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Sample records for pylori enzymatic inhibition

  1. Cell-cycle inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-asparaginase.

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    Claudia Scotti

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application.

  2. Cell-Cycle Inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase

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    Scotti, Claudia; Sommi, Patrizia; Pasquetto, Maria Valentina; Cappelletti, Donata; Stivala, Simona; Mignosi, Paola; Savio, Monica; Chiarelli, Laurent Roberto; Valentini, Giovanna; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Merrell, Douglas Scott; Franchini, Silvia; Verona, Maria Luisa; Bolis, Cristina; Solcia, Enrico; Manca, Rachele; Franciotta, Diego; Casasco, Andrea; Filipazzi, Paola; Zardini, Elisabetta; Vannini, Vanio

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application. PMID:21085483

  3. Anti-bacterial effects of enzymatically-isolated sialic acid from glycomacropeptide in a Helicobacter pylori-infected murine model

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    Noh, Hye-Ji; Koh, Hong Bum; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Cho, Hyang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization of the stomach mucosa and duodenum is the major cause of acute and chronic gastroduodenal pathology in humans. Efforts to find effective anti-bacterial strategies against H. pylori for the non-antibiotic control of H. pylori infection are urgently required. In this study, we used whey to prepare glycomacropeptide (GMP), from which sialic acid (G-SA) was enzymatically isolated. We investigated the anti-bacterial effects of G-SA against H. pylori in vitro and in an H. pylori-infected murine model. MATERIALS/METHODS The anti-bacterial activity of G-SA was measured in vitro using the macrodilution method, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production was measured in H. pylori and AGS cell co-cultures by ELISA. For in vivo study, G-SA 5 g/kg body weight (bw)/day and H. pylori were administered to mice three times over one week. After one week, G-SA 5 g/kg bw/day alone was administered every day for one week. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of G-SA. In addition, real-time PCR was performed to measure the genetic expression of cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). RESULTS G-SA inhibited the growth of H. pylori and suppressed IL-8 production in H. pylori and in AGS cell co-cultures in vitro. In the in vivo assay, administration of G-SA reduced levels of IL-1β and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines whereas IL-10 level increased. Also, G-SA suppressed the expression of cagA in the stomach of H. pylori-infected mice. CONCLUSION G-SA possesses anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect in an experimental H. pylori-infected murine model. G-SA has potential as an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of H. pylori infection and H. pylori-induced gastric disease prevention. PMID:28194260

  4. Celecoxib inhibits Helicobacter pylori colonization-related factors

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    Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hong; Li, Jiang; Liu, Fang-Xun

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization-related factors and its mechanism. METHODS: After co-incubation with celecoxib, morphology of H. pylori strain 26695 was observed under a transmission electron microscope. Flagella motility was assessed by stab agar motility test. Adherence of H. pylori to AGS cells was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Levels of mRNA expression in flagellar genes (flaA, flaB), urease genes (ureA, ureB) and adhesin genes (babA, sabA, alpA, alpB, hpaA, hopZ) were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Separation and non-integrity of bacterial cell wall, rarefaction and asymmetry of cytoplasm, and even lysis of H. pylori were observed in the presence of celecoxib. When H. pylori strains were incubated in the presence of celecoxib, their flagellar motility and adherence to AGS cells were inhibited. The expression of ureA, ureB, babA, sabA, alpA, alpB, hpaA, hopZ was up-regulated while the expression of flaA, flaB was down-regulated in the presence of celecoxib. CONCLUSION: Celecoxib inhibits flagellar motility and adherence of H. pylori to AGS cells, and destructs their normal structure in vitro. PMID:20143463

  5. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori and Its Associated Urease by Palmatine: Investigation on the Potential Mechanism

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    Tan, Li-Hua; Xu, Yi-Fei; Liu, Yu-Hong; Mo, Zhi-Zhun; Dou, Yao-Xing; Su, Rui; Su, Zi-Ren; Huang, Ping; Xie, Jian-Hui

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluated the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and the possible inhibitory effect on its associated urease by Palmatine (Pal) from Coptis chinensis, and explored the potential underlying mechanism. Results indicated that Pal exerted inhibitory effect on four tested H. pylori strains (ATCC 43504, NCTC 26695, SS1 and ICDC 111001) by the agar dilution test with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 100 to 200 μg/mL under neutral environment (pH 7.4), and from 75 to 100 μg/mL under acidic conditions (pH 5.3), respectively. Pal was observed to significantly inhibit both H. pylori urease (HPU) and jack bean urease (JBU) in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 0.53 ± 0.01 mM and 0.03 ± 0.00 mM, respectively, as compared with acetohydroxamic acid, a well-known urease inhibitor (0.07 ± 0.01 mM for HPU and 0.02 ± 0.00 mM for JBU, respectively). Kinetic analyses showed that the type of urease inhibition by Pal was noncompetitive for both HPU and JBU. Higher effectiveness of thiol protectors against urease inhibition than the competitive Ni2+ binding inhibitors was observed, indicating the essential role of the active-site sulfhydryl group in the urease inhibition by Pal. DTT reactivation assay indicated that the inhibition on the two ureases was reversible, further supporting that sulfhydryl group should be obligatory for urease inhibition by Pal. Furthermore, molecular docking study indicated that Pal interacted with the important sulfhydryl groups and inhibited the active enzymatic conformation through N-H ∙ π interaction, but did not interact with the active site Ni2+. Taken together, Pal was an effective inhibitor of H. pylori and its urease targeting the sulfhydryl groups, representing a promising candidate as novel urease inhibitor. This investigation also gave additional scientific support to the use of C. chinensis to treat H. pylori-related gastrointestinal diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. Pal might be

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and mice gastric mucosa colonization.

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    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori drug-resistant strains and non-compliance to therapy are the major causes of H. pylori eradication failure. For some bacterial species it has been demonstrated that fatty acids have a growth inhibitory effect. Our main aim was to assess the ability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA to inhibit H. pylori growth both in vitro and in a mouse model. The effectiveness of standard therapy (ST in combination with DHA on H. pylori eradication and recurrence prevention success was also investigated. The effects of DHA on H. pylori growth were analyzed in an in vitro dose-response study and n in vivo model. We analized the ability of H. pylori to colonize mice gastric mucosa following DHA, ST or a combination of both treatments. Our data demonstrate that DHA decreases H. pylori growth in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA inhibits H. pylori gastric colonization in vivo as well as decreases mouse gastric mucosa inflammation. Addition of DHA to ST was also associated with lower H. pylori infection recurrence in the mouse model. In conclusion, DHA is an inhibitor of H. pylori growth and its ability to colonize mouse stomach. DHA treatment is also associated with a lower recurrence of H. pylori infection in combination with ST. These observations pave the way to consider DHA as an adjunct agent in H. pylori eradication treatment.

  7. Peptides from Pisum sativum L. enzymatic protein digest with anti-adhesive activity against Helicobacter pylori: structure-activity and inhibitory activity against BabA, SabA, HpaA and a fibronectin-binding adhesin.

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    Niehues, Michael; Euler, Marco; Georgi, Gilda; Mank, Marko; Stahl, Bernd; Hensel, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Identification of anti-adhesive peptides against Helicobacter pylori obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of seed proteins from Pisum sativum L. (Fabaceae). Bioassay-guided fractionation of protein tryptic digest by ultrafiltration, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and reversed phase chromatography (RPC) were used. Identification of bioactive peptides was achieved by MALDI-TOF-MS. Adhesion of H. pylori was monitored by two different assays, using a quantitative in vitro assay on human AGS cells with evaluation of bacterial binding by flow cytometry, beside a semi-quantitative in situ adhesion assay using FITC-labelled H. pylori on human stomach tissue sections. From two highly active fractions (F3, F3.3) two anti-adhesive peptides (S3, S5) were identified. Neither F3 nor S3 or S5 had any cytotoxic effect against H. pylori. By hemagglutination assay and semiquantitative dot blot overlay assay with immobilized ligands it was shown that F3 interacts specifically with H. pylori adhesins BabA, SabA, HpaA and a fibronectin-binding adhesin, while S3 and S5 inhibit only BabA. It was demonstrated that BabA, usually interacting with carbohydrate motifs such as fucosylated blood group antigens, interacts with the peptide moieties. Bioactive peptides from pea protein could be applied as functional ingredients for protecting infants and children against infections such as H. pylori. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Comparison of Helicobacter pylori Urease Inhibition by Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri and Berberine: Mechanisms of Interaction with the Sulfhydryl Group.

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    Li, Cailan; Xie, Jianhui; Chen, Xiaoying; Mo, Zhizhun; Wu, Wen; Liang, Yeer; Su, Zuqing; Li, Qian; Li, Yucui; Su, Ziren; Yang, Xiaobo

    2016-03-01

    Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri, and berberine were reported to inhibit Helicobacter pylori. However, the underlying mechanism remained elusive. Urease plays a vital role in H. pylori colonization and virulence. In this work, aqueous extracts of Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri of different origins, and purified berberine were investigated against H. pylori urease and jack bean urease to elucidate the inhibitory capacity, kinetics, and mechanism. Results showed that berberine was the major chemical component in Rhizoma Coptidis and Cortex Phellodendri, and the content of berberine in Rhizoma Coptidis was higher than in Cortex Phellodendri. The IC50 values of Rhizoma Coptidis were significantly lower than those Cortex Phellodendri and purified berberine, of which Coptis chinensis was shown to be the most active concentration- and time-dependent urease inhibitor. The Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis indicated that the inhibition pattern of C. chinensis against urease was noncompetitive for both H. pylori urease and jack bean urease. Thiol protectors (L-cysteine, glutathione, and dithiothreithol) significantly protected urease from the loss of enzymatic activity, while fluoride and boric acid showed weaker protection, indicating the active-site sulfhydryl group was possibly responsible for its inhibition. Furthermore, the urease inhibition proved to be reversible since C. chinensis-blocked urease could be reactivated by glutathione. The results suggested that the anti-urease activity of Rhizoma Coptidis was superior to that of Cortex Phellodendri and berberine, which was believed to be more likely to correlate to the content of total alkaloids rather than berberine monomer. The concentration- and time-dependent, reversible, and noncompetitive inhibition against urease by C. chinensis might be attributed to its interaction with the sulfhydryl group of the active site of urease.

  9. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth and adherence to gastric mucosal cells by Pycnogenol.

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    Rohdewald, Peter; Beil, Winfried

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains has necessitated the identification of alternative additive therapies for the treatment of this infection. The study tested whether a specific pine bark extract (Pycnogenol is effective in inhibiting the growth and adherence of H. pylori in vitro. Inhibition of H. pylori growth by Pycnogenol was tested in liquid medium as well as in an in vitro model by using sessile bacteria attached to AGS cells. Adherence was determined by co-incubation of gastric cells with Pycnogenol and H. pylori in vitro. Pycnogenol inhibited H. pylori growth in suspension with an MIC(50) of 12.5 microg/mL. Growth of H. pylori in infected cells was reduced to 10% of the control value by 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. Adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells was reduced by 70% after 3 h incubation with 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. The results show a significant, yet limited inhibition of growth and adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells by Pycnogenol. In vivo studies have to demonstrate the clinical relevance of these findings.

  10. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression.

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    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity.

  11. Celecoxib inhibits Helicobacter pylori colonization-related factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of celecoxib,a selective COX-2 inhibitor,on Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) colonization-related factors and its mechanism.METHODS:After co-incubation with celecoxib,morphology of H.pylori strain 26695 was observed under a transmission electron microscope.Flagella motility was assessed by stab agar motility test.Adherence of H.pylori to AGS cells was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Levels of mRNA expression in flagellar genes(flaA,flaB),urease genes(ureA,ureB)and ...

  12. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori and Its Associate Urease by Labdane Diterpenoids Isolated from Andrographis paniculata.

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    Shaikh, Rafik U; Dawane, Ashwini A; Pawar, Rajendra P; Gond, Dhananjay S; Meshram, Rohan J; Gacche, Rajesh N

    2016-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate anti-Helicobacter pylori and its associated urease activity of labdane diterpenoids isolated from Andrographis paniculata. A molecular docking analysis was performed by using ArgusLab 4.0.1 software. The results obtained indicate that compound A possesses strong inhibition to H. pylori, 28 ± 2.98 (minimum inhibitory concentration, 9 µg/mL), and its urease, 85.54 ± 2.62% (IC50 , 20.2 µg/mL). Compounds B, C, and D also showed moderate inhibition to H. pylori and its urease. The obtained results were in agreement with the molecular docking analysis of compounds. The phytochemicals under investigation were found to be promising antibacterial agents. Moreover, the isolated compounds can be considered as a resource for searching novel anti-H. pylori agents possessing urease inhibition.

  13. The role of acid inhibition in Helicobacter pylori eradication [version 1; referees: 3 approved

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    David R. Scott

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the stomach by the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori results in chronic active gastritis and leads to the development of gastric and duodenal ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. Eradication of H. pylori infection improves or resolves the associated pathology. Current treatments of H. pylori infection rely on acid suppression in combination with at least two antibiotics. The role of acid suppression in eradication therapy has been variously attributed to antibacterial activity of proton pump inhibitors directly or through inhibition of urease activity or increased stability and activity of antibiotics. Here we discuss the effect of acid suppression on enhanced replicative capacity of H. pylori to permit the bactericidal activity of growth-dependent antibiotics. The future of eradication therapy will rely on improvement of acid inhibition along with current antibiotics or the development of novel compounds targeting the organism’s ability to survive in acid.

  14. Lactobacillus plantarum B7 inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth and attenuates gastric inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chompoonut Sunanliganon; Duangporn Thong-Ngam; Somying Tumwasorn; Naruemon Klaikeaw

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine the anti-Helicobacter property of Lactobacillus plantarum B7 (L.plantarum) B7 supernatants in vitro and the protective effects of L.plantarum B7 on serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α),gastric malondialdehyde (MDA) level,apoptosis,and histopathology in Helicobacter pylori (H.pylorl)-induced gastric inflammation in rats.METHODS:In vitro,the inhibition of H,pylori growth was examined using L.plantarum B7 supernatants at pH 4 and pH 7 and at the concentration of 1×,5× and 10× on plates inoculated with H.pylori.The inhibitory effect of H.pylori was interpreted by the size of the inhibition zone.In vitro,male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups including group 1 (control group),group 2 (H.pylori infected group),group 3 (H.pylori infected with L.plantarum B7 10é CFUs/mL treated group) and group 4 (H.pylori infected with L.plantarum B7 1010 CFUs/mL treated group).One week after H.pylori inoculation,L.plantarum B7 106 CFUs/mL or 1010 CFUs/mL were fed once daily to group 3 and group 4,respectively,for one week.Blood and gastric samples were collected at the end of the study.RESULTS:In vitro,at intact pH 4,mean inhibitory zone diameters of 8.5 mm and 13 mm were noted at concentrations of 5× and 10× of L.plantarum B7supernatant disks,respectively.At adjusted pH 7,L.plantarum B7 supernatants at concentrations of 5 × and 10× yielded mean inhibitory zone diameters of 6.5 mm and 11 mm,respectively.In the in vitro study,in group 2,stomach histopathology revealed mild to moderate H.pylori colonization and inflammation.The level of gastric MDA and epithelial cell apoptosis were significantly increased compared with group 1.The serum TNF-α level was significant decreased in group 3compared with group 2 (P < 0.05).In addition,L.plantarum B7 treatments resulted in a significant improvement in stomach pathology,and decreased gastric MDA level and apoptotic epithelial cells.CONCLUSION:L.plantarum B7 supernatant inhibits H.pylori

  15. Effect of propolis in gastric disorders: inhibition studies on the growth of Helicobacter pylori and production of its urease.

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    Baltas, Nimet; Karaoglu, Sengul Alpay; Tarakci, Cemre; Kolayli, Sevgi

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in alternative approaches to inhibit Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and thus treat many stomach diseases. Propolis is a pharmaceutical mixture containing many natural bioactive substances. The aim of this study was to use propolis samples to treat H. pylori. The anti-H. pylori and anti-urease activities of 15 different ethanolic propolis extracts (EPEs) were tested. The total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents of the EPE were also measured. The agar-well diffusion assay was carried out on H. pylori strain J99 and the inhibition zones were measured and compared with standards. All propolis extracts showed high inhibition of H. pylori J99, with inhibition diameters ranging from 31.0 to 47.0 mm. Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitory activity was measured using the phenol-hypochlorite assay; all EPEs showed significant inhibition against the enzyme, with inhibition concentrations (IC50; mg/mL) ranging from 0.260 to 1.525 mg/mL. The degree of inhibition was related to the phenolic content of the EPE. In conclusion, propolis extract was found to be a good inhibitor that can be used in H. pylori treatment to improve human health.

  16. HELICOBACTER PYLORI GROWTH INHIBITION BY SUBSTANCE PRODUCED PSEUDOMONAS BY AEROGINOSA: IN VTRO STUDY

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    A FAZELI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of H.pylori against metronidazole is increasingly appeared in reports of investigators of gastric infections. So that, seeking to find more effective anti-helicobacter drugs is a necessity. In this study, inhibitory effect of the P. aeroginosa-produced substance on H. pylori growth was determined using two methods, Cross-streak and Well-diffusion Only two out of 37 P. aeroginosa isalates were able to inhibit H. pylori growth which one of them was chosen for further investigation. Its antibacterial activity was tested on 31 isolates of H. pylori consisting 27 metrondazole-sensitive and 4 metronidazole-resistant isolates. The inhibitory substance was enable to kill both metrondazole-sensitive and resistant isolates of H. pylori. The substance could also inhibit the of several other bacteria including E.coli, Salmonella sp., Klebsiella sp., S. aureus and a gram positive bacilli. While the inhibitory effect of the substance had no change at 40c for 30 days, its effect substantially reduced by treating at 600c for 15 minutes. Treatment of substance at 600c (30 min. 80?c and 100?c (15 & 30min, and freezing (-20?c and melting (37?c inactivated its inhibitory effect completely. Treatment with trips in also could inactivate it. Thus P. aeroginosa-produced substance, probably is a protein and may be classified in bacteriocin group.

  17. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori urease with non and semi fermented Camellia sinensis

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    Shoae Hassani A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent in duodenal and peptic ulcers. The growing problem of antibiotic resistance by the organism demands the search for novel compounds, especially from natural sources. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Camellia sinensis extracts on the urease enzyme that is a major colonization factor for H. pylori. Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations of nonfermented and semifermented C. sinensis methanol: water extracts were assessed by broth dilution method. Examination of the urease function was performed by Mc Laren method, and urease production was detected on 12% SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from whole cell and membrane bound proteins. Results: Both extracts had inhibitory effects against H. pylori and urease production. At a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml of nonfermented extract and 3.5 mg/ml of semifermented extract the production of Ure A and Ure B subunits of the urease enzyme were inhibited completely. A concentration of 4 mg/ml of nonfermented and 5.5 mg/ml of semifermented extract were bactericidal for H. pylori. Conclusions: C. sinensis extracts, especially the nonfermented, could reduce H. pylori population and inhibit urease production at lower concentrations. The superior effect of nonfermented extract is due to its rich polyphenolic compounds and catechin contents.

  18. Synthesis and bioevaluation of novel 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives that inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced pathogenesis in human gastric epithelial cells.

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    Chang, Chih-Shiang; Liu, Ju-Fang; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lin, Chia-Der; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Sing, Yu-Ting; Chen, Li-Yu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2012-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and even gastric malignancy. H. pylori's antibiotic resistance is the major obstacle preventing its eradication. A series of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-H. pylori activity. The compound, 2-fluorophenyl-5-methyl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)benzimidazole (FMTMB), was determined as the most potent in the inhibition of H. pylori growth and pathogenesis of host cells. An in vitro H. pylori infection model revealed that FMTMB inhibited H. pylori adhesion and invasion of gastric epithelial cells. Results from this study provide evidence that FMTMB is a potent therapeutic agent that exhibits both anti-H. pylori growth properties and anti-H. pylori-induced pathogenesis of cells.

  19. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression

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    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Sunil D Saroj; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit ad...

  20. Inhibition of enzymatic browning in foods and beverages.

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    McEvily, A J; Iyengar, R; Otwell, W S

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic browning is a major factor contributing to quality loss in foods and beverages. Sulfiting agents are used commonly to control browning; however, several negative attributes associated with sulfites have created the need for functional alternatives. Recent advances in the development of nonsulfite inhibitors of enzymatic browning are reviewed. The review focuses on compositions that are of practical relevance to food use.

  1. Identification of self-growth-inhibiting compounds lauric acid and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid from Helicobacter pylori.

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    Yamashita, Shinpei; Igarashi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Chigusa; Shitara, Tetsuo; Nomoto, Akio; Mizote, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori growth medium is usually supplemented with horse serum (HS) or FCS. However, cyclodextrin derivatives or activated charcoal can replace serum. In this study, we purified self-growth-inhibiting (SGI) compounds from H. pylori growth medium. The compounds were recovered from porous resin, Diaion HP-20, which was added to the H. pylori growth medium instead of known supplements. These SGI compounds were also identified from 2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which was supplemented in a pleuropneumonia-like organisms broth. The growth-inhibiting compounds were identified as lauric acid (LA) and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid [7-(Z)-TDA]. Although several fatty acids had been identified in H. pylori, these specific compounds were not previously found in this species. However, we confirmed that these fatty acids were universally present in the cultivation medium of the H. pylori strains examined in this study. A live/dead assay carried out without HS indicated that these compounds were bacteriostatic; however, no significant growth-inhibiting effect was observed against other tested bacterial species that constituted the indigenous bacterial flora. These findings suggested that LA and 7-(Z)-TDA might play important roles in the survival of H. pylori in human stomach epithelial cells.

  2. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

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    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition downregulates Helicobacter pylori-induced epithelial inflammatory responses, DNA damage and gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Johanna C; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Delgado, Alberto G; Wroblewski, Lydia E; Barry, Daniel P; Peek, Richard M; Gobert, Alain P; Wilson, Keith T

    2017-05-04

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor. We have reported increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in the H. pylori-induced human carcinogenesis cascade, and association with DNA damage. Our goal was to determine the role of EGFR activation in gastric carcinogenesis. We evaluated gefitinib, a specific EGFR inhibitor, in chemoprevention of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and cancer development. Mice with genetically targeted epithelial cell-specific deletion of Egfr (Efgr(Δepi) mice) were also used. In C57BL/6 mice, gefitinib decreased Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 expression by gastric epithelial cells, myeloperoxidase-positive inflammatory cells in the mucosa and epithelial DNA damage induced by H. pylori infection. Similar reductions in chemokines, inflammatory cells and DNA damage occurred in infected Egfr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) control mice. In H. pylori-infected transgenic insulin-gastrin (INS-GAS) mice and gerbils, gefitinib treatment markedly reduced dysplasia and carcinoma. Gefitinib blocked H. pylori-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 (MAPK1/3) and activator protein 1 in gastric epithelial cells, resulting in inhibition of chemokine synthesis. MAPK1/3 phosphorylation and JUN activation was reduced in gastric tissues from infected wild-type and INS-GAS mice treated with gefitinib and in primary epithelial cells from Efgr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Epithelial EGFR activation persisted in humans and mice after H. pylori eradication, and gefitinib reduced gastric carcinoma in INS-GAS mice treated with antibiotics. These findings suggest that epithelial EGFR inhibition represents a potential strategy to prevent development of gastric carcinoma in H. pylori-infected individuals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Pineapple juice and its fractions in enzymatic browning inhibition of banana [Musa (AAA group) Gros Michel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisakdanugull, Chitsuda; Theerakulkait, Chockchai; Wrolstad, Ronald E

    2007-05-16

    The effectiveness of pineapple juice in enzymatic browning inhibition was evaluated on the cut surface of banana slices. After storage of banana slices at 15 degrees C for 3 days, pineapple juice showed browning inhibition to a similar extent as 8 mM ascorbic acid but less than 4 mM sodium metabisulfite. Fractionation of pineapple juice by a solid-phase C18 cartridge revealed that the directly eluted fraction (DE fraction) inhibited banana polyphenol oxidase (PPO) about 100% when compared to the control. The DE fraction also showed more inhibitory effect than 8 mM ascorbic acid in enzymatic browning inhibition of banana puree during storage at 5 degrees C for 24 h. Further identification of the DE fraction by fractionation with ion exchange chromatography and confirmation using model systems indicated that malic acid and citric acid play an important role in the enzymatic browning inhibition of banana PPO.

  5. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang, E-mail: lvguoqiangwuxivip@163.com

    2015-08-07

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity.

  6. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mar Mar Khin; Jie Song Hua; Hah Cong Ng; Bow Ho; Torkel Wadstrorr

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms.METHODS Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A ),fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas ( Lotus A ) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori-lectin agglutination. Interestingly, heating of H.pylori cells at 60℃ for 1 hour was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during theevents of morphological transformation,resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection.This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease.

  8. Inhibition of enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, J; Van den Steen, P E; Mine, A; Van Landuyt, K L; Poitevin, A; Opdenakker, G; Van Meerbeek, B

    2009-12-01

    Adhesive procedures activate dentin-associated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and so iatrogenically initiate bond degradation. We hypothesized that adding MMP inhibitors to adhesive primers may prevent this endogenous enzymatic degradation, thereby improving bond durability. A non-specific MMP inhibitor (chlorhexidine) and a MMP-2/9-specific inhibitor (SB-3CT) were admixed to the primers of an etch & rinse and a self-etch adhesive, both considered as gold-standard adhesives within their respective categories. For dentin powder exposed to the adhesives under clinical application conditions, gelatin zymography revealed the release of MMP-2 (not of MMP-9) by the etch & rinse adhesive, while no release of enzymes could be detected for the mild self-etch adhesive, most likely because of its limited dentin demineralization effect. The built-in MMP inhibitors appeared effective in reducing bond degradation only for the etch & rinse adhesive, and not for the self-etch adhesive. Water sorption of adhesive interfaces most likely remains the principal mechanism of bond degradation, while endogenous enzymes appear to contribute to bond degradation of only etch & rinse adhesives.

  9. Product inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose: are we running the reactions all wrong?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    include high substrate conversion (maximal yields), maximal enzyme efficiency, maximal volumetric reactor productivity, minimal equipment investment, minimal size, and short reaction time. The classic batch type STR reactions used for enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis prevent these goals to be fulfilled...... of minimum ∼5–6% v/v, the glucose product concentrations exceed the critical limit for product inhibition. Hence, regardless of the recent progress in enzyme development for cellulose hydrolysis, the glucose product inhibition remains an issue, which is exacerbated as the reaction progresses, especially...... at high substrate loadings in batch reactions. Hence in addition to understanding product inhibition and develop new cellulolytic enzymes that are more resistant to product inhibition, much can be gained from proper reaction design and continuous removal of the product(s) in enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis...

  10. Inhibition of Enzymatic Browning of Chlorogenic Acid by Sulfur-Containing Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T.F.M.; Narvaez Cuenca, C.E.; Vincken, J.P.; Verloop, J.W.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Gruppen, H.

    2012-01-01

    The antibrowning activity of sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO3) was compared to that of other sulfur-containing compounds. Inhibition of enzymatic browning was investigated using a model browning system consisting of mushroom tyrosinase and chlorogenic acid (5-CQA). Development of brown color (spectra

  11. Elucidation of the mechanism of enzymatic browning inhibition by sodium chlorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium chlorite (SC) is a well known anti-microbial agent and its strong inhibitory effect on enzymatic browning of fresh-cut produce has recently been identified. We investigated the mechanisms of browning inhibition by SC using chlorogenic acid (CA) and PPO extracted from mushroom to emulate the b...

  12. Eliminating inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis by lignosulfonate in unwashed sulfite-pretreated aspen using metal salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao Liu; Junyong Zhu

    2010-01-01

    This study demonstrated the efficiency of Ca(II) and Mg(II) in removing inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis by lignosulfonate through non-productive adsorption of enzymes. Adding 1 mmol/g cellulose of either metal salt restores approximately 65% of the activity lost when a pure cellulose/cellulase solution is spiked with lignosulfonate. Addition of either Ca(II) or Mg(...

  13. Natural product juglone targets three key enzymes from Helicobacter pylori: inhibition assay with crystal structure characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-hua KONG; Liang ZHANG; Zheng-yi YANG; Cong HAN; Li-hong HU; Hua-liang JIANG; Xu SHEN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the inhibition features of the natural product juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) against the three key enzymes from Helicobacter pylori (cystathionine γ-synthase [HpCGS], malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase [HpFabD], and β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase [HpFabZ]). Methods: An enzyme inhibition assay against HpCGS was carded out by using a continuous coupled spectrophotometric assay approach. The inhibition assay of HpFabD was performed based on the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase-coupled system, while the inhibition assay for HpFabZ was monitored by detecting the decrease in absorbance at 260 nm with crotonoyl-CoA conversion to βhydroxybutyryl-CoA. The juglone/FabZ complex crystal was obtained by soaking juglone into the HpFabZ crystal, and the X-ray crystal structure of the complex was analyzed by molecular replacement approach. Results: Juglone was shown to potently inhibit HpCGS, HpFabD, and HpFabZ with the half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 values of 7.0±0.7, 20±1, and 30±4 μmol/L, respectively. An inhibition-type study indicated that juglone was a non-competitive inhibitor of HpCGS against O-succi-nyl-L-homoserine (KI=αKI=24 μmol/L), an uncompetitive inhibitor of HpFabD against malonyl-CoA (αKI=7.4 μmol/L), and a competitive inhibitor of HpFabZ against crotonoyl-CoA (K,1=6.8 μtmol/L). Moreover, the crystal structure of the HpFabZ/juglone complex further revealed the essential binding pattern ofjuglone against HpFabZ at the atomic level. Conclusion: HpCGS, HpFabD, and HpFabZ are potential targets ofjuglone.

  14. Prominent role of γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase on the growth of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Gong; Bow Ho

    2004-01-01

    AIM: γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) has been reported as a virulence and colonizing factor of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori). This study examined the effect of GGT on the growth of H pylori.METHODS: Standard H pylori strain NCTC 11637 and 4clinical isolates with different levels of GGT activity as measured by an enzymatic assay were used in this study. Growth inhibition and stimulation studies were carried out by culturing H pylori in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with specific GGT inhibitor (L-serine sodium borate complex, SBC)or enhancer (glutathione together with glycyl-glycine),respectively. The growth profiles of H pyloriwere determined based on viable bacterial count at time interval.RESULTS: Growth was more profuse for H pylori isolates with higher GGT activity than those present with lower GGT activity. However, in the presence of SBC, growth of H pylori was retarded in a dose dependent manner (P = 0.034). In contrast, higher growth rate was observed when GGT activity was enhanced in the presence of glutathione and glycyl-glycine.CONCLUSION: Higher GGT activity provides an advantage to the growth of H pylori in vitro. Inhibition of GGT activity by SBC resulted in growth retardation. The study shows that GGT plays an important role on the growth of H pylori.

  15. Lactobacilli inhibit interleukin-8 production induced by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide-activated Toll-like receptor 4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhou; Feng-Zhen Ma; Xue-Jie Deng; Hong Yuan; Hong-Sheng Ma

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Lactobacillus bulgaricus (LBG) on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in SGC-7901 cells treated with Helicobacter pyloriSydney strain 1 lipopolysaccharide (H pyloriSS1-LPS).METHODS: SGC-7901 cells were treated with H pyIoriSS1-LPS in the presence or absence of pretreatment for 1 h with viable LBG or supematant recovered from LBG culture MRS broth (LBG-s). Cellular lysates were prepared for Western blot with anti-TLR4,anti-transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), anti-phospho-TAK1, anti-nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), anti-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and anti-phospho-p38MAPK antibodies.The amount of IL-8 in cell culture medium was measured by ELISA.RESULTS: H pyloriSS1-LPS up-regulated the expression of TLR4, stimulated the phosphorylation of TAK1, subsequently enhanced the activation of NFκB and the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in a timedependent manner, leading to augmentation of IL-8 production in SGC-7901 cells. Viable LBG or LBG-s pretreatment attenuated the expression of TLR4,inhibited the phosphorylation of TAK1 and p38MAPK,prevented the activation of NF-κB, and consequently blocked IL-8 production.CONCLUSION: H pyloriSS1-LPS induces IL-8production through activating TLR4 signaling in SGC-7901 cells and viable LBG or LBG-s prevents H pyloriSS1-LPS-mediated IL-8 production via inhibition of the TLR4 pathway.

  16. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane vesicles inhibit human T cell responses via induction of monocyte COX-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Barry D; McKenzie, Judith L; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2017-06-01

    The modulation of T cell responses by Helicobacter pylori is thought to potentiate both H. pylori persistence and development of gastric pathologies including cancer. Release of outer membrane vesicles (OMV) by H. pylori provides a potential vehicle for modulation of the immune system. Although OMV are thought to have T cell suppressive activity, this has not yet been demonstrated. Their suppressive activity was investigated in this study using the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to T cell stimuli as a readout. We demonstrate that addition of OMV to PBMC significantly inhibits subsequent T cell proliferation in a cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent manner. Addition of OMV did not significantly modulate PBMC apoptosis, but induced strong expression of COX-2 by the monocytes present and significantly increased levels of PGE2 and IL-10. These effects were independent of vacuolating cytotoxin expression. Together, these findings demonstrate that OMV can suppress human T cell responses and that the predominant mechanism is not through a direct effect on the T cells but results from the induction of COX-2 expression in monocytes. This increased COX-2 activity may modulate not only H. pylori-directed immune responses but also wider immune responses. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori CagA-Induced Pathogenesis by Methylantcinate B from Antrodia camphorata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jung Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (Hp is the leading risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Hp virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA interacted with cholesterol-enriched microdomains and leads to induction of inflammation in gastric epithelial cells (AGS. In this study, we identified a triterpenoid methylantcinate B (MAB from the medicinal mushroom Antrodia camphoratawhich inhibited the translocation and phosphorylation of CagA and caused a reduction in hummingbird phenotype in HP-infected AGS cells. Additionally, MAB suppressed the Hp-induced inflammatory response by attenuation of NF-κB activation, translocation of p65 NF-κB, and phosphorylation of IκB-α, indicating that MAB modulates CagA-mediated signaling pathway. Additionally, MAB also suppressed the IL-8 luciferase activity and its secretion in HP-infected AGS cells. On the other hand, molecular structure simulations revealed that MAB interacts with CagA similarly to that of cholesterol. Moreover, binding of cholesterol to the immobilized CagA was inhibited by increased levels of MAB. Our results demonstrate that MAB is the first natural triterpenoid which competes with cholesterol bound to CagA leading to attenuation of Hp-induced pathogenesis of epithelial cells. Thus, this study indicates that MAB may have a scope to develop as a therapeutic candidate against Hp CagA-induced inflammation.

  18. Inhibition of the alpha- and beta-carbonic anhydrases from the gastric pathogen Helycobacter pylori with anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Alfonso; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori encodes two carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), an α- and a β-class one, hpαCA and hpβCA, crucial for its survival in the acidic environment from the stomach. Sulfonamides, strong inhibitors of these enzymes, block the growth of the pathogen, in vitro and in vivo. Here we report the inhibition of the two H. pylori CAs with inorganic and complex anions and other molecules interacting with zinc proteins. hpαCA was inhibited in the low micromolar range by diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamide, sulfamic acid, phenylboronic acid, and in the submillimolar one by cyanide, cyanate, hydrogen sulfide, divanadate, tellurate, perruthenate, selenocyanide, trithiocarbonate, iminodisulfonate. hpβCA generally showed a stronger inhibition with most of these anions, with several low micromolar and many submillimolar inhibitors detected. These inhibitors may be used as leads for developing anti-H. pylori agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to clinically used antibiotics.

  19. Reactor design for minimizing product inhibition during enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis II. Quantification of inhibition and suitability of membrane reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andric, Pavle; Meyer, Anne S.; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2010-01-01

    hydrolysis rates and higher enzyme usage efficiency (kg(product/)kg(enzyme)). Current membrane reactor designs are however not feasible for large scale operations. The report emphasizes that the industrial realization of cellulosic ethanol requires more focus on the operational feasibility within......Product inhibition of cellulolytic enzymes affects the efficiency of the biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol and other valuable products. New strategies that focus on reactor designs encompassing product removal, notably glucose removal, during enzymatic cellulose...... conversion are required for alleviation of glucose product inhibition. Supported by numerous calculations this review assesses the quantitative aspects of glucose product inhibition on enzyme-catalyzed cellulose degradation rates. The significance of glucose product inhibition on dimensioning of different...

  20. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António M. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits phagocyte clearance of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimczok, Diane; Smythies, Lesley E; Waites, Ken B; Grams, Jayleen M; Stahl, Richard D; Mannon, Peter J; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, C Mel; Harris, Paul R; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B; Smith, Phillip D

    2013-06-15

    Increased apoptotic death of gastric epithelial cells is a hallmark of Helicobacter pylori infection, and altered epithelial cell turnover is an important contributor to gastric carcinogenesis. To address the fate of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells and their role in H. pylori mucosal disease, we investigated phagocyte clearance of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells in H. pylori infection. Human gastric mononuclear phagocytes were analyzed for their ability to take up apoptotic epithelial cells (AECs) in vivo using immunofluorescence analysis. We then used primary human gastric epithelial cells induced to undergo apoptosis by exposure to live H. pylori to study apoptotic cell uptake by autologous monocyte-derived macrophages. We show that HLA-DR(+) mononuclear phagocytes in human gastric mucosa contain cytokeratin-positive and TUNEL-positive AEC material, indicating that gastric phagocytes are involved in AEC clearance. We further show that H. pylori both increased apoptosis in primary gastric epithelial cells and decreased phagocytosis of the AECs by autologous monocyte-derived macrophages. Reduced macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells was mediated in part by H. pylori-induced macrophage TNF-α, which was expressed at higher levels in H. pylori-infected, compared with uninfected, gastric mucosa. Importantly, we show that H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa contained significantly higher numbers of AECs and higher levels of nonphagocytosed TUNEL-positive apoptotic material, consistent with a defect in apoptotic cell clearance. Thus, as shown in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, insufficient phagocyte clearance may contribute to the chronic and self-perpetuating inflammation in human H. pylori infection.

  2. Determination of inhibition in the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose using hybrid neural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Corazza

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural networks and hybrid models were used to study substrate and product inhibition observed in the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose at 40ºC, 50ºC and 55ºC, pH 4.8, using cellobiose solutions with or without the addition of exogenous glucose. Firstly, the initial velocity method and nonlinear fitting with StatisticaÒ were used to determine the kinetic parameters for either the uncompetitive or the competitive substrate inhibition model at a negligible product concentration and cellobiose from 0.4 to 2.0 g/L. Secondly, for six different models of substrate and product inhibitions and data for low to high cellobiose conversions in a batch reactor, neural networks were used for fitting the product inhibition parameter to the mass balance equations derived for each model. The two models found to be best were: 1 noncompetitive inhibition by substrate and competitive by product and 2 uncompetitive inhibition by substrate and competitive by product; however, these models’ correlation coefficients were quite close. To distinguish between them, hybrid models consisting of neural networks and first principle equations were used to select the best inhibition model based on the smallest norm observed, and the model with noncompetitive inhibition by substrate and competitive inhibition by product was shown to be the best predictor of cellobiose hydrolysis reactor behavior.

  3. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Helicobacter pylori-Induced Oncogene Expression and Hyperproliferation by Suppressing the Activation of NADPH Oxidase in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunyoung Byun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperproliferation and oncogene expression are observed in the mucosa of Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori- infected patients with gastritis or adenocarcinoma. Expression of oncogenes such as β-catenin and c-myc is related to oxidative stress. α-Lipoic acid (α-LA, a naturally occurring thiol compound, acts as an antioxidant and has an anticancer effect. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of α-LA on H. pylori-induced hyperproliferation and oncogene expression in gastric epithelial AGS cells by determining cell proliferation (viable cell numbers, thymidine incorporation, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, NADPH oxidase activation (enzyme activity, subcellular levels of NADPH oxidase subunits, activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1, expression of oncogenes (β-catenin, c-myc, and nuclear localization of β-catenin. Furthermore, we examined whether NADPH oxidase mediates oncogene expression and hyperproliferation in H. pylori-infected AGS cells using treatment of diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. As a result, α-LA inhibited the activation of NADPH oxidase and, thus, reduced ROS production, resulting in inhibition on activation of NF-κB and AP-1, induction of oncogenes, nuclear translocation of β-catenin, and hyperproliferation in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. DPI inhibited H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, oncogene expression and hyperproliferation by reducing ROS levels in AGS cells. In conclusion, we propose that inhibiting NADPH oxidase by α-LA could prevent oncogene expression and hyperproliferation occurring in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

  4. Reactor design for minimizing product inhibition during enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis: II. Quantification of inhibition and suitability of membrane reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrić, Pavle; Meyer, Anne S; Jensen, Peter A; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Product inhibition of cellulolytic enzymes affects the efficiency of the biocatalytic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol and other valuable products. New strategies that focus on reactor designs encompassing product removal, notably glucose removal, during enzymatic cellulose conversion are required for alleviation of glucose product inhibition. Supported by numerous calculations this review assesses the quantitative aspects of glucose product inhibition on enzyme-catalyzed cellulose degradation rates. The significance of glucose product inhibition on dimensioning of different ideal reactor types, i.e. batch, continuous stirred, and plug-flow, is illustrated quantitatively by modeling different extents of cellulose conversion at different reaction conditions. The main operational challenges of membrane reactors for lignocellulose conversion are highlighted. Key membrane reactor features, including system set-up, dilution rate, glucose output profile, and the problem of cellobiose are examined to illustrate the quantitative significance of the glucose product inhibition and the total glucose concentration on the cellulolytic conversion rate. Comprehensive overviews of the available literature data for glucose removal by membranes and for cellulose enzyme stability in membrane reactors are given. The treatise clearly shows that membrane reactors allowing continuous, complete, glucose removal during enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis, can provide for both higher cellulose hydrolysis rates and higher enzyme usage efficiency (kg(product)/kg(enzyme)). Current membrane reactor designs are however not feasible for large scale operations. The report emphasizes that the industrial realization of cellulosic ethanol requires more focus on the operational feasibility within the different hydrolysis reactor designs, notably for membrane reactors, to achieve efficient enzyme-catalyzed cellulose degradation. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of ERBB2-overexpressing Tumors by Recombinant Human Prolidase and Its Enzymatically Inactive Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ERBB2 is an oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in a subset of human breast cancer and other cancers. We recently found that human prolidase (PEPD, a dipeptidase, is a high affinity ERBB2 ligand and cross-links two ERBB2 monomers. Here, we show that recombinant human PEPD (rhPEPD strongly inhibits ERBB2-overexpressing tumors in mice, whereas it does not impact tumors without ERBB2 overexpression. rhPEPD causes ERBB2 depletion, disrupts oncogenic signaling orchestrated by ERBB2 homodimers and heterodimers, and induces apoptosis. The impact of enzymatically-inactive mutant rhPEPDG278D on ERBB2 is indistinguishable from that of rhPEPD, but rhPEPDG278D is superior to rhPEPD for tumor inhibition. The enzymatic function of rhPEPD stimulates HIF-1α and other pro-survival factors in tumors, which likely attenuates its antitumor activity. rhPEPDG278D is also attractive in that it may not interfere with the physiologic function of endogenous PEPD in normal cells. Collectively, we have identified a human protein as an inhibitory ERBB2 ligand that inhibits ERBB2-overexpressing tumors in vivo. Several anti-ERBB2 agents are on the market but are hampered by drug resistance and high drug cost. rhPEPDG278D may synergize with these agents and may also be highly cost-effective, since it targets ERBB2 with a different mechanism and can be produced in bacteria.

  6. Inhibition effects of dilute-acid prehydrolysate of corn stover on enzymatic hydrolysis of Solka Floc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Urvi D; Lee, Yoon Y

    2011-11-01

    Dilute-acid pretreatment liquor (PL) produced at NREL through a continuous screw-driven reactor was analyzed for sugars and other potential inhibitory components. Their inhibitory effects on enzymatic hydrolysis of Solka Floc were investigated. When the PL was mixed into the enzymatic hydrolysis reactor at 1:1 volume ratio, the glucan and xylan digestibility decreased by 63% and 90%, respectively. The tolerance level of the enzyme for each inhibitor was determined. Of the identified degradation components, acetic acid was found to be the strongest inhibitor for cellulase activity, as it decreased the glucan yield by 10% at 1 g/L. Among the sugars, cellobiose and glucose were found to be strong inhibitors to glucan hydrolysis, whereas xylose is a strong inhibitor to xylan hydrolysis. Xylo-oligomers inhibit xylan digestibility more strongly than the glucan digestibility. Inhibition by the PL was higher than that of the simulated mixture of the identifiable components. This indicates that some of the unidentified degradation components, originated mostly from lignin, are potent inhibitors to the cellulase enzyme. When the PL was added to a simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation using Escherichia coli KO11, the bioprocess was severely inhibited showing no ethanol formation or cell growth.

  7. Inhibition of enzymatic browning of chlorogenic acid by sulfur-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Tomas F M; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Verloop, Annewieke J W; van Berkel, Willem J H; Gruppen, Harry

    2012-04-01

    The antibrowning activity of sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO(3)) was compared to that of other sulfur-containing compounds. Inhibition of enzymatic browning was investigated using a model browning system consisting of mushroom tyrosinase and chlorogenic acid (5-CQA). Development of brown color (spectral analysis), oxygen consumption, and reaction product formation (RP-UHPLC-PDA-MS) were monitored in time. It was found that the compounds showing antibrowning activity either prevented browning by forming colorless addition products with o-quinones of 5-CQA (NaHSO(3), cysteine, and glutathione) or inhibiting the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase (NaHSO(3) and dithiothreitol). NaHSO(3) was different from the other sulfur-containing compounds investigated, because it showed a dual inhibitory effect on browning. Initial browning was prevented by trapping the o-quinones formed in colorless addition products (sulfochlorogenic acid), while at the same time, tyrosinase activity was inhibited in a time-dependent way, as shown by pre-incubation experiments of tyrosinase with NaHSO(3). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that sulfochlorogenic and cysteinylchlorogenic acids were not inhibitors of mushroom tyrosinase.

  8. Enzymatic characterization and crystal structure analysis of the D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dalei; Zhang, Liang; Kong, Yunhua; Du, Jiamu; Chen, Shuai; Chen, Jing; Ding, Jianping; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2008-09-01

    D-Alanine-D-alanine ligase is the second enzyme in the D-Ala branch of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan assembly, and recognized as an attractive antimicrobial target. In this work, the D-Ala-D-Ala ligase of Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 (HpDdl) was kinetically and structurally characterized. The determined apparent K(m) of ATP (0.87 microM), the K(m1) (1.89 mM) and K(m2) of D-Ala (627 mM), and the k(cat) (115 min(-1)) at pH 8.0 indicated its relatively weak binding affinity and poor catalytic activity against the substrate D-Ala in vitro. However, by complementary assay of expressing HpDdl in Escherichia coli Delta ddl mutant, HpDdl was confirmed to be capable of D-Ala-D-Ala ligating in vivo. Through sequence alignment with other members of the D-Ala-D-X ligase superfamily, HpDdl keeps two conservatively substituted residues (Ile16 and Leu241) and two nonconserved residues (Leu308 and Tyr311) broadly located in the active region of the enzyme. Kinetic analyses against the corresponding HpDdl mutants (I16V, L241Y, L241F, L308T, and Y311S) suggested that these residues, especially Leu308 and Tyr311, might partly contribute to the unique catalytic properties of the enzyme. This was fairly proved by the crystal structure of HpDdl, which revealed that there is a 3(10)-helix (including residues from Gly306 to Leu312) near the D-Ala binding region in the C-terminal domain, where HpDdl has two sequence deletions compared with other homologs. Such 3(10)-helix may participate in D-Ala binding and conformational change of the enzyme. Our present work hopefully provides useful information for understanding the D-Ala-D-Ala ligase of Helicobacter pylori.

  9. Inhibition of cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis by laccase-derived compounds from phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Taravilla, Alfredo; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Demuez, Marie; González-Fernández, Cristina; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The presence of inhibitors compounds after pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials affects the saccharification and fermentation steps in bioethanol production processes. Even though, external addition of laccases selectively removes the phenolic compounds from lignocellulosic prehydrolysates, when it is coupled to saccharification step, lower hydrolysis yields are attained. Vanillin, syringaldehyde and ferulic acid are phenolic compounds commonly found in wheat-straw prehydrolysate after steam-explosion pretreatment. These three phenolic compounds were used in this study to elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms of laccase-derived compounds after laccase treatment. Reaction products derived from laccase oxidation of vanillin and syringaldehyde showed to be the strongest inhibitors. The presence of these products causes a decrement on enzymatic hydrolysis yield of a model cellulosic substrate (Sigmacell) of 46.6 and 32.6%, respectively at 24 h. Moreover, a decrease in more than 50% of cellulase and β-glucosidase activities was observed in presence of laccase and vanillin. This effect was attributed to coupling reactions between phenoxyl radicals and enzymes. On the other hand, when the hydrolysis of Sigmacell was performed in presence of prehydrolysate from steam-exploded wheat straw a significant inhibition on enzymatic hydrolysis was observed independently of laccase treatment. This result pointed out that the other components of wheat-straw prehydrolysate are affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis to a higher extent than the possible laccase-derived products. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. 2-Bromopalmitate reduces protein deacylation by inhibition of acyl-protein thioesterase enzymatic activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P Pedro

    Full Text Available S-acylation, the covalent attachment of palmitate and other fatty acids on cysteine residues, is a reversible post-translational modification that exerts diverse effects on protein functions. S-acylation is catalyzed by protein acyltransferases (PAT, while deacylation requires acyl-protein thioesterases (APT, with numerous inhibitors for these enzymes having already been developed and characterized. Among these inhibitors, the palmitate analog 2-brompalmitate (2-BP is the most commonly used to inhibit palmitoylation in cells. Nevertheless, previous results from our laboratory have suggested that 2-BP could affect protein deacylation. Here, we further investigated in vivo and in vitro the effect of 2-BP on the acylation/deacylation protein machinery, with it being observed that 2-BP, in addition to inhibiting PAT activity in vivo, also perturbed the acylation cycle of GAP-43 at the level of depalmitoylation and consequently affected its kinetics of membrane association. Furthermore, 2-BP was able to inhibit in vitro the enzymatic activities of human APT1 and APT2, the only two thioesterases shown to mediate protein deacylation, through an uncompetitive mechanism of action. In fact, APT1 and APT2 hydrolyzed both the monomeric form as well as the micellar state of the substrate palmitoyl-CoA. On the basis of the obtained results, as APTs can mediate deacylation on membrane bound and unbound substrates, this suggests that the access of APTs to the membrane interface is not a necessary requisite for deacylation. Moreover, as the enzymatic activity of APTs was inhibited by 2-BP treatment, then the kinetics analysis of protein acylation using 2-BP should be carefully interpreted, as this drug also inhibits protein deacylation.

  11. 2-Bromopalmitate reduces protein deacylation by inhibition of acyl-protein thioesterase enzymatic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Maria P; Vilcaes, Aldo A; Tomatis, Vanesa M; Oliveira, Rafael G; Gomez, Guillermo A; Daniotti, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    S-acylation, the covalent attachment of palmitate and other fatty acids on cysteine residues, is a reversible post-translational modification that exerts diverse effects on protein functions. S-acylation is catalyzed by protein acyltransferases (PAT), while deacylation requires acyl-protein thioesterases (APT), with numerous inhibitors for these enzymes having already been developed and characterized. Among these inhibitors, the palmitate analog 2-brompalmitate (2-BP) is the most commonly used to inhibit palmitoylation in cells. Nevertheless, previous results from our laboratory have suggested that 2-BP could affect protein deacylation. Here, we further investigated in vivo and in vitro the effect of 2-BP on the acylation/deacylation protein machinery, with it being observed that 2-BP, in addition to inhibiting PAT activity in vivo, also perturbed the acylation cycle of GAP-43 at the level of depalmitoylation and consequently affected its kinetics of membrane association. Furthermore, 2-BP was able to inhibit in vitro the enzymatic activities of human APT1 and APT2, the only two thioesterases shown to mediate protein deacylation, through an uncompetitive mechanism of action. In fact, APT1 and APT2 hydrolyzed both the monomeric form as well as the micellar state of the substrate palmitoyl-CoA. On the basis of the obtained results, as APTs can mediate deacylation on membrane bound and unbound substrates, this suggests that the access of APTs to the membrane interface is not a necessary requisite for deacylation. Moreover, as the enzymatic activity of APTs was inhibited by 2-BP treatment, then the kinetics analysis of protein acylation using 2-BP should be carefully interpreted, as this drug also inhibits protein deacylation.

  12. Elucidation of the mechanism of enzymatic browning inhibition by sodium chlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Luo, Yaguang; Chen, Pei

    2008-10-15

    Sodium chlorite (SC) is a well known anti-microbial agent and its strong inhibitory effect on enzymatic browning of fresh-cut produce has recently been identified. We investigated the effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and its substrate, chlorogenic acid (CA), as it relates to the mechanisms of browning inhibition by SC. Results indicate that the browning reaction of CA (1.0mM) catalyzed by PPO (33U/mL) was significantly inhibited by 1.0mM SC at pH 4.6. Two PPO isoforms were identified by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and both were inactivated by SC (3.0mM). This suggests that SC serves as a PPO inhibitor to prevent enzymatic browning. Furthermore, the effect of SC on the stability of CA in both acidic (pH 4.5) and basic conditions (pH 8.3) was studied by UV-Vis scan and LC-MS analysis. The results showed that at the presence of SC (3.0mM), CA (0.1mM) degraded to quinic acid and caffeic acid as well as other intermediates. Hence, the anti-browning property of SC can be attributed to the two modes of action: the inactivation of polyphenol oxidase directly and the oxidative degradation of phenolic substrates. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Correlation between lignin physicochemical properties and inhibition to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Pan, Xuejun

    2016-06-01

    Using isolated organosolv lignins from hardwood poplar and softwood lodgepole pine with varied physicochemical properties (molecular weight, aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, and hydrophobicity), the inhibitory effect of the lignins on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was investigated and the relationship between lignin properties and the inhibitory effect was elucidated. The results indicated that the lignin inhibition to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was closely related to the hydrophobicity and the phenolic hydroxyl groups of the lignin. The overall hydrophobicity of the lignin quantified by contact angle could serve as a predictor of the inhibitory effect of lignin. Hydrophilic modification of the lignin by carboxylation and sulfonation reduced the hydrophobicity by 22-30% and thereby removed the lignin inhibition by 76-96%. Phenolic hydroxyl group was a crucial factor affecting the inhibitory effect of lignin. Blocking free phenolic hydroxyl group by chemical reaction such as hydroxypropylation significantly (65-91%) reduced the inhibitory effect of lignin. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1213-1224. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Inhibition of urease activity but not growth of Helicobacter pylori by acetohydroxamic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldie, J; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J; Jalali, S; H. Richardson; Hunt, R H

    1991-01-01

    The in vitro effects of acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), a potent urease inhibitor, were studied to determine the effect on the urease activity and growth of 38 strains of Helicobacter pylori. AHA in concentrations of 50-1000 mg/l had a noticeably reversible inhibitory effect on the urease activity of the organism but no effect on growth.

  15. Inhibition of tyrosinase-mediated enzymatic browning by sulfite and natural alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T.F.M.; Vincken, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Although sulfite is widely used to counteract enzymatic browning, its mechanism has remained largely unknown. We describe a double inhibitory mechanism of sulfite on enzymatic browning, affecting both the enzymatic oxidation of phenols into o‑quinones, as well as the non‑enzymatic reactions of these

  16. Undesirable Enzymatic Browning in Crustaceans: Causative Effects and Its Inhibition by Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, Nilesh Prakash; Benjakul, Soottawat; Ahmad, Mehraj; Arfat, Yasir Ali; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable enzymatic browning mediated by polyphenol oxidase (E.C. 1.14.18.1) on the surface of seafood from crustaceans have been a great concern to food processors, causing quality losses of seafood products. Seafoods especially from crustaceans are worldwide consumed due to their delicacy and nutritional value. However, black spot formation (melanosis) is the major problem occurring in crustaceans during postmortem handling and refrigerated storage induce deleterious changes in organoleptic properties and, therefore, decreases commercial value. Polyphenoloxidase (PPO), the copper-containing metalloprotein involved in oxidation of phenol to quinone is the major biochemical reaction of melanosis formation. This enzymatic mechanism causes unappealing blackening in postharvest crustaceans. To alleviate the melanosis formation in crustaceans, use of phenolic compounds from plant extract can serve as antimelanotics and appears to be a good alternative to the conventional sulfites which are associated with health-related disorders. In this review, we focuses on the unique features about the structure, distribution, and properties of PPO as well as mechanism of melanosis formation and provide a comprehensive deeper insight on the factors affecting melanosis formation and its inhibition by various antimelanotics including newly discovered plant phenolic compounds.

  17. Inhibition of enzymatic browning and protection of sulfhydryl enzymes by thiol compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, O; Ozawa, T

    2000-06-01

    In a reaction between (-)-epicatechin (EC) and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME), catalyzed by partially purified polyphenol oxidase (PPO) extracted from the style of Rhododendron mucronatum, 2'-(2-hydroxyethylthio)-(-)-epicatechin (2'-HETEC), 5'-(2-hydroxyethylthio)-(-)-epicatechin (5'-HETEC), and 2',5'-bis(2-hydroxyethylthio)-(-)-epicatechin (2',5'-HETEC) were formed. The rate of formation of 2',5'-HETEC from 5'-HETEC was faster than that from 2'-HETEC. In the absence of 2ME, the concentration of EC decreased rapidly and the reaction mixture turned brown; 2'-, 5'-, and 2',5'-HETEC, especially 2'-substituted HETECs. reacted more slowly. These data indicate that 2ME acts both as an inhibitor of the polymerization of O-quinone, presumably by binding to it and as a reductant involved in the conversion of O-quinone to O-dihydroxyphenol, Inhibition of enzymatic browning by other thiol compounds such as cysteine and dithiothreitol was also investigated.

  18. Effect and Modeling of Glucose Inhibition and In Situ Glucose Removal During Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Wheat Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andric, Pavle; Meyer, Anne S.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    , during 96 h of reaction. When glucose was removed by dialysis during the enzymatic hydrolysis, the cellulose conversion rates and glucose yields increased. In fact, with dialytic in situ glucose removal, the rate of enzyme-catalyzed glucose release during 48-72 h of reaction recovered from 20......-40% to become approximate to 70% of the rate recorded during 6-24 h of reaction. Although Michaelis-Menten kinetics do not suffice to model the kinetics of the complex multi-enzymatic degradation of cellulose, the data for the glucose inhibition were surprisingly well described by simple Michaelis......-Menten inhibition models without great significance of the inhibition mechanism. Moreover, the experimental in situ removal of glucose could be simulated by a Michaelis-Menten inhibition model. The data provide an important base for design of novel reactors and operating regimes which include continuous product...

  19. BabA dependent binding of Helicobacter pylori to human gastric mucins cause aggregation that inhibits proliferation and is regulated via ArsS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Emma C; Padra, Médea; Åberg, Anna; Gideonsson, Pär; Obi, Ikenna; Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P; Arnqvist, Anna; Lindén, Sara K

    2017-01-20

    Mucins in the gastric mucus layer carry a range of glycan structures, which vary between individuals, can have antimicrobial effect or act as ligands for Helicobacter pylori. Mucins from various individuals and disease states modulate H. pylori proliferation and adhesin gene expression differently. Here we investigate the relationship between adhesin mediated binding, aggregation, proliferation and adhesin gene expression using human gastric mucins and synthetic adhesin ligand conjugates. By combining measurements of optical density, bacterial metabolic activity and live/dead stains, we could distinguish bacterial aggregation from viability changes, enabling elucidation of mechanisms behind the anti-prolific effects that mucins can have. Binding of H. pylori to Le(b)-glycoconjugates inhibited the proliferation of the bacteria in a BabA dependent manner, similarly to the effect of mucins carrying Le(b). Furthermore, deletion of arsS lead to a decrease in binding to Le(b)-glycoconjugates and Le(b)-decorated mucins, accompanied by decreased aggregation and absence of anti-prolific effect of mucins and Le(b)-glycoconjugates. Inhibition of proliferation caused by adhesin dependent binding to mucins, and the subsequent aggregation suggests a new role of mucins in the host defense against H. pylori. This aggregating trait of mucins may be useful to incorporate into the design of adhesin inhibitors and other disease intervention molecules.

  20. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thöle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL led to reduced binding to 3ʹ-sialyl lactose, sialylated Lea and Lex. A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity.

  1. BabA dependent binding of Helicobacter pylori to human gastric mucins cause aggregation that inhibits proliferation and is regulated via ArsS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Emma C.; Padra, Médea; Åberg, Anna; Gideonsson, Pär; Obi, Ikenna; Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P.; Arnqvist, Anna; Lindén, Sara K.

    2017-01-01

    Mucins in the gastric mucus layer carry a range of glycan structures, which vary between individuals, can have antimicrobial effect or act as ligands for Helicobacter pylori. Mucins from various individuals and disease states modulate H. pylori proliferation and adhesin gene expression differently. Here we investigate the relationship between adhesin mediated binding, aggregation, proliferation and adhesin gene expression using human gastric mucins and synthetic adhesin ligand conjugates. By combining measurements of optical density, bacterial metabolic activity and live/dead stains, we could distinguish bacterial aggregation from viability changes, enabling elucidation of mechanisms behind the anti-prolific effects that mucins can have. Binding of H. pylori to Leb-glycoconjugates inhibited the proliferation of the bacteria in a BabA dependent manner, similarly to the effect of mucins carrying Leb. Furthermore, deletion of arsS lead to a decrease in binding to Leb-glycoconjugates and Leb-decorated mucins, accompanied by decreased aggregation and absence of anti-prolific effect of mucins and Leb-glycoconjugates. Inhibition of proliferation caused by adhesin dependent binding to mucins, and the subsequent aggregation suggests a new role of mucins in the host defense against H. pylori. This aggregating trait of mucins may be useful to incorporate into the design of adhesin inhibitors and other disease intervention molecules. PMID:28106125

  2. Helicobacter pylori CagA inhibits PAR1-MARK family kinases by mimicking host substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesić, Dragana; Miller, Marshall C; Quinkert, Zachary T; Stein, Markus; Chait, Brian T; Stebbins, C Erec

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  3. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1/MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neišić, Dragana; Miller, Marshall C.; Quinkert, Zachary T.; Stein, Markus; Chait, Brian T.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors, and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the co-crystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2. PMID:19966800

  4. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  5. Enzymatic activity and inhibition of the neurotoxic complex vipoxin from the venom of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noetzel, Corinna; Chandra, Vikas; Perbandt, Markus; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Singh, Tej; Aleksiev, Boris; Kalkura, Narayana; Genov, Nicolay; Betzel, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Vipoxin from the venom of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis is an unique neurotoxic complex between a toxic phospholipase A2 and a highly homologous non-toxic protein inhibitor. It is an example of evolution of a catalytic and toxic function into inhibitory and non-toxic one. The activity of the V. ammodytes meridionalis toxin is 1.7 times higher than that of the closely related (92% sequence identity) neurotoxic complex RV4/RV7 from the venom of Vipera russelli formosensis The enhanced enzymatic activity of vipoxin is attributed to limited structural changes, in particular to the substitutions G54R and Q78K in the PLA2 subunit of the complex and to the T54R substitution in the inhibitor. Oleyloxyethylphosphocholine, aristolochic acid and vitamin E suppressed the enzymatic activity of vipoxin and its isolated PLA2 subunit. These compounds influence inflammatory processes in which PLA2 is implicated. The peptide Lys-Ala-Ile-Tyr-Ser, which is an integral part of the PLA2 components of the two neurotoxic complexes from V. ammodytes meridionalis and V. russelli formosensis (sequence 70-74) activated vipoxin increasing its PLA2 activity by 23%. This is in contrast to the inhibitory effect of the respective pentapeptides with 70-74 sequences on other group II PLA2s. Surprisingly, the same peptide inhibited 46% of the V. russelli formosensis PLA2 activity. The limited changes in the structure of the two highly homologous neurotoxins lead to considerable differences in their interaction with native peptides.

  6. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haim Shmuely; Noam Domniz; Jacob Yahav

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro antiHelicobacter pylori(H.pylori)activity,but are less effective in vivo.The anti-H.pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane,anti-adhesion,inhibition of bacterial enzymes andbacterial grown.We,herein,review treatment effects of cranberry,garlic,curcumin,ginger and pistacia gum against H.pylori in both in vitro,animal studies and in vivo studies.

  7. Effects of ozone and chlorine disinfection on VBNC Helicobacter pylori by molecular techniques and FESEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta de Velásquez, María Teresa; Yáñez Noguez, Isaura; Casasola Rodríguez, Beatriz; Román Román, Priscila Ivette

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogen bacteria associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric carcinoma. H. pylori has a spiral morphology, which under certain conditions of stress becomes a coccoid form. This type of morphology has been linked to a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state, which is thought to allow its persistence in the environment. Membrane damage in VBNC H. pylori in water as a mechanism for inactivation using ozone (O3) and chlorine disinfection has not been reported in the literature. In this paper, disinfection assays with ozone and chlorine were conducted to evaluate their effects on VBNC H. pylori cells. The use of fluorescent dyes such as propidium monoazide (PMA) coupled with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions produced results necessary to assess the viability of the microorganism and demonstrate the effect of each disinfectant on the bacterial count. Applying ozone showed a 5-log bacterial reduction using a disinfectant concentration and exposure time (CT) of 4 mg min/L. Chlorine disinfection for the same 5-log reduction required a higher CT value. Field emission scanning electron microscope images of ozone-treated VBNC H. pylori also showed severe cell damage. The use of PMA revealed that chlorine produced physical damage in the membrane in addition to the known inhibiting effect on cell enzymatic processes. These findings are important for the detection and control of VBNC H. pylori cells in drinking water systems.

  8. Aqueous Leaf Extract of Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae) Inhibits Enzymatic and Biological Actions of Bothrops jararaca Snake Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix-Silva, Juliana; Souza, Thiago; Menezes, Yamara A. S.; Cabral, Bárbara; Câmara, Rafael B. G.; Silva-Junior, Arnóbio A.; Rocha, Hugo A. O.; Rebecchi, Ivanise M. M.; Zucolotto, Silvana M.; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F.

    2014-01-01

    Snakebites are a serious public health problem due their high morbi-mortality. The main available specific treatment is the antivenom serum therapy, which has some disadvantages, such as poor neutralization of local effects, risk of immunological reactions, high cost and difficult access in some regions. In this context, the search for alternative therapies is relevant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antiophidic properties of Jatropha gossypiifolia, a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat snakebites. The aqueous leaf extract of the plant was prepared by decoction and phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of sugars, alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes and/or steroids and proteins. The extract was able to inhibit enzymatic and biologic activities induced by Bothrops jararaca snake venom in vitro and in vivo. The blood incoagulability was efficiently inhibited by the extract by oral route. The hemorrhagic and edematogenic local effects were also inhibited, the former by up to 56% and the latter by 100%, in animals treated with extract by oral and intraperitoneal routes, respectively. The inhibition of myotoxic action of B. jararaca reached almost 100%. According to enzymatic tests performed, it is possible to suggest that the antiophidic activity may be due an inhibitory action upon snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) and/or serine proteinases (SVSPs), including fibrinogenolytic enzymes, clotting factors activators and thrombin like enzymes (SVTLEs), as well upon catalytically inactive phospholipases A2 (Lys49 PLA2). Anti-inflammatory activity, at least partially, could also be related to the inhibition of local effects. Additionally, protein precipitating and antioxidant activities may also be important features contributing to the activity presented. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the potential antiophidic activity of J. gossypiifolia extract, including its significant action upon local effects, suggesting that

  9. Aqueous leaf extract of Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae inhibits enzymatic and biological actions of Bothrops jararaca snake venom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Félix-Silva

    Full Text Available Snakebites are a serious public health problem due their high morbi-mortality. The main available specific treatment is the antivenom serum therapy, which has some disadvantages, such as poor neutralization of local effects, risk of immunological reactions, high cost and difficult access in some regions. In this context, the search for alternative therapies is relevant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antiophidic properties of Jatropha gossypiifolia, a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat snakebites. The aqueous leaf extract of the plant was prepared by decoction and phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of sugars, alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes and/or steroids and proteins. The extract was able to inhibit enzymatic and biologic activities induced by Bothrops jararaca snake venom in vitro and in vivo. The blood incoagulability was efficiently inhibited by the extract by oral route. The hemorrhagic and edematogenic local effects were also inhibited, the former by up to 56% and the latter by 100%, in animals treated with extract by oral and intraperitoneal routes, respectively. The inhibition of myotoxic action of B. jararaca reached almost 100%. According to enzymatic tests performed, it is possible to suggest that the antiophidic activity may be due an inhibitory action upon snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs and/or serine proteinases (SVSPs, including fibrinogenolytic enzymes, clotting factors activators and thrombin like enzymes (SVTLEs, as well upon catalytically inactive phospholipases A2 (Lys49 PLA2. Anti-inflammatory activity, at least partially, could also be related to the inhibition of local effects. Additionally, protein precipitating and antioxidant activities may also be important features contributing to the activity presented. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the potential antiophidic activity of J. gossypiifolia extract, including its significant action upon local effects

  10. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein as target for new drugs against H.pylori inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodora Choli-Papadopoulou; Filippos Kottakis; Georgios Papadopoulos; Stefanos Pendas

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is among the most common human infections and the major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Within this work we present the implication of C-terminal region of H. pylori neutrophil activating protein in the stimulation of neutrophil activation as well as the evidence that the C-terminal region of H. pylori activating protein is indispensable for neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, a step necessary to H. pylori inflammation. In addition we show that arabino galactan proteins derived from chios mastic gum, the natural resin of the plant Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia inhibit neutrophil activation in vitro .

  11. Michaelis-Menten Kinetics in Transient State: Proposal for Reversible Inhibition Model and its Application on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Disaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rosa Martins

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic processes according Michaelis-Menten kinetics have been studied from various approaches to describe the inhibition state. Proposals for inhibition were compared from a generic process, where kinetic constants have received unitary values, and the numeric value of the concentration of substrate was ten (10 times higher than the numerical value of the concentration of enzyme. For each inhibition model proposed, numerical solutions were obtained from nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, generating results presents by graphs showing the variation of the enzyme and enzyme complexes, also the variation of substrate and product of the reaction. Also, was designed a model with performance, indicating similar behavior to that seen in the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, where complex of reaction is rapidly formed and throughout the process, tends to decay to zero. Thus, in this new proposed model, the effect of inhibition starts at zero and, throughout the process, tends to the nominal value of the initial enzyme concentration. Such responses have proved to be valid for different values of enzyme concentration and process time, showing robustness. The proposed model was applied to the hydrolysis of disaccharides, providing a setting with conservation of mass of the model at the end of the process regarding the responses of the carbohydrate concentration.

  12. Helicobacter pylori Cholesteryl α-Glucosides Contribute to Its Pathogenicity and Immune Response by Natural Killer T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Vela, Jose Luis; Matsumura, Fumiko; Hoshino, Hitomi; Tyznik, Aaron; Lee, Heeseob; Girardi, Enrico; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Liddington, Robert; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Bao, Xingfeng; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Jin, Rongsheng; Zong, Yinong; Seeberger, Peter H.; Nakayama, Jun; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Fukuda, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10–15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer), while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18−/−) or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis. PMID:24312443

  13. Helicobacter pylori cholesteryl α-glucosides contribute to its pathogenicity and immune response by natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Approximately 10-15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer, while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT, which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18(-/- or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis.

  14. Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    BATESON, M

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer disease, and its detection and eradication are now an important part of gastroenterology. Effective regimes are available which will eliminate the organism in about 90% of cases in developed countries.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori

  15. The Use of Biobased Surfactant Obtained by Enzymatic Syntheses for Wax Deposition Inhibition and Drag Reduction in Crude Oil Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil plays an important role in providing the energy supply of the world, and pipelines have long been recognized as the safest and most efficient means of transporting oil and its products. However, the transportation process also faces the challenges of asphaltene-paraffin structural interactions, pipeline pressure losses and energy consumption. In order to determine the role of drag-reducing surfactant additives in the transportation of crude oils, experiments of wax deposition inhibition and drag reduction of different oil in pipelines with a biobased surfactant obtained by enzymatic syntheses were carried out. The results indicated that heavy oil transportation in the pipeline is remarkably enhanced by creating stable oil-in-water (O/W emulsion with the surfactant additive. The wax appearance temperature (WAT and pour point were modified, and the formation of a space-filling network of interlocking wax crystals was prevented at low temperature by adding a small concentration of the surfactant additive. A maximum viscosity reduction of 70% and a drag reduction of 40% for light crude oil flows in pipelines were obtained with the surfactant additive at a concentration of 100 mg/L. Furthermore, a successful field application of the drag-reducing surfactant in a light crude oil pipeline in Daqing Oilfield was demonstrated. Hence, the use of biobased surfactant obtained by enzymatic syntheses in oil transportation is a potential method to address the current challenges, which could result in a significant energy savings and a considerable reduction of the operating cost.

  16. Salicylic acid inhibits enzymatic browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) by competitively inhibiting polyphenol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Li, Lin; Wu, Yanwen; Fan, Junfeng; Ouyang, Jie

    2015-03-15

    The inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of salicylic acid (SA) on the browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut were investigated. Shelled and sliced chestnuts were immersed in different concentrations of an SA solution, and the browning of the chestnut surface and interior were inhibited. The activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) extracted from chestnuts were measured in the presence and absence of SA. SA at concentrations higher than 0.3g/L delayed chestnut browning by significantly inhibiting the PPO activity (P0.05). The binding and inhibition modes of SA with PPO and POD, determined by AUTODOCK 4.2 and Lineweaver-Burk plots, respectively, established SA as a competitive inhibitor of PPO.

  17. An extract of Pelargonium sidoides (EPs 7630) inhibits in situ adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittschier, N; Faller, G; Hensel, A

    2007-04-01

    Root extract from Pelargonium sidoides DC is used therapeutically as antimicrobial agent against infections of the respiratory system. In order to elucidate possible modes of actions we investigated the influence of P. sidoides root extract on microbial adhesion with Helicobacter pylori as model microorganism, a germ with a strong adherence to human stomach tissue. In an in-situ anti-adhesion assay intact human stomach tissue from patient resectates was incubated with fluorescent-labelled bacteria. Epithelial adhesion occurred in untreated samples and was quantified by fluorescent microscopy. Pre-treatment of the bacteria with Pelargonium extract showed good anti-adhesive activity. The antiadhesive effect was clearly dose-dependent in a range from 0.001 to 10 mg/ml. Within agar diffusion-test the extract had no direct cytotoxicity against H. pylori. The results show that the root extract from Pelargonium sidoides is a potent anti-adhesive agent against H. pylori and could therefore be a useful choice to avoid the first step of a bacterial infection.

  18. Calcium pentosan polysulfate directly inhibits enzymatic activity of ADAMTS4 (aggrecanase-1) in osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Masayuki; Yatabe, Taku; Okada, Aiko; Chijiiwa, Miyuki; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Ghosh, Peter; Okada, Yasunori

    2008-08-20

    Aggrecanases that include ADAMTS1, 4, 5, 8, 9 and 15 are considered to play key roles in aggrecan degradation in osteoarthritic cartilage. Here we demonstrate that calcium pentosan polysulfate (CaPPS) directly inhibits the aggrecanase activity of ADAMTS4 without affecting the mRNA expression of the ADAMTS species in interleukin-1alpha-stimulated osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Synthetic peptides corresponding to specific regions of the thrombospondin type 1 repeat, cysteine-rich or spacer domain of ADAMTS4 inhibit the binding to immobilized CaPPS. These data suggest that CaPPS could function as chondroprotective agent for the treatment of osteoarthritis by inhibition of ADAMTS4 through interaction with the C-terminal ancillary domain.

  19. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  20. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  1. Phenolic compounds from Citrus leaves: antioxidant activity and enzymatic browning inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khettal, Bachra; Kadri, Nabil; Tighilet, Karim; Adjebli, Ahmed; Dahmoune, Farid; Maiza-Benabdeslam, Fadila

    2017-03-01

    Background Phenolic compounds from Citrus are known to be a topic of many studies due to their biological properties including antioxidant activity. Methods Methanolic and aqueous extracts were isolated from Citrus leaves of different species (C. clementina, C. limon, C. hamlin, C. navel, C. aurantifolia, C. aurantium and C. grandis) harvested in Algeria. Results The results showed that aqueous extracts of all species are rich in total phenolic compounds and flavonoids (from 68.23 to 125.28 mg GAE/g DM) and (from 11.99 to 46.25 mg QE/g DM) respectively. The methanolic and aqueous extracts were examined for in vitro antioxidant properties using various antioxidant assays. For aqueous extracts, C. limon showed an important DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC50 35.35 µg/mL), and C. clementina exerted the highest ABTS radical scavenging activity (1,174.43 µM ET/g DM) and a significant ferric reducing potential (30.60 mg BHAE/g DM). For methanolic extracts, C. clementina showed the highest antioxidant activity for all the realized assays (IC50 41.85 µg/mL, 378.63 µM ET/g DM and 13.85 mg BHAE/g DM) for DPPH, ABTS radicals scavenging activities and ferric reducing potential respectively. Antiperoxidase and antipolyphenol oxidase activities of these samples were also evaluated. Conclusions In this investigation, the assessment of antiperoxidase activity proved that the leaves extracts of different species were able to inhibit peroxidase activity. However, this inhibition varied with the species and the source of these enzymes. On the other hand, the aqueous extracts of different species showed moderate inhibition of polyphenol oxidase, while no effect on these enzymes was obtained with methanolic extracts.

  2. MRS Medium Inhibition Effect against Helicobacter pylori%MRS培养基对幽门螺杆菌具有抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗君莅; 吴正钧

    2012-01-01

    在筛选对幽门螺杆菌有抑制作用的乳酸菌的体外实验中,发现用于培养乳酸菌的MRS培养基本身就对幽门螺杆菌的液体或固体培养物有抑制作用.这种培养基带来的抑制势必对乳酸菌的筛选造成影响,产生假性结果.之前相关报道中,虽然都将MRS作为培养或筛选用培养基,但没有提及这种押制.认为在筛选对幽门螺杆菌有抑制作用的乳酸菌的体外实验中,应使用合适的培养基,即排除培养基本身对幽门螺杆菌的抑制.%It was found in vitro experiment to screen lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that inhibit Helicobacterpylori,the MRS medium to culture LAB itself had the inhibition effect against the H.pylori.The inhibition of the medium certainly will affect the screening of LAB,and produce false results.However,the related reports had never been mentioned the inhibition,even though the MRS medium has ever been used as culturing and/or screening medium.Therefore,the in vitro experiment to screen LAB that inhibits H.pyroli must use a proper medium,i.e.to eliminate the inhibition against H.pyroli existed in the medium itself.

  3. Gastroprotective Effect of Ginger Rhizome (Zingiber officinale Extract: Role of Gallic Acid and Cinnamic Acid in H+, K+-ATPase/H. pylori Inhibition and Anti-Oxidative Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaraju M. Nanjundaiah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinger officinale has been used as a traditional source against gastric disturbances from time immemorial. The ulcer-preventive properties of aqueous extract of ginger rhizome (GRAE belonging to the family Zingiberaceae is reported in the present study. GRAE at 200 mg kg−1 b.w. protected up to 86% and 77% for the swim stress-/ethanol stress-induced ulcers with an ulcer index (UI of 50 ± 4.0/46 ± 4.0, respectively, similar to that of lansoprazole (80% at 30 mg kg−1 b.w. Increased H+, K+-ATPase activity and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS were observed in ulcer-induced rats, while GRAE fed rats showed normalized levels and GRAE also normalized depleted/amplified anti-oxidant enzymes in swim stress and ethanol stress-induced animals. Gastric mucin damage was recovered up to 77% and 74% in swim stress and ethanol stress, respectively after GRAE treatment. GRAE also inhibited the growth of H. pylori with MIC of 300 ± 38 μg and also possessed reducing power, free radical scavenging ability with an IC50 of 6.8 ± 0.4 μg mL−1 gallic acid equivalent (GAE. DNA protection up to 90% at 0.4 μg was also observed. Toxicity studies indicated no lethal effects in rats fed up to 5 g kg−1 b.w. Compositional analysis favored by determination of the efficacy of individual phenolic acids towards their potential ulcer-preventive ability revealed that between cinnamic (50% and gallic (46% phenolic acids, cinnamic acid appear to contribute to better H+, K+-ATPase and Helicobacter pylori inhibitory activity, while gallic acid contributes significantly to anti-oxidant activity.

  4. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal name: Helicobacter pylori Related tests: Gastrin At a Glance Test Sample ... else I should know? How is it used? Helicobacter pylori testing is used to diagnose an infection due ...

  5. [Jianpi jiedu recipe inhibited Helicobacter pylori-induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 via p38MAPK/ATF-2 signal transduction pathway in human gastric cancer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning-ning; Wang, Yan; Wu, Qiong

    2011-07-01

    To study the effect of Jianpi Jiedu Recipe (JJR) on the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) in Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infected gastric cancer cell line MKN 45, and its regulatory mechanism of p38MAPK signal transduction. The expressions of COX-2 mRNA and protein in human gastric cancer cell line MKN 45 infected by Hp type strain NCTC 11637 and the regulatory effect of JJR containing serum were detected using Real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RFQ-PCR) and Western blot. The effects of Hp on COX-2 mRNA and protein expressions in human gastric cancer cell line MKN 45 were observed using blocking p38MAPK signal transduction pathway by p38MAPK specific inhibitor SB203580. The effects of JJR on Hp-infection activated p38MAPK signal transduction pathway and its downstream activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) were observed. COX-2 mRNA and protein expressions were obviously higher after human gastric cancer cell line MKN 45 were infected by Hp (PATF-2. Hp infection induced COX-2 expressions of gastric cancer cells via p38MAPK signal transduction pathway. JJR inhibited Hp-induced the expression of COX-2 through regulating p38MAPK/ATF-2 signal transduction pathway, which may be one of its mechanisms in prevention and treatment of Hp-induced gastric cancer.

  6. Regulation of RKIP function by Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika L Moen

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium that infects more than half of the world's population and is a major cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mechanisms that link H. pylori infection to gastric carcinogenesis are not well understood. In the present study, we report that the Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP has a role in the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. Western blot and luciferase transcription reporter assays demonstrate that the pathogenicity island of H. pylori rapidly phosphorylates RKIP, which then localizes to the nucleus where it activates its own transcription and induces apoptosis. Forced overexpression of RKIP enhances apoptosis in H. pylori-infected cells, whereas RKIP RNA inhibition suppresses the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori infection. While inducing the phosphorylation of RKIP, H. pylori simultaneously targets non-phosphorylated RKIP for proteasome-mediated degradation. The increase in RKIP transcription and phosphorylation is abrogated by mutating RKIP serine 153 to valine, demonstrating that regulation of RKIP activity by H. pylori is dependent upon RKIP's S153 residue. In addition, H. pylori infection increases the expression of Snail, a transcriptional repressor of RKIP. Our results suggest that H. pylori utilizes a tumor suppressor protein, RKIP, to promote apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  7. N-acetylcysteine, a novel treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hien Quoc; Couper, Richard T L; Tran, Cuong D; Moore, Lynette; Kelso, Richard; Butler, Ross N

    2004-01-01

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), being both a mucolytic agent and a thiol-containing antioxidant, may affect the establishment and maintenance of H. pylori infection within the gastric mucus layer and mucosa. Agar and broth dilution susceptibility tests determined the MIC of H. pylori strain SSI to NAC. H. pylori load in SSI strain-infected C57BL mice was determined as colony forming units per gram of gastric tissue. Gastritis assessment was scored and gastric surface hydrophobicity was determined by contact angle measurement. MICs of NAC were 5 to 10 and 10 to 15 mg/ml using the agar dilution and broth dilution methods, respectively. NAC (120 mg per day for 14 days) reduced the H. pylori load in mice by almost 1 log compared with sham treatment. Pretreatment with NAC (40 mg/day) also significantly reduced the H. pylori load but did not prevent H. pylori colonization. Both H. pylori infection and NAC reduced the surface hydrophobicity of murine gastric mucosa. No significant differences were observed in the gastritis scores of H. felis- or H. pylori-infected mice receiving either NAC or sham treatments. This study demonstrates that NAC inhibits the growth of H. pylori in both agar and broth susceptibility tests and in H. pylori-infected mice. NAC did not alter the severity of H. pylori- or H. felis-induced gastritis.

  8. Mimotopes selected with a neutralizing antibody against urease B from Helicobacter pylori induce enzyme inhibitory antibodies in mice upon vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Min

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urease B is an important virulence factor that is required for Helicobacter pylori to colonise the gastric mucosa. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that inhibit urease B enzymatic activity will be useful as vaccines for the prevention and treatment of H. pylori infection. Here, we produced murine mAbs against urease B that neutralize the enzyme's activity. We mapped their epitopes by phage display libraries and investigated the immunogenicity of the selected mimotopes in vivo. Results The urease B gene was obtained (GenBank accession No. DQ141576 and the recombinant pGEX-4T-1/UreaseB protein was expressed in Escherichia coli as a 92-kDa recombinant fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase (GST. Five mAbs U001-U005 were produced by a hybridoma-based technique with urease B-GST as an immunogen. Only U001 could inhibit urease B enzymatic activity. Immunoscreening via phage display libraries revealed two different mimotopes of urease B protein; EXXXHDM from ph.D.12-library and EXXXHSM from ph.D.C7C that matched the urease B proteins at 347-353 aa. The antiserum induced by selected phage clones clearly recognised the urease B protein and inhibited its enzymatic activity, which indicated that the phagotope-induced immune responses were antigen specific. Conclusions The present work demonstrated that phage-displayed mimotopes were accessible to the mouse immune system and triggered a humoral response. The urease B mimotope could provide a novel and promising approach for the development of a vaccine for the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection.

  9. Covalent immobilization of porcine pancreatic lipase on carboxyl-activated magnetic nanoparticles: Characterization and application for enzymatic inhibition assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuan-Ting [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ren, Xiao-Yun [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Yi-Ming [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217 (United States); Wei, Ying [Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi 046000 (China); Qing, Lin-Sen [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liao, Xun, E-mail: liaoxun@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Using carboxyl functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carrier, a novel immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was prepared through the 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. Transmission electron microscopic images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–SiO{sub 2}) possessed three dimensional core–shell structures with an average diameter of ∼ 20 nm. The effective enzyme immobilization onto the nanocomposite was confirmed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. Results from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Bradford protein assay, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that PPL was covalently attached to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles with a PPL immobilization yield of 50 mg enzyme/g MNPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the MNPs-PPL nanocomposite had a high saturation magnetization of 42.25 emu·g{sup −1}. The properties of the immobilized PPL were investigated in comparison with the free enzyme counterpart. Enzymatic activity, reusability, thermo-stability, and storage stability of the immobilized PPL were found significantly superior to those of the free one. The K{sub m} and the V{sub max} values (0.02 mM, 6.40 U·mg{sup −1} enzyme) indicated the enhanced activity of the immobilized PPL compared to those of the free enzyme (0.29 mM, 3.16 U·mg{sup −1} enzyme). Furthermore, at an elevated temperature of 70 °C, immobilized PPL retained 60% of its initial activity. The PPL-MNPs nanocomposite was applied in the enzyme inhibition assays using orlistat, and two natural products isolated from oolong tea (i.e., EGCG and EGC) as the test compounds. - Highlights: • Porcine pancreatic lipase was firstly covalently immobilized onto carboxylated MNPs. • Immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was characterized by various techniques. • MNPs-PPL showed higher activity

  10. Inhibition of ALK enzymatic activity in T-cell lymphoma cells induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation and STAT3 phosphorylation independently of Jak3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Kasprzycka, Monika; Ptasznik, Andrzej;

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the ALK tyrosine kinase as a chimeric protein with nucleophosmin (NPM) and other partners plays a key role in malignant cell transformation of T-lymphocytes and other cells. Here we report that two small-molecule, structurally related, quinazoline-type compounds, WHI-131...... and WHI-154, directly inhibit enzymatic activity of NPM/ALK as demonstrated by in vitro kinase assays using a synthetic tyrosine-rich oligopeptide and the kinase itself as the substrates. The inhibition of NPM/ALK activity resulted in malignant T cells in suppression of their growth, induction...... of apoptosis and inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, the key effector of the NPM/ALK-induced oncogenesis. We also show that the STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation is mediated in the malignant T cells by NPM/ALK independently of Jak3 kinase as evidenced by the presence of STAT3 phosphorylation...

  11. Helicobacter pylori's cholesterol uptake impacts resistance to docosahexaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Marta; Casal, Susana; Vinagre, João; Seruca, Raquel; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette; Machado, José C

    2014-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes half of the world population and is associated with gastric cancer. We have previously demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid known for its anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects, directly inhibits H. pylori growth in vitro and in mice. Nevertheless, the concentration of DHA shown to reduce H. pylori mice gastric colonization was ineffective in vitro. Related to the auxotrophy of H. pylori for cholesterol, we hypothesize that other mechanisms, in addition to DHA direct antibacterial effect, must be responsible for the reduction of the infection burden. In the present study we investigated if DHA affects also H. pylori growth, by reducing the availability of membrane cholesterol in the epithelial cell for H. pylori uptake. Levels of cholesterol in gastric epithelial cells and of cholesteryl glucosides in H. pylori were determined by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The consequences of epithelial cells' cholesterol depletion on H. pylori growth were assessed in liquid cultures. We show that H. pylori uptakes cholesterol from epithelial cells. In addition, DHA lowers cholesterol levels in epithelial cells, decreases its de novo synthesis, leading to a lower synthesis of cholesteryl glucosides by H. pylori. A previous exposition of H. pylori to cholesterol influences the bacterium response to the direct inhibitory effect of DHA. Overall, our results suggest that a direct effect of DHA on H. pylori survival is modulated by its access to epithelial cell cholesterol, supporting the notion that cholesterol enhances the resistance of H. pylori. The cholesterol-dependent resistance of H. pylori to antimicrobial compounds raises new important aspects for the development of new anti-bacterial strategies.

  12. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on Bax protein expression in patients with gastric precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Feng Liu; Wei-Wen Liu; Guo-An Wang; Xiao-Chun Teng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection on Bax protein expression, and explore the role of H pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: H pylori was assessed by rapid urease test and Warthin-Starry method, and expression of Bax protein was examined immunohistochemically in 72 patients with pre-malignant lesions.RESULTS: Bax protein was differently expressed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric dysplasia, and showed 63.99% positivity. The positivity of Bax protein expression in H pylori-positive gastric precancerous lesions (72.3%) was significantly higher than that in H pylori-negative gastric precancerous lesions (48.0%, χ2 = 4.191, P<0.05).H pylori infection was well correlated with the expression of Bax protein in gastric precancerous lesions (r = 0.978,P<0.01). After eradication of H pylori, the positivity of Bax protein expression significantly decreased in H pylori-positive gastric precancerous lesions (χ2= 5.506,P<0.05). In the persisting H pylori-infected patients,the positivity of Bax protein expression was not changed.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection may be involved in the upregulation of Bax gene, which might be one of the mechanisms of H pylori infection-induced gastric epithelial cell apoptosis. H pylori might act as a tumor promoter in the genesis of gastric carcinoma and eradication of H pylori could inhibit gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. Reactor design for minimizing product inhibition during enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis: I. Significance and mechanism of cellobiose and glucose inhibition on cellulolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andric, Pavle; Meyer, Anne S.; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2010-01-01

    Achievement of efficient enzymatic degradation of cellulose to glucose is one of the main prerequisites and one of the main challenges in the biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to liquid fuels and other valuable products. The specific inhibitory interferences by cellobiose and gluco...

  14. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases...

  15. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases......Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...

  16. Effect of Rebamipide, a Novel Antiulcer Agent, on Helicobacter pylori Adhesion to Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shunji; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Isogai, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko; Aihara, Miki; Kikuchi, Mikio; Asaka, Masahiro; Yokota, Kenji; Oguma, Keiji; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Hirai, Yoshikazu

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major etiological agent in gastroduodenal disorders. The adhesion of H. pylori to human gastric epithelial cells is the initial step of H. pylori infection. Inhibition of H. pylori adhesion is thus a therapeutic target in the prevention of H. pylori infection. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of rebamipide, a novel antiulcer agent, on H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells, derived from human gastric carcinomas, were used as target cells. Ten H. pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer were used in the study. We evaluated the effect of rebamipide on H. pylori adhesion to MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells quantitatively using our previously established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The adhesion of H. pylori to MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of these cells with 100 μg of rebamipide per ml. However, the adhesion was not affected by the pretreatment of H. pylori with rebamipide. On the other hand, the viabilities of H. pylori, MKN-28 cells, and MKN-45 cells were not affected by rebamipide. Our studies suggest that rebamipide inhibits the adhesion of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. PMID:9687380

  17. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and oxidative burst inhibition by the naphthoquinone 5-methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin from Paepalanthus latipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rezende Kitagawa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium recognized as the major cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers. Infection by H. pylori induces inflammatory responses and pathological changes in the gastric microenvironment. The host Keywords: immune cells (especially neutrophils release inflammatory mediators and large 5-methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are associated with an increased Helicobacter pyloririsk of developing gastric cancer. In this study, we evaluated the anti-H. pylori and oxidative burst antioxidantactivitiesofa1,4-naphthoquinone-5-methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin. Paepalanthus latipes The antimicrobial activity was assessed using a spectrophotometric microdilution technique, and antioxidant activity was assessed by noting the effect of 5-methoxy3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin on the neutrophil oxidative burst using luminol-and lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence. The results showed that 5-methoxy-3,4dehydroxanthomegnin is a potent anti-H. pylori compound (MIC 64 µg/mL and MBC 128 µg/mL and a strong antioxidant. 5-Methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin decreased luminol- and lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence, with ED50 values of 1.58±0.09 µg/mL and 5.4±0.15 µg/mL, respectively, reflecting an inhibitory effect on the oxidative burst. These results indicate that 5-methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin is a promising compound for the prevention and treatment of diseases caused by H. pylori infection, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric cancer, because reactive oxygen intermediates are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by H. pylori infections.

  18. 幽门螺杆菌抑制大鼠乙酸胃溃疡愈合的机制%Mechanism of Helicobacter Pylori Inhibiting the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成军; 夏立丁; 金丽; 王国忠

    2009-01-01

    目的 研究幽门螺杆菌抑制大鼠乙酸胃溃疡愈合的机制.方法 用幽门螺杆菌感染Wistar大鼠,4周后复制出乙酸胃溃疡模型,在溃疡模型复制后的3、8、16天测定胃窦部黏膜G细胞、D细胞的数目、胃液量和pH.结果 Hp+乙酸溃疡组G细胞数目、胃液量高于乙酸溃疡组(P<0.01);D细胞的数目和pH低于乙酸溃疡组(P<0.01).结论 幽门螺杆菌通过增加胃酸分泌抑制溃疡愈合.%Objective To study the mechanism of Helicobacter Pylori inhibiting the healing of acetic acid - induced gastric ulcer in rats. Methods Rats were infected with Helicobacter Pylori and the model of acetic acid gastric ulcer was replicated at 4 weeks after in-fection. Amount of G cell and D cell in mucosa of gastric antrum, quantity of gastric juice and pH were measured at the 3rd,Sth, 16th day after the model was replicated. Results When the group of Hp + acetic acid ulcer compared with the group of acetic acid ulcer, the number of G cell, quantity of gastric juice increased (P < 0.01), and the number of D cell and pH decreased (P < 0.01). Conclusion Helicobacter Pylori inhibits ulcer healing through increasing gastric acid secretion.

  19. H. pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... think you may have a high risk of stomach cancer, talk to your doctor. Together you can decide whether you may benefit from H. pylori screening. References H. pylori and peptic ulcers. National Institute ...

  20. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  1. Dual effectiveness of sodium chlorite for enzymatic browning inhibition and Escherichia coli inactivation on fresh-cut apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the dual effectiveness of sodium chlorite (SC) for browning inhibition and microbial inactivation on fresh-cut apples. The SC treatment exhibited a strong inhibition on browning reaction of fresh-cut Red Delicious apples during cold storage. Test results from examination of t...

  2. Iron deficiency in Helicobacter pylori infected patients in Baghdad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenan A. Muhsin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Recent studies have suggested an association of Helicobacter pylori and iron deficiency (ID.Materials and methods: To examine an association between H.pylori infection and ID, blood sampling and a data collectionsurvey were performed in 78 H.pylori infected patients and 22 healthy subjects as control. Serum ferritin and ironwere measured by ELISA and direct enzymatic method techniques respectively.Results: The result showed that 24 of the patients (30.7% have serum ferritin and iron concentrations below the normalrange indicating iron deficiency, with no significantly difference between women and men. ID was more pronounced inpatients with stomach ulcer (58.3% than those without stomach ulcer (41.7% respectively.Conclusions: The conclusion was that H.pylori infection might have a role in iron deficiency and subsequently iron deficiencyanemia. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2011; 1(3:114-117

  3. Recombinant Helicobacter pylori catalase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Ya-Li Zhang; Jian-Feng Jin; Ji-De Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant strain which highly expresses catalase of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) and assay the activity of H. pylori catalase.METHODS: The catalase DNA was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA with PCR techniques and inserted into the prokaryotie expression vector pET-22b (+), and then was transformed into the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain which expressed catalase recombinant protein. The activity of H.pylori catalase was assayed by the Beers & Sizers.RESULTS: DNA sequence analysis showed that the sequence of catalase DNA was the same as GenBank's research. The catalase recombinant protein amounted to 24.4 % of the total bacterial protein after induced with IPTG for 3 hours at 37 ℃ and the activity of H. pylori catalase was high in the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain.CONCLUSION: A clone expressing high activity H. pylori catalase is obtained, laying a good foundation for further studies.

  4. Streptococcus mitis induces conversion of Helicobacter pylori to coccoid cells during co-culture in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major gastric pathogen that has been associated with humans for more than 60,000 years. H. pylori causes different gastric diseases including dyspepsia, ulcers and gastric cancers. Disease development depends on several factors including the infecting H. pylori strain, environmental and host factors. Another factor that might influence H. pylori colonization and diseases is the gastric microbiota that was overlooked for long because of the belief that human stomach was a hostile environment that cannot support microbial life. Once established, H. pylori mainly resides in the gastric mucosa and interacts with the resident bacteria. How these interactions impact on H. pylori-caused diseases has been poorly studied in human. In this study, we analyzed the interactions between H. pylori and two bacteria, Streptococcus mitis and Lactobacillus fermentum that are present in the stomach of both healthy and gastric disease human patients. We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells. In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth. Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells. This study provide evidences that gastric bacteria influences H. pylori physiology and therefore possibly the diseases this bacterium causes.

  5. Effect of Weifuchun of inhibiting inflammation of helicobacter pylori-infected GES-1 cells and NF-κB signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of Weifuchun on inflammation of Helicobacter pylori(Hp)-infected gastric epithelial cells(GES-1)and its correlation with NF-κB signaling pathway.Methods Hp standard home-made strain(CagA+,VacA+)NCTCI 1637 infected GES-1cells were used.Weifuchun was used as intervention.Weifuchun of different concentrations(5,10,and 20μg/

  6. Alterations in gastric mucin synthesis by Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James C, Byrd; Robert S, Bresalier

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the role of Helicobacter pylori in altering gastric mucin synthesis and define how thprocess relates to H. pylori-related diseases.METHODS Analyses of human gastric tissues using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridizatiodocument the role of H. pylori in altering the composition and distribution of gastric mucins.RESULTS These data indicate a decrease in the product of the MUC5 (MUC5AC) gene and aberraexpression of MUC6 in the surface epithelium of H. pylori-infected patients. A normal pattern was restorby H. pylori eradication. Inhibition of mucin synthesis including MUC5AC and MUCl mucins by H. pvlohas been established in vitro using biochemical and Western blot analyses. This effect is not due to inhibitiof glycosylation, but results from inhibition of synthesis of mucin core structures. In vitro experiments usiinhibitors of mucin synthesis indicate that cell surface mucins decrease adhesion of H. pylori to gastepithelial cells.CONCLUSION Inhibition of mucin synthesis by H. pylori in vivo can disrupt the protective mucous layand facilitate bacterial adhesion, which may lead to increased inflammation in thc gastric epithelium.

  7. Supplementation with xylanase and β-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Qing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemicellulose is often credited with being one of the important physical barriers to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, and acts by blocking enzyme access to the cellulose surface. In addition, our recent research has suggested that hemicelluloses, particularly in the form of xylan and its oligomers, can more strongly inhibit cellulase activity than do glucose and cellobiose. Removal of hemicelluloses or elimination of their negative effects can therefore become especially pivotal to achieving higher cellulose conversion with lower enzyme doses. Results In this study, cellulase was supplemented with xylanase and β-xylosidase to boost conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose in pretreated biomass through conversion of xylan and xylo-oligomers to the less inhibitory xylose. Although addition of xylanase and β-xylosidase did not necessarily enhance Avicel hydrolysis, glucan conversions increased by 27% and 8% for corn stover pretreated with ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX and dilute acid, respectively. In addition, adding hemicellulase several hours before adding cellulase was more beneficial than later addition, possibly as a result of a higher adsorption affinity of cellulase and xylanase to xylan than glucan. Conclusions This key finding elucidates a possible mechanism for cellulase inhibition by xylan and xylo-oligomers and emphasizes the need to optimize the enzyme formulation for each pretreated substrate. More research is needed to identify advanced enzyme systems designed to hydrolyze different substrates with maximum overall enzyme efficacy.

  8. The effect of hydrogen ion on the steady-state multiplicity of substrate-inhibited enzymatic reactions. II. Transient behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnashaie, S S; Elrifaie, M A; Ibrahim, G; Badra, G

    1983-12-01

    In this paper we concentrate our attention on the stability and transient behavior of the isothermal system (CSTR) with a substrate-inhibited enzyme reaction producing hydrogen ions. Our investigation covers the region of multiple steady states uncovered previously (1) (ordinary hysteresis and isola). We investigate the local stability characteristics of the different steady states, the effect of the initial condition on the transient behavior and the response of the system to feed disturbances of various magnitudes and durations.

  9. Epigenetic Therapy of Hematopoietic Malignancies: Novel Approaches for Tissue-Specific and Global Inhibition of EZH2 Enzymatic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; 5Department of Genetics, and 6Departments of Neurology and Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of...inhibition of both EZH2 and EZH1 as a promising therapeutics for MLL-rearranged leukemia. Methods Compound synthesis and usage UNC1999 and UNC2400 were...oncogenic events are required for neoplastic transformation, although GC-derived lymphomas remain addicted to EZH2 mutations. It has been shown that

  10. Helicobacter pylori arginase mutant colonizes arginase Ⅱ knockout mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songhee H Kim; Melanie L Langford; Jean-Luc Boucher; Traci L Testerman; David J McGee

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of host and bacterial argi-nases in the colonization of mice by Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori).METHODS: H. Pylori produces a very powerful urease that hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which neutralizes acid. Urease is absolutely essential to H. Pylori pathogenesis; therefore, the urea substrate must be in ample supply for urease to work efficiently. The urea substrate is most likely provided by arginase activity, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. Previous work has demonstrated that H. Pylori arginase is surprisingly not required for colonization of wild-type mice. Hence, another in vivo source of the critical urea substrate must exist. We hypothesized that the urea source was provided by host arginase Ⅱ, since this enzyme is expressed in the stomach, and H. Pylori has previously been shown to induce the expres-sion of murine gastric arginase Ⅱ. To test this hypoth-esis, wild-type and arginase (rocF) mutant H. Pylori strain SS1 were inoculated into arginase Ⅱ knockout mice. RESULTS: Surprisingly, both the wild-type and rocF mutant bacteria still colonized arginase Ⅱ knock-out mice. Moreover, feeding arginase Ⅱ knockout mice the host arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC), while inhibiting > 50% of the host arginase Ⅰactivity in several tissues, did not block the ability of the rocF mutant H. Pylori to colonize. In con-trast, BEC poorly inhibited H. Pylori arginase activity. CONCLUSION: The in vivo source for the essential urea utilized by H. Pylori urease is neither bacterial arginase nor host arginase Ⅱ; instead, either residual host arginase Ⅰor agmatinase is probably responsible.

  11. Antimicrobial Characterization of Inula britannica against Helicobacter pylori on Gastric Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Hwan; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2016-06-28

    The antimicrobial effects of methanol and ethanol extracts of Inula britannica against several Helicobacter pylori strains (26695, J99, and SS1) were evaluated in vitro, to determine their applicability as functional foods. In the paper disc diffusion method, the antimicrobial effects of the I. britannica extracts against the H. pylori strains were apparent. Viable cell counting also showed that the extracts at 100 μg/ml concentration dramatically decreased the viability of the H. pylori strains. In particular, the methanol and ethanol extracts at a concentration of 100 μg/ml reduced the H. pylori SS1 cell number to 2.46 log CFU/ml and 1.08 log CFU/ml, respectively. In the presence of 100 μg/ml extracts, the urease production of H. pylori SS1 was decreased to more than 30%, whereas that of H. pylori J99 and H. pylori 26695 was decreased to about 20%, relative to the controls. The extracts inhibited the attachment of the H. pylori strains to human gastric AGS cells as well as caused the detachment of already attached H. pylori cells. In addition, the H. pylori morphology was changed to a coccoidal shape in the presence of the extracts. In conclusion, the I. britannica extracts were effective against H. pylori strains in vitro, irrespective of genotype status, and could therefore be used as novel functional foods.

  12. N-acetylcysteine prevents the development of gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sungil; Bak, Eun-Jung; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen, causing various gastric diseases ranging from gastritis to gastric adenocarcinoma. It has been reported that combining N-acetylcysteine (NAC) with conventional antibiotic therapy increases the success rate of H. pylori eradication. We evaluated the effect of NAC itself on the growth and colonization of H. pylori, and development of gastritis, using in vitro liquid culture system and in vivo animal models. H. pylori growth was evaluated in broth culture containing NAC. The H. pylori load and histopathological scores of stomachs were measured in Mongolian gerbils infected with H. pylori strain 7.13, and fed with NAC-containing diet. In liquid culture, NAC inhibited H. pylori growth in a concentration-dependent manner. In the animal model, 3-day administration of NAC after 1 week from infection reduced the H. pylori load; 6-week administration of NAC after 1 week from infection prevented the development of gastritis and reduced H. pylori colonization. However, no reduction in the bacterial load or degree of gastritis was observed with a 6-week administration of NAC following 6-week infection period. Our results indicate that NAC may exert a beneficial effect on reduction of bacterial colonization, and prevents the development of severe inflammation, in people with initial asymptomatic or mild H. pylori infection.

  13. 红枣汁非酶褐变抑制技术的研究%Inhibition Technology of Non-enzymatic Browning Against Chinese Jujube Juice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐辉艳

    2011-01-01

    本试验以红枣为主要原料,研究HSO3-、半胱氨酸和Ca2+对红枣汁非酶褐变抑制作用的影响,通过单因素试验和正交试验的研究,结果表明:HSO3-、半胱氨酸和Ca2+均可有效的抑制红枣汁非酶褐变;HSO3-、半胱氨酸和Ca2+三者最佳组合为HSO3-:150μg/g,半胱氨酸:2%,Ca2+:120μg/g,在此组合下,红枣汁的A420值为0.462。从极差和方差分析可知,这三种抑制剂对红枣汁非酶褐变影响的主次顺序为半胱氨酸〉Ca2+〉HSO3-。%Chinese jujube was used as raw material in this paper.HSO3-,cysteine and Ca2+ were researched on the non-enzymatic browning inhibition of Chinese jujube juice;The results were confirmed by single factor test and orthogonal test as follows: HSO3-cysteine a

  14. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Harris

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Using an evidence-based approach this review discusses the current treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcer disease, functional (non-ulcer)dyspepsia or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).It also briefly addresses the potential role of eradication of H . pylori in preventing gastric cancer .

  15. In situ targeted MRI detection of Helicobacter pylori with stable magnetic graphitic nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunjie; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Ding, Ding; Zou, Yuxiu; Xu, Yiting; Wang, Xuewei; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Long; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in the aetiology of many diseases. Despite numerous studies, a painless, fast and direct method for the in situ detection of H. pylori remains a challenge, mainly due to the strong acidic/enzymatic environment of the gastric mucosa. Herein, we report the use of stable magnetic graphitic nanocapsules (MGNs), for in situ targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of H. pylori. Several layers of graphene as the shell effectively protect the magnetic core from corrosion while retaining the superior contrast effect for MRI in the gastric environment. Boronic-polyethylene glycol molecules were synthesized and modified on the MGN surface for targeted MRI detection. In a mouse model of H. pylori-induced infection, H. pylori was specifically detected through both T2-weighted MR imaging and Raman gastric mucosa imaging using functionalized MGNs. These results indicated that enhancement of MRI using MGNs may be a promising diagnostic and bioimaging platform for very harsh conditions.

  16. Bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of culinary and medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachel O'Mahony; Huda Al-Khtheeri; Deepeka Weerasekera; Neluka Fernando; Dino Vaira; John Holton; Christelle Basset

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of 25 plants against Helicobacter pylori (H pylori).METHODS: Twenty-five plants were boiled in water to produce aqueous extracts that simulate the effect of cooking. The bactericidal activity of the extracts was assessed by a standard kill-curve with seven strains of H pylori. The anti-adhesive property was assessed by the inhibition of binding of four strains of FITC-labeled H pylori to stomach sections. RESULTS: Of all the plants tested, eight plants, including Bengal quince, nightshade, garlic, dill, black pepper, coriander, fenugreek and black tea, were found to have no bactericidal effect on any of the isolates. Columbo weed, long pepper, parsley, tarragon, nutmeg, yellow-berried nightshade, threadstem carpetweed, sage and cinnamon had bactericidal activities against H pylori, but total inhibition of growth was not achieved in this study. Among the plants that killed H pylori, turmeric was the most efficient, followed by cumin, ginger, chilli, borage, black caraway, oregano and liquorice. Moreover, extracts of turmeric; borage and parsley were able to inhibit the adhesion of H pylori strains to the stomach sections.CONCLUSION: Several plants that were tested in our study had bactericidal and/or anti-adhesive effects on H pylori. Ingestion of the plants with anti-adhesive properties could therefore provide a potent alternative therapy for H pylori infection, which overcomes the problem of resistance associated with current antibiotic treatment.

  17. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  18. Antibacterial effects of Bismuth compounds and it synergy with Tetracycline and Metronidazole on Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabie A

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth salts and different antimicrobials including Metonidazole & Tetracyclines were used in the assessment of inhibition zone of Helicobacter pylori cultures on solid media. Antibiotics were used or in combined in order to find out their possible synergistic effects. It was showed that: only Bismuth substrate and not then salts have antibacterial effects on Helicobacter pylori and also on the other bacteria such as staphylococci; salmonella and brulla. In addition, only Bismuth substrances showed remarkable synergistic effects with antimicrobial drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Therefore the data obtained from this investigation confirm previously known effect of combination antibiotic therapy including Bismuth compounds in eradicating Helicobacter pylori.

  19. A Single-Domain Llama Antibody Potently Inhibits the Enzymatic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Binding to the Non-Catalytic [alpha]-Exosite Binding Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Jianbo; Thompson, Aaron A.; Fan, Yongfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Marks, James D. (UIUC); (Scripps); (UCSF)

    2010-08-13

    Ingestion or inhalation of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) results in botulism, a severe and frequently fatal disease. Current treatments rely on antitoxins, which, while effective, cannot reverse symptoms once BoNT has entered the neuron. For treatments that can reverse intoxication, interest has focused on developing inhibitors of the enzymatic BoNT light chain (BoNT Lc). Such inhibitors typically mimic substrate and bind in or around the substrate cleavage pocket. To explore the full range of binding sites for serotype A light chain (BoNT/A Lc) inhibitors, we created a library of non-immune llama single-domain VHH (camelid heavy-chain variable region derived from heavy-chain-only antibody) antibodies displayed on the surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Library selection on BoNT/A Lc yielded 15 yeast-displayed VHH with equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub d}) from 230 to 0.03 nM measured by flow cytometry. Eight of 15 VHH inhibited the cleavage of substrate SNAP25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25,000 Da) by BoNT/A Lc. The most potent VHH (Aa1) had a solution K{sub d} for BoNT/A Lc of 1.47 x 10{sup -10} M and an IC{sub 50} (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.7 x 10{sup -10} M and was resistant to heat denaturation and reducing conditions. To understand the mechanism by which Aa1 inhibited catalysis, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the BoNT/A Lc-Aa1 VHH complex at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals that the Aa1 VHH binds in the {alpha}-exosite of the BoNT/A Lc, far from the active site for catalysis. The study validates the utility of non-immune llama VHH libraries as a source of enzyme inhibitors and identifies the BoNT/A Lc {alpha}-exosite as a target for inhibitor development.

  20. Human β-defensin-3 induction in H pylori-infected gastric mucosal tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K Kawauchi; A Yagihashi; N Tsuji; N Uehara; D Furuya; D Kobayashi; N Watanabe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3)expression in inflamed gastric mucosal tissues or MKN45 gastric cancer cells with or without H pylori infection for better understanding the innate immune response to H pylori.METHODS: We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and immunohistochemistry to examine hBD-3 expression in inflamed gastric mucosal tissues or MKN45 gastric cancer cells with or without H pylori.Effects of hBD-3 against H pylori were also evaluated.RESULTS: The mean mRNA expression of hBD-3 in H pylori-positive specimens was significantly higher than that in H pylori-negative specimens (P = 0.0002,Mann-Whitney). In addition, unlike uninfected samples,8 of 15 (53.33%) infected mucosal samples expressed hBD-3 protein. H pylori dose-dependently induced mRNA expression of hBD-3 in MKN45 cells, an effect inhibited by adding anti-toil-like receptor (TLR)-4 antibody. HBD-3 protein completely inhibited H pylori growth.CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that like hBD-2,hBD-3 may be involved in the pathophysiology of H pylori-induced gastritis.

  1. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of non-living, heat-killed form of lactobacilli including Lactobacillus johnsonii No.1088.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Yuji; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2017-06-15

    Some strains of lactic acid bacteria are reported to inhibit the growth of Helicobacter pylori and proposed to be useful to support so-called triple therapy for H. pylori. Although most strains must be alive to exert their anti-H. pylori activity, some lactobacilli strains are effective even when dead. One possible underlying mechanism of such an activity of non-living lactobacilli is reportedly co-aggregation with H. pylori. In this study, we found that a non-living heat-killed form of Lactobacillus johnsonii No.1088 (HK-LJ88) and also that of some other lactobacilli inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro. Furthermore, the number of H. pylori in the infected stomach of germ-free mice was significantly decreased by the repeated oral administration of HK-LJ88. Observation by scanning electron microscopy revealed that no co-aggregation had occurred between H. pylori and HK-LJ88; instead, deformations of H. pylori (e.g. disappearance of spiral, bending of cell body, coccoid formation, degradations, etc.) appeared after incubation for 24 h with HK-LJ88. These results suggest that HK-LJ88 inhibited H. pylori activity probably not by co-aggregation but by some unknown mechanism involving HK-LJ88's cell surface molecules and that even non-living lactobacilli are possibly useful to support H. pylori eradication therapy. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Helicobacter pylori in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Matjaž; Hojsak, Iva; Kolaček, Sanja

    2012-09-01

    This review summarizes important pediatric studies published from April 2011 up to March 2012. Proteomics profile of ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains was defined in the most interesting study of the last year. The antigen stool test is becoming the "gold standard" in prevalence studies, and according to the last epidemiologic studies, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in childhood is not decreasing any more in the developed world. The resistance rate of H. pylori strains is high in children. Therefore, among other important issues concerning H. pylori in pediatrics, guidelines published by ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN last year also recommended culture and susceptibility testing before first-line treatment in areas with high or unknown antibiotic resistance rates.

  3. Helicobacter pylori induces cell migration and invasion through casein kinase 2 in gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Do Yeon; Yu, Da Yeon; Kim, Shin; Lee, Yong Chan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is causally linked with gastric carcinogenesis. Virulent H. pylori strains deliver bacterial CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Induction of high motility and an elongated phenotype is considered to be CagA-dependent process. Casein kinase 2 plays a critical role in carcinogenesis through signaling pathways related to the epithelial mesenchymal transition. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on the casein kinase 2-mediated migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells. AGS or MKN28 cells as human gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori strains Hp60190 (ATCC 49503, CagA(+)) and Hp8822 (CagA(-)) were used. Cells were infected with H. pylori at multiplicity of infection of 100 : 1 for various times. We measured in vitro kinase assay to examine casein kinase 2 activity and performed immunofluorescent staining to observe E-cadherin complex. We also examined β-catenin transactivation through promoter assay and MMP7 expression by real-time PCR and ELISA. H. pylori upregulates casein kinase 2 activity and inhibition of casein kinase 2 in H. pylori-infected cells profoundly suppressed cell invasiveness and motility. We confirmed that casein kinase 2 mediates membranous α-catenin depletion through dissociation of the α-/β-catenin complex in H. pylori-infected cells. We also found that H. pylori induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and increases MMP7 expressions mediated through casein kinase 2. We show for the first time that CagA(+) H. pylori upregulates cellular invasiveness and motility through casein kinase 2. The demonstration of a mechanistic interplay between H. pylori and casein kinase 2 provides important insights into the role of CagA(+) H. pylori in the gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Helicobacter pylori does not use spermidine synthase to produce spermidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Au, Shannon Wing Ngor

    2017-08-26

    Helicobacter pylori is the primary pathogen associated to gastritis and gastric cancer. Growth of H. pylori depends on the availability of spermidine in vivo. Interestingly, the genome of H. pylori contains an incomplete set of genes for the classical pathway of spermidine biosynthesis. It is thus not clear whether some other genes remained in the pathway would have any functions in spermidine biosynthesis. Here, we study spermidine synthase, which is responsible for the final catalytic process in the classical route. Protein sequence alignment reveals that H. pylori SpeE (HpSpeE) lacks key residues for substrate binding. By using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that purified recombinant HpSpeE does not interact with the putative substrates putrescine and decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine, and the product spermidine. High performance liquid chromatography analysis further demonstrates that HpSpeE has no detectable in vitro enzymatic activity. Additionally, intracellular spermidine level in speE-null mutant strain is comparable to that in the wild type strain. Collectively, our results suggest that HpSpeE is functionally distinct from spermidine production. H. pylori may instead employ the alternative pathway for spermidine synthesis which is dominantly exploited by other human gut microbes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunity and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Harris

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria called Helicobacter pylori arrived to the American continent 12,000 years ago (1, reaching South America roughly 5,400-4,600 years AC according to research by Pelayo Correa, a Colombian pathologist who found Helicobacter in stool next to Chinchorro mummies in the North of Arica close to the Pacific Ocean. In 2005, Barry Marshall was awarded the Nobel Prize for his studies on Helicobacter pylori together with Robin Warren.

  6. Potential implications of Helicobacter pylori-related neutrophil-activating protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jannis Kountouras; Ioannis Venizelos; Christos Zavos; Georgia Deretzi; Emmanuel Gavalas; Dimitrios Chatzopoulos; Panagiotis Katsinelos; Elena Tsiaousi; Stergios Gagalis; Stergios A Polyzos

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) virulence factors promote the release of various chemoattractants/inflammatory mediators, including mainly the neutrophilattractant chemokine interleukin-8 and neutrophilactivating protein (NAP), involved in H. pylori-induced gastric pathologies. Co-administration of Chios mastic gum (CMG), which inhibits H. pylori NAP, with an H. pylori eradication regimen might add clinical benefits against H. pylori-related gastric pathologies, but possibly not CMG as main therapy. Although H. pylori NAP and other H. pylori-related cytotoxins [i.e., vaculating cytotoxin (VacA)] appear to play a major role in generating and maintaining the H. pylori-associated gastric inflammatory response and H. pylori NAP is a promising vaccine candidate against H. pylori infection (H. pylori-I), concerns regarding its potential drawbacks, particularly neurogenic ones, due to possible crossmimicry, should be considered. Possible cross-mimicry between H. pylori NAP and/or bacterial aquaporin (AQP) and neural tissues may be associated with the anti-AQP-4 antibody-related neural damage in multiple sclerosis (MS)/neuromyelitis optica patients. Moreover, the sequence homology found between H. pylori VacA and human Na+/K+-ATPase A subunit suggests that antibodies to VacA involve ion channels in abaxonal Schwann cell plasmalemma resulting in demyelination in some patients. A series of factors have been implicated in inducing blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, including inflammatory mediators (e.g., cytokines and chemokines induced by H. pylori-I) and oxidative stress. BBB disruption permits access of AQP4-specific antibodies and T lymphocytes to the central nervous system, thereby playing a major role in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. Relative studies show a strong association between H. pylori-I and MS. H. pylori-I induces humoral and cellular immune responses that, owing to the sharing of homologous epitopes (molecular mimicry), cross-react with components of

  7. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  8. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detec

  9. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  10. High Cell Sensitivity to Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin Depends on a GPI-anchored Protein and is not Blocked by Inhibition of the Clathrin-mediated Pathway of Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Vittorio; Galmiche, Antoine; Doye, Anne; Necchi, Vittorio; Solcia, Enrico; Boquet, Patrice

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) causes vacuolation in a variety of cultured cell lines, sensitivity to VacA differing greatly, however, among the different cell types. We found that the high sensitivity of HEp-2 cells to VacA was impaired by treating the cells with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) which removes glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins from the cell surface. Incubation of cells with a cholesterol-sequestering agent, that impairs both structure and function of sphingolipid-cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (“lipid rafts”), also impaired VacA-induced cell vacuolation. Overexpression into HEp-2 cells of proteins inhibiting clathrin-dependent endocytosis (i.e., a dominant-negative mutant of Eps15, the five tandem Src-homology-3 domains of intersectin, and the K44A dominant-negative mutant of dynamin II) did not affect vacuolation induced by VacA. Nevertheless, F-actin depolymerization, known to block the different types of endocytic mechanisms, strongly impaired VacA vacuolating activity. Taken together, our data suggest that the high cell sensitivity to VacA depends on the presence of one or several GPI-anchored protein(s), intact membrane lipid rafts, and an uptake mechanism via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway. PMID:11071915

  11. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    excellent stability with limited fusion ability and negligible cargo releases. However when the stabilized liposomes are present in an environment with neutral pH, the gold stabilizers detach from the liposomes resulting in free liposomes that can actively fuse with bacterial membranes. The reported liposome system holds a substantial potential for gastric drug delivery; it remains inactive (stable) in the stomach lumen but actively interact with bacteria once reaches the mucus layer of the stomach where the bacteria may reside. Another stimulus that can activate drug release from liposomes is virulence factor released from bacteria themselves. We formulate liposomes with a lipid composition sensitive to bacterium-secreted phospholipase A2 (PLA2) degradation and then adsorb AuChi onto their surfaces. The resulting AuChi-stabilized liposomes (AuChi-liposomes) showed prohibited fusion activity and negligible drug leakage. When loaded with doxycycline, AuChi-liposomes effectively inhibit H. pylori growth in vitro. Overall, the design of AuChi-liposomes allows for a smart "on-demand" payload delivery: the more enzymes or bacteria at the infection site, which depends on the severity of infection, the more drug will be released. Given the strong association of PLA2 with a diverse range of diseases, the present liposomal delivery technique holds broad application potential for tissue microenvironment-responsive drug delivery.

  12. Interleukin-17C in Human Helicobacter pylori Gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Cruz, Modesto; Uchida, Tomohisa; Uotani, Takahiro; Jiménez Abreu, José A; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-10-01

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) family of cytokines (IL-17A to IL-17F) is involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17A is recognized as being involved in the pathophysiology of Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, the role of other IL-17 cytokine family members remains unclear. Microarray analysis of IL-17 family cytokines was performed in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsy specimens. IL-17C mRNA was upregulated approximately 4.5-fold in H. pylori-infected gastric biopsy specimens. This was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in infected and uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from Bhutan and from the Dominican Republic. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-17C expression in H. pylori-infected gastric biopsy specimens was predominantly localized to epithelial and chromogranin A-positive endocrine cells. IL-17C mRNA levels were also significantly greater among cagA-positive than cagA-negative H. pylori infections (P = 0.012). In vitro studies confirmed an increase in IL-17C mRNA and protein levels in cells infected with cagA-positive infections compared to cells infected with either cagA-negative or cag pathogenicity island (PAI) mutant. Chemical inhibition of IκB kinase (IKK), mitogen-activated protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK), and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibited induction of IL-17C proteins in infected cells, whereas p38 inhibition had no effect on IL-17C protein secretion. In conclusion, H. pylori infection was associated with a significant increase in IL-17C expression in human gastric mucosa. The role of IL-17C in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-induced diseases remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Early apoptosis of monocytes induced by Helicobacter pylori infection through multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Hui; Zhao, Huilin; Chen, Xingxing; Li, Jiaojiao; Li, Boqing

    2017-08-01

    Only a small percentage of people infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) will develop overt chronic gastric diseases. To understand the pathological mechanism, the action of H. pylori on monocyte apoptosis was detected. H. pylori co-culturing with peripheral blood monocytes, THP-1 or U937 cells result in early apoptosis at 6, 12, and 24 h after infection. The phosphorylated Bad and JNK were increased, and Bcl-2 was declined at 6, 12, and 24 h in peripheral blood monocytes after H. pylori infection. The phosphorylated Akt was augmented at 6 and 12 h post-infection. A slow apoptotic response was induced by H. pylori via Bad and Bcl-2 regulators, activated caspase-8 and caspase-9, and JNK at 24 h in THP-1 cells. Meanwhile, only Bad and JNK were involved in regulating U937 cells apoptosis at 24 h after infection. These results supported a novel mechanism of H. pylori escaping from monocytes by upregulation of early apoptosis and inhibition of late apoptosis. The differences among the three cells may reveal why H. pylori-derived disease occurs in relatively few people and provide a pathological mechanism whereby a treatment for H. pylori-derived disease may be developed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Statin Decreases Helicobacter pylori Burden in Macrophages by Promoting Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Chih; Huang, Mei-Zi; Wang, Michelle Lily; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lu, Tzu-Li; Lo, Horng-Ren; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Sun, Yu-Chen; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lim, Hui-Jing; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been found to provide protective effects against several bacterial infectious diseases. Although the use of statins has been shown to enhance antimicrobial treated Helicobacter pylori eradication and reduce H. pylori-mediated inflammation, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear. In this study, in vitro and ex vivo macrophage models were established to investigate the molecular pathways involved in statin-mediated inhibition of H. pylori-induced inflammation. Our study showed that statin treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intracellular H. pylori burden in both RAW264.7 macrophage cells and murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). Furthermore, statin yielded enhanced early endosome maturation and subsequent activation of the autophagy pathway, which promotes lysosomal fusion resulting in degradation of sequestered bacteria, and in turn attenuates interleukin (IL)-1β production. These results indicate that statin not only reduces cellular cholesterol but also decreases the H. pylori burden in macrophages by promoting autophagy, consequently alleviating H. pylori-induced inflammation. PMID:28144585

  15. Human gastric mucins differently regulate Helicobacter pylori proliferation, gene expression and interactions with host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Skoog

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcers and cancer. The main components of the mucus layer are heavily glycosylated mucins, to which H. pylori can adhere. Mucin glycosylation differs between individuals and changes during disease. Here we have examined the H. pylori response to purified mucins from a range of tumor and normal human gastric tissue samples. Our results demonstrate that mucins from different individuals differ in how they modulate both proliferation and gene expression of H. pylori. The mucin effect on proliferation varied significantly between samples, and ranged from stimulatory to inhibitory, depending on the type of mucins and the ability of the mucins to bind to H. pylori. Tumor-derived mucins and mucins from the surface mucosa had potential to stimulate proliferation, while gland-derived mucins tended to inhibit proliferation and mucins from healthy uninfected individuals showed little effect. Artificial glycoconjugates containing H. pylori ligands also modulated H. pylori proliferation, albeit to a lesser degree than human mucins. Expression of genes important for the pathogenicity of H. pylori (babA, sabA, cagA, flaA and ureA appeared co-regulated in response to mucins. The addition of mucins to co-cultures of H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells protected the viability of the cells and modulated the cytokine production in a manner that differed between individuals, was partially dependent of adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric cells, but also revealed that other mucin factors in addition to adhesion are important for H. pylori-induced host signaling. The combined data reveal host-specific effects on proliferation, gene expression and virulence of H. pylori due to the gastric mucin environment, demonstrating a dynamic interplay between the bacterium and its host.

  16. "Helicobacter Pylori Attachment To 7 Mamalian Cell Lines "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rahimi-Fard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of chronic –active gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers in humans, and a co-factor in the occurrence of gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tumors, Adhesion of H.pylori to the gastric mucosa is a critical and also initial step in the pathogenesis of the disease. Bacterial adhesion inhibitory agents provide a novel pharmacologic approach to the management of infectious diseases. Materials and Methods: 22 H. pylori strains, isolated from the antral biopsies of 49 patients with dyspepsia, gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer,…were assayed by ELISA (UPRto investigate the diversity of attachment to 7 mamalian cell lines. Results: The concentration of H.pylori and cell suspention ,the condition and temperature, can alter the attachment rate.Best bacterial concentration was equal to 1 Mc farland,and for cell suspension was 5*10 cells/ml.90 minutes in 37C incubation period result in maximum attachment. H.pylori can attach to all 7 cell lines, there are no significant differences between 22 H.pylori strains in attachment to cells. The attachment pattern of H.pylori to the cells showed significant reduction respectly from HepII, HeLa, SW742, AGS,HT29/219, HT29 to Caco-2.Maximum attachment were seen to HepII, HeLa and SW742 cells, and among these HepII was the best cells for this purpose. Conclusion: Our studies suggest that Hep II, HeLa and SW742 cells could serve as a suitable in-vitro model for the study of H.pylori adhesions, attachment, inhibition of attachment and detachment assays and among these Hep II cell is prefer recommended.

  17. Enzymatic Treatment of Whey Proteins in Cow's Milk Results in Differential Inhibition of IgE-Mediated Mast Cell Activation Compared to T-Cell Activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knipping, Karen; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; van Ieperen-van Dijk, Adrie G.; van Hoffen, Els; van Baalen, Ton; Knippels, Leon M. J.; van der Heide, Sicco; Dubois, Anthony E. J.; Garssen, Johan; Knol, Edward F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cow's milk (CM) hydrolysates are frequently used as milk substitutes for children with CM allergy. In hydrolysates, allergenic epitopes within CM proteins are diminished by enzymatic treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the allergenic and immunogenic properties of whey protein

  18. Apoptosis, proliferation and p53 gene expression of H. pylori associated gastric epithelial lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Zhang1; Yuan Yuan; Hua Gao; Ming Dong; Lan Wang; Yue-Hua Gong

    2001-01-01

    dysplasia H.pylori can inhibit cellular apoptosis. And H. Pylori infection can strengthen the expression of mutated p53 gene.

  19. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Osborn, John F.; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the human stomach for many decades without adverse consequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children wit...

  20. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia; Pacifico; Caterina; Anania; John; F; Osborn; Flavia; Ferraro; Claudio; Chiesa

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the hu-man stomach for many decades without adverse con-sequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent a...

  1. Probiotic BIFICO cocktail ameliorates Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Jing; Liu, Wei; Chang, Zhen; Shen, Hui; He, Li-Juan; Wang, Sha-Sha; Liu, Lu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Xu, Guo-Tong; An, Mao-Mao; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2015-06-07

    To determine the protective effect of triple viable probiotics on gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and elucidate the possible mechanisms of protection. Colonization of BIFICO strains in the mouse stomach was determined by counting colony-forming units per gram of stomach tissue. After treatment with or without BIFICO, inflammation and H. pylori colonization in the mouse stomach were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa staining, respectively. Cytokine levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Milliplex. The activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and MAPK signaling in human gastric epithelial cells was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA expression in the mouse stomach. We demonstrated that BIFICO, which contains a mixture of Enterococcus faecalis, Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus, was tolerant to the mouse stomach environment and was able to survive both the 8-h and 3-d courses of administration. Although BIFICO treatment had no effect on the colonization of H. pylori in the mouse stomach, it ameliorated H. pylori-induced gastritis by significantly inhibiting the expression of cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, G-CSF and MIP-2 (P gastritis by inhibiting the inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells.

  2. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  3. The Research Progress on Inhibition of Fresh-cut Fruits and Vegetable Enzymatic Bromning%鲜切果蔬酶促褐变控制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓露; 缪丽华

    2012-01-01

    褐变是影响鲜切果蔬外观品质的一个重要因素。本文介绍了抑制鲜切果蔬酶促褐变的物理、化学等方法。旨在为以后的研究提供一定的依据。%Enzymatic browning is one of important factors impacting quality of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. Physical inhibition ways and chemical inhibition methods of fresh-cut fruits and vegetable enzym atic browning is reviewed in this text. This study is designed to providing reference to the de'velopment of longan drying.

  4. Effects of fucosylated milk of goat and mouse on Helicobacter pylori binding to Lewis b antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Tao Xu; Ning Li; Lennart Hammarstr(o)m; Thomas Borén; Rolf Sj(o)str(o)m; Yao-Feng Zhao; Zheng-Xing Lian; Bao-Liang Fan; Zhi-Hui Zhao; Shu-Yang Yu; Yun-Ping Dai; Li-Li Wang; Hui-Ling Niu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of animal milk containing fucosylated antigens on Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) binding to Lewis b antigen.METHODS: A mammary gland expression vector containing human α1-3/4-fucosyltransferase cDNA sequences was constructed. Transient expression of human α1-3/4-fucosyltransferase cDNA in goat mammary cell and establishment of transgenic mice were performed. The adhesion inhibitory properties of milk samples were analyzed by using H pylori RESULTS: Goat milk samples were found to inhibit bacterial binding to Lewis b antigen. The highest inhibition was observed 42 h after injection of the plasmid. The binding activity of Hpylori to Lewis b antigen reduced mostly, by 83%, however milk samples from transgenic mice did not inhibit H pylori binding to Lewis b antigen.CONCLUSION: The use of "humanized" animal milk produced by the transgenic introduction of fucosylated antigen can perhaps provide an alternative therapy and preventive measure for H pylori infection.

  5. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  7. Biopatologia do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeira Marcelo Sady Plácido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori induz inflamação persistente na mucosa gástrica com diferentes lesões orgânicas em humanos, tais como gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. Os fatores determinantes desses diferentes resultados incluem a intensidade e a distribuição da inflamação induzida pelo H. pylori na mucosa gástrica. Evidências recentes demonstram que cepas do H. pylori apresentam diversidade genotípica, cujos produtos acionam o processo inflamatório por meio de mediadores e citocinas, que podem levar a diferentes graus de resposta inflamatória do hospedeiro, resultando em diferentes destinos patológicos. Cepas H. pylori com a ilha de patogenicidade cag induzem resposta inflamatória mais grave, através da ativação da transcrição de genes, aumentando o risco para desenvolvimento de úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. O estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo induzido pela inflamação desempenha importante papel na carcinogênese gástrica como mediador da formação ou ativação de cancerígenos, danos no DNA, bem como de alterações da proliferação celular e da apoptose.

  8. Effects of Helicobacter pylori and Heat Shock Protein 70 on the Proliferation of Human Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Tao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori changed the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and decreased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70. However, the effects of H. pylori on the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and the roles of HSP70 during the progress need further investigation. Objective. To investigate the effects of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 on the proliferation of human gastric epithelial cells. Methods. H. pylori and a human gastric epithelial cell line (AGS were cocultured. The proliferation of AGS cells was quantitated by an MTT assay, and the expression of HSP70 in AGS cells was detected by Western blotting. HSP70 expression in AGS cells was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA to investigate the role of HSP70. The siRNA-treated AGS cells were cocultured with H. pylori and cell proliferation was measured by an MTT assay. Results. The proliferation of AGS cells was accelerated by coculturing with H. pylori for 4 and 8 h, but was suppressed at 24 and 48 h. HSP70 expression was decreased in AGS cells infected by H. pylori for 48 h. The proliferation in HSP70-silenced AGS cells was inhibited after coculturing with H. pylori for 24 and 48 h compared with the control group. Conclusions. Coculture of H. pylori altered the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and decreased HSP70 expression. HSP70 knockdown supplemented the inhibitory effect of H. pylori on proliferation of epithelial cells. These results indicate that the effects of H. pylori on the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells at least partially depend on the decreased expression of HSP70 induced by the bacterium.

  9. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  10. Exopolysaccharide production by Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a widespread Gram-negative bacterium that infects the stomach of humans leading to the onset of several gastric disorders, such as, gastritis, gastric ulcers, and cancers. Studies from developing countries with low socioeconomic status and poor management of the drinking water suggest that it may serve as an environmental reservoir of H. pylori and therefore contribute to human infection. It has been reported that H. pylori has the ability to form microbi...

  11. In vitro and In vivo Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activities of Centella asiatica Leaf Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong-Mei; Choi, Myung-Joo; Kim, Jae Min; Lee, Kye Wan; Park, Yu Hwa; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of developing upper gastrointestinal tract diseases. However, treatment failure is a major cause of concern mainly due to possible recurrence of infection, the side effects, and resistance to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the activities of Centella asiatica leaf extract (CAE) against H. pylori both in vitro and in vivo. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against 55 clinically isolated strains of H. pylori were tested using an agar dilution method. The MICs of CAE ranged from 0.125 mg/mL to 8 mg/mL, effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth was 2 mg/mL. The anti-H. pylori effects of CAE in vivo were also examined in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice. CAE was orally administrated once daily for 3 weeks at doses of 50 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg. CAE at the 50 mg/kg dose significantly reduced H. pylori colonization in mice gastric mucosa. Our study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effects of CAE against H. pylori infection, and it suggests that CAE may be useful as an alternative therapy. PMID:27752495

  12. Activation of Helicobacter pylori causes either autoimmune thyroid diseases or carcinogenesis in the digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astl, J; Šterzl, I

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in stimulation of immune system, development of autoimmune endocrinopathies as autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) and on other hand induction of immunosupresion activates gastric and extra-gastric diseases such as gastric ulcer or cancer. It causes persistent lifelong infection despite local and systemic immune response. Our results indicate that Helicobacter pylori might cause inhibition of the specific cellular immune response in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with or without autoimmune diseases such as AT. We cannot also declare the carcinogenic effect in oropharynx. However the association of any infection agents and cancerogenesis exists. The adherence of Helicobacter pylori expression and enlargement of benign lymphatic tissue and the high incidence of the DNA of Helicobacter pylori in laryngopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cancer is reality. LTT appears to be a good tool for detection of immune memory cellular response in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection and AT. All these complications of Helicobacter pylori infection can be abrogated by successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  13. NikR mediates nickel-responsive transcriptional induction of urease expression in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Arnoud H M; Poppelaars, Sophie W; Davies, Beverly J; Stoof, Jeroen; Bereswill, Stefan; Kist, Manfred; Penn, Charles W; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kusters, Johannes G

    2002-06-01

    The important human pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires the abundant expression and activity of its urease enzyme for colonization of the gastric mucosa. The transcription, expression, and activity of H. pylori urease were previously demonstrated to be induced by nickel supplementation of growth media. Here it is demonstrated that the HP1338 protein, an ortholog of the Escherichia coli nickel regulatory protein NikR, mediates nickel-responsive induction of urease expression in H. pylori. Mutation of the HP1338 gene (nikR) of H. pylori strain 26695 resulted in significant growth inhibition of the nikR mutant in the presence of supplementation with NiCl(2) at > or =100 microM, whereas the wild-type strain tolerated more than 10-fold-higher levels of NiCl(2). Mutation of nikR did not affect urease subunit expression or urease enzyme activity in unsupplemented growth media. However, the nickel-induced increase in urease subunit expression and urease enzyme activity observed in wild-type H. pylori was absent in the H. pylori nikR mutant. A similar lack of nickel responsiveness was observed upon removal of a 19-bp palindromic sequence in the ureA promoter, as demonstrated by using a genomic ureA::lacZ reporter gene fusion. In conclusion, the H. pylori NikR protein and a 19-bp operator sequence in the ureA promoter are both essential for nickel-responsive induction of urease expression in H. pylori.

  14. Effects of EGFR Inhibitor on Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastric Epithelial Pathology in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Robinson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori transactivates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR and predisposes to gastric cancer development in humans and animal models. To examine the importance of EGFR signalling to gastric pathology, this study investigated whether treatment of Mongolian gerbils with a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, EKB-569, altered gastric pathology in chronic H. pylori infection. Gerbils were infected with H. pylori and six weeks later received either EKB-569-supplemented, or control diet, for 32 weeks prior to sacrifice. EKB-569-treated H. pylori-infected gerbils had no difference in H. pylori colonisation or inflammation scores compared to infected animals on control diet, but showed significantly less corpus atrophy, mucous metaplasia and submucosal glandular herniations along with markedly reduced antral and corpus epithelial proliferation to apoptosis ratios. EKB-569-treated infected gerbils had significantly decreased abundance of Cox-2, Adam17 and Egfr gastric transcripts relative to infected animals on control diet. EGFR inhibition by EKB-569 therefore reduced the severity of pre-neoplastic gastric pathology in chronically H. pylori-infected gerbils. EKB-569 increased gastric epithelial apoptosis in H. pylori-infected gerbils which counteracted some of the consequences of increased gastric epithelial cell proliferation. Similar chemopreventative strategies may be useful in humans who are at high risk of developing H.pylori-induced gastric adenocarcinoma.

  15. Overview of the phytomedicine approaches against Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) successfully colonizes the human stomach of the majority of the human population. This infection always causes chronic gastritis, but may evolve to serious outcomes, such as peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori first line therapy recommended by the Maastricht-4 Consensus Report comprises the use of two antibiotics and a proton-pomp inhibitor, but in some regions failure associated with this treatment is already undesirable high. Indeed, treatment failure is one of the major problems associated with H. pylori infection and is mainly associated with bacterial antibiotic resistance. In order to counteract this situation, some effort has been allocated during the last years in the investigation of therapeutic alternatives beyond antibiotics. These include vaccines, probiotics, photodynamic inactivation and phage therapy, which are briefly revisited in this review. A particular focus on phytomedicine, also described as herbal therapy and botanical therapy, which consists in the use of plant extracts for medicinal purposes, is specifically addressed, namely considering its history, category of performed studies, tested compounds, active principle and mode of action. The herbs already experienced are highly diverse and usually selected from products with a long history of employment against diseases associated with H. pylori infection from each country own folk medicine. The studies demonstrated that many phytomedicine products have an anti-H. pylori activity and gastroprotective action. Although the mechanism of action is far from being completely understood, current knowledge correlates the beneficial action of herbs with inhibition of essential H. pylori enzymes, modulation of the host immune system and with attenuation of inflammation. PMID:24914319

  16. Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zare Javid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped, microaerophilic organism that colonizes the stomach of humans and causes chronic-active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancers, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach and MALT (mucosal-associated lymphoid tumor lymphomas. H. pylori colonizes the stomach of over 50 % the world’s human population, primarily those who reside in developing nations. Infection is generally first acquired in children, who may be entirely asymptomatic, and then persists for life, unless specific eradication therapy is initiated. All infected individuals have mucosal inflammation in the stomach in response to the organism, but only a subset will develop disease complications, such as an ulcer in the stomach or proximal duodenum and cancer in either the body or the antrum of the stomach. It is estimated that the lifetime risk of developing peptic ulceration is roughly 15%. However, this is an exceedingly important disease, because it has serious morbidity and mortality. Eradication of H. pylori infection is not successful when using antibiotics as monotherapy or dual therapy using combinations of an acid-suppressing agent and an antibiotic or two antibiotics without acid blockage. Multiple studies show that some probiotic strains can inhibit the growth of H. pylori. To date, probiotics do not appear to have a role as sole therapy for use in the prevention or treatment of H. pylori infection. However, there is increasing evidence that a variety of probiotic agents are useful as adjunctive therapy, which can both enhance the success of eradicating the gastric pathogen while, reduce the frequency and severity of adverse effects arising from the other agents that are employed in current combination treatment regimens. Future studies should assess the role of prebiotics and synbiotics and products derived from probiotics as additional options for use in the prevention and treatment of H. pylori infection

  17. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  18. Crystal structure of β1→6-galactosidase from Bifidobacterium bifidum S17: trimeric architecture, molecular determinants of the enzymatic activity and its inhibition by α-galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Andre Schutzer; Camilo, Cesar Moises; Kadowaki, Marco Antonio; Muniz, Heloisa Dos S; Espirito Santo, Melissa; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-11-01

    In a search for better comprehension of β-galactosidase function and specificity, we solved the crystal structures of the GH42 β-galactosidase BbgII from Bifidobacterium bifidum S17, a well-adapted probiotic microorganism from the human digestive tract, and its complex with d-α-galactose. BbgII is a three-domain molecule that forms barrel-shaped trimers in solution. BbgII interactions with d-α-galactose, a competitive inhibitor, showed a number of residues that are involved in the coordination of ligands. A combination of site-directed mutagenesis of these amino acid residues with enzymatic activity measurements confirmed that Glu161 and Glu320 are fundamental for catalysis and their substitution by alanines led to catalytically inactive mutants. Mutation Asn160Ala resulted in a two orders of magnitude decrease of the enzyme kcat without significant modification in its Km , whereas mutations Tyr289Phe and His371Phe simultaneously decreased kcat and increased Km values. Enzymatic activity of Glu368Ala mutant was too low to be detected. Our docking and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the enzyme recognizes and tightly binds substrates with β1→6 and β1→3 bonds, while binding of the substrates with β1→4 linkages is less favorable.

  19. Effect of pretreatment severity on accumulation of major degradation products from dilute acid pretreated corn stover and subsequent inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Byung-Hwan; van Walsum, G Peter

    2012-09-01

    The concept of reaction severity, which combines residence time and temperature, is often used in the pulp and paper and biorefining industries. The influence of corn stover pretreatment severity on yield of sugar and major degradation products and subsequent effects on enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis was investigated. The pretreatment residence time and temperature, combined into the severity factor (Log R(o)), were varied with constant acid concentration. With increasing severity, increasing concentrations of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) coincided with decreasing yields of oligosaccharides. With further increase in severity factor, the concentrations of furans decreased, while the formation of formic acid and lactic acid increased. For example, from severity 3.87 to 4.32, xylose decreased from 6.39 to 5.26 mg/mL, while furfural increased from 1.04 to 1.33 mg/mL; as the severity was further increased to 4.42, furfural diminished to 1.23 mg/mL as formate rose from 0.62 to 1.83 mg/mL. The effects of dilute acid hydrolyzate, acetic acid, and lignin, in particular, on enzymatic hydrolysis were investigated with a rapid microassay method. The microplate method gave considerable time and cost savings compared to the traditional assay protocol, and it is applicable to a broad range of lignocellulosic substrates.

  20. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  1. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  2. 酸性电解水对鲜切马铃薯酶促褐变抑制效果研究%Inhibition effects of enzymatic browning in fresh-cut potatoes by using acidic electrolyzed oxidizing water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓清云; 刘海杰; 张芊

    2012-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the effect that acidic electrolyzed oxidizing water (AEOW) inhibit enzymatic browning in fresh-cut potato slices and which factors affected its efficiency. Through the comparison of several treatments on △L% values of fresh-cut potato slices after different storage time, the results showed that compared to no treatment, AEOW could significantly (P〈0.05) inhibit the enzymatic browning of potato slices and its effect was equal to oxalic acid (20 mg/L) and citric acid (20 mg/L). This study also found that processing time, the temperature of AEOW, processing methods (soaking, flushing, oscillating) would influenced the effect of AEOW on enzymatic browning, besides the volume of AEOW. When the processing time was 15 min, AEOW was 40 ℃, and the processing method was oscillating, AEOW had a better inhibition effect on browning. Also the speed of oscillating was higher, the effect was better.%研究了酸性电解水对鲜切马铃薯酶促褐变的抑制效果,并进一步探究了影响酸性电解水抑制酶促褐变效果的外因。通过比较几种方式处理的马铃薯切片在不同贮藏期的褐变度,结果表明,与无处理相比,340e指标的酸性电解水均能够显著(P〈0.05)抑制鲜切马铃薯的酶促褐变,其抑制效果与草酸(20mg/L)、柠檬酸(20mg/L)相当。同时研究发现,处理时间、酸性电解水的温度、处理方式(静止浸泡、流水冲洗、振荡)对酸性电解水的褐变抑制效果均产生影响,而料液比变化对酸性电解水的褐变抑制效果影响不大。处理时间为15min,酸性电解水温度为40℃,振荡处理酸性电解水的褐变抑制效果好,且振荡速度越大,效果越好。

  3. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; de Laat, L; van Oijen, A H; de Boer, W A

    2012-03-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detect halitosis. In this study a possible relation between H. pylori and halitosis was evaluated, using an objective method (gas chromatography, GC) to detect the VSCs, responsible for the halitosis. The levels of the VSCs hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in mouth breath and in stomach air of 11 H. pylori positive patients and of 38 H. pylori negative patients, all with gastric pathology. Halitosis was also established by organoleptic scoring (OLS) of mouth-breath. The levels of H(2)S, MM and DMS in the mouth-breath and stomach air of the H. pylori positive patients did not differ significantly from those of the H. pylori negative patients. OLS of the mouth-breath resulted in 9 patients with halitosis, 1 out of the H. pylori positive group and 8 out of the H. pylori negative group, which is not statistically different. The concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach. The patients with gastric pathology were also compared with control patients without gastric pathology and with normal volunteers. No significant differences in VSCs in mouth breath were observed between these groups. Thus, in this study no association between halitosis and H. pylori infection was found. Halitosis, as established by GC and OLS, nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach.

  4. Synthesis and activity of Helicobacter pylori urease and catalase at low pH.

    OpenAIRE

    Bauerfeind, P; Garner, R; Dunn, B E; Mobley, H L

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori produces large amounts of urease presumably to be prepared for the rare event of a sudden acid exposure. The hypothesis that H pylori is acid sensitive and protein production is inhibited by low pH was examined. METHODS: H pylori or its soluble enzymes were incubated buffered or unbuffered at a pH ranging from 2-7 in the presence of 5 mM urea for 30 minutes. After exposure, urease and catalase activities of whole cells, supernatants, and soluble enzyme preparat...

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2000-01-01

    @@ IS THERE ANYTHING NEW? Helicobacter pylori has been for many years a forgotten bacterium, since the first report on this spiral organism dated from the 19th century[1]. As early as in 1906, an association between a spiral organism and gastric carcinoma was suggested[2].Doenges reported in 1938 that on autopsy not less than 40% of human stomachs were found to be invaded by spiral organisms[3].

  6. Direct measurement of gastric H + / K +-ATPase activities in patients with or without Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duangporn Thong-Ngam; Pisit Tangkijvanich; Pichet Sampatanukul; Paungpayom Prichakas; Varocha Mahachai; Piyaratana Tosukowong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection in gastric acid secretion of patients with chronic gastritisremains controversial. This study was designed to elucidate the effect of H pylori on H+/K+-ATPase activities in gastric biopsy specimens.METHODS: Eighty-two patients with chronic gastritis who had undergone upper endoscopy were included in this study. H pylori infection was confirmed by rapid urease test and histology. Gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities and serum gastrin concentrations were measured by an enzymatic method and radioimmunoassay, respectively. For those patients who received triple therapy for eradicating H pylori, changes in the activity of gastric H+/K+-ATPase and serum gastrin levels were also measured. RESULTS: The mean gastric H+/K+-ATPase activity in H pyloripositive group (42 patients) was slightly higher than thatin H pylori-negative group (29 patients) (169.65±52.9 and eradication of H pylori, the gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities slightly decreased compared to prior therapy (165.03±59.50 The mean basal gastrin concentration was slightly higher in H pylori-positive patients than in H pylori-negative patients (87.92±39.65 pg/mL vs75.04± 42.57 pg/mL, P= 0.228). The gastrin levels fell significantly after the eradication of Hpylori. (Before treatment 87.00±30.78 pg/mL, aftertreatment 64.73±18.96 pg/mL, P = 0.015).CONCLUSION: Gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities are not associated with H pylori status in patients with chronicgastritis.

  7. Nitroimidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wouden, EJ; Thijs, JC; Van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a nitroimidazole-containing regimen for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection is decreased by nitroimidazole resistance. Nitroimidazoles are metabolized by H. pylori by several nitro-reductases of which an oxygen-insensitive NADPH nitroreductase encoded by the rdxA gene is t

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  9. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  10. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Kusters (Johannes); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection

  11. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event.

  12. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitory peptide attenuates Helicobacter pylori-mediated hyper-proliferation in AGS enteric epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himaya, S.W.A. [Marine Bio-Process Research Center, Pukyong National University, Nam-Gu, Busan, 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Dewapriya, Pradeep [Department of Chemistry, Pukyong National University, Nam-Gu, Busan, 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Kwon, E-mail: sknkim@pknu.ac.kr [Marine Bio-Process Research Center, Pukyong National University, Nam-Gu, Busan, 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Pukyong National University, Nam-Gu, Busan, 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most critical causes of stomach cancer. The current study was conducted to explore the protective effects of an isolated active peptide H-P-6 (Pro-Gln-Pro-Lys-Val-Leu-Asp-Ser) from microbial hydrolysates of Chlamydomonas sp. against H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. The peptide H-P-6 has effectively suppressed H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of gastric epithelial cells (AGS). However, the peptide did not inhibit the viability of the bacteria or invasion into AGS cells. Therefore, the effect of the peptide on regulating H. pylori-induced molecular signaling was investigated. The results indicated that H. pylori activates the EGFR tyrosine kinase signaling and nuclear translocation of the β-catenin. The EGFR activation has led to the up-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Moreover, the nuclear translocation levels of β-catenin were significantly increased as a result of Akt mediated down-regulation of GSK3/β protein levels in the cytoplasm. Both of these consequences have resulted in increased expression of cell survival and migration related genes such as c-Myc, cyclin-D, MMP-2 and matrilysin. Interestingly, the isolated peptide potently inhibited H. pylori-mediated EGFR activation and thereby down-regulated the subsequent P13K/Akt signaling leading to β-catenin nuclear translocation. The effect of the peptide was confirmed with the use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1487 and molecular docking studies. Collectively this study identifies a potent peptide which regulates the H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells at molecular level. - Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. derived peptide H-P-6 inhibits H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. • H-P-6 suppresses H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells. • The peptide inhibits H. pylori-induced EGFR activation.

  13. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits enzymatic browning of cut lettuce by repressing the induction of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase without promotion of microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Eriko; Okumura, Saya; Takamiya, Rikako; Hosaka, Hitomi; Shimamura, Yuko; Murata, Masatsune

    2011-06-22

    Cinnamaldehyde treatment inhibited the browning of cut lettuce during cold storage. In this study, to clarify the mechanism of inhibitory action of cinnamaldehyde against the browning and to show its microbiological merit, its effect on the browning of cut lettuce was compared to that of mild heat treatment. Both cinnamaldehyde and mild heat treatments inhibited the induction of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity because of cutting. As a result, the biosynthesis of polyphenols, which are substrates of polyphenol oxidase, was inhibited. This reduction of polyphenol synthesis caused the inhibition of the browning. Cinnamaldehyde treatment repressed the induction of PAL mRNA, while mild heat treatment did not repress its induction. The increase in microbes in cut lettuce treated with cinnamaldehyde was less than that treated with mild heat after 12 days.

  14. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Liu, Yu; Li, Ning; Yu, Jing; Cheng, Hong; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Xue-Zhi

    2015-04-14

    To investigate the bactericidal effects of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (CAL) against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) both in vitro and in vivo. For in vitro experiments, the inhibitory activity of CAL was tested using an agar dilution method; H. pylori strain NCTC11637 was incubated on Columbia blood agar plates containing serial concentrations of CAL. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the absence of H. pylori colonies on the agar plate. Time-kill curves were used to evaluate bactericidal activity; the average number of colonies was calculated at 0, 2, 8 and 24 h after liquid incubation with concentrations of CAL at 0.5, 1, and 2 × MIC. For in vivo experiments, H. pylori-infected mice were randomly divided into CAL, triple therapy (lansoprazole, metronidazole, and clarithromycin), blank control, or H. pylori control groups. The eradication ratios were determined by positive findings from rapid urease tests (RUTs) and by histopathology. In vitro, the MIC of CAL against H. pylori was 16 mg/L. The time-kill curves showed a stable and persistent decreasing tendency with increasing CAL concentration, and the intensity of the bactericidal effect was proportional to dose; the 1 and 2 × MIC completely inhibited the growth of H. pylori at 24 h. In vivo, the eradication ratios in the CAL group were 60% (6/10) by RUT and 50% (5/10) by histopathology. Ratios in the triple therapy group were both 70% (7/10), and there was no difference between the CAL and triple therapy groups. Histopathologic evaluation revealed massive bacterial colonization on the surface of gastric mucosa and slight infiltration of mononuclear cells after inoculation with H. pylori, but no obvious inflammation or other pathologic changes in gastric mucosa of mice from CAL and triple therapy groups. CAL demonstrates effective bactericidal activity against H. pylori both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. The Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin CagA is essential for suppressing host heat shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Lang, Ben; J Gorrell, Rebecca; Tafreshi, Mona; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Kwok, Terry; T Price, John

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections typically elicit a strong Heat Shock Response (HSR) in host cells. However, the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has the unique ability to repress this response, the mechanism of which has yet to be elucidated. This study sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms by which H. pylori down-modulates host HSP expression upon infection. Examination of isogenic mutant strains of H. pylori defective in components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS), identified the secretion substrate, CagA, to be essential for down-modulation of the HSPs HSPH1 (HSP105), HSPA1A (HSP72), and HSPD1 (HSP60) upon infection of the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Ectopic expression of CagA by transient transfection was insufficient to repress HSP expression in AGS or HEK293T cells, suggesting that additional H. pylori factors are required for HSP repression. RT-qPCR analysis of HSP gene expression in AGS cells infected with wild-type H. pylori or isogenic cagA-deletion mutant found no significant change to account for reduced HSP levels. In summary, this study identified CagA to be an essential bacterial factor for H. pylori-mediated suppression of host HSP expression. The novel finding that HSPH1 is down-modulated by H. pylori further highlights the unique ability of H. pylori to repress the HSR within host cells. Elucidation of the mechanism by which H. pylori achieves HSP repression may prove to be beneficial in the identification of novel mechanisms to inhibit the HSR pathway and provide further insight into the interactions between H. pylori and the host gastric epithelium.

  16. Crosstalk between Helicobacter pylori and gastric epithelial cells is impaired by docosahexaenoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori colonizes half of the world's population leading to gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori strains resistant to antibiotics are increasing which raises the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been shown to decrease H. pylori growth and its associated-inflammation through mechanisms poorly characterized. We aimed to explore DHA action on H. pylori-mediated inflammation and adhesion to gastric epithelial cells (AGS and also to identify bacterial structures affected by DHA. H. pylori growth and metabolism was assessed in liquid cultures. Bacterial adhesion to AGS cells was visualized by transmission electron microscopy and quantified by an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Inflammatory proteins were assessed by immunoblotting in infected AGS cells, previously treated with DHA. Bacterial total and outer membrane protein composition was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Concentrations of 100 µM of DHA decreased H. pylori growth, whereas concentrations higher than 250 µM irreversibly inhibited bacteria survival. DHA reduced ATP production and adhesion to AGS cells. AGS cells infected with DHA pre-treated H. pylori showed a 3-fold reduction in Interleukin-8 (IL-8 production and a decrease of COX2 and iNOS. 2D electrophoresis analysis revealed that DHA changed the expression of H. pylori outer membrane proteins associated with stress response and metabolism and modified bacterial lipopolysaccharide phenotype. As conclusions our results show that DHA anti-H. pylori effects are associated with changes of bacteria morphology and metabolism, and with alteration of outer membrane proteins composition, that ultimately reduce the adhesion of bacteria and the burden of H. pylori-related inflammation.

  17. Suppression of cell division-associated genes by Helicobacter pylori attenuates proliferation of RAW264.7 monocytic macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace Min Yi; Looi, Chung Yeng; Fernandez, Keith Conrad; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai; Wong, Won Fen

    2015-06-16

    Helicobacter pylori at multiplicity of infection (MOI ≥ 50) have been shown to cause apoptosis in RAW264.7 monocytic macrophage cells. Because chronic gastric infection by H. pylori results in the persistence of macrophages in the host's gut, it is likely that H. pylori is present at low to moderate, rather than high numbers in the infected host. At present, the effect of low-MOI H. pylori infection on macrophage has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the genome-wide transcriptional regulation of H. pylori-infected RAW264.7 cells at MOI 1, 5 and 10 in the absence of cellular apoptosis. Microarray data revealed up- and down-regulation of 1341 and 1591 genes, respectively. The expression of genes encoding for DNA replication and cell cycle-associated molecules, including Aurora-B kinase (AurkB) were down-regulated. Immunoblot analysis verified the decreased expression of AurkB and downstream phosphorylation of Cdk1 caused by H. pylori infection. Consistently, we observed that H. pylori infection inhibited cell proliferation and progression through the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints. In summary, we suggest that H. pylori disrupts expression of cell cycle-associated genes, thereby impeding proliferation of RAW264.7 cells, and such disruption may be an immunoevasive strategy utilized by H. pylori.

  18. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  19. Impact of Helicobacter pylori on the healing process of the gastric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnich, Eliza; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicińska, Paulina; Hinc, Krzysztof; Obuchowski, Michał; Gajewski, Adrian; Moran, Anthony P; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the impact of selected well defined Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antigens on gastric barrier cell turnover. METHODS In this study, using two cellular models of gastric epithelial cells and fibroblasts, we have focused on exploring the effects of well defined H. pylori soluble components such as glycine acid extract antigenic complex (GE), subunit A of urease (UreA), cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on cell turnover by comparing the wound healing capacity of the cells in terms of their proliferative and metabolic activity as well as cell cycle distribution. Toxic effects of H. pylori components have been assessed in an association with damage to cell nuclei and inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. RESULTS We showed that H. pylori GE, CagA and UreA promoted regeneration of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which is necessary for effective tissue healing. However, in vivo increased proliferative activity of these cells may constitute an increased risk of gastric neoplasia. In contrast, H. pylori LPS showed a dose-dependent influence on the process of wound healing. At a low concentration (1 ng/mL) H. pylori LPS accelerated of healing epithelial cells, which was linked to significantly enhanced cell proliferation and MTT reduction as well as lack of alterations in cell cycle and downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) production as well as cell nuclei destruction. By comparison, H. pylori LPS at a high concentration (25 ng/mL) inhibited the process of wound repair, which was related to diminished proliferative activity of the cells, cell cycle arrest, destruction of cell nuclei and downregulation of the EGF/STAT3 signalling pathway. CONCLUSION In vivo H. pylori LPS driven effects might lead to the maintenance of chronic inflammatory response and pathological disorders on the level of the gastric mucosal barrier. PMID:27672275

  20. Rebamipide, a novel antiulcer agent, attenuates Helicobacter pylori induced gastric mucosal cell injury associated with neutrophil derived oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Miura, S; Mori, M; Kai, A; Suzuki, H; Fukumura, D; Suematsu, M; Tsuchiya, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a novel antiulcer compound, on Helicobacter pylori activated neutrophil dependent in vitro gastric epithelial cell injury was investigated. Luminol dependent chemiluminescence (ChL), which detects toxic oxidants from neutrophils exhibited a 12-fold increase when the bacterial suspension of H pylori was added to the isolated human neutrophils. This change was significantly attenuated by rebamipide at a concentration less than 1 mM, showing that rebamipide may inhibit oxidant production from H pylori elicited neutrophils. To assess whether rebamipide attenuates gastric mucosal injury, we tested its inhibitory action on H pylori induced gastric mucosal damage associated with neutrophils in vitro. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were monolayered in culture wells and coincubated with human neutrophils and H pylori, and the cytotoxicity index was then calculated. Cultured gastric cells were significantly damaged when they were incubated with human neutrophils activated by H pylori. This cellular damage was attenuated by rebamipide in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, spectrophotometrical measurement showed that rebamipide (1 mM) inhibits urease activity by 21.7%. As monochloramine (an oxidant yielded by reaction of neutrophil derived chlorinated oxidant and ammonia) is proposed as an important toxic molecule in this model, the current findings suggest that the preventive effect of rebamipide on H pylori elicited neutrophil induced gastric mucosal injury may result from its inhibitory actions on the neutrophilic oxidative burst as well as H pylori derived urease activity. PMID:7959190

  1. Astaxanthin and β-carotene in Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Inflammation: A Mini-review on Action Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a dominant bacterium living in the human gastric tissues. In H. pylori-infected tissues, the infiltrated inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to gastric inflammation with production of various mediators. According to numerous epidemiological studies, dietary carotenoids may prevent gastric inflammation due to their antioxidant properties. Recent studies showed that antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of astaxanthin and β-carotene may contribute to inhibition of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation. Astaxanthin changes H. pylori-induced activation of T helper cell type 1 response towards T helper cell type 2 response in the infected tissues. Astaxanthin inhibits the growth of H. pylori. Even though astaxanthin reduces H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation, it does not reduce cytokine levels in the infected tissues. β-Carotene suppresses ROS-mediated inflammatory signaling, including mitogen-activated protein kinases and redox-sensitive transcription factors, and reduces expression of inflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in the infected tissues. Therefore, consumption of astaxanthin- and β-carotene-rich foods may be beneficial to prevent H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation. This review will summarize anti-inflammatory mechanisms of astaxanthin and β-carotene in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation.

  2. Active packaging use to inhibit enzymatic browning of apples/ Uso de embalagem ativa na inibição do escurecimento enzimático de maçãs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulliano Amaral Viana

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic browning is the most limiting factor of fruits and vegetables shelf-life. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of an active packaging incorporated with anti-oxidant agents to inhibit apple’s enzymatic browning. Cellulosic films were incorporated with cysteine and sulphite and used to cover apples divided in halves. Browning inhibition was measured by polyphenoloxidase activity and colour analysis (CIE Lab colour system. Low concentration of sulphite (1% showed efficient browning inhibition and higher concentration of cysteine (15% was necessary to reach the same results. Treatments containing cysteine and sulphite resulted in brighter apples and less browning compared with control. The quantity of sulphite released to apples was lower than the limit allowed by legislation, decreasing, in this way, the levels of additives ingested by the consumer. In this study, the effectiveness of active packaging in providing product conservation was confirmed by the inhibition of browning in apples.O escurecimento enzimático é um dos fatores mais limitantes da vida de prateleira de frutas e vegetais. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar o efeito do uso de embalagem ativa incorporada com agentes antioxidantes na inibição do escurecimento enzimático de maçãs. Os filmes foram produzidos a base de polímero celulósico e incorporados com sulfito e cisteína para recobrimento de maçãs divididas ao meio. Foi avaliada a inibição do escurecimento através da atividade da polifenoloxidase e pela análise de cor (sistema CIE Lab. Baixas concentrações de sulfito (1% mostraram-se eficientes na inibição do escurecimento das maçãs e altas concentrações de cisteína (15% foram necessárias para a obtenção do mesmo resultado. Os tratamentos tanto com sulfito quanto com cisteína, comparados com os tratamentos controle, proporcionaram maior brilho às maçãs e menor escurecimento. O teor de sulfito liberado para a ma

  3. Protective effect of Korean Red Ginseng extract against Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyung Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation includes induction of inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL-8 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, which are mediated by oxidant-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB. High levels of lipid peroxide (LPO and increased activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO, a biomarker of neutrophil infiltration, are observed in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa. Panax ginseng Meyer, a Korean herb medicine, is widely used in Asian countries for its biological activities including anti-inflammatory efficacy. The present study aims to investigate whether Korean Red Ginseng extract (RGE inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils. One wk after intragastric inoculation with H. pylori, Mongolian gerbils were fed with either the control diet or the diet containing RGE (200 mg RGE/gerbil for 6 wk. The following were determined in gastric mucosa: the number of viable H. pylori in stomach; MPO activity; LPO level; mRNA and protein levels of keratinocyte chemoattractant factor (KC, a rodent IL-8 homolog, IL-1β, and iNOS; protein level of phospho-IκBα (which reflects the activation of NF-κB; and histology. As a result, RGE suppressed H. pylori-induced mRNA and protein levels of KC, IL-1β, and iNOS in gastric mucosa. RGE also inhibited H. pylori-induced phosphorylation of IκBα and increases in LPO level and MPO activity of gastric mucosa. RGE did not affect viable H. pylori colonization in the stomach, but improved the histological grade of infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, intestinal metaplasia, and hyperplasia. In conclusion, RGE inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by suppressing induction of inflammatory mediators (KC, IL-1β, iNOS, MPO activity, and LPO level in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa.

  4. The Role of Product Inhibition as a Yield-Determining Factor in Enzymatic High-Solid Hydrolysis of Pretreated Corn Stover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymand Olsen, Søren; Borch, Kim; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj

    2014-01-01

    . The results suggest that the solid effect is mainly controlled by product inhibition under the given experimental conditions (washed pretreated corn stover as substrate). Cellobiose was found to be approximately 15 times more inhibitory than glucose on a molar scale. However, considering that glucose...

  5. Genipin-cross-linked fucose-chitosan/heparin nanoparticles for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lee, Che-Hsin; He, Zih Sian; Tseng, Guan-Chin

    2013-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a significant human pathogen that recognizes specific carbohydrate receptors, such as the fucose receptor, and produces the vacuolating cytotoxin, which induces inflammatory responses and modulates the cell-cell junction integrity of the gastric epithelium. The clinical applicability of topical antimicrobial agents was needed to complete the eradication of H. pylori in the infected fundal area. In the present study, we combined fucose-conjugated chitosan and genipin-cross-linking technologies in preparing multifunctional genipin-cross-linked fucose-chitosan/heparin nanoparticles to encapsulate amoxicillin of targeting and directly make contact with the region of microorganism on the gastric epithelium. The results show that the nanoparticles effectively reduced drug release at gastric acids and then released amoxicillin in an H. pylori survival situation to inhibit H. pylori growth and reduce disruption of the cell-cell junction protein in areas of H. pylori infection. Furthermore, with amoxicillin-loaded nanoparticles, a more complete H. pylori clearance effect was observed, and H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation in an infected animal model was effectively reduced.

  6. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and immunostimulatory effect of extracts from Byrsonima crassa Nied. (Malpighiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilegas Wagner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several in vitro studies have looked at the effect of medicinal plant extracts against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Regardless of the popular use of Byrsonima crassa (B. crassa as antiemetic, diuretic, febrifuge, to treat diarrhea, gastritis and ulcers, there is no data on its effects against H. pylori. In this study, we evaluated the anti-H. pylori of B. crassa leaves extracts and its effects on reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates induction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Methods The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by broth microdilution method and the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO by the horseradish peroxidase-dependent oxidation of phenol red and Griess reaction, respectively. Results The methanolic (MeOH and chloroformic (CHCl3 extracts inhibit, in vitro, the growth of H. pylori with MIC value of 1024 μg/ml. The MeOH extract induced the production H2O2 and NO, but CHCl3 extract only NO. Conclusion Based in our results, B. crassa can be considered a source of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity, but its use should be done with caution in treatment of the gastritis and peptic ulcers, since the reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by ulcerogenic agents and H. pylori infections.

  7. MicroRNA-155 in exosomes secreted from helicobacter pylori infection macrophages immunomodulates inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Deng, Zhiyong; Wang, Zeyou; Wu, Jianhong; Gu, Tao; Jiang, Yibiao; Li, Guangxin

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes containing microRNA-155 act as molecule carriers during immune cell-cell communication and play an important role in the inflammatory response of H. pylori infection macrophages. Previous reports have found that miR-155 was over-expressed in H. pylori infection macrophages, but the significance of which is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the impact of miR-155 loaded in exosomes derived from macrophages to the inflammatory response of H. pylori infection macrophages and possible mechanisms. We found that miR-155 promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-a, IL-6, IL-23, but also increased the expression of CD40, CD63, CD81, and MCH-I. Meanwhile, inflammatory signal pathways proteins, such as MyD88, NF-κB in H. pylori infection macrophages were down-regulated due to the over-expression of miR-155. Experiments in vitro or in vivo revealed that miR-155 promoted macrophages to inhibit or kill H. pylori by regulating the inflammatory response of cells to prevent the gastritis caused by H. pylori infection. These findings contribute to the understanding of miR-155 contained in exosomes in inflammatory responses of H. pylori infection macrophages. PMID:27725852

  8. Flavonoids with anti-Helicobacter pylori activity from Cistus laurifolius leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustün, Osman; Ozçelik, Berrin; Akyön, Yakut; Abbasoglu, Ufuk; Yesilada, Erdem

    2006-12-06

    Cistus laurifolius flower buds are used traditionally in folk medicine against gastric ailments. In a prior study we showed that the chloroform extract of Cistus laurifolius had a potent anti-ulcer activity. It has been known that there is a causal relationship between peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori infection. Then in a previous study, we demonstrated that chloroform extract of Cistus laurifolius possessed a significant anti-Helicobacter pylori activity. We designed this study to isolate and define the active component(s) involved in the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of the extract through activity-guided fractionation procedures. The chloroform extract was fractionated by using various chromatography techniques, i.e., Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and preparative thin layer chromatography and six compounds were isolated (1-6). Each of these six compounds' anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was tested in vitro and was measured as minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values by using agar dilution method. The compound 2 had the highest activity against Helicobacter pylori (MIC 3.9 microg/mL). Its chemical structure was elucidated as quercetin 3-methyl ether (isorhamnetin) by various spectroscopic techniques. We believe that the therapeutic effect of Cistus laurifolius in ulcer is at least partially related to its effect on Helicobacter pylori. We hope that the isolated flavonoid having anti-Helicobacter pylori activity ultimately can be utilized as an alternative or additive agent to the current therapy.

  9. 15-Deoxy-delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) inhibits IL-1beta-induced IKK enzymatic activity and IkappaBalpha degradation in rat chondrocytes through a PPARgamma-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyault, Sandrine; Bianchi, Arnaud; Moulin, David; Morin, Sylvie; Francois, Mathias; Netter, Patrick; Terlain, Bernard; Bordji, Karim

    2004-08-13

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands have been shown to inhibit the effects of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). This cytokine plays a key role in articular pathophysiologies by inducing the production of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We previously demonstrated that 15d-PGJ(2) was more potent than troglitazone to counteract IL-1beta effects on chondrocytes. Here, we studied the action of 15d-PGJ(2) on intracellular targets in nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signalling pathway in IL-1beta treated rat chondrocytes. We found that 15d-PGJ(2) decreased inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation but not its phosphorylation by specifically inhibiting IkappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta), but not IKKalpha, enzymatic activity. We further evaluated the involvement of PPARgamma in the anti-inflammatory action of its ligands. In chondrocytes overexpressing functional PPARgamma protein, 15d-PGJ(2) pre-treatment inhibited inducible NO synthase and COX-2 mRNA expression, nitrite and PGE(2) production, p65 translocation and NF-kappaB activation. Troglitazone or rosiglitazone pre-treatment had no effect. 15d-PGJ(2) exhibited the same effect in chondrocytes overexpressing mutated PPARgamma protein. These results suggest that 15d-PGJ(2) exerts its anti-inflammatory effect in rat chondrocytes by a PPARgamma-independent mechanism, which can be conferred to a partial inhibition of IkappaBalpha degradation.

  10. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  11. High Cell Sensitivity to Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin Depends on a GPI-anchored Protein and is not Blocked by Inhibition of the Clathrin-mediated Pathway of Endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) causes vacuolation in a variety of cultured cell lines, sensitivity to VacA differing greatly, however, among the different cell types. We found that the high sensitivity of HEp-2 cells to VacA was impaired by treating the cells with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) which removes glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins from the cell surface. Incubation of cells with a cholesterol-seques...

  12. Antibacterial activity of Boesenbergia rotunda (L. Mansf. and Myristica fragrans Houtt. against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Mahady

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative bacterium, is recognized as the primary etiological agent for the development of gastritis, dyspepsia, peptic ulcer as well as gastric and colon cancer. In developing countries the incidence of H. pylori infection ranges from 50-100%. Two Thai plants, namely Boesenbergia rotunda (L.Mansf. and Myristica fragrans Houtt., have been used to treat dyspepsia and peptic ulcer in Thai Traditional Medicine. Their crude extracts were previously reported to possess anti- H. pylori activity. This investigation proposed to test previously isolated bioactive compounds from B. rotunda and M. fragrans if they possessed anti- H. pylori activity. Primary cultures of H. pylori from local hospital patients in Thailand were used in the investigation. In vitro anti- H. pylori testing had been performed with pinostrobin and red oil from roots of B. rotunda, and dihydroguaiaretic acid from arils of M. fragrans. Clarithromycin (MIC 120 µg/mL was used as a positive control. All three compounds showed positive clear zone in agar diffusion test at p<0.05 in all 10 clinical cultures. Pinostrobin, red oil and dihydroguaiaretic acid autoclaved in blood agar medium had MIC of 125, 150, 100 µg/mL and MBC of 150, 175, 125 µg/mL, respectively. All three compounds have their activities against H. pylori in the same range of that of drug currently used in the treatment of peptic ulcer. Thus, all three compounds from B. rotunda and M. fragrans show good potential for further drug development. This investigation demonstrates that food and spice plants used in Thai Traditional Medicine for treatment of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer contain compounds which inhibit the growth of H. pylori in vitro. The result suggests that ingredients of some Thai food in regular diet may contribute to the low incidence of gastric cancer in the Thai population by affecting the growth of H. pylori.

  13. Is Helicobacter pylori resident or transient in the human oral cavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, A; Kürschner, A; Weckesser, S; Wittmer, A; Rauberger, H; Jakob, T; Hellwig, E; Kist, M; Waidner, B

    2012-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of at least half of the world's human population. The role of the oral cavity in this colonization is not clear and there are, to date, no comprehensive data that clearly demonstrate the isolation of this bacterium from the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori in the oral cavity of 15 patients who tested positive for H. pylori. A comprehensive dental examination of all patients was conducted. Samples were taken from supragingival and subgingival plaque, saliva, periapical exudates and tongue swabs. All samples were taken before the application of antibiotics. A total of 163 oral samples were investigated by PCR using two different H. pylori-specific primer pairs. A PCR inhibition control using a modified plasmid was always included for the most specific primer pair. In addition, a culture technique was used to confirm PCR results. Despite a PCR detection limit of 10(2) bacteria ml(-1), out of 14 patients, H. pylori could not be detected in any of the samples taken. In one patient, H. pylori-positive PCR signals were obtained in two samples using only one primer pair. H. pylori could not be cultivated from these two PCR-positive samples; therefore, no correlation to oral colonization status could be established. This study challenges the misleading preconception that H. pylori resides in the human oral cavity and suggests that this bacterium should be considered transient and independent of the oral status. To date, positive PCR results for H. pylori in the oral cavity have been overestimated and not critically interpreted in literature.

  14. In vitro screening of selected Iranian medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hosseininejad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is virtually always associated with duodenal, peptic and gastric ulcers and promotion of gastrointestinal cancer. Some of medicinal plants traditionally have been used for gastrointestinal problems. In the present work, the inhibitory effect of the essential oils of some medicinal plants was evaluated against clinical isolate of H. pylori. H. pylori was isolated from gastric biopsy of patients with gastric complications. Agar diffusion and agar dilution methods were used for evaluating the anti-H. pylori effect and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC determination of tested plants. The results were reported as mean±SD and differences considered significant at a P value <0.05. The essential oils of Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Zataria multiflora demonstrated potent anti-H. pylori effect with inhibition zone diameter of 24.8 mm and 23.6 mm, respectively. The MIC of both two essential oils was estimated to be 0.3 μl/ml. The essential oils of Heracleum persicum, Syzygium aromaticum and Citrus aurantium exhibited more than 88% inhibition in concentration of 0.3 μl/ml. The essential oils of C. zeylanicum and Z. multiflora might be good candidate for treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori and it is needed to do further study about these essential oils.

  15. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-02-08

    The author reviews the main achievements in Helicobacter pylori research in the past 2 years. Of the more than 1000 microRNAs described thus far, sets of over- and underexpressed samples were identified that are associated with either gastric cancer or precancerous lesions, and some of them could be either markers or therapeutic targets in the near future. Meta-analyses involved 95 new publications: the association between infection and oesophageal, colorectal, pancreatic and liver carcinomas is supported by the increased odds ratios, but the results do not reach the strength seen in gastric carcinoma. Epstein-Barr virus is an emerging pathogen: 10% of gastric cancers are virus-associated; the prevalence of the virus in normal mucosa, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently being studied. Current Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens frequently achieve suboptimal results: a few optimisation methods are presented, although not all are supported by the meta-analyses. In 2013, the European Helicobacter Study Group proposed the development of a pan-European registry; data from 5792 patients registered so far indicated that many therapeutic regimens resulted in a low eradication rate. In 2013, the Healthy Stomach Initiative was started with the aim of supporting and disseminating research performed in the field of healthy and diseased stomachs.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  17. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  18. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  19. Piperine treatment suppresses Helicobacter pylori toxin entry in to gastric epithelium and minimizes β-catenin mediated oncogenesis and IL-8 secretion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer initiation has been studied widely. The objective of our present study was to evaluate the effect of a single compound piperine on H. pylori infection and its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects in vitro. Cytotoxicity was tested by Ez-cytox cell viability assay kit. Effects of piperine on H. pylori toxin gene expression and IL-8 expression in mammalian cells during infection were assessed by RT-PCR. Effects of piperine on toxin entry into host cells, E-cadherin cleavage by H. pylori, and the changes in H. pylori mediated β-catenin expression and IL-8 secretion were determined by immunoblotting. Piperine treatment restrained the entry of CagA and VacA into AGS cells. Piperine administration in H. pylori infection reduced E-cadherin cleavage in stomach epithelium. In addition, H. pylori induced β-catenin up-regulation was reduced. Piperine administration impaired IL-8 secretion in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. As we reported previously piperine restrained H. pylori motility. The possible reason behind the H. pylori inhibition mechanism of piperine could be the dwindled motility, which weakened H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. The reduced adhesion decreased the toxin entry thereby secreting less amount of IL-8. In addition, piperine treatment suppressed H. pylori protease led to reduction of E-cadherin cleavage and β-catenin expression resulting in diminished β-catenin translocation into the nucleus thus decreasing the risk of oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the preliminary report of piperine mediated H. pylori infection control on gastric epithelial cells in-vitro.

  20. Glycolic acid inhibits enzymatic, hemorrhagic and edema-inducing activities of BaP1, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom: insights from docking and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereañez, Jaime Andrés; Patiño, Arley Camilo; Rey-Suarez, Paola; Núñez, Vitelbina; Henao Castañeda, Isabel Cristina; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2013-09-01

    Glycolic acid (GA) (2-Hydroxyethanoic acid) is widely used as chemical peeling agent in Dermatology and, more recently, as a therapeutic and cosmetic compound in the field of skin care and disease treatment. In this work we tested the inhibitory ability of glycolic acid on the enzymatic, hemorrhagic and edema-inducing activities of BaP1, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper venom, which induces a variety of toxic actions. Glycolic acid inhibited the proteolytic activity of BaP1 on azocasein, with an IC₅₀ of 1.67 mM. The compound was also effective at inhibiting the hemorrhagic activity of BaP1 in skin and muscle in experiments involving preincubation of enzyme and inhibitor prior to injection. When BaP1 was injected i.m. and then, at the same site, different concentrations of glycolic acid were administered at either 0 or 5 min, 7 mM solutions of the inhibitor partially abrogated hemorrhagic activity when administered at 0 min. Moreover, glycolic acid inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, edema-forming activity of BaP1 in the footpad. In order to have insights on the mode of action of glycolic acid, UV-vis and intrinsic fluorescence studies were performed. Results of these assays suggest that glycolic acid interacts directly with BaP1 and chelates the Zn²⁺ ion at the active site. These findings were supported by molecular docking results, which suggested that glycolic acid forms hydrogen bonds with residues Glu143, Arg110 and Ala111 of the enzyme. Additionally, molecular modeling results suggest that the inhibitor chelates Zn²⁺, with a distance of 3.58 Å, and may occupy part of substrate binding cleft of BaP1. Our results suggest that glycolic acid is a candidate for the development of inhibitors to be used in snakebite envenomation.

  1. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Paul; Waidner, Barbara; Hofman, Véronique; Bereswill, Stefan; Brest, Patrick; Kist, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    Research in the last year has provided new insights into the function of the the cag-associated type IV secretion system and the vacuolating toxin VacA. A quite new aspect was disclosed by the finding that Helicobacter pylori in Mongolian gerbils colonizes a very distinct topology in the gastric mucous layer, obviously providing optimal conditions for long-term survival. Further research activities focused on H. pylori ammonia and metal metabolism as well as on bacterial stress defence mechanisms. Differential expression of approximately 7% of the bacterial genome was found at low pH suggesting that H. pylori has evolved a multitude of acid-adaptive mechanisms. VacA was shown to interrupt phagosome maturation in macrophage cell lines as well as to modulate and interfere with T lymphocyte immunological functions. Gastric mucosa as well as the H. pylori-infected epithelial cell line AGS strongly express IL-8 receptor A and B, which might contribute to the augmentation of the inflammatory response. Accumulating evidence implicates genetic variation in the inflammatory response to H. pylori in the etiology of the increased risk of gastric cancer after H. pylori infection. The chronic imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation is the first step of gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard, it was demonstrated that coexpression of two H. pylori proteins, CagA and HspB, in AGS cells, caused an increase in E2F transcription factor, cyclin D3, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Taken together, we now have a better understanding of the role of different virulence factors of H. pylori. There is still a lot to be learned, but the promising discoveries summarized here, demonstrate that the investigation of the bacterial survival strategies will give novel insights into pathogenesis and disease development.

  2. Lactobacillus acidophilus ameliorates H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inactivating the Smad7 and NFκB pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yao-Jong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background H. pylori infection may trigger Smad7 and NFκB expression in the stomach, whereas probiotics promote gastrointestinal health and improve intestinal inflammation caused by pathogens. This study examines if probiotics can improve H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inactivating the Smad7 and NFκB pathways. Results Challenge with H. pylori increased IL-8 and TNF-α expressions but not TGF-β1 in MKN45 cells. The RNA levels of Smad7 in AGS cells increased after H. pylori infection in a dose-dependent manner. A higher dose (MOI 100 of L. acidophilus pre-treatment attenuated the H. pylori-induced IL-8 expressions, but not TGF-β1. Such anti-inflammatory effect was mediated via increased cytoplasmic IκBα and depletion of nuclear NFκB. L. acidophilus also inhibited H. pylori-induced Smad7 transcription by inactivating the Jak1 and Stat1 pathways, which might activate the TGF-β1/Smad pathway. L. acidophilus pre-treatment ameliorated IFN-γ-induced Smad7 translation level and subsequently reduced nuclear NF-κB production, as detected by western blotting. Conclusions H. pylori infection induces Smad7, NFκB, IL-8, and TNF-α production in vitro. Higher doses of L. acidophilus pre-treatment reduce H. pylori-induced inflammation through the inactivation of the Smad7 and NFκB pathways.

  3. Alternative therapies for Helicobacter pylori: probiotics and phytomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítor, Jorge M B; Vale, Filipa F

    2011-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen infecting about 30% of children and 60% of adults worldwide and is responsible for diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Treatment against H. pylori is based on the use of antibiotics, but therapy failure can be higher than 20% and is essentially due to an increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which has led to the search for alternative therapies. In this review, we discuss alternative therapies for H. pylori, mainly phytotherapy and probiotics. Probiotics are live organisms or produced substances that are orally administrated, usually in addition to conventional antibiotic therapy. They may modulate the human microbiota and promote health, prevent antibiotic side effects, stimulate the immune response and directly compete with pathogenic bacteria. Phytomedicine consists of the use of plant extracts as medicines or health-promoting agents, but in most cases the molecular mode of action of the active ingredients of these herbal extracts is unknown. Possible mechanisms include inhibition of H. pylori urease enzyme, disruption of bacterial cell membrane, and modulation of the host immune system. Other alternative therapies are also reviewed.

  4. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  5. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Qing Wang; Ying-Nin Xin; Ni Li; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic sequences have been determined for a number of strains of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and related bacteria.With the development of microarray analysis and the wide use of subtractive hybridization techniques,comparative studies have been carried out with respect to the interstrain differences between H pylori and inter-species differences in the genome of related bacteria.It was found that the core genome of H pylori constitutes 1111 genes that are determinants of the species properties.A great pool of auxillary genes are mainly from the categories of cag pathogenicity islands,outer membrane proteins,restriction-modification system and hypothetical proteins of unknown function.Persistence of H pylori in the human stomach leads to the diversification of the genome.Comparative genomics suggest that a host jump has occurs from humans to felines.Candidate genes specific for the development of the gastric diseases were identified.With the aid of proteomics,population genetics and other molecular methods,future comparative genomic studies would dramatically promote our understanding of the evolution,pathogenesis and microbiology of H pylori.

  6. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  7. Does Helicobacter pylori affect portal hypertensive gastropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major etiological factor of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. It is supposed to be a risk factor for the more frequently encountered PUD in patients with liver cirrhosis. Several investigators have evaluated the effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis, portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG and encephalopathy with controversial results. Some reports have shown a higher seroprevalence and suggested a synergistic effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis and PHG. However, this increased prevalence is associated with a negative histology and is not influenced by the cause of cirrhosis, PHG, Child class or gender. Most studies have not found any correlation between H. pylori and PHG. In contrast, other studies have reported a markedly lower prevalence of H. pylori in cirrhotics with duodenal ulcer compared to controls. The aim of this article is to review the relationship between H. pylori infection and portal hypertensive gastropathy and the role of H. pylori eradication in cirrhotic patients.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection- recent developments in diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Isabel Lopes Filipa F Vale Mónica Oleastro

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods,a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication...

  9. Extraction and inhibition of enzymatic activity of botulinum neurotoxins/A1, /A2, and /A3 by a panel of monoclonal anti-BoNT/A antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R Kalb

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs are extremely potent toxins that are capable of causing death or respiratory failure leading to long-term intensive care. Treatment includes serotype-specific antitoxins, which must be administered early in the course of the intoxication. Rapidly determining human exposure to BoNT is an important public health goal. In previous work, our laboratory focused on developing Endopep-MS, a mass spectrometry-based endopeptidase method for detecting and differentiating BoNT/A-G serotypes in buffer and BoNT/A, /B, /E, and /F in clinical samples. We have previously reported the effectiveness of antibody-capture to purify and concentrate BoNTs from complex matrices, such as clinical samples. Because some antibodies inhibit or neutralize the activity of BoNT, the choice of antibody with which to extract the toxin is critical. In this work, we evaluated a panel of 16 anti-BoNT/A monoclonal antibodies (mAbs for their ability to inhibit the in vitro activity of BoNT/A1, /A2, and /A3 complex as well as the recombinant LC of A1. We also evaluated the same antibody panel for the ability to extract BoNT/A1, /A2, and /A3. Among the mAbs, there were significant differences in extraction efficiency, ability to extract BoNT/A subtypes, and inhibitory effect on BoNT catalytic activity. The mAbs binding the C-terminal portion of the BoNT/A heavy chain had optimal properties for use in the Endopep-MS assay.

  10. What Do We Do about Helicobacter pylori?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Hawkey

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs cause ulcers by different mechanisms. Under some circumstances, patients infected with H pylori may be less prone to NSAID-associated ulcers than those who are H pylori-negative. Eradication trials have yielded differing results. However, those who have studied patients who have a past history of ulcer disease and are already established on NSAIDs have shown no benefit from H pylori eradication.

  11. CD44 plays a functional role in Helicobacter pylori-induced epithelial cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Bertaux-Skeirik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxin-associated gene (Cag pathogenicity island is a strain-specific constituent of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori that augments cancer risk. CagA translocates into the cytoplasm where it stimulates cell signaling through the interaction with tyrosine kinase c-Met receptor, leading cellular proliferation. Identified as a potential gastric stem cell marker, cluster-of-differentiation (CD CD44 also acts as a co-receptor for c-Met, but whether it plays a functional role in H. pylori-induced epithelial proliferation is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that CD44 plays a functional role in H. pylori-induced epithelial cell proliferation. To assay changes in gastric epithelial cell proliferation in relation to the direct interaction with H. pylori, human- and mouse-derived gastric organoids were infected with the G27 H. pylori strain or a mutant G27 strain bearing cagA deletion (∆CagA::cat. Epithelial proliferation was quantified by EdU immunostaining. Phosphorylation of c-Met was analyzed by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis for expression of CD44 and CagA. H. pylori infection of both mouse- and human-derived gastric organoids induced epithelial proliferation that correlated with c-Met phosphorylation. CagA and CD44 co-immunoprecipitated with phosphorylated c-Met. The formation of this complex did not occur in organoids infected with ∆CagA::cat. Epithelial proliferation in response to H. pylori infection was lost in infected organoids derived from CD44-deficient mouse stomachs. Human-derived fundic gastric organoids exhibited an induction in proliferation when infected with H. pylori that was not seen in organoids pre-treated with a peptide inhibitor specific to CD44. In the well-established Mongolian gerbil model of gastric cancer, animals treated with CD44 peptide inhibitor Pep1, resulted in the inhibition of H. pylori-induced proliferation and associated atrophic gastritis. The current study reports a unique

  12. Induction of CD69 expression by cagPAI-positive Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Mori; Chie Ishikawa; Masachika Senba

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and elucidate the molecular mech-anism that regulates inducible expression of CD69 by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection.METHODS: The expression levels of CD69 in a T-cell line, Jurkat, primary human peripheral blood mononu-clear cells (PBMCs), and CD4+T cells, were assessed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. Activation of CD69 promoter was detected by reporter gene. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in Jurkat cells infected with H. pylori was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The role of NF-κB signaling in H. pylori -induced CD69 expression was analyzed using inhibitors of NF-κB and dominant-negative mutants. The isogenic mutants with disrupted cag pathogenicity island ( cagPAI) and virD4 were used to elucidate the role of cagPAI-encoding type Ⅳ secretion system and CagA in CD69 expression.RESULTS: CD69 staining was detected in mucosal lymphocytes and macrophages in specimens of pa-tients with H. pylori -positive gastritis. Although cagPAI-positive H. pylori and an isogenic mutant of virD4 induced CD69 expression, an isogenic mutant of cag-PAI failed to induce this in Jurkat cells. H. pylori also induced CD69 expression in PBMCs and CD4+T cells. The activation of the CD69 promoter by H. pylori was mediated through NF-κB. Transfection of dominant-negative mutants of IκBs, IκB kinases, and NF-κB-inducing kinase inhibited H. pylori -induced CD69 activation. Inhibitors of NF-κB suppressed H. pylori -induced CD69 mRNA expression.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that H. pylori in-duces CD69 expression through the activation of NF-κB. cagPAI might be relevant in the induction of CD69 expression in T cells. CD69 in T cells may play a role in H. pylori -induced gastritis.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Children With Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefichaijan; Mosayebi; Sharafkhah; Kahbazi; Heydarbagi; Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have reported an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization and the occurrence of asthma or other allergies. However, data are inconsistent, and few studies have been performed in children. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate H. pylori seropositivity in children with and without asthma. Patients and Methods This cross-sect...

  14. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces th...... vaccine for H. pylori that will represent a novel and very important bullet against both infection and gastric cancer....

  15. Attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of Helicobacter pylori by human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, M; Paziak-Domanska, B; Wadström, T

    1995-02-01

    The different steps of phagocytosis, attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of cells of Helicobacter pylori strain 17874 (expressing sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) and cells of H. pylori strain 17875 (expressing non-sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) have been studied. More cells of sialopositive H. pylori strain 17874 have been found attached to human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBM) and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages (PIM) than cells of sialonegative H. pylori strain 17875. Binding of cells of H. pylori strain 17874 has been significantly inhibited by treatment of phagocytes with neuraminidase. Inhibition of adhesion of these bacteria preincubated with foetuin to normal phagocytic cells has also been found. Well adhering cells of H. pylori strain 17874 were more resistant to killing mechanisms of human PBM and mouse PIM than cells of strain 17875. Good, probably sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin dependent, adhesion of H. pylori bacteria to phagocytes can be considered as an important virulence factor which facilitates the pathogen to avoid the defence mechanisms.

  16. Avaliação do tempo de secagem e da atividade de óxido-redutases de yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius sob tratamento químico Drying evaluation time and yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius enzymatic activity inhibition under chemical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivianne Montarroyos Padilha

    2009-10-01

    project aimed to evaluate the use of chemical agents in yacon processing to obtain flour in a way that inhibits enzymatic darkening of the product besides determining the enzymatic activity in these treatments. Samples of yacon without chemical inhibitions, yacon treated with 1.0g 100g-1 calcium chloride for 30 seconds and yacon treated with 0.5g 100g-1 potassium metabisulfite for 5 minutes were dried at 55oC in a ventilated greenhouse and the proportions of humidity and drying curves were determined. The peroxidase activities and polyphenol oxidase enzymes were checked before and after being dried with an enzymatic darkening possible biochemist marker of this tubercle. Regarding humidity Parameter all the three treatment were equivalent, but treatment 2 (calcium chloride reduced the humidity in lower time. Before and after the thermal treatment the enzymatic activity was higher in treatment 3 (potassium metabisulfite. The thermal action did not inhibit completely polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The treatment with calcium chloride at 1.0g 100g-1 for 30 minutes to obtain yacon flour was the one with better result despite the fact that it did not inhibit completely peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase enzymes activity, offering a better drying time better material of row firmness , facilitating the process for obtaining the meal.

  17. Two acidic, anticoagulant PLA2 isoenzymes purified from the venom of monocled cobra Naja kaouthia exhibit different potency to inhibit thrombin and factor Xa via phospholipids independent, non-enzymatic mechanism.

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    Ashis K Mukherjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The monocled cobra (Naja kaouthia is responsible for snakebite fatality in Indian subcontinent and in south-western China. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2; EC 3.1.1.4 is one of the toxic components of snake venom. The present study explores the mechanism and rationale(s for the differences in anticoagulant potency of two acidic PLA2 isoenzymes, Nk-PLA2α (13463.91 Da and Nk-PLA2β (13282.38 Da purified from the venom of N. kaouthia. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By LC-MS/MS analysis, these PLA2s showed highest similarity (23.5% sequence coverage with PLA2 III isolated from monocled cobra venom. The catalytic activity of Nk-PLA2β exceeds that of Nk-PLA2α. Heparin differentially regulated the catalytic and anticoagulant activities of these Nk-PLA2 isoenzymes. The anticoagulant potency of Nk-PLA2α was comparable to commercial anticoagulants warfarin, and heparin/antithrombin-III albeit Nk-PLA2β demonstrated highest anticoagulant activity. The anticoagulant action of these PLA2s was partially contributed by a small but specific hydrolysis of plasma phospholipids. The strong anticoagulant effect of Nk-PLA2α and Nk-PLA2β was achieved via preferential, non-enzymatic inhibition of FXa (Ki = 43 nM and thrombin (Ki = 8.3 nM, respectively. Kinetics study suggests that the Nk-PLA2 isoenzymes inhibit their "pharmacological target(s" by uncompetitive mechanism without the requirement of phospholipids/Ca(2+. The anticoagulant potency of Nk-PLA2β which is higher than that of Nk-PLA2α is corroborated by its superior catalytic activity, its higher capacity for binding to phosphatidylcholine, and its greater strength of thrombin inhibition. These PLA2 isoenzymes thus have evolved to affect haemostasis by different mechanisms. The Nk-PLA2β partially inhibited the thrombin-induced aggregation of mammalian platelets suggesting its therapeutic application in the prevention of unwanted clot formation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In order to develop peptide

  18. Antiadhesive Properties of Abelmoschus esculentus (Okra) Immature Fruit Extract against Helicobacter pylori Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Anna; Glocker, Erik; Borén, Thomas; Hensel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional Asian and African medicine use immature okra fruits (Abelmoschus esculentus) as mucilaginous food to combat gastritis. Its effectiveness is due to polysaccharides that inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates the antiadhesive effect in mechanistic detail. Methodology A standardized aqueous fresh extract (Okra FE) from immature okra fruits was used for a quantitative in vitro adhesion assay with FITC-labled H. pylori J99, 2 clinical isolates, AGS cells, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Bacterial adhesins affected by FE were pinpointed using a dot-blot overlay assay with immobilized Lewisb, sialyl-Lewisa, H-1, laminin, and fibronectin. 125I-radiolabeled Okra FE polymer served for binding studies to different H. pylori strains and interaction experiments with BabA and SabA. Iron nanoparticles with different coatings were used to investigate the influence of the charge-dependence of an interaction on the H. pylori surface. Principal findings Okra FE dose-dependently (0.2 to 2 mg/mL) inhibited H. pylori binding to AGS cells. FE inhibited the adhesive binding of membrane proteins BabA, SabA, and HpA to its specific ligands. Radiolabeled compounds from FE bound non-specifically to different strains of H. pylori, as well as to BabA/SabA deficient mutants, indicating an interaction with a still-unknown membrane structure in the vicinity of the adhesins. The binding depended on the charge of the inhibitors. Okra FE did not lead to subsequent feedback regulation or increased expression of adhesins or virulence factors. Conclusion Non-specific interactions between high molecular compounds from okra fruits and the H. pylori surface lead to strong antiadhesive effects. PMID:24416297

  19. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors affecting gastric proton pump expression and acid secretion.

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    Hammond, Charles E; Beeson, Craig; Suarez, Giovanni; Peek, Richard M; Backert, Steffen; Smolka, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric epithelial cells and human gastric biopsies represses H,K-ATPase α subunit (HKα) gene expression and inhibits acid secretion, causing transient hypochlorhydria and supporting gastric H. pylori colonization. Infection by H. pylori strains deficient in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) genes cagL, cagE, or cagM, which do not transfer CagA into host cells or induce interleukin-8 secretion, does not inhibit HKα expression, nor does a cagA-deficient strain that induces IL-8. To test the hypothesis that virulence factors other than those mediating CagA translocation or IL-8 induction participate in HKα repression by activating NF-κB, AGS cells transfected with HKα promoter-Luc reporter constructs containing an intact or mutated NF-κB binding site were infected with wild-type H. pylori strain 7.13, isogenic mutants lacking cag PAI genes responsible for CagA translocation and/or IL-8 induction (cagA, cagζ, cagε, cagZ, and cagβ), or deficient in genes encoding two peptidoglycan hydrolases (slt and cagγ). H. pylori-induced AGS cell HKα promoter activities, translocated CagA, and IL-8 secretion were measured by luminometry, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Human gastric biopsy acid secretion was measured by microphysiometry. Taken together, the data showed that HKα repression is independent of IL-8 expression, and that CagA translocation together with H. pylori transglycosylases encoded by slt and cagγ participate in NF-κB-dependent HKα repression and acid inhibition. The findings are significant because H. pylori factors other than CagA and IL-8 secretion are now implicated in transient hypochlorhydria which facilitates gastric colonization and potential triggering of epithelial progression to neoplasia.

  20. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Osawa

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primar-ily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lym-phoid tissue lymphorna. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in Hpylori injected sub-jects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in associa-tion with atrophic gastritis induced by Hpylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentra-tion. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may re-sult from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations be-fore and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels.

  1. Betanin reduces the accumulation and cross-links of collagen in high-fructose-fed rat heart through inhibiting non-enzymatic glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junyan; Tan, Chang; Wang, Yiheng; Yang, Shaobin; Tan, Dehong

    2015-02-05

    We attempted to determine whether betanin (from natural pigments) that has antioxidant properties would be protective against fructose-induced diabetic cardiac fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Fructose water solution (30%) was accessed freely, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was administered by intra-gastric gavage continuously for 60 d. Rats were sacrificed after overnight fast. The rat blood and left ventricle were collected. In vitro antiglycation assay in bovine serum albumin/fructose system was also performed. In rats treated only with fructose, levels of plasma markers: glucose, insulin, HOMA and glycated hemoglobin rised, left ventricle collagen accumulated and cross-linked, profibrotic factor-transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein expression increased, and soluble collagen decreased, compared with those in normal rats, showing fructose induces diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with betanin antagonized the changes of these parameters, demonstrating the antifibrotic role of betanin in the selected diabetic models. In further mechanistic study, betanin decreased protein glycation indicated by the decreased levels of protein glycation reactive intermediate (methylglyoxal), advanced glycation end product (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine) and receptors for advanced glycation end products (AGEs), antagonized oxidative stress and nuclear factor-κB activation elicited by fructose feeding, suggesting inhibition of glycation, oxidative stress and nuclear factor-κB activation may be involved in the antifibrotic mechanisms. Betanin also showed anitglycative effect in BSA/fructose system, which supported that anitglycation was involved in betanin's protective roles in vivo. Taken together, the potential for using betanin as an auxillary therapy for diabetic cardiomyopathy deserves to be explored further.

  2. Roles of the Peptide Transport Systems and Aminopeptidase PepA in Peptide Assimilation by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Mi Ran; Lee, Ji Hyun; Yun, Soon Kyu; Choi, Kyung Min; Hwang, Se Young

    2015-10-01

    Peptide assimilation in Helicobacter pylori necessitates a coordinated working of the peptide transport systems (PepTs) and aminopeptidase (PepA). We found that H. pylori hydrolyzes two detector peptides, L-phenylalanyl-L-3-thiaphenylalanine (PSP) and L-phenylalanyl-L-2- sulfanilylglycine (PSG), primarily before intake and excludes their antibacterial effects, whereas Escherichia coli readily transports them with resultant growth inhibition. PSP assimilation by H. pylori was inhibited by aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin, but not by dialanine or cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone, contrary to that of E. coli. RT- and qRT-PCR analyses showed that H. pylori may express first the PepTs (e.g., DppA and DppB) and then PepA. In addition, western blot analysis of PepA suggested that the bacterium secretes PepA in response to specific inducers.

  3. Motility and chemotaxis mediate the preferential colonization of gastric injury sites by Helicobacter pylori.

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    Eitaro Aihara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a pathogen contributing to peptic inflammation, ulceration, and cancer. A crucial step in the pathogenic sequence is when the bacterium first interacts with gastric tissue, an event that is poorly understood in vivo. We have shown that the luminal space adjacent to gastric epithelial damage is a microenvironment, and we hypothesized that this microenvironment might enhance H. pylori colonization. Inoculation with 106 H. pylori (wild-type Sydney Strain 1, SS1 significantly delayed healing of acetic-acid induced ulcers at Day 1, 7 and 30 post-inoculation, and wild-type SS1 preferentially colonized the ulcerated area compared to uninjured gastric tissue in the same animal at all time points. Gastric resident Lactobacillus spp. did not preferentially colonize ulcerated tissue. To determine whether bacterial motility and chemotaxis are important to ulcer healing and colonization, we analyzed isogenic H. pylori mutants defective in motility (ΔmotB or chemotaxis (ΔcheY. ΔmotB (10(6 failed to colonize ulcerated or healthy stomach tissue. ΔcheY (10(6 colonized both tissues, but without preferential colonization of ulcerated tissue. However, ΔcheY did modestly delay ulcer healing, suggesting that chemotaxis is not required for this process. We used two-photon microscopy to induce microscopic epithelial lesions in vivo, and evaluated accumulation of fluorescently labeled H. pylori at gastric damage sites in the time frame of minutes instead of days. By 5 min after inducing damage, H. pylori SS1 preferentially accumulated at the site of damage and inhibited gastric epithelial restitution. H. pylori ΔcheY modestly accumulated at the gastric surface and inhibited restitution, but did not preferentially accumulate at the injury site. H. pylori ΔmotB neither accumulated at the surface nor inhibited restitution. We conclude that bacterial chemosensing and motility rapidly promote H. pylori colonization of injury sites

  4. Spermine oxidase is a regulator of macrophage host response to Helicobacter pylori: enhancement of antimicrobial nitric oxide generation by depletion of spermine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P; Frye, Jeanetta W; Casero, Robert A; Wilson, Keith T

    2014-03-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. We have reported that in H. pylori-activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) can kill the bacterium, iNOS protein expression is dependent on uptake of its substrate L-arginine (L-Arg), the polyamine spermine can inhibit iNOS translation by inhibiting L-Arg uptake, and inhibition of polyamine synthesis enhances NO-mediated bacterial killing. Because spermine oxidase (SMO), which back-converts spermine to spermidine, is induced in macrophages by H. pylori, we determined its role in iNOS-dependent host defense. SMO shRNA knockdown in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resulted in a marked decrease in H. pylori-stimulated iNOS protein, but not mRNA expression, and a 90% reduction in NO levels; NO production was also inhibited in primary murine peritoneal macrophages with SMO knockdown. There was an increase in spermine levels after H. pylori stimulation that rapidly decreased, while SMO knockdown caused a greater increase in spermine that was sustained. With SMO knockdown, L-Arg uptake and killing of H. pylori by macrophages was prevented. The overexpression of SMO by transfection of an expression plasmid prevented the H. pylori-stimulated increase in spermine levels, and led to increased L-Arg uptake, iNOS protein expression and NO production, and H. pylori killing. In two human monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP-1, overexpression of SMO caused a significant enhancement of NO production with H. pylori stimulation. By depleting spermine, SMO can abrogate the inhibitory effect of polyamines on innate immune responses to H. pylori by enhancing antimicrobial NO production.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Capsaicin and Piperine on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Chronic Gastritis in Mongolian Gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Takeshi; Shi, Liang; Takasu, Shinji; Cho, Young-Man; Kiriyama, Yuka; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Tatematsu, Masae; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Spices have been used for thousands of years, and recent studies suggest that certain spices confer beneficial effects on gastric disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible chemopreventive effects of spice-derived compounds on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced gastritis. We examined the inhibitory effects of curcumin, capsaicin, and piperine on H. pylori in vitro by determining the colony-forming units and real-time RT-PCR in H. pylori stimulated AGS gastric cancer cells. For in vivo analysis, 6-week-old SPF male Mongolian gerbils were infected with H. pylori, fed diets containing 5000 ppm curcumin, 100 ppm capsaicin, or 100 ppm piperine, and sacrificed after 13 weeks. All three compounds inhibited in vitro proliferation of H. pylori, with curcumin being the most effective. Infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells was suppressed by piperine both in the antrum and corpus of H. pylori-infected gerbils. Capsaicin also decreased neutrophils in the antrum and corpus and mononuclear cell infiltration and heterotopic proliferative glands in the corpus. mRNA expression of Tnf-α and formation of phospho-IκB-α in the antrum were reduced by both capsaicin and piperine. In addition, piperine suppressed expression of Il-1β, Ifn-γ, Il-6, and iNos, while H. pylori UreA and other virulence factors were not significantly attenuated by any compounds. These results suggest that capsaicin and piperine have anti-inflammatory effects on H. pylori-induced gastritis in gerbils independent of direct antibacterial effects and may thus have potential for use in the chemoprevention of H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

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    Li, Guanggang; Wulan, Hasi; Song, Zongchang; Paik, Paul A; Tsao, Ming L; Goodman, Gary M; MacEachern, Paul T; Downey, Robert S; Jankowska, Anna J; Rabinowitz, Yaron M; Learch, Thomas B; Song, David Z; Yuan, Ji J; Zheng, Shihang; Zheng, Zhendong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  7. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

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    Guanggang Li

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  8. Addition of cranberry to proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyedmajidi, Mohammadreza; Ahmadi, Anahita; Hajiebrahimi, Shahin; Seyedmajidi, Seyedali; Rajabikashani, Majid; Firoozabadi, Mona; Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy with two antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori eradication is widely accepted, but this combination fails in a considerable number of cases. Some studies have shown that cranberry inhibits the adhesion of a wide range of microbial pathogens, including H. pylori. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cranberry on H. pylori eradication with a standard therapy including lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin (LCA) in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Methods: In this study, H. pylori-positive patients with PUD were randomized into two groups: Group A: A 14-day LCA triple therapy with 30 mg lansoprazole bid, 1000 mg amoxicillin bid, and 500 mg clarithromycin bid; Group B: A 14-day 500 mg cranberry capsules bid plus LCA triple therapy. A 13C-urea breath test was performed for eradication assessment 6 weeks after the completion of the treatment. Findings: Two hundred patients (53.5% males, between 23 and 77 years, mean age ± standard deviation: 50.29 ± 17.79 years) continued treatment protocols and underwent 13C-urea breath testing. H. pylori eradication was achieved in 74% in Group A (LCA without cranberry) and 89% in Group B (LCA with cranberry) (P = 0.042). Conclusion: The addition of cranberry to LCA triple therapy for H. pylori has a higher rate of eradication than the standard regimen alone (up to 89% and significant). PMID:27843960

  9. Photoelectrochemical enzymatic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-06-15

    Enzymatic biosensors have been valuable bioanalytical devices for analysis of diverse targets in disease diagnosis, biological and biomedical research, etc. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) bioanalysis is a recently emerged method that promptly becoming a subject of new research interests due to its attractive potential for future bioanalysis with high sensitivity and specificity. PEC enzymatic biosensors integrate the inherent sensitivities of PEC bioanalysis and the selectivity of enzymes and thus share their both advantages. Currently, PEC enzymatic biosensors have become a hot topic of significant research and the recent impetus has grown rapidly as demonstrated by increased research papers. Given the pace of advances in this area, this review will make a thorough discussion and survey on the fundamentals, sensing strategies, applications and the state of the art in PEC enzymatic biosensors, followed by future prospects based on our own opinions. We hope this work could provide an accessible introduction to PEC enzymatic biosensors for any scientist.

  10. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. 苦瓜提取物抑制蛋白质的非酶糖基化%Inhibitive Effects of Bitter Melon Extract on the Protein Non-enzymatic Glycation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈绍红; 刘少彬; 赵云涛

    2012-01-01

    Objective; Using in vitro and in vivo models, the role of bitter melon extract on protein non-enzymatic glycation were investigated. Method; In vitro model, different doses of the extract (0. 01 , 0. 1 , 1. 0 g · L-1) or aminogunidine (4 mmol · L-l) were added, non-enzymatic glycation end products were measured at different time points by fluorescent measurer. In vivo model, diabetes mice were fed with different doses of extract (10, 30 g · kg-1) . The effects of bitter melon extract on blood glucose, advanced glycation end products ( AGEs) levels, superoxide dismutases (SOD) activity and maleic dialdehyde (MDA) content in heart, liver and kidney tissue were assayed. Result; In vitro system, protein glycation products formation was positively correlated with the incubation time, bitter melon extract inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products dose-dependently (P < 0. 01) . Animal experiments showed that bitter melon extract inhibited blood sugar of diabetic mice (P < 0. 05 , P <0. 01). AGE levels and MDA content of heart, liver and kidney tissue were lowed significantly in group which fed with extract (P <0. 05, P <0. 01). Also, SOD activity was enhanced in group which fed with extract (P < 0. 05, P < 0. 01). Conclusion; Bitter melon extract have inhibitive effects on the formation of advanced glycation end products in vitro and in vivo.%目的:研究苦瓜提取物对蛋白质非酶糖基化终末产物( AGE)生成的抑制作用.方法:体外蛋白质非酶糖基化反应系统中分别加入不同质量浓度的苦瓜提取物(0.01,0.1,1.0 g·L-1)或氮基胍(4 mmol·L-1),在不同时间分别测定蛋白质非酶糖化终末产物的生成量.制备糖尿病小鼠模型,以苦瓜提取物10,30 g·kg-1两个剂量连续ig 14 d,测定苦瓜提取物对糖尿病小鼠血糖以及心、肝、肾组织中AGE含量、超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)活性和丙二醛(MDA)含量的影响.结果:在体外系统中,蛋白糖化产物的生成与孵育时间

  12. A pro-inflammatory role for Th22 cells in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Cheng, Ping; Liu, Xiao-fei; Peng, Liu-sheng; Li, Bo-sheng; Wang, Ting-ting; Chen, Na; Li, Wen-hua; Shi, Yun; Chen, Weisan; Pang, Ken C; Zeng, Ming; Mao, Xu-hu; Yang, Shi-ming; Guo, Hong; Guo, Gang; Liu, Tao; Zuo, Qian-fei; Yang, Hui-jie; Yang, Liu-yang; Mao, Fang-yuan; Lv, Yi-pin; Zou, Quan-ming

    2015-09-01

    Helper T (Th) cell responses are critical for the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis. Th22 cells represent a newly discovered Th cell subset, but their relevance to H. pylori-induced gastritis is unknown. Flow cytometry, real-time PCR and ELISA analyses were performed to examine cell, protein and transcript levels in gastric samples from patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Gastric tissues from interleukin (IL)-22-deficient and wild-type (control) mice were also examined. Tissue inflammation was determined for pro-inflammatory cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory protein production. Gastric epithelial cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were isolated, stimulated and/or cultured for Th22 cell function assays. Th22 cells accumulated in gastric mucosa of both patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Th22 cell polarisation was promoted via the production of IL-23 by dendritic cells (DC) during H. pylori infection, and resulted in increased inflammation within the gastric mucosa. This inflammation was characterised by the CXCR2-dependent influx of MDSCs, whose migration was induced via the IL-22-dependent production of CXCL2 by gastric epithelial cells. Under the influence of IL-22, MDSCs, in turn, produced pro-inflammatory proteins, such as S100A8 and S100A9, and suppressed Th1 cell responses, thereby contributing to the development of H. pylori-associated gastritis. This study, therefore, identifies a novel regulatory network involving H. pylori, DCs, Th22 cells, gastric epithelial cells and MDSCs, which collectively exert a pro-inflammatory effect within the gastric microenvironment. Efforts to inhibit this Th22-dependent pathway may therefore prove a valuable strategy in the therapy of H. pylori-associated gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Evaluation on antibiotic resistance of helicobacter pylori isolated from patients admitted to tooba medical center, Sari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Talebi BezminAbadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 17 March, 2009; Accepted 8 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Helicobacter pylori, which infect approximately one half of the world’s population, are an important risk factor in chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is now widely recommended as the most effective treatment of peptic ulcer disease. One of the most important reasons for treatment failure is H. pylori resistance to the antimicrobials usage in therapy. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility patterns of H. pylori isolates in 6 routine anti-microbial agents in Northern Iran.Materials and methods: 125 patients from Tooba Medical Center in Sari with endoscopic evidence of dyspepsia complaints were used for obtaining gastric biopsies specimens. Biopsies were sent to the laboratory in thioglycolate broth (transport medium. Bacteria were primarily cultured on Columbia agar supplemented with 7% horse blood, 7% fetal calf serum. Urease, Catalase and Oxidase activities were used for H. pylori identification. Bacterial suspensions equivalent to 3 Mc. Farlands were spread on plates, along with antibiotic disks and placed in the diameter zone. Inhibition was measured after 3 days of incubation in micro-aerophilic condition.Results: H. pylori were isolated from 116(92.8% subjects, a total of 125 biopsy specimens. Resistance to metronidazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, furazolidone and ciprofloxacin were 71%, 35%, 25%, 9%, 24% and 25%, respectively. Multiple resistance (amoxicillin-clarithromycin-metronidazole were found in (65% of the isolates.Conclusion: Comparison of our data with previous results showed that prevalence of H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, furazolidone and metronidazole has increased in Iran considerably. Resistance to amoxicillin in our study was too high in comparison with foreign studies. The present study demonstrates the need for continuous monitoring of the antimicrobial

  14. Dietary prevention of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer with kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young-Min; Park, Kun Young; Lee, Don Haeng; Yoo, Joon-Hwan; Cho, Joo Young; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2015-10-06

    To prove whether dietary intervention can prevent Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer, we developed cancer preventive kimchi (cpKimchi) through special recipe and administered to chronic H. pylori-initiated, high salt diet-promoted, gastric tumorigenesis mice model. H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice were administered with cpKimchi mixed in drinking water up to 36 weeks. Gross and pathological gastric lesions were evaluated after 24 and 36 weeks, respectively and explored underlying molecular changes to explain efficacies. Cancer preventive actions of anti-inflammation and anti-mutagenesis were compared between standard recipe kimchi (sKimchi) and special recipe cpKimchi in in vitro H. pylori-infected cell model. The erythematous and nodular changes, mucosal ulcerative and erosive lesions in the stomach were noted at 24th weeks, but cpKimchi administration significantly ameliorated. After 36th weeks, scattered nodular masses, some ulcers, and thin nodular gastric mucosa were noted in H. pylori-infected mice, whereas these gross lesions were significantly attenuated in cpKimchi group. On molecular analysis, significant expressions of COX-2 and IL-6, activated NF-κB and STAT3, increased apoptosis, and marked oxidative stresses were noted in H. pylori-infected group relevant to tumorigenesis, but these were all significantly attenuated in cpKimchi group. cpKimchi extracts imparted significant selective induction of apoptosis only in cancer cells, led to inhibition of H. pylori-induced proliferation, while no cytotoxicity through significant HO-1 induction in non-transformed gastric cells. In conclusion, daily dietary intake of cpKimchi can be an effective way either to rejuvenate H. pylori-atrophic gastritis or to prevent tumorigenesis supported with the concerted actions of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-mutagenic mechanisms.

  15. Effect of the Vacuolation of Helicobacter Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic test in vitro combined with cytochemical stain, fluorescent stain, transmission electronmicrograph was used to study the vacuolated effect by helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) (Toxin+) and its pathological mechanism. 78.26 % patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori was infected with H.pylori (Toxin+), while 42.86 % patients with gastritis was infected with H.pylori (Toxin+). It was positive in vacuole with acridine orange and acid phosphatase stain. Transmission electronmicrograph of vacuole revealed the presence of abounding membrane. There was a closed relationship between infection with H.pylori (Toxin+) and peptic ulcer disease. The vacuole induced by H.pylori (Toxin+) was autophagosome, which was pathological phenomenon induced by toxin.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been linked to peptic ulcer disease, gastric lymphoma, and gastric carcinoma. Apart from its well-demonstrated role in gastroduodenal diseases, some authors have suggested a potential role of Helicobacter pylori infection in several extra-intestinal pathologies including haematological, cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic, autoimmune, and dermatological diseases. Some studies suggest an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and skin diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria and rosacea. There have also been few case reports documenting association between Helicobacter pylori and psoriasis vulgaris, Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases; most of the studies do not show relevant relationships of these diseases with Helicobacter pylori infections. This review discusses skin diseases that are believed to be associated with Helicobacter pylori.

  17. Difluoromethylornithine is a novel inhibitor of Helicobacter pylori growth, CagA translocation, and interleukin-8 induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Barry

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infects half the world's population, and carriage is lifelong without antibiotic therapy. Current regimens prescribed to prevent infection-associated diseases such as gastroduodenal ulcers and gastric cancer can be thwarted by antibiotic resistance. We reported that administration of 1% D,L-α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO to mice infected with H. pylori reduces gastritis and colonization, which we attributed to enhanced host immune response due to inhibition of macrophage ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. Although no ODC has been identified in any H. pylori genome, we sought to determine if DFMO has direct effects on the bacterium. We found that DFMO significantly reduced the growth rate of H. pylori in a polyamine-independent manner. Two other gram-negative pathogens possessing ODC, Escherichia coli and Citrobacter rodentium, were resistant to the DFMO effect. The effect of DFMO on H. pylori required continuous exposure to the drug and was reversible when removed, with recovery of growth rate in vitro and the ability to colonize mice. H. pylori exposed to DFMO were significantly shorter in length than those untreated and they contained greater internal levels of ATP, suggesting severe effects on bacterial metabolism. DFMO inhibited expression of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A, and its translocation and phosphorylation in gastric epithelial cells, which was associated with a reduction in interleukin-8 expression. These findings suggest that DFMO has effects on H. pylori that may contribute to its effectiveness in reducing gastritis and colonization and may be a useful addition to anti-H. pylori therapies.

  18. Difluoromethylornithine Is a Novel Inhibitor of Helicobacter pylori Growth, CagA Translocation, and Interleukin-8 Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Daniel P.; Asim, Mohammad; Leiman, David A.; de Sablet, Thibaut; Singh, Kshipra; Casero, Robert A.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects half the world's population, and carriage is lifelong without antibiotic therapy. Current regimens prescribed to prevent infection-associated diseases such as gastroduodenal ulcers and gastric cancer can be thwarted by antibiotic resistance. We reported that administration of 1% d,l-α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) to mice infected with H. pylori reduces gastritis and colonization, which we attributed to enhanced host immune response due to inhibition of macrophage ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. Although no ODC has been identified in any H. pylori genome, we sought to determine if DFMO has direct effects on the bacterium. We found that DFMO significantly reduced the growth rate of H. pylori in a polyamine-independent manner. Two other Gram-negative pathogens possessing ODC, Escherichia coli and Citrobacter rodentium, were resistant to the DFMO effect. The effect of DFMO on H. pylori required continuous exposure to the drug and was reversible when removed, with recovery of growth rate in vitro and the ability to colonize mice. H. pylori exposed to DFMO were significantly shorter in length than those untreated and they contained greater internal levels of ATP, suggesting severe effects on bacterial metabolism. DFMO inhibited expression of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A, and its translocation and phosphorylation in gastric epithelial cells, which was associated with a reduction in interleukin-8 expression. These findings suggest that DFMO has effects on H. pylori that may contribute to its effectiveness in reducing gastritis and colonization and may be a useful addition to anti-H. pylori therapies. PMID:21386987

  19. Extraction and inhibition of enzymatic activity of botulinum neurotoxins /B1, /B2, /B3, /B4, and /B5 by a panel of monoclonal anti-BoNT/B antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalb Suzanne R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, extremely toxic proteins which can induce respiratory failure leading to long-term intensive care or death. Treatment for botulism includes administration of antitoxins, which must be administered early in the course of the intoxication; therefore, rapid determination of human exposure to BoNT is an important public health goal. In previous work, our laboratory reported on Endopep-MS, a mass spectrometry-based activity method for detecting and differentiating BoNT/A, /B, /E, and /F in clinical samples. We also demonstrated that antibody-capture is effective for purification and concentration of BoNTs from complex matrices such as clinical samples. However, some antibodies inhibit or neutralize the enzymatic activity of BoNT, so the choice of antibody for toxin extraction is critical. Results In this work, we evaluated 24 anti-BoNT/B monoclonal antibodies (mAbs for their ability to inhibit the in vitro activity of BoNT/B1, /B2, /B3, /B4, and /B5 and to extract those toxins. Among the mAbs, there were significant differences in ability to extract BoNT/B subtypes and inhibitory effect on BoNT catalytic activity. Some of the mAbs tested enhanced the in vitro light chain activity of BoNT/B, suggesting that BoNT/B may undergo conformational change upon binding some mAbs. Conclusions In addition to determining in vitro inhibition abilities of a panel of mAbs against BoNT/B1-/B5, this work has determined B12.2 and 2B18.2 to be the best mAbs for sample preparation before Endopep-MS. These mAb characterizations also have the potential to assist with mechanistic studies of BoNT/B protection and treatment, which is important for studying alternative therapeutics for botulism.

  20. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection.

  1. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  2. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. A diagnosis of infection is thus an important part of a treatment strategy of many gastrointestinal tract diseases. Many diagnostic tests are available but all have some limitations in different clinical situations and laboratory settings. A single gold standard cannot available, but be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in daily clinical practice in all areas, so several techniques have been developed to give reliable results, especially focusing on real time endoscopic features. The narrow band imaging system (NBI) and high resolution endoscopy are imaging techniques for enhanced visualization of infected mucosa and premalignant gastric lesions. The aim of this article is to review the current diagnostic options and possible future developments detection of Helicobacter pylori infection.

  3. Comprehensive mapping of the Helicobacter pylori NikR regulon provides new insights in bacterial nickel responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Andrea; Pinatel, Eva; Costantini, Paolo Emidio; Pelliciari, Simone; Roncarati, Davide; Puccio, Simone; De Bellis, Gianluca; Peano, Clelia; Danielli, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Nickel homeostasis is important for pathogenic and ureolytic bacteria, which use this metal ion as enzymatic cofactor. For example, in the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori an optimal balance between nickel uptake and incorporation in metallo-enzymes is fundamental for colonization of the host. Nickel is also used as cofactor to modulate DNA binding of the NikR regulator, which controls transcription of genes involved in nickel trafficking or infection in many bacteria. Accordingly, there is much interest in a systematic characterization of NikR regulation. Herein we use H. pylori as a model to integrate RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data demonstrating that NikR not only regulates metal-ion transporters but also virulence factors, non-coding RNAs, as well as toxin-antitoxin systems in response to nickel stimulation. Altogether, results provide new insights into the pathobiology of H. pylori and contribute to understand the responses to nickel in other bacteria. PMID:28393877

  4. Role of caspase-3/E-cadherin in helicobacter pylori-induced apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongmei; Du, Jie; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Yuanjian

    2017-08-29

    This study was designed to investigate the role of caspase-3/E-cadherin in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) -induced gastric epithelial apoptosis in cells, animal models and clinical gastritis patients. In cultured gastric mucosal epithelial cells, gastric glandular epithelial cells and C57BL/6 mice, H. pylori infection significantly induced apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells, down-regulated full-length E-cadherin and Bcl-2 expression, and up-regulated cleaved-caspase-3, E-cadherin/carboxy-terminal fragment 3 and Bax expression. Z-DEVD-FMK, an inhibitor of caspase-3, attenuated the effect of H. pylori. E-cadherin overexpression significantly inhibited the apoptosis of GES-1 and SGC-7901 cells induced by the H. pylori. The results from clinical studies also showed down-regulation of E-cadherin, up-regulation of cleaved-caspase-3 expression and increased apoptosis in gastric tissues from gastritis patients with H. pylori infection. These results suggest that the caspase-3/E-cadherin pathway is involved in the apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells induced by H. pylori.

  5. Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activity of Isocoumarin Paepalantine: Morphological and Molecular Docking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, João Paulo L; Rodrigues, Ricardo P; Gonçalves, Rita de Cássia R; Kitagawa, Rodrigo R

    2017-05-12

    The Helicobacterpylori bacterium is one of the main causes of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and even gastric cancer. It affects an average of half of the world population. Its difficult eradication depends upon multi-drug therapy. Since its classification as a group 1 carcinogenic by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the importance of H. pylori eradication has obtained a novel meaning. There is considerable interest in alternative therapies for the eradication of H. pylori using compounds from a wide range of natural products. In the present study, we investigated the antibacterial property of the isocoumarin paepalantine against H. pylori and it exhibited significant anti-H. pylori activity at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 128 μg/mL and at a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 256 μg/mL. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed significant morphological changes of the bacterial cell as a response to a sub-MIC of paepalantine, suggesting a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) inhibition. Computational studies were carried out in order to study binding modes for paepalantine in PBP binding sites, exploring the active and allosteric sites. The data from the present study indicates that paepalantine exhibits significant anti-H. pylori activity, most likely by inhibiting membrane protein synthesis.

  6. Dispepsia ed Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Helicobacter pylori (HP eradication on functional dyspepsia has been analysed in several clinical trials, including large, controlled and well-designed studies as well as small, flowed studies. The results of these studies indicate that HP infection does not play a major role in the aetiology of this disease and that HP eradication improves dyspeptic symptoms in no more than 15% of patients as compared to placebo. From a practical point of view 15 patients need to be treated for one to benefit while, in duodenal ulcer, 1.4 patient need to be treated for one to benefit. It remains to be elucidated if HP eradication in functional dyspepsia is useful to reduce the risk of developing organic dyspepsia (namely peptic ulcer in functional dyspepsia. In uninvestigated dyspepsia the management of HP infection in primary care has been fully debated.Two therapeutics strategies have been proposed: test and scope and test and treat. The value of test and treat strategy over alternative strategies has been demonstrated in several decision analyses. HP test and scope increases costs in primary care without improving symptoms and saves only 15% of endoscopies.

  7. Effects of H pylori infection on gap-junctional intercellular communication and proliferation of gastric epithelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of H pylori infection on gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and proliferation of gastric epithelial cells in vitro. METHODS: A human gastric epithelial cell line (SGC-7901) cultured on coverslips was exposed overnight to intact H pylori (CagA+ or CagA- strains) and sonicated extracts, respectively. GJIC between the cells was detected by fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching (FRAP) technique. Proliferation of SGC cells was determined by methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT)assay.RESULTS: When compared with control in which cells were cultured with simple medium alone, both CagA+ and CagA- H pylori isolates could inhibit GJIC (CagA+:F = 57.98, P < 0.01; CagA-: F = 29.59, P < 0.01) and proliferation (CagA+: F = 42.65, P < 0.01; CagA-: F =58.14, P < 0.01) of SGC-7901 cells. Compared with CagA- strains, CagA+ H pylori more significantly downregulated GJIC of gastric cells (intact H pylori: t = 13.86,P < 0.01; sonicated extracts: t = 11.87, P < 0.01) and inhibited proliferation gastric cells to a lesser extent in vitro (intact H pylori: t = 3.06, P < 0.05; sonicated extracts: t = 3.94, P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Compared with CagA- H pylori strains,CagA+ strains down-regulate GJIC of gastric epithelial cells more significantly and inhibit proliferation of gastric cells to a lesser extent in vitro. H pylori, especially CagA+ strains, may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis.

  8. In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Activities of Patchouli Alcohol, a Naturally Occurring Tricyclic Sesquiterpene, against Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y F; Lian, D W; Chen, Y Q; Cai, Y F; Zheng, Y F; Fan, P L; Ren, W K; Fu, L J; Li, Y C; Xie, J H; Cao, H Y; Tan, B; Su, Z R; Huang, P

    2017-06-01

    This study further evaluated the in vitro and in vivo anti-Helicobacter pylori activities and potential underlying mechanism of patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene. In the in vitro assay, the capacities of PA to inhibit and kill H. pylori were tested on three standard strains at different pH values and on 12 clinical isolates. The effects of PA on H. pylori adhesion (and its alpA, alpB, and babA genes), motility (and its flaA and flaB genes), ultrastructure, and flagellation were investigated. Moreover, the H. pylori resistance to and postantibiotic effect (PAE) of PA were determined. Furthermore, the in vivo effects of PA on H. pylori eradication and gastritis were examined. Results showed that MICs of PA against three standard strains (pH 5.3 to 9) and 12 clinical isolates were 25 to 75 and 12.5 to 50 μg/ml, respectively. The killing kinetics of PA were time and concentration dependent, and its minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were 25 to 75 μg/ml. In addition, H. pylori adhesion, motility, ultrastructure, and flagellation were significantly suppressed. PA also remarkably inhibited the expression of adhesion genes (alpA and alpB) and motility genes (flaA and flaB). Furthermore, PA treatment caused a longer PAE and less bacterial resistance than clarithromycin and metronidazole. The in vivo study showed that PA can effectively eradicate H. pylori, inhibit gastritis, and suppress the expression of inflammatory mediators (COX-2, interleukin 1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]). In conclusion, PA can efficiently kill H. pylori, interfere with its infection process, and attenuate gastritis with less bacterial resistance, making it a potential candidate for new drug development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. 草酸与柠檬酸抑制鲜切香蕉酶褐变的比较研究%Study on inhibition of enzymatic browning of fresh-cut banana by oxalic acid and citric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃海元; 杨昌鹏; 陈智理; 黄卫萍; 潘嫣丽

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of oxalic acid and citric acid in enzymatic browning inhibition of fresh-cut banana slices were studied.At the first experiment, banana slices were dipped in 0,5,10,20,40,60,80,100mmol/L oxalic acid solution and citric acid solution for 5min, respectively, and then stored at room temperature for 8h.The L * values of banana slices were measured every two hours.At the second experiment, banana slices were dipped in 60mmol/L oxalic acid solution and citric acid solution with or without 0.5% sodium isoascorbate for 5min, respectively,packaged in plastic trays covered with PE film, and then stored at 10℃ for 5ad.The L * values of banana slices were measured every day.The results showed that both oxalic acid and citric acid could inhibit browning of fresh-cut banana effectively, but oxalic acid had better anti- browning effectiveness than citric acid, no matter at room temperature or at low temperature.%对草酸和柠檬酸抑制鲜切香蕉片酶褐变的效果进行了研究.鲜切香蕉片分别用0、5、10、20、40、60、80、100mmol/L的草酸和柠檬酸溶液浸泡5 min,然后置于白纸上常温存放8h,每2h抽样测定香蕉片的L*值;鲜切香蕉片分别用60mmol/L草酸,60mmol/L柠檬酸、60mmol/L草酸+0.5%异杭坏血酸钠和60mmol/L柠檬酸+0.5%异抗坏血酸钠溶液浸泡5min,然后装在塑料托盘里,用PE保鲜膜包扎,在10℃下贮藏5d,每天抽样测定香蕉片的L*值.结果表明,无论常温还是低温下,草酸和柠檬酸均可有效抑制鲜切香蕉褐变,而且草酸抑制鲜切香蕉褐变的效果均好于柠檬酸.

  10. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis, J.K. (Boston Univ., MA (United States). School of Medicine); Kitchell, J.P. (Holometrix, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1988-12-15

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  11. Effect of the oral intake of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 on Helicobacter pylori causing peptic ulcer in C57BL/6 mice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Baljinder; Garg, Neena; Sachdev, Atul; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are being proposed to cure peptic ulcers by reducing colonization of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach mucosa and by eradicating already established infection. In lieu of that, in vitro inhibitory activity of pediocin-producing probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 was evaluated against H. pylori by growth inhibition assays. Further, chronic gastritis was first induced in two groups of C57BL/6 mice by orogastric inoculation with H. pylori with polyethylene catheter, and probiotic P. acidilactici BA28 was orally administered to study the eradication and cure of peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori and P. acidilactici BA28 were detected in gastric biopsy and fecal samples of mice, respectively. A probiotic treatment with P. acidilactici BA28, which is able to eliminate H. pylori infection and could reverse peptic ulcer disease, is being suggested as a co-adjustment with conventional antibiotic treatment. The study provided an evidence of controlling peptic ulcer disease, by diet mod

  12. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  13. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  14. Current knowledge on alleviating Helicobacter pylori infections through the use of some commonly known natural products: bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliga Raman Murali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium, has been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization and recognized as the causative agent for peptic ulcers, duodenal ulcer, gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas, and gastric cancer. Owing to their alarming rate of drug resistance, eradication of H. pylori remains a global challenge. Triple therapy consisting of a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and either amoxicillin or metronidazole, is generally the recommended standard for the treatment of H. pylori infection. Complementary and alternative medicines have a long history in the treatment of gastrointestinal ailments and various compounds has been tested for anti-H. pylori activity both in vitro and in vivo; however, their successful use in human clinical trials is sporadic. Hence, the aim of this review is to analyze the role of some well-known natural products that have been tested in clinical trials in preventing, altering, or treating H. pylori infections. Whereas some in vitro and in vivo studies in the literature have demonstrated the successful use of a few potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections, others indicate a need to consider natural products, with or without triple therapy, as a useful alternative in treating H. pylori-related infections. Thus, the reported mechanisms include killing of H. pylori urease inhibition, induction of bacterial cell damage, and immunomodulatory effect on the host immune system. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the successful use of some potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections. Nevertheless, the routine prescription of potential complementary and alternative medicines continues to be restrained, and evidence on the safety and efficacy of the active compounds remains a subject of ongoing debate.

  15. H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study whether H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis.METHODS:The subjects were divided into three groups:H pylori-infected cholecystitis group,H pylorinegative cholecystitis group and control group.Pathologic changes of the gallbladder were observed by optic and electronic microscopes and the levels of interleukin-1,6 and 8(IL-1,6 and 8)were detected by radioimmunoassay.RESULTS:Histological evidence of chronic cholecystitis including degeneration,necrosis,inflammatory cell infiltration,were found in the region where H pylori-colonized.Levels of IL-1,6 and 8 in gallbladder mucosa homogenates were significantly higher in H pylori-infected cholecystitis group than those in H pylori-negative cholecystitis group and control group.CONCLUSION:H pylori infection may be related to cholecystitis.

  16. Molecular interactions of UvrB protein and DNA from Helicobacter pylori: Insight into a molecular modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavi, Rohit; Kumar, Raj; Rampogu, Shailima; Son, Minky; Park, Chanin; Baek, Ayoung; Kim, Hyong-Ha; Suh, Jung-Keun; Park, Seok Ju; Lee, Keun Woo

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) persevere in the human stomach, an environment in which they encounter many DNA-damaging conditions, including gastric acidity. The pathogenicity of H. pylori is enhanced by its well-developed DNA repair mechanism, thought of as 'machinery,' such as nucleotide excision repair (NER). NER involves multi-enzymatic excinuclease proteins (UvrABC endonuclease), which repair damaged DNA in a sequential manner. UvrB is the central component in prokaryotic NER, essential for damage recognition. Therefore, molecular modeling studies of UvrB protein from H. pylori are carried out with homology modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results reveal that the predicted structure is bound to a DNA hairpin with 3-bp stem, an 11-nucleotide loop, and 3-nt 3' overhang. In addition, a mutation of the Y96A variant indicates reduction in the binding affinity for DNA. Free-energy calculations demonstrate the stability of the complex and help identify key residues in various interactions based on residue decomposition analysis. Stability comparative studies between wild type and mutant protein-DNA complexes indicate that the former is relatively more stable than the mutant form. This predicted model could also be useful in designing new inhibitors for UvrB protein, as well as preventing the pathogenesis of H. pylori.

  17. Cloning and expression of Helicobacter pylori GDP-l-fucose synthesizing enzymes (GMD and GMER) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, N; Mäki, M; Räbinä, J; Roos, C; Mattila, P; Renkonen, R

    2001-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative gastric pathogen causing diseases from mild gastric infections to gastric cancer. The difference in clinical outcome has been suggested to be due to strain differences. H. pylori undergoes phase variation by changing its lipopolysaccharide structure according to the environmental conditions. The O-antigen of H. pylori contains fucosylated glycans, similar to Lewis structures found in human gastric epithelium. These Lewis glycans of H. pylori have been suggested to play a role in pathogenesis in the adhesion of the bacterium to gastric epithelium. In the synthesis of fucosylated structures, GDP-l-fucose is needed as a fucose donor. Here, we cloned the two key enzymes of GDP-l-fucose synthesis, H. pylori gmd coding for GDP-d-mannose dehydratase (GMD), and gmer coding for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose-3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) and expressed them in an enzymatically active form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The end product of these enzymes, GDP-l-fucose was used as a fucose donor in a fucosyltransferase assay converting sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine to sialyl Lewis X.

  18. Synthesis of 1,2,3-Triazolo[4,5-h]quinolone Derivatives with Novel Anti-Microbial Properties against Metronidazole Resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Sini, Mohammad; Mayyas, Amal; Al-Karablieh, Nehaya; Darwish, Rula; Al-Hiari, Yusuf; Aburjai, Talal; Arabiyat, Shereen; Abu-Qatouseh, Luay

    2017-05-20

    Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to gastritis, peptic ulcer, and the development of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Treatment and eradication of H. pylori infection can prevent relapse and accelerate the healing of gastric and duodenal ulcers as well as regression of malignancy. Due to the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates of H. pylori, alternative approaches using newly discovered antimicrobial agents in combination with the standard antibiotic regimens for the treatment of H. pylori are of major importance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of newly synthesized 8-amino 7-substituted fluoroquinolone and their correspondent cyclized triazolo derivatives when either alone or combined with metronidazole against metronidazole-resistant H. pylori. Based on standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and checkerboard titration assay, all of the tested compounds showed interesting antimicrobial activity against 12 clinical strains of H. pylori, with best in vitro effect for compounds 4b and 4c. Fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) mean values showed synergistic pattern in all compounds of Group 5. In addition, additive activities of some of the tested compounds of Group 4 were observed when combined with metronidazole. In contrast, the tested compounds showed no significant urease inhibition activity. These results support the potential of new fluoroquinolone derivatives to be useful in combination with anti-H. pylori drugs in the management of H. pylori-associated diseases.

  19. Regulation of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) induced apoptosis by soluble TNF receptors in Helicobacter pylori infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, J; Goto, H.; Arisawa, T.; Niwa, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Nakayama, A.; Mori, N.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a predominant cytokine produced in the gastric mucosa of patients with Helicobacter pylori infection. TNF induces apoptosis in a variety of cells. The soluble TNF receptors (sTNF-Rs) can be divided into sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII, both of which inhibit TNF activity. However, their precise mechanisms remain unclear.
AIM—To investigate the role of sTNF-Rs in H pylori infection.
METHODS—In 40 patients, production of TNF and sTNF-Rs in gastric mucosa was measu...

  20. Helicobacter pylori susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy differ in the maturation and activation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitar, Andreja N; Skvarc, Miha; Tepes, Bojan; Kos, Janko; Ihan, Alojz

    2013-12-01

    The natural course of Helicobacter pylori infection, as well as the success of antibiotic eradication is determined by the immune response to bacteria. The aim of the study is to investigate how different Helicobacter pylori isolates influence the dendritic cells maturation and antigen-presenting function in order to elucidate the differences between Helicobacter pylori strains, isolated from the patients with successful antibiotic eradication therapy or repeated eradication failure. Dendritic cells maturation and antigen presentation were monitored by flow cytometry analysis of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and costimulatory molecules expression, and by determining cytokine secretion. Dendritic cells stimulated with Helicobacter pylori isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure expressed less human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), CD86, TLR-2, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy; the latter expressed lower production of IL-10. Polymyxin B inhibition of lipopolysaccharide reduces IL-8 secretion in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy. The differences in IL-8 secretion between both groups are lipopolysaccharide dependent, while the differences in secretion of IL-10 remain unchanged after lipopolysaccharide inhibition. Inhibitor of cathepsin X Mab 2F12 reduced the secretion of IL-6, and the secretion was significantly lower in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure. Helicobacter pylori strains, susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy, differ in their capability to induce DCs maturation and antigen-presenting function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Essential role of ferritin Pfr in Helicobacter pylori iron metabolism and gastric colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waidner, Barbara; Greiner, Stefan; Odenbreit, Stefan; Kavermann, Holger; Velayudhan, Jyoti; Stähler, Frank; Guhl, Johannes; Bissé, Emmanuel; van Vliet, Arnoud H M; Andrews, Simon C; Kusters, Johannes G; Kelly, David J; Haas, Rainer; Kist, Manfred; Bereswill, Stefan

    2002-07-01

    The reactivity of the essential element iron necessitates a concerted expression of ferritins, which mediate iron storage in a nonreactive state. Here we have further established the role of the Helicobacter pylori ferritin Pfr in iron metabolism and gastric colonization. Iron stored in Pfr enabled H. pylori to multiply under severe iron starvation and protected the bacteria from acid-amplified iron toxicity, as inactivation of the pfr gene restricted growth of H. pylori under these conditions. The lowered total iron content in the pfr mutant, which is probably caused by decreased iron uptake rates, was also reflected by an increased resistance to superoxide stress. Iron induction of Pfr synthesis was clearly diminished in an H. pylori feoB mutant, which lacked high-affinity ferrous iron transport, confirming that Pfr expression is mediated by changes in the cytoplasmic iron pool and not by extracellular iron. This is well in agreement with the recent discovery that iron induces Pfr synthesis by abolishing Fur-mediated repression of pfr transcription, which was further confirmed here by the observation that iron inhibited the in vitro binding of recombinant H. pylori Fur to the pfr promoter region. The functions of H. pylori Pfr in iron metabolism are essential for survival in the gastric mucosa, as the pfr mutant was unable to colonize in a Mongolian gerbil-based animal model. In summary, the pfr phenotypes observed give new insights into prokaryotic ferritin functions and indicate that iron storage and homeostasis are of extraordinary importance for H. pylori to survive in its hostile natural environment.

  2. Transcriptional profiling of gastric epithelial cells infected with wild type or arginase-deficient Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Songhee H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori causes acute and chronic gastric inflammation induced by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines secreted by cells of the gastric mucosa, including gastric epithelial cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the bacterial arginase, RocF, is involved in inhibiting T cell proliferation and CD3ζ expression, suggesting that arginase could be involved in a more general dampening of the immune response, perhaps by down-regulation of certain pro-inflammatory mediators. Results Global transcriptome analysis was performed on AGS gastric epithelial cells infected for 16 hours with a wild type Helicobacter pylori strain 26695, an arginase mutant (rocF- or a rocF+ complemented strain. H. pylori infection triggered altered host gene expression in genes involved in cell movement, death/growth/proliferation, and cellular function and maintenance. While the wild type strain stimulates host inflammatory pathways, the rocF- mutant induced significantly more expression of IL-8. The results of the microarray were verified using real-time PCR, and the differential levels of protein expression were confirmed by ELISA and Bioplex analysis. MIP-1B was also significantly secreted by AGS cells after H. pylori rocF- mutant infection, as determined by Bioplex. Even though not explored in this manuscript, the impact that the results presented here may have on the development of gastritis, warrant further research to understand the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between H. pylori RocF and IL-8 induction. Conclusions We conclude that H. pylori arginase modulates multiple host signaling and metabolic pathways of infected gastric epithelial cells. Arginase may play a critical role in anti-inflammatory host responses that could contribute to the ability of H. pylori to establish chronic infections.

  3. Identification of novel Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent genes in Helicobacter pylori infection in vivo

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    Wiedenmann Bertram

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a crucial determining factor in the pathogenesis of benign and neoplastic gastric diseases. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 is the inducible key enzyme of arachidonic acid metabolism and is a central mediator in inflammation and cancer. Expression of the Cox-2 gene is up-regulated in the gastric mucosa during H. pylori infection but the pathobiological consequences of this enhanced Cox-2 expression are not yet characterized. The aim of this study was to identify novel genes down-stream of Cox-2 in an in vivo model, thereby identifying potential targets for the study of the role of Cox- 2 in H. pylori pathogenesis and the initiation of pre- cancerous changes. Results Gene expression profiles in the gastric mucosa of mice treated with a specific Cox-2 inhibitor (NS398 or vehicle were analysed at different time points (6, 13 and 19 wk after H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection affected the expression of 385 genes over the experimental period, including regulators of gastric physiology, proliferation, apoptosis and mucosal defence. Under conditions of Cox-2 inhibition, 160 target genes were regulated as a result of H. pylori infection. The Cox-2 dependent subset included those influencing gastric physiology (Gastrin, Galr1, epithelial barrier function (Tjp1, connexin45, Aqp5, inflammation (Icam1, apoptosis (Clu and proliferation (Gdf3, Igf2. Treatment with NS398 alone caused differential expression of 140 genes, 97 of which were unique, indicating that these genes are regulated under conditions of basal Cox-2 expression. Conclusion This study has identified a panel of novel Cox-2 dependent genes influenced under both normal and the inflammatory conditions induced by H. pylori infection. These data provide important new links between Cox-2 and inflammatory processes, epithelial repair and integrity.

  4. In vitro activity of Aloe vera inner gel against Helicobacter pylori strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, L; Di Bartolomeo, S; Di Campli, E; Genovese, S; Locatelli, M; Di Giulio, M

    2014-07-01

    Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) is a herbal remedy widely used for a variety of illnesses; A. vera leaf extracts have been promoted for detoxification, cure constipation, help flush out toxins and wastes from the body, promote digestion and are used in the treatment of peptic ulcer for cytoprotective action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of A. vera inner gel against both susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains isolated in Abruzzo region, Italy. The inner gel of leaves of a 5-year-old plant of A. vera was extracted, homogenized and tested from 800 to 1.56 mg ml(-1) against 14 clinical strains and one reference strain of H. pylori using the broth microdilution methodology. Furthermore, the sample of A. vera was investigated for the chemical fingerprint of anthraquinones. The inhibitory concentrations of A. vera inner gel were similar to the bactericidal ones, with values ranging from 6.25 to 800 mg ml(-1) . Fifty per cent of the detected strains, independently of their susceptibility profile, were inhibited in their growth at 100 mg ml(-1) . Aloe vera inner gel expresses antibacterial properties against H. pylori and, therefore, in combination with antibiotics, could represent a novel strategy for the treatment of the infection of H. pylori, especially in cases of multiresistance. The study demonstrates that the Aloe vera inner gel expresses antibacterial properties against both susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains. These findings may impact on the antimicrobial resistance phenomenon of H. pylori, proposing the A. vera inner gel as a novel effective natural agent for combination with antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori gastric infection. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Recombinant human lactoferrin enhances the efficacy of triple therapy in mice infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuping; Wu, Qinyi; Cheng, Guoxiang; Liu, Xuefang; Liu, Siguo; Luo, Juan; Zhang, Aimin; Bian, Li; Chen, Jianquan; Lv, Jiajun; Dong, Xiangqian; Yang, Gang; Zhu, Yunzhen; Ma, Lanqing

    2015-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a life-threatening pathogen which causes chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and even stomach cancer. Treatment normally involves bacterial eradication; however, this type of treatment only has a rate of effectiveness of <80%. Thus, it is a matter of some urgency to develop new therapeutic strategies. Lactoferrin, a member of the transferrin family of iron-binding proteins, has been proven to be effective in removing a vast range of pathogens, including H. pylori. In the present study, we examined the effectiveness of recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLf) isolated from transgenic goats as a treatment for H. pylori in vitro and in vivo. For the in vivo experiments, BALB/c mice received an intragastric administration of 0.1 ml of a suspension of H. pylori. The mice were then divided into 4 groups: group A, treated with saline; group B, treated with 1.5 g of rhLF; group C, treated with the standard triple therapy regimen; and group D, treated with the standard triple therapy regimen plus.5 g of rhLF. Following sacrifice, the stomach tissues of the mice were histologically examined for the presence of bacteria. For the in vitro experiments, the bacteria were cultured in BHI broth and RT-qPCR and western blot analysis were carried out to determine the mRNA and protein levels of virulence factors (CagA and VacA) in the cultures. Our results revealed that rhLf not only inhibited the growth of H. pylori, but also suppressed the expression of two major virulence factors. Moreover, rhLf markedly increased bacterial eradication and effectively reduced the inflammatory response when combined with the standard triple therapy regimen. These results provide evidence supporting the use of rhLF as an adjuvant to traditional therapeutic strategies in the treatment of H. pylori.

  6. Helicobacter Pylori Seropostivity of Colon Cancer

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    F. Tugba Kos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Until now many researches have showed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be etiological factor of colorectal cancer. The aim of current study was to investigate the frequency of H.pylori infection seropositivity of colorectal cancer patients and compare the clinicopathological features of H.pylori positive patients with negative ones. Material and Method: Seventy four colorectal patients were included in study. Retrospectively, patients clinical features, surgery history and pathological characteristics were screened. Patients group serum samples were collected. H.pylori Ig G level were quantitatively measured with ELISA method and levels above 5 arbU/ml were accepted as seropositive. Results: Patients median age was 60.5 ( range 26-83 and 56.8% (n=42 were male. H.pylori Ig G was positive in 37.8% (n=28 and negative in 62.2% (n=46 of patient group. H.pylori serpositive and negative patients median age of diagnosis were 56 and 64 respectively (p=0.01. There were no significant difference between H.pylori seropositive group when compared with negative group according to age, level of CEA and Ca 19-9, stage, lymph node involvement, perineural and vascular invasion, presence of polyps, differantion, localisation of tumours. Discussion: H.pylori seropositive patients were diagnosed at younger age. Association of this finding with etiology was confusing. Further studies with healthy controls may provide detailed information about whether H.pylori seropositivity is associated with colorectal cancer etiology.

  7. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

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    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  8. 3rd Brazilian Consensus on Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga; Maguinilk, Ismael; Zaterka, Schlioma; Parente, José Miguel; do Carmo Friche Passos, Maria; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2013-04-01

    Signicant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  9. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection Angiogénesis gástrica e infección por Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  10. Helicobacter pylori VacA suppresses Lactobacillus acidophilus-induced interferon beta signaling in macrophages via alterations in the endocytic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Gudrun; Forster, Sam; Irving, Aaron; Tate, Michelle; Ferrero, Richard L; Hertzog, Paul; Frøkiær, Hanne; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria

    2013-06-11

    Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis and avoids elimination by the immune system of the infected host. The commensal bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus has been suggested to exert beneficial effects as a supplement during H. pylori eradication therapy. In the present study, we applied whole-genome microarray analysis to compare the immune responses induced in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with L. acidophilus, H. pylori, or both bacteria in combination. While L. acidophilus induced a Th1-polarizing response characterized by high expression of interferon beta (IFN-β) and interleukin 12 (IL-12), H. pylori strongly induced the innate cytokines IL-1β and IL-1α. In BMDMs prestimulated with L. acidophilus, H. pylori blocked the expression of L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β and IL-12 and suppressed the expression of key regulators of the Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 GTPases. The inhibition of L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β was independent of H. pylori viability and the virulence factor CagPAI; however, a vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) mutant was unable to block IFN-β. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the addition of H. pylori to L. acidophilus-stimulated BMDMs redirects intracellular processing, leading to an accumulation of L. acidophilus in the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. Thus, our findings indicate that H. pylori inhibits the development of a strong Th1-polarizing response in BMDMs stimulated with L. acidophilus by blocking the production of IFN-β in a VacA-dependent manner. We suggest that this abrogation is caused by a redirection of the endocytotic pathway in the processing of L. acidophilus. IMPORTANCE Approximately half of the world's population is infected with Helicobacter pylori. The factors that allow this pathogen to persist in the stomach and cause chronic infections have not yet been fully elucidated. In particular, how H. pylori avoids killing by macrophages, one of the main types of immune cell underlying the

  11. Helicobacter pylori: epidemiology and routes of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L M

    2000-01-01

    H. pylori is a common bacterium, and approximately 50 percent of the world's population has been estimated to be infected (198). Humans are the principal reservoir. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, race, ethnicity, and SES. Rates appear to be higher in developing than in developed countries, with most of the infections occurring during childhood, and they seem to be decreasing with improvements in hygiene practices. H. pylori causes chronic gastritis and has been associated with several serious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer. Since its "discovery" in 1982 by Warren and Marshall (1), H. pylori has been the topic of extensive research. A number of studies have used questionnaire components to investigate factors possibly related to the etiology of H. pylori infection. The majority of recent studies have not found tobacco use or alcohol consumption to be risk factors for H. pylori infection. Adequate nutritional status, especially frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables and of vitamin C, appears to protect against infection with H. pylori. In contrast, food prepared under less than ideal conditions or exposed to contaminated water or soil may increase the risk. Overall, inadequate sanitation practices, low social class, and crowded or high-density living conditions seem to be related to a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection. This finding suggests that poor hygiene and crowded conditions may facilitate transmission of infection among family members and is consistent with data on intrafamilial and institutional clustering of H. pylori infection. Understanding the route of H. pylori transmission is important if public health measures to prevent its spread are to be implemented. Iatrogenic transmission of H. pylori following endoscopy is the only proven mode. For the general population, the most likely mode of transmission is from person to person, by either the

  12. H pylori stimulates proliferation of gastric cancer cells through activating mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Chang Chen; Ying Wang; Jing-Yan Li; Wen-Rong Xu; You-Li Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the mechanism by which H pylori causes activation of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: A VacA (+) and CagA (+) standard Hpyloriline NCTC 11637 and a human gastric adenocarcinoma derived gastric epithelial cell line BGC-823 were applied in the study. MTT assay and 3H-TdR incorporation test were used to detect the proliferation of BGC-823 cells and Western blotting was used to detect the activity and existence of related proteins.RESULTS: Incubation with Hpylori extract increased the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, reflected by both live cell number and DNA synthesis rate. The activity of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signal transduction cascade increased within 20 min after incubation with Hpylori extract and appeared to be a sustained event. MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059abolished the action of H pylori extract on both ERK activity and cell proliferation. Incubation with H pyloriextract increased c-Fos expression and SRE-dependentgene expression. H pylori extract caused phosphorylation of several proteins including a protein with molecular size of 97.4 kDa and tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibited the activation of ERK and the proliferation of cells caused by H pylori extract.CONCLUSION: Biologically active elements in H pylori extract cause proliferation of gastric epithelial cells through activating tyrosine kinase and ERK signal transduction cascade.

  13. Regulation of Noxa-mediated apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Suvasmita; Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Pratheek, B M; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Goswami, Chandan; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) in human gastric epithelial cells (GECs). Apoptosis of oncogenic protein Mcl1-expressing cells is mainly regulated by Noxa-mediated degradation of Mcl1. We wanted to elucidate the status of Noxa in H. pylori-infected GECs. For this, various GECs such as AGS, MKN45, and KATO III were either infected with H. pylori or left uninfected. The effect of infection was examined by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, in vitro binding assay, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. Infected GECs, surgical samples collected from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma as well as biopsy samples from patients infected with H. pylori showed significant up-regulation of both Mcl1 and Noxa compared with noninfected samples. Coexistence of Mcl1 and Noxa was indicative of an impaired Mcl-Noxa interaction. We proved that Noxa was phosphorylated at Ser(13) residue by JNK in infected GECs, which caused cytoplasmic retention of Noxa. JNK inhibition enhanced Mcl1-Noxa interaction in the mitochondrial fraction of infected cells, whereas overexpression of nonphosphorylatable Noxa resulted in enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in the infected epithelium. Because phosphorylation-dephosphorylation can regulate the apoptotic function of Noxa, this could be a potential target molecule for future treatment approaches for H. pylori-induced gastric cancer.

  14. Isolation and characterisation of putative adhesins from Helicobacter pylori with affinity for heparan sulphate proteoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Bustos, E; Ochoa, J L; Wadström, T; Ascencio, F

    2001-03-01

    A pool of heparan sulphate-binding proteins (HSBPs) from Helicobacter pylori culture supernates was obtained by sequential ammonium sulphate precipitation and affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose. The chromatographic procedure yielded one major fraction that contained proteins with heparan sulphate affinity as revealed by inhibition studies of heparan sulphate binding to H. pylori cells. Preparative iso-electric focusing, SDS-PAGE and blotting experiments, with peroxidase(POD)-labelled heparan sulphate as a probe, indicated the presence of two major extracellular proteins with POD-heparan sulphate affinity. One protein had a molecular mass of 66.2 kDa and a pI of 5.4, whilst the second protein had a molecular mass of 71.5 kDa and a pI of 5.0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 71.5-kDa HSBP did not show homology to any other heparin-binding protein, nor to known proteins of H. pylori, whereas the 66.2-kDa HSBP showed a high homology to an Escherichia coli chaperon protein and equine haemoglobin. A third HSBP was isolated from an outer-membrane protein (OMP) fraction of H. pylori cells with a molecular mass of 47.2 kDa. The amino acid sequence of an internal peptide of the OMP-HSBP did not show homology to the extracellular HSBP of H. pylori, or to another microbial HSBP.

  15. Methods to monitor autophagy in H. pylori vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA)-treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Deepa; Jones, Nicola L

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram negative pathogen that infects at least half of the world's population and is associated not only with gastric cancer but also with other diseases such as gastritis and peptic ulcers. Indeed, H. pylori is considered the single most important risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. The vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, secreted by H. pylori, promotes intracellular survival of the bacterium and modulates host immune responses. In a recent study, we reported that VacA induces autophagy. Multilamellar autophagosomes are detected in gastric epithelial cells that are distinct from the large vacuoles formed by VacA. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy stabilizes VacA and reduces vacuolation in the cells indicating that the toxin is being degraded by autophagy, thus limiting toxin-induced host cell damage. Many of the methods that were used for this study are commonly employed techniques that were adapted for H. pylori infection and VacA intoxication. In this paper, we describe the various methods and specific protocols used for the assessment and monitoring of autophagy during H. pylori infection.

  16. Antimicrobial activities of Eugenol and Cinnamaldehyde against the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khaja S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eradication of Helicobacter pylori is an important objective in overcoming gastric diseases. Many regimens are currently available but none of them could achieve 100% success in eradication. Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde that are commonly used in various food preparations are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria. Aim The present study was performed to assess the in vitro effects of eugenol and cinnamaldehyde against indigenous and standard H. pylori strains, their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs and time course lethal effects at various pH. Methods A total of 31 strains (29 indigenous and one standard strain of H. pylori ATCC 26695, one strain of E. coli NCIM 2089 were screened. Agar dilution method was used for the determination of drug sensitivity patterns of isolates to the commonly used antibiotics and broth dilution method for the test compounds. Results Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibited the growth of all the 30 H. pylori strains tested, at a concentration of 2 μg/ml, in the 9th and 12th hours of incubation respectively. At acidic pH, increased activity was observed for both the compounds. Furthermore, the organism did not develop any resistance towards these compounds even after 10 passages grown at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Conclusion These results indicate that the two bioactive compounds we tested may prevent H. pylori growth in vitro, without acquiring any resistance.

  17. The immunomodulatory properties of Helicobacter pylori confer protection against allergic and chronic inflammatory disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eMüller

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic infection with the gastric bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes gastritis and predisposes carriers to a high risk of developing gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, but has also recently been shown to protect against certain allergic and chronic inflammatory disorders. The immunomodulatory properties that allow the bacteria to persist for decades in infected individuals in the face of a vigorous, yet ultimately non-protective, innate and adaptive immune response may at the same time confer protection against allergies, asthma and inflammatory bowel diseases. Experimental evidence from mouse models suggests that H. pylori has evolved to skew the adaptive immune response towards immune tolerance rather than immunity, which promotes persistent infection on the one hand, and inhibits auto-aggressive and allergic T-cell responses on the other. Regulatory T-cells mediating peripheral immune tolerance have emerged as key cellular players in facilitating persistent infection as well as protection from allergies, in both observational studies in humans and experimental work in mice. Recent data suggest that H. pylori actively targets dendritic cells to promote tolerance induction. The findings discussed in this review raise the possibility of harnessing the immunomodulatory properties of H. pylori for the prevention and treatment of allergic and auto-immune diseases, and also provide new insights relevant for H. pylori-specific vaccine development.

  18. Inhibitory Effects of Polaprezine on the Inflammatory Response to Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Handa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori-infected gastrointestinal mucosa is frequently infiltrated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN and monocytes, and these invading cells have been implicated in gastrointestinal mucosal inflammation. To clarify the efficacy of polaprezinc, a chelate compound consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, against H pylori-induced inflammation including PMN infiltration, the in vitro effects of this drug on interleukin (IL-8 production by an established gastric cancer cell line (MKN 45 cells and on PMN-endothelial cell adhesive interactions was investigated. Polaprezinc and zinc sulphate inhibited IL-8 production by MKN 45 cells in response to stimulation with H pylori water extract (HPE in a dose-dependent manner from 10-7 M to 10-5 M. In addition, the expression of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and PMN-dependent adhesion to endothelial cells elicited by HPE was inhibited by polaprezinc and zinc sulphate in a concentration-dependent manner. L-carnosine did not have any effects on IL-8 production or PMN-endothelial cell interactions. These results suggest that polaprezinc, mainly the zinc component, may inhibit H pylori-induced PMN-mediated gastric inflammation by attenuating CD11b/CD18 expression on PMN and IL-8 production from gastric epithelial cells.

  19. Oxidative and nitrosative stress enzymes in relation to nitrotyrosine in Helicobacter pylori-infected humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anders; Elfvin; Anders; Edebo; Peter; Hallersund; Anna; Casselbrant; Lars; Fndriks

    2014-01-01

    formation, Western blot did not show any significant increase or decrease compared to controls, 7.0 ± 0.9 vs 6.9 ± 1.1, not significant.CONCLUSION: iNOS, MPO and NADPH-oxidase was up-regulated among H. pylori infected. Regarding nitrotyrosine no difference was found. This support an H. pylori related inhibition of radical formation.

  20. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John K C

    2016-01-14

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization.

  1. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  2. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Vania; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Touati, Eliette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the most commonly found infection in the world's population. It is the major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Numerous studies published over the last year provide new insights into the strategies employed by H. pylori to adapt to the extreme acidic conditions of the gastric environment, to establish persistent infection and to deregulate host functions, leading to gastric pathogenesis and cancer. In this review, we report recent data on the mechanisms involved in chemotaxis, on the essential role of nickel in acid resistance and gastric colonization, on the importance of adhesins and Hop proteins and on the role of CagPAI-components and CagA. Among the host functions, a special focus has been made on the escape from immune response, the ability of bacteria to induce genetic instability and modulate telomeres, the mechanism of autophagy and the deregulation of micro RNAs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Immune response to H pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes; Ellen J Beswick

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer,attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferrit...

  5. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  6. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  7. Helicobacter pylori: From Infection to Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 380 abstracts, presentations and posters of recent advances were highlighted at the European and International Helicobacter pylori meeting held July 7 to 9, 1995 in Edinburgh, Scotland. New advances abound, with major interest focusing on the simple, safe, inexpensive new `gold standard’ for H pylori eradication therapy: a single week of tid omeprazole 20 mg, metronidazole 400 mg and clarithromycin 250 mg, or omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg and clarithromycin 500 mg. To avoid false negative results, two biopsies must be taken from the antrum and two from the gastric body at least four weeks after completion of eradication therapy, and ideally should be supplemented with at least one further H pylori test such as a biopsy for urease activity or culture, or a urea breath test. While most patients with a gastric or duodenal ulcer (DU who do not consume nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are infected with H pylori, the association is much less apparent in those with a DU who present with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. H pylori eradication for nonulcer dyspepsia is not widely recommended, and the patient with a DU given effective H pylori eradication who presents with dyspepsia likely has erosive esophagitis rather than recurrent DU or H pylori. Gastroenterologists are at increased risk of H pylori infection, particularly older gastroenterologists who are very busy endoscopists.

  8. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takahisa; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    It is well known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with many nonmalignant disorders such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric polyp, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin-induced gastric injury, and functional dyspepsia. In 2008, interesting articles on the association of H. pylori infection with these disorders were presented, some of which intended to reveal the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in response to H. pylori infection, and have demonstrated that genetic differences in host and bacterial factors as well as environmental factors account for these differences. A decline in the occurrence of peptic ulcer related to H. pylori was confirmed. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and GERD was also confirmed but the impact of gastric atrophy on the prevention of GERD remained debatable. For NSAID-induced gastric injury, eradication of H. pylori infection has been recommended. During this year, eradication of H. pylori infection was recommended for patients treated with antiplatelet therapy as well as aspirin and NSAID. It was also reported that for patients with functional dyspepsia, eradication of H. pylori offers a modest but significant benefit.

  9. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host. PMID:28652651

  10. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18...

  11. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-06-14

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host.

  12. ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF STARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Reyna M., L.; Facultad de Química e ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima-Perú; Robles, R.; Facultad de Química e ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima-Perú; Reyes P., M.; Facultad de Química e ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima-Perú; Mendoza R., Y.; Facultad de Química e ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima-Perú; Romero D., J.; Facultad de Química e ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima-Perú

    2014-01-01

    We obtained rate constant for enzymatic hydrolysis of barley at temperature of 70 ºC. Se ha llevado a cabo la hidrólisis enzimática de la cebada a 70 ºC y se determinó la constante cinética de reacción.

  13. Enzymatic synthesis of vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, RHH; Fraaije, MW; Laane, C; van Berkel, WJH; Heuvel, Robert H.H. van den; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    2001-01-01

    Due to increasing interest in natural vanillin, two enzymatic routes for the synthesis of vanillin were developed. The flavoprotein vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO) acts on a wide range of phenolic compounds and converts both creosol and vanillylamine to vanillin with high yield. The VAO-mediated conv

  14. Antiadhesion and anti-inflammation effects of noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit extracts on AGS cells during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Lun; Ko, Chien-Hui; Yan, Yeong-Yu; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2014-03-19

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen that adheres to host cells and injects cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8), inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Noni (Morinda citrifolia) is found to possess antibacteria, anti-inflammation, and antioxidation activities, but its effect on H. pylori infection is still unknown. Ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of noni fruit were used in this study. The inhibitory effect on CagA and H. pylori-induced IL-8, iNOS, and COX-2 were determined. The coculture medium was collected for measuring neutrophil chemotaxis. Both extracts of noni fruit showed weak inhibition on H. pylori. Both ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts provided antiadhesion of H. pylori to AGS cells and down-regulation on the CagA, IL-8, COX-2, and iNOS expressions. Results also indicated both extracts relieved neutrophil chemotaxis. Noni fruit extracts down-regulated inflammatory responses during H. pylori infection, and the phenolic compounds play key role in antiadhesion.

  15. Helicobacter pylori therapy:Present and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo; De; Francesco; Enzo; Ierardi; Cesare; Hassan; Angelo; Zullo

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis,peptic ulcer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-lymphoma,and is also involved in carcinogenesis of the stomach.H.pylori treatment still remains a challenge for physicians,since no current first-line therapy is able to cure the infection in all treated patients.Several factors may help in the eradication of therapy failure.We reviewed both bacterial and host factors involved in therapeutic management of the H.pylori infection.In addition,we evaluated data on the most successful therapy regimens-sequential and concomitant therapies-currently available for H.pylori eradication.

  16. Role of Helicobacter pylori in functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colm O'Morain

    2006-01-01

    The aetiology of dyspepsia is unknown in the majority of patients. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) is the cause in a subset of patients. A non invasive test to assess the presence of H pylori is recommended in the management of patients under the age of 50 presenting to a family practitioner with dyspepsia. A urea breath test or a stool antigen test are the most reliable non invasive tests. Eradication of H pylori will reduce the risk to the patient with dyspepsia of developing a peptic ulcer, reduce the complication rate if prescribed nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and later reduce the risk of gastric cancer. The recommended treatment for non ulcer dyspepsia associated with a H pylori infection should be a 10-d course of treatment with a PPI and two antibiotics. Treatment efficacy should be assessed four weeks after completing treatment with a urea breath test or a stool antigen test.

  17. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  18. Design and evaluation of novel pH-sensitive ureido-conjugated chitosan/TPP nanoparticles targeted to Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Zi-Wei; Jia, Yi-Yang; Wan, Ning; Luo, Min; Huan, Meng-Lei; Kang, Tai-Bin; Zhou, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Bang-Le

    2016-04-01

    The covalently modified ureido-conjugated chitosan/TPP multifunctional nanoparticles have been developed as targeted nanomedicine delivery system for eradication of Helicobacter pylori. H. pylori can specifically express the urea transport protein on its membrane to transport urea into cytoplasm for urease to produce ammonia, which protects the bacterium in the acid milieu of stomach. The clinical applicability of topical antimicrobial agent is needed to eradicate H. pylori in the infected fundal area. In this study, we designed and synthesized two ureido-conjugated chitosan derivatives UCCs-1 and UCCs-2 for preparation of multifunctional nanoparticles. The process was optimized in order to prepare UCCs/TPP nanoparticles for encapsulation of amoxicillin. The results showed that the amoxicillin-UCCs/TPP nanoparticles exhibited favorable pH-sensitive characteristics, which could procrastinate the release of amoxicillin at gastric acids and enable the drug to deliver and target to H. pylori at its survival region effectively. Compared with unmodified amoxicillin-chitosan/TPP nanoparticles, a more specific and effective H. pylori growth inhibition was observed for amoxicillin-UCCs/TPP nanoparticles. Drug uptake analysis tested by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy verified that the uptake of FITC-UCCs-2/TPP nanoparticles was associated with urea transport protein on the membrane of H. pylori and reduced with the addition of urea as competitive transport substrate. These findings suggest that the multifunctional amoxicillin-loaded nanoparticles have great potential for effective therapy of H. pylori infection. They may also serve as pharmacologically effective nanocarriers for oral targeted delivery of other therapeutic drugs to treat H. pylori.

  19. 3-Arylpropionylhydroxamic acid derivatives as Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitors: Synthesis, molecular docking and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Kang; Deng, Rui-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Fei; Yue, Qin-Qin; Liu, Qi; Ding, Kun-Ling; Yang, Mei-Hui; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Gong, Si-Hua; Deng, Min; Liu, Wen-Run; Feng, Qiu-Ju; Xiao, Zhu-Ping; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori urease is involved in several physiologic responses such as stomach and duodenal ulcers, adenocarcinomas and stomach lymphomas. Thus, inhibition of urease is taken for a good chance to treat H. pylori-caused infections, we have therefore focused our efforts on seeking novel urease inhibitors. Here, a series of arylpropionylhydroxamic acids were synthesized and evaluated for urease inhibition. Out of these compounds, 3-(2-benzyloxy-5-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxypropionylhydroxamic acid (d24) was the most active inhibitor with IC50 of 0.15±0.05μM, showing a mixed inhibition with both competitive and uncompetitive aspects. Non-linear fitting of kinetic data gives kinetics parameters of 0.13 and 0.12μg·mL(-1) for Ki and Ki', respectively. The plasma protein binding assays suggested that d24 exhibited moderate binding to human and rabbit plasma proteins.

  20. Helicobacter pylori and pregnancy-related disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaropoli, Simona; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is investigated in gastric diseases even during pregnancy. In particular, this Gram-negative bacterium seems to be associated with hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. During the last decade, the relationship among H. pylori and several extra-gastric diseases strongly emerged in literature. The correlation among H. pylori infection and pregnancy-related disorders was mainly focused on iron deficiency anemia, thrombocytopenia, fetal malformations, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. H. pylori infection may have a role in the pathogenesis of various pregnancy-related disorders through different mechanisms: depletion of micronutrients (iron and vitamin B12) in maternal anemia and fetal neural tube defects; local or systemic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines release and oxidative stress in gastrointestinal disorders and pre-eclampsia; cross-reaction between specific anti-H. pylori antibodies and antigens localized in placental tissue and endothelial cells (pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, miscarriage). Since H. pylori infection is most likely acquired before pregnancy, it is widely believed that hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy could activate latent H. pylori with a negative impact not only on maternal health (nutritional deficiency, organ injury, death), but also on the fetus (insufficient growth, malformation, death) and sometime consequences can be observed later in life. Another important issue addressed by investigators was to determine whether it is possible to transmit H. pylori infection from mother to child and whether maternal anti-H. pylori antibodies could prevent infant’s infection. Studies on novel diagnostic and therapeutic methods for H. pylori are no less important, since these are particularly sensitive topics in pregnancy conditions. It could be interesting to study the possible correlation between H

  1. Efficacy of tailored Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment based on clarithromycin susceptibility and maintenance of acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Uotani, Takahiro; Sahara, Shu; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Yamade, Mihoko; Sugimoto, Ken; Furuta, Takahisa

    2014-08-01

    Insufficient acid inhibition during Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment and bacterial resistance to antibiotics often causes eradication failure. Four times daily dosing (q.i.d.) of a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) achieves potent acid inhibition, suggesting its potential usefulness as a regimen for eradicating H. pylori infection. Therefore, a tailored eradication regimen based on antibiotic susceptibility and maintenance of acid inhibition should have a high success rate. We investigated the efficacy of such treatment based on clarithromycin (CAM) susceptibility. Using 153 H. pylori-positive Japanese patients, we investigated the efficacy of tailored eradication strategy: (1) Patients infected with CAM-sensitive H. pylori were treated with a PPI (rabeprazole 10 mg q.i.d.), amoxicillin 500 mg q.i.d., and CAM 200 mg b.i.d. (n = 89), and (2) patients infected with CAM-resistant were given the same doses of rabeprazole and amoxicillin and metronidazole 250 mg b.i.d. (n = 64) for 1 week. In the tailored regimen group, the overall eradication rate was 96.7% (95% CI: 92.5-98.9%, 148/153) in the intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis and 97.4% (93.4-99.3%, 148/152) in the PP analysis. The eradication rates for the CAM- and metronidazole-based treatments were similar (95.5% and 98.4%, respectively, p = .400). The tailored treatment achieved a high eradication rate in CYP2C19 rapid metabolizers who were a resistance genotype for PPI treatment (94.3% (86.0-98.4%, 66/70)). A tailored H. pylori eradication regimen based on CAM susceptibility and maintaining acid secretion (rabeprazole 10 mg q.i.d.) is useful because it can achieve an eradication rate exceeding 95%, irrespective of eradication history, thus overcoming differences among CYP2C19 genotypes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Phenolic acids enzymatic lipophilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Espinoza, Maria-Cruz; Villeneuve, Pierre

    2005-04-20

    Lipophilization is the esterification of a lipophilic moiety (fatty acid or fatty alcohol) on different substrates (phenolic acid, sugar, protein, ...), resulting in new molecules with modified hydrophilic/lipophilic balance. This reaction can be obtained chemically or enzymatically using different enzymes. Phenolic acids possess interesting biological properties (antioxidant, chelator, free radical scavenger, UV filter, antimicrobial, ...), but because of their relatively low solubility in aprotic media, their application in oil-based products is limited. Therefore, the esterification of their carboxylic acid function with a fatty alcohol enhances their hydrophobicity and results in a multifunctional amphiphilic molecule. Enzymatic lipophilization of phenolic acids is nowadays studied for potential industrial applications. Different systems have been proposed to perform the reaction yield [free or immobilized enzymes (lipase, feruloyl esterase, tannase, etc.), free or added organic solvent, addition of surfactant, microemulsion system, etc.]. Some of the functional properties of these esters have been demonstrated. This review presents a panorama of the advances in this field.

  3. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.

    1991-05-16

    The overall objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of an enzymatic desulfurization process specifically intended for organic sulfur removal from coal. Toward that end, a series of specific objectives were defined: (1) establish the feasibility of (bio)oxidative pretreatment followed by biochemical sulfate cleavage for representative sulfur-containing model compounds and coals using commercially-available enzymes; (2) investigate the potential for the isolation and selective use of enzyme preparations from coal-utilizing microbial systems for desulfurization of sulfur-containing model compounds and coals; and (3) develop a conceptual design and economic analysis of a process for enzymatic removal of organic sulfur from coal. Within the scope of this program, it was proposed to carry out a portion of each of these efforts concurrently. (VC)

  4. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Lignocelluloses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolasa, Marta; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2010-01-01

    bonds. Cellulose can be degraded to simple sugar components by means of enzymatic hydrolysis. However, due to its complex, crystalline structure it is difficult to break it down and the cooperative action of a variety of cellulolytic enzymes is necessary. Fungi are known to have potential in production......Lignocellulosic materials form a huge part of the plant biomass from agricultural and forestry wastes. They consist of three major components: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Cellulose, the main constituent of plant cell wall, is a polymer of D–glucopyranose units linked by β-1,4-glucosidic...... of a variety of cellulolytic enzymes. The aim of this work is to discover new thermostable and robust cellulolytic enzymes for improved enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. For this purpose two screening methods are applied in different fungal strains with high cellulolytic activities: an expression–based method...

  5. Enzymatic production of cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biwer, A; Antranikian, G; Heinzle, E

    2002-09-01

    Cyclodextrins (CD) are enzymatically modified starches with a wide range of applications in food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries, agriculture and environmental engineering. They are produced from starch via enzymatic conversion using cyclodextrin glycosyl transferases (CGTases) and partly alpha-amylases. Due to its low solubility in water, separation and purification of beta-CD is relatively easy compared to alpha- and gamma-CD. In recent years more economic processes for gamma-CD and especially alpha-CD production have been developed using improved CGTases and downstream processing. New purification steps, e.g. affinity adsorption, may reduce the use of complexing agents. The implementation of thermostable CGTases can simplify the production process and increase the selectivity of the reaction. A tabular overview of alpha-CD production processes is presented.

  6. Helicobacter pylori urease activates blood platelets through a lipoxygenase-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, German E; Olivera-Severo, Deiber; Uberti, Augusto F; Carlini, Célia R

    2010-07-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcers and gastric cancer in human beings by mechanisms yet not fully understood. H. pylori produces urease which neutralizes the acidic medium permitting its survival in the stomach. We have previously shown that ureases from jackbean, soybean or Bacillus pasteurii induce blood platelet aggregation independently of their enzyme activity by a pathway requiring platelet secretion, activation of calcium channels and lipoxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We investigated whether H. pylori urease displays platelet-activating properties and defined biochemical pathways involved in this phenomenon. For that the effects of purified recombinant H. pylori urease (HPU) added to rabbit platelets were assessed turbidimetrically. ATP secretion and production of lipoxygenase metabolites by activated platelets were measured. Fluorescein-labelled HPU bound to platelets but not to erythrocytes. HPU induced aggregation of rabbit platelets (ED(50) 0.28 microM) accompanied by ATP secretion. No correlation was found between platelet activation and ureolytic activity of HPU. Platelet aggregation was blocked by esculetin (12-lipoxygenase inhibitor) and enhanced approximately 3-fold by indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor). A metabolite of 12-lipoxygenase was produced by platelets exposed to HPU. Platelet responses to HPU did not involve platelet-activating factor, but required activation of verapamil-inhibitable calcium channels. Our data show that purified H. pylori urease activates blood platelets at submicromolar concentrations. This property seems to be common to ureases regardless of their source (plant or bacteria) or quaternary structure (single, di- or tri-chain proteins). These properties of HPU could play an important role in pathogenesis of gastrointestinal and associated cardiovascular diseases caused by H. pylori.

  7. Activation of IκB Kinase β and NF-κB Is Essential for Helicobacter pylori-Induced Chronic Gastritis in Mongolian Gerbils▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Ayako; Maeda, Shin; Shibata, Wataru; Hikiba, Yohko; Sakamoto, Kei; Nakagawa, Hayato; Ohmae, Tomoya; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Ogura, Keiji; Muto, Susumu; Itai, Akiko; Omata, Masao

    2008-01-01

    The Mongolian gerbil model of Helicobacter pylori infection resembles human gastritis. In this study, we investigated the role of NF-κB activation in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Activated macrophages were significantly increased in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa and were identified as being important cells with potent activation of NF-κB, which plays an important part in producing proinflammatory cytokines. Macrophage depletion by the administration of clodronate resulted in milder inflammation in gerbils infected with H. pylori. In macrophages, the inhibition of IκB kinase β (IKKβ), which is a critical kinase for NF-κB activation, resulted in lower proinflammatory cytokine expression caused by heat-killed H. pylori cells. Furthermore, treatment with IKKβ inhibitor resulted in milder inflammation in gerbils with H. pylori gastritis. Collectively, our data suggest that H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation critically depends on the efficient recruitment and activation of macrophages, with sufficient NF-κB activation. PMID:18070894

  8. Helicobacter pylori induces in-vivo expansion of human regulatory T cells through stimulating interleukin-1β production by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P J; Afzali, B; Fazekasova, H; Chen, D; Ali, N; Powell, N; Lord, G M; Lechler, R I; Lombardi, G

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common infections in the world. Despite inciting inflammation, immunological clearance of the pathogen is often incomplete. CD4(+) CD25(hi) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+)) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) are potent suppressors of different types of immune responses and have been implicated in limiting inflammatory responses to H. pylori. Investigating the influence of H. pylori on T(reg) function and proliferation, we found that H. pylori-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) induced proliferation in T(regs) and impaired their suppressive capability. This effect was mediated by interleukin (IL)-1β produced by H. pylori-stimulated DCs. These data correlated with in-vivo observations in which H. pylori(+) gastric mucosa contained more T(regs) in active cell division than uninfected stomachs. Inciting local proliferation of T(regs) and inhibiting their suppressive function may represent a mechanism for the chronic gastritis and carcinogenesis attributable to H. pylori.

  9. Campylobacter pylori: clinical, histological, and serological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, C; Bolton, F J; Krypczyk, A M; Temperley, J M; Cairns, S A; Owen, W G; Hutchinson, D N

    1988-01-01

    The presence of Campylobacter pylori, histologically diagnosed gastritis, and antibodies to C pylori were determined in a series of 113 patients undergoing endoscopy. Paired biopsy specimens from the fundus, body, and antrum were collected from 59 patients and from the antrum of 54 patients. The presence of C pylori was confirmed by either culture or silver stain in 30 of 59, 31 of 59, and 54 of 103 biopsy specimens from the fundus, body, and antrum, respectively. Of the specimens which contained C pylori 20 of 30 (66%) from the fundus, 25 of 31 (80%) from the body, and 54 (100%) from the antrum showed gastritis. C pylori and gastritis were shown in seven of nine (78.1%) of patients with gastric ulcers and in nine of 11 (82%) of patients with duodenal ulcers. Using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique to detect IgG antibody to C pylori, all patients with histologically diagnosed gastritis and organisms present had titres of greater than or equal to 640; eight of 39 (21%) of patients without gastritis and without organisms gave similar titres. Hence the presence of C pylori was associated with gastritis and with raised titres of IgG antibody. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:3225334

  10. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  11. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective:to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infection.Methods:Serum soluble antigen of H.pylori was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H.pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test(RUT).histologic examination and serology,Results:The sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46% ,91.07%,91.67% and 76.12%,respectively.The prevalence rate of werum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergong endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT methods(P>0.05).Conclusions:The detection of serum H.pylori soluble antigen(HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate,and convenient,not affected by the memorizing raction of serum antibody;is more sensitive,more specific and suitable for dinical diagriosis,and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H.pylori as well as for detection in children and pregnant women.

  12. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  13. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori outer membrane vesicles by gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heather; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2010-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori bacteria colonize the human stomach where they stimulate a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori is considered noninvasive; however, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enriched outer membrane vesicles (OMV), continuously shed from the surface of this bacterium, are observed within gastric epithelial cells. The mechanism of vesicle uptake is poorly understood, and this study was undertaken to examine the roles of bacterial VacA cytotoxin and LPS in OMV binding and cholesterol and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in vesicle uptake by gastric epithelial cells. OMV association was examined using a fluorescent membrane dye to label OMV, and a comparison was made between the associations of vesicles from a VacA(+) strain and OMV from a VacA(-) isogenic mutant strain. Within 20 min, essentially all associated OMV were intracellular, and vesicle binding appeared to be facilitated by the presence of VacA cytotoxin. Uptake of vesicles from the VacA(+) strain was inhibited by H. pylori LPS (58% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS), while uptake of OMV from the VacA(-) mutant strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS). Vesicle uptake did not require cholesterol. However, uptake of OMV from the VacA(-) mutant strain was inhibited by a reduction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (42% with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine), while uptake of OMV from the VacA(+) strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine). We conclude that VacA toxin enhances the association of H. pylori OMV with cells and that the presence of the toxin may allow vesicles to exploit more than one pathway of internalization.

  14. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Vesicles by Gastric Epithelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heather; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori bacteria colonize the human stomach where they stimulate a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori is considered noninvasive; however, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enriched outer membrane vesicles (OMV), continuously shed from the surface of this bacterium, are observed within gastric epithelial cells. The mechanism of vesicle uptake is poorly understood, and this study was undertaken to examine the roles of bacterial VacA cytotoxin and LPS in OMV binding and cholesterol and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in vesicle uptake by gastric epithelial cells. OMV association was examined using a fluorescent membrane dye to label OMV, and a comparison was made between the associations of vesicles from a VacA+ strain and OMV from a VacA− isogenic mutant strain. Within 20 min, essentially all associated OMV were intracellular, and vesicle binding appeared to be facilitated by the presence of VacA cytotoxin. Uptake of vesicles from the VacA+ strain was inhibited by H. pylori LPS (58% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS), while uptake of OMV from the VacA− mutant strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS). Vesicle uptake did not require cholesterol. However, uptake of OMV from the VacA− mutant strain was inhibited by a reduction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (42% with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine), while uptake of OMV from the VacA+ strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine). We conclude that VacA toxin enhances the association of H. pylori OMV with cells and that the presence of the toxin may allow vesicles to exploit more than one pathway of internalization. PMID:20876296

  15. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  16. Mechanochemical synthesis and in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori and uresase inhibitory activities of novel zinc(II)-famotidine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mohammad S; Hughes, Roy W; Khan, Safyan A; Reynolds, Paul A; Enne, Virve I; Sajjad-ur-Rahman; Mirza, Akmal S

    2010-06-01

    The mechanochemical synthesis and characterization of a zinc complex with famotidine is described. The complex was characterized by microanalysis and a number of spectroscopic techniques. The complex was of M:L dihydrate type. Derivatization of famotidine with zinc appears to enhance the activity of the drug by inhibiting the growth of Helicobacter pylori (two reference and 34 clinical isolates). The complex inhibited the growth of H. pylori in an MIC range of 1-8 microg mL(-1). The anti-H. pylori activity of the zinc-famotidine complex against antibiotic-resistant strains was nearly comparable to that of antibiotic-susceptible strains. The complex was found to be far less toxic than the parent drug, as demonstrated by its higher LD(50) value. In the human urease enzyme inhibition assay the complex exhibited significant inhibition. The new complex appears to be more useful in eradicating both the antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant strains of H. pylori.

  17. Helicobacter pylori-induced Sonic Hedgehog expression is regulated by NFκB pathway activation: the use of a novel in vitro model to study epithelial response to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Michael A; Feng, Rui; Aihara, Eitaro; Engevik, Amy C; Montrose, Marshall H; Ottemann, Karen M; Zavros, Yana

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection leads to acute induction of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the stomach that is associated with the initiation of gastritis. The mechanism by which H. pylori induces Shh is unknown. Shh is a target gene of transcription factor Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB). We hypothesize that NFκB mediates H. pylori-induced Shh. To visualize Shh ligand expression in response to H. pylori infection in vivo, we used a mouse model that expresses Shh fused to green fluorescent protein (Shh::GFP mice) in place of wild-type Shh. In vitro, changes in Shh expression were measured in response to H. pylori infection using 3-dimensional epithelial cell cultures grown from whole dissociated gastric glands (organoids). Organoids were generated from stomachs collected from the fundic region of control and mice expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (PC-Shh(KO) mice). Within 2 days of infection, H. pylori induced Shh expression within parietal cells of Shh::GFP mice. Organoids expressed all major gastric cell markers, including parietal cell marker H(+) ,K(+) -ATPase and Shh. H. pylori infection of gastric organoids induced Shh expression; a response that was blocked by inhibiting NFκB signaling and correlated with IκB degradation. H. pylori infection of PC-Shh(KO) mouse-derived organoids did not result in the induction of Shh expression. Gastric organoids allow for the study of the interaction between H. pylori and the differentiated gastric epithelium independent of the host immune response. H. pylori induces Shh expression from the parietal cells, a response mediated via activation of NFκB signaling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Preparation of Enzymatic Hydrolysate of R-phycoerythrin from Porphyra yezoensis and Its Antioxidant and Tumor Cell Proliferation Inhibiting Activities%条斑紫菜R-藻红蛋白酶解物的制备及其抗氧化和肿瘤细胞增殖抑制活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方勇; 杨方美; 赵殿峰; 杨文建; 赵立艳; 辛志宏; 马宁; 施瑛; 胡秋辉

    2012-01-01

    [目的]研究木瓜蛋白酶对条斑紫菜R-藻红蛋白的抗氧化性和肿瘤增殖抑制活性的影响.[方法]采用超声波破壁法提取条斑紫菜R-藻红蛋白,用DEAE柱层析法纯化后进行木瓜蛋白酶酶解,通过正交试验设计,以还原力A700为考察指标确定酶解反应的最佳工艺参数,进一步测定获得的R-藻红蛋白及其酶解物的还原力、清除羟自由基能力和对人肉瘤细胞U2O及人肝癌细胞HepG-2的肿瘤增殖抑制活性.[结果]R-藻红蛋白的最佳酶解工艺条件为:木瓜蛋白酶添加量25000 U·g-1,pH 7.0,温度50℃,酶解时间4h.在此条件下,R-藻红蛋白酶解物还原力为0.573,较未酶解的R-藻红蛋白提高了2.35倍;清除羟自由基能力为51.03%,较未酶解的R-藻红蛋白活性提高了3.22倍.随着浓度的增加,R-藻红蛋白及其酶解物对人肉瘤细胞U2O和人肝癌细胞HepG-2抑制生长作用增强.R-藻红蛋白对人肉瘤细胞U2O抑制作用的IC50值为2431.32 μg·mL-1,其酶解物IC50值降低为1271.46μg·mL-1.R-藻红蛋白对肝癌细胞HepG-2抑制作用的IC50值为1593.61 μg·mL-1,其酶解物IC50值降低为512.05 μg·mL-1.[结论]经木瓜蛋白酶酶解后,R-藻红蛋白酶解物具有较强的抗氧化和抑瘤活性.酶解技术可作为进一步提高R-藻红蛋白生物活性的有效手段.%[Objective] The effect of enzymatic hydrolysis by papain on antioxidant and tumor cell proliferation inhibiting activities of R-phycoerythrin from Porphyra yezoensis was investigated. [Method] R-phycoerythrin of Porphyra yezoensis was extracted by ultrasonic cell wall breaking, and then purified by DEAE column chromatography. Orthogonal design was employed to obtain the optimal condition of enzymatic hydrolysis by determination of reducing powder A700 of their enzymatic hydrolysates. Subsequently, hydroxyl radical-scavenging ability and proliferation inhibiting activities of human sarcoma cancer cell U2O and liver cancer cell HepG-2

  19. Antimicrobial activity of Sapindus mukorossi and Rheum emodi extracts against H pylori: In vitro and in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Khan, Aleem A; Tiwari, Santosh K; Habeeb, Mohammed Aejaz; Khaja, MN; Habibullah, CM

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of Sapindus mukorossi (S. mukorossi) and Rheum emodi (R. emodi). METHODS: Powders of S. mukorossi and R. emodi were extracted successively with petroleum ether, benzene, chloroform and ethanol and were concentrated in vacuum. The disk diffusion method was used for in vitro studies and in vivo studies were performed on male Wister rats. Thirty resistant clinical isolates of H pylori, as determined by their antibiotic sensitivity patterns by E-test, along with two Gram +ve (S. aureus, B. subtilis) and two Gram -ve (E. coli, P. vugaris) organisms were screened for their susceptibility patterns against these extracts. RESULTS: In our screening, all 30 resistant isolates and the other four organisms (two Gram +ve S. aureus, B. subtilis and two Gram -ve, E. coli, P. vugaris) were sensitive to the test compounds. It was found that ethanol and chloroform extracts of S. mukorossi and ethanol and benzene extracts of R. emodi inhibited H pylori at very low concentrations. In the in vitro study, the isolates showed a considerable zone of inhibition at very low concentrations (10 μg/mL) for both the extracts. In the in vivo study, the H pylori infection was cleared with minimal doses of extracts of S. mukorossi (2.5 mg/mL) and R. emodi (3.0 mg/mL) given orally for seven days. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from this study that the extracts of S. mukorossi and R. emodi inhibited the growth of pylori in vitro and, in in vivo studies, the H pylori infection cleared within seven days at very low concentrations. We also found that H pylori did not acquire resistance against these herbal extracts even after 10 consecutive passages. PMID:17131475

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Sapindus mukorossi and Rheum emodi extracts against H pylori: In vitro and in vivo studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed Ibrahim; Aleem A Khan; Santosh K Tiwari; Mohammed Aejaz Habeeb; MN Khaja; CM Habibullah

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of Sapindus mukorossi (S. mukorossi) and Rheum emodi (R. emodi).METHODS: Powders of S. mukorossi and R. emodi were extracted successively with petroleum ether,benzene, chloroform and ethanol and were concentrated in vacuum. The disk diffusion method was used for in vitro studies and in vivo studies were performed on male Wister rats. Thirty resistant clinical isolates of H pylori,as determined by their antibiotic sensitivity patterns by E-test, along with two Gram +ve (S. aureus, B. subtilis)and two Gram -ve (E. coli, P. vugaris) organisms were screened for their susceptibility patterns against these extracts.RESULTS: In our screening, all 30 resistant isolates and the other four organisms (two Gram +ye S. aureus,B. subtilis and two Gram -ve, E. coli, P. vugaris) were sensitive to the test compounds. It was found that ethanol and chloroform extracts of S. mukorossi and ethanol and benzene extracts of R. emodi inhibited H pylori at very low concentrations. In the in vitro study,the isolates showed a considerable zone of inhibition at very low concentrations (10 μg/mL) for both the extracts. In the in vivo study, the H pylori infection was cleared with minimal doses of extracts of S. mukorossi (2.5 mg/mL) and R. emodi(3.0 mg/mL) given orally for seven days.CONCLUSION: We can conclude from this study that the extracts of S. mukorossi and R. emodi inhibited the growth of pylori in vitro and, in in vivo studies, the H pylori infection cleared within seven days at very low concentrations. We also found that H pylori did not acquire resistance against these herbal extracts even after 10 consecutive passages.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erdal Kurtoglu; Ertugrul Kayacetin; Aysegul Ugur

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) infection in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) patients with that of nonthrombocytopenic controls,and to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment in H pylori(+)and H pylori(-) AITP patients.METHODS: The prevalence of gastric H pylori infection in 38 adult AITP patients (29 female and 9 male; median age 27 years; range 18-39 years) who consecutively admitted to our clinic was investagated.RESULTS: H pylori infection was found in 26 of 38 AITP patients (68.5%). H pylori infection was found in 15 of 23control subjects (65.2%). The difference in H pylori infection between the 2 groups was not significant. Thrombocyte count of H pylori-positive AITP patients was significantly lower than that of H pylori-negative AITP patients (P<0.05).Thrombocyte recovery of H pylori-positive group was less than that of H pylori-negative group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: H pylori infection should be considerecd in the treatment of AITP patients with H pylori infection.

  2. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzung-Shiun; Hu, Huang-Ming; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Chao-Hung

    2014-04-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection has become an important issue recently, because this bacterial species cluster can cause many gastrointestinal diseases. Elevated antibiotic resistance is related to an increasing failure rate of H. pylori eradication. Standard triple therapy is still the first-line therapy; however, according to the Maastricht IV Consensus Report, it should be abandoned in areas of high clarithromycin resistance. Alternative first-line therapies include bismuth-containing quadruple therapy, sequential, concomitant, and hybrid therapies. Quinolone-based triple therapy may be considered as first-line therapy in areas of clarithromycin resistance >15-20% and quinolone resistance <10%. Unique second-line therapy is still unclear, and bismuth-containing quadruple therapy or levofloxacin-based triple therapy can be used as rescue treatment. Third-line therapy should be under culture guidance to select the most effective regimens (such as levofloxacin-based, rifabutin-based, or furazolidone-based therapies). Antibiotics resistance, patient compliance, and CYP 2C19 genotypes could influence the outcome. Clinicians should use antibiotics according to local reports.

  3. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  4. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    variables such as age, sex, socioeconomic status, dietary habits, genetic, and immunological ... Age distribution of H. pylori infection did not show any trend towards increase or .... infection in dyspeptic patients in Iran. Gastroenterol Insights.

  6. Helicobacter Pylori Bacteremia: An Unusual Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Concetta; Mancin, Annalisa; Calabrò, Maria; Daleno, Cristina; Ferrario, Antonella; Renzulli, Raffaella; Scuderi, Cristina; Casari, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent immediately to Laboratory, were positive for a spiral Gram-negative bacterium. This isolate was identified as H. pylori and the specific susceptibility test was performed. One day after the fever was decreased but antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin was continued and it was maintained until discharge. In summary, H. pylori transient bacteremia may occur as a rare complication after stomach surgery. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the potential role of Helicobacter pylori presence in blood.

  7. Helicobacter pylori: Basic Mechanisms to Clinical Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its rediscovery 10 years ago, Helicobacter pylori has reshaped our thinking about the course of peptic ulcer disease. Our approach to the patient with a duodenal ulcer has become one of attempting eradication therapy at the time of first diagnosis, in the hope of curing the ulcer disease. Gastric and duodenal ulceration are only two of the manifestations of this chronic antral infection; other complications of H pylori include gastritis, gastric cancer and possible maltomas. Therapy of H pylori infection is complicated and involves dual therapy with an antibiotic plus a protein pump inhibitor, such as omeprazole 20 mg bid plus amoxicillin 1 g bid for two weeks, triple or quadruple therapy with bismuth, two antibiotics and an H2-receptor antagonist. Vaccination against H pylori is on the far horizon.

  8. Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, Andreas; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2015-09-01

    During the period reviewed, prevalence studies were essentially performed in less economically advanced countries and a high prevalence was found. The traditional risk factors for Helicobacter pylori positivity were mostly found. Transmission studied by molecular typing showed a familial transmission. The eventual role of water transmission was explored in several studies with controversial results. Concerning diagnosis, most of the invasive and noninvasive methods used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection are long standing with efficient performance. The most interesting recent improvements in H. pylori diagnosis include advances in endoscopy, developments in molecular methods, and the introduction of omics-based techniques. Interpretation of old or newer method should take into account the pretest probability and the prevalence of H. pylori in the population under investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and endoscopic findings among patients with dyspepsia in north ... Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences ... Results: Of the 148 subjects studied, 68 (46.0%) were males and 80 (54.0%) females.

  10. Distribution of Helicobacter pylori in north China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Hua Gong; Ying Wang; Yuan Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the distribution of virulence-associatedgenotypes of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) in two areas of north China with different gastric cancer risk and furthermore probe into the pathogenicity of the bacterium. METHODS: Gastric biopsies were taken from 355 subjects from Zhuanghe, a high risk area of gastric cancer, and 136 subjects from Shenyang, a low risk area of gastric cancer. A total of 149 H pylori strains isolated from these patients were studied by PCR for differences in the genotypes of cagA, vac A, and iceA.RESULTS: In patients with high risk for gastric cancer, higher frequencies of vacA s1 or s1m1b genotypes were found as compared to those from the low risk area. CONCLUSION: There is significantly different distribution of H pylori genotypes between Zhuanghe and Shenyang areas in north China.

  11. HELICOBACTER PYLORI: THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF PEPTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    some of the virulence factors possessed by the organism, its metabolism and growth .... lymphoma and some types of gastric adenocarcinoma .... carbon to the lungs, where the patient exhales it. .... pylori as a risk factor for cancer, Bailliere's.

  12. Enzymatic Modification of Sphingomyelin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Hellgren, Lars; Xu, Xuebing

    Due to its major role in maintaining the water-retaining properties of the epidermis, ceramide is of great commercial potential in cosmetic and pharmaceuticals such as hair and skin care products. Currently, chemical synthesis of ceramide is a costly process, and developments of alternative cost......-efficient, high yield production methods are of great interest. In the present study, the potential of producing ceramide through enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingomyelin have been studied. Sphingomyelin (SM) is a ubiquitous membrane-lipid and dairy products or by-products is a rich source of sphingomyelin....... In present study, we have optimized the production of ceramide from sphingomyelin using Phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens....

  13. Enzymatic cascade bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Volponi, Joanne V.; Ingersoll, David; Walker, Andrew

    2007-09-04

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for continuously converting sucrose to .beta.-D-glucose. The method comprises a three stage enzymatic reactor in which an aqueous solution of sucrose is first converted into a solution of fructose and .alpha.-D-glucose by passing it through a porous, packed column containing an inert media on which invertase is immobilized. This solution is then sent through a second packed column containing glucose isomerase and finally a third packed column containing mutarotase. Solution temperature and pH are adjusted to maximize glucose output.

  14. Helicobacter pylori resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Helicobacter pylori eradication rates have fallen considerably in recent years. Antibiotic resistance is thought to be rising. OBJECTIVES: To examine the levels of resistance to metronidazole (MTZ) and clarithromycin (CLA) in H. pylori, isolates were taken in a reference centre in Ireland from 2007 to 2008 and were compared to a similar cohort from a study in 1997. METHOD: Antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested by E-test. Frequencies of spontaneous metronidazole and clarithromycin resistance were measured on an agar plate containing the antibiotics at concentrations of 2x and 4x minimum inhibition concentration values. Clinical data were obtained from charts, laboratory and endoscopy reports. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-two patients were analyzed, 98 were females. Colonies amenable to culture were grown in 219 patients. Thirty-seven had prior attempts at eradication therapy (all with amoxicillin-CLA-proton pump inhibitor. A total of 31.5% of the patients had strains resistant to MTZ and 13.2% of the patients were noted to have strains resistant to CLA. About 8.6% of the patients had strains resistant to both the agents. CLA resistance was 9.3% in those who had no prior eradication therapy compared with 32.4% of those who had. CLA resistance increased from 3.9%, among treatment-naive patients in 1997, to 9.3% in our study. MTZ resistance was 29.1% in the treatment-naive population. In 1997, MTZ resistance in the treatment-naive cohort was 27.1%. MTZ resistance was more likely to occur in females (35.4 vs. 28.5%) than in males. CONCLUSION: This study shows that resistance to CLA among Irish patients infected with H. pylori has increased since 1997. The future of treatment may well lie in the widespread use of sensitivity testing before the treatment. This would promote an accurate treatment.

  15. Effectiveness of Citrus Fruits on Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    It is known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Due to the increased side effects of the treatment regimens and the development of antimicrobial resistance, a number of natural compounds have been tested as potential alternatives. In this review, we will examine the current knowledge on the effect of Citrus fruits and their derivatives against H. pylori, highlighting the remaining outstanding questions on the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28408943

  16. Helicobacter pylori : migrations humaines et cancer gastrique

    OpenAIRE

    Breurec, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe gastroduodenal disorders but is also a bacterial genetic marker of human migrations. First, we provide evidence that distinct H. pylori genetic populations accompanied at least four ancient human migrations into Oceania and Southeast Asia: i) an expansion of Austronesian speaking people about 5000 years ago from Taiwan into Oceania, ii) a migration from India into Southeast Asia within the last 2000 years, iii) a migration of Austro-Asiatic speaki...

  17. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 bio...

  18. Oral Immunization with a Multivalent Epitope-Based Vaccine, Based on NAP, Urease, HSP60, and HpaA, Provides Therapeutic Effect on H. pylori Infection in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Le; Yang, Hua; Tang, Feng; Yin, Runting; Liu, Hongpeng; Gong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Guangxian; Liu, Kunmei

    2017-01-01

    Epitope-based vaccine is a promising strategy for therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. A multivalent subunit vaccine containing various antigens from H. pylori is superior to a univalent subunit vaccine. However, whether a multivalent epitope-based vaccine is superior to a univalent epitope-based vaccine in therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori, remains unclear. In this study, a multivalent epitope-based vaccine named CWAE against H. pylori urease, neutrophil-activating protein (NAP), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA) was constructed based on mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Th1-type adjuvant NAP, multiple copies of selected B and Th cell epitopes (UreA27-53, UreA183-203, HpaA132-141, and HSP60189-203), and also the epitope-rich regions of urease B subunit (UreB158-251 and UreB321-385) predicted by bioinformatics. Immunological properties of CWAE vaccine were characterized in BALB/c mice model. Its therapeutic effect was evaluated in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbil model by comparing with a univalent epitope-based vaccine CTB-UE against H. pylori urease that was constructed in our previous studies. Both CWAE and CTB-UE could induce similar levels of specific antibodies against H. pylori urease, and had similar inhibition effect of H. pylori urease activity. However, only CWAE could induce high levels of specific antibodies to NAP, HSP60, HpaA, and also the synthetic peptides epitopes (UreB158-172, UreB181-195, UreB211-225, UreB349-363, HpaA132-141, and HSP60189-203). In addition, oral therapeutic immunization with CWAE significantly reduced the number of H. pylori colonies in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils, compared with oral immunization using CTB-UE or H. pylori urease. The protection of CWAE was associated with higher levels of mixed CD4(+) T cell (Th cell) response, IgG, and secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies to H. pylori. These results indic ate that a multivalent epitope

  19. Oral Immunization with a Multivalent Epitope-Based Vaccine, Based on NAP, Urease, HSP60, and HpaA, Provides Therapeutic Effect on H. pylori Infection in Mongolian gerbils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epitope-based vaccine is a promising strategy for therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection. A multivalent subunit vaccine containing various antigens from H. pylori is superior to a univalent subunit vaccine. However, whether a multivalent epitope-based vaccine is superior to a univalent epitope-based vaccine in therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori, remains unclear. In this study, a multivalent epitope-based vaccine named CWAE against H. pylori urease, neutrophil-activating protein (NAP, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 and H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA was constructed based on mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Th1-type adjuvant NAP, multiple copies of selected B and Th cell epitopes (UreA27–53, UreA183–203, HpaA132–141, and HSP60189–203, and also the epitope-rich regions of urease B subunit (UreB158–251 and UreB321–385 predicted by bioinformatics. Immunological properties of CWAE vaccine were characterized in BALB/c mice model. Its therapeutic effect was evaluated in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbil model by comparing with a univalent epitope-based vaccine CTB-UE against H. pylori urease that was constructed in our previous studies. Both CWAE and CTB-UE could induce similar levels of specific antibodies against H. pylori urease, and had similar inhibition effect of H. pylori urease activity. However, only CWAE could induce high levels of specific antibodies to NAP, HSP60, HpaA, and also the synthetic peptides epitopes (UreB158–172, UreB181–195, UreB211–225, UreB349–363, HpaA132–141, and HSP60189–203. In addition, oral therapeutic immunization with CWAE significantly reduced the number of H. pylori colonies in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils, compared with oral immunization using CTB-UE or H. pylori urease. The protection of CWAE was associated with higher levels of mixed CD4+ T cell (Th cell response, IgG, and secretory IgA (sIgA antibodies to H. pylori. These results indic

  20. Helicobacter pylori induces Snail expression through ROS-mediated activation of Erk and inactivation of GSK-3β in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hoang-Kieu-Chi; Lee, Hee Geum; Piao, Juan-Yu; Zhong, Xiancai; Lee, Ha-Na; Han, Hyeong-Jun; Kim, Wonki; Kim, Do-Hee; Cha, Young-Nam; Na, Hye-Kyung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been known to be implicated in human gastric carcinogenesis. Snail, the zinc-finger transcription factor known as a key inducer of changes in the cell shape and morphogenetic movement, is aberrantly overexpressed and correlates with lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether H. pylori could induce Snail activation to provoke these changes. Using a cell scatter assay, we noticed that human gastric cancer AGS cells infected with H. pylori underwent morphological changes as well as disruption of cell-cell interaction, which was then reversed by silencing of Snail by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, infection with H. pylori resulted in an increased intracellular level of Snail in gastric cancer cells, which was abrogated in the presence of U0126 and LY294002, inhibitors of MEK/Erk and PI3K/Akt pathways, respectively. Cycloheximide pulse-chase experiments coupled with immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the induction of Snail by H. pylori was regulated at multiple levels, including increased transcription of Snail mRNA, inhibition of protein degradation, and enhancement of nuclear translocation of Snail. Pre-treatment of AGS cells with N-acetylcysteine, a well-known reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, attenuated the H. pylori-induced activation of Erk, its binding to Snail promoter, inactivation of GSK-3β, and accumulation of Snail. Collectively, these findings suggest that the upregulation of Snail expression induced by H. pylori and transformation to a spindle-like shape as a consequence in gastric cancer cells are attributable to ROS-mediated activation of Erk and the inhibition of GSK-3β signaling. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mechanisms for the induction of gastric cancer by Helicobacter pylori infection: aberrant DNA methylation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Masahiro; Moro, Hiroshi; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2017-03-01

    Multiple pathogenic mechanisms by which Helicobacter pylori infection induces gastric cancer have been established in the last two decades. In particular, aberrant DNA methylation is induced in multiple driver genes, which inactivates them. Methylation profiles in gastric cancer are associated with specific subtypes, such as microsatellite instability. Recent comprehensive and integrated analyses showed that many cancer-related pathways are more frequently altered by aberrant DNA methylation than by mutations. Aberrant DNA methylation can even be present in noncancerous gastric mucosae, producing an "epigenetic field for cancerization." Mechanistically, H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation, but not H. pylori itself, plays a direct role in the induction of aberrant DNA methylation. The expression of three inflammation-related genes, Il1b, Nos2, and Tnf, is highly associated with the induction of aberrant DNA methylation. Importantly, the degree of accumulated aberrant DNA methylation is strongly correlated with gastric cancer risk. A recent multicenter prospective cohort study demonstrated the utility of epigenetic cancer risk diagnosis for metachronous gastric cancer. Suppression of aberrant DNA methylation by a demethylating agent was shown to inhibit gastric cancer development in an animal model. Induction of aberrant DNA methylation is the major pathway by which H. pylori infection induces gastric cancer, and this can be utilized for translational opportunities.

  2. Reflux esophagitis triggered after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a noteworthy demerit of eradication therapy among the Japanese?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori eIijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the February 2013 Revision of Insured Medical Treatment, bacterial eradication for all Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals in Japan was covered under the insurance scheme. However, reflux esophagitis is believed to occur in approximately 10% of Japanese patients who undergo eradication therapy. Hence, the risk of reflux esophagitis among such cases should be carefully considered, particularly in the treatment for H. pylori-positive patients who are otherwise healthy. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori in cases of H. pylori-positive gastritis markedly suppresses gastric inflammation, and inhibits gastric mucosal atrophy and its progression to intestinal metaplasia. In a long-term follow-up study (10-20 years, eradication treatment was found to reduce the risk of subsequent gastric cancer. However, the fact that eradication-induced reflux esophagitis could increase the long-term risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma should also be considered in the Japanese population. Appropriate treatment with proton pump inhibitors should be taken into consideration for patients undergoing eradication therapy in clinical practice.

  3. Inhibitory Activities of Palmatine from Coptis chinensis Against Helicobactor pylori and Gastric Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joohee; Choi, Jae Sue; Jeong, Choon-Sik

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important factor of gastric disease in clinical practice. Moreover, smoking, stress and a poor diet may be additive factors for gastric damage. With these factors, increasing infection of H. pylori triggers gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. To develop a new protective agent, we are concerned with plant-derived extract. The extract of Coptis chinensis (C. chinensis) and its constituents were investigated to assess their protective activities against gastric damage. The C. chinensis extract showed a scavenging effect against 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radicals, inhibition of H. pylori colonization and antiulcerogenic activities in rat. In particular, palmatine derived from C. chinensis was found to be the novel protective agent. It is better than the C. chinensis extract, berberine, a well-known constituent of C. chinensis. We suggest that palmatine from the root cortex of C. chinensis may be a good candidate for the development of new pharmaceuticals to prevent gastric disease.

  4. Changing epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manami

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is known as the most important cause of gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, and socioeconomic status. In Japan, H. pylori infection has been highly correlated with the incidence rate of gastric cancer, and a reduction in H. pylori infection is therefore crucial for decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer, especially at the population level. Infection occurs during childhood, commonly before 5 years of age. In Japan, where gastric cancer has ranked as the most common cancer by incidence and mortality for the last several decades, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has dramatically declined by birth cohort effect, mainly due to improvements in the general hygiene environment in childhood. Older generations born before around 1950 show a high prevalence of around 80-90 %, decreasing with age to reach around 10 % or less in those born around the 1990s, and less than 2 % for children born after the year 2000. This change will have generational effects on gastric cancer prevention strategies, both primary and secondary. The risk-stratified approach to gastric cancer prevention should be considered in Japan and other countries which have similarly experienced rapid economic development.

  5. Relation between Psoriasis and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dursun Türkmen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. It was aimed to detect the role of H. pylori in triggering psoriasis. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 clinically diagnosed psoriatic patients who applied to the dermatology outpatient clinic, were included in the study. As the control group, 57 patients who do not have psoriasis and H. pylori associated dermatologic diseases were included in the study. All patients and control group were tested for H. pylori by the urea-breath test (UBT. Results: Thirty-eight (67.9% of 56 psoriasis patients (mean age 38.4±14.08 years; 32 men, 24 women and 38 (66.7% of 57 control group(men age, 37.9±13.73 years; 26 men, 31 women were positive for H. pylori. There was no statistically significant difference between psoriasis patients and controls with respect to the urea breath test (p=0.89. UBT was positive in all patiens who have gastrointestinal reflux. Conclusion: We could not determine the role of H. pylori in psoriasis. There have been some reports about the association of H. pylori and palmoplantar pustular psoriasis. Therefore, we believe that there is a need for newer studies in a large psoriasis group with tests which have higher specificity and sensitivity.

  6. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobac ter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection. Methods: Serum soluble antigen of H. p ylor i was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H. pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test ( RUT ), histo logi c examination and serology. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive pred ictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46%, 91.07%, 91.67% a nd 76.12 %, respectively. The prevalence rate of serum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergoing endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT met hods ( P>0.05 ). Conclusions: The detection of serum H. pylori solub le antigen( HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate, and convenie nt, not affected by the memorizing reaction of serum antibody; is more sensitive , m ore specific and suitable for clinical diagnosis, and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H. pylori as well as for detection in children and pre gnant women.

  7. Review: clinical management of Helicobacter pylori infection in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been associated with gastric disorders. The situation of H. pylori infection in China-where a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, a high incidence of gastric cancer, and widespread resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin exist-is quite different from that in Western countries. In order for Chinese clinicians to better manage H. pylori infection, a Chinese Study Group on H. pylori published four consensus reports regarding the management of H. pylori infection in China between 1999 and 2012. The eradication rate with standard triple therapy was pylori in China in recent years. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  9. Helicobacter pylori-coccoid forms and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Rasmussen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    be detected by PCR in water supplies. There is no substantial evidence for viable H. pylori persisting in water supplies. Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental water is a risk factor for H. pylori infection when compared with tap water, and formation of H. pylori biofilm cannot be excluded....... Helicobacter pylori does not seem to take part in biofilm formation in the oral cavity even though the bacterium may be detected....

  10. Extraintestinal manifestations of Helicobacter pylori: A concise review

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Frank; Rayner-Hartley, Erin; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been clearly linked to peptic ulcer disease and some gastrointestinal malignancies. Increasing evidence demonstrates possible associations to disease states in other organ systems, known as the extraintestinal manifestations of H. pylori. Different conditions associated with H. pylori infection include those from hematologic, cardiopulmonary, metabolic, neurologic, and dermatologic systems. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of...

  11. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carini Francesco; Samir Mallat; Cappello Francesco; Zummo Giovani; Jurjus Abdo; Tomasello Giovanni; Leone Angelo; Di Pasquale Roberto; Saniflippo Beatrice; Sinagra Emanuele; Damiani Provvidenza; Rosalyn Jurjus; Alice Gerges-Geagea; Inaya Hajj Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  12. A study of Helicobacter pylori infection in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Khwaja Saifullah Zafar; Vidyasagar Ram; Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori is the most common bacterial infection in human beings. The aim was to study the association of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients of diabetes mellitus. Design of the study was observational analytic cross sectional study. Methods: A total of 69 subjects were studied. Of these 30 were non diabetics and 39 were diabetics, with disease duration more than 1 year. The serological diagnosis of H. pylori was made by Anti- Helicobacter pylori antibody test....

  13. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carini Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  14. Probiotics for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, Lucia; Osborn, John Frederick; Bonci, Enea; Romaggioli, Sara; Baldini, Rossella; Chiesa, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The combination of a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics (clarithromycin plus amoxicillin or metronidazole) has been the recommended first-line therapy since the first guidelines for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in children were published. In recent years, the success of eradication therapies has declined, in part due to the development of H. pylori resistant strains. Alternative anti-H. pylori treatments are currently becoming more popular than the traditional eradication ...

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  16. Effects of lignin-metal complexation on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Liu; Junyong Zhu; S.Y. Fu

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis by unbound lignin (soluble and insoluble) with or without the addition of metal compounds. Sulfonated, Organosolv, and Kraft lignin were added in aqueous enzyme-cellulose systems at different concentrations before hydrolysis. The measured substrate enzymatic digestibility (SED) of cellulose was decreased by...

  17. Identification of E-cadherin signature motifs functioning as cleavage sites for Helicobacter pylori HtrA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas P.; Perna, Anna M.; Fugmann, Tim; Böhm, Manja; Jan Hiss; Haller, Sarah; Götz, Camilla; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Hoy, Benjamin; Rau, Tilman T.; Neri, Dario; Backert, Steffen; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-03-01

    The cell adhesion protein and tumour suppressor E-cadherin exhibits important functions in the prevention of gastric cancer. As a class-I carcinogen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has developed a unique strategy to interfere with E-cadherin functions. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that H. pylori secretes the protease high temperature requirement A (HtrA) which cleaves off the E-cadherin ectodomain (NTF) on epithelial cells. This opens cell-to-cell junctions, allowing bacterial transmigration across the polarised epithelium. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the HtrA-E-cadherin interaction and identified E-cadherin cleavage sites for HtrA. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and Edman degradation revealed three signature motifs containing the [VITA]-[VITA]-x-x-D-[DN] sequence pattern, which were preferentially cleaved by HtrA. Based on these sites, we developed a substrate-derived peptide inhibitor that selectively bound and inhibited HtrA, thereby blocking transmigration of H. pylori. The discovery of HtrA-targeted signature sites might further explain why we detected a stable 90 kDa NTF fragment during H. pylori infection, but also additional E-cadherin fragments ranging from 105 kDa to 48 kDa in in vitro cleavage experiments. In conclusion, HtrA targets E-cadherin signature sites that are accessible in in vitro reactions, but might be partially masked on epithelial cells through functional homophilic E-cadherin interactions.

  18. Red wine and green tea reduce H pylori- or VacA-induced gastritis in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Ruggiero; Giacomo Rossi; Francesco Tombola; Laura Pancotto; Laura Lauretti; Giuseppe Del Giudice; Mario Zoratti

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether red wine and green tea could exert anti-H pylori or anti-VacA activity in vivo in a mouse model of experimental infection.METHODS: Ethanol-free red wine and green tea concentrates were administered orally as a mixture of the two beverages to H pylori infected mice, or separately to VacA-treated mice. Gastric colonization and gastric inflammation were quantified by microbiological,histopathological, and immunohistochemical analyses.RESULTS: In H pylori-infected mice, the red wine and green tea mixture significantly prevented gastritis and limited the localization of bacteria and VacA to the surface of the gastric epithelium. Similarly, both beverages significantly prevented gastric epithelium damage in VacA-treated mice; green tea, but not red wine, also altered the VacA localization in the gastric epithelium.CONCLUSION: Red wine and green tea are able to prevent H pylori-induced gastric epithelium damage,possibly involving VacA inhibition. This observation supports the possible relevance of diet on the pathological outcome of H pylori infection.

  19. Helicobacter Pylori and the Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is an important cause of stomach cancer that infects a substantial proportion of the Canadian adult population. H pylori can be detected by noninvasive tests and effectively eradicated by medical treatment. Screening for and treatment of H pylori may represent a significant opportunity for preventive oncology.

  20. Furazolidone therapy for Helicobacter pylori: Is it effective and safe?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo De Francesco; Enzo Ierardi; Cesare Hassan; Angelo Zullo

    2009-01-01

    Some aspects related with the use of furazolidone as a rescue therapy for Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection should be remarked, especially regarding its potential oncologic risk. The inclusion of furazolidone in a treatment regimen for H pylori infection is, at least, controversial, and it does not appear to be safe.

  1. Characterization and inactivation of an agmatine deiminase from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Justin E.; Causey, Corey P.; Lovelace, Leslie; Knuckley, Bryan; Flick, Heather; Lebioda, Lukasz; Thompson, Paul R. (SC)

    2010-11-12

    Helicobacter pylori encodes a potential virulence factor, agmatine deiminase (HpAgD), which catalyzes the conversion of agmatine to N-carbamoyl putrescine (NCP) and ammonia - agmatine is decarboxylated arginine. Agmatine is an endogenous human cell signaling molecule that triggers the innate immune response in humans. Unlike H. pylori, humans do not encode an AgD; it is hypothesized that inhibition of this enzyme would increase the levels of agmatine, and thereby enhance the innate immune response. Taken together, these facts suggest that HpAgD is a potential drug target. Herein we describe the optimized expression, isolation, and purification of HpAgD (10-30 mg/L media). The initial kinetic characterization of this enzyme has also been performed. Additionally, the crystal structure of wild-type HpAgD has been determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. This structure provides a molecular basis for the preferential deimination of agmatine, and identifies Asp198 as a key residue responsible for agmatine recognition, which has been confirmed experimentally. Information gathered from these studies led to the development and characterization of a novel class of haloacetamidine-based HpAgD inactivators. These compounds are the most potent AgD inhibitors ever described.

  2. Gastric exocrine and endocrine cell morphology under prolonged acid inhibition therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiocca, R; Mastracci, L; Attwood, S E;

    2012-01-01

    Sustained acid inhibition with PPI stimulates gastrin secretion, exerting a proliferative drive on enterochromaffin-like cells (ECL cells) of the oxyntic mucosa. It may also accelerate development of gastric gland atrophy in Helicobacter pylori-infected individuals.......Sustained acid inhibition with PPI stimulates gastrin secretion, exerting a proliferative drive on enterochromaffin-like cells (ECL cells) of the oxyntic mucosa. It may also accelerate development of gastric gland atrophy in Helicobacter pylori-infected individuals....

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    . Also noninvasive tests have been studied in children, including serology, 13C-urea breath test and stool antigen test, showing good results in the different age groups as compared to the gold standard. However, the infection often remains asymptomatic in children and the role of this bacterium......A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...... place only after susceptibility testing. The association of a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics for 1 or 2 weeks gives the best eradication rates. The crucial question to elucidate is whether asymptomatic children should be treated to prevent cancer in the future....

  4. Pathogenic diversity of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégraud, F

    1997-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been shown to possess a very heterogeneous genoma despite its common phenotypic properties. Some characteristics relevant to pathogenesis have also been found to be heterogeneous. This is the case for adherence properties and the amount of urease produced, but it was not possible to relate these properties to disease entities. A vacuolating cytotoxin which alters epithelial cells has been found in about 60% of strains isolated from patients with ulcers versus 30% from those with gastritis only. The cagA gene can be used as a marker to detect the cag pathogenicity island. This DNA fragment seems to induce an increased inflammation in the gastric tissue via release of interleukin 8 by the epithelial cells. The association of this marker is strongly linked with ulcers compared with gastritis only (80% vs 55%, respectively). A number of other properties may be heterogeneous, but the low number of strains studied does not allow conclusions to be drawn.

  5. Enzymatic Modification of Sphingomyelin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due to its major role in maintaining the water-retaining properties of the epidermis, ceramide is of great commercial potential in cosmetic and pharmaceuticals such as hair and skin care products. Currently, chemical synthesis of ceramide is a costly process, and developments of alternative cost......-efficient, high yield production methods are of great interest. In the present study, the potential of producing ceramide through the enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingomyelin have been studied. sphingomyelin is a ubiquitous membrane-lipid and rich in dairy products or by-products. It has been verified...... that sphingomyelin modification gives a feasible approach to the potential production of ceramide. The reaction system has been improved through system evaluation and the optimization of several important factors, and phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens shows higher activity towards the hydrolysis reaction...

  6. Enzymatic generation of hydrogen peroxide shows promising antifouling effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, J.B.; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Laursen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) potential of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced enzymatically in a coating containing starch, glucoamylase, and hexose oxidase was evaluated in a series of laboratory tests and in-sea field trials. Dissolved H2O2 inhibited bacterial biofilm formation by eight of nine marine...

  7. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori by Helicobacter pylori outer membrane proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jiang; Ai-Long Huang; Xiao-Hong Tao; Pi-Long Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the serological response of patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobocter pylori(Hpylori)infection to two H pylori outer membrane proteins (OMPs)(Mr18 000 and Mr26 000) acquired by gene recombinanttechnique, and to determine the diagnostic significance of serological tests derived from these OMPs.METHODS: Recombinant vectors encoding the two H pylori OMPs were used to transform and express in BL21 (DE3)E. coli. After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin, colloid gold kits were prepared with purified recombinant proteins to detect H pylori infection and H pylori-associated diseases by the immunity-marker technology. We selected 150 patients with H pyloriinfection and digestive symptoms without previous treatment, induding chronic gastritis (n = 60), duodenal ulcer (n = 30), gastric ulcer (n = 30), and gastric cancer (n = 30).As controls, 33 H pylori-negative healthy volunteers were also recruited. Serum samples were collected from all subjects, and the antibodies to specific proteins of H pylori were tested with the colloid gold test kits. The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the colloid gold tests were evaluated, by using the combination of standard diagnostic methods (13C urea breath test and bacteria culture) and classic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as reference.RESULTS: After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin,the purity of recombinant fusion proteins was about 95%.The recombinant fusion proteins were recognized by the specific monoclonal antibodies against the two H pylori OMPs,as demonstrated by the ELISA. Of the 150 serum samples from patients infected with H pylori 141 (94.0%) responded positively to the recombinant protein with Mr26 000, while the seropositive rates were 95.0%, 96.7%, 96.7% and 90.0%for patients with H pylori-associated chronic gastritis,duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer respectively.The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the colloid gold kit with Mr26 000

  8. Comparison of IL-6, IL-8 Concentrations in H. pylori- and non-H. pylori-associated Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontar Alamsyah Siregar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is a non-invasive microorganism causing intense gastric mucosal inflammatory and immune reaction. The gastric mucosal levels of the proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin 6 (IL-6 and IL-8 have been reported to be increased in H. pylori infection, but the serum levels in H. pylori infection is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in H. pylori infection. METHODS: A cross sectional study was done on eighty consecutive gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and Permata Bunda Hospital, Medan, Indonesia from May-October 2014. Histopathology was performed for the diagnosis of gastritis. Rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Serum samples were obtained to determine circulating IL-6 and IL-8. Univariate and bivariate analysis (independent t test were done. RESULTS: There were 41.25% patients infected with H. pylori. Circulatory IL-6 levels were significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori negative, but there were no differences between serum levels of IL-8 in H. pylori positive and negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected in an increased level of serum IL-6. Serum levels of IL-8 were not significantly different between H. pylori positive and negative. KEYWORDS: Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, IL-6, IL-8, cytokine.

  9. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy significantly reduces Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal damage in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Chao Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Chen; Gi-Shih Lien; Yuarn-Jang Lee; Horng-Yuan Lou; Ching-Ruey Hsieh; Chia-Lang Fang; Shiann Pan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of 4 d' anti-Helicobacter pyloritherapy on the H pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils based on physiological and pathological changes.METHODS: We used 6-wk-old male gerbils orally inoculated with H pylori (ATCC43504, 2x108 CFU/mL).Seven weeks after H pylori inoculation, the animals of study group received 4 d' anti-H pylori triple therapy (H pylorieradicated group). Seven days later, all animals of the H pylori-eradicated and control groups (H pylori-infected& H pylori-uninfected groups) were sacrificed. We examined gastric mucosal lesions macroscopically, studied gastritis microscopically and determined the stomach weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin (PG) E2 level.RESULTS: The results showed that both macroscopic and histological gastric damages were significantly less in H pylori-eradicated group than H pylori-infected group.Stomach weight ratio, MPO activity and PGE2 levels were significantly higher in H pylori-infected group than those in the other two groups.CONCLUSION: Four days' anti-H pylori therapy was effective in the improvement of H pylori-induced gastric lesions in Mongolian gerbils.

  10. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Anna Ingibjorg; Gudjonsson, Hallgrimur; Hardardottir, Hjordis; Jonsdottir, Karen Drofn; Bjornsson, Einar Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Increasing resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to antibiotics calls for constant re-evaluation of multidrug regimens that have been used to eradicate the infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current antibiotic susceptibility of H. pylori in an Icelandic cohort. Patients referred for gastroscopy were recruited prospectively. Those found to have a positive rapid urease test were included in the study. Susceptibility testing was conducted by the Epsilometer test (E-test) method for ampicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole and tetracycline. Results were obtained after three days of incubation in microaerophilic conditions at 37 °C, except for the metronidazole were the first 24 hours were anaerobic. Of the 613 patients who underwent gastroscopy, 138 (23%) had a positive rapid urease test. H. pylori was successfully cultured from 105 (76%) of the urease test positive patients and the isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Five patients had prior H. pylori eradication. Antibiotic resistance for ampicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole and tetracycline was 0%, 9%, 4%, 1% and 0%, respectively. If those who had previously undergone eradication treatment were excluded, the resistance was 0%, 6%, 3%, 1% and 0%, respectively. Clarithromycin resistance was higher amongst women than men, 13% vs. 5%, however, not significantly. Clarithromycin resistance was 60% amongst those who had previously received eradication treatment compared to 6% of those who had not (p pylori isolates can be considered relatively low. Therefore, in the current cohort, standard triple-drug clarithromycin-containing regimen should remain the first-line treatment against H. pylori.

  12. Helicobacter pylori Antibiotic Resistance: Trends Over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond G Lahaie

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to antibiotics can be a major problem in the treatment of bacterial infections. As the use of antibiotics increases, bacterial resistance to these agents is rising and in many cases is responsible for the failure of treatment regimens. Although the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection requires the use of more than one antibiotic to obtain adequate eradication rates, the efficacy of the currently used antibiotic combinations has been shown to be decreased by resistance to one of the antibiotics. The use of antibiotics in regimens for the treatment of H pylori is increasing in many countries, including Canada. This increase is both in the use of these antibiotics alone for the treatment of nongastrointestinal infections and in their use in association with proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of H pylori infection. In several European and Asian countries, where resistance to antibiotics is being monitored, it has been demonstrated that H pylori resistance to metronidazole and to clarithromycin increased throughout the 1990s. Thus far, the data available in Canada do not show increased resistance to either of these antibiotics. As for other antibiotics used in the treatment of H pylori infection, such as tetracycline and amoxicillin, the rate of resistance to these agents is still very low and does not constitute a significant problem. Because the efficacy of the regimens used in the treatment of H pylori infection is compromised by resistance to the antibiotics used, it is important that H pylori resistance rates in Canada and throughout the world continue to be monitored. Only with such reliable data can the most optimal regimens be recommended.

  13. Strategies to inhibit the lipid oxidation in the enzymatic synthesis of monoglycerides by glycerolysis of Babassu oil - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i3.14187

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Freitas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different strategies to avoid the lipid feedstock oxidation in the enzymatic synthesis of monoglycerides (MAG from glycerolysis of babassu oil were tested. The reactions were catalyzed by Burkholderia cepacia lipase immobilized on SiO2-PVA and the tests carried out in batchwise. The best strategy was tested in a continuous packed-bed reactor. Different antioxidants and emulsifiers were used, including: Buthyl-hydroxy-toluene (BHT, tocopherol, soy lecithin and Triton X-100. The influence of inert atmosphere (N2 on the MAG production was also investigated. Results were compared with those attaining in the control reaction. The best performance was obtained using N2 in the reaction medium, preventing the oxidation of babassu oil. MAG concentrations were 60 and 24% in batch and continuous mode, respectively. Among the tested antioxidant and emulsifying agents, only soy lecithin was found to be efficient but its application showed limit performance to be used in continuous runs.  

  14. Assessment of competitive and mechanism-based inhibition by clarithromycin: use of domperidone as a CYP3A probe-drug substrate and various enzymatic sources including a new cell-based assay with freshly isolated human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Veronique; Turgeon, Jacques

    2010-04-01

    Clarithromycin is involved in a large number of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. Discrepancies are observed between the magnitude of drug interactions predicted from in vitro competitive inhibition studies and changes observed clinically in the plasma levels of affected CYP3A substrates. The formation of metabolic-intermediate complexes has been proposed to explain these differences. The objectives of our study were: 1) to determine the competitive inhibition potency of clarithromycin on the metabolism of domperidone as a CYP3A probe drug using human recombinant CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 isoenzymes, human liver microsomes and cultured human hepatocytes; 2) to establish the modulatory role of cytochrome b5 on the competitive inhibition potency of clarithromycin; 3) to demonstrate the clarithromycin-induced formation of CYP450 metabolic-intermediate complexes in human liver microsomes; and 4) to determine the extent of CYP3A inhibition due to metabolic-intermediate complex formation using human liver microsomes and cultured human hepatocytes. At high concentrations (100 µM), clarithromycin had weak competitive inhibition potency towards CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. Inhibition potency was further decreased by the addition of cytochrome b5 (9-19%). Clarithromycin-induced metabolic-intermediate complexes were revealed by spectrophotometry analysis using human liver microsomes while time- and concentration-dependent mechanism-based inhibitions were quantified using isolated hepatocytes. These results indicate that mechanism-based but not competitive inhibition of CYP3As is the major underlying mechanism of drug-drug interactions observed clinically with clarithromycin. Drug interactions between clarithromycin and several CYP3A substrates are predicted to be insidious; the risk of severe adverse events should increase over time and persist for a few days after cessation of the drug.

  15. Differential regulation of urease activity in Helicobacter hepaticus and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzer, Clara; Stoof, Jeroen; Beckwith, Catherine S; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kusters, Johannes G; van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2005-12-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus is a pathogen of rodents, which causes diverse enteric and hepatic inflammatory diseases and malignancies. The urease enzyme is an important colonization factor of gastric Helicobacter species like Helicobacter pylori, but little is known about the role and regulation of urease in enterohepatic Helicobacter species. Here it is reported that urease activity of H. hepaticus does not contribute to acid resistance, and that it is nickel-responsive at the post-translational level. H. hepaticus strain ATCC 51449 did not grow or survive at pH 3.0, and supplementation with urea or NiCl2 did not abrogate this acid sensitivity. Furthermore, urease enzyme activity of H. hepaticus was acid-independent, which contrasts with the acid-induced urease system of H. pylori. Nickel supplementation of Brucella medium resulted in a tenfold increase in urease activity in both H. hepaticus and H. pylori, but the maximum level of urease activity in H. hepaticus was still three- to fivefold lower when compared to H. pylori in the same conditions. The increase in urease activity of H. hepaticus was not associated with elevation of urease mRNA or protein levels. Inhibition of protein synthesis by chloramphenicol did not affect nickel-responsive induction of urease activity in H. hepaticus, and confirmed that nickel induction occurs at the post-translational level, probably by activation of preformed apo-enzyme. In conclusion, both the role of the urease enzyme and the regulation of urease activity differ between the enterohepatic pathogen H. hepaticus and the gastric pathogen H. pylori.

  16. Anti- Helicobacter pylori therapy followed by celecoxib on progression of gastric precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Jing Zhang; Shi-Yan Wang; Xiao-Hui Huo; Zhen-Long Zhu; Jian-Kun Chu; Jin-Cheng Ma; Dong-Sheng Cui; Ping Gu; Zeng-Ren Zhao; Ming-Wei Wang; Jun Yu

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate whether celecoxib,a selective cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor,could reduce the severity of gastric precancerous lesions following Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication.METHODS:H pylori-eradicated patients with gastric precancerous lesions randomly received either celecoxib (n=30) or placebo (n=30) for up to 3 mo.COX-2 expression and activity was determined by immunostaining and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) assay,cell proliferation by Ki-67 immunostaining,apoptosis by TUNEL staining and angiogenesis by microvascular density (MVD) assay using CD31 staining.RESULTS:COX-2 protein expression was significantly increased in gastric precancerous lesions (atrophy,intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia,respectively) compared with chronic gastritis,and was concomitant with an increase in cell proliferation and angiogenesis.A significant improvement in precancerous lesions was observed in patients who received celecoxib compared with those who received placebo (P<0.001).Of these three changes,84.6% of sites with dysplasia regressed in patients treated with celecoxib (P=0.002) compared with 60% in the placebo group,suggesting that celecoxib was effective on the regression of dysplasia.COX-2 protein expression (P<0.001) and COX-2 activity (P<0.001) in the gastric tissues were consistently lower in celecoxib-treated patients compared with the placebo-treated subjects.Moreover,it was also shown that celecoxib suppressed cell proliferation (P<0.01),induced cell apoptosis (P<0.01) and inhibited angiogenesis with decreased MVD (P<0.001).However,all of these effects were not seen in placebo-treated subjects.Furthermore,COX-2 inhibition resulted in the up-regulation of PPARg expression,a protective molecule with anti-neoplastic effects.CONCLUSION:H pylori eradication therapy followed by celecoxib treatment improves gastric precancerous lesions by inhibiting COX-2 activity,inducing apoptosis,and suppressing cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  17. [Peptic Ulcer Disease Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Se-Hwan; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2016-06-25

    Although the global prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is decreasing, PUD is still one of the most common upper gastrointestinal diseases in the world due to Helicobacter pylori infection and increased use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Korea, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is also declining, but it is still the major cause of PUD. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are caused by imbalances between bacterial virulence factors, host factors, and environmental influences. In this review, we describe the prevalence trends of H. pylori infection in Korea, the mechanism of H. pylori infection-related PUD, and treatment strategies.

  18. Innate immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan K; Trombly, Melanie I; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune receptors detect Helicobacter pylori infection and trigger downstream signaling events that result in the production of cytokines and interferon-β. This chapter gives an overview of the receptors and their roles in responding to H. pylori infection and details the downstream signaling events. The tools that have been developed to study the innate immune response to H. pylori are also discussed. Understanding the immune response to H. pylori is critical to develop better treatments for H. pylori-induced disease states including gastric malignancies and cancer.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Infection and atherosclerosis: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karbasi-Afshar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a spiral-shaped gram negative bacterium that naturally colonizes the human gastric epithelium. In recent years, large evidence has come to the literature strongly proposing causal link between H. pylori and extra gastric disorders. Cardiovascular system is one of the extra gastric organs that can be affected by H. pylori infection. The first evidence suggestive of such an association comes from seroepidemiological evaluations, but histopathological and eradication studies have strongly confirmed existence of a causal association between H. pylori infection and cardiovascular events.

  20. Recombinant HpaA purified from Escherichia coli has biological properties similar to those of native Helicobacter pylori HpaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Anneli M; Bolin, Ingrid; Bystrom, Mona; Nystrom, Susanne

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to recombinantly produce and purify Helicobacter pylori adhesin A (HpaA) from Escherichia coli and compare it to purified native H. pylori HpaA, for potential use as a vaccine antigen. The hpaA gene was cloned from H. pylori, transferred to two different expression vectors, and transformed into E. coli. Expression of rHpaA was analysed by immunoblot, inhibition ELISA, and semi-quantitative dot-blot. Using affinity chromatography, rHpaA was purified from E. coli and native HpaA from H. pylori. The binding of both purified proteins to sialic acid was analysed and antibody titres to native and rHpaA were compared after intraperitoneal immunisation of C57/Bl mice. The rHpaA protein was highly expressed in E. coli from both vectors. Purified recombinant and native HpaA bound similarly to fetuin but also to the non-sialylated asialofetuin. Both native HpaA and rHpaA induced comparable amounts of specific antibodies in serum after immunisation and they were identical in double immunodiffusion. In conclusion, rHpaA was successfully produced in E. coli. Purified rHpaA showed biological properties similar to those of native HpaA isolated from H. pylori and may therefore be further used as an antigen in the development of a vaccine against H. pylori infection.

  1. The internalization of Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the failure of H. pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You-Hua; Lv, Zhi-Fa; Zhong, Yao; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Shu-Ping; Xie, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) internalization involves invasion of cells by the bacterium. Several studies have shown that H. pylori can invade human gastric epithelial cells, immune cells, and Candida yeast in vivo and in vitro. Whether bacterial invasion plays a role in eradication failure is unclear. To investigate the relationship between H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells and H. pylori eradication failure. Forty-two clinical strains isolated from H. pylori-positive patients with different outcomes after treatment with furazolidone-based therapy were examined (17 failures and 25 successes). The H. pylori strains were shown to be susceptible to amoxicillin and furazolidone, and the patients also exhibited good compliance. Genotyping was performed for cagA and vacA (s and m). The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains to amoxicillin, furazolidone, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was determined by E-tests. The levels of H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells were detected by gentamicin colony-forming unit assays. The internalization level in the eradication success group was 5.40±5.78 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell, and the median was 6.194 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell; the internalization level in the eradication failure group was 8.98±5.40 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell, and the median was 10.28 × 10(-3)  cfu/cell. The eradication failure group showed a greater invasion level than the eradication success group (P.05). The results showed that H. pylori invasion of the gastric epithelia might play a role in eradication failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Horizontal versus familial transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Schwarz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of Helicobacter pylori is thought to occur mainly during childhood, and predominantly within families. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining H. pylori isolates from large population samples and to the extensive genetic diversity between isolates, the transmission and spread of H. pylori remain poorly understood. We studied the genetic relationships of H. pylori isolated from 52 individuals of two large families living in a rural community in South Africa and from 43 individuals of 11 families living in urban settings in the United Kingdom, the United States, Korea, and Colombia. A 3,406 bp multilocus sequence haplotype was determined for a total of 142 H. pylori isolates. Isolates were assigned to biogeographic populations, and recent transmission was measured as the occurrence of non-unique isolates, i.e., isolates whose sequences were identical to those of other isolates. Members of urban families were almost always infected with isolates from the biogeographic population that is common in their location. Non-unique isolates were frequent in urban families, consistent with familial transmission between parents and children or between siblings. In contrast, the diversity of H. pylori in the South African families was much more extensive, and four distinct biogeographic populations circulated in this area. Non-unique isolates were less frequent in South African families, and there was no significant correlation between kinship and similarity of H. pylori sequences. However, individuals who lived in the same household did have an increased probability of carrying the same non-unique isolates of H. pylori, independent of kinship. We conclude that patterns of spread of H. pylori under conditions of high prevalence, such as the rural South African families, differ from those in developed countries. Horizontal transmission occurs frequently between persons who do not belong to a core family, blurring the pattern of familial

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  4. Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Famouri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Childrenwith Helicobacter infection need treatment. The aim of treatment is elimination of H.Pylori. Most patients with this infection are asymptomatic and without peptic disease. Treatment and management of these patients are controversy. Conventional Treatment: The best treatment for H. pylori eradication regimens should have cure rates of at least 80%, be without major side effects, and induce minimal bacterial resistance. Antibiotics alone have not achieved this. Luminal acidity influences both the effectiveness of some antimicrobial agents and the survival of the bacteri; thus antibiotics have been combined with acid suppression such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, bismuth, or H2 antagonists. The “classic” regimen is treatment twice daily for 7 days with a PPI and clarithromycin plus either amoxicillin or metronidazole Bismuth has been used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease and 1 part o quadruple therapy for H.Pylori but compliance of children for it is low.   Sequential Therapy  Sequential therapyinvolves dual therapy with a PPI and amoxicillin for 5 days followed sequentially by clarithromycin, Tinidazole and omeperazole for 5 days or other triple therapy for 7 days. This treatment has had 97% efficacy.   Adjunctive Therapies A number of studies have showed the potential benefits of probiotic therapy in H. pylori treatment regimens.Consumption of these drugs accompanied with other medications increase H.Pylori eradication.    

  5. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  6. Helicobacter pylori: prospettive per un vaccino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Del Giudice

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most widespread infections worldwide: it affects more than 50% of the human population, and is responsible for serious gastric pathologies such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, atrophic gastritis and, in some individuals, gastric cancer. Current treatments with antibiotics are efficacious, but encounters several drawbacks at the level of compliance, side effects, antibiotic resistance, etc.The availability of vaccines could contribute in reducing the burden of H. pylori associated diseases. Several bacterial antigens have been identified as virulence factors and proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Some of these antigens have been tested in experimental animal models of challenge with H. pylori. The experiments in animals have shown that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori is indeed feasible. Several open questions still remain concerning the understanding of the host-microbe relationship and the quality of the immune response which should be induced in order to confer protective immunity in man.The answers to these questions will be crucial in helping the preparation of appropriate vaccine formulations able to efficaciously protect humans both prophylactically and therapeutically. A few clinical trials have been carried out so far with still limited results. Other trials in humans are in progress and are planned for the next few years.The final hope is that these new vaccines will show the expected efficacy against H. pylori and will permit the elimination of this pathogen which has cohabited with humans for more than 100,000 years.

  7. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  8. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-01-01

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability. PMID:28785141

  9. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-07-21

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability.

  10. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, ppylori-positive group (ppylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status.

  11. Current Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Gold

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infects approximately 50% of the world’s population and is a definitive cause of gastroduodenal disease (ie, gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers in children and adults. Four consensus conferences held around the globe have brought together clinicians, scientists, epidemiologists and health care economists to discuss the role of the gastric pathogen H pylori in human gastroduodenal disease. At each of these conferences, the overriding objective was to reach a consensus on the development of practical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of H pylori-infected individuals. However, it was not until the Canadian H pylori Consensus Conference, held in November 1997, that the issues of H pylori infection in children were addressed. Therapies for H pylori infection in children, presented in part at the First Canadian Paediatric H pylori Consensus Conference, held in Victoria, British Columbia, November 1998, are reviewed in this paper.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... pathways. As such, this review highlights the consequences of H. pylori infection on the integrity of DNA in the host cells. By down-regulating major DNA repair pathways, H. pylori infection has the potential to generate mutations. In addition, H. pylori infection can induce direct changes on the DNA...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  13. Tackling Critical Catalytic Residues in Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella Maggi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial asparaginases (amidohydrolases, EC 3.5.1.1 are important enzymes in cancer therapy, especially for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. They are tetrameric enzymes able to catalyze the deamination of L-ASN and, to a variable extent, of L-GLN, on which leukemia cells are dependent for survival. In contrast to other known L-asparaginases, Helicobacter pylori CCUG 17874 type II enzyme (HpASNase is cooperative and has a low affinity towards L-GLN. In this study, some critical amino acids forming the active site of HpASNase (T16, T95 and E289 have been tackled by rational engineering in the attempt to better define their role in catalysis and to achieve a deeper understanding of the peculiar cooperative behavior of this enzyme. Mutations T16E, T95D and T95H led to a complete loss of enzymatic activity. Mutation E289A dramatically reduced the catalytic activity of the enzyme, but increased its thermostability. Interestingly, E289 belongs to a loop that is very variable in L-asparaginases from the structure, sequence and length point of view, and which could be a main determinant of their different catalytic features.

  14. Enzymatic degradation of endomorphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Staniszewska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub

    2008-11-01

    Centrally acting plant opiates, such as morphine, are the most frequently used analgesics for the relief of severe pain, even though their undesired side effects are serious limitation to their usefulness. The search for new therapeutics that could replace morphine has been mainly focused on the development of peptide analogs or peptidomimetics with high selectivity for one receptor type and high bioavailability, that is good blood-brain barrier permeability and enzymatic stability. Drugs, in order to be effective, must be able to reach the target tissue and to remain metabolically stable to produce the desired effects. The study of naturally occurring peptides provides a rational and powerful approach in the design of peptide therapeutics. Endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, are two potent and highly selective mu-opioid receptor agonists, discovered only a decade ago, which display potent analgesic activity. However, extensive studies on the possible use of endomorphins as analgesics instead of morphine met with failure due to their instability. This review deals with the recent investigations that allowed determine degradation pathways of endomorphins in vitro and in vivo and propose modifications that will lead to more stable analogs.

  15. Combined enzymatic starch hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebesny, E.

    1989-07-01

    From researches so far there comes out that glucoamylase AMG 300 L and pullulanase Promozyme 200 L when used in quantities the same as in preparation of Dextrozyme 225/75 L Novo at an action on liquified starch by means of /alpha/-amylase after 48 h of saccharification already (similarly like Dextrozyme) are able to get up to 98 DE. Chromatographic analysis proved that glucoamylase AMG 300 L Novo and succouring it pullulanase Promozyme 200 L are working most effectively when both enzymes are added to the liquified starch medium simultaneously. From this comes out that pullulanase hydrolyzes better /alpha/-1,6 bonds in lowmolecular dextrins than in oligosaccharides G/sub 4/ to G/sub 7/ formed at previous action of glucoamylase. At an optimum ratio of glucoamylase and pullulanase in relation to the dissolved starch after 8 h of the hydrolysis there are neither iso-sugars (isomaltose, panose), no oligosaccharides higher than G/sub 5/ and no dextrins. At the solution of the starch by /alpha/-amylase and its hydrolysis by enzymatic preparation Fungamyl 800 L Novo, at doses 0.02-0.8% to d.s. of starch, already after 8 h the reaction of hydrolysis contents of 36-62% maltose in dry substance of hydrolyzates are reached with only traces of glucose. (orig.).

  16. Fucoidans Disrupt Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to AGS Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng-Guan Chua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fucoidans are complex sulphated polysaccharides derived from abundant and edible marine algae. Helicobacter pylori is a stomach pathogen that persists in the hostile milieu of the human stomach unless treated with antibiotics. This study aims to provide preliminary data to determine, in vitro, if fucoidans can inhibit the growth of H. pylori and its ability to adhere to gastric epithelial cells (AGS. We analysed the activity of three different fucoidan preparations (Fucus A, Fucus B, and Undaria extracts. Bacterial growth was not arrested or inhibited by the fucoidan preparations supplemented into culture media. All fucoidans, when supplemented into tissue culture media at 1000 µg mL−1, were toxic to AGS cells and reduced the viable cell count significantly. Fucoidan preparations at 100 µg mL−1 were shown to significantly reduce the number of adherent H. pylori. These in vitro findings provide the basis for further studies on the clinical use of sulphated polysaccharides as complementary therapeutic agents.

  17. Optimization of Substrate Feeding for Enzymatic Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Nordblad, Mathias

    to be effective in mitigating the effects of substrate inhibition. Using enzymatic biodiesel production as a case study, the volumetric productivity of the reactor is increased while minimizing inactivation of the enzyme due to the alcohol. This is done by using a simple optimization routine where the substrate...... (both the vegetable oil and alcohol) feed rate/concentration is manipulated simultaneously. The results of the simulation were tested in the laboratory and are sufficiently positive to suggest the implementation of a feeding strategy for large scale enzymatic biodiesel production....

  18. Optimization of Substrate Feeding for Enzymatic Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Nordblad, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    to be effective in mitigating the effects of substrate inhibition. Using enzymatic biodiesel production as a case study, the volumetric productivity of the reactor is increased while minimizing inactivation of the enzyme due to the alcohol. This is done by using a simple optimization routine where the substrate...... (both the vegetable oil and alcohol) feed rate/concentration is manipulated simultaneously. The results of the simulation were tested in the laboratory and are sufficiently positive to suggest the implementation of a feeding strategy for large scale enzymatic biodiesel production...

  19. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  20. Helicobacter pylori vaccine: from past to future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Kanishtha; Agarwal, Shvetank

    2008-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide and is an important cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma), and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is usually acquired during childhood and tends to persist unless treated. Because eradication requires treatment with multidrug regimens, prevention of initial infection by a suitable vaccine is attractive. Although immunization with H pylori protein subunits has been encouraging in animals, similar vaccine trials in humans have shown adjuvant-related adverse effects and only moderate effectiveness. Newer immunization approaches (use of DNA, live vectors, bacterial ghosts, and microspheres) are being developed. Several questions about when and whom to vaccinate will need to be appropriately answered, and a cost-effective vaccine production and delivery strategy will have to be useful for developing countries. For this review, we searched MEDLINE using the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms Helicobacter pylori and vaccines for articles in English from 1990 to 2007.

  1. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. β-Hydroxyacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Dehydratase (FabZ) from Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis : Structure Determination, Enzymatic Characterization, and Cross-Inhibition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGillick, Brian E.; Kumaran, Desigan; Vieni, Casey; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2016-02-23

    The bacterial system for fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) contains several enzymes whose sequence and structure are highly conserved across a vast array of pathogens. This, coupled with their low homology and difference in organization compared to the equivalent system in humans, makes the FAS pathway an excellent target for antimicrobial drug development. To this end, we have cloned, expressed, and purified the β-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabZ) from both Francisella tularensis (FtFabZ) and Yersinia pestis (YpFabZ). We also solved the crystal structures and performed an enzymatic characterization of both enzymes and several mutant forms of YpFabZ. Additionally, we have discovered two novel inhibitors of FabZ, mangostin and stictic acid, which show similar potencies against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Lastly, we selected several compounds from the literature that have been shown to be active against single homologues of FabZ and tested them against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. These results have revealed clues as to which scaffolds are likely to lead to broad-spectrum antimicrobials targeted against FabZ as well as modifications to existing FabZ inhibitors that may improve potency.

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plant extracts traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; Miguel, Obdulio Gomes; Cunico, Miriam Machado; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Kussen, Gislene Maria Botão; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2010-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of plant extracts obtained from Bixa orellana L., Chamomilla recutita L., Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., Malva sylvestris L., Plantago major L. and Rheum rhaponticum L. has been evaluated against two reference strains and eleven clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. All the plant species chosen are used in popular Brazilian cuisine and folk medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Initial screening was made by the disk diffusion test and then minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the agar dilution method. The results presented in this work demonstrated that among the plant preparations analyzed, B. orellana L., C. recutita L., I. paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. and M. sylvestris L. were capable of inhibiting the in vitro growth of H. pylori. PMID:24031496

  4. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plant extracts traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Lúcia Cogo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of plant extracts obtained from Bixa orellana L., Chamomilla recutita L., Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., Malva sylvestris L., Plantago major L. and Rheum rhaponticum L. has been evaluated against two reference strains and eleven clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. All the plant species chosen are used in popular Brazilian cuisine and folk medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Initial screening was made by the disk diffusion test and then minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the agar dilution method. The results presented in this work demonstrated that among the plant preparations analyzed, B. orellana L., C. recutita L., I. paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. and M. sylvestris L. were capable of inhibiting the in vitro growth of H. pylori.

  5. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plant extracts traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; Miguel, Obdulio Gomes; Cunico, Miriam Machado; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Kussen, Gislene Maria Botão; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2010-04-01

    The antibacterial activity of plant extracts obtained from Bixa orellana L., Chamomilla recutita L., Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., Malva sylvestris L., Plantago major L. and Rheum rhaponticum L. has been evaluated against two reference strains and eleven clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. All the plant species chosen are used in popular Brazilian cuisine and folk medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Initial screening was made by the disk diffusion test and then minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the agar dilution method. The results presented in this work demonstrated that among the plant preparations analyzed, B. orellana L., C. recutita L., I. paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. and M. sylvestris L. were capable of inhibiting the in vitro growth of H. pylori.

  6. Giardia lamblia and Helicobater pylori Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shafie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Giardia lamblia and Helicobacter pylori are two flagellate microorganisms that grow in duodenum and stom­ach. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of them in patients with dyspepsia and other GI disorders. "nMethods: In this cross-sectional study, co-infection of above-mentioned agents was investigated in a group of 130 patients [me­dian age of 40 yr (range=11-79 including 76 males (58.8%] with dyspepsia using three methods of duodenal aspiration sam­ple, duodenal biopsy samples and evaluation of stool samples."nResults: : From 105 patients (59 males, 46 females, median age 40 years, range 11-79 entering this study from 3 hospitals, 4 patients (3.8% had G. lamblia and 61 patients (58% had H. pylori. All 4 patients infected by Giardia had also H. pylori infec­tion. Tenesmus (3 out of 4 patients was the most common symptom in patients with H. pylori infection (48 out of 61 pa­tients was reflux. Other symptoms in patients infected with both organisms (4 patients included diarrhea (2 cases, weight loss (2 cases, and loss of appetite (1 case but no report of vomiting."nConclusion: In patients co-infected with Giardia, H.pylori differentiation by physical examination is not possible. So in those patients with positive Rapid Urease Test (RUT, stool examination for Giardia detection is recommended. In addition, met­ronidazole (broad spectrum, anti-protozoal drug can be useful in H. pylori infection.

  7. Endoscopic faces of Helicobacter Pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geanina Spulber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The infection caused by H. pylori appears secondary after a bacterial colonization of the stomach and the initial portion of the small bowel. H. pylori –infected patients can develop gastritis, peptic ulcer, stomach cancer or MALT lymphoma. H. pylori infection is defined by WHO like a type I carcinogen, its role in gastric carcinogenesis being supported by the greatest researchers. Objectives: In this study our purpose was to determine the endoscopic appearances in H. pylori infection quoted in medical literature until now and the frequency of their appearance in our group of interest. Materials and methods: In this study it was made an analytic study in which it was realized a retrospective cohort investigation at the Emergency Central Military and University Hospital “Dr. Carol Davila” Bucharest, gastroenterology branch –endoscopic department between 18.12.2012- 21.08.2013 on 1694 patients between 18 and 92 years old, with the medium age of 55 years old. As a diagnostic method for H. pylori infection we used superior digestive endoscopy during which were taken biopsies and it was made a fast urease test. Results: Regarding the variation of the endoscopic aspects at the population of study, we have found gastritis with all its aspects (which was Sidney classified in the biggest percentage meaning 59.3% of the cases, followed with a percentage of 18.8% by those without any endoscopic abnormality, and then in 10,33% of the cases we have found peptic ulcer. With a smaller percentage, under 10%, we have found duodenitis at 8.67% of this patients, and finally the most severe lesions represented by gastric cancer and lymphoma were found at 2,7% of the H.pylori infected patients.

  8. Helicobacter pylori: From Bench to Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exponential increase in research in the field of Helicobacter pylori a paradigm shift has occurred. It is now recognized that H pylori is a chronic infection of the stomach causing inflammation. Some patients remain asymptomatic, while others may develop dyspepsia, duodenal or gastric ulcer, gastric cancer or a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. However, the role of H pylori in contributing to nonulcer dyspepsia or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy remains controversial. An effective vaccine against H pylori is years away. Major interest has focused on the questions "who should be investigated and therefore treated" and "what is the latest gold standard for eradication of H pylori"? In Europe, guidelines have been developed to help the practitioner answer these important questions. Canadian guidelines will soon be available. For persons with known peptic ulcer disease there should be unequivocal acceptance that the good clinical practice of eradicating H pylori will result in substantial savings in health care expenses. The original 'classical triple therapy' (bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline [BMT] has now been surpassed by the combination of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI plus two antibiotics (metronidazole plus clarithromycin; amoxicillin plus clarithromycin; or amoxicillin plus metronidazole, each given twice a day for one week. In Canada, the regimen of omeprazole plus one antibiotic (amoxicillin or clarithromycin was approved recently but gives an eradication rate that is lower than the current target of 90%. According to the European (Mäastricht recommendations, if a single treatment attempt with PPI plus two antibiotics fails, PPI plus BMT is recommended.

  9. Helicobacter pylori-related immunoglobulins in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Betty L; Vlach, Victoria; Dew, Michelle; Willsie, Sandra K

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine serum antibody titers against a common bacterial antigen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylon), in subjects with sarcoidosis, comparing those titers to those present in a healthy population. With the approval of the Institutional Review Board of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, patients with sarcoidosis (pulmonary and extrapulmonary) who visited the Truman Medical Center-Hospital Hill pulmonary clinic were recruited to enter the study. A serum sample was frozen at -70 degrees C for later testing (n = 20). Specific information collected on subjects included corticosteroid use, use of histamine2 blockers and antacids, date of first diagnosis, and stage of sarcoidosis. Normal controls and demographically matched individuals who lacked pulmonary diseases, including sarcoidosis, were also recruited. Serum samples were processed as above. Antibody capture enzyme immunoassay was completed for H. pylori and urease antigens by serum dilution assay for each subject, from which titers for antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA were calculated. Nonspecific serum IgE was also measured. An increased incidence of high-titer IgG antibody directed against H. pylori antigens was found in subjects with sarcoidosis compared with controls. The sarcoidosis and control groups were significantly different with respect to IgG and IgA against H. pylori, both at p = .001. IgG directed against urease was also significantly different between sarcoidosis and control patients (p = .001), but IgA directed against urease was very low in all subjects and did not yield significant differences between groups. Specific H. pylori and urease IgG antibodies exceeded those expected in the population studied. The data suggest that in pulmonary sarcoidosis, the relationship of H. pylori and its products to sarcoid granuloma formation warrants further investigation.

  10. Structural and mutational analysis of TenA protein (HP1287) from the Helicobacter pylori thiamin salvage pathway - evidence of a different substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barison, Nicola; Cendron, Laura; Trento, Alberto; Angelini, Alessandro; Zanotti, Giuseppe

    2009-11-01

    HP1287 (tenA) from Helicobacter pylori is included among the genes that play a relevant role in bacterium colonization and persistence. The gene has been cloned and its product, protein TenA, has been expressed and purified. The crystal structures of the wild-type protein and the mutant F47Y have been determined at resolutions of 2.7 and 2.4 A, respectively. The molecular model, a homotetramer with 222 symmetry, shows that the H. pylori TenA structure belongs to the thiaminase II class of proteins. These enzymes were recently found to be involved in a salvage pathway for the synthesis of the thiamin precursor hydroxypyrimidine, which constitutes a building block in thiamin biosynthesis, in particular in bacteria living in the soil. By contrast, enzymatic measurements on TenA from H. pylori indicate that the activity on the putative substrate 4-amino-5-aminomethyl-2-methylpyrimidine is very modest. Moreover, in the present study, we demonstrate that the mutation at residue 47, a position where a phenylalanine occurs in all the strains of H. pylori sequenced to date, is not sufficient to explain the very low catalytic activity toward the expected substrate. As a result of differences in the colonization environment of H. pylori as well as the TenA structural and catalytic peculiar features, we suggest a possible pivotal role for the H. pylori enzyme in the thiamin biosynthetic route, which is in agreement with the relevance of this protein in the stomach colonization process.

  11. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  12. 3rd Brazilian consensus on Helicobacter pylori 3º Consenso Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.Os avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Segundo Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 2004, em São Paulo, justificam este terceiro consenso. O evento foi organizado pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, departamento da Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia, tendo sido realizado em Bento Gonçalves, RS, nos dias 12 a 15 de abril de 2011. Contou com a participação de 30 delegados provenientes das cinco regiões brasileiras e um convidado internacional, incluindo gastroenterologistas

  13. Apigenin has anti-atrophic gastritis and anti-gastric cancer progression effects in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Weng, Bi-Chuang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wu, Deng-Chang; Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-02-12

    Apigenin, one of the most common flavonoids, is abundant in celery, parsley, chamomile, passionflower, and other vegetables and fruits. Celery is recognized as a medicinal vegetable in Oriental countries to traditionally treat inflammation, swelling, blood pressure, serum lipid, and toothache. In this study, we investigated apigenin treatment effects on Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression in Mongolian gerbils. Five to eight-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori for four weeks without (atrophic gastritis group) or with N'-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) (gastric cancer group) in drinking water, and were then rested for two weeks. During the 7th-32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 7th-52th (gastric cancer group) weeks, they were given various doses (0-60 mg/kgbw/day) of apigenin. At the end of the 32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 52th (atrophic gastritis group) week, all Mongolian gerbils were sacrificed using the CO2 asphyxia method. The histological changes of Helicobacter pylori colonization, neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations, and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils were examined using immunohistochemistry stain and Sydney System scoring. Apigenin treatments (30-60 mg/kgbw/day) effectively decreased atrophic gastritis (atrophic gastritis group) and dysplasia/gastric cancer (gastric cancer group) rates in Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin treatment (60 mg/kgbw/day) significantly decreased Helicobacter pylori colonization and Helicobacter pylori-induced histological changes of neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin has the remarkable ability to inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression as well as possessing potent anti-gastric cancer activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  14. The antibody titers to Helicobacter pylori in 7- 12 year old iron deficiency anemic children, in Ilam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Hoseinzadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has recently been revealed that H. pylori infection is one the most important causes of anemia inhibiting iron uptake. The current study was designed to evaluate the correlation between the iron deficiency anemia and IgG to H. pylori in anemic children. Methods: In this analytical study, 100 anemic children were analyzed using total Iron, Ferritin, TIBC and H. pylori IgG assay. Data were collected using a questionnaire including parameters of age, blood group, infancy nutrition, iron consumption, fatigue, weakness, height, weight, gastrointestinal infectious, parasitic and blood diseases, parent literacy, income, inhabitation, etc. Data were analyzed using Multivariate Regression Analysis Models, Pearson Correlation- test and Kolmogrov Smirnov. Results: The most prevalent blood group detected in the study sample was group O (62%; 79% were breastfed, 9% were bottle- fed, 12% were both breastfed and bottle- fed. The history of gastrointestinal disorders was mentioned amongst 91% of the patients′ family members. A significant relationship was observed between the iron level with serum, ferritin, level of TIBC and elevated level of IgG titer to H. pylori (p < 0.001. There was a significant association between the shared dishes, GI disorders, fatigue and weakness and level of TIBC, ferritin, Iron and IgG (p < 0.001. Conclusions: The significant relationship between the iron level, IgG titer and H. pylori infection rate can be referred to as important factors influencing the anemia rate. Therefore, H. pylori IgG test can be checked for anemia together with the other routine tests.

  15. Antibiotic resistance of Helycobacter pylori isolated from patients admitted to Imam Hospital, Sari, IRAN, 2002-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Naghshvar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose : -Helicobacter pylori is a gram negative spiral bacilus which infects gastric mucosa and causes a wide range of gastro intestinal diseases.Unfortunately the prevalence of the infection by this organism in developing countries is high and despite numerous existing drug regimens, treatment fails to eradicate the organism in many occasions. To reach an effective and curative regimen, invitro determination of suscepibility and resistance of the organism, to various antimicrobials, is pradent. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Helicobacter pylori,s isolated from cultures. Biopsies from 67 patients admitted to the Sari Imam Hospital were used to cultur Helicobacter pylori and determine their susceptibility and resistance to metronidazole, claritromycin and amoxycillin.Materials and methods : Disc diffusion tecniqu was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration , (MIC and resistance pattern of the isolated Helicobacter pylori.In this method we used the cutoff point of MIC 90 ie , a concentration at which 90% or more of culture plates show inhibition zone around the antimicrobial test disc. Results : MIC 90 for amoxycillin and claritramycin in our study was 0.25 g/ml and all isolates were susceptible to amoxycillin. Only one isolate was resistant to claritramycin. MIC 90 for metronidzole was 16 and 4 resistant cases were isolated.Conclusion : This stndy showed low level of resistance to metronidazole and claritramycin which were comparable to the reported results from other studies. No resistance was observed to amoxycillin which was also the same as other reported results. According to the pattern of antimicrobial resistance, we can recommend the studied drugs, against Helicobacter pylori.

  16. L-forms of H. Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Chao-Pin Li; Yu-Bao Cui; Ye Tian; Qing-Gui Yang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the occurrence of L-forms of H. pyloriinfection in patients with peptic ulcers and its association with possible changes of cellular immune function in the patients.METHODS: Endoscopic biopsy specimens of gastric antrum and gastric corpus were taken from 228 patients with peptic ulcers and inoculated into Skirrow selective medium for H.pylorivegetative forms and special medium for H. pylori Lforms, followed by bacterial isolation and identification. And peripheral venous blood of the patients was taken to detect the percentage of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ with biotin-streptavidin (BSA) and the level of IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 with ElISA.RESULTS: (1) The detection rates of H. pyloriL-forms and vegetative forms in the patients were 50.88 % (116/228)and 64.91 % (148/228) respectively, and the co-infection rate of H. pyloriL-forms and vegetative forms was 78.38 % (116/148). To be more exact, the detection rates of H. pylori L-forms in male and female patients were 57.04 % (77/135) and 41.94 % (39/93) respectively, and statistics found significant difference between them (P<0.05). Furthermore, the detection rates of H. pyloriL-forms in patients aged 14 years-, 30 years-, 40 years- and 50 years- were 31.91%(15/47), 42.86 % (24/56), 56.94 % (41/72) and 67.92 %(36/53) respectively, and there was significant difference between them (P<0.011). (2) The percentages of CD3+, CD4+,CD8+, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and the level of IL-2, IL-6,IL-8 in H. pylori-positive patients were (52.59±5.44) %,(35.51±5.74) %, (27.77±8.64) %, (1.56±0.51), (2.66±0.47)mg/L, (108.62±5.85) ng/L and (115.79±7.18) ng/Lrespectively, compared with those in H. pylori-negative patients, the percentages of CD3+, CD4+ and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ decreased, but the level of IL-2, IL-6 increased, and the difference was significant (P<0.001-P<0.011).Moreover, the percentages of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and the level of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 in the patients with mixed infection of

  17. 绿豆淀粉抗老化技术及在冰淇淋中的应用%An Enzymatic Method for Inhibiting Retrogradation of Mung Bean Starch and Its Application in Ice Cream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新华; 岳小靖

    2012-01-01

    为抑制绿豆淀粉在冰淇淋贮藏期间老化而产生的淀粉味感,以绿豆淀粉为原料,经过α-淀粉酶酶解处理,通过正交试验研究不同酶解条件对绿豆淀粉抗老化性质的影响。结果表明:用α-淀粉酶处理绿豆淀粉,使其适度的水解,保持了绿豆特有的口感风味,且保水力较大,糊化性好,老化度明显低于未经过α-淀粉酶处理的绿豆淀粉。酶解最佳工艺为pH6.5、酶解温度70℃、添加0.0008%的α-淀粉酶、酶解8min。在绿豆冰淇淋制作中添加不同量的酶解绿豆浆、CMC-Na、明胶、单甘酯对绿豆冰淇淋膨化率及融化率和口感有不同的影响,酶解豆浆、CMC-Na、明胶、单甘酯的添加量分别为60%、0.1%、0.1%、0.15%时,绿豆冰淇淋的风味口感明显改善。%The retrogradation of mung bean starch in ice cream during frozen storage leads to an unpleasant starchy taste.In this study,mung bean starch was treated withα-amylase and the effects of various hydrolysis conditions on retrogradation properties of mung bean starch were investigated using orthogonal array design method.After proper treatment with α-amylase,the unique taste of mung bean was still maintained,and mung bean starch showed high water-holding capacity,good gelatinization properties and significantly lower retrogradation degree compared with native mung bean starch.The optimal hydrolysis conditions were pH 6.5,α-amylase dosage 0.0008% and 70 ℃ for a hydrolysis duration of 8 min.Different levels of enzymatic hydrolysate of mung bean starch,CMC-Na,gelatin,glycerin monostearate(GMS) were added together for manufacturing ice cream and these ingredients were found to have different effects on the swelling rate,melting resistance and taste of ice cream.Ice cream with enzymatic hydrolysate of mung bean starch,CMC-Na,gelatin and GMS added at 60%,0.1%,0.1% and 0.15%,respectively showed notably improved taste.

  18. Helicobacter pylori in humans: Where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Arshad Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been associated with colonization of gastro duodenal mucosa of humans from millions of years. The main burden of the disese is in the developing countries, due to overcrowding and poor hygiene. If left untreated it leads to lot of sequlae from minor to sinister diseases over a period of time. The main challenges that remain are prevention of H. pylori-related diseases by effective treatment and screening procedures and development of a vaccine, which can address all these issues including beneficial aspects of H. pylori. The literature pertaining to different aspects of H. pylori were scrutinized from Pubmed. Material on clinical behavior, complications of chronic gastric involvement, and prevention besides role of H. pylori in nongastric diseases and the latest trends of management was collected for research and review. We continue to face many challenges.The prevention of cancer of the stomach, a worst sequlae of H. pylori continues to be a big challenge despite population screening and prevention surveys being underway in many countries. On the other hand continued scientific work has now unfolded involvement of H. pylori in extragastric diseases like cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, idiopathic thrombocytopenia, sideroblastic anemia, mental diseases, and collagen vascular diseases. In contrast, the beneficial effects of H. pylori with respect to allergic diseases and obesity are now clear. Moreover, problem of drug resistance for eradication of H. pylori has arisen for which novel treatments are being tried. Lactobacillus reuteri having anti H. pylori action is emerging as one of the promising treatment.

  19. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and risk of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a risk factor for distal stomach cancer, and a few small studies have suggested that H. pylori may be a potential risk factor for lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study of 350 lung adenocarcinoma cases, 350 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 700 controls nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC cohort of male Finnish smokers. Controls were one-to-one matched by age and date of baseline serum draw. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori whole-cell and cytotoxin-associated gene (CagA antigens, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for associations between H. pylori seropositivity and lung cancer risk using conditional logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was detected in 79.7% of cases and 78.5% of controls. After adjusting for pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with either adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.75-1.6 or squamous cell carcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.77-1.7. Results were similar for CagA-negative and CagA-positive H. pylori seropositivity. Despite earlier small studies suggesting that H. pylori may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, H. pylori seropositivity does not appear to be associated with lung cancer.

  20. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: Updates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is highly prevalentin human, affecting nearly half of the world'spopulation; however, infection remains asymptomaticin majority of population. During its co-existence withhumans, H. pylori has evolved various strategies tomaintain a mild gastritis and limit the immune responseof host. On the other side, presence of H. pylori is alsoassociated with increased risk for the development ofvarious gastric pathologies including gastric cancer (GC).A complex combination of host genetics, environmentalagents, and bacterial virulence factors are consideredto determine the susceptibility as well as the severityof outcome in a subset of individuals. GC is one of themost common cancers and considered as the third mostcommon cause of cancer related death worldwide. Manystudies had proved H. pylori as an important risk factorin the development of non-cardia GC. Although both H.pylori infection and GC are showing decreasing trendsin the developed world, they still remain a major threatto human population in the developing countries. Thecurrent review attempts to highlight recent progress inthe field of research on H. pylori induced GC and aimsto provide brief insight into H. pylori pathogenesis,the role of major virulence factors of H. pylori thatmodulates the host environment and transform thenormal gastric epithelium to neoplastic one. This reviewalso emphasizes on the mechanistic understanding ofhow colonization and various virulence attributes of H.pylori as well as the host innate and adaptive immuneresponses modulate the diverse signaling pathways thatleads to different disease outcomes including GC.

  1. Is duodenal biopsy appropriate in areas endemic for Helicobacter pylori?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Abdurrahman; Cihangiroglu, Gulcin; Bilgic, Yilmaz; Calhan, Turan; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The primary reason for obtaining duodenal biopsy sample is to diagnose celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and drug injury are common causes of duodenitis. The aim of this retrospective study was to explore effects of H. pylori and drugs on duodenal mucosa. Duodenal biopsy samples of patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE) between February 2014 and December 2014 were retrospectively examined. Clinical symptoms, referral indications, endoscopic findings, H. pylori status, and drug history were recorded. Duodenal biopsy findings were compared based on presence of H. pylori and drug history. Of 2389 patients who underwent UGIE, 206 had duodenal biopsy. Eight patients (3.9%) were diagnosed with celiac disease. After excluding cases with celiac disease, 76 patients of remaining 198 patients (36.9%) had duodenal histopathological abnormality. H. pylori was found in 95 (47.9%) patients. Drug usage was less common (42%). Of patients who had histopathological duodenitis, 59% were H. pylori-infected. Rate of duodenitis was higher in H. pylori (+) group than in H. pylori (-) group (45% vs 27.1%; odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.4; p=0.005). There was no difference between groups regarding drug use in terms of histopathological duodenitis. H. pylori is the major contributor to duodenitis in high prevalence regions. Serological testing may be more appropriate before performing duodenal biopsy in patients with suspected celiac disease.

  2. Autophagy-related genes in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uotani, Takahiro; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces autophagy in gastric epithelial cells. However, prolonged exposure to H. pylori reduces autophagy by preventing maturation of the autolysosome. The alterations of the autophagy-related genes in H. pylori infection are not yet fully understood. We analyzed autophagy-related gene expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from 136 Bhutanese volunteers with mild dyspeptic symptoms. We also studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of autophagy-related gene in 283 Bhutanese participants to identify the influence on susceptibility to H. pylori infection. Microarray analysis of 226 autophagy-related genes showed that 16 genes were upregulated (7%) and nine were downregulated (4%). We used quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to measure mRNA levels of the downregulated genes (ATG16L1, ATG5, ATG4D, and ATG9A) that were core molecules of autophagy. ATG16L1 and ATG5 mRNA levels in H. pylori-positive specimens (n=86) were significantly less than those in H. pylori-negative specimens (n=50). ATG16L1 mRNA levels were inversely related to H. pylori density. We also compared SNPs of ATG16L1 (rs2241880) among 206 H. pylori-positive and 77 H. pylori-negative subjects. The odds ratio for the presence of H. pylori in the GG genotype was 0.40 (95% CI: 0.18-0.91) relative to the AA/AG genotypes. Autophagy-related gene expression profiling using high-throughput microarray analysis indicated that downregulation of core autophagy machinery genes may depress autophagy functions and possibly provide a better intracellular habit for H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Catechins and Sialic Acid Attenuate Helicobacter pylori-Triggered Epithelial Caspase-1 Activity and Eradicate Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Chin Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammasome/caspase-1 signaling pathway in immune cells plays a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis; however, the regulation of this pathway in the gastric epithelium during Helicobacter pylori infection is yet to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of catechins (CAs, sialic acid (SA, or combination of CA and SA (CASA on H. pylori-induced caspase-1-mediated epithelial damage, as well as H. pylori colonization in vitro (AGS cells and in vivo (BALB/c mice. Our results indicate that the activity of caspase-1 and the expression of its downstream substrate IL-1β were upregulated in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. In addition, we observed increased oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase gp91phox, CD68, caspase-1/IL-1β, and apoptosis, but decreased autophagy, in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected mice. We have further demonstrated that treatment with CASA led to synergistic anti-H. pylori activity and was more effective than treatment with CA or SA alone. In particular, treatment with CASA for 10 days eradicated H. pylori infection in up to 95% of H. pylori-infected mice. Taken together, we suggest that the pathogenesis of H. pylori involves a gastric epithelial inflammasome/caspase-1 signaling pathway, and our results show that CASA was able to attenuate this pathway and effectively eradicate H. pylori infection.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-07-28

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance. PMID:25071324

  7. Effects of Community Screening for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, Maria; Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication improves the prognosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), dyspepsia, and possibly gastric cancer. Hp screening tests are accurate and eradication therapy is effective. Hp population screening seems attractive. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  8. Natural transformation and recombination in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, L.C.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriën kennen geen geslachtelijke voortplanting, ze hebben altijd één “ouder” in plaats van twee. Ze kunnen dus tijdens de voortplanting niet kruisen. Om toch erfelijke eigenschappen te kunnen uitwisselen hebben ze andere methoden. De maagbacterie Helicobacter pylori kan dit bijvoorbeeld doen doo

  9. Helicobacter pylori HP0425 Targets the Nucleus with DNase I-Like Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Min; Choe, Min-Ho; Asaithambi, Killivalavan; Song, Jae-Young; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Je Chul; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Lee, Kon Ho; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Youn, Hee-Shang; Baik, Seung-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins has a significant impact on host cell pathology. Helicobacter pylori have many nuclear targeting proteins that translocate into the nucleus of host cells. H. pylori HP0425, annotated as hypothetical, has a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, but its function has not been demonstrated. The aim of this experiment was to address the nuclear translocation of HP0425 and determine the effect of HP0425 pathology on host cells. To investigate the nuclear localization of HP0425, it was expressed in AGS and MKN-1 cells as a GFP fusion protein (pEGFP-HP0425), and its localization was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Recombinant HP0425 (rHP0425) protein was overproduced as a GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified by glutathione-affinity column chromatography. Purified rHP0425 was examined for cytotoxicity and DNase activity. The pEGFP-HP0425 fluorescence was expressed in the nucleus and cytosol fraction of cells, while it was localized in the cytoplasm in the negative control. This protein exhibited DNase activity under various conditions, with the highest DNase activity in the presence of manganese. In addition, the rHP0425 protein efficiently decreased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that HP0425 carrying a nuclear localization signal sequence translocates into the nucleus of host cells and degrades genomic DNA by DNase I-like enzymatic activity, which is a new pathogenic strategy of H. pylori in the host. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  11. Chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP have recently emerged as a novel eliciting factor for chronic urticaria (CU. The possible association between HP and CU has enormous potential, as eradicating HP could cure CU. Aims and Objectives: We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of HP infection and effect of bacterium eradication on skin lesions in patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU. Settings and Design: Four hundred sixty patients of CU attending the allergy clinic, SMS hospital, Jaipur during the period February 6, 2004, to February 6, 2006, were screened for possible eliciting factors. Patients with CIU were enrolled and others were excluded. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight patients of CIU and similar number of age and sex matched controls, attending the allergy clinic, SMS Hospital, Jaipur were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endoscopy with antral biopsy for urease and histopathology to identify HP-associated gastritis. Infected patients were given HP eradication therapy. Eradication of bacterium was confirmed by fecal antigen assay. Subjective response to treatment was judged using chronic urticaria quality-of-life questionnaire (CU-Q 2 oL while objective response to treatment was judged by need for ′rescue medication′ (antihistaminics. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi square and paired′t′ test for their level of significance. Results: HP associated gastritis was present in 48 (70.58% patients, out of which 39 (81.25% patients responded to eradication therapy. Ten (50.00% patients without HP associated gastritis showed response to symptomatic therapy. Overall 49 (72.05% patients responded and 19 (27.94% showed no response. The value of χ2 was 28.571 (P = 0.003, which showed significant association between presence of HP and response to eradication regimen. Conclusion: The response of HP eradication therapy in infected patients of CIU is significant. HP should be included in diagnostic

  12. Analysis on enzymatic browning in pine needles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, K.H.; Park, H.J.; Choi, S.S.; Cho, S.H. [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Y.T. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Tyrosinases are related to the enzymatic browning of plants and attract the major scientific interest for the prevention of it. Three tyrosinase isozymes (P{sub 1}, P{sub 2} and P{sub 3}) from pine needles were purified to homogeneity and characterized the factors that affect their activities. The L-ascorbic acid and {beta}-mercaptoethanol notably inhibited the enzymatic activities of the three isozymes. The sodium diethyldithiocarbamate was a competitive inhibitor of isozymes with the K{sub i} values of P{sub 1}(0.30 mM), P{sub 2}(0.015 mM) and P{sub 3}(0.019 mM), respectively. Their enzyme activities were however, increased by the addition of most metal ions. The optimum pH for the three isozymes was 9.0{approx}9.5 and the optimum temperatures ranged from 55 to 60{sup o} C using L-DOPA as substrate. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Dyslipidemia and H pylori in gastric xanthomatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Young Yi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship among gastric xanthomatosis (GX),H pylori, dyslipidemia, and gastritis in Korea, a well-known H pylori endemic area.METHODS: A total of 771 patients who had undergone gastroduodenoscopy by one endoscopist were included in this study. Among them, 54 patients with GX were assessed for H pylori infection and their endoscopic characteristics and serum lipid profiles. The findings were compared with 54 age- and sex-matched control subjects without GX.RESULTS: The prevalence of GX was 7% (54/771) with no sex difference. GX was mainly single (64.8%) and located in the antrum (53.7%). The mean diameter was 7 ± 3 mm. Mean body mass index (BMI) of patients with GX was 23.1 ± 2.8 and no one was above 30.Compared with the controls, lipid profiles of GX group showed significantly lower HDL-cholesterol (48.8 ± 12.3vs 62.9 ± 40.5, P = 0.028) and higher LDL-cholesterol (112.9 ± 29.9 vs 95.9 ± 22.4, P = 0.032). The level of total serum cholesterol, triglyceride and the existence of dyslipoproteinemia were not related to the presence of GX. However, GX showed a close relationship with endoscopically determined atrophic gastritis and histologic severity (24/53, 44.4% vs 8/54, 14.8%, P =0.0082). H pylori infection and bile reflux gastritis were not significantly related with GX.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of GX is 7% and it may be an increasing entity in Korea. Moreover, dyslipidemia and atrophic gastritis are found to be related to GX, but H pylori infection is not.

  14. Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Nigro Casimiro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nature of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and reflux oesophagitis is still not clear. To investigate the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and GERD taking into account endoscopic, pH-metric and histopathological data. Methods Between January 2001 and January 2003 a prospective study was performed in 146 patients with GERD in order to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection at gastric mucosa; further the value of the De Meester score endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric parameters, i.e. reflux episodes, pathological reflux episodes and extent of oesophageal acid exposure, of the patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection were studied and statistically compared. Finally, univariate analysis of the above mentioned data were performed in order to evaluate the statistical correlation with reflux esophagitis. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups, HP infected and HP negative patients, regarding age, gender and type of symptoms. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding severity of symptoms and manometric parameters. The value of the De Meester score and the ph-metric parameters were similar in both groups. On univariate analysis, we observed that hiatal hernia (p = 0,01, LES size (p = 0,05, oesophageal wave length (p = 0,01 and pathological reflux number (p = 0,05 were significantly related to the presence of reflux oesophagitis. Conclusion Based on these findings, it seems that there is no significant evidence for an important role for H. pylori infection in the development of GERD and erosive esophagitis. Nevertheless, current data do not provide sufficient evidence to define the relationship between HP and GERD. Further assessments in prospective large studies are warranted.

  15. H. pylori and mitochondrial changes in epithelial cells: The role of oxidative stress H. pylori y alteraciones mitocondriales en células epiteliales: Relación con estrés oxidativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calvino-Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with H. pylori plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and gastric lymphoma, but mechanisms leading to the various clinical manifestations remain obscure and are the primary focus of research in this field. Proliferation and apoptosis are essential in the maintenance of gastric tissue homeostasis, and changes seen in their balance may condition gastric mucosal changes during infection. Thus, excessive apoptosis or proliferation inhibition will result in cell mass loss, which is observed in gastric ulcers. On the other hand, accelerated epithelial cell turnover is characteristic of carcinogenic mucosas. There is also scientific evidence that demonstrates an association between H. pylori infection and exacerbated synthesis of free radicals, the latter being well known as a primary cause of cell death. A thorough review of the literature and the results of our experimental research lead to conclude that H. pylori-induced oxidative stress activates the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Structural and functional changes caused by this process on mitochondrial organelles lie at the origin of gastric mucosal toxicity, and lead to the development of the various manifestations associated with this infection. Based on these data we suggest that therapy with antioxidants should prove beneficial for the clinical management of patients with H. pylori infection.

  16. Challenges in Diagnosis of H. Pylori Infection in Children

    OpenAIRE

    M Sobhani Shahmirzadi

    2014-01-01

    H. pylori infection is usually acquired in early childhood. Its role in gastrointestinal and extra intestinal complaints and serious consequences in adulthood make it as challenging issues. Despite different clinical presentations, in most children, the presence of H. pylori infection does not lead to clinically apparent disease, even when it causes chronic active gastritis. Some of most important recommendations for managing H. pylori infection in children based on Guidelines from ESPGHAN an...

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been wel...

  18. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    OpenAIRE

    Wroblewski Lydia E; Peek Richard M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gas...

  19. Management and response to treatment of Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, M J; Wyatt, J I; Littlewood, J M

    1992-01-01

    Gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori was present in gastric biopsies from 24/95 (25%) children and adolescents undergoing endoscopy for recurrent abdominal pain and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. H pylori associated gastritis occurred mainly in older children (8-16 years) and was significantly associated with low socioeconomic class and a family history of peptic ulcer disease. Antral nodularity was a common endoscopic finding in H pylori positive children. Eighteen children, all o...

  20. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Patients and methods Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. Results A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, pgastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status. PMID:28860835

  1. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wroblewski Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gastric epithelial barrier.

  2. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Ontario: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Naja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been classified by the World Health Organization as a type I carcinogen. Nearly 50% of the world’s population is estimated to be infected with H pylori. Prevalence patterns of the infection are different between developing and developed countries. The present study had two objectives – to estimate the prevalence of H pylori infection in Ontario, and to evaluate the relationship between the infection and various demographic characteristics and selected lifestyle factors.

  3. Cloning and Expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Moein Farshchian; Saman Hoseinkhani; Javad Atoofi; Shahin Najar Peerayeh

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinomaand gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Antibiotictherapies do not protect from potential re-infection and have a risk for development of drugresistance. Therefore, prophylactic vaccine mediated protection against H. pylori is an attractiveclinical interest. H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA) is a conserved surface lipoprotein and playsimportant roles in the pathogenesis of...

  4. Precise role of H pylori in duodenal ulceration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Hobsley; Frank I Tovey; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    The facts that H pylori infection is commoner in duodenal ulcer (DU) patients than in the normal population, and that eradication results in most cases being cured,have led to the belief that it causes DU. However, early cases of DU are less likely than established ones to be infected. H pylori-negative cases are usually ascribed to specific associated factors such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), Crohn's disease,and hypergastrinaemia, but even after excluding these, several H pylori-negative cases remain and are particularly common in areas of low prevalence of H pylori infection. Moreover, this incidence of H pylori negative DU is not associated with a fall in overall DU prevalence when compared with countries with a higher H pylori prevalence. In countries with a high H pylori prevalence there are regional differences in DU prevalence, but no evidence of an overall higher prevalence of DU than in countries with a low H pylori prevalence. There is no evidence that virulence factors are predictive of clinical outcome. After healing following eradication of H pylori infection DU can still recur.Medical or surgical measures to reduce acid output can lead to long-term healing despite persistence of H pylori infection. Up to half of cases of acute DU perforation are H pylori negative. These findings lead to the conclusion that H pylori infection does not itself cause DU, but leads to resistance to healing, i.e., chronicity. This conclusion is shown not to be incompatible with the universally high prevalence of DU compared with controls.

  5. [On the rating of Helicobacter pylori in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedichkina, T P; Solenova, L G; Zykova, I E

    2014-01-01

    There are considered the issues related to the possibility to rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) content in drinking water. There is described the mechanism of of biofilm formation. The description refers to the biofilm formation mechanism in water supply systems and the existence of H. pylori in those systems. The objective premises of the definition of H. pylori as a potential limiting factor for assessing the quality of drinking water have been validated as follows: H. pylori is an etiologic factor associated to the development of chronic antral gastritis, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer either, in the Russian population the rate of infection with H. pylori falls within range of 56 - 90%, water supply pathway now can be considered as a source of infection of the population with H. pylori, the existence of WHO regulatory documents considering H. pylori as a candidate for standardization of the quality of the drinking water quite common occurrence of biocorrosion, the reduction of sanitary water network reliability, that creates the possibility of concentrating H. pylori in some areas of the water system and its delivery to the consumer of drinking water, and causes the necessity of the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology of the population. A comprehensive and harmonized approach to H. pylori is required to consider it as a candidate to its rating in drinking water. Bearing in mind the large economic losses due to, on the one hand, the prevalence of disease caused by H. pylori, and, on the other hand, the biocorrosion of water supply system, the problem is both relevant in terms of communal hygiene and economy.

  6. Synthesis, molecular docking and kinetic properties of β-hydroxy-β-phenylpropionyl-hydroxamic acids as Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhu-Ping; Peng, Zhi-Yun; Dong, Jing-Jun; Deng, Rui-Cheng; Wang, Xu-Dong; Ouyang, Hui; Yang, Pan; He, Juan; Wang, Yuan-Feng; Zhu, Man; Peng, Xiao-Chun; Peng, Wan-Xi; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2013-10-01

    Inhibition of urease results in Helicobacter pylori growth arrest in the stomach, promoting urease as promising targets for gastrointestinal ulcer therapy. Twenty hybrid derivatives of flavonoid scaffold and hydroxamic acid, β-hydroxy-β-phenylpropionylhydroxamic acids, were therefore synthesized and evaluated against H. pylori urease. Biological evaluation of these compounds showed improved urease inhibition exhibiting micromolar to mid-nanomolar IC50 values. Most importantly, 3-(3-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxypropionyl-hydroxamic acid (6g) exhibited high potency with IC50 of 0.083±0.004 μM and Ki of 0.014±0.003 μM, indicating that 6g is an excellent candidate to develop novel antiulcer agent. A mixture of competitive and uncompetitive mechanism was putatively proposed to understand the inconsistency between the crystallographic and kinetic studies for the first time, which is supported by our molecular docking studies.

  7. Invitro Comparitive Study of the Efficacy of Licorice Decoctant and Choice Antibiotics on Helicobacter Pylori Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Botorabi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice root, a member of the pea family has been used since ancient times as both food and medicine. Licorice has been used as an antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti inflammatory in researches .Extraction of this medical plant is used as the basis of anti-ulcer medicine for treatment of peptic ulcer. Patients and Methods: In the present study, licorice decoction (20gr/dl,33gr/dl was prepared and anti microbial activity on helicobacter pylori growth was studied by disk diffusion method and cup plate method. Results: The results showed that licorice decoction 33gr/dl by disk diffusion method inhibited growth of helicobacter pylori in vitro the same as metronidazole.(P value=0.709 However, it does not have anti bacterial activity against helicobacter pylori like amoxicillin and clarythromycin (Pvalue~0.000. Conclusion: Decoction licorice (20gr/dl, 33gr/dl can not be used as an alternative to choice antibiotics (amoxicillin, clarythromycin in vitro.

  8. Effect of Helicobacter pylori's vacuolating cytotoxin on the autophagy pathway in gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terebiznik, Mauricio R; Raju, Deepa; Vázquez, Cristina L; Torbricki, Karl; Kulkarni, Reshma; Blanke, Steven R; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Colombo, María I; Jones, Nicola L

    2009-04-01

    Host cell responses to Helicobacter pylori infection are complex and incompletely understood. Here, we report that autophagy is induced within human-derived gastric epithelial cells (AGS) in response to H. pylori infection. These autophagosomes were distinct and different from the large vacuoles induced during H. pylori infection. Autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy, conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, GFP-LC3 recruitment to autophagosomes, and depended on Atg5 and Atg12. The induction of autophagy depended on the vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and, moreover, VacA was sufficient to induce autophagosome formation. The channel-forming activity of VacA was necessary for inducing autophagy. Intracellular VacA partially co-localized with GFP-LC3, indicating that the toxin associates with autophagosomes. The inhibition of autophagy increased the stability of intracellular VacA, which in turn resulted in enhanced toxin-mediated cellular vacuolation. These findings suggest that the induction of autophagy by VacA may represent a host mechanism to limit toxin-induced cellular damage.

  9. Helicobacter pylori damages human gallbladder epithelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori (Hpy/orO damages human gallbladder epithelial cells (HGBEC).METHODS: H pylori isolated from gallbladder were cultured in a liquid medium. Different concentration supernatants and sonicated extracts of H pylori cells were then added to HGBEC in a primary culture. The morphological changes in HGBEC as well as changes in the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutamyltransferase (GGT)were measured.RESULTS: According to the culture curve of HGBEC,it was convenient to study the changes in HGBEC by adding H pylori sonicated extracts and H pylori culture supernatants. Both H pylori sonicated extracts and H pylori culture supernatants had a significant influence on HGBEC morphology, i.e. HGBEC grew more slowly, their viability decreased and their detachment increased. Furthermore, HGBEC ruptured and died. The levels of ALP (33.84 ± 6.00 vs 27.01± 4.67, P < 0.05), LDH (168.37 ± 20.84 vs 55.51 ±17.17, P < 0.01) and GGT (42.01 ± 6.18 vs 25.34 ±4.33, P < 0.01) significantly increased in the HGBEC culture supernatant in a time- and concentrationdependent. The damage to HGBEC in Hpylori culture liquid was more significant than that in H pylori sonicated extracts.CONCLUSION: H pylori induces no obvious damage to HGBEC.

  10. Chronic Gastritis and its Association with H. Pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatema, J; Khan, A H; Uddin, M J; Rahman, M H; Saha, M; Safwath, S A; Alam, M J; Mamun, M A

    2015-10-01

    This cross sectional study was designed to see association of chronic gastritis including its type with H. pylori infection. Consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic examination having histopathological evidence of chronic gastritis were enrolled in the study and was done in Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College from July 2011 to June 2012. Biopsies were taken from antrum, body and fundus in all patients. Histopathological examinations were done using H-E stain and for detection of H. pylori, rapid urease test, anti-H.pylori antibody test and histopathological test with modified Giemsa stain were done. Patients having results positive in at least two methods were considered infected by H. pylori. Total 80 dyspeptic patients having chronic gastritis were evaluated. Out of them 67(83.8%) had H. pylori infection and 13(16.2%) were H. pylori negative. Among all patients 57(71.2%) had pangastritis and 23(28.8%) had antral gastritis with female and male predominance respectively. H. pylori infection was present in 49(86.0%) cases of pangastritis and 18(78.3%) cases of antral gastritis. H. pylori infection was a little higher among males (34, 50.7%) females (33, 49.3%). H. pylori infection is the predominant cause of chronic gastritis and pangastritis is the major type.

  11. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamori, Satoshi; Higashida, Akihiro; Kawara, Fumiaki; Ohnishi, Katsuhiro; Takeda, Akihiko; Senda, Eri; Ashida, Cho; Yamada, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H. pylori infection, underwent gastro-endoscopy, and were treated with H. pylori eradication therapy. Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d. All of the patients underwent a 13C urea breath test at least 1 mo after the completion of eradication therapy. The current study investigated the independent factors associated with successful H. pylori eradication using a multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The overall success rate in the patients was 85.8%. Among the general factors examined in the multivariate analyses, only having an age less than 50 years was found to be significantly associated with a poor response to H. pylori eradication. Moreover, side effects were the only clinical factors in the patients who were under 50 years of age that significantly influenced the poor response to H. pylori eradication. CONCLUSION: H. pylori-positive elderly patients should undergo eradication therapy. In addition, it is necessary to improve H. pylori eradication therapy in younger patients. PMID:20806435

  12. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Mi; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Eui Young; Jang, Eun Kyung; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims There have been controversial reports linking Helicobacter pylori infection to autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). However, data regarding the relationship are limited for Asian populations, which have an extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. We performed this study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and AITD in Koreans. Methods This study involved adults aged 30 to 70 years who had visited a health promotion center. A total of 5,502 subjects were analysed. Thyroid status was assessed by free thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to H. pylori were measured as an indication of H. pylori infection. We compared the prevalence of TPO-Ab in subjects with and without H. pylori infection. Results H. pylori IgG antibodies were found in 2,875 subjects (52.3%), and TPO-Ab were found in 430 (7.8%). Individuals positive for H. pylori Ab were older than those negative for H. pylori Ab (p thyroiditis. PMID:28092700

  13. Helicobacter pylori vs coronary heart disease- searching for connections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena; Chmiela; Adrian; Gajewski; Karolina; Rudnicka

    2015-01-01

    In this review,we discussed the findings and concepts underlying the potential role of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infections in the initiation,development or persistence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease(CHD).This Gram-negative bacterium was described by Marshall and Warren in 1984.The majority of infected subjects carries and transmits H.pylori with no symptoms; however,in some individuals these bacteria may cause peptic ulcers,and even gastric cancers.The widespread prevalence of H.pylori infections and the fact that frequently they remain asymptomatic may suggest that,similarly to intestinal microflora,H.pylori may deliver antigens that stimulate not only local,but also systemic inflammatory response.Recently,possible association between H.pylori infection and extragastric disorders has been suggested.Knowledge on the etiology of atherosclerosis together with current findings in the area of H.pylori infections constitute the background for the newly proposed hypothesis that those two processes may be related.Many research studies confirm the indirect association between the prevalence of H.pylori and the occurrence of CHD.According to majority of findings the involvement of H.pylori in this process is based on the chronic inflammation which might facilitate the CHDrelated pathologies.It needs to be elucidated,if the infection initiates or just accelerates the formation of atheromatous plaque.

  14. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  15. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection: Bacterium and host relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of a half of the mankind. Duodenal ulcer is found in 15-25%, t gastric ulcer in 13%, while gastric adenocarcinoma develops in 1% of all infected individuals. Pathogenesis of H. pylori infection is related to the virulence factors of the bacterium, environmental (dietary habits, hygiene, stress and host factors (age, sex, blood type. Colonization of the gastric mucosa is related to the motility of the bacterium, presence of lipopolysacharide (LPS and various bacterial enzymes. Gastric mucosal injury is the result of H. pylori LPS, vacuolization cytotoxin (vacA, cytotoxin associated protein (cagA, heat shock proteins and factors responsible for neutrophil chemotaxis and activity. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa and zones of ectopic gastric epithelium. H. pylori infection is transmitted via oral-oral, fecal-oral and iatrogenic way (during endoscopy. Higher prevalence of the infection is associated with lower socioeconomic level, lack of drinking water, and living in a community. Acute H. pylori gastritis is superficial pangastritis progressing into the chronic phase after 7-10 days. Gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia can develop during the course of H. pylori infection. Clearly defined factors that influence the outcome of H. pylori infection include bacterial strain, distribution of gastritis, acid secretion and gastric mucosal atrophy.

  16. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  17. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi; Mamori; Akihiro; Higashida; Fumiaki; Kawara; Katsuhiro; Ohnishi; Akihiko; Takeda; Eri; Senda; Cho; Ashida; Hajime; Yamada

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)infection.METHODS:The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H.pylori infection,underwent gastroendoscopy,and were treated with H.pylori eradication therapy.Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d.All of the patients underwent a 13 C urea breath test at least 1 mo...

  18. The efficacy of blueberry and grape seed extract combination on triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chian-Sem; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Chen, Jui-Hao; Liu, Yuh-Hwa; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Lee, Hsiu-Chuan; Huang, Shih-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Traditional therapy with proton pump inhibitor and antibiotics is regarded as optimal for H. pylori eradication whereas, the eradication rate is unsatisfactory. Studies have reported that cranberry may inhibit H. pylori adhesion to the human gastric mucus but lack of other berry extracts have been evaluated in clinical study. Thus, a 9-week add-on randomised controlled trial was conducted to explore the impact of blueberry and grape seed extract (BGE) combinations traditional therapy for H. pylori eradication. In results, we found that there was no significant difference of eradication rate between the berry extract group and placebo group in the intention-to-treat analysis and in the per-protocol analysis (94.64% versus 84.62%, p = 0.085). Diarrhoea, constipation and epigastric pain were observed increasing during ingestion of the berry extract in some cases. In conclusion, this study indicated that no significant difference existed between the BGE extract group and placebo group in eradication rate under triple therapy.

  19. Let-7b is involved in the inflammation and immune responses associated with Helicobacter pylori infection by targeting Toll-like receptor 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-gen Teng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Toll-like receptors (TLRs are important initiators in native immune responses to microbial infections. TLR4 is up-regulated in response to H.pylori infection in gastric epithelial cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms for the expression of TLR4 in H.pylori infection have not been clearly defined. The aims of this study are to present the evidence that microRNA let-7b directly regulates TLR4 expression in human gastric epithelial cells, and subsequently influences the activation of NF-κB and the expression of the downstream genes in H.pylori infection. METHODS: The expression of let-7b was determined in gastric mucosa specimens and in two gastric epithelial cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of TLR4 was determined by immunohistochemistry staining and RT-PCR. The potential target of let-7b was identified by luciferase reporter assay and Western blot. Let-7b mimics and inhibitors were used to examine the effects of let-7b on NF-κB activity. The expression of the downstream genes of NF-κB was also determined in cells infected with H.pylori 26695. RESULTS: Let-7b was significantly decreased in gastric mucosa specimens and in gastric epithelial cell lines (AGS, GES-1 infected with H.pylori 26695 (cagA+. Let-7b was complementary to the 3'-UTR of TLR4 mRNA and regulated TLR4 expression via post-transcriptional suppression in gastric epithelium. Infection of H.pylori induced the expression of TLR4 and activated NF-κB in AGS and GES-1 cells. Overexpression of let-7b by mimics downregulated TLR4, and subsequently attenuated NF-κB, MyD88, NF-κB1/p50, RelA/p65. The expression of IL-8, COX-2 and CyclinD1 was inhibited in H.pylori infected cells with let-7b overexpression. Both TAK-242 (TLR4 inhibitor and SN50 (NF-κB inhibitor significantly inhibited the H.pylori induced downregulation of let-7b. CONCLUSIONS: Let-7b targets at TLR4 mRNA, and regulates the activation of NF-κB and the expression of the downstream genes

  20. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  1. Enzymatic Browning: a practical class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Pedrosa Silva Clerici

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a practical class about the enzymes polyphenol oxidases, which have been shown to be responsible for the enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables. Vegetables samples were submitted to enzymatic inactivation process with chemical reagents, as well as by bleaching methods of applying heat by conventional oven and microwave oven. Process efficiency was assessed qualitatively by both observing the guaiacol peroxidase activity and after the storage period under refrigeration or freezing. The practical results obtained in this class allow exploring multidisciplinary knowledge in food science, with practical applications in everyday life.

  2. Monitoring of Enzymatic Proteolysis Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dot-Protein Substrate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R. Clapp

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously utilized hybrid semiconductor quantum dot- (QD- peptide substrates for monitoring of enzymatic proteolysis. In this report, we expand on this sensing strategy to further monitor protein-protease interactions. We utilize QDs self-assembled with multiple copies of dye-labeled proteins as substrates for the sensing of protease activity. Detection of proteolysis is based on changes in the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between the QDs and the proximal dye-labeled proteins following protein digestion by added enzyme. Our study focused on two representative proteolytic enzymes: the cysteine protease papain and the serine protease endoproteinase K. Analysis of the enzymatic digestion allowed us to estimate minimal values for the enzymatic activities of each enzyme used. Mechanisms of enzymatic inhibition were also inferred from the FRET data collected in the presence of inhibitors. Potential applications of this technology include drug discovery assays and in vivo cellular monitoring of enzymatic activity.

  3. Dual Roles of Helicobacter pylori NapA in inducing and combating oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Hong, Yang; Olczak, Adriana; Maier, Susan E; Maier, Robert J

    2006-12-01

    Neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) has been well documented to play roles in human neutrophil recruitment and in stimulating host cell production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). A separate role for NapA in combating oxidative stress within H. pylori was implied by studies of various H. pylori mutant strains. Here, physiological analysis of a napA strain was the approach used to assess the iron-sequestering and stress resistance roles of NapA, its role in preventing oxidative DNA damage, and its importance to mouse colonization. The napA strain was more sensitive to oxidative stress reagents and to oxygen, and it contained fourfold more intracellular free iron and more damaged DNA than the parent strain. Pure, iron-loaded NapA bound to DNA, but native NapA did not, presumably linking iron levels sensed by NapA to DNA damage protection. Despite its in vitro phenotype of sensitivity to oxidative stress, the napA strain showed normal (like that of the wild type) mouse colonization efficiency in the conventional in vivo assay. By use of a modified mouse inoculation protocol whereby nonviable H. pylori is first inoculated into mice, followed by (live) bacterial strain administration, an in vivo role for NapA in colonization efficiency could be demonstrated. NapA is the critical component responsible for inducing host-mediated ROI production, thus inhibiting colonization by the napA strain. An animal colonization experiment with a mixed-strain infection protocol further demonstrated that the napA strain has significantly decreased ability to survive when competing with the wild type. H. pylori NapA has unique and separate roles in gastric pathogenesis.

  4. Helicobacter pylori may induce bile reflux: link between H pylori and bile induced injury to gastric epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, S D; Katsogridakis, J; Malamou, H; Giannopoulou, H; Kesse-Elia, M; Raptis, S A

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and duodenogastric reflux are both recognised as playing aetiological roles in chronic gastritis. This study investigated whether H pylori colonisation of the antral mucosa and duodenogastric reflux are independent phenomena or have a causal relationship. Thirty eight patients (15 men, 23 women) aged (mean (SD)) 48 (17) years participated. Each patient underwent gastroscopy. Antral biopsy specimens were taken to investigate H pylori colonisation. In addition BrIDA-99mTc/111In-DTPA scintigraphy was used to quantify duodenogastric reflux. H pylori positive patients who were found to have duodenogastric reflux were treated with amoxycillin (1 g/d) and metronidazole (1.5 g/d) for seven days and four tablets of bismuth subcitrate daily for four weeks. Follow up antral biopsies and scintigraphy were repeated at six months. Duodenogastric reflux could not be found in 18 patients, including eight (44%) who were H pylori positive. Ten of the 11 patients who had duodenogastric reflux (reflux % 11.6 (9.2)), however, were H pylori positive (chi 2 = 6.26, p = 0.01). These 10 patients were given eradication treatment. At six months, in six patients who became H pylori negative, duodenogastric reflux was significantly reduced from a pretreatment value of 14.3% to 3.3% (two tail, paired t = 2.57, p = 0.016). These data suggest that H pylori may induced duodenogastric reflux which may be important in the pathogenesis of H pylori gastritis or carcinogenesis, or both. PMID:8566844

  5. Aqueous and Organic Solvent-Extracts of Selected South African Medicinal Plants Possess Antimicrobial Activity against Drug-Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori: Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collise Njume

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638 using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC50 values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05 as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05. These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity.

  6. H. pylori-Induced DNA Strand Breaks Are Introduced by Nucleotide Excision Repair Endonucleases and Promote NF-κB Target Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara L. Hartung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori exhibits genotoxic properties that promote gastric carcinogenesis. H. pylori introduces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in epithelial cells that trigger host cell DNA repair efforts. Here, we show that H. pylori-induced DSBs are repaired via error-prone, potentially mutagenic non-homologous end-joining. A genome-wide screen for factors contributing to DSB induction revealed a critical role for the H. pylori type IV secretion system (T4SS. Inhibition of transcription, as well as NF-κB/RelA-specific RNAi, abrogates DSB formation. DSB induction further requires β1-integrin signaling. DSBs are introduced by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG, which, together with RelA, are recruited to chromatin in a highly coordinated, T4SS-dependent manner. Interestingly, XPF/XPG-mediated DNA DSBs promote NF-κB target gene transactivation and host cell survival. In summary, H. pylori induces XPF/XPG-mediated DNA damage through activation of the T4SS/β1-integrin signaling axis, which promotes NF-κB target gene expression and host cell survival.

  7. Rebamipide attenuates Helicobacter pylori CagA-induced self-renewal capacity via modulation of β-catenin signaling axis in gastric cancer-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong Woo; Noh, Yu Na; Hwang, Won Chan; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2016-08-01

    Rebamipide, a mucosal-protective agent, is used clinically for treatment of gastritis and peptic ulcers induced by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) which is associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Although rebamipide is known to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells, the action mechanisms of rebamipide in gastric carcinogenesis remains elusive. Here, we show that rebamipide suppresses H. pylori CagA-induced β-catenin and its target cancer-initiating cells (C-IC) marker gene expression via upregulation of miRNA-320a and -4496. Rebamipide attenuated in vitro self-renewal capacity of H. pylori CagA-infected gastric C-IC via modulation of miRNA-320a/-4496-β-catenin signaling axis. Moreover, rebamipide enhanced sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs in CagA-expressed gastric C-IC. Furthermore, rebamipide suppressed tumor-initiating capacity of gastric C-IC, probably via suppression of CagA-induced C-IC properties. These data provide novel insights for the efficacy of rebamipide as a chemoprotective drug against H. pylori CagA-induced carcinogenic potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Helicobacter pylori-induced modulation of the promoter methylation of Wnt antagonist genes in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyo-Joon; Kim, Sang Gyun; Lim, Joo Hyun; Choi, Ji Min; Kim, Woo Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2017-06-22

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in the promoter methylation and gene expression of multiple Wnt antagonists between the chronic infection and eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in gastric carcinogenesis. The levels of methylation and corresponding mRNA expression of seven Wnt antagonist genes (SFRP1, -2, -5, DKK1, -2, -3, WIF1) were compared among the patients with H. pylori-positive gastric cancers (GCs), and H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative controls, by quantitative MethyLight assay and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. The changes of the methylation and expression levels of the genes were also compared between the H. pylori eradication and H. pylori-persistent groups 1 year after endoscopic resection of GCs. The methylation levels of SFRP and DKK family genes were significantly increased in the patients with H. pylori-positive GCs and followed by H. pylori-positive controls compared with H. pylori-negative controls (P pylori-negative controls, H. pylori-positive controls, and to H. pylori-positive GCs (P pylori eradication (P pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. The epigenetic field may not be reversed even after H. pylori eradication except by DKK3 methylation.

  9. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  10. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  11. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Bioluminescence methods for enzymatic determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, William D.; Denton, Mark S.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.

    1982-01-01

    An enzymatic method for continuous, on-line and rapid detection of diagnostically useful biomarkers, which are symptomatic of disease or trauma-related tissue damage, is disclosed. The method is characterized by operability on authentic samples of complex biological fluids which contain the biomarkers.

  13. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in benign gastric ulcers in a cohort of Sri Lankan patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijetunge, S; Kotakadeniya, R; Noordeen, F; Buharideen, S M; Samarasinghe, B; Dharmapala, A; Galketiya, K B

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence is decreasing globally and prevalence of non H. pylori gastric ulcers is increasing. The following study was conducted to assess the prevalence of H. pylori in benign gastric ulcers in a sample of Sri Lankan patients. This was a cross-sectional study of 59 dyspeptic patients with benign gastric ulcers. Multiple endoscopic gastric biopsies were obtained and histology, immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction were performed for H. pylori detection. An immunochromatography assay was performed to detect blood anti H. pylori antibodies. Four (6.8%) were positive for H. pylori. Therefore, it is likely that most benign gastric ulcers are of non-H. pylori aetiology.

  14. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  15. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  16. Helicobacter pylori and gastric or duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, treatment of the infection improves healing and prevents complications and recurrences. The drug regimen generally consists of a high-dose proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole plus antibiotics. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we conducted a review of the literature in order to determine the standard empirical antibiotic regimen for H. pylori infection in adults with gastric or duodenal ulcer in France. In 2015, due to an increase in H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, a 7-day course of the PPI + clarithromycin + amoxicillin combination is effective in only about 70% of cases. A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of trials involving thousands of patients suggests that prolonging treatment with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin or a PPI + amoxicillin + metronidazole to 10 or 14 days improves the rate of H. pylori eradication by 5% to 10%. A metanalysis of seven trials including a total of about 1000 patients showed that combination therapy with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days eradicates H. pylori in about 90% of cases, compared to about 80% of cases with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin given for 7 days. Sequential treatment with amoxicillin for 5 days, followed by clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days, has also been tested in thousands of patients. Efficacy and adverse effects were similar to those observed when the same antibiotics were taken simultaneously for 5 days. In randomised trials, replacing clarithromycin or amoxicillin with a fluoroquinolone yielded conflicting results. In 2009, nearly 20% of H. pylori isolates were resistant to levofloxacin in France. Tetracycline has only been evaluated in combination with bismuth. The few available data on doxycycline suggest that its efficacy is similar to that of tetracycline. A fixed-dose combination of bismuth subcitrate potassium + metronidazole

  17. Systems analysis of metabolism in Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric diseases, such as gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinomas. Despite more than half of the global population being infected with this bacterium, not all individuals will develop clinical symptoms. Nevertheless, its association with gastric cancer, the high infection rate, as well as the failures on eradication ...

  18. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Karimi; Koroush Fakhimi Derakhshan; Farid Imanzadeh; Mohamad Rezaei; Zahra Cavoshzadeh; Saeid Maham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and ...

  19. H. PYLORI AND GASTROPATHY IN DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Koval V. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 11 years the prevalence of diabetes in Ukraine has increased rapidly – from 1.8 to 2.8%. This especially concerns children and adolescents. The progression and compensation of the diabetes depend on many factors. In today’s medical literature the role of Helicobacter рylori in the development and progression of diabetic gastroparesis is widely discussed. In addition, the issue of the necessity and feasibility of H. Pylori eradication in these patients is ...

  20. Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori and Acid Peptic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sigmund Kradjen; Philip Sherman

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacteria implicated as a cause of histological gastritis, contributing to peptic ulcer disease and perhaps playing a role in gastric cancer in humans. The organism is found worldwide; the prevalence of infection increases with age; and colonization probably persists for life. Diagnostic approaches chat have been used include tissue stains, culture of stomach biopsy specimens, labelled-urea breath tests and serology. It is ...

  1. Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bednarska, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis – a summary K.A. Bednarska The dissertation entitled ‘Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis’ describes the enzymatic hydrolysis and kinetic modelling of liquefaction and saccharification of wheat starch. A

  2. [Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Zaterka, Schlioma

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroent