up and a negative 13CUBT a year after eradication)revealed annual recurrence rate of 1.45%[relative risk(RR),0.54]and 12.00%(RR,0.92)in developed and developing countries,respectively.These findings support the notion that in developed countries many cases of recurrence are due to recrudescence within the first year after eradication,with a 46% drop in the recurrence rate after the first year post eradication,while in developing countries reinfection is more pronounced,and continue at the same rate since eradication.A different approach for follow-up after H pylori eradication is probably needed in patients of developing countries,since reinfection is highly prevalent.

  16. Diagnosis and epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier; Ramírez Lázaro, María-José; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2013-09-01

    A limited amount of new information was published in the field of diagnosis and epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori this last year. Besides some improvement in current tests, it is interesting to note the attempts to identify severe disease, for example gastric cancer, by breath analysis using nanomaterial-based sensors. In contrast, the predictive value for gastric cancer and atrophy of pepsinogen determinations was found inadequate. Prevalence studies of H. pylori infection have been carried out in adults and children around the world in the general population but also in specific communities. The usual risk factors were found. In addition, a Japanese study highlighted the role of grandmothers in the familial transmission of H. pylori. A study showed that the infection may not always readily establish itself in children, given the number of transient infections observed. It was also noted that after eradication, a first-year relapse is likely to be a recurrence of the previous infection, while later on it is probably a reinfection with a new strain.

  17. Serum Prohepcidin Levels in Helicobacter Pylori Infected Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Young; Song, Eun Young; Yun, Yeo Min; Yoon, So Young; Cho, Yo Han; Kim, Sung-Yong; Lee, Mark Hong

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection appears to subvert the human iron regulatory mechanism and thus upregulates hepcidin, resulting in unexplained iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). We evaluated serum prohepcidin levels before and after eradication of H. pylori in IDA patients to assess whether it plays a role in IDA related to H. pylori infection. Methods Subjects diagnosed with unexplained IDA underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy to confirm H. pylori i...

  18. A Unique Feature of Iron Loss via Close Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Host Erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiwei Wang; Lijuan Zhang; Zhi Guo; Lei Liu; Jun Ji; Jianian Zhang; Xuehua Chen; Bingya Liu; Jun Zhang(UT Austin); Qiulan Ding; Xuefeng Wang; Wei Zhao; Zhenggang Zhu; Yingyan Yu

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is an extra-stomach disease experienced in H. pylori carriers. Individuals with type A blood are more prone to suffering from H. pylori infection than other individuals. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying H. pylori-associated anemia, we collected erythrocytes from A, B, O, and AB blood donors and analyzed morphology, the number of erythrocytes with H. pylori colonies attached to them, and iron contents in erythrocytes and H. pylori (NCTC11637 and SS1 strains...

  19. Evolution in an oncogenic bacterial species with extreme genome plasticity: Helicobacter pylori East Asian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handa Naofumi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of Helicobacter pylori, an oncogenic bacterium in the human stomach, rapidly evolves and shows wide geographical divergence. The high incidence of stomach cancer in East Asia might be related to bacterial genotype. We used newly developed comparative methods to follow the evolution of East Asian H. pylori genomes using 20 complete genome sequences from Japanese, Korean, Amerind, European, and West African strains. Results A phylogenetic tree of concatenated well-defined core genes supported divergence of the East Asian lineage (hspEAsia; Japanese and Korean from the European lineage ancestor, and then from the Amerind lineage ancestor. Phylogenetic profiling revealed a large difference in the repertoire of outer membrane proteins (including oipA, hopMN, babABC, sabAB and vacA-2 through gene loss, gain, and mutation. All known functions associated with molybdenum, a rare element essential to nearly all organisms that catalyzes two-electron-transfer oxidation-reduction reactions, appeared to be inactivated. Two pathways linking acetyl~CoA and acetate appeared intact in some Japanese strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed greater divergence between the East Asian (hspEAsia and the European (hpEurope genomes in proteins in host interaction, specifically virulence factors (tipα, outer membrane proteins, and lipopolysaccharide synthesis (human Lewis antigen mimicry enzymes. Divergence was also seen in proteins in electron transfer and translation fidelity (miaA, tilS, a DNA recombinase/exonuclease that recognizes genome identity (addA, and DNA/RNA hybrid nucleases (rnhAB. Positively selected amino acid changes between hspEAsia and hpEurope were mapped to products of cagA, vacA, homC (outer membrane protein, sotB (sugar transport, and a translation fidelity factor (miaA. Large divergence was seen in genes related to antibiotics: frxA (metronidazole resistance, def (peptide deformylase, drug target, and ftsA (actin

  20. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted in 22 identified studies through Chinese literature searching which were published after 1995 and evaluated diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Results: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) had the best performance with diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 6.7 (5.5-7.8), followed by 13C urea breath test and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) quantitative serological test, with DOR being 6.4 (5.4-7.4) and 4.5 (3.8-5.2), respectively. Conclusion: Non-invasive tests are the appropriate methods for screening H. pylori infection, whereas invasive tests are the best methods for ascertaining the suspected patients.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and endocrine disorders: Is there a link?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos X Papamichael; Garyphallia Papaioannou; Helen Karga; Anastasios Roussos; Gerassimos J Mantzaris

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is a leading world-wide infectious disease as it affects more than half of the world population and causes chronic gastritis,peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies.The infection elicits a chronic cellular inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa.However,the effects of this local inflammation may not be confined solely to the digestive tract but may spread to involve extraintestinal tissues and/or organs.Indeed,H pylori infection has been epidemiologically linked to extra-digestive conditions and diseases.In this context,it has been speculated that H pylori infection may be responsible for various endocrine disorders,such as autoimmune thyroid diseases,diabetes mellitus,dyslipidemia,obesity,osteoporosis and primary hyperparathyroidism.This is a review of the relationship between H pylori infection and these endocrine disorders.

  2. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Tsukamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents.

  3. NOD1-Mediated Mucosal Host Defense against Helicobacter pylori

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    Tomohiro Watanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the stomach with Helicobacter pylori is an important risk factor for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Although it has been well established that persistent colonization by H. pylori is associated with adaptive Th1 responses, the innate immune responses leading to these Th1 responses are poorly defined. Recent studies have shown that the activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 in gastric epithelial cells plays an important role in innate immune responses against H. pylori. The detection of H. pylori-derived ligands by cytosolic NOD1 induces several host defense factors, including antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and chemokines. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanisms by which NOD1 contributes to mucosal host defense against H. pylori infection of the stomach.

  4. Clinical Profile in H. Pylori Positive Patients in Jammu

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    Rajesh Kumar, G. Bano, B. Kapoor, Sunil Sharma*, Yudhvir Gupta**

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective one year, study enrolled 265 symptomatic patients of acid peptic disease, out of which 92patients were found H. pylori positive (by biopsy urease test and histopathological test giving a prevalence of34.71% . Among H. pylori positive patients, 64.13% were males and 35.86% were females. Age wise distributionshowed maximum prevalence of H. pylori infection in the age group of 36-45 years and minimum in the age group of66-75 years. Pain upper abdomen was the most frequent symptom in 49 (54.20% patients followed by fullness aftermeals and retrosternal burning. Endoscopic and histopathological examination of H. pylori positive patients revealedchronic superficial gastritis in 87 (94.56% patients followed by duodenitis in 11 (11.95% and oesophagitis 8 (8.6%.All the positive patients were given anti-H. pylori treatment.

  5. ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES OF Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens

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    L .D. Varbanets

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of lipopolysaccharides of two strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens to inhibit in vitro the reproduction of human viruses: influenza A/FM/1/47 (H1N1, herpes simplex type 2 and bovine diarrhea, which is used as a model of hepatitis C virus, as well as to suppress hepatitis C virus production in model system of cells transfected with cDNA of this virus. It has been established that for both lipopolysaccharides in three types of cultures (MDCK, Vero and MDBK the toxicity is not manifested even in a concentration of 100.0 μg/ml, and decreasing in infectious virus titer more than by 2.0 lg TCD50 (ED99 was already achieved at concentrations of 1.55 mg/ml. Selectivity indexes determination of lipopolysaccharides preparations against the influenza A/FM/1/47 (H1N1 virus, herpes simplex virus type 2 and bovine diarrhea virus shows that lipopolysaccharides of P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens UCM B-306 and UCM B-111 are effective inhibitors of investigated viruses reproduction: selectivity index is at least 64. In the model of Jurkat cells transfected with human hepatitis C virus cDNA, viral RNA loading was determined in cells treated with lipopolysaccharides of P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens. The results of the studies indicate that when lipopolysaccharides of both strains are administered, the production of the hepatitis C virus is completely inhibited.

  6. The accuracy of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test in diagnosing H-pylori in treated and untreated patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arents, NL; van Zwet, AA; Thijs, JC; de Jong, A; Pool, MO; Kleibeuker, JH

    Objective and design To evaluate the performance of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA test) in detecting H. pylori infection and monitoring the effect of treatment. This was done in two separate studies using either a biopsy or the C-13-urea breath test based 'gold standard' (in

  7. Epidemiological study on food intake and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyonaga, A; Okamatsu, H; Sasaki, K; Kimura, H; Saito, T; Shimizu, S; Fukuizumi, K; Tsuruta, O; Tanikawa, K; Sata, M

    2000-01-01

    We conducted an epidemiological study to investigate the relation of food intake to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in an area endemic for H. pylori. In this study, 365 subjects, 104 men and 261 women, were randomly selected from 7,389 adult (over age 20) inhabitants of town A, Japan. The prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) class antibody to H. pylori (anti-H. pylori) was 83.7% and the prevalence of anti-H. pylori increased with age significantly (P gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer and gastric cancer tended to have a higher anti-H. pylori positive ratio (93.5%) than those without (81.0%). But there was no relationship between anti-H. pylori prevalence and sex, blood type, smoking or drinking habits. Daily intake of foods by food groups, nutrients and the concentrations of serum ingredients were compared between 37 anti-H. pylori-positive and 40 negative subjects selected from 365 inhabitants by matching up according to sex and age. The daily intake of cereals, potatoes and starches, and milks tended to be higher in positive than negative subjects, while the daily intake of algae and tea appeared to be a little higher in negative than in positive subjects. The daily zinc intake of antibody-positive subjects was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in antibody negative subjects. On the other hand, the daily iron intake in negative subjects was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in positive subjects. The serum concentrations of copper, zinc, and vitamin E tended to be higher in positive than negative subjects. But there were no significant differences in serum ingredients concentrations between antibody negative and positive subjects. Our findings suggest that iron and zinc intakes may effect on H. pylori infection.

  8. Helicobacter pylori impairs murine dendritic cell responses to infection.

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    Ya-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric malignancies, is generally viewed as an extracellular microorganism. Here, we show that H. pylori replicates in murine bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (BMDCs within autophagosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A 10-fold increase of CFU is found between 2 h and 6 h p.i. in H. pylori-infected BMDCs. Autophagy is induced around the bacterium and participates at late time points of infection for the clearance of intracellular H. pylori. As a consequence of infection, LC3, LAMP1 and MHC class II molecules are retained within the H. pylori-containing vacuoles and export of MHC class II molecules to cell surface is blocked. However, formalin-fixed H. pylori still maintain this inhibitory activity in BMDC derived from wild type mice, but not in from either TLR4 or TLR2-deficient mice, suggesting the involvement of H. pylori-LPS in this process. TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 expression was also modulated upon infection showing a TLR2-specific dependent IL-10 secretion. No IL-12 was detected favoring the hypothesis of a down modulation of DC functions during H. pylori infection. Furthermore, antigen-specific T cells proliferation was also impaired upon infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori can infect and replicate in BMDCs and thereby affects DC-mediated immune responses. The implication of this new finding is discussed for the biological life cycle of H. pylori in the host.

  9. Helicobacter pylori arginase mutant colonizes arginase Ⅱ knockout mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songhee H Kim; Melanie L Langford; Jean-Luc Boucher; Traci L Testerman; David J McGee

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of host and bacterial argi-nases in the colonization of mice by Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori).METHODS: H. Pylori produces a very powerful urease that hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which neutralizes acid. Urease is absolutely essential to H. Pylori pathogenesis; therefore, the urea substrate must be in ample supply for urease to work efficiently. The urea substrate is most likely provided by arginase activity, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. Previous work has demonstrated that H. Pylori arginase is surprisingly not required for colonization of wild-type mice. Hence, another in vivo source of the critical urea substrate must exist. We hypothesized that the urea source was provided by host arginase Ⅱ, since this enzyme is expressed in the stomach, and H. Pylori has previously been shown to induce the expres-sion of murine gastric arginase Ⅱ. To test this hypoth-esis, wild-type and arginase (rocF) mutant H. Pylori strain SS1 were inoculated into arginase Ⅱ knockout mice. RESULTS: Surprisingly, both the wild-type and rocF mutant bacteria still colonized arginase Ⅱ knock-out mice. Moreover, feeding arginase Ⅱ knockout mice the host arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC), while inhibiting > 50% of the host arginase Ⅰactivity in several tissues, did not block the ability of the rocF mutant H. Pylori to colonize. In con-trast, BEC poorly inhibited H. Pylori arginase activity. CONCLUSION: The in vivo source for the essential urea utilized by H. Pylori urease is neither bacterial arginase nor host arginase Ⅱ; instead, either residual host arginase Ⅰor agmatinase is probably responsible.

  10. Strategies used by helicobacter pylori to establish persistent infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative and motile bacterium that colonizes the hostile microniche of the human stomach, then persists for the host’s entire life, if not effectively treated. Clinically, H. pylori plays a causative role in the development of a wide spectrum of diseases including chronic active gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Due to the global distribution of H. pylori, it is no exaggeration to conclude that smart strategies are contributing to adaptation of the bacterium to its permanent host. Thirty-four years after the discovery of this bacterium, there are still many unanswered questions. For example, which strategies help the bacterium to survive in this inhospitable microniche? This question is slightly easier to answer if we presume the same clinical concept for both persistent infection and disease. Understanding the mechanisms governing H. pylori persistence will improve identification of the increased risk of diseases such as gastric cancer in patients infected with this bacterium. A well-defined and long-term equilibrium between the human host and H. pylori allows bacterial persistence in the gastric microniche; although this coexistence leads to a high risk of severe diseases such as gastric cancer. To escape the bactericidal activity of stomach acid, H. pylori secretes large amounts of surface-associated and cytosolic urease. The potential to avoid acidic conditions and immune evasion are discussed in order to explain the persistence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric mucosa, and data on bacterial genetic diversity are included. Information on the mechanisms related to H. pylori persistence can also provide the direction for future research concerning effective therapy and management of gastroduodenal disorders. The topics presented in the current review are important for elucidating the strategies used by H. pylori to help the bacterium

  11. Helicobacter pylori in Cholecystectomy Specimens-Morphological and Immunohistochemical Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Venkatarami; Jena, Amitabh; Gavini, Siva; Thota, Asha; Nandyala, Rukamangadha; Chowhan, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Current literature describes presence of H.pylori in various extra-gastric locations and its association with many diseases. Apart from the conventional location of gastric and duodenal mucosa, H.pylori have been isolated and cultured from gallbladder. Aim Analysis of cholecystectomy specimens to detect H.pylori by means of immunohistochemical staining. Materials and Methods There were a total of 118 cholecystectomy specimens received in the Department of Pathology in three months duration. We have performed immunostaining for H.pylori in 45 consecutive cases of cholecystectomy specimen. Clinical and other investigational information were retrieved from the medical records department. For each case, routine Haematoxylin and Eosin stain was studied. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was done using purified polyclonal Helicobacter pylori antiserum. Results Majority of the patients had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy for the presenting complaint of right hypochondrial pain. Multiple pigmented stones were present in majority (27/45) of them. Immunostain for H.pylori was positive in ten cases. Six of these cases had pigmented gall stones, two had stones not specified and in two of the cases there were no stones. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori is present in gall bladder and is commonly seen in association with stones. A more detailed study of cholecystectomy cases (both neoplastic and non-neoplastic) with serological, culture and molecular data of H.pylori is desirable to study the pathogenesis of cholecystitis, its association with gall stones and other gall bladder disorders. PMID:27437221

  12. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotype is a predominant determinant of immune response to Helicobacter pylori CagA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Alexander; Langner, Cosima; Schirrmeister, Wiebke; Habendorf, Wiebke; Weigt, Jochen; Venerito, Marino; Tammer, Ina; Schlüter, Dirk; Schlaermann, Philipp; Meyer, Thomas F; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-07-14

    To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA antibodies in H. pylori infected subjects and to identify potential histopathological and bacterial factors related to H. pylori CagA-immune response. Systematic data to H. pylori isolates, blood samples, gastric biopsies for histological and molecular analyses were available from 99 prospectively recruited subjects. Serological profile (anti-H. pylori, anti-CagA) was correlated with H. pylori isolates (cagA, EPIYA, vacA s/m genotype), histology (Sydney classification) and mucosal interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and protein expression. Selected H. pylori strains were assessed for H. pylori CagA protein expression and IL-8 induction in co-cultivation model with AGS cells. Thirty point three percent of microbiologically confirmed H. pylori infected patients were seropositive for CagA. Majority of H. pylori isolates were cagA gene positive (93.9%) with following vacA polymorphisms: 42.4% vacA s1m1, 23.2% s1m2 and 34.3% s2m2. Anti-CagA-IgG seropositivity was strongly associated with atrophic gastritis, increased mucosal inflammation according to the Sydney score, IL-8 and cagA mRNA expression. VacA s and m polymorphisms were the major determinants for positive (vacA s1m1) or negative (vacA s2m2) anti-CagA serological immune response, which also correlated with the in vitro inflammatory potential in AGS cells. In vitro co-cultivation of representative H. pylori strains with AGS cells confirmed functional CagA translocation, which showed only partial correlation with CagA seropositivity in patients, supporting vacA as major co-determinant of the immune response. Serological immune response to H. pylori cagA+ strain in H. pylori infected patients is strongly associated with vacA polymorphism, suggesting the crucial role of bacterial factors in immune and clinical phenotype of the infection.

  13. Review: Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jerry D; Kocíncová, Dana; Westman, Erin L; Lam, Joseph S

    2009-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes serious nosocomial infections, and an important virulence factor produced by this organism is lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This review summarizes knowledge about biosynthesis of all three structural domains of LPS - lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and O polysaccharides. In addition, based on similarities with other bacterial species, this review proposes new hypothetical pathways for unstudied steps in the biosynthesis of P. aeruginosa LPS. Lipid A biosynthesis is discussed in relation to Escherichia coli and Salmonella, and the biosyntheses of core sugar precursors and core oligosaccharide are summarised. Pseudomonas aeruginosa attaches a Common Polysaccharide Antigen and O-Specific Antigen polysaccharides to lipid A-core. Both forms of O polysaccharide are discussed with respect to their independent synthesis mechanisms. Recent advances in understanding O-polysaccharide biosynthesis since the last major review on this subject, published nearly a decade ago, are highlighted. Since P. aeruginosa O polysaccharides contain unusual sugars, sugar-nucleotide biosynthesis pathways are reviewed in detail. Knowledge derived from detailed studies in the O5, O6 and O11 serotypes is applied to predict biosynthesis pathways of sugars in poorly-studied serotypes, especially O1, O4, and O13/O14. Although further work is required, a full understanding of LPS biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa is almost within reach.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, D; Dembinski, J; Heep, A; Bartmann, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) in preterm infants with neonatal bacterial infection (NBI). Methods: Blood samples were analysed of 57 preterm (28+1 to 36+6, median 33+2 weeks gestation) and 17 term infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit within the first 72 hours of life with suspicion of NBI. Samples were obtained at first suspicion of sepsis and after 12 and 24 hours. Diagnosis of NBI was confirmed by raised concentrations of C reactive protein and/or interleukin 6. The influence of gestational age and labour was analysed. Results: Maximum LBP concentrations in infants with NBI were greatly increased compared with infants without NBI (13.0–46.0 µg/ml (median 20.0 µg/ml) v 0.6–17.4 µg/ml (median 4.2 µg/ml)). LBP concentrations in infected infants were not yet significantly raised when NBI was first suspected. The LBP concentrations of preterm infants were comparable to those of term infants. Regression analysis revealed no significant effect of labour or gestational age on LBP. Conclusions: Raised LBP concentrations indicate NBI in preterm and term infants. Preterm infants of > 28 weeks gestation seem to be capable of producing LBP as efficiently as term infants. Neonatal LBP concentrations are not influenced by labour. LBP may be a useful diagnostic marker of NBI in preterm infants. PMID:15499153

  15. Helicobacter pylori as a zoonotic infection: the detection of H. pylori antigens in the milk and faeces of cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Zandi, Ashkan; Rashidipour, Alireza

    2011-02-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, which may increase the risk of gastritis, peptic ulcers, and cancer, has increased worldwide. This number is estimated to be around 70-90% in developing countries and 25-50% in developed countries. It is possible that the bacterium can be transmitted via food and water as well as zoonotically and iatrogenically. Because of high prevalence of this infection in Iran, the aim of this study is to examine whether H. pylori infection might be transmitted from cow's milk and faeces. The existence of the H. pylori antibody and antigen was investigated in samples of serum, milk, and faeces from 92 lactating Holstein cows in Shahrekord, Iran. The H. pylori antigen and antibody were detected using ELISA and were confirmed by PCR. It was found that out of 92 serum specimens, 25 (27%) of the cows were positive for the H. pylori antibody and 67 specimens were negative. From these 25 seropositive cows, 10 (40%) faeces samples and four (16%) milk samples were antigen positive for H. pylori. Four of the antigen-positive milk specimens were also antigen positive for faeces. The existence of the UreC gene was also confirmed in positive samples of milk and faeces. There is a possibility that cow's milk is a transmission mode in H. pylori infection and faecal contamination and inappropriate management processes could transfer H. pylori to humans. The awareness of the H. pylori epidemiology and its method of distribution are necessary for public health measures and controlling the spread of this bacterium. Further investigation with a greater sample number is necessary to verify the ability of H. pylori transmission via milk consumption.

  16. High rate of Helicobacter pylori reinfection in Lithuanianpeptic ulcer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori ) reinfection in peptic ulcer patients during 9 yearsafter H. pylori eradication.METHODS: We invited 117 peptic ulcer patients inwhom eradication of H. pylori was confirmed 1 yearafter eradication treatment both by histology and byrapid urease test. In total, 57 patients were availablefor the study procedures: 34 (59.6%) male, 23 (40.4%)female; mean age 52.3 ± 13.0 years. There were 45(78.9%) patients with duodenal ulcer and 12 (21.1%)with gastric ulcer. H. pylori was diagnosed by a rapidurease test and histology if endoscopy was performed.If endoscopy was refused, H. pylori was diagnosed bythe C14-urea breath test and serology. H. pylori wasestablished if at least one of the tests was positive.RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 8.9 ± 1.0 years(range, 6-12). H. pylori was established in 15 patients.In 2 H. pylori -negative patients, H. pylori was establishedduring the follow-up period and eradicated. Therefore,we consider that reinfection occurred in 17 patients. Inthe per protocol analysis, reinfection was established in17 of 57 (29.8%; 95%CI: 19.2-42.2) patients during thefollow-up period. The annual rate of infection was 3.36%.If all non-responders were considered H. pylori -negative,reinfection would be 14.5% (17/117), the annual rate being 1.63%. The mean age of patients with reinfectionwas 51.8 ± 14.0 years, and without reinfection was52.5 ± 13.0 years, P 〉 0.05; the mean body massindex of patients with reinfection was 27.2 ± 4.1 kg/m2,and without reinfection was 25.7 ± 4.2 kg/m2, P 〉0.05. There were no differences in the reinfection ratesaccording the location of the peptic ulcer, the eradicationregimen used, and smoking status.CONCLUSION: The reinfection rate of H. pylori isrelatively high in Lithuania and probably related to thehigh prevalence of H. pylori , what may reflect differencesin the socioeconomic status between Western and

  17. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Doo Ri [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Sook [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151 742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Kim, Soon-Jong [Mokpo National University, Chonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Il [National Cancer Center, Gyeonggi 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    H. pylori Csd3 (HP0506), together with other peptidoglycan hydrolases, plays an important role in determining cell shape. Its crystal structure in the latent state is reported. Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d, d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala{sup 4}-mDAP{sup 3} peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d, d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala{sup 5} from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn{sup 2+} ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain.

  18. The level of C.pneumoniae, Cytomegalovirus, and H.pylori antibody in a patient with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasnan Ismail

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available At herosclerosis is still the chief cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations. Even though in developed nations the modification of risk factors is able to reduce the prevalence rate of atherosclerosis, such reduction is starting to slow down. Such condition has stimulated researchers to identify environmental exposure, including infection, that can influence the process of atherosclerosis. This cross sectional study was conducted from March to August 1998, on 122 patients that clinically demonstrate coronary heart disease and have underwent cardiac catheterization, 92 males and 30 females with an average age of 55 years. Patients undergo clinical and laboratory evaluation (blood glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, and antibody for C.pneumoniae. Cytomegalovirus, and H.pylori. We found a significant difference in cholesterol, triglyceride, and HDL levels in those with coronary stenosis and those without. However, we did not find a significant difference in the levels of C.pneumoniae, Cytomegalovirus, and H.pylori antibodies. This study is unable to conclude the influence of these antibodies on atherosclerosis, since in the non-stenosis group, we cannot eliminate the possibility of atherosclerosis, since the average age of study subject is 55 years. Studies on the interaction between infection and traditional risk factors as well as gender and nutrition is needed to find a clear answer of the influence of infection in atherosclerosis. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 211-4Keywords: Level of C.pneumoniae, Cytomegalovirus, H.pylori antibody, coronary heart disease.

  19. The putative neuraminyllactose-binding hemagglutinin HpaA of Helicobacter pylori CCUG 17874 is a lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, P W; Janzon, L; Doig, P; Huang, J; Kostrzynska, M; Trust, T J

    1995-11-01

    The ability of certain strains of Helicobacter pylori to cause sialic acid-sensitive agglutination of erythrocytes has been attributed to the HpaA protein (D.G. Evans, T.K. Karjalainen, D. J. Evans, Jr., D. Y. Graham, and C.H. Lee, J. Bacteriol. 175:674-683, 1993), the gene for which has been cloned and sequenced. On the basis of the hydropathy plot of HpaA and the presence of a potential lipoprotein signal sequence and modification site, and because of the similarities of these features with those of the cell envelope lipoprotein Lpp20 of H. pylori, we examined the possibility that HpaA was also a lipoprotein. Posttranslational processing of the HpaA protein expressed by the cloned gene was sensitive to globomycin, an inhibitor of the lipoprotein-specific signal peptidase II. Antibodies raised to the putative sialic acid-binding region of HpaA failed to bind to the surface of H. pylori cells in immunoelectron microscopy but instead were observed to have labeled the cytoplasm when thin sections were examined. This antibody recognized a 29,000-M(r) protein in Western blots (immunoblots) of cell extracts of H. pylori and Escherichia coli cells expressing the cloned hpaA gene. Determination of the sequence of hpaA from strain CCUG 17874 indicated significant differences from that determined by Evans and coworkers in the above-mentioned study, including extension of the gene into the open reading frame 3 downstream of hpaA to produce a protein with an M(r) of 26,414. Localization of HpaA indicated that it was predominantly located in the cytoplasmic fraction of the cell in both E. coli and H. pylori. HpaA was not observed in the sarkosyl-insoluble outer membrane fraction. An isogenic mutant generated by insertional inactivation of hpaA was unaffected in its ability to bind four different human cell lines as well as fixed sections of gastric tissue and had hemagglutination properties identical to those of the wild type. The data collectively suggest that HpaA is a

  20. Improved method for extraction and detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric biopsies using laser micro-dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loayza, María Fernanda; Villavicencio, Fernando Xavier; Santander, Stephanie Carolina; Baldeón, Manuel; Ponce, Lourdes Karina; Salvador, Iván; Vivar Díaz, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    To assess the molecular events exerted by Helicobacter pylori interacting directly with gastric epithelial cells, an improved procedure for microbial DNA isolation from stained hematoxilin-eosin gastric biopsies was developed based on laser micro-dissection (LM) [1]. Few articles have described the use of LM to select and detect H. pylori genome from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric tissue [2]. To improve the yield and quality of DNA isolated from H. pylori contacting intestinal epithelial cells, the following conditions were established after modification of the QIAamp DNA Micro kit. •Use of at least 25 cut sections of 10-20 μm of diameter and 3 μm thick with more than 10 bacteria in each cut.•Lysis with 30 μL of tissue lysis buffer and 20 μL of proteinase K (PK) with the tube in an upside-down position.•The use of thin purification columns with 35 μL of elution buffer. The mean of DNA concentration obtained from 25 LM cut sections was 1.94± 0 .16 ng/μL, and it was efficiently amplified with qPCR in a Bio Rad iCycler instrument. The LM can improve the sample selection and DNA extraction for molecular analysis of H. pylori associated with human gastric epithelium.

  1. Improved method for extraction and detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric biopsies using laser micro-dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loayza, María Fernanda; Villavicencio, Fernando Xavier; Santander, Stephanie Carolina; Baldeón, Manuel; Ponce, Lourdes Karina; Salvador, Iván; Vivar Díaz, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    To assess the molecular events exerted by Helicobacter pylori interacting directly with gastric epithelial cells, an improved procedure for microbial DNA isolation from stained hematoxilin-eosin gastric biopsies was developed based on laser micro-dissection (LM) [1]. Few articles have described the use of LM to select and detect H. pylori genome from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric tissue [2]. To improve the yield and quality of DNA isolated from H. pylori contacting intestinal epithelial cells, the following conditions were established after modification of the QIAamp DNA Micro kit. • Use of at least 25 cut sections of 10–20 μm of diameter and 3 μm thick with more than 10 bacteria in each cut. • Lysis with 30 μL of tissue lysis buffer and 20 μL of proteinase K (PK) with the tube in an upside-down position. • The use of thin purification columns with 35 μL of elution buffer. The mean of DNA concentration obtained from 25 LM cut sections was 1.94± 0 .16 ng/μL, and it was efficiently amplified with qPCR in a Bio Rad iCycler instrument. The LM can improve the sample selection and DNA extraction for molecular analysis of H. pylori associated with human gastric epithelium. PMID:26150965

  2. Comparison of lipopolysaccharide structures of Bordetella pertussis clinical isolates from pre- and post-vaccine era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albitar-Nehme, Sami; Basheer, Soorej M; Njamkepo, Elisabeth; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Guiso, Nicole; Caroff, Martine

    2013-08-30

    Endotoxins are lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and major constituents of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Bordetella pertussis LPS were the only major antigens, of this agent of whooping-cough, that were not yet analyzed on isolates from the pre- and post-vaccination era. We compared here the LPS structures of four clinical isolates with that of the vaccine strain BP 1414. All physico-chemical analyses, including SDS-PAGE, TLC, and different MALDI mass spectrometry approaches were convergent. They helped demonstrating that, on the contrary to some other B. pertussis major antigens, no modification occurred in the dodecasaccharide core structure, as well as in the whole LPS molecules. These results are rendering these major antigens good potential vaccine components. Molecular modeling of this conserved LPS structure also confirmed the conclusions of previous experiments leading to the production of anti-LPS monoclonal antibodies and defining the main epitopes of these major antigens.

  3. The Helicobacter pylori theory and duodenal ulcer disease. A case study of the research process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Gjørup, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the medical research process from the time of the generation of a new theory to its implementation in clinical practice. The Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) theory, i.e. the theory that H. pylori plays a significant causal role in duodenal ulcer disease was chosen as a case....... MATERIAL: Abstracts from 1984 to 1993, identified in the CD-Rom, Medline system, ("Silverplatter"), using the search terms Campylobacter pylori and Helicobacter pylori, and reviews and editorials about H. pylori in some of the most widespread clinical journals. RESULTS: 2204 papers on H. pylori were....... pylori in duodenal ulcer disease had been published in some of the most widespread clinical journals. In half of the papers the authors were convinced of the causal role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer disease, while in the remainder they were sceptical. In seven cases the authors stated which patients...

  4. H pylori: Treatment for the patient only or the whole family?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effects of treatment of H pyIori infected individuals with the effects of treatment of individuals as well as all HpyIori-infected family members. METHODS: H pylori-positive patients with similar demographic specifications were prospectively randomized with respect to treatment, with a triple regimen of either patients and all H pylori-positive family members living together (group) or patients only (group ).Nine months after treatment, all patients were assessed for H pylori positivity. RESULTS: There were 70 H pylori-positive patients in each group; patients in groups and lived with 175and 190 H pylori-positive relatives, respectively. Age, sex and H pylori positivity rate were similar in both groups of relatives. Nine months after 14 d standard triple therapy, H pylori positivity was 7.1% in group patients and 38.6% in group patients [P < 0.01,OR = 8.61 95%confidence interval (CI):2.91-22.84=. CONCLUSION: The present results indicate bad environmental hygienic conditions and close intra-familial relationships are important in H pylori contamination. These findings indicate all family members of H pylori positive individuals should be assessed for H pylori positivity, particularly in developing countries where H pylori prevalence is high; they also suggest patients, their spouses and all H pylori-positive family members of H pylori-positive individuals should be treated for H pylori infection.

  5. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on Bax protein expression in patients with gastric precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Feng Liu; Wei-Wen Liu; Guo-An Wang; Xiao-Chun Teng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection on Bax protein expression, and explore the role of H pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: H pylori was assessed by rapid urease test and Warthin-Starry method, and expression of Bax protein was examined immunohistochemically in 72 patients with pre-malignant lesions.RESULTS: Bax protein was differently expressed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric dysplasia, and showed 63.99% positivity. The positivity of Bax protein expression in H pylori-positive gastric precancerous lesions (72.3%) was significantly higher than that in H pylori-negative gastric precancerous lesions (48.0%, χ2 = 4.191, P<0.05).H pylori infection was well correlated with the expression of Bax protein in gastric precancerous lesions (r = 0.978,P<0.01). After eradication of H pylori, the positivity of Bax protein expression significantly decreased in H pylori-positive gastric precancerous lesions (χ2= 5.506,P<0.05). In the persisting H pylori-infected patients,the positivity of Bax protein expression was not changed.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection may be involved in the upregulation of Bax gene, which might be one of the mechanisms of H pylori infection-induced gastric epithelial cell apoptosis. H pylori might act as a tumor promoter in the genesis of gastric carcinoma and eradication of H pylori could inhibit gastric carcinogenesis.

  6. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  7. Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikiphoros Philippou; Panagiotis Koursarakos; Evgenia Anastasakou; Vasiliki Krietsepi; Stavroula Mavrea; Anastasios Roussos; Dionissia Alepopoulou; Irineos Iliopoulos

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) seroprevalence in a cohort of Greek patients with lung cancer.METHODS: Seventy-two lung cancer patients (55 males and 17 females, aged 58.2±11.7 years) and 68, age and gender-matched, control subjects were enrolled. All subjects underwent an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay IgG serologic test for H pylori diagnosis.RESULTS: A correlation between age and H pylori IgG level was detected for both lung cancer patients (r = 0.42,P= 0.004) and controls (r= 0.44, P= 0.004). Seropositivity for H pylori did not differ significantly between patients with lung cancer and controls (61.1% vs 55.9%, P>0.05).Concerning the mean serum concentration of IgG antibodies against H pylori, no significant difference between the two groups was detected (32.6±19.1 vs 27.4±18.3 U/mL,P>0.05).CONCLUSION: No significant association between H pylori infection and lung cancer was found.

  8. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current and future insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Maliheh; Sabourian, Reyhaneh; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an important major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies such as mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma worldwide. H. pylori treatment still remains a challenge, since many determinants for successful therapy are involved such as individual primary or secondary antibiotics resistance, mucosal drug concentration, patient compliance, side-effect profile and cost. While no new drug has been developed, current therapy still relies on different mixture of known antibiotics and anti-secretory agents. A standard triple therapy consisting of two antibiotics and a proton-pump inhibitor proposed as the first-line regimen. Bismuth-containing quadruple treatment, sequential treatment or a non-bismuth quadruple treatment (concomitant) are also an alternative therapy. Levofloxacin containing triple treatment are recommended as rescue treatment for infection of H. pylori after defeat of first-line therapy. The rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance reduces the effectiveness of any regimens involving these remedies. Therefore, adding probiotic to the medications, developing anti-H. pylori photodynamic or phytomedicine therapy, and achieving a successful H. pylori vaccine may have the promising to present synergistic or additive consequence against H. pylori, because each of them exert different effects. PMID:26798626

  9. Autoantibodies to gastric mucosa in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, R; Savio, A; Appelmelk, B J

    1997-07-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori is recognized as the main cause of chronic gastritis and its associated diseases, very little is known about the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to intestinal metaplasia and atrophic gastritis. We reviewed the data regarding the possible pathogenetic role played by the anti-H. pylori immune responses in the genesis of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Although only type A (corpus-restricted atrophic gastritis), often associated to pernicious anemia, is considered autoimmune in nature, abundant evidence supports the presence of cellular and humoral autoimmune responses also in patients with H. pylori infection. In a mechanism known as antigenic mimicry, highly conserved immunogenic molecules expressed by infectious pathogens may act as a trigger for the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses that cross-react with host cellular antigens. Numerous studies support the view that H. pylori is very effective in inducing antigenic mimicry, and antibodies against H. pylori have been found to cross-react with both antral mucosal cells (the membrane of the secretory canalicular structures of the parietal cells) and gastrin-producing cells. Such autoantibodies were detected both in human infections and in experimental work in rodents. The detection of antibodies that cross-react with H. pylori and various components of the gastric mucosa provides strong support to the view that immune responses against H. pylori not only participate in the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to atrophy in the progressive atrophic gastritis associated with Helicobacter infection but also in the corpus-restricted autoimmune gastritis.

  10. Eradication of H pylori for the prevention of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karolin Trautmann; Manfred Stolte; Stephan Miehlke

    2006-01-01

    Tnfection with H pylori is the most important known etiological factor associated with gastric cancer. While colonization of the gastric mucosa with H pylori results in active and chronic gastritis in virtually all individuals infected, the likelihood of developing gastric cancer depends on environmental, bacterial virulence and host specific factors. The majority of all gastric cancer cases are attributable to H pylori infection and therefore theoretically preventable. There is evidence from animal models that eradication of H pylori at an early time point can prevent gastric cancer development. However, randomized clinical trials exploring the prophylactic effect of H pylori eradication on the incidence of gastric cancer in humans remain sparse and have yielded conflicting results. Better markers for the identification of patientsat risk for H pylori induced gastric malignancy are needed to allow the development of a more efficient public eradication strategy. Meanwhile, screening and treatment of H pylori in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients as well as certain high-risk populations might be beneficial.

  11. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Farshad, Shohreh

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative motile bacterium causative agent of acute and chronic digestive and extra-digestive human infections. According to different reports worldwide, H. pylori symptomatic and asymptomatic infections are a global problem. The statistical investigations show a percentage of 50 for people who are involved in H. pylori acute/chronic digestive and/or extra-digestive infections around the world. This review focuses on digestive and extra-digestive diseases caused by H. pylori, the related virulence factors, diagnostic techniques including non-invasive and invasive diagnostics and treatment. There is an abundance of diagnostics for detection and identification of H. pylori. The availability, cost, and the condition of test performance may differ from place to place. To increase the level of reliability in association with diagnostic tools for detecting H. pylori, several techniques must be applied at once as multi-diagnostic technique. Furthermore, there are several pharmacotherapies which can be used for complete eradication of H. pylori infection.

  12. The occurrence of Helicobacter pylori in hydatid liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adil Edan Alsaimary; Hayder M Abdulnbi; Abdulhadi Laibi; Ahmed Rasheed Jwad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To detect the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in hydatid liver disease. Methods: A total of 58 patients with hydatid liver disease attending AL-Sadder Teaching Hospital in Al-Najaf and Al-Basrah governorate from February to August, 2008 were included in the study and served as group A. One hundred and twenty 1st degree relative patients (group B) and 20 normal persons including 10 male and 10 female (group C) as control were detected for the presence of H. pylori infection in general population. Chest X-ray was done for the above groups to exclude lung hydrated cyst. The patients were screened by ultrasound to obtain intra abdominal hydrated cyst and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) test was utilized to detect the H. pylori infection. Results: Fifty eight patients from group A with hydatid liver disease, 30 male (51.7%) and 28 female (48.3%) were screened for the presence of H. pylori infection by using ELISA test. We found that 28 patients from group A had positive ELISA test including 19 male (32.8%) and 9 female (15.5%) (P<0.01). However, there were no positive results of H. pylori infection in group B and C by chest X-ray, ultrasound and ELISA test. Conclusions: It can be concluded that there is a strong relationship between hydatid liver disease and presence of H. pylori.

  13. Alterations in gastric mucin synthesis by Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James C, Byrd; Robert S, Bresalier

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the role of Helicobacter pylori in altering gastric mucin synthesis and define how thprocess relates to H. pylori-related diseases.METHODS Analyses of human gastric tissues using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridizatiodocument the role of H. pylori in altering the composition and distribution of gastric mucins.RESULTS These data indicate a decrease in the product of the MUC5 (MUC5AC) gene and aberraexpression of MUC6 in the surface epithelium of H. pylori-infected patients. A normal pattern was restorby H. pylori eradication. Inhibition of mucin synthesis including MUC5AC and MUCl mucins by H. pvlohas been established in vitro using biochemical and Western blot analyses. This effect is not due to inhibitiof glycosylation, but results from inhibition of synthesis of mucin core structures. In vitro experiments usiinhibitors of mucin synthesis indicate that cell surface mucins decrease adhesion of H. pylori to gastepithelial cells.CONCLUSION Inhibition of mucin synthesis by H. pylori in vivo can disrupt the protective mucous layand facilitate bacterial adhesion, which may lead to increased inflammation in thc gastric epithelium.

  14. Celecoxib inhibits Helicobacter pylori colonization-related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hong; Li, Jiang; Liu, Fang-Xun

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization-related factors and its mechanism. METHODS: After co-incubation with celecoxib, morphology of H. pylori strain 26695 was observed under a transmission electron microscope. Flagella motility was assessed by stab agar motility test. Adherence of H. pylori to AGS cells was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Levels of mRNA expression in flagellar genes (flaA, flaB), urease genes (ureA, ureB) and adhesin genes (babA, sabA, alpA, alpB, hpaA, hopZ) were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Separation and non-integrity of bacterial cell wall, rarefaction and asymmetry of cytoplasm, and even lysis of H. pylori were observed in the presence of celecoxib. When H. pylori strains were incubated in the presence of celecoxib, their flagellar motility and adherence to AGS cells were inhibited. The expression of ureA, ureB, babA, sabA, alpA, alpB, hpaA, hopZ was up-regulated while the expression of flaA, flaB was down-regulated in the presence of celecoxib. CONCLUSION: Celecoxib inhibits flagellar motility and adherence of H. pylori to AGS cells, and destructs their normal structure in vitro. PMID:20143463

  15. Fluoroquinolone-based protocols for eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispo, Antonio; Capone, Pietro; Castiglione, Fabiana; Pasquale, Luigi; Rea, Matilde; Caporaso, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a widespread pathogen infecting about 40% of people living in urban areas and over 90% of people living in the developing regions of the world. H. pylori is well-documented as the main factor in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease, chronic gastritis, and gastric malignancies such as cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-lymphoma; hence, its eradication is strongly recommended. The Maastricht IV consensus, which focused on the management of H. pylori infection, set important new strategies in terms of treatment approaches, particularly with regards to first- and second-line treatment protocols and led to improved knowledge and understanding of H. pylori resistance to antibiotics. In recent years, various fluoroquinolone-based protocols, mainly including levofloxacin, have been proposed and effectively tested at all therapeutic lines for H. pylori eradication. The aim of the present paper is to review the scientific literature focused on the use of fluoroquinolones in eradicating H. pylori. PMID:25083067

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection: an overview in 2013, focus on therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Rongli; Zhou Liya

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article aimed to review the incidence of Helicobacterpylori (H.pylon) infection and its therapy.Data sources Relevant articles published in English were identified by searching in PubMed from 2000 to 2013,with keywords "H.pylori".Important references from selected articles were also retrieved from Elsevier,Wiley,EBSCO,and SPRINGER.The Chinese articles published were searched from China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI).Study selection Articles about "prevalence","gastric carcinoma","peptic ulcer","gastroesophageal reflux disease","functional dyspepsia","pathogenic mechanism","therapy","eradication rate","antibiotic resistance",and "gene polymorphisms" were selected.Results The decreased infection rates of H.pylori could also be linked to the changed disease spectrum,such as the decreased morbidity and recurrence rate of H.pylori-related peptic ulcer,and the increased morbidity of gastroesophageal reflux.Although different treatment regimens have been used for H.pylori infection,the H.pylori eradication rate declined gradually.Due to primary resistance to antibiotics,the gene polymorphism of host and infected strain,and the therapy regimes,H.pylori eradication became even more difficult.Conclusions The prevalence of H.py/ori infection had been decreasing,but the rate of eradication failure has dramatically risen in many countries due to resistance to antibiotic.H.pylori therapy in clinical practice is becoming proqressively more difficult.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-14

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation.

  18. Iron deficiency and Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendt, N; Kool, P; Teesalu, K; Lillemäe, K; Maaroos, H-I; Oona, M

    2011-09-01

    To examine the relationship between iron deficiency (ID) and Helicobacter pylori infection in school-aged children. Altogether 363 children from ambulatory admission were consecutively enrolled in the study. Haemoglobin (Hb), soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), IgG against H. pylori and IgA against tissue transglutaminase were measured. The criteria for ID were sTfR > 5.7 mg/L in children aged 7-12 years and sTfR > 4.5 mg/L in older children, for anaemia Hb Iron deficiency was found in 17% of the children, 5% had also anaemia. H. pylori colonization was detected in 27% and serum markers for coeliac disease in 0.6% of the children. The prevalence of ID and H. pylori seropositivity was higher in older children (23% and 29%, vs 9% and 22%, respectively). Children with H. pylori were significantly shorter [length SDS 1.0 (0.98-1.01) vs 0.98 (0.97-0.99)]. Older children had risk for ID (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.3, p = 0.03). Although the prevalence of H. pylori seropositivity was higher in the ID group, it was not significantly associated with ID in multivariate analysis. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity was not associated with ID. The associated factor for ID was age. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  19. In vitro antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus casei against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enany, Shymaa; Abdalla, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic infections in humans. Curing H. pylori infection is difficult because of the habitat of the organism below the mucus adherent layer of gastric mucosa. Lactobacilli are known as acid-resistant bacteria and can remain in stomach for a long time than any other organism, we aimed in this study to examine the efficacy of Lactobacillus casei as a probiotic against H. pylori in humans. Particularly, L. casei was opted as it is considered to be one of the widely used probiotics in dairy products. One hundred and seven strains of H. pylori were isolated from dyspeptic patients and were tested for their antibiotic susceptibility to metronidazole (MTZ), clarithromycin (CLR), tetracycline (TET), and amoxicillin (AMX) by the disc diffusion method. The strains were examined for their susceptibility toward L. casei - present in fermented milk products - by well diffusion method. It was found that 74.7% strains were resistant to MTZ; 1.8% to MTZ, TET, and CLR; 3.7% to MTZ and CLR; 4.6% to MTZ and TET; and 0.9% were resistant to MTZ, TET, and AMX. The antibacterial activity of L. casei against H. pylori was determined on all the tested H. pylori isolates including antibiotic resistant strains with different patterns. Our study proposed the use of probiotics for the treatment of H. pylori infection as an effective approach.

  20. Helicobacter pylori and Antibiotic Resistance, A Continuing and Intractable Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Zhang, Meng; Lu, Bin; Dai, Jinfeng

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen with a high global prevalence, is the causative pathogen for multiple gastrointestinal diseases, especially chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric malignancies. Antibiotic therapies remain the mainstay for H. pylori eradication; however, this strategy is hampered by the emergence and spread of H. pylori antibiotic resistance. Exploring the mechanistic basis of this resistance is becoming one of the major research questions in contemporary biomedical research, as such knowledge could be exploited to devise novel rational avenues for counteracting the existing resistance and devising strategies to avoid the development of a novel anti-H. pylori medication. Encouragingly, important progress in this field has been made recently. Here, we attempt to review the current state and progress with respect to the molecular mechanism of antibiotic resistance for H. pylori. A picture is emerging in which mutations of various genes in H. pylori, resulting in decreased membrane permeability, altered oxidation-reduction potential, and a more efficient efflux pump system. The increased knowledge on these mechanisms produces hope that antibiotic resistance in H. pylori can ultimately be countered. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The putative neuraminyllactose-binding hemagglutinin HpaA of Helicobacter pylori CCUG 17874 is a lipoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Toole, P W; Janzon, L; Doig, P; Huang, J.; Kostrzynska, M; Trust, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    The ability of certain strains of Helicobacter pylori to cause sialic acid-sensitive agglutination of erythrocytes has been attributed to the HpaA protein (D.G. Evans, T.K. Karjalainen, D. J. Evans, Jr., D. Y. Graham, and C.H. Lee, J. Bacteriol. 175:674-683, 1993), the gene for which has been cloned and sequenced. On the basis of the hydropathy plot of HpaA and the presence of a potential lipoprotein signal sequence and modification site, and because of the similarities of these features with...

  2. H pylori infection among 1000 southern Iranian dyspeptic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood Reza Hashemi; Mohammad Rahnavardi; Bavand Bikdeli; Mohsen Dehghani Zahedani

    2006-01-01

    AIS: To describe the frequency of H pylori infection among 1000 southern Iranian dyspeptic patients.METHODS: A prospective study was performed in a referral hospital in south of Iran from 1999 to 2005. One thousand dyspeptic patients (518 males, mean ± SD age of 49.12 ± 12.82 years) consecutively underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Multiple gastric antral biopsy samples were taken from all patients for rapid ureasetest and histopathologic examination (96.9% satisfactory samples). Patients were considered H pylori-infected if one or both tests were positive.RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-one patients (67.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 64.2%-70.0%) were H pylori-infected.H pylori positivity was significantly more frequent in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD)than in those with non-ulcer dyspepsia (P < 0.001).Male-to-female ratio for duodenal and gastric ulcers was 2.7:1 and 1.5:1, respectively. Moreover, the duodenalto-gastric ulcer ratio was 1.95:1. The frequency of H pylori infection among those with endoscopic diagnosis of gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and normal mucosa was 70.1% (398/568), 86.2% (150/174),71.9% (64/89), and 33.5% (54/161), respectively. H pylori infection, male sex, and older age were independently associated with PUD in multivariate analysis.H pylori positivity was associated with chronic gastritis, and chronic active gastritis with odds ratios of 34.21 (95% CI: 12.19%-96.03%) and 81.21 (95% CI:28.85%-228.55%), respectively.CONCLUSION: H pylori and PUD are highly frequent in dyspeptic patients from south of Iran. H pylori is a cardinal risk factor for chronic active or inactive gastritis.

  3. Severe gastritis decreases success rate of Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Ismail Hakki; Sapmaz, Ferdane; Güliter, Sefa; Atasoy, Pınar

    2016-05-01

    In several studies, different risk factors other than antibiotic resistance have been documented with Helicobacter pylori eradication failure. We aimed in this study to investigate the relationship of gastric density of H. pylori, the occurrence/degree of gastric atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia (IM) with success rate of H. pylori eradication. Two hundred consecutive treatment naive patients who received bismuth containing standart quadruple treatment due to H. pylori infection documented by histopathological examination of two antral or two corpal biopsies entered this retrospective study. The updated Sydney system was used to grade the activity of gastritis, density of H. pylori colonization, atrophy, and IM. Stages III and IV of operative link for gastritis assessment (OLGA) or the operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) stages was considered as severe gastritis. H. pylori eradication was determined via stool H. pylori antigen test performed 4 weeks after the end of therapy. The presence of gastric atrophy and IM was significantly higher in patients with eradication failure (p = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Severe gastritis (OLGA III-IV and OLGIM III-IV) rates were higher in eradication failure group. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that OLGA and OLGIM stages were to be independent risk factors for eradication failure (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Our results suggested that histopathologically severe gastritis may cause H. pylori eradication failure. In addition, we found that H. pylori density was not a risk factor for treatment failure in patients who receive quadruple treatment.

  4. Animal Model Reveals Potential Waterborne Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne H. pylori could cause gastric infection. Groups of immunocompetent C57/BL6 Helicobacter-free mice were exposed to static concentrations (1.29 × 10(5), 10(6), 10(7), 10(8), and 10(9) CFU/L) of H. pylori in their drinking water for 4 weeks. One group of Helicobacter-free mice was exposed to uncontaminated water as a negative control. H. pylori morphology changes in water were examined using microscopy Live/Dead staining. Following exposure, H. pylori infection and inflammation status in the stomach were evaluated using quantitative culture, PCR, the rapid urease test, and histology. None of the mice in the negative control or 10(5) groups were infected. One of 20 cages (one of 40 mice) of the 10(6) group, three of 19 cages (four of 38 mice) of the 10(7) CFU/L group, 19 of 20 cages (33 of 40 mice) of the 10(8) group, and 20 of 20 cages (39 of 40 mice) of the 10(9) CFU/L group were infected. Infected mice had significantly higher gastric inflammation than uninfected mice (27.86% higher inflammation, p < .0001). We offer proof that H. pylori in water is infectious in mice, suggesting that humans drinking contaminated water may be at risk of contracting H. pylori infection. Much work needs to be performed to better understand the risk of infection from drinking H. pylori-contaminated water. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Characterization of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Patients with Gastric Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, infection due to Helicobacter Pylori is recognized as a medical problem worldwide. It causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, lymphatic proliferative disorders and it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Objective: To characterize Helicobacter Pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcer and to relate this infection to gastric histological diagnoses. Methods: An observational, descriptive, correlational retrospective study in patients with gastric ulcers at the Dr.Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital was carried out from January 2005 to December 2007. Endoscopy and mucous gastric biopsy were performed for the histological and diagnostic study of the infection due to Helicobacter Pylori by means of the hematoxiline-eosine and giemsa stain respectively. The sample was composed by 137 patients. Results: the frequency of infection due to Helicobacter pylori was 59,1 % prevailing in the age groups 51-60 years old (34,6 % and 61-70 yearsold. (30,8 %. The highest frequency of malignant ulcers were located at the antral region (85,7 % with predominance of Helicobacter Pylori (80 %. There was a 95 % reliability between the relationship of Helicobacter Pylori and the histological diagnoses. The patients under the diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori showed a greater probability to present cancer (OR 4,32 IC: 0,58-39,44 and worsened chronic gastritis (OR 2,59 IC: 0,61-11,30. Chronic gastritis did not constitute a risk factor for acute gastritis(OR 0,86 IC: 0,09-7,08. Conclusions: The probability of suffering from gastric cancer, chronic gastritis and worsened chronic gastritis was greater in all those patients who presented with Helicobacter pylori infection but in this study Helicobacter pylori did not constitute a risk factor for acute gastritis

  6. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Faisal Zaidi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world’s population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class Ⅰ definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  7. H pylori status and angiogenesis factors in human gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anita Mangia; Alfredo Di Leo; Stefania Tommasi; Pasquale Berloco; Jian Ming Xu; Angelo Paradiso; Annalisa Chiriatti; Girolamo Ranieri; Ines Abbate; Maria Coviello; Giovanni Simone; Francesco Alfredo Zito; Severino Montemurro; Antonello Rucci

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate H pylori expression in gastric cancer patients in relation to primary tumor angiogenic markers, such as microvessel density (MVD), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGF-R1), p53 and circulating VEGF levels.METHODS: Angiogenic markers were analyzed immunohistochemically in 56 primary gastric cancers. H pylori cytotoxin (vacA) and the cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA) amplification were evaluated using PCR assay. Serum H pylori IgG antibodies and serum/plasma circulating VEGF levels were detected in 39 and 38 patients by ELI SA, respectively.RESULTS: A total of 69% of patients were positive for circulating IgG antibodies against H pylori. cagA-positive H pylori strains were found in 41% of gastric patients. vacA was found in 50% of patients; s1 strains were more highly expressed among vacA-positive patients. The presence of the s1 strain was significantly associated with cagA (P = 0.0001). MVD was significantly correlated with both tumor VEGF expression (r = 0.361, P = 0.009) and serum VEGF levels (r = -0.347, P = 0.041).Conversely, neither VEGF-R1 expression nor MVD was related to p53 expression. However, H pylori was not related to any angiogenic markers except for the plasma VEGF level (P = 0.026).CONCLUSION: H pylori antigen is related to higher plasma VEGF levels, but not to angiogenic character istics. It can be hypothesized that the toxic effects of H pylori on angiogenesis occurs in early preclinical disease phase or in long-lasting aggressive infections, but only when high H pylori IgG levels are persistent.

  8. "Rescue" regimens after Helicobacter pylori treatment failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javier P Gisbert

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)infection is the main cause of gastritis,gastroduodenal ulcer disease,and gastric cancer.After more than 20 years of experience in Hpylori treatment,in my opinion,the ideal regimen to treat this infection is still to be found.Currently,apart from having to know first-line eradication regimens well,we must also be prepared to face lyeatment failures.Therefore,in designing a treatment strategy we should not focus on the results of primary therapy alone,but also on the final (overall) eradication rate.The choice of a "rescue" treatment depends on which treatment is used initially.If a clarithromycinbased regimen was used initially,a subsequent metronidazole-based treatment (quadruple therapy)may be used afterwards,and then a levofloxacinbased combination would be a third "rescue" option.Alternatively,it has recently been suggested that levofloxacin-based rescue therapy constitutes an encouraging second-line strategy,representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure,with the advantage of efficacy,simplicity and safety.In this case,a quadruple regimen may be reserved as a third-line rescue option.Finally,rifabutin-based rescue therapy constitutes an encouraging empirical fourthline strategy after multiple previous eradication failures with key antibiotics such as amoxicillin,clarithromycin,metronidazole,tetracycline,and levofloxacin.Even after two consecutive failures,several studies have demonstrated that H pylor/eradication can finally be achieved in almost all patients if several rescue therapies are consecutively given.Therefore,the attitude in H pylori eradication therapy failure,even after two or more unsuccessful attempts,should be to fight and not to surrender.

  9. Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marjan Mohammadi; Delaram Doroud; Nazanin Mohajerani; Sadegh Massarrat

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the frequency of antibiotic resistance in Iranian Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) strains isolated from two major hospitals in Tehran.METHODS: Examination of antibiotic resistance was performed on 120 strains by modified disc diffusion test and PCR-RFLP methods. In addition, in order to identify the possible causes of the therapeutic failure in Iran, we also determined the resistance of these strains to the most commonly used antibiotics (metronidazole, amoxicillin,and tetracycline) by modified disc diffusion test.RESULTS: According to modified disc diffusion test, 1.6% of the studied strains were resistant to amoxicillin, 16.7% to clarithromycin, 57.5% to metronidazole, and there was no resistance to tetracycline. Of the clarithromycin resistant strains, 73.68% had the A2143G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene, 21.05% A2142C, and 5.26% A2142G.None of the sensitive strains were positive for any of the three point mutations. Of the metronidazole resistant strains, deletion in rdxA gene was studied and detected in only 6 (5%) of the antibiogram-based resistant strains.None of the metronidazole sensitive strains possessed rdxA gene deletion.CONCLUSION: These data show that despite the fact that clarithromycin has not yet been introduced to the Iranian drug market as a generic drug, nearly 20% rate of resistance alerts toward the frequency of macrolide resistance strains, which may be due to the widespread prescription of erythromycin in Iran. rdxA gene inactivation,if present in Iranian H pylori strains, may be due to other genetic defects rather than gene deletion.

  10. [Latin American contribution to the study of Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Ramos, Alberto; Sánchez Sánchez, Rolando

    2009-09-01

    We have reviewed Lilacs, PubMed and Google searching for original articles related to Helicobacter pylori published by Latin American investigators from 2003 to 2008. Contributions in the following fields by countries are: Molecular biology: Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Peru y Venezuela. Argentina, Brasil, Colombia, Cuba, Peru y Venezuela. Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Costa Rica, Colombia, Mexico, Peru y Venezuela. Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal diseases: Brasil, Cuba, Peru y Venezuela. Helicobacter pylori and extra digestive diseases: Brasil, Colombia and Venezuela. Pediatrics: Brasil, Cuba y Venezuela. Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru y Venezuela.

  11. Immune Homeostasis of Human Gastric Mucosa in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, I V; Yamamoto, T; Vershinina, S S; Reva, G V

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of electron microscopic, microbiological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic studies of gastric biopsy specimens taken for diagnostic purposes according by clinical indications during examination of patients with gastrointestinal pathology. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa against the background of infection with various pathogen strains of Helicobacter pylori was studied in patients of different age groups with peptic ulcer, gastritis, metaplasia, and cancer. Some peculiarities of Helicobacter pylori contamination in the gastric mucosa were demonstrated. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa in different pathologies was analyzed depending on the Helicobacter pylori genotype.

  12. Helicobacter pylori phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlace Glenn N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a micro-aerophilic, spiral-shaped, motile bacterium that is the principal cause of gastric and duodenal ulcers in humans and is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Despite provoking a strong innate and adaptive immune response in the host, H. pylori persists in the gastric mucosa, avoiding eradication by macrophages and other phagocytic cells, which are recruited to the site of infection. Here we have characterised the critical degradative process of phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages for five genotypically and phenotypically distinct clinical strains of H. pylori. Results All of the H. pylori strains examined showed some disruption to the phagosome maturation process, when compared to control E. coli. The early endosome marker EEA1 and late endosome marker Rab7 were retained on H. pylori phagosomes, while the late endosome-lysosome markers CD63, LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 were acquired in an apparently normal manner. Acquisition of EEA1 by H. pylori phagosomes appeared to occur by two distinct, strain specific modes. H. pylori strains that were negative for the cancer associated virulence factor CagA were detected in phagosomes that recruited large amounts of EEA1 relative to Rab5, compared to CagA positive strains. There were also strain specific differences in the timing of Rab7 acquisition which correlated with differences in the rate of intracellular trafficking of phagosomes and the timing of megasome formation. Megasomes were observed for all of the H. pylori strains examined. Conclusions H. pylori appeared to disrupt the normal process of phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages, appearing to block endosome fission. This resulted in the formation of a hybrid phagosome-endosome-lysosome compartment, which we propose has reduced degradative capacity. Reduced killing by phagocytes is consistent with the persistence of H. pylori in the host, and would

  13. Bactericidal activity of Pistacia lentiscus mastic gum against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, P; Bono, L; Leone, E; Bona, S; Carretto, E; Perversi, L

    2001-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of mastic gum, a resin obtained from the Pistacia lentiscus tree, against clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were obtained by a microdilution assay. Mastic gum killed 50% of the strains tested at a concentration of 125 microg/ml and 90% at a concentration of 500 microg/ml. The influence of sub-MBCs of mastic gum on the morphologies of H. pylori was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. The lentiscus resin induced blebbing, morphological abnormalities and cellular fragmentation in H. pylori cells.

  14. Hybrid Therapy Regimen for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Jian Liu; Li-Ya Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) eradication remains a challenge with increasing antibiotic resistance.Hybrid therapy has attracted widespread attention because of initial report with good efficacy and safety.However,many issues on hybrid therapy are still unclear such as the eradication efficacy,safety,compliance,influencing factors,correlation with antibiotic resistance,and comparison with other regimens.Therefore,a comprehensive review on the evidence of hybrid therapy for H.pylori infection was conducted.Data Sources:The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to September 30,2015,searching by the terms of"Helicobacterpylori" or "H.pylori",and "hybrid".Study Selection:Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results:Totally,1871 patients of 12 studies received hybrid therapy.The eradication rates were 77.6-97.4% in intention-to-treat and 82.6-99.1% in per-protocol analyses.Compliance was 93.3-100.0%,overall adverse effects rate was 14.5-67.5%,and discontinued medication rate due to adverse effects was 0-6.7%.H.pylori culture and sensitivity test were performed only in 13.3% patients.Pooled analysis showed that the eradication rates with dual clarithromycin and metronidazole susceptible,isolated metronidazole or clarithromycin resistance,and dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance were 98.5%,97.6%,92.9%,and 80.0%,respectively.Overall,the efficacy,compliance,and safety of hybrid therapy were similar with sequential or concomitant therapy.However,hybrid therapy might be superior to sequential therapy in Asians.Conclusions:Hybrid therapy showed wide differences in the efficacy but consistently good compliance and safety across different regions.Dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance were the key factor to efficacy.Hybrid therapy was similar to sequential or concomitant therapy in the efficacy,safety,and compliance.

  15. Glycophenotypic alterations induced by Pteridium aquilinum in mice gastric mucosa: synergistic effect with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Gomes

    Full Text Available The bracken fern Pteridium aquilinum is a plant known to be carcinogenic to animals. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between bracken fern exposure and gastric cancer development in humans. The biological effects of exposure to this plant within the gastric carcinogenesis process are not fully understood. In the present work, effects in the gastric mucosa of mice treated with Pteridium aquilinum were evaluated, as well as molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic role with Helicobacter pylori infection. Our results showed that exposure to Pteridium aquilinum induces histomorphological modifications including increased expression of acidic glycoconjugates in the gastric mucosa. The transcriptome analysis of gastric mucosa showed that upon exposure to Pteridium aquilinum several glycosyltransferase genes were differently expressed, including Galntl4, C1galt1 and St3gal2, that are mainly involved in the biosynthesis of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens. Concomitant treatment with Pteridium aquilinum and infection with Helicobacter pylori also resulted in differently expressed glycosyltransferase genes underlying the biosynthesis of terminal sialylated Lewis antigens, including Sialyl-Lewis(x. These results disclose the molecular basis for the altered pattern of glycan structures observed in the mice gastric mucosa. The gene transcription alterations and the induced glycophenotypic changes observed in the gastric mucosa contribute for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Pteridium aquilinum in the gastric carcinogenesis process.

  16. Helicobacter Pylori Transmission and Risk Factors for Infection in Rural China

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-08

    was able to experimentally infect na"ive cats with H. pylori. to culture H. pylori from feline salivary and gastric sections, and to find H. pylori DNA...in feline feces and dental plaque.217,218 Although peR cannot determine the viability of the H. pylori organism, these studies raised the possibility...Helicobacter pylori. Scand.J.GastroenteroLSuppl. 1995; 208:33-46:33-46. 16. Blaser MJ. Ecology of Helicobacter pylori in the human stomach. J.Clin.fnvest

  17. Rapid improvement of Henoch-Schonlein purpura associated with the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Ulas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are one of the most common bacterial infections, seen in humans, worldwide and their possible relationships to different diseases are a focus of attention nowadays. H. pylori may cause some extra intestinal manifestations some of which are dermatological conditions, including Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP, chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis. We describe a 49-year-old man who presented with HSP triggered by gastric H. pylori infection. Treatment of H. Pylori infection was accompanied by prompt resolution of the gastrointestinal manifestations and purpuric rashes. These findings suggest a causative role for H. pylori in the occurrence of HSP.

  18. Enterohepatic Helicobacter other than Helicobacter pylori

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    Beatriz Mateos Muñoz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Helicobacter genus includes Gram negative bacteria which were originally considered to belong to the Campylobacter genus. They have been classified in a separate genus since 1989 because they have different biochemical characteristics, with more than 24 species having been identified and more still being studied. H. pylori is the best known. It has an important etiopathogenic role in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Enterohepatic Helicobacter s (EHH other than H. pylori colonize the bowel, biliary tree and liver of animals and human beings with pathogenic potential. The difficulties existing to correctly isolate these microorganisms limit the description of their true prevalence and of the diseases they cause. Many studies have tried to discover the different clinical implications of EHH. Diseases like chronic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, hepatocarcinoma, autoimmune hepatobiliary disease, biliary lithiasis, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, Meckel's diverticulum, acute appendicitis and inflammatory bowel disease have been related with different EHH species with different results, although their prevalence is greater than in healthy subjects. However, these data are currently not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Finally, the best known role of EHH in bowel disease is production of acute and chronic diarrhea pictures initially referred to as Campylobacter. H. pullorum has been identified in patients with acute gastroenteritis. The correct identification of EHH as producers of infectious gastroenteritis is found in its antibiotic susceptibility. It is generally macrolide-susceptible and quinolone-resistant.

  19. [Helicobacter pylori antibiotic sensitivity by microdilution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, F; Rivera, P; Hernández, F; Hevia, F; Guillén, F; Tamayo, G

    2000-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as the major aetiologic agent of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers and also a risk factor for gastric cancer; eradication of H pylori prevents peptic ulcer recurrence and may also decrease the prevalence of gastric cancer in high risk populations around the world. Currently the only accepted indication for treatment is ulcer disease and maltosa, infected with Helicobacter pilory. However treatment is difficult and easily develops resistance. The elaboration of an antibiotic profile is recommended after a treatment failure. There is a lack of information in developing countries so the aim of this work was to determine the antibiotic profile of 51 strains isolated from patients gastric biopsies attended at Hospital San Juan de Dios in Costa Rica, using egg yolk broth and finding a resistance of 63.0% to metronidazole with a breakpoint of 8.0 microg/ml and 20.0% resistance to tetracycline (MIC1.0 microg/ml), 6.0% to clarithromicyn with a MIC of 0.125 microg/ml. There was no resistance to amoxicilin (MIC 0.015 microg/ml). The microdilution technique is very laborious, but highly reproducible with results accordingly to previous work, and we recommended it for the designing of therapeutical scheme.

  20. Iron deficiency in Helicobacter pylori infected patients in Baghdad

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    Jenan A. Muhsin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Recent studies have suggested an association of Helicobacter pylori and iron deficiency (ID.Materials and methods: To examine an association between H.pylori infection and ID, blood sampling and a data collectionsurvey were performed in 78 H.pylori infected patients and 22 healthy subjects as control. Serum ferritin and ironwere measured by ELISA and direct enzymatic method techniques respectively.Results: The result showed that 24 of the patients (30.7% have serum ferritin and iron concentrations below the normalrange indicating iron deficiency, with no significantly difference between women and men. ID was more pronounced inpatients with stomach ulcer (58.3% than those without stomach ulcer (41.7% respectively.Conclusions: The conclusion was that H.pylori infection might have a role in iron deficiency and subsequently iron deficiencyanemia. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2011; 1(3:114-117

  1. Extradigestive Manifestation of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Sherman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection fulfills each of Koch's postulates as a human pathogen causing chronic active gastritis. Disease consequences that develop in a subset of infected subjects include peptic ulcerations, gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. More recently, multiple publications have advocated a role for H pylori infection in causing a variety of extraintestinal manifestations. Many of these reports suffer from being case reports or case series without adequate controls. As a result, purported manifestations may simply be coincidental in nature. On the other hand, increasing evidence supports H pylori infection as a cause of sideropenic (refractory iron deficiency anemia. Moderate evidence supports H pylori gastric infection as a cause of some cases of immune thrombocytopenic purpura due to molecular mimicry. Guidelines should be adjusted in accordance with advancing knowledge in the field.

  2. Discovery – The Link to H.Pylori Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supported research to solidify the link between H. pylori infections and stomach cancer. As a result, new cancer treatment and prevention strategies are being developed, encouraging scientists to carefully examine other cancers for viral and bacterial connections.

  3. Diet, microbial virulence, and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, Timothy L; Peek, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the strongest known risk factors for this malignancy. H. pylori strains exhibit a high level of genetic diversity, and the risk of gastric cancer is higher in persons carrying certain strain types (for example, those that contain a cag pathogenicity island or type s1 vacA alleles) than in persons carrying other strain types. Additional risk factors for gastric cancer include specific human genetic polymorphisms and specific dietary preferences (for example, a high-salt diet or a diet deficient in fruits and vegetables). Finally, iron-deficiency anemia is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Recent studies have provided evidence that several dietary risk factors for gastric cancer directly impact H. pylori virulence. In this review article, we discuss mechanisms by which diet can modulate H. pylori virulence and thereby influence gastric cancer risk.

  4. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rajesh Vijayvergiya Ramalingam Vadivelu

    2015-01-01

    ... dysfunction, contribute in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Studies have shown a positive relations between Cytotoxic associated gene-A positive strains of Helicobacter pylori and vascular diseases such as coronary artery disease and stroke...

  5. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections: Mitigating factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... systems worldwide. The prevalence of H. pylori ... test, histology, fluorescent in situ hybridization, culture ..... spread use of CLR in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. ..... than one bird with the same stone. Ther.

  6. Risks and Benefits of Helicobacter pylori Eradication: Current Status

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    Richard H Hunt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with diseases known to be associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, such as peptic ulcer, treatment of the underlying infection is the standard of care. However, in most major consensus management guidelines, including those published in Canada, widespread testing for H pylori infection is not recommended. This practice is not encouraged because of insufficient evidence of cost-benefit in gastric cancer prevention, the potential for increases in antibiotic resistance and the controversial hypothesis of potential negative effects of eradication in certain clinical entities. For example, there is insufficient evidence to recommend against eradicating H pylori discovered in a patient with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The management guidelines designed specifically in Canada should, therefore, continue to be applied, with H pylori diagnosed and treated in appropriately selected patients.

  7. PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN PATIENTS WITH DYSPEPSIA

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    Chandrashekar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia is synonymous with commonly used non - medical term indigestion . It includes symptoms like pain , bloating , nausea & early satiety . I t is now recognized that the large majority of duodenal and gastric ulcers are caused by H. pylori infection and/or NSAID use . H. pylori infection is associated with poverty, household crowding & limited education. Colonization rates exceed 70% in some groups and vary from less than 10% to more than 80% worldwide. Several studies have revealed the association of H. pylori in 70 – 75% of patients with dyspepsia. The aim o f this study is t o study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients. To study the various upper GI endoscopy findings in dyspeptic patients.

  8. Effect of curcumin on Helicobacter pylori biofilm formation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Effect of ... to coccoid form with cell damage after curcumin treatment. Curcumin ... successively used for H. pylori treatment. However ..... bacteriophage to hydrolyze biofilm extracellular polymers.

  9. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takafumi Ando; Yasuyuki Goto; Osamu Maeda; Osamu Watanabe; Kazuhiro Ishiguro; Hidemi Goto

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most frequent cancer in the world, accounting for a large proportion of all cancer cases in Asia, Latin America, and some countries in Europe. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) is regarded as playing a specific role in the development of atrophic gastritis, which represents the most recognized pathway in multistep intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis. Recent studies suggest that a combination of host genetic factors, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental and lifestyle factors determine the severity of gastric damage and the eventual clinical outcome of H pylori infection. The seminal discovery of H pylori as the leading cause of gastric cancer should lead to effective eradication strategies. Prevention of gastric cancer requires better screening strategies to identify candidates for eradication.

  10. H pylori seropositivity and cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuaki Saijo; Eiji Yoshioka; Tomonori Fukui; Mariko Kawaharada; Fumihiro Sata; Hirokazu Sato; Reiko Kishi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the pro- and antiinflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms, IL1B-511C/T,IL1B-31C/T, IL6-634C/G, TNF-1031T/C, TNF-857C/T, and IL10-1082A/G, interact with smoking and drinking habits to influence infection with H pylori.METHODS: The subjects were 410 Japanese transit company employees. C-reactive protein and conventional cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated. Serum anti-H pylori antibodies were measured. The genotypes of IL1B-511C/T, IL1B-31C/T, IL6-634C/G, TNF-1031T/C,TNF-857C/T, and IL10-1082A/G polymorphisms were determined by allelic discrimination using fluorogenic probes and a 5'nuclease assay.RESULTS: In gender- and age-adjusted logistic analyses,the subjects with TNF-857T/T had a significantly lower odds ratio (OR) for H pylori seropositivity (reference -857C/C; OR = 0.15, 95% CI: 0.03-0.59, P = 0.007).After stratification according to smoking and drinking status, among never-smokers, the subjects with IL1B-511C/T had a significantly lower OR (reference -511C/C;OR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.10-0.90, P = 0.032). Among drinkers in the 1-5 times/wk category, the subjects with IL1B-511T/T had a significantly lower OR (reference C/C; OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.16-0.95, P = 0.039), and the subjects with IL1B-31C/T and T/T had a significantly higher OR (reference C/C; C/T: OR = 2.59, 95% CI, P =0.042: 1.04-6.47; C/C: OR = 3.17, 95% CI: 1.23-8.14,P = 0.017). Among current smokers, the subjects with IL6-634C/G had a significantly higher OR (reference C/C;OR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.13-4.58, P = 0.021). However,the interactions terms between the aforementioned genotypes and lifestyles were not statistically significant.CONCLUSION: Contrary to previous findings, the results herein suggest that the TNF-857T/T genotype may be protective against chronic infection with H pylori. Drinking and smoking habits may influence the effect of cytokine gene polymorphisms. Further studies are required to clarify the effects of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine

  11. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with protection against tuberculosis.

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    Sharon Perry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a lifelong and typically asymptomatic infection of the stomach, profoundly alters gastric immune responses, and may benefit the host in protection against other pathogens. We explored the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first examined M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma and H. pylori antibody responses in 339 healthy Northern Californians undergoing routine tuberculin skin testing. Of 97 subjects (29% meeting criteria for latent tuberculosis (TB infection (LTBI, 45 (46% were H. pylori seropositive. Subjects with LTBI who were H. pylori-seropositive had 1.5-fold higher TB antigen-induced IFN-gamma responses (p = 0.04, ANOVA, and a more Th-1 like cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to those who were H. pylori seronegative. To explore an association between H. pylori infection and clinical outcome of TB exposure, we evaluated H. pylori seroprevalence in baseline samples from two high risk TB case-contact cohorts, and from cynomolgus macaques experimentally challenged with M. tuberculosis. Compared to 513 household contacts who did not progress to active disease during a median 24 months follow-up, 120 prevalent TB cases were significantly less likely to be H. pylori infected (AOR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.0.36-0.83, p = 0.005, though seroprevalence was not significantly different from non-progressors in 37 incident TB cases (AOR: 1.35 [95% CI 0.63-2.9] p = 0.44. Cynomolgus macaques with natural H. pylori infection were significantly less likely to progress to TB 6 to 8 months after M. tuberculosis challenge (RR: 0.31 [95% CI 0.12-0.80], p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori infection may induce bystander effects that modify the risk of active TB in humans and non-human primates. That immunity to TB may be enhanced by exposure to other microbial agents may have important implications for

  12. Helicobacter pylori and Hepatitis C virus coinfection in Egyptian patients

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    El-Masry Samir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease worldwide. It has been shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori plays an important role in chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies, and its eradication has been advocated. The association between H. pylori infection and liver cirrhosis in patients with hepatitis C virus has been documented in different parts of the world; nevertheless, no conclusive data is available in Egypt. Materials and Methods: In the present study, the status of H. pylori infection was sought in 90 patients with chronic HCV infection and in 66 HCV-free healthy controls. Results: The study showed that the H. pylori positivity was increased significantly (P = 0.03 in the HCV-infected patients when compared to that in healthy controls, where H. pylori infection was found in 50 (55.6% out of 90 of the HCV-infected patients versus 26 (39.4% out of 66 of the healthy controls. In HCV-infected patients, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was increased significantly (P = 0.04 from chronic active hepatitis to cirrhosis. H. pylori infection was present in 6/18 (33.3%, 10/21 (47.6%, 16/27 (59.3%, 18/24 (75.0% patients with chronic active hepatitis, Child-Pugh score A, Child-Pugh score B and Child-Pugh score C, respectively. More importantly, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in HCV-infected patients was increased very significantly (P = 0.003 with increasing Meld (model for end-stage liver disease score. The prevalence of H. pylori was documented in 9/28 (32.1% patients with Meld score ≤10 and in 41/62 (66.1% patients with Meld score> 10. Conclusion: It may be stated that our results collectively reflect a remarkable increase in H. pylori prevalence with advancing hepatic lesions, and the eradication treatment may prove beneficial in those patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  13. Recent acquisition of Helicobacter pylori by Baka pygmies.

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    Sandra Nell

    Full Text Available Both anatomically modern humans and the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori originated in Africa, and both species have been associated for at least 100,000 years. Seven geographically distinct H. pylori populations exist, three of which are indigenous to Africa: hpAfrica1, hpAfrica2, and hpNEAfrica. The oldest and most divergent population, hpAfrica2, evolved within San hunter-gatherers, who represent one of the deepest branches of the human population tree. Anticipating the presence of ancient H. pylori lineages within all hunter-gatherer populations, we investigated the prevalence and population structure of H. pylori within Baka Pygmies in Cameroon. Gastric biopsies were obtained by esophagogastroduodenoscopy from 77 Baka from two geographically separated populations, and from 101 non-Baka individuals from neighboring agriculturalist populations, and subsequently cultured for H. pylori. Unexpectedly, Baka Pygmies showed a significantly lower H. pylori infection rate (20.8% than non-Baka (80.2%. We generated multilocus haplotypes for each H. pylori isolate by DNA sequencing, but were not able to identify Baka-specific lineages, and most isolates in our sample were assigned to hpNEAfrica or hpAfrica1. The population hpNEAfrica, a marker for the expansion of the Nilo-Saharan language family, was divided into East African and Central West African subpopulations. Similarly, a new hpAfrica1 subpopulation, identified mainly among Cameroonians, supports eastern and western expansions of Bantu languages. An age-structured transmission model shows that the low H. pylori prevalence among Baka Pygmies is achievable within the timeframe of a few hundred years and suggests that demographic factors such as small population size and unusually low life expectancy can lead to the eradication of H. pylori from individual human populations. The Baka were thus either H. pylori-free or lost their ancient lineages during past demographic fluctuations. Using

  14. Sulfated Cyclocarya paliurus polysaccharides markedly attenuates inflammation and oxidative damage in lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophage cells and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Xie, Jianhua; Yang, Yujiao; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Shengnan; Wu, Ting; Shen, Mingyue; Xie, Mingyong

    2017-01-01

    Natural polysaccharides and their modified derivatives are crucial supplements to the prevention of inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of sulfated modification on the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities of Cyclocarya paliurus polysaccharides (CP). A sulfated CP, S-CP1–4 was obtained using chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method. The chemical components and FT-IR spectrum confirmed that sulfated group was synthesized to the polysaccharide chains successfully. S-CP1–4 was found to inhibit nitric oxide production, phagocytic activity and the release of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β in lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophage cells, RAW 264.7. S-CP1–4 significantly decreased the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and the thymus and spleen indexes, and increased the production of IL-10 in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice. S-CP1–4 could better protect the liver by inhibiting the activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and malondialdehyde level while increasing the superoxide dismutase activity and total anti-oxidative capacity. These results suggested that S-CP1–4 may be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, and sulfated modification may be a reliable method for the development of food supplements. PMID:28094275

  15. Mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance and molecular testing

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiro eNishizawa; Hidekazu eSuzuki

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main factor affecting the efficacy of current treatment methods against infection caused by this organism. The traditional culture methods for testing bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are expensive and require 10 to 14 days. Since resistance to clarithromycin, fluoroquinolone, and tetracycline seems to be exclusively caused by specific mutations in a small region of the responsible gene, molecular methods offer an attracti...

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Gerrits, Monique

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAn estimated 4 to 5 million individuals in the Netherlands are actively infected with Helicobacter pylori. Eradication of this bacterium becomes more difficult as the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide. Most H. pylori infections are now diagnosed by non-invasive testing (i.e. urea breath test, serology, stool test), and thus data on antibiotic susceptibility are lacking. Furthermore, once the antibiotic susceptibility is assessed using conventional culture...

  17. Cloning and Expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Farshchian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinomaand gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. Antibiotictherapies do not protect from potential re-infection and have a risk for development of drugresistance. Therefore, prophylactic vaccine mediated protection against H. pylori is an attractiveclinical interest. H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA is a conserved surface lipoprotein and playsimportant roles in the pathogenesis of infection. In this study the recombinant protein (rHpaAwas over-expressed in E.coli.Materials and Methods: The hpaA gene was amplified by PCR. Prokaryote expression vectorpET28a-hpaA was constructed, and used to transform E.coli BL21DE3. The expressionof recombinant protein induced by IPTG was examined by SDS-PAGE. Western blot wereused to determine immunoreactivity of rHpaA by a rabbit polyclonal antibodies against wholecell of H. pylori.Results: The hpaA gene nucleotide sequence in the recombinant plasmid vector of pET-28-a-hpaA was consistent with that of H.pylori hpaA as published in the GenBank. SDS-PAGEdemonstrated that the constructed prokaryotic expression efficiently produced rHpaA at the1.5 mmol/L of IPTG. HpaA fusion protein was able to react with the rabbit polyclonal antibodyagainst whole cells of H. pylori.Conclusion: A prokaryotic expression system pET-28a-hpaA-BL21 with high efficiency of H.pylori hpaA gene was successfully established and the HpaA fusion protein showed satisfactoryimmunoreactivity. These results indicate that production of a specific recombinant proteinis an alternative and potentially more expeditious strategy for development of H. pylori vaccine.

  18. "Helicobacter Pylori Attachment To 7 Mamalian Cell Lines "

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    N. Rahimi-Fard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of chronic –active gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers in humans, and a co-factor in the occurrence of gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tumors, Adhesion of H.pylori to the gastric mucosa is a critical and also initial step in the pathogenesis of the disease. Bacterial adhesion inhibitory agents provide a novel pharmacologic approach to the management of infectious diseases. Materials and Methods: 22 H. pylori strains, isolated from the antral biopsies of 49 patients with dyspepsia, gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer,…were assayed by ELISA (UPRto investigate the diversity of attachment to 7 mamalian cell lines. Results: The concentration of H.pylori and cell suspention ,the condition and temperature, can alter the attachment rate.Best bacterial concentration was equal to 1 Mc farland,and for cell suspension was 5*10 cells/ml.90 minutes in 37C incubation period result in maximum attachment. H.pylori can attach to all 7 cell lines, there are no significant differences between 22 H.pylori strains in attachment to cells. The attachment pattern of H.pylori to the cells showed significant reduction respectly from HepII, HeLa, SW742, AGS,HT29/219, HT29 to Caco-2.Maximum attachment were seen to HepII, HeLa and SW742 cells, and among these HepII was the best cells for this purpose. Conclusion: Our studies suggest that Hep II, HeLa and SW742 cells could serve as a suitable in-vitro model for the study of H.pylori adhesions, attachment, inhibition of attachment and detachment assays and among these Hep II cell is prefer recommended.

  19. Lymphocytic gastritis is not associated with active Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jennifer A; Roberts, Cory A; Lager, Donna J; Putcha, Rajesh V; Jain, Rajeev; Lewin, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG), characterized by marked intra-epithelial lymphocytosis in the gastric mucosa, has been frequently associated with both celiac disease (CD) and H. pylori gastritis. The aim of this study was to review and correlate the morphology of LG with the presence of CD and H. pylori. Gastric biopsies diagnosed with LG from 1/1/2006 to 8/1/2013 at our institution and corresponding small bowel biopsies, when available, were reviewed for verification of the diagnosis and to assess for the presence of H. pylori and CD. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for H. pylori was performed on all gastric biopsies. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were obtained from the medical record. Fifty-four of the 56 cases that met inclusion criteria demonstrated significant intra-epithelial lymphocytosis as the predominant histologic abnormality; however, none were associated with H. pylori infection by IHC staining. Two cases that also showed a prominent intra-epithelial and lamina propria neutrophilic infiltrate were both positive for H. pylori and were excluded from further study. Of the 36 small bowel biopsies available, 19 (53%) showed changes in CD. LG is not a distinct clinicopathologic entity, but a morphologic pattern of gastric injury that can be secondary to a variety of underlying etiologies. When restricted to cases with lymphocytosis alone, LG is strongly associated with CD and not with active H. pylori infection. However, cases that also show significant neutrophilic infiltrate should be regarded as "active chronic gastritis" and are often associated with H. pylori infection. A morphologic diagnosis of LG should prompt clinical and serologic workup to exclude underlying CD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastrointestinal symptoms on Chilean pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ferrer Poveda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection on Chilean pregnant women and its relationship with the appearance and severity of hyperemesis and dyspepsia. Methods: quantitative study of prevalence in a transversal cut with variable analysis. The sample was taken from 274 Chilean pregnant women from the Bío Bío province through vein puncture between June and December, 2005. Pregnant women were informed of this study, interviewed and signed an informed consent. The samples were processed using ImmunoComb II Helicobacter pylori IgG kit. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Program. Results: out of the total number of pregnant women, 68.6% showed infection by Helicobacter pylori. 79.6% of the total sample had symptoms of dyspepsia, and 72.5% of this group presented Helicobacter pylori infection. 12.4% showed pregnancy hyperemesis; among them, 79.4% were infected with Helicobacter pylori. 73.4% of the pregnant women that showed gastric discomfort during the first three months had Helicobacter pylori infection. 53.7% of them continued with gastric discomfort after the first three months; of those, 95.8% were infected. Helicobacter pylori infection was present only in 1.5% of pregnant women without gastric discomfort. Conclusion: both, gastric discomfort of pregnant women and the continuity of severe symptoms of dyspepsia and hyperemesis after the first three months of gestation are significantly correlated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  1. Antibiotic resistance among Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Valdivieso, Manuel; Bussalleu, Alejandro; Sexton, Rachael; Thompson, Kathryn C; Osorio, Soledad; Reyes, Italo Novoa; Crowley, John J; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Gastric carcinoma is the most common cancer and cause of cancer mortality in Peru. Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach, is a Group 1 carcinogen due to its causal relationship to gastric carcinoma. While eradication of H. pylori can help prevent gastric cancer, characterizing regional antibiotic resistance patterns is necessary to determine targeted treatment for each region. Thus, we examined primary antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of H. pylori in Lima, Peru. Materials and methods H. pylori strains were isolated from gastric biopsies of patients with histologically proven H. pylori infection. Primary antibiotic resistance among isolates was examined using E-test strips. Isolates were examined for the presence of the cagA pathogenicity island and the vacA m1/m2 alleles via polymerase chain reaction. Results Seventy-six isolates were recovered from gastric biopsies. Clinical isolates showed evidence of antibiotic resistance to 1 (27.6%, n=21/76), 2 (28.9%, n=22/76), or ≥3 antibiotics (40.8%). Of 76 isolates, eight (10.5%) were resistant to amoxicillin and clarithromycin, which are part of the standard triple therapy for H. pylori infection. No trends were seen between the presence of cagA, vacA m1, or vacA m2 and antibiotic resistance. Conclusion The rate of antibiotic resistance among H. pylori isolates in Lima, Peru, is higher than expected and presents cause for concern. To develop more targeted eradication therapies for H. pylori in Peru, more research is needed to better characterize antibiotic resistance among a larger number of clinical isolates prospectively. PMID:28331349

  2. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fund...

  3. Characterization of Patients with Helicobacter pylori-Negative Peptic Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Hernández Conde; Guillermo Noa Pedroso; Carlos Domínguez Álvarez; Isabel Mora Díaz; Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola; Yagén Pomares Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Background: the rate of Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers is increasing. Treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other ulcerogenic drugs plays a significant role.Objective: to characterize patients with Helicobacter pylori-negative peptic ulcer. Methods: a case series study of patients attended by the Gastroenterology Service of the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital was conducted in the year 2009. Demographic, epidemiological, clinical, endoscopic and histological variables were ...

  4. A novel one-step Helicobacter pylori saliva antigen test

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    Bi-Ling Yang

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: The one-step HPS test exhibited a high sensitivity and low specificity compared with the other tests, indicating that it is not sufficiently accurate for use in a clinical setting for diagnosing H. pylori infection. However, the test is simple to use (requiring only a saliva sample, inexpensive, and noninvasive in its application, and thus appealing for use in population-based prevalence surveys of the epidemiology of H. pylori infection.

  5. Diet, microbial virulence, and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cover, Timothy L.; Peek, Jr, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the strongest known risk factors for this malignancy. H. pylori strains exhibit a high level of genetic diversity, and the risk of gastric cancer is higher in persons carrying certain strain types (for example, those that contain a cag pathogenicity island or type s1 vacA alleles) than in persons carrying other strain types. Additional risk factors for gastric cancer includ...

  6. Helicobacter pylori Antigens Inducing Early Immune Response in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji Hyun; Youn, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Eun A; Jun, Jin Su; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae Young; Woo, Hyang Ok; Youn, Hee Shang; Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Park, Jin Sik; Baik, Seung Chul; Lee, Woo Kon; Cho, Myung Je; Rhee, Kwang Ho

    2017-07-01

    To identify the Helicobacter pylori antigens operating during early infection in sera from infected infants using proteomics and immunoblot analysis. Two-dimensional (2D) large and small gel electrophoresis was performed using H. pylori strain 51. We performed 2D immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA), and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody immunoblotting using small gels on sera collected at the Gyeongsang National University Hospital from 4-11-month-old infants confirmed with H. pylori infection by pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. Immunoblot spots appearing to represent early infection markers in infant sera were compared to those of the large 2D gel for H. pylori strain 51. Corresponding spots were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The peptide fingerprints obtained were searched in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. Eight infant patients were confirmed with H. pylori infection based on urease tests, histopathologic examinations, and pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. One infant showed a 2D IgM immunoblot pattern that seemed to represent early infection. Immunoblot spots were compared with those from whole-cell extracts of H. pylori strain 51 and 18 spots were excised, digested in gel, and analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. Of the 10 peptide fingerprints obtained, the H. pylori proteins flagellin A (FlaA), urease β subunit (UreB), pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR), and translation elongation factor Ts (EF-Ts) were identified and appeared to be active during the early infection periods. These results might aid identification of serological markers for the serodiagnosis of early H. pylori infection in infants. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  7. Role of food in environmental transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Mohammad; Vahedi, Amin; Maghdouri, Zahra; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a gram-negative bacterium that has infected more than half of the world's population. This pathogen colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is usually acquired during childhood. It is an important cause of peptic ulcers, chronic gastritis and stomach cancer. Among the risk factors for acquisition of H. pylori infection, poor socioeconomic status, poor sanitization and hygiene practices, and contaminated food and water, are the most significant ones. The main route of H. pylori transmission is still unknown. Studies show that H.pylori bacteria can spread directly from one person to the other, or indirectly from an infected person to the environment. Person to person transmission is divided into fecal-oral, gastric-oral, oral-oral, sexual routes. Presently, interpersonal pathways are more acceptable than environmental exposure routes. Literatures indicate the presence and survival of H. pylori in food samples, such as milk, vegetables and meat, and suggest these foods may play an important role in the environmental transmission of this pathogen. In addition, other studies report the presence of H. pylori in the gastric tissue of some animals (e.g. sheep and cow) and therefore, it is likely they participate in the food chain transmission as reservoirs besides human. Although there are findings which indicate the probable role of food products in the environmental transmission of H. pylori, there is still not enough direct evidence to confirm this and more studies are needed. However, attention to food contamination sources (unhygienic water) and controlling them may prevent transmission of pathogens associated with health.

  8. Relatedness of Helicobacter pylori populations to gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Shu-Hui Zhan; Li-Li Wang; Yong-Ning Xin; Man Jiang; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects half of the human population.The infection is associated with chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and peptic ulcers.It is also a major risk factor for gastric cancer.Phylogenetic analysis of global strains reveals there are seven populations of H.pylori,including hpAfrica1,hpAfrica2,hpEastAsia,hpEurope,hpNEAfrica,hpAsia2 and hpSahul.These populations are consistent with their geographical origins,and possibly result from geographical separation of the bacterium leading to reduced bacterial recombination in some populations.For each population,H.pylori has evolved to possess genomic contents distinguishable from others.The hpEurope population is distinct in that it has the largest genome of 1.65 mbp on average,and the highest number of coding sequences.This confers its competitive advantage over other populations but at the cost of a lower infection rate.The large genomic size could be a cause of the frequent occurrence of the deletion of the cag pathogenicity island in H.pylori strains from hpEurope.The incidence of gastric cancer varies among different geographical regions.This can be attributed in part to different rates of infection of H.pylori.Recent studies found that different populations of H.pylori vary in their carcinogenic potential and contribute to the variation in incidence of gastric cancer among geographical regions.This could be related to the ancestral origin of H.pylori.Further studies are indicated to investigate the bacterial factors contributing to differential virulence and their influence on the dinical features in infected individuals.

  9. Age of the association between Helicobacter pylori and man.

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    Yoshan Moodley

    Full Text Available When modern humans left Africa ca. 60,000 years ago (60 kya, they were already infected with Helicobacter pylori, and these bacteria have subsequently diversified in parallel with their human hosts. But how long were humans infected by H. pylori prior to the out-of-Africa event? Did this co-evolution predate the emergence of modern humans, spanning the species divide? To answer these questions, we investigated the diversity of H. pylori in Africa, where both humans and H. pylori originated. Three distinct H. pylori populations are native to Africa: hpNEAfrica in Afro-Asiatic and Nilo-Saharan speakers, hpAfrica1 in Niger-Congo speakers and hpAfrica2 in South Africa. Rather than representing a sustained co-evolution over millions of years, we find that the coalescent for all H. pylori plus its closest relative H. acinonychis dates to 88-116 kya. At that time the phylogeny split into two primary super-lineages, one of which is associated with the former hunter-gatherers in southern Africa known as the San. H. acinonychis, which infects large felines, resulted from a later host jump from the San, 43-56 kya. These dating estimates, together with striking phylogenetic and quantitative human-bacterial similarities show that H. pylori is approximately as old as are anatomically modern humans. They also suggest that H. pylori may have been acquired via a single host jump from an unknown, non-human host. We also find evidence for a second Out of Africa migration in the last 52,000 years, because hpEurope is a hybrid population between hpAsia2 and hpNEAfrica, the latter of which arose in northeast Africa 36-52 kya, after the Out of Africa migrations around 60 kya.

  10. Comparative genomics of a Helicobacter pylori isolate from a Chinese Yunnan Naxi ethnic aborigine suggests high genetic divergence and phage insertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanhai You

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a common pathogen correlated with several severe digestive diseases. It has been reported that isolates associated with different geographic areas, different diseases and different individuals might have variable genomic features. Here, we describe draft genomic sequences of H. pylori strains YN4-84 and YN1-91 isolated from patients with gastritis from the Naxi and Han populations of Yunnan, China, respectively. The draft sequences were compared to 45 other publically available genomes, and a total of 1059 core genes were identified. Genes involved in restriction modification systems, type four secretion system three (TFS3 and type four secretion system four (TFS4, were identified as highly divergent. Both YN4-84 and YN1-91 harbor intact cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI and have EPIYA-A/B/D type at the carboxyl terminal of cagA. The vacA gene type is s1m2i1. Another major finding was a 32.5-kb prophage integrated in the YN4-84 genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (30/33 with Helicobacter pylori prophage KHP30. Moreover, a 1,886 bp transposable sequence (IS605 was found in the prophage. Our results imply that the Naxi ethnic minority isolate YN4-84 and Han isolate YN1-91 belong to the hspEAsia subgroup and have diverse genome structure. The genome has been extensively modified in several regions involved in horizontal DNA transfer. The important roles played by phages in the ecology and microevolution of H. pylori were further emphasized. The current data will provide valuable information regarding the H. pylori genome based on historic human migrations and population structure.

  11. Readers of histone modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miyong Yun; Jun Wu; Jerry L Workman; Bing Li

    2011-01-01

    Histone modifications not only play important roles in regulating chromatin structure and nuclear processes but also can be passed to daughter cells as epigenetic marks.Accumulating evidence suggests that the key function of histone modifications is to signal for recruitment or activity of downstream effectors. Here, we discuss the latest discovery of histone-modification readers and how the modification language is interpreted.

  12. Infezioni da H.pylori. Diagnosi: il ruolo del gastroenterologo

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    Claudia Guatti Zuliani

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of H. pylori infection: the role of gastroenterologist Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection can be diagnosed by invasive techniques requiring endoscopy and biopsy (histological examination, rapid urease test, culture and by non invasive techniques (serology, urea breath test, detection of H. pylori antigen stool specimen.At present, no single test can be absolutely relied upon to detect colonization by H. pylori and a combination of two tests is recommended if feasible.Nevertheless, in routine dayto- day clinical practice H. pylori diagnosis is often by a single test and consequently the choice of the more suitable test is even more important. Choosing among them is not easy, and several issues need to be considered, such as the clinical situation, (i.e. present symptoms and past medical history, age of patients, if it is first diagnosis or follow-up after treatment.., sensitivity and specificity of the test, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy, the availability of the test, the local expertise . Since the “Ideal test” is not relied, the gastroenterologist or clinician as well, has the important role of deciding which test to employ. A good knowledge of advantages and vantages of each test is so necessary to make the best choose as possible.

  13. [The diagnostic of chronic infection Helicobacter pylori in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereschenko, S Yu; Olkhovskiy, I A

    2014-02-01

    The epidemiological studies testify an extremely high prevalence of chronic infection of children with Helicobacter pylori in Russia. The affection consists from 50% to 80% depending on region and age of examined children. The currently in force recommendations "Maastricht IV" concerning diagnostic and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection adult patients are applied not in its fullness to children adolescent population. At the same time recently published joint conciliatory document of the European and North American associations of pediatric gastroenterologists is oriented to populations with low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and particular profile of drug resistance. Hence, an urgent need exists to develop modern local algorithm concerning diagnostic, treatment and control of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection among children and adolescents in Russia. The review presents analysis of admissibility of application in Russia's conditions of the international conciliatory documents concerning diagnostic of Helicobacter pylori infection in children. The data from conciliatory document of the European (ESPGHAN) and North American (NASPGHAN) associations of pediatric gastroenterologists, particular orginal research studies and one's own clinical experience were used. The advantages and shortcomings of actual methods of laboratory diagnostic of Helicobacter pylori infection are discussed. The approaches to application of particular diagnostic methods are considered. The enhanced indications to detection of infection and implementation of eradication therapy are proposed.

  14. Methods for detecting the environmental coccoid form of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz eMazaheri Assadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is recognized as the most common pathogen to cause gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. The organisms are found in two forms: 1 spiral-shaped bacillus and 2 coccoid. H. pylori coccoid form, generally found in the environment, is the transformed form of the normal spiral-shaped bacillus after exposed to water or adverse environmental conditions such as exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents. The putative infectious capability and the viability of H. pylori under environmental conditions are controversial. This disagreement is partially due to the fact of lack in detecting the coccoid form of H. pylori in the environment. Accurate and effective detection methods of H. pylori will lead to rapid treatment and disinfection, and less human health damages and reduction in health care costs. In this review, we provide a brief introduction to H. pylori environmental coccoid forms, their transmission and detection methods. We further discuss the use of these detection methods including their accuracy and efficiency.

  15. Evaluation of Salivary Antibodies to Detect Infection with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B Loeb

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and chronic gastritis. Infection with this bacterium stimulates the production of immunoglobulin (Ig G antibody. Salivary IgG antibody tests to detect H pylori infection offer a convenient and noninvasive method of diagnosis. To evaluate an IgG salivary antibody kit, saliva was collected from 157 out-patients with dyspepsia referred for endoscopy to a tertiary centre. A salivary IgG ELISA antibody assay was performed using the Helisal Helicobacter pylori (IgG assay kit, and at least four gastric biopsies were obtained. H pylori infection was confirmed by demonstration of the organism on Warthin-Starry silver stain (sensitivity 85%, specificity 55%. The prevalence of infection with H pylori was 30%. When the analysis was redone, excluding those treated with eradication therapy, the results were similar (sensitivity 86%, specificity 58%. The positive predictive value of the assay was 45% and the negative predictive value was 90%. Despite the ease of sampling, the assay used has limited diagnostic utility, lacking the predictive value to indicate which patients referred with dyspeptic symptoms to a tertiary care setting are infected with H pylori.

  16. [Helicobacter pylori gastritis: assessment of OLGA and OLGIM staging systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Slama, Sana; Ben Ghachem, Dorra; Dhaoui, Amen; Jomni, Mohamed Taieb; Dougui, Mohamed Hédi; Bellil, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) gastritis presents a risk of cancer related to atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Two recent classifications OLGA (Operative Link on Gastritis Assessment) and OLGIM (Operative Link on Gastritic Intestinal Metaplasia assessment) have been proposed to identify high-risk forms (stages III and IV). The aim of this study is to evaluate the OLGA and OLGIM staging systems in H pylori gastritis. A descriptive study of 100 cases of chronic H pylori gastritis was performed. The revaluation of Sydney System parameters of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, of gastric antrum and corpus, allowed identifying respectively the stages of OLGA and OLGIM systems. The progressive risk of our H pylori gastritis was 6% according to OLGA staging and 7% according to OLGIM staging. Significant correlation was revealed between age and OLGA staging. High-risk gastritis according to OLGIM staging was significantly associated with moderate to severe atrophy. High-risk forms according to OLGA staging were associated in 80% of the cases to intestinal metaplasia. OLGA and OLGIM systems showed a highly significant positive correlation between them with a mismatch at 5% for H pylori gastritis. The OLGA and OLGIM staging systems in addition to Sydney System, allow selection of high risk forms of chronic gastritis requiring accurate observation.

  17. Use of probiotics in the fight against Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo; Ruggiero

    2014-01-01

    After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori), and the evidence of its relationship with gastric diseas-es, antibiotic-based therapies were developed, which efficacy was however limited by antibiotic resistance and lack of patient compliance. A vaccine would over-come these drawbacks, but currently there is not any H. pylori vaccine licensed. In the frame of the studies aimed at finding alternative therapies or at increasing the efficacy of the current ones and/or reducing their side effects, the investigation on the use of probiotics plays an interesting role. In vitro and preclinical stud-ies have shown the feasibility of this approach. Several clinical trials indicated that administration of probiot-ics can reduce the side effects of H. pylori eradication treatment, increasing tolerability, and often increases the overall efficacy. The results of these trials vary, likely reflecting the variety of probiotics assessed and that of the eradication treatment, as well as the differ-ences in the geographic area that imply different H. py-lori strains distribution, host susceptibility, and therapy efficacy. In conclusion, the use of probiotics appears promising as an adjuvant for the current H. pylori erad-ication treatment, though it still requires optimization.

  18. Effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastric epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Shatha; Lina, Taslima T; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium has cells with features that make them a powerful line of defense in innate mucosal immunity. Features that allow gastrointestinal epithelial cells to contribute in innate defense include cell barrier integrity, cell turnover, autophagy, and innate immune responses. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a spiral shape gram negative bacterium that selectively colonizes the gastric epithelium of more than half of the world’s population. The infection invariably becomes persistent due to highly specialized mechanisms that facilitate H. pylori’s avoidance of this initial line of host defense as well as adaptive immune mechanisms. The host response is thus unsuccessful in clearing the infection and as a result becomes established as a persistent infection promoting chronic inflammation. In some individuals the associated inflammation contributes to ulcerogenesis or neoplasia. H. pylori has an array of different strategies to interact intimately with epithelial cells and manipulate their cellular processes and functions. Among the multiple aspects that H. pylori affects in gastric epithelial cells are their distribution of epithelial junctions, DNA damage, apoptosis, proliferation, stimulation of cytokine production, and cell transformation. Some of these processes are initiated as a result of the activation of signaling mechanisms activated on binding of H. pylori to cell surface receptors or via soluble virulence factors that gain access to the epithelium. The multiple responses by the epithelium to the infection contribute to pathogenesis associated with H. pylori. PMID:25278677

  19. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: Past, present and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasilios; Papastergiou; Sotirios; D; Georgopoulos; Stylianos; Karatapanis

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is a major human patho-gen associated with significant morbidity and mortal-ity. However, after decades of efforts, treatment of H. pylori remains a challenge for physicians, as there is no universally effective regimen. Due to the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, mainly to clar-ithromycin, efficacy of standard triple therapies has declined to unacceptably low levels in most parts of the world. Novel regimens, specifically experimented to improve the therapeutic outcome against antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains, are now recommended as first-line empirical treatment options providing high ef-ficacy(reportedly > 90% in intention to treat analysis) even in high clarithromycin resistance settings. These include the bismuth quadruple, concomitant, sequential and hybrid therapies. Due to the rapid development of quinolone resistance, levofloxacin-based regimens should be reserved as second-line/rescue options. Adjunct use of probiotics has been proposed in order to boost eradication rates and decrease occurrence of treatment-related side effects. Molecular testing meth-ods are currently available for the characterization of H. pylori therapeutic susceptibility, including genotypic detection of macrolide resistance and evaluation of the cytochrome P450 2C19 status known to affect the me-tabolism of proton pump inhibitors. In the future, use of these techniques may allow for culture-free, non-invasive tailoring of therapy for H. pylori infection.

  20. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori : Is the end coming?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su; Young; Kim; Duck; Joo; Choi; Jun-Won; Chung

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) has been associated with gastroduodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a groupI carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacil us. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication.

  1. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vahid Mirzaee; Mahsa Molaei; Hamid Mohaghegh Shalmani; Mohammad Reza Zali

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To determine the expression of DNA (MMR)proteins,including hMLH1 and hMSH2,in gastric epithelial cells in the patients with or without Hellcobacter pylori(H pylori)-infected gastritis.METHODS:Fifty H pylori-positive patients and 50 H pylori-negative patients were enrolled in the study.During endoscopy of patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia,two antral and two corpus biopsies were taken for histological examination (Giemsa stain)and for immunohistochemical staining of hMLH1 and hMSH2.RESULTS:The percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMLH1 staining was 84.14±7.32% in Hpylori-negative patients,while it was 73.34±10.10% in Hpylori-positive patients (P <0.0001).No significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMSH2 staining (81.16±8.32% in H pylori-negative versus 78.24±8.71% in Hpylori-positive patients,P=0.09).CONCLUSION:This study indicates that H pylori might promote development of gastric carcinoma at least in part through its ability to affect the DNA MMR system.

  3. Relationship Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Seif-Rabiei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There is some evidence indicating the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal diseases including skin, vascular, and autoimmune disorders, as well as some respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between H. pylori and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In a case-control study, 90 patients with COPD and 90 age- and sex- matched control subjects were included. Serum samples were tested for anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA IgG by ELISA. A physician completed a questionnaire including demographic characteristics, habitual history, and spirometric findings for each patient. Of 90 patients with COPD 66 (51% had mild, 31 (34.4% moderate, and 13 (14.4% sever disease. There was no significant association between H. pylori IgG seropositivity and COPD. Serum levels of anti-CagA IgG were significantly higher in patients with COPD than in the control subjects (P < 0.001. No association was observed between H. pylori infection and severity of COPD. The results suggest that there is an association between CagA-positive H. pylori infections and COPD. Further studies should be planned to investigate the potential pathogenic mechanisms that might underlie these associations.

  4. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  5. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie SW; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes. PMID:26523098

  6. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication. PMID:26558152

  7. A 20-minute breath test for helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, B.J.; Plankey, M.W.; Hoffman, S.R.; Boyd, C.L.; Dye, K.R.; Frierson, H.F. Jr.; Guerrant, R.L.; McCallum, R.W. (Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville (USA))

    1991-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated a simplified rapid {sup 14}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. Fasting patients undergoing initial assessment for H. pylori drank 5 microCi of {sup 14}C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath was collected at intervals for 30 min. Samples were counted in a beta-counter, and the results were expressed as counts per minute (cpm). In the same week, patients underwent endoscopy, and a blinded investigator examined biopsy samples of gastric mucosa by culture and histology for H. pylori. There were 49 H. pylori-negative (HP-) and 104 H. pylori-positive (HP+) patients in the study. HP+ patients expired a mean of 4398 cpm (SD 2468) per mmol CO{sub 2} in a sample taken 20 min after ingestion of the isotope. In contrast, HP--patients expired only 340 cpm (SD 196). If the mean +3 SD of HP- patients was used as a cutoff value, the 20-minute sample gave a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% for detecting H. pylori. The radiation exposure from this test is less than 1% of that received from an upper gastrointestinal series, and the short collection time makes it both convenient and cost effective.

  8. Statin Decreases Helicobacter pylori Burden in Macrophages by Promoting Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Chih; Huang, Mei-Zi; Wang, Michelle Lily; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lu, Tzu-Li; Lo, Horng-Ren; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Sun, Yu-Chen; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lim, Hui-Jing; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been found to provide protective effects against several bacterial infectious diseases. Although the use of statins has been shown to enhance antimicrobial treated Helicobacter pylori eradication and reduce H. pylori-mediated inflammation, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear. In this study, in vitro and ex vivo macrophage models were established to investigate the molecular pathways involved in statin-mediated inhibition of H. pylori-induced inflammation. Our study showed that statin treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intracellular H. pylori burden in both RAW264.7 macrophage cells and murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). Furthermore, statin yielded enhanced early endosome maturation and subsequent activation of the autophagy pathway, which promotes lysosomal fusion resulting in degradation of sequestered bacteria, and in turn attenuates interleukin (IL)-1β production. These results indicate that statin not only reduces cellular cholesterol but also decreases the H. pylori burden in macrophages by promoting autophagy, consequently alleviating H. pylori-induced inflammation. PMID:28144585

  9. Analysis of the urinary peptidome associated with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Xiao; Fan-Liang Meng; Li-Hua He; Yi-Xin Gu; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between urinary peptide changes and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection using urinary peptidome profiling.METHODS: The study was performed in volunteers (n= 137) who gave informed consent. Urinary peptides were enriched by magnetic beads based weak cation exchange chromatography and spectrums acquired by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). ClinProTools bioinformatics software was used for statistical analysis and the recognition of peptide patterns. The marker peptides were identified by LTQ Obitrap XL tandem MS.RESULTS: Approximately 50 proteins or peptides which loaded onto the magnetic beads were detected by MALDI-TOF MS. By optimizing the parameters of the model,the Genetic Algorithm model had good recognition capability (97%) and positive predictive value (94%).Based on the model, 2 markers with molecular masses of 6788 and 1912 Da were found that differentiated between H. pylori positive and negative volunteers.The m/z 1912 sequence was parsed as SKQFTSSTSYNRGDSTF.The peptide was identified as isoform 1 of the fibrinogen α chain precursor, whose concentration in urine was markedly higher in H. pylori infected volunteers than in H. pylori non-infected ones.CONCLUSION: The appearance of urinary fibrinogen degradation products is caused by an active H. pylori -induced process.

  10. Primary Antibiotic Resistance of Helicobacter pylori in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is the most important factor leading to the failure of eradication regimens; thus, it is important to obtain regional antibiotic resistance information. This review focuses on the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone in China. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biomedical databases from the earliest date of each database to October 2016. The search terms included the following: H. pylori, antibiotic (including clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone) resistance with or without China or different regions of China. The data analysis was performed using MedCalc 15.2.2. Each article was weighted according to the number of isolated H. pylori strains. A pooled proportion analysis was performed. Twenty-three studies (14 studies in English and 9 in Chinese) were included in this review. A total of 6274, 6418, 3921, 5468, 2802, and 275 H. pylori strains were included in this review to evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone, respectively. Overall, the primary resistance rates of clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were 28.9, 63.8, 28.0, 3.1, 3.9, and 1.7%, respectively. In China, the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was high and increased over time, whereas the resistance rates to amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were low and stable over time.

  11. Linezolid susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori, including strains with multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Evstatiev, Ivailo; Gergova, Galina; Yaneva, Penka; Mitov, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Only a few studies have evaluated Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to linezolid. The aim of the present study was to assess linezolid susceptibility in H. pylori, including strains with double/multidrug resistance. The susceptibility of 53 H. pylori strains was evaluated by Etest and a breakpoint susceptibility testing method. Helicobacter pylori resistance rates were as follows: amoxicillin, 1.9%; metronidazole, 37.7%; clarithromycin, 17.0%; tetracycline, 1.9%; levofloxacin, 24.5%; and linezolid (>4 mg/L), 39.6%. The linezolid MIC50 value was 31.2-fold higher than that of clarithromycin and 10.5-fold higher than that of levofloxacin; however, 4 of 11 strains with double/multidrug resistance were linezolid-susceptible. The MIC range of the oxazolidinone agent was larger (0.125-64 mg/L) compared with those in the previous two reports. The linezolid resistance rate was 2.2-fold higher in metronidazole-resistant strains and in strains resistant to at least one antibiotic compared with the remaining strains. Briefly, linezolid was less active against H. pylori compared with clarithromycin and levofloxacin, and linezolid resistance was linked to resistance to metronidazole as well as to resistance to at least one antibiotic. However, linezolid activity against some strains with double/multidrug resistance may render the agent appropriate to treat some associated H. pylori infections following in vitro susceptibility testing of the strains. Clinical trials are required to confirm this suggestion.

  12. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie S W; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-10-28

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes.

  13. Antigenic proteins of Helicobacter pylori of potential diagnostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilpour, Akbar; Santhanam, Amutha; Wei, Lee Chun; Saadatnia, Geita; Velusamy, Nagarajan; Osman, Sabariah; Mohamad, Ahmad Munir; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori antigen was prepared from an isolate from a patient with a duodenal ulcer. Serum samples were obtained from culture-positive H. pylori infected patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers and gastritis (n=30). As controls, three kinds of sera without detectable H. pylori IgG antibodies were used: 30 from healthy individuals without history of gastric disorders, 30 from patients who were seen in the endoscopy clinic but were H. pylori culture negative and 30 from people with other diseases. OFF-GEL electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and Western blots of individual serum samples were used to identify protein bands with good sensitivity and specificity when probed with the above sera and HRP-conjugated anti-human IgG. Four H. pylori protein bands showed good (≥ 70%) sensitivity and high specificity (98-100%) towards anti-Helicobacter IgG antibody in culture- positive patients sera and control sera, respectively. The identities of the antigenic proteins were elucidated by mass spectrometry. The relative molecular weights and the identities of the proteins, based on MALDI TOF/ TOF, were as follows: CagI (25 kDa), urease G accessory protein (25 kDa), UreB (63 kDa) and proline/pyrroline- 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (118 KDa). These identified proteins, singly and/or in combinations, may be useful for diagnosis of H. pylori infection in patients.

  14. DMPD: Lipopolysaccharide-binding molecules: transporters, blockers and sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15241548 Lipopolysaccharide-binding molecules: transporters, blockers and sensors. ...orters, blockers and sensors. PubmedID 15241548 Title Lipopolysaccharide-binding molecules: transport...Chaby R. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2004 Jul;61(14):1697-713. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Lipopolysaccharide-binding molecules: transp

  15. Early Development of Refl ux Esophagitis after Successful Helicobacter Pylori Eradication in Superfi cial Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H H Jeon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between gastroesophageal refl ux disease (GERD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori eradication is still debated. Recently, we had a patient of GERD who had developed it shortly after H. pylori eradication therapy. A 72-year-old man was diagnosed by endoscopy as suffering from severe superfi cial gastritis in the stomach body. A rapid urease test showed H. pylori infection. He was then started on proton pump inhibitor (PPI based therapy for two weeks eradicating H.pylori. After completion of H. pylori eradication, he complained of a heart-burn sensation. Follow-up endoscopy showed refl ux esophagitis, of grade B according to the Los Angeles classifi cation. Since the patient had developed GERD after completion of the triple therapy, their suggests that H. pylori eradication must have triggered the development of de novo GERD after a short period of time. Keywords: GERD, Helicobacter pylori, PPI.

  16. Diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori Infection is Associated with Lower Prevalence and Subsequent Incidence of Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Lars E; Jepsen, Peter; Christensen, Lisbet A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Helicobacter pylori infection may protect against some chronic inflammatory diseases. This study examined H. pylori infection and its association with the prevalence of the gastrointestinal diseases Crohn's disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC], and coeliac disease [Ce...

  17. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  18. [Expanded indication of National Health Insurance for H. pylori associated gastritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Mototsugu

    2014-05-01

    Since National Health Insurance covered eradication therapy for H. pylori infected gastritis, all patients with H. pylori infection could be received eradication under insurance. Cure of H. pylori infection improves histological gastritis, also atrophic change, and intestinal metaplasia. Prevention of H. pylori associated diseases such as gastric cancer is expected. According to Insurance instruction, it is carried out in order of endoscopic diagnosis of chronic gastritis, diagnosis of H. pylori infection, and eradication treatment. Endoscopic examination prior to H. pylori diagnosis is necessary for screening of gastric cancer. Endoscopic finding of RAC (regular arrangement of collecting venules) in the angle of stomach suggests lack of infection with H. pylori, disappearance of RAC suspects H. pylori infection.

  19. [Relationship between Helicobacter pylori status and the development of reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Tomita, Toshihiko; Oshima, Tadayuki; Fukui, Hirokazu; Miwa, Hiroto

    2013-08-01

    To date, there are many studies on the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here we reviewed the relationship between H. pylori status and the development of reflux esophagitis (RE) or Barrett's esophagus (BE). According to many case-controlled studies, H. pylori infection may play a protective role in the development of RE. However, the frequency of RE development does not increase following successful H. pylori treatment based on the previous studies including meta-analysis and systematic review. Even though RE newly develops after H. pylori eradication, endoscopic findings reveal mild such as grade A or B according to the Los Angeles Classification System. With regard to BE, there is an inverse significant relationship. Since there are few studies indicating that BE increases after treatment of H. pylori, the eradication should be recommended for patients with H. pylori infection irrespective of the presence of RE or BE even in terms of the prevention of gastric cancer.

  20. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori virulence genotypes among children in Eastern Turkey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ozbey, Gokben; Dogan, Yasar; Demiroren, Kaan

    2013-01-01

    To identify the virulence genotypes of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) if present in children in Eastern Turkey and if those genotypes are mostly associated with severe clinical presentations. A total of 49 H...

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection amongst Arab Israeli women with hyperemesis gravidarum—a prospective, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Boltin

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: H. pylori does not seem to increase the likelihood of hyperemesis gravidarum in Arab Israeli women. However, given the high background prevalence of H. pylori in this population, a larger study is required to corroborate these findings. (MOH20110066

  2. The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and hyperemesis gravidarum in pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Ghasempour Shirazi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: There is no relationship between helicobacter pylori and hyperemesis gravidarum in pregnant woman. Considering the high prevalence of H. pylori infection in our country, there is a need for studies with more samples and more diagnostic methods.

  3. Molecular and Structural Basis of Inner Core Lipopolysaccharide Alterations in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gracjana; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Lindner, Buko; Kobylak, Natalia; Brade, Helmut; Raina, Satish

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) often carries nonstoichiometric substitutions in lipid A and in the inner core. In this work, the molecular basis of inner core alterations and their physiological significance are addressed. A new inner core modification of LPS is described, which arises due to the addition of glucuronic acid on the third heptose with a concomitant loss of phosphate on the second heptose. This was shown by chemical and structural analyses. Furthermore, the gene whose product is responsible for the addition of this sugar was identified in all Escherichia coli core types and in Salmonella and was designated waaH. Its deduced amino acid sequence exhibits homology to glycosyltransferase family 2. The transcription of the waaH gene is positively regulated by the PhoB/R two-component system in a growth phase-dependent manner, which is coordinated with the transcription of the ugd gene explaining the genetic basis of this modification. Glucuronic acid modification was observed in E. coli B, K12, R2, and R4 core types and in Salmonella. We also show that the phosphoethanolamine (P-EtN) addition on heptose I in E. coli K12 requires the product of the ORF yijP, a new gene designated as eptC. Incorporation of P-EtN is also positively regulated by PhoB/R, although it can occur at a basal level without a requirement for any regulatory inducible systems. This P-EtN modification is essential for resistance to a variety of factors, which destabilize the outer membrane like the addition of SDS or challenge to sublethal concentrations of Zn2+. PMID:23372159

  4. Bordetella pertussis lipid A glucosamine modification confers resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and increases resistance to outer membrane perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nita R; Hancock, Robert E W; Fernandez, Rachel C

    2014-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, has many strategies for evading the human immune system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important Gram-negative bacterial surface structure that activates the immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 and enables susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). We show modification of the lipid A region of LPS with glucosamine increased resistance to numerous CAMPs, including LL-37. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this glucosamine modification increased resistance to outer membrane perturbation.

  5. Influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on ghrelin levels in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Hui Deng; Bo Chu; Ya-Zhen Xu; Bin Zhang; Li-Rong Jiang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare ghrelin levels in plasma and gastric mucosa before and after Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori)treatment in children with H.pylori-associated functional dyspepsia.METHODS:Children with H.pylori-associated functional dyspepsia were enrolled in this study.H.pylori infection was confirmed by positive bacterial culture results.All of the children received triple H.pylori eradication therapy (a 2 wk course of omeprazole,amoxicillin,and clarithromycin).The children were divided into two groups based on the success of the H.pylori treatment:group 1 (eradicated)-patients who had a negative 13C-urea breath test 2 mo after the end of therapy; and group 2 (non-eradicated)-patients who had a positive 13C-urea breath test.Plasma ghrelin,gastric ghrelin mRNA,and the body mass index were evaluated in both groups before and after the H.pylori treatment.The plasma ghrelin levels were measured by a radioimmunoassay.The expression of gastric gnrelin mRNA was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS:A total of 50 children with H.pylori-associated functional dyspepsia were treated with triple H.pylori eradication therapy.The mean age of the children was 5.52 ± 0.83 years,and there were 28 males and 22 females.Among the 50H.pylori-positive children,30 successfully achieved eradication,and 20 did not.The mean plasma ghrelin levels of group 1 were 22.17 ± 1.73 ng/L and 26.59 ± 2.05 ng/L before and after the treatment,respectively,which was a significant increase (P =0.001).However,the mean plasma ghrelin level of group 2 before and after the H.pylori treatment was 21.34 ± 2.40 ng/L and 22.24 ± 2.10ng/L (P =0.785).The plasma ghrelin levels increased substantially after treatment in group 1 but showed only minor changes in group 2.Similarly,the gastric ghrelin mRNA expression in group 1 before treatment was 2.84 ± 0.08.After treatment,the level was 3.11± 0.65,which was significantly different (P =0.023).The gastric ghrelin m

  6. Helicobacter pylori environmental interactions: effect of acidic conditions on H. pylori-induced gastric mucosal interleukin-8 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Il Ju; Fujimoto, Saori; Yamauchi, Kazuyoshi; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    Summary To explore the interactions between the host, environment and bacterium responsible for the different manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection, we examined the effect of acidic conditions on H. pylori-induced interleukin (IL)-8 expression. AGS gastric epithelial cells were exposed to acidic pH and infected with H. pylori [wild-type strain, its isogenic cag pathogenicity island (PAI) mutant or its oipA mutant]. Exposure of AGS cells to acidic pH alone did not enhance IL-8 production. However, following exposure to acidic conditions, H. pylori infection resulted in marked enhancement of IL-8 production which was independent of the presence of the cag PAI and OipA, indicating that H. pylori and acidic conditions act synergistically to induce gastric mucosal IL-8 production. In neutral pH environments H. pylori-induced IL-8 induction involved the NF-κB pathways, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)→ c-Fos/c-Jun→activating protein (AP-1) pathways, JNK→c-Jun→AP-1 pathways and the p38 pathways. At acidic pH H. pylori-induced augmentation of IL-8 production involved markedly upregulated the NF-κB pathways and the ERK→c-Fos→AP-1 pathways. In contrast, activation of the JNK→c-Jun→AP-1 pathways and p38 pathways were pH independent. These results might explain the clinical studies in which patients with duodenal ulcers had higher levels of IL-8 in the antral gastric mucosa than patients with simple H. pylori gastritis. PMID:17517062

  7. CONVENTIONAL VIDEOENDOSCOPY CAN IDENTIFY HELICOBACTER PYLORI GASTRITIS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alexandre; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Prestes, Manoel Alberto; Costa, Maiza da Silva; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski; Ramos, Gabriela Piovezani

    2016-01-01

    Studies with latest technologies such as endoscopy with magnification and chromoendoscopy showed that various endoscopic aspects are clearly related to infection by Helicobacter pylori (HP). The description of different patterns of erythema in gastric body under magnification of images revived interest in identifying these patterns by standard endoscopy. To validate the morphologic features of gastric mucosa related to H. pylori infection gastritis allowing predictability of their diagnosis as well as proper targeting biopsies. Prospective study of 339 consecutive patients with the standard videoendoscope image analysis were obtained, recorded and stored in a program database. These images were studied with respect to the presence or absence of H. pylori, diagnosed by rapid urease test and/or by histological analysis. Were studied: a) normal mucosa appearance; b) mucosal nodularity; c) diffuse nonspecific erythema or redness (with or without edema of folds and exudate) of antrum and body; d) mosaic pattern with focal area of hyperemia; e) erythema in streaks or bands (red streak); f) elevated (raised) erosion; g) flat erosions; h) fundic gland polyps. The main exclusion criteria were the use of drugs, HP pre-treatment and other entities that could affect results. Applying the exclusion criteria, were included 170 of the 339 patients, of which 52 (30.58%) were positive for HP and 118 negative. On the positive findings, the most associated with infection were: nodularity in the antrum (26.92%); presence of raised erosion (15.38%) and mosaic mucosa in the body (21.15%). On the negative group the normal appearance of the mucosa was 66.94%; erythema in streaks or bands in 9.32%; flat erosions 11.86%; and fundic gland polyps 11.86%. Endoscopic findings are useful in the predictability of the result and in directing biopsies. The most representative form of HP related gastritis was the nodularity of the antral mucosa. The raised erosion and mucosa in mosaic in the body

  8. Bioactive compounds of Crocus sativus L. and their semi-synthetic derivatives as promising anti-Helicobacter pylori, anti-malarial and anti-leishmanial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Monte, Celeste; Bizzarri, Bruna; Gidaro, Maria Concetta; Carradori, Simone; Mollica, Adriano; Luisi, Grazia; Granese, Arianna; Alcaro, Stefano; Costa, Giosuè; Basilico, Nicoletta; Parapini, Silvia; Scaltrito, Maria Maddalena; Masia, Carla; Sisto, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Crocus sativus L. is known in herbal medicine for the various pharmacological effects of its components, but no data are found in literature about its biological properties toward Helicobacter pylori, Plasmodium spp. and Leishmania spp. In this work, the potential anti-bacterial and anti-parasitic effects of crocin and safranal, two important bioactive components in C. sativus, were explored, and also some semi-synthetic derivatives of safranal were tested in order to establish which modifications in the chemical structure could improve the biological activity. According to our promising results, we virtually screened our compounds by means of molecular modeling studies against the main H. pylori enzymes in order to unravel their putative mechanism of action.

  9. New Diagnostic Strategies for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Benjamin D; Gilger, Mark A.; Steven J Czinn

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is a common chronic bacterial infection that is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastroduodenal disease in children. H pylori is also associated with extragastric manifestations, including growth reduction, iron-deficiency anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Current guidelines recommend endoscopy with biopsy for the definitive demonstration of H pylori infection. In contrast to serology, the fecal antigen test and the urea breath test ...

  10. Immunization with Recombinant Helicobacter pylori Urease in Specific-Pathogen-Free Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Solnick, Jay V.; Canfield, Don R.; Hansen, Lori M.; Torabian, Sima Z.

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with urease can protect mice from challenge with Helicobacter pylori, though results vary depending on the particular vaccine, challenge strain, and method of evaluation. Unlike mice, rhesus monkeys are naturally colonized with H. pylori and so may provide a better estimate of vaccine efficacy in humans. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of H. pylori urease as a vaccine in specific-pathogen (H. pylori)-free rhesus monkeys. Monkeys raised from birth and do...

  11. Influence of efflux pump inhibitors on the multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the effect of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).METHODS: H. pylori strains were isolated and cultured on Brucella agar plates with 10% sheep's blood. The multidrug resistant (MDR) H. pylori were obtained with the inducer chloramphenicol by repeated doubling of the concentration until no colony was seen, then the susceptibilities of the MDR strains and their parents to 9 antibiotics were assessed with agar dilution tests. The present stud...

  12. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination : toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J.H. van den; Quaak, S.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, G.; Schumacher, T.N.; Haanen, J.B.A.G.; Nuijen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Method: Micewere vaccinated with a model DNA v

  13. ACTIVATION OF HUMAN BLOOD MONONUCLEARS BY LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE OF DIFFERENT COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Zubova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS composition upon activation of human blood mononuclears was investigated, by measuring levels of pro-inflammatory TNFα and IL-6 cytokines released by the cells. It is shown that LPS from Rhodobacter capsulatus PG, in contrast to E. coli LPS, did not activate the target cells for synthesis of the cytokines.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination : toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J.H. van den; Quaak, S.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, G.; Schumacher, T.N.; Haanen, J.B.A.G.; Nuijen, B.

    Purpose: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Method: Micewere vaccinated with a model DNA

  15. Inhibition of gastric secretion by bacterial lipopolysaccharide in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenen, F.H.H.; Miert, A.S.J.P.A.M. van

    1969-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provoked an inhibition of gastric secretion in the rat. Reserpine and the catecholamine-synthesis inhibitors α-methyldopa and diethyl dithiocarbamate blocked this action of LPS, although adrenergic blocking agents or adrenalectomy were without effect. Direct stimul

  16. Lipid lateral organization on giant unilamellar vesicles containing lipopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubiak, Jakub; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Hansen, Søren

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new (to our knowledge) protocol to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of mixtures of single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) species and Escherichia coli polar lipid extracts. Four different LPSs that differed in the size of the polar headgroup (i.e., LPS smooth > LPS...

  17. A Novel Assay for Easy and Rapid Quantification of Helicobacter pylori Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersoe, Mette E; Rasmussen, Lone; Andersen, Leif P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastric epithelial cells could be a new way to counteract infections with this organism. We here present a novel method for quantification of Helicobacter pylori adhesion to cells. METHODS: Helicobacter pylori is allowed to adhere to AGS...

  18. "Helicobacter Pylori" Infection in Five Inpatient Units for People with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Vemuri, Murali; Gunatilake, Deepthi; Tewari, Sidhartha

    2008-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of "Helicobacter pylori" infection has been reported among people with intellectual disability, especially those residing in hospital and similar settings. Surveys of inpatients have found unusually high rates of gastrointestinal malignancy, to which "H. pylori" infection predisposes. Methods: "Helicobacter pylori"…

  19. Immune Responses to "Helicobacter pylori" Infection in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douraghi, Masoumeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Rostami, Mahmoud Nateghi; Nikmanesh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Infection with "Helicobacter pylori" was assessed through serum "H. pylori" IgG antibody in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). The sero-status of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) was determined as a risk determinant for severe "H. pylori"-associated diseases. In total, 210 children with ID were included…

  20. Transcriptional Regulation of the Nickel and Iron Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.J. Ernst (Florian)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractUp to 50 % of the world's population is infected with Helicobacter pylori. Colonization of the mucus layer of the human stomach by H. pylori, is lifelong unless treated with antibiotics (26). H. pylori, which is a neutralophilic bacterium, survives in the mucus layer of the human stom

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of the Nickel and Iron Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.J. Ernst (Florian)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractUp to 50 % of the world's population is infected with Helicobacter pylori. Colonization of the mucus layer of the human stomach by H. pylori, is lifelong unless treated with antibiotics (26). H. pylori, which is a neutralophilic bacterium, survives in the mucus layer of the human

  2. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders

    1998-01-01

    in 46/66 by culture and histology. The presence of H. pylori was significantly associated with active or inactive chronic gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was associated with both parents being born in a country with a high prevalence and a low social class. Helicobacter pylori-positive children had...

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Madsen, Claus Desler; Bøggild, Cecilie Sisse Line

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for the development of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms explaining the effects of H. pylori infection are not fully elucidated. H. pylori infection is known to induce genetic instability in both nuclear...

  4. The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on liver enzymes in patients referring with unexplained hypertransaminasemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Salehi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed a decrease in liver enzymes after receiving eradication regimen of H. pylori, suggesting a role for H. pylori infection in at least some of patients with mild unexplained hypertransaminasemia. Further studies are warranted to find the underlying mechanisms by which H. pylori infection affects the liver and clinical importance of such effects.

  5. Effect of Rebamipide, a Novel Antiulcer Agent, on Helicobacter pylori Adhesion to Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shunji; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Isogai, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko; Aihara, Miki; Kikuchi, Mikio; Asaka, Masahiro; Yokota, Kenji; Oguma, Keiji; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Hirai, Yoshikazu

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major etiological agent in gastroduodenal disorders. The adhesion of H. pylori to human gastric epithelial cells is the initial step of H. pylori infection. Inhibition of H. pylori adhesion is thus a therapeutic target in the prevention of H. pylori infection. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of rebamipide, a novel antiulcer agent, on H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells, derived from human gastric carcinomas, were used as target cells. Ten H. pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer were used in the study. We evaluated the effect of rebamipide on H. pylori adhesion to MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells quantitatively using our previously established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The adhesion of H. pylori to MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of these cells with 100 μg of rebamipide per ml. However, the adhesion was not affected by the pretreatment of H. pylori with rebamipide. On the other hand, the viabilities of H. pylori, MKN-28 cells, and MKN-45 cells were not affected by rebamipide. Our studies suggest that rebamipide inhibits the adhesion of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. PMID:9687380

  6. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on growth trajectories in young Ethiopian children: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineyam Taye

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: These findings add to the growing body of evidence supporting that H. pylori infection is inversely associated with childhood growth trajectory, after controlling for a range of factors associated with reduced growth and H. pylori status. Further follow-up will be important to confirm possible catch-up in height trajectory among H. pylori-infected children as they grow older.

  7. Immune Responses to "Helicobacter pylori" Infection in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douraghi, Masoumeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Rostami, Mahmoud Nateghi; Nikmanesh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Infection with "Helicobacter pylori" was assessed through serum "H. pylori" IgG antibody in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). The sero-status of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) was determined as a risk determinant for severe "H. pylori"-associated diseases. In total, 210 children with ID were included…

  8. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders

    1998-01-01

    in 46/66 by culture and histology. The presence of H. pylori was significantly associated with active or inactive chronic gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was associated with both parents being born in a country with a high prevalence and a low social class. Helicobacter pylori-positive children had...

  9. "Helicobacter Pylori" Infection in Five Inpatient Units for People with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Vemuri, Murali; Gunatilake, Deepthi; Tewari, Sidhartha

    2008-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of "Helicobacter pylori" infection has been reported among people with intellectual disability, especially those residing in hospital and similar settings. Surveys of inpatients have found unusually high rates of gastrointestinal malignancy, to which "H. pylori" infection predisposes. Methods: "Helicobacter pylori"…

  10. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and its relation with body mass index in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengfu; Yan, Ming; Sun, Yan; Joo, Jungsoo; Wan, Xingyong; Yu, Chaohui; Wang, Qunyan; Shen, Chao; Chen, Peng; Li, Youming; Coleman, William G

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide. The association between obesity and H. pylori infection is controversial in the literature. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its relation with body mass index (BMI) in a Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was performed among adults who underwent health checkups at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University in 2013. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was examined by (13)C urea breath tests, and the association between prevalence of H. pylori infection and BMI was analyzed. Of the 8820 participants enrolled, 3859 (43.8%) were positive for H. pylori infection. H. pylori-positive participants had a more unfavorable metabolic profile than H. pylori-negative participants. Overweight/obese participants showed a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection than that of lean participants, and a positive linear correlation between BMI and prevalence of H. pylori infection was observed. Both unadjusted and adjusted analysis revealed that BMI was significantly associated with risk factors of H. pylori infection. Our results showed that BMI was significantly and positively associated with H. pylori infection, and a high BMI was associated with an increased risk of the infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of prolonged chlorine exposures upon PCR detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of low doses of free chlorine on the detection by qPCR of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) cells by qPCR in tap water was monitored. H. pylori target sequences (within suspended, intact cells at densities of 102 to 103 cells /ml) were rendered undetectable by qPCR an...

  12. The influence of Helicobacter pylori on oesophageal acid exposure in GERD during acid suppressive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Kuipers, EJ; Ganesh, S; Sluiter, WJ; Klinkenberg-Knol, EC; Lamers, CBHW; Kleibeuker, JH

    Background: Helicobacter pylori exaggerates the effect of acid suppressive drugs on intragastric pH. It is unknown whether this is relevant for the treatment of GERD. Aim: To compare oesophageal acid exposure and symptoms in H. pylori-negative and H. pylori-positive GERD patients during low and

  13. Effects of prolonged chlorine exposures upon PCR detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of low doses of free chlorine on the detection by qPCR of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) cells by qPCR in tap water was monitored. H. pylori target sequences (within suspended, intact cells at densities of 102 to 103 cells /ml) were rendered undetectable by qPCR an...

  14. Accurate, noninvasive detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA from stool samples: potential usefulness for monitoring treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuber, Anthony P; Ascaño, Jennifer J; Boynton, Kevin A; Mitchell, Anastasia; Frierson, Henry F; El-Rifai, Wa'el; Powell, Steven M

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA assay demonstrating sensitive and accurate detection of Helicobacter pylori from stool samples is reported. Moreover, in three individuals tested for therapeutic response, the assay showed the disappearance of H. pylori DNA during treatment. Thus, this noninvasive molecular biology-based assay has the potential to be a powerful diagnostic tool given its ability to specifically identify H. pylori DNA.

  15. Accurate, Noninvasive Detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA from Stool Samples: Potential Usefulness for Monitoring Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Shuber, Anthony P; Ascaño, Jennifer J.; Boynton, Kevin A.; Mitchell, Anastasia; Frierson, Henry F.; El-Rifai, Wa’el; Powell, Steven M

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA assay demonstrating sensitive and accurate detection of Helicobacter pylori from stool samples is reported. Moreover, in three individuals tested for therapeutic response, the assay showed the disappearance of H. pylori DNA during treatment. Thus, this noninvasive molecular biology-based assay has the potential to be a powerful diagnostic tool given its ability to specifically identify H. pylori DNA.

  16. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and mice gastric mucosa colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori drug-resistant strains and non-compliance to therapy are the major causes of H. pylori eradication failure. For some bacterial species it has been demonstrated that fatty acids have a growth inhibitory effect. Our main aim was to assess the ability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA to inhibit H. pylori growth both in vitro and in a mouse model. The effectiveness of standard therapy (ST in combination with DHA on H. pylori eradication and recurrence prevention success was also investigated. The effects of DHA on H. pylori growth were analyzed in an in vitro dose-response study and n in vivo model. We analized the ability of H. pylori to colonize mice gastric mucosa following DHA, ST or a combination of both treatments. Our data demonstrate that DHA decreases H. pylori growth in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA inhibits H. pylori gastric colonization in vivo as well as decreases mouse gastric mucosa inflammation. Addition of DHA to ST was also associated with lower H. pylori infection recurrence in the mouse model. In conclusion, DHA is an inhibitor of H. pylori growth and its ability to colonize mouse stomach. DHA treatment is also associated with a lower recurrence of H. pylori infection in combination with ST. These observations pave the way to consider DHA as an adjunct agent in H. pylori eradication treatment.

  17. Helicobacter pylori-associated malignancies: Genetics, Epidemiology and Gastric Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Capelle (Lisette)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter pylori infection affects at least 50% of the world population. The chronic inflammation caused by H. pylori can progress to pre-malignant gastric lesions, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric MALT lymphoma. The widespread high prevalence of H. pylori explains that gastric canc

  18. The influence of Helicobacter pylori on oesophageal acid exposure in GERD during acid suppressive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Kuipers, EJ; Ganesh, S; Sluiter, WJ; Klinkenberg-Knol, EC; Lamers, CBHW; Kleibeuker, JH

    1999-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori exaggerates the effect of acid suppressive drugs on intragastric pH. It is unknown whether this is relevant for the treatment of GERD. Aim: To compare oesophageal acid exposure and symptoms in H. pylori-negative and H. pylori-positive GERD patients during low and prof

  19. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Thein; Shiota, Seiji; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ni, New; Aye, Than Than; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tran, Trang Thi Huyen; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-14

    To survey the detailed analyses for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric mucosal status in Myanmar. A total of 252 volunteers with dyspeptic symptoms (155 female and 97 male; mean age of 43.6 ± 14.2 years) was participated in Yangon and Mandalay. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on 5 different tests including rapid urease test, culture, histology, immunohistochemistry and serology. Histological scores were evaluated according to the update Sydney system and the Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment system. Pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 48.0%. There was no relationship between age and infection rate. Even in young group (less than 29 years old), the H. pylori infection rate was relatively high (41.9%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in Yangon than that of Mandalay. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the presence of gastric mucosal atrophy. All 7 subjects with peptic ulcer were infected with H. pylori. Although H. pylori-positive subjects showed stronger gastritis than H. pylori-negative subjects, most cases had mild gastritis. We revealed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar. The H. pylori infection was a risk factor for peptic ulcer and stronger gastritis.

  20. Streptococcus mitis induces conversion of Helicobacter pylori to coccoid cells during co-culture in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major gastric pathogen that has been associated with humans for more than 60,000 years. H. pylori causes different gastric diseases including dyspepsia, ulcers and gastric cancers. Disease development depends on several factors including the infecting H. pylori strain, environmental and host factors. Another factor that might influence H. pylori colonization and diseases is the gastric microbiota that was overlooked for long because of the belief that human stomach was a hostile environment that cannot support microbial life. Once established, H. pylori mainly resides in the gastric mucosa and interacts with the resident bacteria. How these interactions impact on H. pylori-caused diseases has been poorly studied in human. In this study, we analyzed the interactions between H. pylori and two bacteria, Streptococcus mitis and Lactobacillus fermentum that are present in the stomach of both healthy and gastric disease human patients. We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells. In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth. Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells. This study provide evidences that gastric bacteria influences H. pylori physiology and therefore possibly the diseases this bacterium causes.

  1. Immune Responses to "Helicobacter pylori" Infection in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douraghi, Masoumeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Rostami, Mahmoud Nateghi; Nikmanesh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Infection with "Helicobacter pylori" was assessed through serum "H. pylori" IgG antibody in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). The sero-status of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) was determined as a risk determinant for severe "H. pylori"-associated diseases. In total, 210 children with ID were included who were permanent resident of…

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Madsen, Claus Desler; Bøggild, Cecilie Sisse Line

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for the development of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms explaining the effects of H. pylori infection are not fully elucidated. H. pylori infection is known to induce genetic instability in both nuclear and...

  3. Present and past Helicobacter pylori infection in Mexican school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Eugenia; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Mera, Robertino; Vilchis, Jenny; Moran, Segundo; Rivera, Octavio; Coria, Rafael; Torres, Javier; Correa, Pelayo; Duque, Ximena

    2014-02-01

    In developing countries, more than 50% of children have serological evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, serological tests for H. pylori did not differentiate between active and past infection. The objectives of this study were to estimate the frequency of active and past H. pylori infection utilizing functional urea breath test (UBT) and serological tests and evaluate factors associated with the infection. A total of 675 school children, 6-13 years of age, participated. UBT was performed to detect active H. pylori infection. Blood samples were obtained to determine iron status and Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to the H. pylori whole-cell and to Cag A antigens by antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Weight, height, and sociodemographic characteristics were recorded. A total of 37.9% (95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 34.2-41.6) of school children had active or past H. pylori infection; of them, 73.8% (CI95% 68.4-79.2) were carrying CagA-positive strain, 26.5% (CI95% 23.2-29.8) had active infection, and 11.4% (95%CI: 9.0-13.8) had evidence of past H. pylori infection. School children with iron deficiency and low height for age had higher risk of H. pylori infection: [OR to active or past infection was 2.30 (CI 95% 1.01-5.23) and to active infection it was 2.64 (CI 95% 1.09-6.44)] compared to school children with normal iron status and height for age or with normal iron status but low height for age or with iron deficiency and normal height for age. The estimated prevalence of infection depends of the test utilized. Frequency of H. pylori infection and carrying CagA-positive strains was high in this population. Malnutrition was associated with active H. pylori infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Indigenous Greenlanders have a higher sero-prevalence of IgG antibodies to Helicobacter pylori than Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Byg, Keld-Erik; Andersen, Leif P

    2003-01-01

    To assess the sero-prevalence of IgG antibodies to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in Greenlanders and compare with the sero-prevalence in Caucasian Danes.......To assess the sero-prevalence of IgG antibodies to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in Greenlanders and compare with the sero-prevalence in Caucasian Danes....

  5. Indigenous Greenlanders have a higher sero-prevalence of IgG antibodies to Helicobacter pylori than Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Byg, Keld-Erik; Andersen, Leif P

    2003-01-01

    To assess the sero-prevalence of IgG antibodies to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in Greenlanders and compare with the sero-prevalence in Caucasian Danes.......To assess the sero-prevalence of IgG antibodies to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in Greenlanders and compare with the sero-prevalence in Caucasian Danes....

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...... or amoxicilline. Quadruple therapy for 2 weeks with bismuthsubsalicylate, tetracycline, metronidazole and a proton pump inhibitor is recommended in case of treatment failure. Hp testing should be offered to all patients after eradication therapy but is mandatory in patients with ulcer disease, noninvasive gastric...... degree relatives to patients with gastric cancer, in NSAID-naive patients, who need long-term NSAID therapy, and in patients presenting with dyspepsia and no alarm symptoms. Non-endoscoped patients can be tested with a urea-breath test or a faecal antigen test. Endoscoped patients can be tested...

  7. Helicobacter spp. other than H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mirko; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2012-09-01

    Significant advances have been made over the last 12 months in the understanding of the biology of non-H. pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). Several studies have investigated the association between NHPH and human disease, including Crohn's disease, lithiasis, liver disease, coronary disease, gastritis, and pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers. Novel Helicobacter taxa were identified in new vertebrate hosts, and new methodologies in the fields of identification of Helicobacter spp. and evaluation of antibiotic resistance were described. The genome of the first human-derived gastric NHPH strain (Helicobacter bizzozeronii CIII-1) was sequenced, and several studies elucidated functions of different genes in NHPH. A number of important investigations regarding pathogenesis and immunopathobiology of NHPH infections have been published including the description of a new urease in Helicobacter mustelae. Finally, the effects of the gut microbiota and probiotics on NHPH infections were investigated.

  8. Petri Net-Based Model of Helicobacter pylori Mediated Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins in Stomach Lining during Gastric Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anam Naz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions help prevent the passage of digestive enzymes and microorganisms through the space between adjacent epithelial cells lining. However, Helicobacter pylori encoded virulence factors negatively regulate these tight junctions and contribute to dysfunction of gastric mucosa. Here, we have predicted the regulation of important tight junction proteins, such as Zonula occludens-1, Claudin-2 and Connexin32 in the presence of pathogenic proteins. Molecular events such as post translational modifications and crosstalk between phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, palmitoylation and methylation are explored which may compromise the integrity of these tight junction proteins. Furthermore, the signaling pathways disrupted by dysregulated kinases, proteins and post-translational modifications are reviewed to design an abstracted computational model showing the situation-dependent dynamic behaviors of these biological processes and entities. A qualitative hybrid Petri Net model is therefore constructed showing the altered host pathways in the presence of virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A, leading to the disruption of tight junction proteins. The model is qualitative logic-based, which does not depend on any kinetic parameter and quantitative data and depends on knowledge derived from experiments. The designed model provides insights into the tight junction disruption and disease progression. Model is then verified by the available experimental data, nevertheless formal in vitro experimentation is a promising way to ensure its validation. The major findings propose that H. pylori activated kinases are responsible to trigger specific post translational modifications within tight junction proteins, at specific sites. These modifications may favor alterations in gastric barrier and provide a route to bacterial invasion into host cells.

  9. [Alzheimer's disease and Helicobacter pylori infection: a possible link?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubaud Baudron, Claire; Varon, Christine; Mégraud, Francis; Salles, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with Aß peptide and Tau protein deposits, but the initial process inducing the disease and ultimately neurodegeneration has not yet been elucidated. An infectious hypothesis is suggested by the alteration of the blood-brain barrier and the activation of neuroinflammation in the brain, which could play a role, especially in the decrease of Aß peptide clearance. Several viral or bacterial agents have been incriminated, including Helicobacter pylori. Infection by H. pylori is acquired during childhood and often lifetime persisting, inducing a chronic gastric inflammation, which remains asymptomatic in approximately 80% of cases. However H. pylori infection can induce systemic inflammation and increase homocysteine levels, contributing to worsen AD lesions. Association between H. pylori and AD is suggested by 1) epidemiologic studies, which show higher AD prevalence and more pronounced cognitive impairment in infected than in non-infected subjects; 2) experimental studies in murine models: a) in a first study we evaluated the impact of H. pylori infection on the brain of non-AD predisposed C57BL/6J mice. After an 18-month infection, H. pylori induced a significant gastric inflammation but no brain Aβ deposit nor increased neuroinflammation was observed in their brain; b) we currently study the impact of Helicobacter species infection on behavior and cerebral lesions of AD transgenic (APPswe/PS1dE9) mice and their wild type littermate. The results of these studies do not allow to conclude a significant association between AD and H. pylory infection but may contribute to a better understanding of the role of brain neuroinflammation in AD.

  10. H pylori seroprevalence in patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katayoon Najafizadeh; Sayeed Falah Tafti; Masoud Shiehmorteza; Masoud Saloor; Masoud Jamali

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess H pylori seroprevalence in lung cancer and determine whether there is a potential association between lung cancer and H pylori infection.METHODS: The study was conducted on forty consecutive patients with lung cancer, confirmed by pathology (32 men, 8 women; mean age 55.50 ± 11.91 years,range 16-77 years).Forty healthy subjects (25 men,15 women;mean age 43.08 ± 12.60 years,range 20-79 years) from the patients' family members were matched to each case Subject on the basis of age and socioeconomic status.H pylori infection was detected with a commercially available immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Trinity kit,Biotech co.,USA),previously validated in adults (86% sensitivity,96% specificity) against a gold standard of culture and histology.RESULTS: H pylori seropositivity was present in 52.5% of patients with lung cancer in comparison to 45.0% of healthy control subjects. Although H pylori seropositivity was more frequent in lung cancer patients than in controls, the difference did not reach statistical significance (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.56-3.25; P = 0.65). In addition, there was no significant difference between cases and controls in terms of gastrointestinal symptoms.CONCLUSION: The earlier described association between H pylori infection and lung cancer was not supported in this study. Further studies with larger sample sizes should be undertaken to assess the frequency of H pylori infection in patients with lung cancer and their potential association.

  11. PEPTIC ULCER FREQUENCY DIFFERENCES RELATED TO H. PYLORI OR AINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Michelon de CARLI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Peptic ulcer etiology has been changing because of H. pylori decline. Objectives To estimate peptic ulcer prevalence in 10 years-interval and compare the association with H. pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Methods Records assessment in two periods: A (1997-2000 and B (2007-2010, searching for peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use. Results Peptic ulcer occurred in 30.35% in A and in 20.19% in B. H. pylori infection occurred in 73.3% cases in A and in 46.4% in B. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use was 3.5% in A and 13.3% in B. Neither condition occurred in 10.4% and 20.5% in A and B respectively. Comparing both periods, we observed reduction of peptic ulcer associated to H. pylori (P=0.000, increase of peptic ulcer related to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (P=0.000 and idiopathic peptic ulcer (P=0.002. The concurrent association of H. pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was also higher in B (P=0.002. Rates of gastric ulcer were higher and duodenal ulcer lower in the second period. Conclusions After 10 years, the prevalence of peptic ulcer decreased, as well as ulcers related to H. pylori whereas ulcers associated to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased. There was an inversion in the pattern of gastric and duodenal ulcer and a rise of idiopathic peptic ulcer.

  12. Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltin, Doron

    2016-02-01

    The ideal treatment regimen for the eradication Helicobacter pylori infection has yet to be identified. Probiotics, particularly Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces, have been suggested as adjuncts to antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori. There is in vitro evidence that probiotics dampen the Th1 response triggered by H. pylori, attenuate H. pylori associated hypochlorhydria and secrete bacteriocidal metabolites. Probiotics interact with the innate host immune system through adherence to the gastric epithelium and secretion of bacterial adhesins. In prospective human studies, probiotic monotherapy effectively decrease H. pylori density (expired (13)CO2) by 2.0%-64.0%. Probiotic monotherapy has also been shown to eradicate H. pylori in up to 32.5%, although subsequent recrudescence is likely. Eleven meta-analyses have evaluated the efficacy of probiotics as adjuvants to antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. The addition of a probiotic increased treatment efficacy, OR 1.12-2.07. This benefit is probably strain-specific and may only be significant with relatively ineffective antibiotic regimens. The pooled prevalence of adverse effects was 12.9%-31.5% among subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with 24.3%-45.9% among controls. Diarrhea in particular was significantly reduced in subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with controls (OR 0.16-0.47). A reduction in adverse events other than diarrhea is variable. Despite the apparent benefit on efficacy and side effects conferred by probiotics, the optimal probiotic species, dose and treatment duration has yet to be determined. Further studies are needed to identify the probiotic, antibiotic and patient factors which might predict benefit from probiotic supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple Acid Sensors Control Helicobacter pylori Colonization of the Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Julie Y; Goers Sweeney, Emily; Guillemin, Karen; Amieva, Manuel R

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori's ability to respond to environmental cues in the stomach is integral to its survival. By directly visualizing H. pylori swimming behavior when encountering a microscopic gradient consisting of the repellent acid and attractant urea, we found that H. pylori is able to simultaneously detect both signals, and its response depends on the magnitudes of the individual signals. By testing for the bacteria's response to a pure acid gradient, we discovered that the chemoreceptors TlpA and TlpD are each independent acid sensors. They enable H. pylori to respond to and escape from increases in hydrogen ion concentration near 100 nanomolar. TlpD also mediates attraction to basic pH, a response dampened by another chemoreceptor TlpB. H. pylori mutants lacking both TlpA and TlpD (ΔtlpAD) are unable to sense acid and are defective in establishing colonization in the murine stomach. However, blocking acid production in the stomach with omeprazole rescues ΔtlpAD's colonization defect. We used 3D confocal microscopy to determine how acid blockade affects the distribution of H. pylori in the stomach. We found that stomach acid controls not only the overall bacterial density, but also the microscopic distribution of bacteria that colonize the epithelium deep in the gastric glands. In omeprazole treated animals, bacterial abundance is increased in the antral glands, and gland colonization range is extended to the corpus. Our findings indicate that H. pylori has evolved at least two independent receptors capable of detecting acid gradients, allowing not only survival in the stomach, but also controlling the interaction of the bacteria with the epithelium.

  14. Helicobacter pylori-negative Russell body gastritis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Elli, Luca; Braidotti, Paola; Di Nuovo, Franca; Bosari, Silvano; Romagnoli, Solange

    2011-03-07

    Russell body gastritis is an unusual form of chronic gastritis characterized by the permeation of lamina propria by numerous plasma cells with eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions. Very few cases have been reported in the literature; the majority of which have shown Helicobacter Pylori (H. pylori) infection, thus suggesting a correlation between plasma cell presence and antigenic stimulation by H. pylori. We present a case of Russell body gastritis in a 78-year-old woman who was undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for epigastric pain. Gastric biopsy of the gastroesophageal junction showed the presence of cells with periodic acid-Schiff-positive hyaline pink bodies. Giemsa staining for H. pylori infection was negative, as well as immunohistochemical detection. The cells with eosinophilic inclusions stained positive for CD138, CD79a, and κ and lambda light chains, which confirmed plasma cell origin. In particular, κ and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal origin and the patient was negative for immunological dyscrasia. The histological observations were confirmed by ultrastructural examination. The cases reported in the literature associated with H. pylori infection have shown regression of plasma cells after eradication of H. pylori. Nothing is known about the progression of H. pylori-negative cases. The unusual morphological appearance of this type of chronic gastritis should not be misinterpreted during routine examination, and it should be distinguished from other common forms of chronic gastritis. It is mandatory to exclude neoplastic diseases such as gastric carcinoma, lymphoma and plasmocytoma by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, which can help with differential diagnosis. The long-term effects of plasma cells hyperactivation are still unknown, because cases of gastric tumor that originated in patients affected by Russell body gastritis have not been described in the literature. We are of the opinion that these patients should be scheduled

  15. Reliability of Diagnostic Tests for Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Redéen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is very common worldwide. A reliable diagnosis is crucial for patients with H. pylori-related diseases. At followup, it is important to confirm that eradication therapy has been successful. There is no established gold standard for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Material and Methods. A sample of 304 volunteers from the general population was screened for H. pylori infection with serology, 13C-urea breath test (UBT, rapid urease test (RUT on fresh biopsy, culture from biopsy, and histological examination. Culture was used as gold standard. Results. The sensitivity was 0.99 for serology, 0.90 for UBT, 0.90 for RUT, and 0.90 for histological examination. Corresponding specificities were 0.82, 0.99, 0.98, and 0.97, respectively. The accuracy was 0.86 for serology, 0.96 for UBT, 0.95 for RUT, 0.93 for culture, and 0.95 for histology. There was a strong correlation between the results of UBT and the histological scores of H. pylori colonisation as well as between the results of UBT and the scores of RUT. Conclusion. There were only minor differences in accuracy between the three invasive tests for H. pylori infection in this population. RUT may be recommended as the first choice since a result is obtained within hours. The accuracy of UBT was comparable to the invasive tests, and it is recommended for situations when endoscopy is not needed.

  16. H. pylori infection in patients with food-borne diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lioznov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective: to assess clinical features of food-borne diseases in patients with H. pylori infection.Materials and methods: 98 patients with an acute intestinal infection were examined for the presence of helicobacter pylori infection. Clinical and laboratory parameters were estimated in 82 subjects. Patients were distributed to two groups: 41 H. pylori-infected patients (H. pylori IgG antibodies and DNA in feces and41 H. pylori-noninfected patients.Results: in patients with Helicobacter pyloriinfection a higher range of leukocytosis were indicated: 10,7±2,5×109/l vs 8,6±2,6×109/l respectively, р<0,05, and ESR – 16,2±8,7 mm/h vs 11,2±7,8 mm/h respectively, p<0,05. In H. pyloriinfected patients number of bowel movementsand vomitswere indicated more often than those in the control group: (9,4±5,3 vs 6,7±3,6 times/day respectively, р<0,05; and 4,8±3,4 and 1,0±1,4 times/day, р<0,05. Normalization of bowel function was observedearlier in control group compare with H. pylori-infected patients (3,0±0,7 day of disease and 4,4±1,4 day of disease respectively, in р<0,05.Conclusions: H. pylori-infected patients had clinically and laboratory more severe presentation of acute intestinal infection. Clinical improvementin this patientsoccurredat a later date.

  17. Helicobacter pylori-negative Russell body gastritis: Case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessandro Del Gobbo; Luca Elli; Paola Braidotti; Franca Di Nuovo; Silvano Bosari; Solange Romagnoli

    2011-01-01

    Russell body gastritis is an unusual form of chronic gas-tritis characterized by the permeation of lamina propria by numerous plasma cells with eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions. Very few cases have been reported in the lit-erature; the majority of which have shown Helicobacter Pylori (H. pylori) infection, thus suggesting a correlation between plasma cell presence and antigenic stimulation by H. pylori. We present a case of Russell body gastritis in a 78-year-old woman who was undergoing esophago-gastroduodenoscopy for epigastric pain. Gastric biopsy of the gastroesophageal junction showed the presence of cells with periodic acid-Schiff-positive hyaline pink bodies. Giemsa staining for H. pylori infection was nega-tive, as well as immunohistochemical detection. The cells with eosinophilic inclusions stained positive for CD138, CD79a, and κ and lambda light chains, which confirmed plasma cell origin. In particular, κ and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal origin and the patient was negative for immunological dyscrasia. The histologi-cal observations were confirmed by ultrastructural ex-amination. The cases reported in the literature associated with H. pylori infection have shown regression of plasma cells after eradication of H. pylori. Nothing is known about the progression of H. pylori-negative cases. The unusual morphological appearance of this type of chron-ic gastritis should not be misinterpreted during routine examination, and it should be distinguished from other common forms of chronic gastritis. It is mandatory to exclude neoplastic diseases such as gastric carcinoma, lymphoma and plasmocytoma by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, which can help with differential diagnosis. The long-term effects of plasma cells hyper-activation are still unknown, because cases of gastric tu-mor that originated in patients affected by Russell body gastritis have not been described in the literature. We are of the opinion that these patients should be

  18. DNA transfer in the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Esther; Backert, Steffen

    2014-04-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is one of the most genetically diverse bacteria. Recombination and DNA transfer contribute to its genetic variability and enhance host adaptation. Among the strategies described to increase genetic diversity in bacteria, DNA transfer by conjugation is one of the best characterized. Using this mechanism, a fragment of DNA from a donor cell can be transferred to a recipient, always mediated by a conjugative nucleoprotein complex, which is evolutionarily related to type IV secretion systems (T4SSs). Interestingly, the H. pylori chromosomes can encode up to four T4SSs, including the cagPAI, comB, tfs3, and tfs4 genes, some of which are known to promote chronic H. pylori infection. The T4SS encoded by the cagPAI mediates the injection of the effector protein CagA and proinflammatory signaling, and the comB system is involved in DNA uptake from the environment. However, the role of tfs3 and tfs4 is not yet clear. The presence of a functional XerD tyrosine recombinase and 5'AAAGAATG-3' border sequences as well as two putative conjugative relaxases (Rlx1 and Rlx2), a coupling protein (TraG), and a chromosomal region carrying a putative origin of transfer (oriT) suggest the existence of a DNA transfer apparatus in tfs4. Moreover, a conjugation-like DNA transfer mechanism in H. pylori has already been described in vitro, but whether this occurs in vivo is still unknown. Some extrachromosomal plasmids and phages are also present in various H. pylori strains. Genetic exchange among plasmids and chromosomes, and involved DNA mobilization events, could explain part of H. pylori's genetic diversity. Here, we review our knowledge about the possible DNA transfer mechanisms in H. pylori and its implications in bacterial adaptation to the host environment.

  19. Overview of the phytomedicine approaches against Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) successfully colonizes the human stomach of the majority of the human population. This infection always causes chronic gastritis, but may evolve to serious outcomes, such as peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori first line therapy recommended by the Maastricht-4 Consensus Report comprises the use of two antibiotics and a proton-pomp inhibitor, but in some regions failure associated with this treatment is already undesirable high. Indeed, treatment failure is one of the major problems associated with H. pylori infection and is mainly associated with bacterial antibiotic resistance. In order to counteract this situation, some effort has been allocated during the last years in the investigation of therapeutic alternatives beyond antibiotics. These include vaccines, probiotics, photodynamic inactivation and phage therapy, which are briefly revisited in this review. A particular focus on phytomedicine, also described as herbal therapy and botanical therapy, which consists in the use of plant extracts for medicinal purposes, is specifically addressed, namely considering its history, category of performed studies, tested compounds, active principle and mode of action. The herbs already experienced are highly diverse and usually selected from products with a long history of employment against diseases associated with H. pylori infection from each country own folk medicine. The studies demonstrated that many phytomedicine products have an anti-H. pylori activity and gastroprotective action. Although the mechanism of action is far from being completely understood, current knowledge correlates the beneficial action of herbs with inhibition of essential H. pylori enzymes, modulation of the host immune system and with attenuation of inflammation. PMID:24914319

  20. Interleukin-17C in Human Helicobacter pylori Gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Cruz, Modesto; Uchida, Tomohisa; Uotani, Takahiro; Jiménez Abreu, José A; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-10-01

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) family of cytokines (IL-17A to IL-17F) is involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17A is recognized as being involved in the pathophysiology of Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, the role of other IL-17 cytokine family members remains unclear. Microarray analysis of IL-17 family cytokines was performed in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsy specimens. IL-17C mRNA was upregulated approximately 4.5-fold in H. pylori-infected gastric biopsy specimens. This was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in infected and uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from Bhutan and from the Dominican Republic. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-17C expression in H. pylori-infected gastric biopsy specimens was predominantly localized to epithelial and chromogranin A-positive endocrine cells. IL-17C mRNA levels were also significantly greater among cagA-positive than cagA-negative H. pylori infections (P = 0.012). In vitro studies confirmed an increase in IL-17C mRNA and protein levels in cells infected with cagA-positive infections compared to cells infected with either cagA-negative or cag pathogenicity island (PAI) mutant. Chemical inhibition of IκB kinase (IKK), mitogen-activated protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK), and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibited induction of IL-17C proteins in infected cells, whereas p38 inhibition had no effect on IL-17C protein secretion. In conclusion, H. pylori infection was associated with a significant increase in IL-17C expression in human gastric mucosa. The role of IL-17C in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-induced diseases remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.