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Sample records for pylori colonization-related factors

  1. Celecoxib inhibits Helicobacter pylori colonization-related factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of celecoxib,a selective COX-2 inhibitor,on Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) colonization-related factors and its mechanism.METHODS:After co-incubation with celecoxib,morphology of H.pylori strain 26695 was observed under a transmission electron microscope.Flagella motility was assessed by stab agar motility test.Adherence of H.pylori to AGS cells was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Levels of mRNA expression in flagellar genes(flaA,flaB),urease genes(ureA,ureB)and ...

  2. Celecoxib inhibits Helicobacter pylori colonization-related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hong; Li, Jiang; Liu, Fang-Xun

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization-related factors and its mechanism. METHODS: After co-incubation with celecoxib, morphology of H. pylori strain 26695 was observed under a transmission electron microscope. Flagella motility was assessed by stab agar motility test. Adherence of H. pylori to AGS cells was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Levels of mRNA expression in flagellar genes (flaA, flaB), urease genes (ureA, ureB) and adhesin genes (babA, sabA, alpA, alpB, hpaA, hopZ) were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Separation and non-integrity of bacterial cell wall, rarefaction and asymmetry of cytoplasm, and even lysis of H. pylori were observed in the presence of celecoxib. When H. pylori strains were incubated in the presence of celecoxib, their flagellar motility and adherence to AGS cells were inhibited. The expression of ureA, ureB, babA, sabA, alpA, alpB, hpaA, hopZ was up-regulated while the expression of flaA, flaB was down-regulated in the presence of celecoxib. CONCLUSION: Celecoxib inhibits flagellar motility and adherence of H. pylori to AGS cells, and destructs their normal structure in vitro. PMID:20143463

  3. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Ontario: Prevalence and Risk Factors

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    Farah Naja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been classified by the World Health Organization as a type I carcinogen. Nearly 50% of the world’s population is estimated to be infected with H pylori. Prevalence patterns of the infection are different between developing and developed countries. The present study had two objectives – to estimate the prevalence of H pylori infection in Ontario, and to evaluate the relationship between the infection and various demographic characteristics and selected lifestyle factors.

  4. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

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    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  5. H pylori status and angiogenesis factors in human gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anita Mangia; Alfredo Di Leo; Stefania Tommasi; Pasquale Berloco; Jian Ming Xu; Angelo Paradiso; Annalisa Chiriatti; Girolamo Ranieri; Ines Abbate; Maria Coviello; Giovanni Simone; Francesco Alfredo Zito; Severino Montemurro; Antonello Rucci

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate H pylori expression in gastric cancer patients in relation to primary tumor angiogenic markers, such as microvessel density (MVD), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGF-R1), p53 and circulating VEGF levels.METHODS: Angiogenic markers were analyzed immunohistochemically in 56 primary gastric cancers. H pylori cytotoxin (vacA) and the cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA) amplification were evaluated using PCR assay. Serum H pylori IgG antibodies and serum/plasma circulating VEGF levels were detected in 39 and 38 patients by ELI SA, respectively.RESULTS: A total of 69% of patients were positive for circulating IgG antibodies against H pylori. cagA-positive H pylori strains were found in 41% of gastric patients. vacA was found in 50% of patients; s1 strains were more highly expressed among vacA-positive patients. The presence of the s1 strain was significantly associated with cagA (P = 0.0001). MVD was significantly correlated with both tumor VEGF expression (r = 0.361, P = 0.009) and serum VEGF levels (r = -0.347, P = 0.041).Conversely, neither VEGF-R1 expression nor MVD was related to p53 expression. However, H pylori was not related to any angiogenic markers except for the plasma VEGF level (P = 0.026).CONCLUSION: H pylori antigen is related to higher plasma VEGF levels, but not to angiogenic character istics. It can be hypothesized that the toxic effects of H pylori on angiogenesis occurs in early preclinical disease phase or in long-lasting aggressive infections, but only when high H pylori IgG levels are persistent.

  6. Transforming growth factor-β: an important mediator in Helicobacter pylori-associated pathogenesis

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    Li Nian Shuang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a Gram-negative microaerophilic, curved bacillus that specifically colonizes the gastric mucosa. The interaction between virulence factors, host genetic factors and environmental factors contributes to the pathogenesis of H. pylori, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Infection with H. pylori has recently been recognized as the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. As a pleiotropic cytokine, transforming growth factor (TGF-β regulates various biological processes, ranging from cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent studies have shed new light on the involvement of TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of H. pylori. This review focuses on the potential etiologic role of TGF-β in H. pylori-mediated gastric pathogenesis.

  7. Dietary Factors in Relation to Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Seyyed Ali Mard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Helicobacter pylori (HP and diet are both risk factors for gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Helicobacter pylori infection and dietary habits common in Khuzestan province. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011–2013 on 374 patients. Participants were interviewed using a food frequency questionnaire and tissue sample of the antrum was sent for pathology lab. The histopathological major variables were graded on a scale of 3 (mild, moderate, and severe and data analyzed using nonparametric tests. Results. In this study, of 160 patients (43% that were determined, 8.1 percent had severe contamination. Among dietary patterns, relationship between energy intake and carbohydrate with H. pylori was significant. A direct association was found between mean daily intakes of sausage (P=0.001 and burgers (P<0.05 with HP infection. Low intake of fresh vegetables and fruits was the most significant risk factors (P<0.05. Conclusion. There is a possibility that some dietary factors such as consumption of fast foods and low intake of fresh vegetables may increase the chance of HP and severity of this infection.

  8. Postoperative Helicobacter pylori Infection as a Prognostic Factor for Gastric Cancer Patients after Curative Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Da Hyun; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Chung, Hyunsoo; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2017-09-15

    Few studies have evaluated the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on the prognosis of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer (GC) after curative surgery. We investigated the association between the H. pylori infection status and clinical outcome after surgery. We assessed the H. pylori status of 314 patients who underwent curative resection for GC. The H. pylori status was examined using a rapid urease test 2 months after resection. Patients were followed for 10 years after surgery. An H. pylori infection was observed in 128 of 314 patients. The median follow-up period was 93.5 months. A Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients with H. pylori had a higher cumulative survival rate than those who were negative for H. pylori. Patients with stage II cancer who tested negative for H. pylori were associated with a poor outcome. In a multivariate analysis, H. pylori-negative status was a significant independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival. Having a negative H. pylori infection status seems to indicate poor prognosis for patients with GC who have undergone curative resection. Further prospective controlled studies are needed to evaluate the mechanism by which H. pylori affects GC patients after curative surgery in Korea.

  9. Assessment of risk factors of helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease.

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    Mhaskar, Rahul S; Ricardo, Izurieta; Azliyati, Azizan; Laxminarayan, Rajaram; Amol, Bapaye; Santosh, Walujkar; Boo, Kwa

    2013-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer. There have been no studies addressing environmental and dietary risk factors in western India. We conducted a case control study enrolling peptic ulcer patients in Pune, India. Risk factors for peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection were assessed in a participant interview. H. pylori status was assessed from stool by monoclonal antigen detection. We enrolled 190 peptic ulcer, 35 stomach cancer patients, and 125 controls. Fifty-one percent (180/350) of the participants were infected with H. pylori. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) [odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.39], meat consumption (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.30-4.23), smoking (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24-4.02), eating restaurant food (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.39-10.23), and drinking nonfiltered or nonboiled water (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.23) were risk factors for H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03-2.89), meat (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.75), fish (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02-1.89) consumption, and a family history of ulcer (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08-1.60) were risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers (OR: 0.20, 95% CI: 0.10-0.37) and parasite infestation (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24-0.80) were protective against H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection is associated with peptic ulcer. Lower SES, consumption of restaurant food, meat, nonfiltered water, and smoking are risk factors for H. pylori. Consumption of meat, fish, and a family history of peptic ulcer are risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers and concurrent parasite infestation appear to be protective against H. pylori.

  10. The Clinical Correlations of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors and Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria

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    Yi-Chun Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study Aims. The association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU remains controversial. This study explored the role of H. pylori in CSU among different virulent genotypes patients. Patients and Methods. Patients infected by H. pylori were sorted into two groups as group A (with CSU and group B (without CSU. The tissue materials were taken via endoscopy for polymerase chain reaction study to determine virulence factors. After H. pylori eradication therapy, the eradication rate and response of urticaria were evaluated by using C13-UBT and a three-point scale (complete remission, partial remission, or no improvement. Results. The results were comparable between patients of groups A and B in terms of H. pylori infection rates and eradication rate. Longitudinal follow-up of 23.5 months showed complete remission of urticaria in 63.6% but no improvement in 36.4% of the patients after H. pylori eradication. H. pylori infected patients with different virulence factors such as cytotoxin-associated gene A, vacuolating cytotoxin gene A signal region and middle region have similar remission rates for CSU. Conclusions. Current study suggests that H. pylori may play a role in the development and disease course of CSU but may be irrelevant to different virulent genotypes.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection is an independent risk factor of early and advanced colorectal neoplasm.

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    Kim, Tae Jun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Baek, Sun-Young; Kim, Kyunga; Hong, Sung Noh

    2017-06-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the development of colorectal neoplasm remains controversial. We examined the association between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasm in a large sample of healthy participants who underwent screening colonoscopy. A cross-sectional study of 8916 men, who participated in a regular health-screening examination that included an H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G antibody test and colonoscopy, was conducted to evaluate the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasm. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, regular exercise, regular aspirin use, and family history of colorectal cancer showed that the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for any adenoma and advanced neoplasm was 1.32 (1.07-1.61) and 1.90 (1.05-3.56) in participants with H. pylori infection and without H. pylori infection, respectively. The association persisted after further adjustment for inflammatory markers or metabolic variables including fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Regarding the location, a positive association was confined to cases with proximal adenomas and was observed similarly in all the evaluated subgroups. In a large-scale study, carefully controlled for confounding factors, involving asymptomatic participants without a history of colonoscopy, H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the risk of any colorectal adenoma and advanced colorectal neoplasm. Prospective studies are necessary to determine whether H. pylori eradication can reduce this risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection as a triggering factor of attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visy, Beáta; Füst, George; Bygum, Anette

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori infection is considered among the causative factors of urticaria and angioedema. Having conducted a study on 65 patients, Hungarian authors reported in 2001 that successful eradication of H. pylori is followed by a significant reduction in the number of attacks in ...

  13. Risk Factors and Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Five Largest Islands of Indonesia: A Preliminary Study.

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    Ari Fahrial Syam

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia is still controversial and mainly investigated in the largest ethnic group, Javanese. We examined the prevalence of H. pylori infection using four different tests including culture, histology confirmed by immunohistochemistry and rapid urease test. We also analyzed risk factors associated with H. pylori infection in five largest islands in Indonesia. From January 2014-February 2015 we consecutively recruited a total of 267 patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Java, Papua, Sulawesi, Borneo and Sumatera Island. Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 22.1% (59/267. Papuan, Batak and Buginese ethnics had higher risk for H. pylori infection than Javanese, Dayak and Chinese ethnics (OR = 30.57, 6.31, 4.95; OR = 28.39, 5.81, 4.61 and OR = 23.23, 4.76, 3.77, respectively, P <0.05. The sensitivity and specificity for RUT and culture were 90.2%, 92.9% and 80.5%, 98.2%, respectively. The patients aged 50-59 years group had significantly higher H. pylori infection than 30-39 years group (OR 2.98, P = 0.05. Protestant had significantly higher H. pylori infection rate than that among Catholic (OR 4.42, P = 0.008. It was also significantly lower among peoples who used tap water as source of drinking water than from Wells/river (OR 9.67, P = 0.03. However only ethnics as become independent risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although we confirmed low prevalence of H. pylori in Javanese; predominant ethnic in Indonesia, several ethnic groups had higher risk of H. pylori infection. The age, religion and water source may implicate as a risk factor for H. pylori infection in Indonesia.

  14. Frequency of virulence factors in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with gastritis.

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    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Bagheri, Nader; Zamanzad, Behnam; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-03-01

    The outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been related to specific virulence-associated bacterial genotypes. The vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), cagA gene, oipA and babA2 gene are important virulence factor involving gastric diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between virulence factors of H. pylori and histopathological findings. Gastroduodenoscopy was performed in 436 dyspeptic patients. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, virulence factors and for histopathological assessment. The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect virulence factors of H. pylori using specific primers. vacA genotypes in patients infected with H. pylori were associated with cagA, iceA1 and iceA2. In the patients with H. pylori infection there was a significant relationship between cagA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and chronic inflammation (P = 0.013) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.034). Neutrophil infiltration was found to be more severe in the s1 group than in the s2 group (P = 0.042). Also was a significant relationship between oipA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.018). No significant relationships were observed between other vacA genotypes and histopathological parameters. H. pylori strains showing cagA, vacA s1 and oipA positivity are associated with more severe gastritis in some histological features but virulence factors of H. pylori do not appear to determine the overall pattern of gastritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors associated with H pylori epidemiology in symptomatic children in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cinthia Goldman; Ricardo Weill; Marcela Zubillaga; Guillermo I Perez-Perez; José Boccio; Andrés Barrado; Mariana Janjetic; Norma Balcarce; Eduardo Cueto Rua; Masaru Oshiro; María L Calcagno; Margarita Martinez Sarrasague; Julián Fuda

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine prevalence of H pylori infection in symptomatic children in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and to investigate factors associated with H pylori positivity.METHODS: A total of 395 children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms referred to the Gastroenterology Unit of the Children Hospital "Sor Maria Ludovica"were evaluated for the presence of H pylori by the 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT). A questionnaire was applied to the recruited population.RESULTS: Prevalence of H pylori infection was 40.0% in tlis population (mean age 9.97 ± 3.1 years). The factors associated with H pylori positivity were number of siblings (P < 0.001), presence of pet cats (P = 0.03)and birds (P = 0.04) in the household, and antecedents of gastritis among family members (P = 0.01). After multivariate analysis, number of siblings [Odds ratio (OR)= 1.39; 95% CI, 1.20-1.61] and contact with pet cats (OR = 1.76; 95% CI, 1.00-3.09) remained as variables associated with H pylori infection.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H pylori infection in children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in Argentina was similar to that reported in developed countries. Children from families with a higher crowding index and presence of pet cats have a higher risk of being colonized with H pylori.

  16. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors in patients with benign peptic ulcer disease

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    Depender Kumar Timshina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess and compare the risk factors in patients with benign gastric and duodenal ulcers and to correlate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in benign peptic ulcer disease. Methods: A total of 30 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer disease were included in this study after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Their clinical profile and endoscopic findings were noted. Antral biopsies were subjected to histopathological examination and urease test for detection of H. pylori. Results were correlated. The study was cleared by the Institute Research Council and the Ethics committee. Results: The male: female ratio was 11:4. Overall, H. pylori infection was prevalent in 93.3% of the patients. Patients who took spicy food had a significantly higher rate of H. pylori positivity (P=0.04. Smoking, alcohol intake and NSAIDs did not affect H. pylori status in patients. There was no significant association between the site of the ulcer and H. pylori infection. Conclusions: Based on our observations we conclude that prevalence of H. pylori infection is similar in duodenal and gastric ulcers and intake of spicy food is a significant risk factor.

  17. Factors Related to Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Generation in 2275 Helicobacter pylori Seroprevalent Adults.

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    Lee, Sang Pyo; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2017-06-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) symptoms are common; however, the role of Helicobacter pylori and gastric corpus atrophy in the generation of these symptoms is controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for UGI symptoms in adults in an endemic area of H. pylori infection. Korean adults who completed questionnaires on the day of serum anti-H. pylori IgG and pepsinogen (PG) assays before UGI endoscopy were included. Gastric corpus atrophy was based on the criteria of a serum PG I/II ratio pylori serology assay was positive in 1382 (60.7%) subjects, and gastric corpus atrophy was present in 291 (12.8%). Neither H. pylori seropositivity (p = 0.077) nor gastric corpus atrophy (p = 0.138) was related to the presence of UGI symptoms. Female gender and smoking were independent risk factors for heartburn and upper abdominal pain (all p pylori seroprevalent population, female gender is the most common risk factor followed by smoking for UGI symptom generation. Neither H. pylori seropositivity nor gastric corpus atrophy is an independent risk factor for UGI symptom generation.

  18. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors in duodenal ulceration: A primary cause or a secondary infection causing chronicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank I Tovey; Michael Hobsley; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    Reports from countries with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection do not show a proportionately high prevalence of duodenal ulceration,suggesting the possibility that H pylori cannot be a primary cause of duodenal ulceration. It has been mooted that this discrepancy might be explained by variations in the prevalence of virulence factors in different populations. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the published literature gives support to this possibility. The relevant literature was reviewed and analyzed separately for countries with a high and low prevalence of H pylori infection and virulence factors. Although virulent strains of H pylori were significantly more often present in patients with duodenal ulcer than without the disease in countries with a low prevalence of H pyloriinfection in the population, there was no difference in the prevalence of virulence factors between duodenal ulcer, non- ulcer dyspepsia or normal subjects in many countries, where the prevalence of both H pylori infection and of virulence factors was high.In these countries, the presence of virulence factors was not predictive the clinical outcome. To explain the association between virulence factors and duodenal ulcer in countries where H pylori prevalence is low,only two papers were found that give little support to the usual model proposed, namely that organisms with the virulence factors are more likely than those without them to initiate a duodenal ulcer. We offer an alternative hypothesis that suggests virulence factors are more likely to interfere with the healing of a previously produced ulcer. The presence of virulence factors only correlates with the prevalence of duodenal ulcer in countries where the prevalence of H pylori is low. There is very little evidence that virulence factors initiate duodenal ulceration, but they may be related to failure of the ulcer to heal.

  19. Helicobacter pylori as a risk factor for central serous chorioretinopathy: Literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aránzazu; Mateo-Montoya; Martine; Mauget-Fa?se

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium, is one of the most frequent causes of gastrointestinal infections worldwide. It has been associated as a pathogen for the human body with many systemic diseases, including different eye diseases. We will focus on a specific eye disease called idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy(ICSCR). This disease is characterized by a serous detachment of the neurosensory retina in the macular region, which affects the vision to different degrees. Currently, the pathophysiology of ICSCR is not clear and there is no effective treatment. However, several potential risk factors have been elucidated. One of the factors that has more frequently been associated with ICSCR is stress. As H. pylori was identified as a possible etiological factor for occlusive arterial diseases in young people who were particularly stressed, it was thought that H. pylori might also be present in ICSCR. Therefore, some physicians started to test its presence in patents with ICSCR. If H. pylori happened to be associated with ICSCR, the treatment of gastrointestinal infection could also improve visual symptoms and help to remediate this eye disease. Although H. pylori is highly prevalent in the general population, a true cor-relation seems to exist. We present a review on the relationship between ICSCR and H. pylori.

  20. Risk Factors and Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Five Largest Islands of Indonesia: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, Ari Fahrial; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Makmun, Dadang; Nusi, Iswan Abbas; Zain, Lukman Hakim; Zulkhairi; Akil, Fardah; Uswan, Willi Brodus; Simanjuntak, David; Uchida, Tomohisa; Adi, Pangestu; Utari, Amanda Pitarini; Rezkitha, Yudith Annisa Ayu; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Nasronudin; Suzuki, Rumiko; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia is still controversial and mainly investigated in the largest ethnic group, Javanese. We examined the prevalence of H. pylori infection using four different tests including culture, histology confirmed by immunohistochemistry and rapid urease test. We also analyzed risk factors associated with H. pylori infection in five largest islands in Indonesia. From January 2014-February 2015 we consecutively recruited a total of 267 patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Java, Papua, Sulawesi, Borneo and Sumatera Island. Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 22.1% (59/267). Papuan, Batak and Buginese ethnics had higher risk for H. pylori infection than Javanese, Dayak and Chinese ethnics (OR = 30.57, 6.31, 4.95; OR = 28.39, 5.81, 4.61 and OR = 23.23, 4.76, 3.77, respectively, P Javanese; predominant ethnic in Indonesia, several ethnic groups had higher risk of H. pylori infection. The age, religion and water source may implicate as a risk factor for H. pylori infection in Indonesia.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection: An overview of bacterial virulence factors and pathogenesis

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    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and disease outcomes are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial virulence factors, host, and environmental factors. After H. pylori enters the host stomach, four steps are critical for bacteria to establish successful colonization, persistent infection, and disease pathogenesis: (1 Survival in the acidic stomach; (2 movement toward epithelium cells by flagella-mediated motility; (3 attachment to host cells by adhesins/receptors interaction; (4 causing tissue damage by toxin release. Over the past 20 years, the understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis has been improved by studies focusing on the host and bacterial factors through epidemiology researches and molecular mechanism investigations. These include studies identifying the roles of novel virulence factors and their association with different disease outcomes, especially the bacterial adhesins, cag pathogenicity island, and vacuolating cytotoxin. Recently, the development of large-scale screening methods, including proteomic, and transcriptomic tools, has been used to determine the complex gene regulatory networks in H. pylori. In addition, a more available complete genomic database of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases worldwide is helpful to characterize this bacterium. This review highlights the key findings of H. pylori virulence factors reported over the past 20 years.

  2. Assessment of risk factors of helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease

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    Rahul S Mhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer. There have been no studies addressing environmental and dietary risk factors in western India. We conducted a case control study enrolling peptic ulcer patients in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: Risk factors for peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection were assessed in a participant interview. H. pylori status was assessed from stool by monoclonal antigen detection. Results: We enrolled 190 peptic ulcer, 35 stomach cancer patients, and 125 controls. Fifty-one percent (180/350 of the participants were infected with H. pylori. Lower socioeconomic status (SES [odds ratio (OR: 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.02-1.39], meat consumption (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.30-4.23, smoking (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24-4.02, eating restaurant food (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.39-10.23, and drinking nonfiltered or nonboiled water (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.23 were risk factors for H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03-2.89, meat (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.75, fish (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02-1.89 consumption, and a family history of ulcer (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08-1.60 were risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers (OR: 0.20, 95% CI: 0.10-0.37 and parasite infestation (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24-0.80 were protective against H. pylori infection. Conclusion: H. pylori infection is associated with peptic ulcer. Lower SES, consumption of restaurant food, meat, nonfiltered water, and smoking are risk factors for H. pylori. Consumption of meat, fish, and a family history of peptic ulcer are risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers and concurrent parasite infestation appear to be protective against H. pylori.

  3. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Dietary Factors Act Synergistically to Promote Gastric Cancer.

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    Raei, Negin; Behrouz, Bahador; Zahri, Saber; Latifi-Navid, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    However, the incidence of gastric cancer (GC) has been decreased in past decades; GC is the second cause of cancer related death in the world. Evidence has illustrated that several factors including Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, host genetics, and environmental factors (smoking and particularly diet) may play a crucial role in gastric carcinogenesis. It has been demonstrated that high consumption of fresh fruits, vegetables, high level of selenium and zinc in drinking water, sufficient iron, and cholesterol protect against GC, while; smoked , pickled, and preserved foods in salt, and nitrites increase the risk of GC. Epidemiological studies have also proved that H. pylori infection and a high salt diet could independently induce atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Recently, studies have been demonstrated that dietary factors directly influence H. pylori virulence. The use of appropriate diet could reduce levels of H. pylori colonization or virulence and prevent or delay development of peptic ulcers or gastric carcinoma. This is attractive from a number of perspectives including those of cost, treatment tolerability, and cultural acceptability. This review will describe new insights into the pathogenesis of H. pylori in relation to environmental factors, especially dietary, not only to find the developed means for preventing and treating GC, but also for understanding the role of chronic inflammation in the development of other malignancies.

  4. Helicobacter pylori and Its Virulence Factors' Effect on Serum Oxidative DNA Damages in Adults With Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Shahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter Pylori infection is a common gastrointestinal infection that can cause pathological effects, increase oxidative stress and induce an inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Inflammatory aspects may prompt the production of radical oxygen substance (ROS which may damage cells and release 8-hydroxydyoxyguanosine (8-OHdG to serum. In this study, we evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors and the association between serum level of 8-OHdG, H. pylori infection, and its various virulence factors. The presence of H. pylori and prevalence of cagA, babA and oipA genes in samples were determined by rapid urease test (RUT, histopathological exam (HE and polymerase chain reaction (PCR and oxidative DNA damage situation were assessed by using serum level of 8-OHdG. There was not any direct relation between H. pylori negative and H. pylori oipA+specimens by 8-OHdG serum level (P>0.05. In all clinical observations, the presence of cagA and oipA genes was common. There was a statistical relationship between the presence of cagA, babA factors, and high serum level of 8-OHdG (P<0.05. The presence of cagA and babA virulence factors may be associated with increased serum 8-OHdG in dyspeptic patients and may induce the damage to gastric cells.

  5. Helicobacter pylori and Its Virulence Factors' Effect on Serum Oxidative DNA Damages in Adults With Dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Heshmat; Bahreiny, Rasoul; Reiisi, Somayeh

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter Pylori infection is a common gastrointestinal infection that can cause pathological effects, increase oxidative stress and induce an inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Inflammatory aspects may prompt the production of radical oxygen substance (ROS) which may damage cells and release 8-hydroxydyoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) to serum. In this study, we evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors and the association between serum level of 8-OHdG, H. pylori infection, and its various virulence factors. The presence of H. pylori and prevalence of cagA, babA and oipA genes in samples were determined by rapid urease test (RUT), histopathological exam (HE) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and oxidative DNA damage situation were assessed by using serum level of 8-OHdG. There was not any direct relation between H. pylori negative and H. pylori oipA+specimens by 8-OHdG serum level (P>0.05). In all clinical observations, the presence of cagA and oipA genes was common. There was a statistical relationship between the presence of cagA, babA factors, and high serum level of 8-OHdG (P<0.05). The presence of cagA and babA virulence factors may be associated with increased serum 8-OHdG in dyspeptic patients and may induce the damage to gastric cells.

  6. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

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    LI Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo study the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBC. MethodsA total of 235 patients with HBC who were admitted to our hospitals from October 2008 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. The infection rate of H. pylori in those patients was calculated. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices and 97 patients with portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG, the infection rate of H. pylori was compared between those with different degrees of esophagogastric varices or PHG. In the 32 patients whose blood ammonia was determined, the level of blood ammonia was compared between H. pylori-positive and -negative groups. Between-group comparison of continuous data was performed by t test and analysis of variance, and between-group comparison of categorical data was performed by χ2 test. ResultsThe infection rate of H. pylori in the 235 patients with HBC was 80.85% (190/235. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices, who had tortuous serpentine uplift or bead-like changes of esophageal varices and tumor-like changes (with or without gastric erosion of gastric varices visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild, moderate, and severe varices (50.55% (46/91 vs 43.59% (17/39 vs 76% (19/25, χ2=6.913, P<0.05. In the 97 patients with PHG, who had snake skin-like changes, cherry red spots, scarlet rash, and erosion bleeding of gastric mucosa visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild and severe PHG (43.33% (26/60 vs 67.57% (25/37, χ2=5.391, P<005.In patients whose blood ammonia was determined, patients in H. pylori-positive group had a significantly higher average concentration of blood ammonia than those in H. pylori-negative group (62.76±13.43 vs 47.20±12.51 μmol/L, t= 3.39, P<0

  7. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections: Mitigating factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... systems worldwide. The prevalence of H. pylori ... test, histology, fluorescent in situ hybridization, culture ..... spread use of CLR in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. ..... than one bird with the same stone. Ther.

  8. Analysis of infestation rate of Helicobacter pylori and factors affecting the infestation in Inner Mongolia border recruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-wei YU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infestation and its related risk factors in the recruits at Hulunbuir pastureland and Ala Shan Desert. Methods Nine hundred male recruits (16-24 years old were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. H. pylori infection was detected by 13C-urea breath test, and the related risk factors were surveyed by using questionnaires. The data of risk factors for H.pylori infection were analyzed by using chi-square test and logistic regression. Results The H. pylori infection rate was 47.5% in recruits located in Hulunbuir pastureland, while it was 44.8% in recruits located in Ala Shan Desert. The H. pylori infection rate was higher in recruits from the West China and Central China, and higher in the recruits from the rural area than those from city (P<0.05. The level of serum pepsinogen (PG I and PGⅡ was elevated, but PGR (PGⅠ/PGⅡ lowered in the recruits with H. pylori infection (P<0.05. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the factors as hand-washing with soap, smoking, halitosis, and halitosis with acne were positively correlated with H. pylori infection. Conclusions H. pylori infection rate of new recruits is lower in Inner Mongolia compared to the finding of previous studies. Residential environment is the fact DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.09.17

  9. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors affecting gastric proton pump expression and acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Charles E; Beeson, Craig; Suarez, Giovanni; Peek, Richard M; Backert, Steffen; Smolka, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric epithelial cells and human gastric biopsies represses H,K-ATPase α subunit (HKα) gene expression and inhibits acid secretion, causing transient hypochlorhydria and supporting gastric H. pylori colonization. Infection by H. pylori strains deficient in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) genes cagL, cagE, or cagM, which do not transfer CagA into host cells or induce interleukin-8 secretion, does not inhibit HKα expression, nor does a cagA-deficient strain that induces IL-8. To test the hypothesis that virulence factors other than those mediating CagA translocation or IL-8 induction participate in HKα repression by activating NF-κB, AGS cells transfected with HKα promoter-Luc reporter constructs containing an intact or mutated NF-κB binding site were infected with wild-type H. pylori strain 7.13, isogenic mutants lacking cag PAI genes responsible for CagA translocation and/or IL-8 induction (cagA, cagζ, cagε, cagZ, and cagβ), or deficient in genes encoding two peptidoglycan hydrolases (slt and cagγ). H. pylori-induced AGS cell HKα promoter activities, translocated CagA, and IL-8 secretion were measured by luminometry, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Human gastric biopsy acid secretion was measured by microphysiometry. Taken together, the data showed that HKα repression is independent of IL-8 expression, and that CagA translocation together with H. pylori transglycosylases encoded by slt and cagγ participate in NF-κB-dependent HKα repression and acid inhibition. The findings are significant because H. pylori factors other than CagA and IL-8 secretion are now implicated in transient hypochlorhydria which facilitates gastric colonization and potential triggering of epithelial progression to neoplasia.

  10. Heliobactor pylori Virulence Factors and Their Role in Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    the specified gene. A. β-lactams prevent the completion of the peptidoglycan layer of H. pylori through their interaction with penicillin binding... hypersensitive to oxidative stress and defective in host colonization. Infect Immun 69:4034-40. 106 318. Shames, B., S. Krajden, M. Fuksa, C. Babida

  11. Dietary and socio-economic factors in relation to Helicobacter pylori re-infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslaw Jarosz; Ewa Rychlik; Magdalena Siuba; Wioleta Respondek; Malgorzata Ry(z)ko-Skiba; Iwona Sajór; Sylwia Gugala; Tomasz Bla(z)ejczyk; Janusz Ciok

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine if dietary and socio-economic factors contribute to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) re-infection.METHODS: The population of patients consisted of subjects in whom H py/or/infection had been successfully treated in the past. Patients were divided into two groups;I-examined group (111 persons with Hpy/or/re-infection) and Ⅱ-control group (175 persons who had not been re-infected). The respondents were interviewed retrospectively on their dietary habits and socio-economic factors.RESULTS: A statistically significant lower frequency of fermented dairy products (P < 0.0001), vegetables (P = 0.02), and fruit (P = 0.008) consumption was noted among patients with H pylori re-infection as compared to those who had not been re-infected.CONCLUSION: High dietary intake of probiotic bacteria, mainly lactobacillus, and antioxidants, mainly vitamin C (contained in fruit and vegetables), might decrease the risk of Hpylori re-infection.

  12. Risk Factors for and Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection among Healthy Inhabitants in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Darnindro, Nikko; Puspita Hapsari, Florentina Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia is a developing country, in most of which the infection rates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) have been reported to be high. However, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in Indonesia has been unexpectedly reported to be low. The purpose of our study was to con rm whether the prevalence of H. pylori infection is low among healthy inhabitants in Northern Jakarta by 13C-urea breath test (UBT), and to examine the association of their lifestyle/environmental factors with H. pylori infection and to identify potential routes of transmission. We recruited a total of 196 subjects from a low-income community in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia. Of them, 193 subjects who completed a questionnaire about their lifestyle/environment and had UBT were included in this study. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for sex and age with 95% con dence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression model. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 15.0%. There was difference in H. pylori infection rates among Buginese (40.0%), Betawi (9.1%), Sundanese (3.7%), and Batak (9.1%). After multivariate analysis, the ORs of intake of soybean milk, cucumber more than one time a week, infrequent hand washing before meals, and alcohol consumption were 0.10 (95%CI: 0.01-0.97), 6.61 (95%CI: 1.87-23.3), 4.10 (95%CI: 1.15-14.6), and 61.9 for former drinkers (95%CI: 1.67-2300.8), respectively. Buginese (OR=7.84; 95%CI: 1.82- 33.8) and Batak ethnic groups (OR=20.1; 95%CI: 1.90-213.2) were infected more frequently, compared with Javanese. The H. pylori infection rate in this study was low, as reported previously. After we scrutinized the factors, Buginese and Batak ethnic groups eat food using ngers more frequently than Javanese, Betawi, and Sundanese. In addition, infrequent hand wash practice before meal increased the risk. Our study indicated that person-person transmission was possible in this low prevalence area. The low infection rates of H. pylori among those of Javanese, Betawi, and

  13. The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on macrophage migration inhibitory factor, C-reactive protein and fetuin-a levels

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    Levent Kebapcilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori eradication on blood levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, macrophage migration inhibitory factor and fetuin-A in patients with dyspepsia who are concurrently infected with H. pylori. METHODS: H.pylori infection was diagnosed based on the 14C urea breath test (UBT and histology. Lansoprazole 30 mg twice daily, amoxicillin 1 g twice daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily were given to all infected patients for 14 days; 14C UBT was then re-measured. In 30 subjects, migration inhibitory factor, fetuin-A and hs-CRP levels were examined before and after the eradication of H. pylori infection and compared to levels in 30 healthy subjects who tested negative for H. pylori infection. RESULTS: Age and sex distribution were comparable between patients and controls. Migration inhibitory factor and hs-CRP levels were higher, and fetuin-A levels were lower, in H. pylori-infected patients (p0.05. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that H. pylori eradication reduces the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as migration inhibitory factor and hs-CRP and also results in a significant increase in anti-inflammatory markers such as fetuin-A.

  14. Evaluation of Clinicopathological and Risk Factors for Nonma-lignant H. Pylori Associated Gastroduodenal Disorders in Iraqi Patients

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    Ali Ibrahim Ali AL-Ezzy

    2015-11-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Several life style factors, education, animal contact, using of PPI, and NSAIDs increase the risk of H. pylori infection. Weight loss and heartburn cardinal signs for H. pylori infection. Endoscopic diagnosis and clinicopathological parameters not strictly associated with Cag A positivity.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of Helicobacter pylori infection in Saudi children: a three-year prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasosah, Mohammed; Satti, Mohammed; Shehzad, Amir; Alsahafi, Ashraf; Sukkar, Ghassan; Alzaben, Abdullah; Sunaid, Areej; Ahmed, Abdullah; AlThubiti, Sami; Mufti, Areej; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the most common chronic infections. The risk factors for H. pylori infection in both developing and developed countries are closely related to poor living conditions in childhood. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its associated risk factors among children in the western and central regions of Saudi Arabia. A prospective cross-sectional study was performed among symptomatic children in National Guard hospitals who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy from 2010 to 2013. The gold standard diagnosis of H. pylori infection was histologic presence of the bacteria in the gastric biopsy. The variables analyzed as possible risk factors included demographic and living characteristics, socioeconomic status, potential mode of transmission, and clinical indications of H. pylori infection. A total of 303 children were included in the study. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 49.8%. Among the studied variables, the following were positively associated with the presence of H. pylori in multivariable analyses: age above 10 years(OR = 11.84, 95% CI = 3.90-35.94, p pylori infection (p = .005 and .009, respectively). Helicobacter pylori infection had a high prevalence among Saudi children in the cities of Jeddah and Riyadh. It was a relatively common cause of abdominal pain and anorexia. In this cohort of children, H. pylori infection was associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, further supporting the conclusion that improving socioeconomic conditions and designing a preventive health strategy in Saudi Arabia will likely protect children against this infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Regulation of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) induced apoptosis by soluble TNF receptors in Helicobacter pylori infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, J; Goto, H.; Arisawa, T.; Niwa, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Nakayama, A.; Mori, N.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a predominant cytokine produced in the gastric mucosa of patients with Helicobacter pylori infection. TNF induces apoptosis in a variety of cells. The soluble TNF receptors (sTNF-Rs) can be divided into sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII, both of which inhibit TNF activity. However, their precise mechanisms remain unclear.
AIM—To investigate the role of sTNF-Rs in H pylori infection.
METHODS—In 40 patients, production of TNF and sTNF-Rs in gastric mucosa was measu...

  17. Influence of Dietary Factors on Helicobacter pylori and CagA Seroprevalence in Bulgaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel Yordanov; Lyudmila Boyanova; Rumyana Markovska; Juliana Ilieva; Nikolay Andreev; Galina Gergova; Ivan Mitov

    2017-01-01

    ...) yoghurt consumption also was associated with lower H. pylori virulence of the strains (CagA IgG OR, 0.56 with 95% CI, 0.341-0.921). Smoking and consumption of the other dietary factors resulted in no significant differences in the prevalence...

  18. Is Helicobacter pylori Infection the Primary Cause of Duodenal Ulceration or a Secondary Factor? A Review of the Evidence

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    Vikram Kate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori has a role in the multifactorial etiology of peptic ulcer disease. A link between H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease is now established. Other contributing factors and their interaction with the organism may initiate the ulcerative process. The fact that eradication of H. pylori infection leads to a long-term cure in the majority of duodenal ulcer patients and the fact that the prevalence of infection is higher in ulcer patients than in the normal population are cogent arguments in favor of it being the primary cause of the ulceration. Against this concept there are issues that need explanation such as the reason why only a minority of infected persons develop duodenal ulceration when infection with H. pylori is widespread. There is evidence that H. pylori infection has been prevalent for several centuries, yet duodenal ulceration became common at the beginning of the twentieth century. The prevalence of duodenal ulceration is not higher in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This paper debate puts forth the point of view of two groups of workers in this field whether H. pylori infection is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer disease or a secondary factor.

  19. Risk factors for osteoporosis in Japan: is it associated with Helicobacter pylori?

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    Asaoka D

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Daisuke Asaoka, Akihito Nagahara, Yuji Shimada, Kenshi Matsumoto, Hiroya Ueyama, Kohei Matsumoto, Yuta Nakagawa, Tsutomu Takeda, Ippei Tanaka, Hitoshi Sasaki, Taro Osada, Mariko Hojo, Sumio Watanabe Department of Gastroenterology, University of Juntendo, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Background: A number of diseases and drugs may influence bone mineral density; however, there are few reports concerning the relationship between lifestyle-related diseases and osteoporosis in Japan as determined by multivariate analysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for osteoporosis and whether infection by or eradication of Helicobacter pylori is associated with osteoporosis.Methods: Between February 2008 and November 2014, using a cross-sectional study design, we investigated patient profile (age, sex, BMI, alcohol, smoking, H. pylori infection status, comorbidities, internal medicine therapeutic agents (calcium channel blocker, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, proton pump inhibitor, serum parameters (Hb, calcium, ΥGTP, bone turn over markers (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP and collagen type I cross-linked N telopeptide (NTX, findings on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD score in consecutive outpatients aged ≥50 years at our hospital. We divided the subjects into an osteoporosis group and a non-osteoporosis group and investigated risk factors for osteoporosis between the two groups by bivariate and multivariate analyses.Results: Of the 255 eligible study subjects, 43 (16.9% had osteoporosis. Bivariate analysis showed that advanced age, female sex, lower body mass index, lower cumulative alcohol intake, lower Brinkman index, H. pylori positivity, lower hemoglobin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, lower prevalence of hiatal hernia, and endoscopic gastric mucosal atrophy were related to osteoporosis. Multivariate analysis showed that

  20. Relevance of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors for vaccine development Relevancia de los factores de virulencia de helicobacter pylori para el desarrollo de vacunas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz del Carmen Hernández-Hernández

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk for a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes, ranging from peptic ulcer disease to gastric cancer. However, the infection induces gastric and duodenal ulceration or gastric cancer in only a minority of infected subjects because H. pylori strains are genetically diverse and express different virulence factors. Individuals infected with strains that express these virulence factors probably develop severe diseases such as gastric cancer. Nevertheless, the ancient relationship between H. pylori and humans suggests that some strains could be beneficial to human health, which means that generalized administration of antibiotic therapy could eventually cause problems. The development of vaccines based on virulence factors that provide long-term protection is the best strategy for control and/or elimination of pathogenic strains. The different immunization schemes and formulations designed to evaluate the vaccines based on virulence factors in animal models have offered promising results. However, it is necessary to determine whether or not these results can be reproduced in humans. This article reviews recent vaccination studies that explore this possibility: oral vaccines using urease or inactivated whole cells plus LT as adjuvant and urease expressed in Salmonella spp. vectors, as well as a parenteral multicomponent vaccine plus aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant. Although these studies have achieved limited success, they have established support for the development of an effective vaccine against this infection.La infección por Helicobacter pylori incrementa el riesgo de un amplio espectro de cuadros clínicos, que van de la úlcera péptica al cáncer gástrico. Sin embargo, la infección sólo induce ulceración gástrica y duodenal o cáncer gástrico en la minoría de los sujetos infectados debido que las cepas de H. pylori son genéticamente diversas y expresan diferentes factores de virulencia. As

  1. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD.

  2. Helicobacter pylori enhances tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-mediated apoptosis in human gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ying Wu; Hwei-Fang Tsai; We-Cheng Lin; Ai-Hsiang Chou; Hui-Ting Chen; Jyh-Chin Yang; Ping-I Hsu; Ping-Ning Hsu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relations between tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection in apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells and to assess the expression of TRAIL onthe surface of infiltrating T-cells in Hpylori-infected gastric mucosa.METHODS: Human gastric epithelial cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells were co-cultured with H pylori in vitro, then recombinant TRAIL proteins were added to the culture. Apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells was determined by a specific ELISA for cell death. Infiltrating lymphocytes were isolated from H pylori-infected gastric mucosa, and expression of TRAIL in T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The apoptosis of gastric epithelial cell lines and primary human gastric epithelial cells was mildly increased by interaction with either TRAIL or H pylorialone. Interestingly,the apoptotic indices were markedly elevated when gastric epithelial cells were incubated with both TRAIL and H pylori (Control vsTRAIL and H pylori: 0.51±0.06 vs 2.29±0.27,P = 0.018). A soluble TRAIL receptor (DR4-Fc) could specifically block the TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Further studies demonstrated that infiltrating T-cells in gastric mucosa expressed TRAIL on their surfaces, and the induction of TRAIL sensitivity by H pylori was dependent upon direct cell contact of viable bacteria, but not CagA and VacA of H pylori.CONCLUSION: H pylori can sensitize human gastric epithelial ceils and enhance susceptibility to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Modulation of host cell sensitivity to apoptosis by bacterial interaction adds a new dimension to the immunopathogenesis of H pylori infection.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection is identified as a cardiovascular risk factor in Central Africans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longo-Mbenza B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,1 Jacqueline Nkondi Nsenga,2 Etienne Mokondjimobe,3 Thierry Gombet,3 Itoua Ngaporo Assori,3 Jean Rosaire Ibara,3 Bertrand Ellenga-Mbolla,3 Dieudonné Ngoma Vangu,4 Simon Mbungu Fuele41Faculty of Health Sciences, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha, South Africa; 2Division of Gastroenterology, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Marien Ngouabi, Brazzaville, Democratic Republic of the Congo; 4Biostatistics Unit, Lomo Medical Center, Limete, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the CongoBackground: Helicobacter pylori is now incriminated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.Objective: To examine the importance of H. pylori infection as a cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factor.Methods: Two hundred five patients (128 with H. pylori infection [HP-seropositive] and 77 without had a baseline assessment for other potential CVD risk factors and were followed prospectively for 10 years (1999–2008. They were assessed on a monthly basis for the outcomes of carotid plaque, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and stroke. In the HP-seropositive group, male sex and quartile 4 for IgG anti-H. pylori antibodies (anti-HP Ab were correlated with traditional CVD risk factors, stroke, myocardial infarction, and angina pectoris.Results: At the baseline assessment, the levels of carotid intima-media thickness, blood fibrinogen, total cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, and uric acid were higher in H. pylori-infected patients than in the uninfected group. Serum HDL-cholesterol was significantly lower in the HP-seropositive group. Men had higher levels of IgG anti-HP Ab, waist circumference, blood pressure, uric acid, and total cholesterol than women. Within the HP-seropositive group, individuals in quartile 4 for IgG anti-HP Ab had higher rates of elevated fibrinogen, diabetes mellitus, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, arterial hypertension, and high total

  4. [Helicobacter pylori infection as additional risk factor of the development of NSAID-gastropatia effects at the patients with osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, I V; Samsonov, A A; Lezhneva, Iu A; Andreev, N G; Salova, L M

    2009-01-01

    Prevalence of osteoartrosis disease is high among the population. The main places in treatment of this pathology occupy NSAID. Intake of NSAID is lead to the development of NSAID-gastropatia. During last years H. pylori infection was numbered with risk factors of the NSAID-gastropatia development. In this review considered researches which are devoted to studying ties between H. pylori and NSAID. Data of the using eradication therapy with purpose of prevention and treatment of NSAID-gastropatia associated with H. pylori are shown in this review.

  5. Proteomic analysis of the function of sigma factor σ54 in Helicobacter pylori survival with nutrition deficiency stress in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yundong Sun

    Full Text Available H. pylori can survive under a nutrition-deficient environment. During infection and transmission, H. pylori is confronted with nutrient limitation and the bacterium requires rapid alteration in gene expression for survival under stress conditions. However, the mechanism underlining this regulation remains unknown. A previous study showed that σ(54 is an important regulation factor for H. pylori survival in the nutrition-deficient environment. Our results show that the expression of σ(54 (rpoN is significantly induced in the stationary phase (nutrition deficiency and the rpoN mutant showed a significantly lower viability than wild-type H. pylori in the late stationary phase. Thus, σ(54 is involved in H. pylori survival during nutrient limitation. We used comparative proteomics to analyze the protein differentiation between wild-type and rpoN mutant during the stationary phase. With depleted nutrients, σ(54 can slow the process of proliferation by negatively regulating genes involved in energy metabolism and biosynthesis and enhance stress-resistant ability by positively regulating genes involved in protein fate and redox reaction. Especially, NapA positively regulated by σ(54 plays an important function in H. pylori survival both in the stationary phase and in water, and the latter situation would be beneficial for bacterial in vitro transmission. Our investigations give new light on the adaptive regulation of H. pylori under stress conditions.

  6. Changes with aging in gastric biomarkers levels and in biochemical factors associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in asymptomatic Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jin-Hua; Bai, Xiao-Juan; Han, Lu-Lu; Yuan, Yuan; Sun, Xue-Feng

    2017-08-28

    To observe changes in gastric biomarker levels with age and effects of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in a healthy population, and explore factors associated with gastric biomarkers. Three hundred and ninety-five subjects were selected and underwent physical examinations, biochemical tests, and measurement of serum pepsinogen (PG) I and II, gastrin-17 (G-17) and H. pylori antibody levels. Analyses were made by Student's t-test, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regressions. PGII levels were higher in the ≥ 65-years-old age group (P pylori-infected subjects that were male. LDL-C levels were higher in 55-74-years-old age group (P pylori-infected subjects and 45-64-years-old age group (P pylori infection had an effect on raising LDL-C levels to increase the risk of atherosclerosis in males, especially those of elderly age. Age, H. pylori infection, levels of renal function and FBG were associated with levels of pepsinogens and gastrin.

  7. Immune Reactions Against Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: Specific Pathogenesis of Gastric Ulcer from Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Kiyoshi Ayada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a definite causative factor for gastric ulcers (GUs. In the present study we detected a specific antigen of gastric epithelial cells (HGC-27 using cell ELISA, which was recognized by the sera of GU patients (n=20 but not in patients with chronic gastritis (CG; n=20 or in healthy volunteers (HC; n=10. This antigen was over-expressed by a stressful (heat-stressed environment, and was identified as elongation factor 2 kinase (EF-2K by western blotting. The GU patients' lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori specifically disrupted heat-stressed HGC-27 cells in a cytotoxic assay. In flow cytometry, the effector cells (lymphocytes from GU patients were significantly differentiated to T helper type 1 lymphocyte (Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL as opposed to those from CG patients. The target cells (HGC-27 expressed EF-2K and MHC-class I together with costimulatory molecules from heat stress. This antigen specific immune mechanism could have a prominent role in the pathogenesis of GU.

  8. Helicobacter pylori induces vascular endothelial growth factor production in gastric epithelial cells through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Jung; Song, Eun-Jung; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-12-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori have been known to induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in gastric epithelial cells, the precise mechanism for cellular signaling is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of bacterial virulence factor and host cellular signaling in VEGF production of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. We evaluated production of VEGF, activation of nuclear factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization in gastric epithelial cells infected with H. pylori WT or isogenic mutants deficient in type IV secretion system (T4SS). H. pylori induced VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells via both T4SS-dependent and T4SS-independent pathways, although T4SS-independent pathway seems to be the dominant signaling. The inhibitor assay implicated that activation of NF-κB and MAPKs is dispensable for H. pylori-induced VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori led to HIF-1α stabilization in gastric epithelial cells independently of T4SS, NF-κB, and MAPKs, which was essential for VEGF production in these cells. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor, treatment impaired H. pylori-induced HIF-1α stabilization and VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells. We defined the important role of ROS-HIF-1α axis in VEGF production of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells, and bacterial T4SS has a minor role in H. pylori-induced VEGF production of gastric epithelial cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Analysis of virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori isolated from a Vietnamese population

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    Ta Long

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of gastric cancer differs among countries in Asia, and it has been suggested that virulence factors associated with Helicobacter pylori are partly responsible. The aim of this study was to investigate several genetic factors regarded as virulence or molecular epidemiologic markers in H. pylori isolates from Vietnamese subjects. Results The cagA, vacA and cag right-end junction genotypes of 103 H. pylori strains from Vietnam (54 from Hanoi and 49 from Ho Chi Minh were determined by PCR and sequencing. Three types of deletion in the region located upstream of the cagA Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA repeat region were identified: the 39-bp deletion type, the 18-bp deletion type, and the no-deletion type. The majority of strains studied (77%; 80/103 had the 18-bp deletion irrespective of geographical location in the country or clinical outcome. All of the 39-bp and 18-bp deletion-type strains possessed the East Asian type cagA repeat region. The type II cag right-end junction genotype was predominant (84%. The vacA m1 genotype was significantly more common in strains isolated in Hanoi, where the incidence of gastric cancer is higher, than in strains from Ho Chi Minh. Conclusion Pre-EPIYA-region typing of the cagA gene could provide a new genetic marker of H. pylori genomic diversity. Our data support the hypothesis that vacA m1 is closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis.

  10. The Forgotten Virulence Factor: The 'non-conventional' Hemolysin TlyA And Its Role in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammad Bagher; Katzenmeier, Gerd

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human-specific Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium which colonizes the gastric mucosal layer in the stomach causing diseases such as peptic ulcer, adenocarcinoma, and gastric lymphoma. It is estimated that approximately half of the world's population is infected with H. pylori making it the most intensively characterized microbial pathogen up to now. Hemolysis has been suggested to significantly contribute to colonization of the stomach and disease progression by H. pylori. In a number of earlier studies, TlyA was characterized as a putative pore-forming cytolysin. Although a few observations in the literature suggest a role for TlyA as significant virulence factor of H. pylori, the molecular and structural characterization of this protein is much curtailed at present. Given the intensive characterization of numerous H. pylori virulence factors over the past decade, surprisingly little information exists for the TlyA toxin and its significance for pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview on microbial hemolysis and its role for pathogenesis and discusses recent research efforts aimed at an improved understanding of the role of the 'non-conventional' hemolysin and its associated RNA methyltransferase TlyA from H. pylori.

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition downregulates Helicobacter pylori-induced epithelial inflammatory responses, DNA damage and gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Johanna C; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Delgado, Alberto G; Wroblewski, Lydia E; Barry, Daniel P; Peek, Richard M; Gobert, Alain P; Wilson, Keith T

    2017-05-04

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor. We have reported increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in the H. pylori-induced human carcinogenesis cascade, and association with DNA damage. Our goal was to determine the role of EGFR activation in gastric carcinogenesis. We evaluated gefitinib, a specific EGFR inhibitor, in chemoprevention of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and cancer development. Mice with genetically targeted epithelial cell-specific deletion of Egfr (Efgr(Δepi) mice) were also used. In C57BL/6 mice, gefitinib decreased Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 expression by gastric epithelial cells, myeloperoxidase-positive inflammatory cells in the mucosa and epithelial DNA damage induced by H. pylori infection. Similar reductions in chemokines, inflammatory cells and DNA damage occurred in infected Egfr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) control mice. In H. pylori-infected transgenic insulin-gastrin (INS-GAS) mice and gerbils, gefitinib treatment markedly reduced dysplasia and carcinoma. Gefitinib blocked H. pylori-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 (MAPK1/3) and activator protein 1 in gastric epithelial cells, resulting in inhibition of chemokine synthesis. MAPK1/3 phosphorylation and JUN activation was reduced in gastric tissues from infected wild-type and INS-GAS mice treated with gefitinib and in primary epithelial cells from Efgr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Epithelial EGFR activation persisted in humans and mice after H. pylori eradication, and gefitinib reduced gastric carcinoma in INS-GAS mice treated with antibiotics. These findings suggest that epithelial EGFR inhibition represents a potential strategy to prevent development of gastric carcinoma in H. pylori-infected individuals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. High prevalence of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains and risk factors associated with resistance in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Sonia; Pérez-Pérez, Guillermo; Alarcón, Teresa; López-Brea, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Clarithromycin is one of the antibiotics used for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections, and clarithromycin resistance is the most important factor when it comes to predicting eradication failure. The present study analyzed H. pylori isolates for the presence of 23S rRNA gene mutations and determined the risk factors associated with resistance among H. pylori isolates collected in Madrid, Spain, in 2008. We studied 118 H. pylori strains isolated from the same number of patients. A total of 76.3% of the patients were born in Spain, 52.7% were children, 20.3% had previously been treated, and 66.1% were female. Clarithromycin resistance was determined by Etest. H. pylori strains were considered resistant if the MIC was ≥1 mg/liter. DNA extraction was carried out by use of the NucliSens easyMAG platform with NucliSens magnetic extraction reagents (bioMérieux). The DNA sequences of the 23S rRNA genes of clarithromycin-resistant and -sensitive strains were determined to identify specific point mutations. The vacA genotype and cagA status were determined by PCR. We found that 42 (35.6%) strains were resistant to clarithromycin by Etest. Etest results were confirmed by detection of the presence of point mutations in 34 (88.1%) of these strains. Eight H. pylori strains were resistant to clarithromycin by Etest but did not have a point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Mutation at A2143G was found in 85.3% of the strains, mutation at A2142G in 8.8%, and mutation at T2182C in 5.9%. Dual mutations were found in 8.8% of the strains. H. pylori clarithromycin-resistant strains were strongly associated with pediatric patients, with patients born in Spain, and with patients who had previously been treated (P ≤ 0.02). In addition, H. pylori strains resistant to clarithromycin more frequently presented the vacA s2/m2 genotype and were more likely to be cagA negative than susceptible strains (39.1% and 11.2%, respectively; P value < 0.001). We concluded that, in the

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Helicobacter Pylori Infection among Healthy Inhabitants in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Darnindro, Nikko; Hapsari, Florentina Carolin Puspita

    2016-10-01

    Background: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Indonesia has been reported to be exceedingly low. The purpose of our study was to confirm whether this is the case in Northern Jakarta using a sensitive 13C-urea breath test (UBT), and to examine any associations with lifestyle/environment factors and potential routes of transmission. Methods: We recruited a total of 196 subjects from a low-income community in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia, data from 193 who completed a questionnaire about their lifestyle/environment and had UBT being included as the final. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for sex and age with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a logistic regression model. Results: The overall H. pylori infection rate was 15.0% (95%CI, 10.3-20.9), with variation among Javanese (9.1%, total=77), Buginese (40.0%, 35), Betawi (9.1%, 33), Sundanese (3.7%, 27), and Batak (40.0%, 5). On multivariate analysis, the ORs for intake of soybean milk, cucumber more than once a week, infrequent hand washing practice before meals, and alcohol consumption were 0.10 (95%CI: 0.01-0.97), 6.61 (95%CI: 1.87-23.3), 4.10 (95%CI: 1.15-14.6), and 61.9 (95%CI: 1.67-2300.8), respectively. Rates for Buginese (OR=7.84; 95%CI: 1.82-33.8) and Batak (OR=20.1; 95%CI: 1.90-213.2) were significantly higher than for Javanese. Conclusions: The H. pylori infection rate in this study was relatively low, in line with previous studies. Regarding ethnicity factors, Buginese and Batak reported eating food using fingers more frequently than Javanese, Betawi, and Sundanese. Our study indicated that person-person transmission is possible in this low prevalence area. The low infection rates for H. pylori among Javanese, Betawi, and Sundanese ethnics could be partly due to their sanitary practices.

  14. Helicobacter Pylori Transmission and Risk Factors for Infection in Rural China

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-08

    was able to experimentally infect na"ive cats with H. pylori. to culture H. pylori from feline salivary and gastric sections, and to find H. pylori DNA...in feline feces and dental plaque.217,218 Although peR cannot determine the viability of the H. pylori organism, these studies raised the possibility...Helicobacter pylori. Scand.J.GastroenteroLSuppl. 1995; 208:33-46:33-46. 16. Blaser MJ. Ecology of Helicobacter pylori in the human stomach. J.Clin.fnvest

  15. H pylori infection and other risk factors associated with peptic ulcers in Turkish patients: A retrospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barik A Salih; M Fatih Abasiyanik; Nizamettin Bayyurt; Ersan Sander

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To identify and evaluate the relative impact of H pylori infection and other risk factors on the occurrence of gastric ulcer (GU), duodenal ulcer (DU) and gastritis in Turkish patients.METHODS: A total of 4471 patients (48.3% female) out of 4863 attended the Samatya hospital in Istanbul (June 1999 - October 2003) were included. The records of H pylori status (CLO-test), endoscopic findings of GU, DU and gastritis, personal habits (smoking, alcohol intake)and medication [non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs), aspirin intake] were analyzed using multi-way frequency analysis.RESULTS: We have found that GU in the presence of H pylori had significant association with aspirin (P =0.0001), alcohol (P=0.0090) and NSAIDs (P=0.0372).DU on the other hand had significant association with aspirin/ smoking/NSAIDs (P=0.0259), aspirin/alcohol(P=0.0002) and aspirin/smoking (P=0.0233), also in the presence of H pylori. In the absence of H pylori GU had significant association with alcohol/NSAIDs (P= 0.0431), and NSAIDs (P=0.0436). While DU in the absence of H pylori had significant association with smoking/alcohol/NSAIDs (P=0.0013), aspirin/NSAIDs (P=0.0334), aspirin/alcohol (P=0.0360).CONCLUSION: In the presence of H pylori, aspirin,alcohol and NSAIDs intake act as an independent risk factors that had an augmenting impact on the occurrence of GU and only together on the occurrence of DU in Turkish patients.

  16. Helicobacter pylori promotes the expression of Kruppel-like factor 5, a mediator of carcinogenesis, in vitro and in vivo.

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    Jennifer M Noto

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori expresses a repertoire of virulence factors that increase gastric cancer risk, including the cag pathogenicity island and the vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA. One host element that promotes carcinogenesis within the gastrointestinal tract is Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5, a transcription factor that mediates key cellular functions. To define the role of KLF5 within the context of H. pylori-induced inflammation and injury, human gastric epithelial cells were co-cultured with the wild-type cag(+ H. pylori strain 60190. KLF5 expression was significantly upregulated following co-culture with H. pylori, but increased expression was independent of the cag island or VacA. To translate these findings into an in vivo model, C57BL/6 mice were challenged with the wild-type rodent-adapted cag(+ H. pylori strain PMSS1 or a PMSS1 cagE(- isogenic mutant. Similar to findings in vitro, KLF5 staining was significantly enhanced in gastric epithelium of H. pylori-infected compared to uninfected mice and this was independent of the cag island. Flow cytometry revealed that the majority of KLF5(+ cells also stained positively for the stem cell marker, Lrig1, and KLF5(+/Lrig1(+ cells were significantly increased in H. pylori-infected versus uninfected tissue. To extend these results into the natural niche of this pathogen, levels of KLF5 expression were assessed in human gastric biopsies isolated from patients with or without premalignant lesions. Levels of KLF5 expression increased in parallel with advancing stages of neoplastic progression, being significantly elevated in gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia compared to normal gastric tissue. These results indicate that H. pylori induces expression of KLF5 in gastric epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo, and that the degree of KLF5 expression parallels the severity of premalignant lesions in human

  17. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and regulatory cytokines as predictors of clinical outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Carolina; Diaz, Maria Ines; Valdivia, Alejandra; Godoy, Alex; Peña, Alfredo; Rollan, Antonio; Kirberg, Arturo; Hebel, Eduardo; Fierro, Jaqueline; Klapp, Gerardo; Venegas, Alejandro; Harris, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori infection is highly prevalent in Chile (73%). Usually a minority of infected patients develops complications such as ulcers and gastric cancer that have been associated with the presence of virulence factors (cagA, vacA) and host T helper response (Th1/Th2). Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between strain virulence and host immune response, using a multiple regression approach for the development of a model based on data collected from H. pylori infected patients in Chile. We analyzed levels of selected cytokines determined by ELISA (IL-12, IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-4) and the presence of cagA and vacA alleles polymorphisms determined by PCR in antral biopsies of 41 patients referred to endoscopy. By multiple regression analysis we established a correlation between bacterial and host factors using clinical outcome (gastritis and duodenal ulcer) as dependent variables. The selected model was described by: clinical outcome = 0.867491 (cagA) + 0.0131847 (IL-12/IL-10) + 0.0103503 (IFN-γ/IL-4) and it was able to explain over 90% of clinical outcomes observations (R2=96.4). This model considers that clinical outcomes are better explained by the interaction of host immune factors and strain virulence as a complex and interdependent mechanism. PMID:17336120

  18. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis.

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    Sinem Oktem-Okullu

    Full Text Available The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1, IL-17 (Th17, and FOXP3 (Treg expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer-based models.

  19. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktem-Okullu, Sinem; Tiftikci, Arzu; Saruc, Murat; Cicek, Bahattin; Vardareli, Eser; Tozun, Nurdan; Kocagoz, Tanil; Sezerman, Ugur; Yavuz, Ahmet Sinan; Sayi-Yazgan, Ayca

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1), IL-17 (Th17), and FOXP3 (Treg) expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer—based models. PMID:26287606

  20. Is the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the Dental Plaque of Patients with Chronic Periodontitis a Risk Factor for Gastric Infection?

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    Mohammed Al Asqah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is considered to be a pathogen responsible for gastritis and peptic ulcers, and a risk factor for gastric cancer. A periodontal pocket in the teeth of individuals with chronic periodontitis may function as a reservoir for H pylori.

  1. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-02-14

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation.

  2. Sequence Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from Helicobacter pylori 26695 to Identify Potential Virulence Factors

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    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Anjum, Farah; Khan, Faez Iqbal; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that is responsible for gastritis in human. Its spiral flagellated body helps in locomotion and colonization in the host environment. It is capable of living in the highly acidic environment of the stomach with the help of acid adaptive genes. The genome of H. pylori 26695 strain contains 1,555 coding genes that encode 1,445 proteins. Out of these, 340 proteins are characterized as hypothetical proteins (HP). This study involves extensive analysis of the HPs using an established pipeline which comprises various bioinformatics tools and databases to find out probable functions of the HPs and identification of virulence factors. After extensive analysis of all the 340 HPs, we found that 104 HPs are showing characteristic similarities with the proteins with known functions. Thus, on the basis of such similarities, we assigned probable functions to 104 HPs with high confidence and precision. All the predicted HPs contain representative members of diverse functional classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, binding proteins, regulatory proteins, proteins involved in cellular processes and other proteins with miscellaneous functions. Therefore, we classified 104 HPs into aforementioned functional groups. During the virulence factors analysis of the HPs, we found 11 HPs are showing significant virulence. The identification of virulence proteins with the help their predicted functions may pave the way for drug target estimation and development of effective drug to counter the activity of that protein. PMID:27729842

  3. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  4. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection.

  5. Evaluation of clinical and socio-demographic risk factors for antibacterial resistance of Helicobacter pylori in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Ilieva, Juliana; Gergova, Galina; Spassova, Zoya; Nikolov, Rossen; Davidkov, Lubomir; Evstatiev, Ivailo; Kamburov, Victor; Katsarov, Nikolai; Mitov, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and socio-demographic risk factors for primary Helicobacter pylori antibacterial resistance. In total, 266 consecutive H. pylori strains, from untreated symptomatic adult patients who answered a questionnaire, were evaluated. Strain susceptibility to amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin and tetracycline was tested by a breakpoint susceptibility test. Metronidazole resistance was found in fewer (17.0 %) peptic ulcer patients than in non-ulcer subjects (28.3 %, P=0.037), as well as in fewer patients born in villages (12.7 %) than in those born in towns (27.6 %, P=0.016). Clarithromycin resistance varied from 8.8 to 23.4 % (P=0.009) within the hospital centres. The highest clarithromycin resistance rate was found in hospital centre A (23.4 %) compared to other centres (12.9 %, P=0.041). The factors sex, age, symptom duration, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, diabetes, type of profession and educational level were not associated with H. pylori resistance. Logistic regression revealed that the risk factors for metronidazole resistance were non-ulcer disease [odds ratio (OR) 1.95, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 1.04-3.65] and a birthplace of a town (OR 2.64, 95 % CI 1.18-5.93). The hospital centre may be a risk factor (OR 2.07, 95 % CI 1.02-4.21) for clarithromycin resistance but further studies are required to verify this suggestion. In conclusion, the knowledge of the risk factors for H. pylori resistance to antibacterials could facilitate the treatment choice for H. pylori eradication.

  6. Virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori vacA increase markedly gastric mucosal TGF-β1 mRNA expression in gastritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Sanei, Mohammad Hosein; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Taghikhani, Afshin; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Bagheri, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the main cause of gastric inflammation. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) suppress the activation and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells and mediate immunologic tolerance. TGF-β1 was shown to be secreted in a subset of Treg cells known as 'Th3 cells'. These cells have not been sufficiently studied in context to H. pylori-induced inflammation in human gastric mucosa. In this study we therefore, aimed to investigate the expression of TGF-β1 in the context of H. pylori colonization in chronic gastritis, to examine the relationship between it and histopathologic findings and to compare it with virulence factors. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 48 H. pylori-infected patients and 38 H. pylori-negative patients with gastritis. Mucosal TGF-β1 mRNA expression in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsies was determined by real-time PCR. Presence of vacA, cagA, iceA, babA2 and oipA virulence factors was evaluated using PCR. TGF-β1 mRNA expression was significantly increased in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients. There was association between virulence factors and TGF-β1 mRNA expression. TGF-β1 mRNA expression in mucosa was significantly higher in patients with vacA s1 and s1m1. TGF-β1 may play an important role in the inflammatory response and promote the chronic and persistent inflammatory changes in the gastric. This may ultimately influence the outcome of H. pylori-associated diseases that arise within the context of gastritis and vacA may suffice to induce expression of TGF-β1 mRNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. To be or not to be: The host genetic factor and beyond in Helicobacter pylori mediated gastro-duodenal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta De, Dipanjana; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2015-03-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) have long been associated with a spectrum of disease outcomes in the gastro-duodenal system. Heterogeneity in bacterial virulence factors or strains is not enough to explain the divergent disease phenotypes manifested by the infection. This review focuses on host genetic factors that are involved during infection and eventually are thought to influence the disease phenotype. We have summarized the different host genes that have been investigated for association studies in H. pylori mediated duodenal ulcer or gastric cancer. We discuss that as the bacteria co-evolved with the host; these host gene also show much variation across different ethnic population. We illustrate the allelic distribution of interleukin-1B, across different population which is one of the most popular candidate gene studied with respect to H. pylori infections. Further, we highlight that several polymorphisms in the pathway gene can by itself or collectively affect the acid secretion pathway axis (gastrin: somatostatin) thereby resulting in a spectrum of disease phenotype.

  8. Relation between Helicobacter pylori infection, thyroid hormone levels and cardiovascular risk factors on blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillidis, John K; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Gikas, Aristofanis; Merikas, Emmanuel; Peros, George; Sofroniadou, Kyriaki; Cheracakis, Petros; Sklavaina, Maria; Tzanidis, Georgios; Konstantellou, Evangelia

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, serum thyroid hormone levels and certain cardiovascular risk factors in normal volunteers. In 110 blood donors (85 men, 25 women, aged 35.6 +/- 9.76) the serum levels of IgG antibodies against Hp were estimated using a sensitive immunoassay. Serum estimation of T3, T4, TSH, FT3, FT4, thyroid (microsomial) autoantibodies, C-Reactive-Protein, a1-acid-glycoprotein, vitamin B12, folic acid, cholesterol, triglycerides, total lipids, HDL, LDL, and antibodies against hepatitis A, was also carried-out. In all subjects a number of clinicoepidemiological parameters including body mass index, smoking habits, educational level, number of siblings and presence of symptoms from the digestive system were carefully recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical package. Helicobacter pylori infection was found in 54 subjects (49.1%). On univariate analysis, significant differences between subjects positive and negative for Helicobacter pylori infection were found for FreeT3 (3.11 +/- 0.5 pmol/ vs. 3.42 +/- 0.8 pmol/l, P=0.025), FreeT4 (1.04 +/- 0.2 ng/dl vs. 1.17 +/- 0.3 ng/dl, P=0.025), and thyroid autoanti bodies (23.65 +/- 24 vs. 14.97 +/- 8, P=0.018). Significant differences were also found for Cholesterol (207.8 +/- 39 mg/dl vs. 193.3 +/- 40 md/dl, P=0.05), LDL (133.2 +/- 32 mg/dl vs. 119.6 +/- 40 mg/dl, P=0.05) and folic acid (7.66 +/- 3.7 ng/ml vs. 6.39 +/- 2.5 ng/ml, P=0.038). A significantly positive correlation of Hp infection with age and number of siblings and a negative one with educational level were noticed. No differences concerning the levels of acute phase proteins, vitamin B12, antibodies against hepatitis A, body mass index, and smoking habits were found. On logistic regression analysis, significant differences remained only for thyroid autoantibodies (Odds ratio for titer ?30: 7.8, P=0.012), age (Odds Ratio for those aged >40 years vs those

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection and its related factors in junior high school students in Nagano Prefecture, Japan.

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    Nakayama, Yoshiko; Lin, Yingsong; Hongo, Minoru; Hidaka, Hiroya; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2017-04-01

    There have been few reports on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in asymptomatic Japanese children and adolescents. We hypothesized that the prevalence of H. pylori infection is very low among Japanese children and that clinical variables such as serum pepsinogen and iron levels are associated with H. pylori infection. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of a sample of 454 junior high school students aged 12-15 years in four areas in Nagano Prefecture. A commercial ELISA kit (E-plate Eiken H. pylori antibody) was used to measure IgG antibody against H. pylori. Serum pepsinogen and iron levels were also measured using standard methods. A urea breath test was performed for seropositive students. The overall prevalence of H. pylori was 3.1% (14/454). There were no significant differences in H. pylori prevalence among mountain, rural, and urban areas. The mean level of both serum pepsinogen (PG I) and PG II was significantly increased in the seropositive subjects compared with the seronegative subjects. When the cutoff values for adults (PG I: 70 ng/mL and PG I/II ratio: 3) were used, 4 of 14 subjects had PG I ≤70 ng/mL and PG I/II ratio ≤3. The results of a logistic regression analysis showed that low serum iron levels were significantly associated with H. pylori infection (P=.02). The prevalence of H. pylori infection is as low as 3% among junior high school students aged 12-15 years in Japan. The disappearance of H. pylori is accelerating in Japanese children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  11. Effect of Helicobacter pylori and its Virulence Factors on Portal Hypertensive Gastropathy and Interleukin (IL)-8, IL-10, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Levels

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    Abbas, Zaigham; Yakoob, Javed; Usman, Muhammad W.; Shakir, Tanzila; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim: We aimed to assess the influence of Helicobacter pylori and its virulent factors, cytotoxin associated gene (cag) A and E, on portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) and the levels of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Patients and Methods: The patients with cirrhosis underwent screening endoscopy and the lesions related to PHG were graded. Biopsies were obtained for histology, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of H. pylori 16S rRNA, cagA, cagE, and tissue cytokine levels was carried out. Absent or mild PHG was compared with moderate to severe PHG. Results: One hundred and forty patients with cirrhosis were studied; males numbered 92 and the mean age of the patients was 50.3 ± 12.0 years, H. pylori positivity in 87 (62.1%) patients was associated with male gender (P = 0.032), younger age (P = 0.029), hepatitis D etiology (P = 0.005), higher serum albumin (0.000), lower Child Pugh score (P = 0.001), and lower portal vein diameter (P = 0.001). There was no significant difference in the levels of TNF-α and IL-8. However, a decrease in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was noted with moderate to severe gastropathy. Four H. pylori strains were positive for both cagA and cagE, while four were positive for cagA only. All the four patients with both virulent factors had mild gastropathy only. Conclusion: The presence of H. pylori infection neither affected the severity of PHG nor augmented the IL-8 and TNF-α levels. There was a decline of virulent H. pylori strains and IL-10 levels in patients with advanced PHG. PMID:24705150

  12. Effect of Helicobacter pylori and its virulence factors on portal hypertensive gastropathy and interleukin (IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels

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    Zaigham Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: We aimed to assess the influence of Helicobacter pylori and its virulent factors, cytotoxin associated gene (cag A and E, on portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG and the levels of interleukin (IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. Patients and Methods: The patients with cirrhosis underwent screening endoscopy and the lesions related to PHG were graded. Biopsies were obtained for histology, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR of H. pylori 16S rRNA, cagA, cagE, and tissue cytokine levels was carried out. Absent or mild PHG was compared with moderate to severe PHG. Results: One hundred and forty patients with cirrhosis were studied; males numbered 92 and the mean age of the patients was 50.3 ± 12.0 years, H. pylori positivity in 87 (62.1% patients was associated with male gender (P = 0.032, younger age (P = 0.029, hepatitis D etiology (P = 0.005, higher serum albumin (0.000, lower Child Pugh score (P = 0.001, and lower portal vein diameter (P = 0.001. There was no significant difference in the levels of TNF-α and IL-8. However, a decrease in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was noted with moderate to severe gastropathy. Four H. pylori strains were positive for both cagA and cagE, while four were positive for cagA only. All the four patients with both virulent factors had mild gastropathy only. Conclusion: The presence of H. pylori infection neither affected the severity of PHG nor augmented the IL-8 and TNF-α levels. There was a decline of virulent H. pylori strains and IL-10 levels in patients with advanced PHG.

  13. Biological activity of the virulence factor cagA of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱永良; 郑树; 钱可大; 方平楚

    2004-01-01

    Background China is one of the countries with the highest incidence of H. Pylori and more than 9090 isolates possessed the cagA gene. This study was to evaluate the biological activity of the H.pylori virulence factor cagA isolated from Chinese patients. Methods cagA DNA fragments were amplified from the genomic DNA and subsequently cloned into the mammalian expression vector for cell transfection and DNA sequencing. cagA protein, phosphorylated-tyrosine cagA and the complex of cagA precipitated with SHP-2 were identified respectively by western blot in the crude cell lysate from conditionally immortalized gastric epithelial cells at 48 hours after transfection with cagA DNA. In addition, the ability of induction of scattering phenotype was examined after transient expression of cagA in AGS cells. Results The C-terminal half of cagA contained only one repeated sequence and three tandem five-amino-acid motifs glutamic acid-proline-isoleucine-tyrosine-alanine (EPIYA). Moreover, the amino acid sequence of D2 region in repeated sequence was aspartic acid-phenylanaline-aspartic acid (D-F-D) which was significantly distinguished from the three repeated sequences and aspartic acid-aspartic adid-leucine (D-D-L) in the western standard strain NCTC11637. Western blot revealed that cagA became phosphorylated in tyrosine site and bound with SHP-2 after transient expression of cagA DNA in gastric epithelial cells. Transient expression of cagA in AGS cells showed that cagA was able to induce the elongation phenotype although to a lesser extent than western strains. Conclusions cagA perturbs cell signaling pathways by binding with SHP-2. However, significant difference exists in amino acid sequence and biological function of cagA in Chinese compared with those of western countries.

  14. Principales factores de patogenia en la infección por Helicobacter pylori

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    Lino E. Torres

    2008-01-01

    posee una sofisticada batería de factores de colonización, como son la ureasa y los flagelos, que le brindan las adaptaciones necesarias para su supervivencia y establecimiento en la mucosa del estomago. Adicionalmente, varias proteínas de la bacteria se han reconocido como factores de patogenia, al estudiar su influencia en la aparición de las lesiones gástricas más severas. Son varios los factores de virulencia que posee este patógeno, pero los tres más relevantes son: la adhesina BabA y las toxinas VacA y CagA. En la última década, numerosos estudios han incrementado considerablemente el conocimiento sobre la función y los mecanismos moleculares de estos factores de virulencia y su influencia en la inducción de enfermedades gastroduodenales en los humanos. Esta revisión constituye un resumen de los principales aportes que se han publicado en los últimos años en el tema de los factores de patogenia de H. pylori.

  15. Host-pathogen systems biology: logical modelling of hepatocyte growth factor and Helicobacter pylori induced c-Met signal transduction

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    Kähne Thilo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF stimulates mitogenesis, motogenesis, and morphogenesis in a wide range of tissues, including epithelial cells, on binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met. Abnormal c-Met signalling contributes to tumour genesis, in particular to the development of invasive and metastatic phenotypes. The human microbial pathogen Helicobacter pylori can induce chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration and more rarely, gastric adenocarcinoma. The H. pylori effector protein cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA, which is translocated via a type IV secretion system (T4SS into epithelial cells, intracellularly modulates the c-Met receptor and promotes cellular processes leading to cell scattering, which could contribute to the invasiveness of tumour cells. Using a logical modelling framework, the presented work aims at analysing the c-Met signal transduction network and how it is interfered by H. pylori infection, which might be of importance for tumour development. Results A logical model of HGF and H. pylori induced c-Met signal transduction is presented in this work. The formalism of logical interaction hypergraphs (LIH was used to construct the network model. The molecular interactions included in the model were all assembled manually based on a careful meta-analysis of published experimental results. Our model reveals the differences and commonalities of the response of the network upon HGF and H. pylori induced c-Met signalling. As another important result, using the formalism of minimal intervention sets, phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1 was identified as knockout target for repressing the activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, a signalling molecule directly linked to cell scattering in H. pylori infected cells. The model predicted only an effect on ERK1/2 for the H. pylori stimulus, but not for HGF treatment. This result could be confirmed experimentally in MDCK cells using a specific

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection with intestinal metaplasia: An independent risk factor for colorectal adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ye; Chen, Yi-Na; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Chao; Lin, Chun-Jing; Jin, Yin; Pan, Shuang; Wu, Jian-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To explore the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection status, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and colorectal adenomas. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed 1641 individuals aged ≥ 40 years who underwent physical examination, laboratory testing, 13C-urea breath testing, gastroscopy, colonoscopy, and an interview to ascertain baseline characteristics and general state of health. Histopathological results were obtained by gastric and colorectal biopsies. RESULTS The prevalence of H. pylori infection and adenomas was 51.5% (845/1641) and 18.1% (297/1641), respectively. H. pylori infection was significantly correlated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas (crude OR = 1.535, 95%CI: 1.044-1.753, P = 0.022; adjusted OR = 1.359, 95%CI: 1.035-1.785, P = 0.028). Individuals with IM had an elevated risk of colorectal adenomas (crude OR = 1.664, 95%CI: 1.216-2.277, P = 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.381, 95%CI: 0.998-1.929, P = 0.059). Stratification based on H. pylori infection stage and IM revealed that IM accompanied by H. pylori infection was significantly associated with an increased risk of adenomas (crude OR = 2.109, 95%CI: 1.383-3.216, P = 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.765, 95%CI: 1.130-2.757, P = 0.012). CONCLUSION H. pylori-related IM is associated with a high risk of colorectal adenomas in Chinese individuals. PMID:28293091

  17. Helicobacter pylori: focus on CagA and VacA major virulence factors Helicobacter pylori: enfoque sobre los factores de virulencia CagA y VacA

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    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available After colonizing the human gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori can remain within the host for years and even decades, and is associated with several, highly significant gastric pathologies. In Mexico, the seroprevalence at 1 year of age is 20% and the estimated increment in seropositivity per year is 5% for children aged 1-10 years. More than 80% of adults are infected by the time they are 18-20 years old. Bacterial virulence factors have been proposed for H. pylori, such as urease, flagella, heat-shock protein, lipopolysaccharide, adhesions, vacuolating cytotoxin, cag pathogenicity island and the cytotoxin-associated protein, the latter being the most studied mechanism to date.Después de colonizar la mucosa gástrica humana, Helicobacter pylori puede permanecer por años e incluso décadas en el humano, y se asocia a varias patologías gástricas. En México, la seroprevalencia estimada es de 20% en niños de un año de edad, con una tasa de incremento en seropositividad de 5% anual durante los primeros 10 años de vida hasta alcanzar 80% en adultos jóvenes entre los 18 y 20 años de edad. Los factores bacterianos de virulencia propuestos para H. pylori son ureasa, flagelos, proteínas de choque térmico, lipopolisacárido, adhesinas, citotoxina vacuolizante, isla de patogenicidad y la proteína asociada a la citoxina; este último factor es el más estudiado hasta la fecha.

  18. Association Between Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2 Virulence Factors and Gastric Mucosal Interleukin-33 mRNA Expression and Clinical Outcomes in Dyspeptic Patients.

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    Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Bahreini, Rasol; Bagheri, Nader; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been reported in more than half of the world human population. It is associated with gastric inflammation and noticeable infiltration of the immune cells to the stomach mucosa by several cytokines secretion. IL-1β, IL-18 have been shown to contribute to H. pylori induced gastritis, but the details of inflammation and association of virulence factors remain unclear. IL-1 cytokine family has a new additional cytokine, Interleukin-33 (IL-33), which is contemplated to have an important role for host defense against microorganisms. H. pylori virulence factors important in gastritis risk are the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) and babA. This study evaluated IL-33 mucosal mRNA expression levels in infected and uninfected patients and its relationship with bacterial virulence factors cagA, babA2 and type of gastritis. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 79 H. pylori-infected patients and 51 H. pylori-negative patients. Mucosal IL-33 mRNA expression levels in gastric biopsies were assessed using real-time PCR. Existence of virulence factors were detected by PCR. IL-33 mRNA expression was significantly higher in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients (P<0.0001). Also there was a direct relationship between virulence factor bab-A2 and enhancement in IL-33 mRNA expression. Furthermore, IL-33 mRNA expression level was significantly lower in chronic gastritis patients compared with patients with active gastritis (P<0.001). IL-33 may play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and induction of the chronic gastritis and severity of inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa.

  19. Fatores de risco para infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori em crianças Risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection in children

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    Mônica M. C. Moraes

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: conhecer a soroprevalência da infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori em crianças e identificar a presença de fatores de risco associados à sorologia positiva. Método: realizou-se um estudo transversal para o estabelecimento da soroprevalência e, posteriormente, um estudo comparativo entre as crianças com sorologias positivas e negativas. Estudadas 228 crianças, no Hospital Geral de Pediatria - Instituto Materno-Infantil de Pernambuco, entre maio e julho de 1999. Avaliou-se idade, sexo, variáveis ambientais, socioeconômicas, de saúde e nutricionais; história de moradores do mesmo domicílio, com queixas digestivas e história pregressa de doença péptica. Esses dados foram obtidos através de entrevista realizada com os pais ou responsáveis das crianças. O estado nutricional foi avaliado através dos índices antropométricos. Resultados: a soroprevalência para o Helicobacter pylori foi de 32% (IC 95% 26%-38%; 25,8% (IC 95% 17,8%-33,8% nos pré-escolares, e de 39,4% (IC 95% 30,4% -48,4% nos escolares. Nas crianças soropositivas, observou-se com maior freqüência ausência, no domicílio, de vaso sanitário, ou o mesmo não tinha descarga (p=0,008, maior aglomeração domiciliar (p=0,05, uma menor renda familiar (per capita (p=0,03 e maior número de mães que não sabiam ler nem escrever (p=0,0002. Não houve diferença estatística significante nos dois grupos em relação às variáveis indicadoras de condições de saúde, aos índices antropométricos e quanto ao contato com morador com queixas digestivas ou história pregressa de gastrite ou úlcera péptica. Conclusões: a soroprevalência da infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori foi alta na população estudada, sendo maior entre os escolares. Verificou-se associação entre a soropositividade e condições ambientais desfavoráveis.Objective: to establish the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and to identify risk factors for seropositivity

  20. Environmental Exposures Are Important Risk Factors for Infection Toxoplasma gondii and Helicobacter pylori

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    Background: An estimated 70% of Americans suffer chronic infections. Helicobacter pylori and Toxoplasma gondii affect an estimated 35% and 15% of Americans, respectively. Despite their heavy burden, environmental transmission of these infections is not well understood. Object...

  1. Environmental Exposures Are Important Risk Factors for Infection Toxoplasma gondii and Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: An estimated 70% of Americans suffer chronic infections. Helicobacter pylori and Toxoplasma gondii affect an estimated 35% and 15% of Americans, respectively. Despite their heavy burden, environmental transmission of these infections is not well understood. Object...

  2. Rare Helicobacter pylori infection as a factor for the very low stomach cancer incidence in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Shinkan; Soeripto; Triningsih, F X Ediati; Ananta, Indrawati; Suzuki, Sadao; Kuriki, Kiyonori; Akasaka, Susumu; Kosaka, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hideki; Azuma, Takeshi; Moore, Malcolm A

    2005-02-28

    To elucidate factors associated with the very low risk of gastric neoplasia in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, approximately 1/50 of the level in Japan, we recruited 52 male and 39 female participants from the general populace in the city of Yogyakarta in October 2003. Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies were found in only 5% (0-13) (95% confidence interval) and 4% (0-9) for Javanese males and females, respectively, and were statistically lower than the 62% (58-65) and 57% (53-60), respectively, in Japanese. Furthermore, positive findings of pepsinogen test were only 0 and 2% (0-6) for males and females, in Yogyakarta, and were again significantly lower than the 23% (22-25) and 22% (20-23), in Japan. The very low incidence of stomach cancer in Yogyakarta may be due to a low prevalence of H. pylori infection and chronic atrophic gastritis.

  3. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar Is Related to Gastric Cancer Incidence

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    Tran Thi Huyen Trang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a significant health problem in Asia. Although the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is similar in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar, the incidence of gastric cancer is highest in Bhutan, followed by Vietnam and Myanmar. We hypothesized that H. pylori virulence factors contribute to the differences. The status of cagA, vacA, jhp0562, and β-(1,3galT(jhp0563 was examined in 371 H. pylori-infected patients from Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Each virulence factor could not explain the difference of the incidence of gastric cancer. However, the prevalence of quadruple-positive for cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3galT-negative was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Vietnam and Myanmar and correlated with gastric cancer incidence. Moreover, gastritis-staging scores measured by histology of gastric mucosa were significantly higher in quadruple-positive strains. We suggest that the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3galT-negative genotype may play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  4. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar Is Related to Gastric Cancer Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Shiota, Seiji; Matsuda, Miyuki; Binh, Tran Thanh; Suzuki, Rumiko; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Mahachai, Varocha; Tshering, Lotay; Dung, Ho D Q; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsunari, Osamu; Myint, Thein; Khien, Vu Van; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a significant health problem in Asia. Although the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is similar in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar, the incidence of gastric cancer is highest in Bhutan, followed by Vietnam and Myanmar. We hypothesized that H. pylori virulence factors contribute to the differences. The status of cagA, vacA, jhp0562, and β-(1,3)galT(jhp0563) was examined in 371 H. pylori-infected patients from Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Each virulence factor could not explain the difference of the incidence of gastric cancer. However, the prevalence of quadruple-positive for cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3)galT-negative was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Vietnam and Myanmar and correlated with gastric cancer incidence. Moreover, gastritis-staging scores measured by histology of gastric mucosa were significantly higher in quadruple-positive strains. We suggest that the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3)galT-negative genotype may play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

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    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  6. Interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms in chronic gastritis patients infected with Helicobacter pylori as risk factors of gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatyszyn, Andrzej; Wielgus, Karolina; Kaczmarek-Rys, Marta; Skrzypczak-Zielinska, Marzena; Szalata, Marlena; Mikolajczyk-Stecyna, Joanna; Stanczyk, Jerzy; Dziuba, Ireneusz; Mikstacki, Adam; Slomski, Ryszard

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicated association of the Helicobacter pylori infections with the occurrence of inflammatory conditions of the gastric mucosa and development of chronic gastritis and intestinal type of gastric cancer. IL1A and IL1B genes have been proposed as key factors in determining risk of gastritis and malignant transformation. The aim of this paper was to evaluate association of interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms with chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and intestinal type of gastric cancer in H. pylori-infected patients. Patients subjected to analysis represent group of 144 consecutive cases that suffered from dyspepsia with coexisting infection of H. pylori and chronic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or gastric cancer. Molecular studies involved analysis of -889C>T polymorphism of IL1A gene and +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene. Statistical analysis of association of polymorphism -889C>T of gene IL1A with changes in gastric mucosa showed lack of significance, whereas +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene showed significant association. Frequency of allele T of +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene was higher in group of patients with chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or intestinal type of gastric cancer (32.1 %) as compared with population group (23 %), χ(2) = 4.61 and p = 0.03. This corresponds to odds ratio: 1.58, 95 % CI: 1.04-2.4. Our results indicate that +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene increase susceptibility to inflammatory response of gastric mucosa H. pylori-infected patients and plays a significant role in the development of chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and the initiation of carcinogenesis.

  7. Serum Level of Trefoil Factor 2 can Predict the Extent of Gastric Spasmolytic Polypeptide-Expressing Metaplasia in the H. pylori-Infected Gastric Cancer Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Yu-Ching; Wu, Chung-Tai; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Lu, Cheng-Chang; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2017-02-01

    Gastric cancer has familial clustering in incidence, and the familial relatives of gastric cancer sufferers are prone to have spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), and intestinal metaplasia (IM) after H. pylori infection. This study tested whether serum pepsinogen I/II and trefoil factor family (TFF) proteins can predict SPEM or IM in the H. pylori-infected relatives of patients with gastric cancer. We prospectively enrolled 119 H. pylori-infected relatives of gastric cancer patients of noncardiac gastric cancer patients, who then received panendoscopy to obtain gastric biopsy to define the presence of corpus gastritis index (CGI), SPEM, and IM. The advanced SPEM in histology was defined by TFF2 immunohistochemistry. Each patient also had checkups of serum TFF2, TFF3, and pepsinogen I/II by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The 119 H. pylori-infected relatives included 61 with SPEM, and 34 with IM. The presence of either IM or SPEM was not related to the serum TFF2, TFF3, and pepsinogen I/II levels (p > .05). Serum TFF2 levels were higher in relatives with CGI who also had advanced SPEM (p = .032). For relatives without CGI, the elevated serum TFF2 levels correlated with higher H. pylori density and more severe gastritis in antrum (p = .001). The serum TFF2 level cannot predict SPEM or IM in H. pylori-infected relatives of patients with gastric cancer. For H. pylori-infected relatives with CGI, serum TFF2 levels may predict the advanced severity of SPEM. Elevated serum TFF2 levels may indicate severe H. pylori-related inflammation, at risk of development or progression of SPEM in relatives without CGI. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Does Helicobacter pylori affect portal hypertensive gastropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major etiological factor of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. It is supposed to be a risk factor for the more frequently encountered PUD in patients with liver cirrhosis. Several investigators have evaluated the effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis, portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG and encephalopathy with controversial results. Some reports have shown a higher seroprevalence and suggested a synergistic effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis and PHG. However, this increased prevalence is associated with a negative histology and is not influenced by the cause of cirrhosis, PHG, Child class or gender. Most studies have not found any correlation between H. pylori and PHG. In contrast, other studies have reported a markedly lower prevalence of H. pylori in cirrhotics with duodenal ulcer compared to controls. The aim of this article is to review the relationship between H. pylori infection and portal hypertensive gastropathy and the role of H. pylori eradication in cirrhotic patients.

  9. Characteristics and Risk Factors of Helicobacter pylori Associated Gastritis: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweesak Tongtawee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection are genetic susceptibility and poor living conditions. This study aimed to investigate the Mdm2 gene, clarithromycin resistance, and possible risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods. Risk factors and clinical characteristics were analyzed, including patient demographic data, patient income, personal history, possible source of transmission, patient symptoms, endoscopic findings, patterns of clarithromycin resistance, and patterns of Mdm2 SNIP309. Results. Ingestion of pickled fish (OR = 11.27, 95% CI = 4.31–29.45, p<0.0001, salt crab (OR = 8.83, 95% CI = 1.99–39.14, p<0.001, and Papaya salad (OR = 8.73, 95% CI = 4.54–16.79, p<0.01. The prevalence of clarithromycin resistance was 56% (wild type, A2143/2142A, is 23.8%; mutation, A2143/2142CG, is 35.7%; wild type + mutation is 40.5%. The genetic polymorphisms of Mdm2 SNIP309 were SNIP309 T/T homozygous in 78%, SNIP309 G/T heterozygous in 19%, and SNIP309 G/G homozygous in 3%. Conclusion. Pickled fish, salt crab, and Papaya salad are positive risk factors. There was high prevalence of clarithromycin resistance. The Mdm2 SNIP309 G/G homozygous genotype might be a risk factor for gastric cancer and the fact that it is infrequent in Thailand.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF RELATED ANAMNESTIC AND CLINICAL FACTORS ON EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF ANTI-HELICOBACTER PYLORI THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Andreev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a prospective clinical study in which 100 patients with H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease of stomach/duodenum were examined. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of concomitant anamnestic and clinical factors on the efficacy and safety of eradication therapy (ET. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a factor that significantly reduces the efficiency of ET with OR 0.21 (95% CI 0,06-0,69, p = 0,0102. Using a macrolide antibiotics prior to ET during the previous 12 months is associated with a reduction in the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication with OR 0.27 (95% CI 0,08-0,90, p = 0,0342. Despite the lack of statistical significance observed negative effect on the efficiency of ET factors such as smoking and increased BMI. Smoking, female gender, age over 50 years and the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus had no significant impact on the safety profile of ET. 

  11. Environmental risk factors associated with Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in the United States: a cross-sectional analysis of NHANES data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, W S; Hilborn, E D; Converse, R R; Wade, T J

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori imparts a considerable burden to public health. Infections are mainly acquired in childhood and can lead to chronic diseases, including gastric ulcers and cancer. The bacterium subsists in water, but the environment's role in transmission remains poorly understood. The nationally representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) was examined for environmental risk factors associated with H. pylori seroprevalence. Data from 1999-2000 were examined and weighted to represent the US population. Multivariable logistic regression estimated adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations with seropositivity. Self-reported general health condition was inversely associated with seropositivity. Of participants aged <20 years, seropositivity was significantly associated with having a well as the source of home tap water (aOR 1·7, 95% CI 1·1-2·6) and living in a more crowded home (aOR 2·3, 95% CI 1·5-3·7). Of adults aged ⩾20 years, seropositivity was not associated with well water or crowded living conditions, but adults in soil-related occupations had significantly higher odds of seropositivity compared to those in non-soil-related occupations (aOR 1·9, 95% CI 1·2-2·9). Exposures to both well water and occupationally related soil increased the effect size of adults' odds of seropositivity compared to non-exposed adults (aOR 2·7, 95% CI 1·3-5·6). Environmental exposures (well-water usage and occupational contact with soil) play a role in H. pylori transmission. A disproportionate burden of infection is associated with poor health and crowded living conditions, but risks vary by age and race/ethnicity. These findings could help inform interventions to reduce the burden of infections in the United States.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with increased expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor by T cells and macrophages in gastric mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xing Xiang; Harry Hua Xiang XIA; ZHAO Ying Heng; LIN Man Peng; SHEN Qing Yan; LIU Wei; ZHENG Xue Ling

    2004-01-01

    AIM Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a pivotal role in inflammatory/immune diseases.This study aimed to determine MIF expression in H.pylori-induced gastritis,and the effect of H.pylori on MIF expression in monocytes in vitro.METHODS Seventy-nine patients (M/F,39/40,mean age,52 yrs) referred for upper endoscopy were selected;19 with gastric ulcer,15 with duodenal ulcer and 45 with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD).Gastric antral and body biopsies were obtained for histological examinations,double immunostaining for MIF/T-cells (CD45RO) and MIF/macrophage (KP1),and in situ hybridization for the expression of MIF mRNA.THp-1,a monocyte cell line,was co-incubated with different concentrations of the whole cell proteins prepared from H.pylori strain ATCC26695 or its isogenic type with cagA gene deleted.The expression of MIF protein was determined by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and the MIF mRNA by retrospective transcription-polymerase chain reaction techniques.RESULTS H.pylori was detected in 50 patients (10 with gastric ulcer, 15 with duodenal ulcer and 25 with NUD).Overall,the numbers of total T-cells,MIF+T-cells,total macrophages,MIF+macrophages and MIF mRNA+ cells were greater in the gastric antrum than in the body.There was a significant increase in the numbers of total T-cells, MIF+ T-cells,total macrophages,MIF+macrophages and MIF mRNA+cells in H. pylori positive,compared with H.pylori negative patients,in both the antral and body mucosa.Moreover,the cell numbers increased with more severe chronic gastritis in both the antrum and body.The numbers were also significantly higher in ulcer patients than in NUD patients, particularly in H. pylori positive patients.In vitro,the expression of MIF protein and mRNA in monocytes was significantly increased by incubation with H.pylori whole cell proteins,in a time and dose dependent manner.CONCLUSIONS H.pylori infection stimulates the expression of MIF in the gastric inflammatory cells,which may play a

  13. Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    BATESON, M

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer disease, and its detection and eradication are now an important part of gastroenterology. Effective regimes are available which will eliminate the organism in about 90% of cases in developed countries.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori

  14. Secretor status and Helicobacter pylori infection are independent risk factors for gastroduodenal disease.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis that non-secretors of ABO blood group antigens, a group shown to be more susceptible to certain bacterial infections, may be at greater risk of gastroduodenal disease because of increased susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection was investigated. Of 101 patients with symptoms of dyspepsia who were undergoing endoscopy, 32% were non-secretors (determined from Lewis blood group phenotype), 36% had endoscopically visible gastroduodenal disease (antral gastritis, gastric ulc...

  15. 某部新兵幽门螺杆菌感染率及其影响因素调查%The investigation of Helicobacter pylori infection rate and its affecting factors among recruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊荣荣; 李恕军; 金鹏; 安贺娟; 武子涛; 盛剑秋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the infection rate of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) among recruits and the affecting factors.Methods 500 recruits were chosen randomly as investigation subjects.Basic information and epidemic H.pylori infectional factors were surveyed by questionnaire.H.pylori infection rate was detected with 13C-urea breath test,serum H.pylori-IgG antibody test and H.pylori stool antigen test.H.pylori infection-related factors were statistically analyzed.Results 173 cases were H.pylori positive,the positive rate was 34.6%.Living environment before recruitment was the influence factor of H.pylori infection,and the degree of education,history of smoking,drinking history and taking NSAIDS drugs had no significant effect on H.pylori infection rate.Conclusion H.pylori infection is more common in the recruits,living environment before recruitment is the influence factor of H.pylori infection.%目的 了解某部新兵幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,H.pylori)感染情况及其影响因素.方法 随机抽取某部刚入伍官兵500例,以问卷调查形式填写一般情况调查表,采用13C尿素呼气试验、血清学H.pylori抗体检测、粪便抗原快速免疫卡检测三种方法调查H.pylori感染率,并对H.pylori感染影响因素进行统计学分析.结果 H.pylori阳性者173例,阳性率34.6% (173/500),入伍前居住环境是H.pylori感染的影响因素,而文化程度、吸烟史、饮酒史、服用NSAIDS类药物史对H.pylori感染率无明显影响.结论 刚入伍官兵中H.pylori感染较为常见,入伍前居住环境为H.pylori感染的影响因素.

  16. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  17. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event.

  18. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  19. Association between Virulence Factors and TRAF1/4-1BB/Bcl-xL Expression in Gastric Mucosa Infected with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. CagA+/vacAs1+/vacAm1+ Helicobacter pylori upregulates the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 1 (TRAF1, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9 (4-1BB, and B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL in human gastric epithelial cells. We investigated the correlation between cagA/vacAs1/vacAm1 and TRAF1/4-1BB/Bcl-xL expression in gastric mucosal tissue of patients with gastric disorders. Methods. We collected gastric mucosa samples from 35 chronic, nonatrophic gastritis (CG patients, 41 atrophic gastritis patients, 44 intestinal metaplasia with atypical hyperplasia (IM patients, and 28 gastric carcinoma (Ca patients. The expression of  TRAF1, 4-1BB, and Bcl-xL was determined using western blotting. The expression of cagA, vacAs1, and vacAm1 in H. pylori was examined with polymerase chain reaction. Results. The expression of TRAF1, 4-1BB, and Bcl-xL was significantly upregulated in IM and Ca patients (P<0.05 compared with CG. There were more cases of cagA+/vacAs1+/vacAm1+ H. pylori infection in samples with elevated TRAF1, 4-1BB, or Bcl-xL expression (P<0.05. Additionally, there were a remarkably large number of samples with upregulated TRAF1/4-1BB/Bcl-xL expression in cases of cagA+/vacAs1+/vacAm1+ H. pylori infection (44 cases, 67.7%; P<0.05. Conclusions. The pathogenesis of IM and Ca may be promoted by cagA+/vacAs1+/vacAm1+ H. pylori, possibly via upregulated TRAF1, 4-1BB, and Bcl-xL in gastric mucosal tissue.

  20. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  1. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  2. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein as target for new drugs against H.pylori inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodora Choli-Papadopoulou; Filippos Kottakis; Georgios Papadopoulos; Stefanos Pendas

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is among the most common human infections and the major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Within this work we present the implication of C-terminal region of H. pylori neutrophil activating protein in the stimulation of neutrophil activation as well as the evidence that the C-terminal region of H. pylori activating protein is indispensable for neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, a step necessary to H. pylori inflammation. In addition we show that arabino galactan proteins derived from chios mastic gum, the natural resin of the plant Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia inhibit neutrophil activation in vitro .

  3. Environmental risk factors associated with Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in the United States: A cross-sectional analysis of NHANES data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori imparts a considerable burden to public health. Infections are mainly acquired in childhood and can lead to chronic diseases, including peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. The bacterium subsists in water, but the environment’s role in H. pylori ...

  4. Interacción de los factores de virulencia de Helicobacter Pylori y otros factores ambientales con el sistema HLA del huésped en el proceso de carcinogénesis gástrico

    OpenAIRE

    Soria San Teodoro, María Teresa; Bajador Andreu, Eduardo; Uribarrena Echebarría, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Los factores más importantes que se asocian a la presencia de metaplasia intestinal son la edad avanzada, la infección por cepas de Helicobacter pylori productoras de citotoxina vacuolizante y ser portador del alelo *0501 del gen HLA DQB1. La presencia de los alelos s1 y s2 del gen vacA de Helicobacter pylori y de sus combinaciones con m2 son los factores más importantes asociados a la progresión hacia metaplasia intestinal. Ninguno de los polimorfismos HLA estudiados determina un carácter pr...

  5. Fatores associados com a gastrite crônica em pacientes com presença ou ausência do Helicobacter pylori Factors associated with chronic gastritis in patients with presence and absence of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissa Chamse Ddine

    2012-06-01

    , doenças associadas e nutrição inadequada, interagem para o início das manifestações clínicas, e a presença ou ausência de H. pylori não mostrou diferenças significativas no estado clínico dos pacientes.BACKGROUND - Chronic gastritis is an inflammation of the stomach mucosa, which is considered its main etiological factor the Helicobacter pylori. AIM - To observe the differences in patients with chronic gastritis as well as the presence and absence of H. pylori, to obtain a better understanding of the etiological factors, clinical, dietary and lifestyle habits and associated diseases. METHODS - This was a descriptive study, retrospective medical records of patients with chronic gastritis treated as outpatients. Endoscopy and research of H. pylori was used in the diagnosis of chronic gastritis. The survey was conducted through a questionnaire to ascertain the risk factors for chronic gastritis and the clinical manifestations of disease, dietary and lifestyle habits, family history of the disease, weight changes and medications. For statistical analysis was used Spearman coefficient. Data were considered statistically significant p<0.05. RESULTS - Of the 94 patients evaluated were symptomatic with heartburn, belching, epigastric pain, fullness and nausea. In 56.6% (n = 54 of individuals was detected the presence of bacteria and in 43.6% (n = 40 was not found any specific etiologic factor. Was performed chi-square statistical test of clinical manifestations and factors such as stress and anxiety, leading to positive correlation. It became evident that the risk factors for disease are diverse, including the use of drugs, alcoholism, eating quickly, talking during meals, with significant relation to abdominal distension and reflux. The patients with the bacteria, had a higher risk of experiencing these symptoms. CONCLUSION - Various etiological factors in eating habits and lifestyle, as smoking, alcoholism, anxiety, stress, associated diseases and inadequate

  6. O Blood Group as a Risk Factor for Helicobacter Pylori IgG Seropositivity Among Pregnant Sudanese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasim, Gasim I; Elmugabil, Abdelmageed; Hamdan, Hamdan Z; Rayis, Duria A; Adam, Ishag

    2017-06-07

    The objective was to investigate the prevalence and the association between blood groups and Helicobacter pylori IgG seropositivity among pregnant Sudanese women. A cross-sectional survey was carried-out at Saad Abul Ela Maternity Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan during the period of July 2014 through December 2015. Questionnaires covering socio-demographic and obstetrics information were administered. Specific H. pylori IgG antibody was analysed using ELISA. One hundred eighty six pregnant women were enrolled. The mean (SD) of the age, parity was 28.3 (2.6) years and 2.6 (3.5), respectively. Of the 186 women, 42 (22.6%), 24 (12.9%), 11(5.9%) and 109 (58.6%) had blood group A, B, AB and O, respectively. H. pylori IgG seropositivity rate was 132/186 (71.0%). There was no significant difference in age and parity between women with H. pylori IgG seropositive and seronegative. Compared with the women with H. pylori IgG seronegative, significantly higher numbers of women with H. pylori IgG seropositive had O blood group, [84/132(63.6) versus 25/54(46.3), Ppylori IgG seropositivity. The current study showed that women with blood group O were at higher risk for H. pylori IgG seropositivity.

  7. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  8. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal name: Helicobacter pylori Related tests: Gastrin At a Glance Test Sample ... else I should know? How is it used? Helicobacter pylori testing is used to diagnose an infection due ...

  9. Helicobacter pylori-coccoid forms and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Rasmussen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    be detected by PCR in water supplies. There is no substantial evidence for viable H. pylori persisting in water supplies. Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental water is a risk factor for H. pylori infection when compared with tap water, and formation of H. pylori biofilm cannot be excluded....... Helicobacter pylori does not seem to take part in biofilm formation in the oral cavity even though the bacterium may be detected....

  10. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carini Francesco; Samir Mallat; Cappello Francesco; Zummo Giovani; Jurjus Abdo; Tomasello Giovanni; Leone Angelo; Di Pasquale Roberto; Saniflippo Beatrice; Sinagra Emanuele; Damiani Provvidenza; Rosalyn Jurjus; Alice Gerges-Geagea; Inaya Hajj Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  11. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carini Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  12. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  13. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Paul; Waidner, Barbara; Hofman, Véronique; Bereswill, Stefan; Brest, Patrick; Kist, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    Research in the last year has provided new insights into the function of the the cag-associated type IV secretion system and the vacuolating toxin VacA. A quite new aspect was disclosed by the finding that Helicobacter pylori in Mongolian gerbils colonizes a very distinct topology in the gastric mucous layer, obviously providing optimal conditions for long-term survival. Further research activities focused on H. pylori ammonia and metal metabolism as well as on bacterial stress defence mechanisms. Differential expression of approximately 7% of the bacterial genome was found at low pH suggesting that H. pylori has evolved a multitude of acid-adaptive mechanisms. VacA was shown to interrupt phagosome maturation in macrophage cell lines as well as to modulate and interfere with T lymphocyte immunological functions. Gastric mucosa as well as the H. pylori-infected epithelial cell line AGS strongly express IL-8 receptor A and B, which might contribute to the augmentation of the inflammatory response. Accumulating evidence implicates genetic variation in the inflammatory response to H. pylori in the etiology of the increased risk of gastric cancer after H. pylori infection. The chronic imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation is the first step of gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard, it was demonstrated that coexpression of two H. pylori proteins, CagA and HspB, in AGS cells, caused an increase in E2F transcription factor, cyclin D3, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Taken together, we now have a better understanding of the role of different virulence factors of H. pylori. There is still a lot to be learned, but the promising discoveries summarized here, demonstrate that the investigation of the bacterial survival strategies will give novel insights into pathogenesis and disease development.

  14. O blood group as a risk factor for Helicobacter pylori IgG seropositivity among pregnant Sudanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasim I. Gasim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to investigate the prevalence and the association between blood groups and Helicobacter pylori IgG seropositivity among pregnant Sudanese women. A cross-sectional survey was carried- out at Saad Abul Ela Maternity Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan during the period of July 2014 through December 2015. Questionnaires covering socio-demographic and obstetrics information were administered. Specific H. pylori IgG antibody was analysed using ELISA. One hundred eighty six pregnant women were enrolled. The mean (SD of the age, parity was 28.3 (2.6 years and 2.6 (3.5, respectively. Of the 186 women, 42 (22.6%, 24 (12.9%, 11(5.9% and 109 (58.6% had blood group A, B, AB and O, respectively. H. pylori IgG seropositivity rate was 132/186 (71.0%. There was no significant difference in age and parity between women with H. pylori IgG seropositive and seronegative. Compared with the women with H. pylori IgG seronegative, significantly higher numbers of women with H. pylori IgG seropositive had O blood group, [84/132(63.6 versus 25/54(46.3, P<0.001]. In binary logistic regression, women with O blood group (OR= 2.084, 95% CI=1.060 -4.097, P=0.033 were at a higher H. pylori IgG seropositivity. The current study showed that women with blood group O were at higher risk for H. pylori IgG seropositivity.

  15. Helicobacter pylori Induced Phosphatidylinositol-3-OH Kinase/mTOR Activation Increases Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α to Promote Loss of Cyclin D1 and G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Gastric Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Jimena; Valenzuela, Manuel; Bravo, Jimena; Cerda-Opazo, Paulina; Jorquera, Carla; Toledo, Héctor; Bravo, Denisse; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen that has been linked to the development of several gastric pathologies, such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. In the gastric epithelium, the bacterium modifies many signaling pathways, resulting in contradictory responses that favor both proliferation and apoptosis. Consistent with such observations, H. pylori activates routes associated with cell cycle progression and cell cycle arrest. H. pylori infection also induces the hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α, a transcription factor known to promote expression of genes that permit metabolic adaptation to the hypoxic environment in tumors and angiogenesis. Recently, however, also roles for HIF-1α in the repair of damaged DNA and inhibition of gene expression were described. Here, we investigated signaling pathways induced by H. pylori in gastric cells that favor HIF-1α expression and the consequences thereof in infected cells. Our results revealed that H. pylori promoted PI3K/mTOR-dependent HIF-1α induction, HIF-1α translocation to the nucleus, and activity as a transcription factor as evidenced using a reporter assay. Surprisingly, however, transcription of known HIF-1α effector genes evaluated by qPCR analysis, revealed either no change (LDHA and GAPDH), statistically insignificant increases SLC2A1 (GLUT-1) or greatly enhance transcription (VEGFA), but in an HIF-1α-independent manner, as quantified by PCR analysis in cells with shRNA-mediated silencing of HIF-1α. Instead, HIF-1α knockdown facilitated G1/S progression and increased Cyclin D1 protein half-life, via a post-translational pathway. Taken together, these findings link H. pylori-induced PI3K-mTOR activation to HIF-1α induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by a Cyclin D1-dependent mechanism. Thus, HIF-1α is identified here as a mediator between survival and cell cycle arrest signaling activated by H. pylori infection. PMID:28401064

  16. Expression of nuclear factor-kappa B and target genes in gastric precancerous lesions and adenocarcinoma:Association with Helicobactor pylori cagA (+) infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Fang Yang; Chang-Sheng Deng; Yong-Yan Xiong; Ling-Ling Gong; Bi-Cheng Wang; Jun Luo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the expression of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and its target genes in intestinal metaplasia (IN),dysplasia (DYS) and gastric carcinoma (GC) infected with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) and to investigate the mechanism underlying H pylori cytotoxin associated gene A (cag A) infection leading to gastric adenocarcinoma.METHODS: Expressions of NF-κB/p65 and its target genes:c-myc, cyclinD1 and bcl-xl were immunohistochemically examined in 289 cases of gastric biopsy and resection specimens from patients with IM, DYS and GC infected with H pylori. H pylori in the above mentioned tissues was detected by Warthin-Starry stain and rapid urease tests.IgG antibody to cagA in sera of the patients was measured by ELISA.RESULTS: The positive rates of NF-κB/p65 were significantly higher in groups with cagA of IMI-Ⅱ(28/33), IM Ⅲ(48/52),DYSI(27/31), DYS Ⅱ-Ⅲ(28/32), GC(35/40) than in groups without cagA of IMI-Ⅱ(4/17), IMIII(3/20), DYSI(3/20),DYSII-Ⅲ(6/21), GC(10/23). The expressions of c-myc,cyclinD1, and bcl-xl were significantly higher in groups with cagA of IM Ⅲ(47/52, 49/52, 46/52), DYSII-Ⅲ(29/32, 26/32,25/32) than in groups without cagA of IM Ⅲ(8/20, 7/20,5/20), DYSII-Ⅲ(10/21, 8/21,3/21), which were in conformity with the expression of NF-κB in IM Ⅲ, and DYSII-Ⅲ. A significantly higher expression level of NF-κB/p65, c-myc,cyclinD1 and bcl-xl was detected in intestinal type GC(27/28,18/28, 22/28, 24/28) than in diffuse type GC(8/12, 3/12,3/12, 6/12), respectively.CONCLUSION: There may be two different molecular mechanisms in the occurrence of intestinal and diffuse type gastric carcinomas. Intestinal type gastric carcinoma is strongly associated with high expression of c-myc, cyclinD1 and bcl-xl through NF-κB/p65 activated by H pylori cagA.Inhibiting the activity of NF-κB is an effective and promising way to prevent intestinal type gastric carcinoma.

  17. Lower Circulating Levels of Chemokine CXCL10 In Helicobacter Pylori-Infected Patients with Peptic Ulcer: Influence of the Bacterial Virulence Factor CagA

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    Abdollah Jafarzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Alterations in CXCL10 (a Th1 chemokine expression have been associated with various diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum CXCL10 levels in H. pylori-infected patients with peptic ulcer (PU and to determine its association with bacterial virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA. Materials and Methods: Serum samples from 90 H. pylori infected patients (70 were anti-CagA+, 20 were anti-CagA-, 65 asymptomatic (AS carriers (40 were anti-CagA+, 25 were anti-CagA- and 30 healthy H. pylori-negative subjects (as a control were tested for the concentrations of CXCL10 by using ELISA method. Results: The mean serum levels of CXCL10 in PU patients (96.64 ± 20.85 Pg/mL was significantly lower than those observed in AS subjects (162.16 ± 53.31 Pg/mL, P < 0.01 and control group (193.93 ± 42.14 Pg/mL, P < 0.02. In the PU group, the levels of CXCL10 in anti-CagA+ subjects was significantly higher in comparison to anti-CagA- patients (P<0.04. Conclusion: These results showed that the mean concentrations of CXCL10 in H. pylori-infected-PU patients was lower than AS carriers and control group. In the PU group, the serum levels of CXCL10 were affected by bacterial factor CagA.

  18. Helicobacter Pylori Seropostivity of Colon Cancer

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    F. Tugba Kos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Until now many researches have showed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be etiological factor of colorectal cancer. The aim of current study was to investigate the frequency of H.pylori infection seropositivity of colorectal cancer patients and compare the clinicopathological features of H.pylori positive patients with negative ones. Material and Method: Seventy four colorectal patients were included in study. Retrospectively, patients clinical features, surgery history and pathological characteristics were screened. Patients group serum samples were collected. H.pylori Ig G level were quantitatively measured with ELISA method and levels above 5 arbU/ml were accepted as seropositive. Results: Patients median age was 60.5 ( range 26-83 and 56.8% (n=42 were male. H.pylori Ig G was positive in 37.8% (n=28 and negative in 62.2% (n=46 of patient group. H.pylori serpositive and negative patients median age of diagnosis were 56 and 64 respectively (p=0.01. There were no significant difference between H.pylori seropositive group when compared with negative group according to age, level of CEA and Ca 19-9, stage, lymph node involvement, perineural and vascular invasion, presence of polyps, differantion, localisation of tumours. Discussion: H.pylori seropositive patients were diagnosed at younger age. Association of this finding with etiology was confusing. Further studies with healthy controls may provide detailed information about whether H.pylori seropositivity is associated with colorectal cancer etiology.

  19. [Peptic Ulcer Disease Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Se-Hwan; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2016-06-25

    Although the global prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is decreasing, PUD is still one of the most common upper gastrointestinal diseases in the world due to Helicobacter pylori infection and increased use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Korea, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is also declining, but it is still the major cause of PUD. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are caused by imbalances between bacterial virulence factors, host factors, and environmental influences. In this review, we describe the prevalence trends of H. pylori infection in Korea, the mechanism of H. pylori infection-related PUD, and treatment strategies.

  20. Expression of macrophage migration-inhibitory factor in duodenal ulcer and its relation to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X H; Zhang, Q; Yang, X P; Yang, W; Dai, F; Qian, Z; Wang, Z L; Wu, C F; Zhao, H Z; Wang, G H

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this study was to examine the expression of macrophage migration-inhibitory factor (MIF) in duodenal ulcer epithelial cells and its relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, and to discuss the pathogenic roles of MIF expression and Hp infection in duodenal ulcer. MIF protein and mRNA expression was examined in samples from patients with duodenal ulcer with and without Hp infection (N = 40 each, experimental group), and in normal duodenal bulb mucosal tissue (N = 40, control group) using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Patients without Hp infection received routine treatment, and treatment was provided to the patients positive for Hp to eradicate Hp infection. Hp and MIF expression levels before treatment and after the ulcer had been cured were compared. The positive rates of MIF protein and mRNA in patients with Hp infection before treatment were 67.5 and 65%, respectively, and were 18.9 and 21.6% in the 37 patients from whom Hp was eliminated. These were statistically different both before and after treatment compared with controls (P 0.05). The results of this study suggested that MIF is related to the development of duodenal ulcer, and that the presence of Hp is closely related with the expression of MIF in the duodenal mucosa and the development of duodenal ulcer.

  1. HELICOBACTER PYLORI: THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF PEPTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    some of the virulence factors possessed by the organism, its metabolism and growth .... lymphoma and some types of gastric adenocarcinoma .... carbon to the lungs, where the patient exhales it. .... pylori as a risk factor for cancer, Bailliere's.

  2. Helicobacter pylori therapy:Present and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo; De; Francesco; Enzo; Ierardi; Cesare; Hassan; Angelo; Zullo

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis,peptic ulcer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-lymphoma,and is also involved in carcinogenesis of the stomach.H.pylori treatment still remains a challenge for physicians,since no current first-line therapy is able to cure the infection in all treated patients.Several factors may help in the eradication of therapy failure.We reviewed both bacterial and host factors involved in therapeutic management of the H.pylori infection.In addition,we evaluated data on the most successful therapy regimens-sequential and concomitant therapies-currently available for H.pylori eradication.

  3. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  4. Patterns of Adherence of Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates to Epithelial Cells, and its Association with Disease and with Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Jiménez, Flor Elizabeth; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Cerezo, Silvia Giono; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Adherence to the gastric epithelium is one of the most important steps of Helicobacter pylori to remain and cause disease. The aim of this study was to analyze whether H. pylori isolates from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases present differences in the pattern of adherence to gastric epithelial cells (AGS), in the ability to induce IL-8, and in the presence of virulence genes. We tested 75 H. pylori strains isolated from nonatrophic gastritis, gastric cancer, and duodenal ulcer patients. The adhesion pattern and IL-8 induction were determined in AGS cells, and invasion of AGS cells was studied using a gentamicin protection assay. The IL-8 levels induced were determined by ELISA. Helicobacter pylori strains presented diffuse adherence (DA) and localized (LA) adherence patterns, similar to those described for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), were observed in AGS cells. A DA pattern was observed in 57% and LA in 43% of the strains, and DA was more frequent in isolates from patients with gastric cancer (p = 0.044). Strains with a LA pattern induced higher levels of IL-8 (p = 0.042) in AGS cells. The adherence pattern was not associated with neither invasiveness nor with the presence of virulence genes. Our study shows that H. pylori strains present adherence patterns to AGS cells resembling those observed in EPEC and that these patterns may be associated with disease and with activity on AGS cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Ins Genotype in Patients Harbouring Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Potential Risk Factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genre, J; Reginaldo, F P Santos; Andrade, J Marco de Leon; Lima, F P; da Camara, A V Coutinho; Donadi, E A; Crispim, J C

    2016-01-01

    H. pylori is a potent pathogen due to its capacity to successfully evade host defence mechanisms. Despite inducing immune responses in infected individuals, sometimes these responses fail to clear the infection and the bacterium establishes a persistent infection leading to chronic inflammation. In this context, we hypothesized that human leucocyte antigen G (HLA-G), a non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule that has the ability to regulate immune responses both in physiological and in pathological conditions, may play an important role in promoting tolerance and helping H. pylori to subvert host defence and consequently establish a chronic infection. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism in patients harbouring H. pylori infection, as well as their relationship with histological and demographic variables, to gain a better understanding of the actual role of HLA-G and its genetic polymorphisms in bacterial infection. Sixty-eight patients with clinical symptoms suggestive of H. pylori infection were enrolled to assess HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism allele and genotype frequencies. After adjustment for covariates (age and gender), the odds of having the genotype Ins/Ins, compared to Del/Del, were 3.77 times greater among HP+ cases than among controls. These findings suggest that the 14-bp Ins/Ins genotype, already associated with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases as well as some viral and parasitic infections, could confer a greater risk of developing H. pylori infection.

  6. Helicobacter pylori: epidemiology and routes of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L M

    2000-01-01

    H. pylori is a common bacterium, and approximately 50 percent of the world's population has been estimated to be infected (198). Humans are the principal reservoir. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, race, ethnicity, and SES. Rates appear to be higher in developing than in developed countries, with most of the infections occurring during childhood, and they seem to be decreasing with improvements in hygiene practices. H. pylori causes chronic gastritis and has been associated with several serious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer. Since its "discovery" in 1982 by Warren and Marshall (1), H. pylori has been the topic of extensive research. A number of studies have used questionnaire components to investigate factors possibly related to the etiology of H. pylori infection. The majority of recent studies have not found tobacco use or alcohol consumption to be risk factors for H. pylori infection. Adequate nutritional status, especially frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables and of vitamin C, appears to protect against infection with H. pylori. In contrast, food prepared under less than ideal conditions or exposed to contaminated water or soil may increase the risk. Overall, inadequate sanitation practices, low social class, and crowded or high-density living conditions seem to be related to a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection. This finding suggests that poor hygiene and crowded conditions may facilitate transmission of infection among family members and is consistent with data on intrafamilial and institutional clustering of H. pylori infection. Understanding the route of H. pylori transmission is important if public health measures to prevent its spread are to be implemented. Iatrogenic transmission of H. pylori following endoscopy is the only proven mode. For the general population, the most likely mode of transmission is from person to person, by either the

  7. Análise das impressões digitais de DNA e de fatores de virulência de linhagens de Helicobacter pylori Analysis of molecular fingerprint and virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita P. O. Godoy

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Helicobacter pylori é hoje aceito como o principal agente etiológico de gastrite em seres humanos e fator de risco para úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. A evolução da infecção está relacionada a diversos fatores, inclusive bacterianos, como presença do gene cagA e o genótipo vacA s1m1, associados ao desenvolvimento de úlcera e adenocarcinoma gástrico. A técnica de RAPD ("random amplified polimorphic" tem sido amplamente utilizada para obtenção de impressões digitais de DNA para examinar a similaridade entre linhagens. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a presença de cagA e alelos do vacA em amostras de H. pylori e associar os achados com a doença apresentada e também investigar possível clonicidade entre os fatores de virulência e as doenças com a impressão digital de DNA gerada pelo RAPD-PCR. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídas 112 amostras provenientes de pacientes com diferentes laudos endoscópicos: gastrite (n = 41, esofagite de refluxo (n = 14, úlcera gástrica (n = 19 e úlcera duodenal (n = 38. A análise dos fatores de virulência da bactéria foi feita por PCR e as impressões digitais de DNA foram estabelecidas pelo método de RAPD-PCR. RESULTADOS: Os resultados obtidos indicam que houve uma associação significativa entre úlcera duodenal e o mosaico vacA s1m1. Analisando-se os padrões de bandas geradas pelo RAPD-PCR, sete diferentes dendogramas foram construídos e não foi possível detectar associação significativa entre os agrupamentos, sugerindo que as amostras não possuem perfil clonal. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados reforçam a importância do gene vacA como um marcador de virulência do H. pylori. O RAPD da impressão digital de DNA realizado foi incapaz de associar o padrão de bandas com as enfermidades e os genótipos de vacA e cagA.BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is now accepted as the most important agent of gastritis in humans, as well as a risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. The

  8. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  9. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takahisa; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    It is well known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with many nonmalignant disorders such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric polyp, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin-induced gastric injury, and functional dyspepsia. In 2008, interesting articles on the association of H. pylori infection with these disorders were presented, some of which intended to reveal the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in response to H. pylori infection, and have demonstrated that genetic differences in host and bacterial factors as well as environmental factors account for these differences. A decline in the occurrence of peptic ulcer related to H. pylori was confirmed. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and GERD was also confirmed but the impact of gastric atrophy on the prevention of GERD remained debatable. For NSAID-induced gastric injury, eradication of H. pylori infection has been recommended. During this year, eradication of H. pylori infection was recommended for patients treated with antiplatelet therapy as well as aspirin and NSAID. It was also reported that for patients with functional dyspepsia, eradication of H. pylori offers a modest but significant benefit.

  10. Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A activates tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in gastric epithelial cells through P300/CBP-associated factor-mediated nuclear factor-κB p65 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiong; Xu, Hui; Chen, Xintao; Tang, Guorong; Gu, Lan; Wang, Yehong

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori‑initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by the cytotoxin‑associated gene (Cag) pathogenicity island‑dependent upregulation of pro‑inflammatory cytokines in gastric epithelial cells, which is largely mediated by the activation of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB as a transcription factor. However, the precise regulation of NF‑κB activation, particularly post‑translational modifications in the CagA‑induced inflammatory response, has remained elusive. The present study showed that Helicobacter pylori CagA, an important virulence factor, induced the expression of P300/CBP‑associated factor (PCAF) in gastric epithelial cells. Further study revealed that PCAF was able to physically associate with the NF‑κB p65 sub‑unit and enhance its acetylation. More importantly, PCAF‑induced p65 acetylation was shown to contribute to p65 phosphorylation and further upregulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and interleukin (IL)‑6 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that Helicobacter pylori CagA enhanced TNF‑α and IL‑6 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells through PCAF‑mediated NF‑κB p65 sub‑unit acetylation.

  11. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  12. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 are not increased in dyspeptic patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Bayraktaroğlu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a non-invasive microorganism causing intense gastric mucosal inflammatory and immune reaction. H. pylori-induced gastric mucosal cytokine overproduction has been clearly documented previously. The stomach has a large surface area and continuous spill-over of locally produced cytokines into the blood stream is a possibility. There are few and conflicting data on circulatory proinflammatory cytokine levels in patients with H. pylori infection.

  13. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases...

  14. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases......Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been wel...

  16. The Primary Resistance of Helicobacter pylori in Taiwan after the National Policy to Restrict Antibiotic Consumption and Its Relation to Virulence Factors-A Nationwide Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ming Liou

    Full Text Available The Taiwan Government issued a policy to restrict antimicrobial usage since 2001. We aimed to assess the changes in the antibiotic consumption and the primary resistance of H. pylori after this policy and the impact of virulence factors on resistance.The defined daily dose (DDD of antibiotics was analyzed using the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI research database. H. pylori strains isolated from treatment naïve (N=1395 and failure from prior eradication therapies (N=360 from 9 hospitals between 2000 and 2012 were used for analysis. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by agar dilution test. Genotyping for CagA and VacA was determined by PCR method.The DDD per 1000 persons per day of macrolides reduced from 1.12 in 1997 to 0.19 in 2008, whereas that of fluoroquinolones increased from 0.12 in 1997 to 0.35 in 2008. The primary resistance of amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and tetracycline remained as low as 2.2%, 7.9%, 23.7%, and 1.9% respectively. However, the primary levofloxacin resistance rose from 4.9% in 2000-2007 to 8.3% in 2008-2010 and 13.4% in 2011-2012 (p=0.001. The primary resistance of metronidazole was higher in females than males (33.1% vs. 18.8%, p<0.001, which was probably attributed to the higher consumption of nitroimidazole. Neither CagA nor VacA was associated with antibiotic resistance.The low primary clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance of H. pylori in Taiwan might be attributed to the reduced consumption of macrolides and nitroimidazole after the national policy to restrict antimicrobial usage. Yet, further strategies are needed to restrict the consumption of fluoroquinolones in the face of rising levofloxacin resistance.

  17. Up-expression of NapA and other oxidative stress proteins is a compensatory response to loss of major Helicobacter pylori stress resistance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Adriana A; Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J

    2005-11-01

    Twenty-six Helicobacter pylori targeted mutant strains with deficiencies in oxidative stress combating proteins, including 12 double mutant strains were analyzed via physiological and proteomic approaches to distinguish the major expression changes caused by the mutations. Mutations were introduced into both a Mtz(S) and a Mtz(R) strain background. Most of the mutations caused increased growth sensitivity of the strains to oxygen, and they all exhibited clear compensatory up-expression of oxidative stress resistance proteins enabling survival of the bacterium. The most frequent up-expressed oxidative stress resistance factor (observed in 16 of the mutants) was the iron-sequestering protein NapA, linking iron sequestration with oxidative stress resistance. The up-expression of individual proteins in mutants ranged from 2 to 10 fold that of the wild type strain, even when incubated in a low O(2) environment. For example, a considerably higher level of catalase expression (4 fold of that in the wild-type strain) was observed in ahpC napA and ahpC sodB double mutants. A Fur mutant up-expressed ferritin (Pfr) protein 20-fold. In some mutant strains the bacterial DNA is protected from oxidative stress damage apparently via overexpression of oxidative stress-combating proteins such as NapA, catalase or MdaB (an NADPH quinone reductase). Our results show that H. pylori has a variety of ways to compensate for loss of major oxidative stress combating factors.

  18. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  19. H. pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... think you may have a high risk of stomach cancer, talk to your doctor. Together you can decide whether you may benefit from H. pylori screening. References H. pylori and peptic ulcers. National Institute ...

  20. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and risk of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a risk factor for distal stomach cancer, and a few small studies have suggested that H. pylori may be a potential risk factor for lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study of 350 lung adenocarcinoma cases, 350 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 700 controls nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC cohort of male Finnish smokers. Controls were one-to-one matched by age and date of baseline serum draw. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori whole-cell and cytotoxin-associated gene (CagA antigens, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for associations between H. pylori seropositivity and lung cancer risk using conditional logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was detected in 79.7% of cases and 78.5% of controls. After adjusting for pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with either adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.75-1.6 or squamous cell carcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.77-1.7. Results were similar for CagA-negative and CagA-positive H. pylori seropositivity. Despite earlier small studies suggesting that H. pylori may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, H. pylori seropositivity does not appear to be associated with lung cancer.

  1. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: Updates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is highly prevalentin human, affecting nearly half of the world'spopulation; however, infection remains asymptomaticin majority of population. During its co-existence withhumans, H. pylori has evolved various strategies tomaintain a mild gastritis and limit the immune responseof host. On the other side, presence of H. pylori is alsoassociated with increased risk for the development ofvarious gastric pathologies including gastric cancer (GC).A complex combination of host genetics, environmentalagents, and bacterial virulence factors are consideredto determine the susceptibility as well as the severityof outcome in a subset of individuals. GC is one of themost common cancers and considered as the third mostcommon cause of cancer related death worldwide. Manystudies had proved H. pylori as an important risk factorin the development of non-cardia GC. Although both H.pylori infection and GC are showing decreasing trendsin the developed world, they still remain a major threatto human population in the developing countries. Thecurrent review attempts to highlight recent progress inthe field of research on H. pylori induced GC and aimsto provide brief insight into H. pylori pathogenesis,the role of major virulence factors of H. pylori thatmodulates the host environment and transform thenormal gastric epithelium to neoplastic one. This reviewalso emphasizes on the mechanistic understanding ofhow colonization and various virulence attributes of H.pylori as well as the host innate and adaptive immuneresponses modulate the diverse signaling pathways thatleads to different disease outcomes including GC.

  2. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  4. Risk Factors for Upper GI Damage in Low-Dose Aspirin Users and the Interaction Between H. pylori Infection and Low-Dose Aspirin Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, low-dose aspirin is widely administered at low dose as an antithrombotic drug for the prevention of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. However, aspirin, even at a low dose, can induce varying degrees of gastroduodenal mucosal injury (erosion, ulcer, ulcer bleeding). Hence, co-prescription of proton pump inhibitors with low-dose aspirin is recommended for those at high risk for adverse gastroduodenal events. At present, a history of peptic ulcer, especially that of complicated ulcer, is the most important risk factor for low-dose aspirin-associated gastroduodenal adverse events. Additionally, concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including COX-2 selective inhibitors, anti-platelet agents, anti-coagulants, and oral corticosteroid is recognized to increase the risk for adverse gastroduodenal events in low-dose aspirin users. H. pylori infection could also be associated with the increased risk for adverse gastroduodenal events in low-dose aspirin users, especially in patients with histories of peptic ulcers. Therefore, eradication therapy for such patients can prevent ulcer recurrence. However, the efficacy of eradication therapy on low-dose aspirin-related gastroduodenal lesions in unselected H. pylori-positive lowdose aspirin users without histories of peptic ulcers remains to be clarified.

  5. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Man [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Li, Fu-gang [Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China); Xie, Xi-sheng [Department of Nephrology, Second Clinical Medical Institution of North Sichuan Medical College (Nanchong Central Hospital), Nanchong City 637400 (China); Wang, Shao-qing [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Fan, Jun-ming, E-mail: junmingfan@163.com [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  6. Risk factors associated with Helicobacter pylori infection: A population-based study conducted in the province of Ourense Factores de riesgo asociados a la infección por Helicobacter pylori: Un estudio de base poblacional en la provincia de Ourense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Macenlle García

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to identify the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and various factors that have been described in other studies in the general adult population in the province of Ourense. Material and methods: three hundred and eighty-three participants were enrolled in a study on the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. All participants filled in a questionnaire under supervision, and the data obtained were examined by means of a univariate analysis. The odds ratio corresponding to each variable studied was calculated with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Furthermore, a multivariate analysis was performed. Results: the univariate analysis revealed an association between infection and: age, place of residence during childhood, current social status based on the head of the family's profession, current blue collar/white collar profession of the head of the family, sharing a bedroom during childhood, type of drinking water, and contact with animals during childhood. No association was found with respect to the presence of dyspeptic symptoms. The multivariate analysis disclosed that only age is an independent risk factor associated with infection. Conclusion: age has been identified as the only independent risk factor associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in this population-based study. The univariate analysis has detected other factors. No association has been identified with respect to dyspeptic symptoms.Objetivos: identificar en la población general adulta de la provincia de Ourense, la relación entre la infección por Helicobacter pylori y diversos factores que se han descrito en otros estudios. Material y métodos: se han incluido los 383 participantes en un estudio de prevalencia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori. Todos han completado un cuestionario bajo supervisión y los datos se han examinado mediante análisis univariante. Se han calculado las odds ratio correspondientes a cada variable

  7. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamori, Satoshi; Higashida, Akihiro; Kawara, Fumiaki; Ohnishi, Katsuhiro; Takeda, Akihiko; Senda, Eri; Ashida, Cho; Yamada, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H. pylori infection, underwent gastro-endoscopy, and were treated with H. pylori eradication therapy. Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d. All of the patients underwent a 13C urea breath test at least 1 mo after the completion of eradication therapy. The current study investigated the independent factors associated with successful H. pylori eradication using a multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The overall success rate in the patients was 85.8%. Among the general factors examined in the multivariate analyses, only having an age less than 50 years was found to be significantly associated with a poor response to H. pylori eradication. Moreover, side effects were the only clinical factors in the patients who were under 50 years of age that significantly influenced the poor response to H. pylori eradication. CONCLUSION: H. pylori-positive elderly patients should undergo eradication therapy. In addition, it is necessary to improve H. pylori eradication therapy in younger patients. PMID:20806435

  8. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection: Bacterium and host relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of a half of the mankind. Duodenal ulcer is found in 15-25%, t gastric ulcer in 13%, while gastric adenocarcinoma develops in 1% of all infected individuals. Pathogenesis of H. pylori infection is related to the virulence factors of the bacterium, environmental (dietary habits, hygiene, stress and host factors (age, sex, blood type. Colonization of the gastric mucosa is related to the motility of the bacterium, presence of lipopolysacharide (LPS and various bacterial enzymes. Gastric mucosal injury is the result of H. pylori LPS, vacuolization cytotoxin (vacA, cytotoxin associated protein (cagA, heat shock proteins and factors responsible for neutrophil chemotaxis and activity. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa and zones of ectopic gastric epithelium. H. pylori infection is transmitted via oral-oral, fecal-oral and iatrogenic way (during endoscopy. Higher prevalence of the infection is associated with lower socioeconomic level, lack of drinking water, and living in a community. Acute H. pylori gastritis is superficial pangastritis progressing into the chronic phase after 7-10 days. Gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia can develop during the course of H. pylori infection. Clearly defined factors that influence the outcome of H. pylori infection include bacterial strain, distribution of gastritis, acid secretion and gastric mucosal atrophy.

  9. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 bio...

  10. Streptococcus mitis induces conversion of Helicobacter pylori to coccoid cells during co-culture in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major gastric pathogen that has been associated with humans for more than 60,000 years. H. pylori causes different gastric diseases including dyspepsia, ulcers and gastric cancers. Disease development depends on several factors including the infecting H. pylori strain, environmental and host factors. Another factor that might influence H. pylori colonization and diseases is the gastric microbiota that was overlooked for long because of the belief that human stomach was a hostile environment that cannot support microbial life. Once established, H. pylori mainly resides in the gastric mucosa and interacts with the resident bacteria. How these interactions impact on H. pylori-caused diseases has been poorly studied in human. In this study, we analyzed the interactions between H. pylori and two bacteria, Streptococcus mitis and Lactobacillus fermentum that are present in the stomach of both healthy and gastric disease human patients. We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells. In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth. Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells. This study provide evidences that gastric bacteria influences H. pylori physiology and therefore possibly the diseases this bacterium causes.

  11. Recombinant Helicobacter pylori catalase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Ya-Li Zhang; Jian-Feng Jin; Ji-De Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant strain which highly expresses catalase of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) and assay the activity of H. pylori catalase.METHODS: The catalase DNA was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA with PCR techniques and inserted into the prokaryotie expression vector pET-22b (+), and then was transformed into the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain which expressed catalase recombinant protein. The activity of H.pylori catalase was assayed by the Beers & Sizers.RESULTS: DNA sequence analysis showed that the sequence of catalase DNA was the same as GenBank's research. The catalase recombinant protein amounted to 24.4 % of the total bacterial protein after induced with IPTG for 3 hours at 37 ℃ and the activity of H. pylori catalase was high in the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain.CONCLUSION: A clone expressing high activity H. pylori catalase is obtained, laying a good foundation for further studies.

  12. Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, Andreas; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2015-09-01

    During the period reviewed, prevalence studies were essentially performed in less economically advanced countries and a high prevalence was found. The traditional risk factors for Helicobacter pylori positivity were mostly found. Transmission studied by molecular typing showed a familial transmission. The eventual role of water transmission was explored in several studies with controversial results. Concerning diagnosis, most of the invasive and noninvasive methods used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection are long standing with efficient performance. The most interesting recent improvements in H. pylori diagnosis include advances in endoscopy, developments in molecular methods, and the introduction of omics-based techniques. Interpretation of old or newer method should take into account the pretest probability and the prevalence of H. pylori in the population under investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Madsen, Claus Desler; Bøggild, Cecilie Sisse Line

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for the development of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms explaining the effects of H. pylori infection are not fully elucidated. H. pylori infection is known to induce genetic instability in both nuclear...

  14. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on growth trajectories in young Ethiopian children: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineyam Taye

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: These findings add to the growing body of evidence supporting that H. pylori infection is inversely associated with childhood growth trajectory, after controlling for a range of factors associated with reduced growth and H. pylori status. Further follow-up will be important to confirm possible catch-up in height trajectory among H. pylori-infected children as they grow older.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Madsen, Claus Desler; Bøggild, Cecilie Sisse Line

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for the development of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms explaining the effects of H. pylori infection are not fully elucidated. H. pylori infection is known to induce genetic instability in both nuclear and...

  16. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi; Mamori; Akihiro; Higashida; Fumiaki; Kawara; Katsuhiro; Ohnishi; Akihiko; Takeda; Eri; Senda; Cho; Ashida; Hajime; Yamada

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)infection.METHODS:The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H.pylori infection,underwent gastroendoscopy,and were treated with H.pylori eradication therapy.Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d.All of the patients underwent a 13 C urea breath test at least 1 mo...

  17. Precise role of H pylori in duodenal ulceration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Hobsley; Frank I Tovey; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    The facts that H pylori infection is commoner in duodenal ulcer (DU) patients than in the normal population, and that eradication results in most cases being cured,have led to the belief that it causes DU. However, early cases of DU are less likely than established ones to be infected. H pylori-negative cases are usually ascribed to specific associated factors such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), Crohn's disease,and hypergastrinaemia, but even after excluding these, several H pylori-negative cases remain and are particularly common in areas of low prevalence of H pylori infection. Moreover, this incidence of H pylori negative DU is not associated with a fall in overall DU prevalence when compared with countries with a higher H pylori prevalence. In countries with a high H pylori prevalence there are regional differences in DU prevalence, but no evidence of an overall higher prevalence of DU than in countries with a low H pylori prevalence. There is no evidence that virulence factors are predictive of clinical outcome. After healing following eradication of H pylori infection DU can still recur.Medical or surgical measures to reduce acid output can lead to long-term healing despite persistence of H pylori infection. Up to half of cases of acute DU perforation are H pylori negative. These findings lead to the conclusion that H pylori infection does not itself cause DU, but leads to resistance to healing, i.e., chronicity. This conclusion is shown not to be incompatible with the universally high prevalence of DU compared with controls.

  18. [On the rating of Helicobacter pylori in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedichkina, T P; Solenova, L G; Zykova, I E

    2014-01-01

    There are considered the issues related to the possibility to rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) content in drinking water. There is described the mechanism of of biofilm formation. The description refers to the biofilm formation mechanism in water supply systems and the existence of H. pylori in those systems. The objective premises of the definition of H. pylori as a potential limiting factor for assessing the quality of drinking water have been validated as follows: H. pylori is an etiologic factor associated to the development of chronic antral gastritis, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer either, in the Russian population the rate of infection with H. pylori falls within range of 56 - 90%, water supply pathway now can be considered as a source of infection of the population with H. pylori, the existence of WHO regulatory documents considering H. pylori as a candidate for standardization of the quality of the drinking water quite common occurrence of biocorrosion, the reduction of sanitary water network reliability, that creates the possibility of concentrating H. pylori in some areas of the water system and its delivery to the consumer of drinking water, and causes the necessity of the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology of the population. A comprehensive and harmonized approach to H. pylori is required to consider it as a candidate to its rating in drinking water. Bearing in mind the large economic losses due to, on the one hand, the prevalence of disease caused by H. pylori, and, on the other hand, the biocorrosion of water supply system, the problem is both relevant in terms of communal hygiene and economy.

  19. Clinical relevance of Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rui M; Machado, José C; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major etiological factor of gastric carcinoma. This disease is the result of a long, multistep, and multifactorial process, which occurs only in a small proportion of patients infected with H. pylori. Gastric carcinoma development is influenced by host genetic susceptibility factors, environmental factors, and H. pylori virulence. H. pylori is genetically highly variable, and variability that affects H. pylori virulence factors may be useful to identify strains with different degrees of pathogenicity. This review will focus on VacA and CagA that have polymorphic regions that impact their functional properties. The characterization of H. pylori vacA and cagA-associated could be useful for identifying patients at highest risk of disease, who could be offered H. pylori eradication therapy and who could be included in programs of more intensive surveillance in an attempt to reduce gastric carcinoma incidence.

  20. Colon related symptoms in a 70-year-old Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, L; Jørgensen, Torben; Schultz-Larsen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess (1) the prevalence of colon related symptoms among the elderly and (2) whether different definitions identify different subjects with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The study was carried out in a random sample of 1119 70-year-old Danes of whom 72% answered...... a questionnaire concerning colon related symptoms. The number of bowel movements a week ranged from 0 to 21 among men and 1 to 28 among women, 5% limits were at 15 movements a week. The individual symptoms occurred with prevalences between 16 and 25% among men and 27 and 41% among the women. Abdominal...... pain, distension and borborygmi occurred significantly more often among women than men, whereas no sex difference was found for alternating stool consistency and number of bowel movements. According to the different definitions the prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome varied from 0 to 18% among men...

  1. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in female Vietnamese immigrants to Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Jung Baik; Sun Young Yi; Hye Sook Park; Bo Hyun Park

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its relationship to nutritional factors in ^emale Vietnamese immigrants to Korea.METHODS: A total of 390 female immigrants from Vietnam and 206 Korean male spouses participated in the study. Blood samples from 321 female immigrants and 201 Korean male spouses were analyzed for H. pylori antibodies. Data on age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking status, dietary nutritional factors and gastrointestinal symptoms were collected using questionnaires. The daily intakes of the following nutrients were estimated: energy, protein, niacin, lipid, fiber, calcium, iron, sodium, potassium, zinc, folate, cholesterol, and vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, C and E.RESULTS: The prevalence of H. pylori positivity was lower in the immigrants than in age-matched Korean females (55.7% vs 71.4%, respectively; P < 0.0001) and the domestic population of Vietnam. The prevalence of H. pylori positivity among married couples was 31.7% for both spouses. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of smoking, amount of alcohol consumed, or nutritional factors between the H. pylori-positive and negative groups.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H. pylori positivity was lower among female Vietnamese immigrants than among Korean females. Nutritional factors did not differ between the H. pylori-positive and negative groups.

  2. The impact of Helicobacter pylori on atopic disorders in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); A.J. Vila (Anne J.); D. Caudri (Daan); C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); G.I. Perez; M.J. Blaser (Martin J.); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Western populations has steadily decreased. This has been suggested as one of the factors involved in the recent increase of asthma and allergy. Some studies have reported a negative association between H. pylori and asthma and

  3. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in School and Pre-School Aged Children with C-14 Urea Breath Test and the Association with Familial and Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Çınar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection in pre-school and school age children with C-14 urea breath test, and to explore its association with age and socioeconomic factors in Turkey. Methods: Hp infection status was determined by using Urea Breath Test (UBT. Patients who had previous gastric surgery, Hp eradication treatment or equivocal UBT results were excluded. A questionnaire was administered to elicit information on gender, age, ABO/Rh blood group type, presence of gastric disease in the family, domestic animal in the household, and treatment for idiopathic Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA. Results: This retrospective study included 500 pediatric patients (179 boys, 321 girls, mean age 10.7±4.3 years of whom 62 (12.4% were aged ≤6 years and 438 (87.6% were aged 7 to 16 years. Helicobacter pylori (Hp was positive in 245 (49% cases. In the pre-school age group, 21/62 cases (34% had positive UBT while in the school age group 224/438 children (51% had positive UBT. A family history of dyspepsia and pet ownership were not associated with Hp positivity. Hp positive 76 (29.8% children were on IDA treatment but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The Hp infection positivity rate was 49% in the pediatric age study group. The positivity rate was significantly lower at preschool age than school age, and it increased with age. There was no association with gender, ABO/Rh blood groups, presence of domestic pets, IDA, or history of gastric disease in the family.

  4. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  5. Curcumin suppresses gastric NF-κB activation and macromolecular leakage in Helicobacter pylori-infected rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kawiya; Sintara; Duangporn; Thong-Ngam; Suthiluk; Patumraj; Naruemon; Klaikeaw; Tanittha; Chatsuwan

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether curcumin could attenuate nuclear factor(NF)-κB p65 expression and macromolecular leakage in the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)-infected rats.METHODS:Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into five groups:control rats(Control),control rats supplemented with 600 mg/kg curcumin,H.pylori-infected rats(Hp),H.pylori-infected rats supplemented with 200 mg/kg curcumin(Hp + curIn H.pylori-infected groups,rats were inoculated with H.pylori suspension twi...

  6. NOD1-Mediated Mucosal Host Defense against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Watanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the stomach with Helicobacter pylori is an important risk factor for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Although it has been well established that persistent colonization by H. pylori is associated with adaptive Th1 responses, the innate immune responses leading to these Th1 responses are poorly defined. Recent studies have shown that the activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 in gastric epithelial cells plays an important role in innate immune responses against H. pylori. The detection of H. pylori-derived ligands by cytosolic NOD1 induces several host defense factors, including antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and chemokines. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanisms by which NOD1 contributes to mucosal host defense against H. pylori infection of the stomach.

  7. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and its relation with body mass index in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengfu; Yan, Ming; Sun, Yan; Joo, Jungsoo; Wan, Xingyong; Yu, Chaohui; Wang, Qunyan; Shen, Chao; Chen, Peng; Li, Youming; Coleman, William G

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide. The association between obesity and H. pylori infection is controversial in the literature. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its relation with body mass index (BMI) in a Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was performed among adults who underwent health checkups at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University in 2013. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was examined by (13)C urea breath tests, and the association between prevalence of H. pylori infection and BMI was analyzed. Of the 8820 participants enrolled, 3859 (43.8%) were positive for H. pylori infection. H. pylori-positive participants had a more unfavorable metabolic profile than H. pylori-negative participants. Overweight/obese participants showed a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection than that of lean participants, and a positive linear correlation between BMI and prevalence of H. pylori infection was observed. Both unadjusted and adjusted analysis revealed that BMI was significantly associated with risk factors of H. pylori infection. Our results showed that BMI was significantly and positively associated with H. pylori infection, and a high BMI was associated with an increased risk of the infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Thein; Shiota, Seiji; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ni, New; Aye, Than Than; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tran, Trang Thi Huyen; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-14

    To survey the detailed analyses for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric mucosal status in Myanmar. A total of 252 volunteers with dyspeptic symptoms (155 female and 97 male; mean age of 43.6 ± 14.2 years) was participated in Yangon and Mandalay. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on 5 different tests including rapid urease test, culture, histology, immunohistochemistry and serology. Histological scores were evaluated according to the update Sydney system and the Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment system. Pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 48.0%. There was no relationship between age and infection rate. Even in young group (less than 29 years old), the H. pylori infection rate was relatively high (41.9%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in Yangon than that of Mandalay. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the presence of gastric mucosal atrophy. All 7 subjects with peptic ulcer were infected with H. pylori. Although H. pylori-positive subjects showed stronger gastritis than H. pylori-negative subjects, most cases had mild gastritis. We revealed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar. The H. pylori infection was a risk factor for peptic ulcer and stronger gastritis.

  9. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Vania; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Touati, Eliette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the most commonly found infection in the world's population. It is the major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Numerous studies published over the last year provide new insights into the strategies employed by H. pylori to adapt to the extreme acidic conditions of the gastric environment, to establish persistent infection and to deregulate host functions, leading to gastric pathogenesis and cancer. In this review, we report recent data on the mechanisms involved in chemotaxis, on the essential role of nickel in acid resistance and gastric colonization, on the importance of adhesins and Hop proteins and on the role of CagPAI-components and CagA. Among the host functions, a special focus has been made on the escape from immune response, the ability of bacteria to induce genetic instability and modulate telomeres, the mechanism of autophagy and the deregulation of micro RNAs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  11. Clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori cagA and iceA genotype status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser; Amjad; Hussain; Ali; Osman; Najibah; Abdul; Razak; Junaini; Kassian; Jeffri; Din; Nasuruddin; bin; Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the presence of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) virulence factors and clinical outcome in H.pylori infected patients.METHODS:A prospective analysis of ninety nine H.pylori-positive patients who underwent endoscopy in our Endoscopy suite were included in this study.DNA was isolated from antral biopsy samples and the presence of cagA,iceA,and iceA2 genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction and a reverse hybridization technique.Screening for H.pylori infection was performed in all patie...

  12. Treatment outcome of localized Helicobacter pylori-negative low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyung; Soon; Park; Yu; Jin; Kim; Woo; Ick; Yang; Chang; Ok; Suh; Yong; Chan; Lee

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate treatment outcome of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori )-negative low-grade gastric mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma.METHODS: In this study,we retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcome and clinicopathologic factors of stage Ⅰ E H.pylori -negative low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma cases from August 1998 to June 2009.RESULTS: A total of eleven patients with H.pylori -negative low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma were enrolled in the study and received anti-H.pylori eradication tre...

  13. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Harris

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Using an evidence-based approach this review discusses the current treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcer disease, functional (non-ulcer)dyspepsia or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).It also briefly addresses the potential role of eradication of H . pylori in preventing gastric cancer .

  14. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Investigation on the Influence Factors of Helicobacter Pylori Infection of Children with Recurrent Abdominal Pain%反复腹痛患儿幽门螺杆菌感染影响因素调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴凌根; 陈景亮; 孙义娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To analyze and study the influence factors of helicobacter pylori infection of chil-dren with recurrent abdominal pain.Methods:175 children with recurrent abdominal pain who were diag-nosed and treated in our hospital from Feb.2011 to Apr.2013 were selected as research object,and the heli-cobacter pylori infection rate of all the children was analyzed , then the helicobacter pylori infection rate of children with different ages,gender,feeding way,family history of stomach,peptic ulcer and education degree of mother were compared ,and the correction between those factors and helicobacter pylori infection was ana-lyzed.Results:74 cases of 175 children with recurrent abdominal pain were with helicobacter pylori infec-tion,the infection rate was 42.29%,and the infection rate of children with higher age,male,chewing feed-ing,family history of stomach,peptic ulcer and lower education degree of mother were higher than those of others,those factors were all the high risk factors of helicobacter pylori infection by the analysis of logistic,all P<0.05,there were all significant differences.Conclusion:The helicobacter pylori infection rate of children with recurrent abdominal pain is higher,and the age,gender,feeding way,family history of stomach,peptic ulcer and education degree of mother are all the influence factors of helicobacter pylori infection of children with recurrent abdominal pain.%目的:分析研究反复腹痛患儿幽门螺杆菌感染的影响因素。方法:选取2011年2月至2013年4月于本院进行诊治的175例反复腹痛患儿为研究对象,将其中幽门螺杆菌感染率进行统计,并将其中不同年龄、性别、喂食方式、胃病家族史、消化性溃疡及母亲文化程度者的幽门螺杆菌感染率进行比较,并分析上述因素与幽门螺杆菌感染的相关性。结果:175例反复腹痛患儿中74例为幽门螺杆菌感染,感染率为42.29%,其中年龄越高、男性、咀嚼喂食者

  16. Analysis of Pathogenic Factors of Helicobacter Pylori in a High Prevalence Area of Gastric Cancer in Xinin,Qinghai Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuanzhiXiong; WeihongYang; YingcaiMa; GuiyingYang; YonggengYang; LiliMa

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze positive rates of the specific proteins CagA, VacA, UreA and UreB of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) in people in Xinin city Qinghai Province, a district with a high prevalence of gastric carcinoma, and to examine the relationship among the incidence, gross diagnosis and pathologic diagnosis. METHODS The gastric tissue biopsy specimens taken under endoscopy were examined by CLO,WS and Western Blot to judge the condition of the Hp infection. The positive rates of Hp CagA,VacA,UreA and UreB that had infected patients were evaluated. RESULTS The positive rate of UreA was markedly lower in chronic superficial gastritis (CSG) than in duodenal ulcer (DU) and compound ulcer, and also lower than in chronic atrophic gastritis(CAG), gastric ulcer(GU) and gastric cancinoma. However the positive rate of UreB was notably lower in duodenal ulcer and gastric ulcer than in chronic superficial gastritis and atrophic gastritis. The rates of UreB found in intestinal epithelial metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinoma were notably lower than in other diseases, however, it was markedly increased in chronic superficial gastritis, No differences were found among CagA and VacA of specimens with different endoscopic diagnosis or pathologic diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS The UreA in Hp may be relevant to the pathogenic mechanism of severe gastric diseases. However, UreB may have some protective effect on severe gastric diseases.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and cancer among adults in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens Marilyn

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Data from Africa on infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are sparse. Therefore, as part of an epidemiological study of cancer in Uganda, we investigated the prevalence and determinants of antibodies against H. pylori among 854 people with different cancer types and benign tumours. Patients were recruited from hospitals in Kampala, Uganda, interviewed about various demographic and lifestyle factors and tested for antibodies against H. pylori. In all patients combined, excluding those with stomach cancer (which has been associated with H. pylori infection, the prevalence of antibodies was 87% (723/833 overall, but declined with increasing age (p = 0.02 and was lower among people who were HIV seropositive compared to seronegative (p H. pylori antibodies (odds ratio 0.8, 95% confidence intervals 0.2–2.9, p = 0.7; estimated using all other patients as controls, with adjustment for age, sex and HIV serostatus. No other cancer site or type was significantly associated with anti-H. pylori antibodies. The prevalence of H. pylori reported here is broadly in accord with results from other developing countries, although the determinants of infection and its' role in the aetiology of gastric cancer in Uganda remain unclear.

  18. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in HIV-infected patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Daniel T; Morgan, Christopher J; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    The risk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are different: H. pylori is transmitted by gastro- or fecal-oral routes and is associated with low socioeconomic conditions, while HIV is transmitted through sexual intercourse, infected body fluids, and transplacentally. If the host responses to these infections were independent, the prevalence of H. pylori should be similar in HIV-infected and non-infected patients. Yet, several studies have detected a lower prevalence of H. pylori in patients with HIV infection, whereas other studies found either no differences or greater rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-positive subjects. To review studies that addressed the issue of these two simultaneous infections and attempt to determine whether reliable conclusions can be drawn from this corpus of often contrasting evidence. Electronic literature search for relevant publications, followed by manual search of additional citations from extracted articles. The initial search yielded 44 publications; after excluding case reports, reviews, narrowly focused articles, and duplicate reports, there remained 29 articles, which are the corpus of this review. With one exception, all studies reported higher rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-negative subjects. Five studies also examined the CD4 lymphocyte counts and found an inverse correlation between the degree of immunosuppression and the prevalence of active H. pylori infection. Current evidence suggests that it is likely that H. pylori needs a functional immune system to successfully and persistently colonize the human gastric mucosa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Public Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Khean-Lee; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Shiota, Seiji; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes studies on the epidemiology and public health implications of Helicobacter pylori published in peer-reviewed journals from April 2010 through March 2011. Prevalence rates vary widely between different geographical regions and ethnic groups. An interesting study from the USA identified the degree of African ancestry as an independent predictor of H. pylori infection. Two studies have demonstrated early childhood as the period of transmission of infection and identified an infected sibling as an important risk factor. An oral–oral route of spread has been substantiated with several studies showing the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity. Studies have shown the presence of H. pylori in drinking water and the role of poor living conditions and sanitation in H. pylori infection, supporting an oral–fecal route of spread. Screening for H. pylori as a gastric cancer prescreening strategy has been described in Japan, and the importance of H. pylori eradication as a gastric cancer–prevention strategy has now been further emphasized in Japanese guidelines. Two studies have shown a decrease in the burden of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer disease with H. pylori eradication. PMID:21896079

  20. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Faisal Zaidi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world’s population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class Ⅰ definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Helicobacter pylori Strain 29CaP Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucito-Varela, Eduardo; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Lozano, Luis; Merino, Enrique; López-Leal, Gamaliel

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for the development of gastric cancer and other gastroduodenal diseases. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. pylori strain 29CaP, isolated from a Mexican patient with gastric cancer. The genomic data analysis revealed a cag-negative H. pylori strain that contains a prophage sequence. PMID:26769924

  2. Validation of a High-Throughput Multiplex Genetic Detection System for Helicobacter pylori Identification, Quantification, Virulence, and Resistance Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanmei; Zhao, Fuju; Kong, Mimi; Wang, Shiwen; Nan, Li; Hu, Binjie; Olszewski, Michal A.; Miao, Yingxin; Ji, Danian; Jiang, Wenrong; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Jinghao; Chen, Fei; Xiang, Ping; Wu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is closely related to various gastroduodenal diseases. Virulence factors and bacterial load of H. pylori are associated with clinical outcomes, and drug-resistance severely impacts the clinical efficacy of eradication treatment. Existing detection methods are low-throughput, time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, a rapid and high-throughput method is needed for clinical diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring for H. pylori. High-throughput Multip...

  3. The Role of H. pylori CagA in Regulating Hormones of Functional Dyspepsia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Ping Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, Hp colonizes the stomachs of approximately 20%–80% of humans throughout the world. The Word Healthy Organization (WHO classified H. pylori as a group 1 carcinogenic factor in 1994. Recently, an increasing number of studies has shown an association between H. pylori infection and various extragastric diseases. Functional dyspepsia (FD is considered a biopsychosocial disorder with multifactorial pathogenesis, and studies have shown that infection with CagA-positive H. pylori strains could explain some of the symptoms of functional dyspepsia. Moreover, CagA-positive H. pylori strains have been shown to affect the secretion of several hormones, including 5-HT, ghrelin, dopamine, and gastrin, and altered levels of these hormones might be the cause of the psychological disorders of functional dyspepsia patients. This review describes the mutual effects of H. pylori and hormones in functional dyspepsia and provides new insight into the pathogenesis of functional dyspepsia.

  4. Rare Gastric Lesions Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Histopathological Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Mee

    2017-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. However, some rare gastric lesions exhibiting distinctive histological features may also be associated with H. pylori infection, including lymphocytic gastritis, granulomatous gastritis, Russell body gastritis, or crystal-storing histiocytosis. Although diverse factors can contribute to their development, there is convincing evidence that H. pylori infection may play a pathogenic role. These findings are mainly based on studies in patients with these lesions who exhibited clinical and histological improvements after H. pylori eradication therapy. Thus, H. pylori eradication therapy might be indicated in patients with no other underlying disease, particularly in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This review describes the characteristic histological features of these rare lesions and evaluates the evidence regarding a causative role for H. pylori infection in their pathogenesis.

  5. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotype is a predominant determinant of immune response to Helicobacter pylori CagA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Alexander; Langner, Cosima; Schirrmeister, Wiebke; Habendorf, Wiebke; Weigt, Jochen; Venerito, Marino; Tammer, Ina; Schlüter, Dirk; Schlaermann, Philipp; Meyer, Thomas F; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-07-14

    To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA antibodies in H. pylori infected subjects and to identify potential histopathological and bacterial factors related to H. pylori CagA-immune response. Systematic data to H. pylori isolates, blood samples, gastric biopsies for histological and molecular analyses were available from 99 prospectively recruited subjects. Serological profile (anti-H. pylori, anti-CagA) was correlated with H. pylori isolates (cagA, EPIYA, vacA s/m genotype), histology (Sydney classification) and mucosal interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and protein expression. Selected H. pylori strains were assessed for H. pylori CagA protein expression and IL-8 induction in co-cultivation model with AGS cells. Thirty point three percent of microbiologically confirmed H. pylori infected patients were seropositive for CagA. Majority of H. pylori isolates were cagA gene positive (93.9%) with following vacA polymorphisms: 42.4% vacA s1m1, 23.2% s1m2 and 34.3% s2m2. Anti-CagA-IgG seropositivity was strongly associated with atrophic gastritis, increased mucosal inflammation according to the Sydney score, IL-8 and cagA mRNA expression. VacA s and m polymorphisms were the major determinants for positive (vacA s1m1) or negative (vacA s2m2) anti-CagA serological immune response, which also correlated with the in vitro inflammatory potential in AGS cells. In vitro co-cultivation of representative H. pylori strains with AGS cells confirmed functional CagA translocation, which showed only partial correlation with CagA seropositivity in patients, supporting vacA as major co-determinant of the immune response. Serological immune response to H. pylori cagA+ strain in H. pylori infected patients is strongly associated with vacA polymorphism, suggesting the crucial role of bacterial factors in immune and clinical phenotype of the infection.

  6. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  7. Helicobacter pylori: prospettive per un vaccino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Del Giudice

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most widespread infections worldwide: it affects more than 50% of the human population, and is responsible for serious gastric pathologies such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, atrophic gastritis and, in some individuals, gastric cancer. Current treatments with antibiotics are efficacious, but encounters several drawbacks at the level of compliance, side effects, antibiotic resistance, etc.The availability of vaccines could contribute in reducing the burden of H. pylori associated diseases. Several bacterial antigens have been identified as virulence factors and proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Some of these antigens have been tested in experimental animal models of challenge with H. pylori. The experiments in animals have shown that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori is indeed feasible. Several open questions still remain concerning the understanding of the host-microbe relationship and the quality of the immune response which should be induced in order to confer protective immunity in man.The answers to these questions will be crucial in helping the preparation of appropriate vaccine formulations able to efficaciously protect humans both prophylactically and therapeutically. A few clinical trials have been carried out so far with still limited results. Other trials in humans are in progress and are planned for the next few years.The final hope is that these new vaccines will show the expected efficacy against H. pylori and will permit the elimination of this pathogen which has cohabited with humans for more than 100,000 years.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gallstones: Epidemiological survey in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fen-Ming; Yu, Chao-Hui; Chen, Hong-Tan; Shen, Zhe; Hu, Feng-Ling; Yuan, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Guo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the prevalence and risk factors for gallstones, primarily focusing on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: A total of 10016 Chinese subjects, who had undergone physical examination, fasting 13C urea breath test and abdominal ultrasonography, had sufficient blood test data, and had finished a questionnaire, were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants (n = 1122) who had previous eradication of H. pylori were studied separately. RESULTS: Gallstones were discovered in 9.10% of men and 8.58% of women, with no significant sex difference. Multivariate analyses displayed that age, aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol, H. pylori infection, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and fatty liver had a significant association with gallstones (P gallstones. After age stratification, H. pylori infection and fatty liver still had a significant positive association with gallstones in any age-specific groups, whereas HCV infection had a significant positive association in patients aged > 40 years. The prevalence of gallstones among H. pylori-positive, H. pylori-eradicated, and H. pylori-negative subjects was 9.47%, 9.02%, and 8.46%, respectively. The matched analysis showed that gallstones among H. pylori eradicated subjects was significantly lower compared with H. pylori-positive subjects (P gallstones. H. pylori eradication may lead to prevention of gallstones. PMID:26269681

  9. Cholesterol glucosylation by Helicobacter pylori delays internalization and arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shin-Yi; Wang, Hung-Jung; Cheng, Hsin-Hung; Chen, Sheng-De; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and contributes to chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa. H. pylori persistence occurs because of insufficient eradication by phagocytic cells. A key factor of H. pylori, cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase encoded by capJ that extracts host cholesterol and converts it to cholesteryl glucosides, is important to evade host immunity. Here, we examined whether phagocytic trafficking in macrophages was perturbed by capJ-carrying H. pylori. J774A.1 cells were infected with H. pylori at a multiplicity of infection of 50. Live-cell imaging and confocal microscopic analysis were applied to monitor the phagocytic trafficking events. The viability of H. pylori inside macrophages was determined by using gentamicin colony-forming unit assay. The phagocytic routes were characterized by using trafficking-intervention compounds. Wild type (WT) H. pylori exhibited more delayed entry into macrophages and also arrested phagosome maturation more than did capJ knockout mutant. Pretreatment of genistein and LY294002 prior to H. pylori infection reduced the internalization of WT but not capJ-knockout H. pylori in macrophages. Cholesterol glucosylation by H. pylori interferes with phagosome trafficking via a lipid-raft and PI3K-dependent manner, which retards engulfment of bacteria for prolonged intracellular survival of H. pylori. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The role of autonomic neuropathy as a risk factor of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, S; Turco, S; Oliviero, B; Torella, R

    1998-10-01

    A high prevalence of upper gastrointestinal symptoms is described in diabetic patients and, at least in part, this has been attributed to abnormal emptying of the stomach. In an unselected small series of dyspeptic patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), we previously described a higher prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection associated with autonomic neuropathy (AN) than in non-diabetic subjects. To evaluate the prevalence of Hp and its relationship with AN, we studied 164 DM2 patients, matched for sex, age ( +/- 5 years) and body weight ( +/- kg) to 164 non-diabetic subjects, all affected with dyspepsia of unknown origin. Results document that the prevalence of peptic ulcer is similar in both groups of patients (20.1 vs 29.3% P = n.s.); chronic gastritis was 50% in the control group and 35.4% in the DN2 group (P diabetics (44.5 vs 20.7%, P diabetic subjects. In addition, in diabetic patients the frequency of non-ulcer, non-gastritis dyspepsia is two times higher than in non-diabetics and is strictly associated with autonomic neuropathy, acting as a favoring factor for occurrence and recurrence of gastrointestinal disease.

  11. Diet, microbial virulence, and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, Timothy L; Peek, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the strongest known risk factors for this malignancy. H. pylori strains exhibit a high level of genetic diversity, and the risk of gastric cancer is higher in persons carrying certain strain types (for example, those that contain a cag pathogenicity island or type s1 vacA alleles) than in persons carrying other strain types. Additional risk factors for gastric cancer include specific human genetic polymorphisms and specific dietary preferences (for example, a high-salt diet or a diet deficient in fruits and vegetables). Finally, iron-deficiency anemia is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Recent studies have provided evidence that several dietary risk factors for gastric cancer directly impact H. pylori virulence. In this review article, we discuss mechanisms by which diet can modulate H. pylori virulence and thereby influence gastric cancer risk.

  12. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  13. Vascular risks and complications in diabetes mellitus: the role of helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa Ahmed; Amine, Nabila F; Galal, Ghada M; Helal, Shaaban R; Tag El-Din, Lubna M; Shawky, Ola A; Ahmed, Eman A; Abdel Rahman, Mohamed S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are at risk for Helicobacter pylori infection. This infection has been linked to atherosclerosis and its vascular complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the: (1) prevalence of H pylori infection in patients with DM; (2) association between diabetic vascular complications and H pylori infection; and (3) influence of H pylori infection on atherosclerosis and inflammatory biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated 80 patients with DM for atherosclerosis; cardiac, cerebral, and peripheral vascular diseases; retinopathy; neuropathy; and nephropathy. We estimated the blood levels of glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, complete blood cell count, erythrocytic sedimentation rate, lipid profile, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and anti-H pylori IgG antibodies. H pylori infection was detected in 85% of patients versus 76.7% for control subjects. Carotid artery intima-media thickness was significant in H pylori-infected patients. IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were significantly associated with H pylori infection. In multivariate analysis, blood glucose, triglycerides, erythrocytic sedimentation rate, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased the odds for atherothrombotic cause of cerebral ischemia in H pylori infection. We concluded that H pylori infection is common in DM and seems to be linked to the presence of atherosclerosis and ischemic cerebrovascular stroke. This effect could be mediated by increasing cytokine levels.

  14. Diet, microbial virulence, and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cover, Timothy L.; Peek, Jr, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the strongest known risk factors for this malignancy. H. pylori strains exhibit a high level of genetic diversity, and the risk of gastric cancer is higher in persons carrying certain strain types (for example, those that contain a cag pathogenicity island or type s1 vacA alleles) than in persons carrying other strain types. Additional risk factors for gastric cancer includ...

  15. Helicobacter pylori in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Matjaž; Hojsak, Iva; Kolaček, Sanja

    2012-09-01

    This review summarizes important pediatric studies published from April 2011 up to March 2012. Proteomics profile of ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains was defined in the most interesting study of the last year. The antigen stool test is becoming the "gold standard" in prevalence studies, and according to the last epidemiologic studies, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in childhood is not decreasing any more in the developed world. The resistance rate of H. pylori strains is high in children. Therefore, among other important issues concerning H. pylori in pediatrics, guidelines published by ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN last year also recommended culture and susceptibility testing before first-line treatment in areas with high or unknown antibiotic resistance rates.

  16. Eradication of H pylori for the prevention of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karolin Trautmann; Manfred Stolte; Stephan Miehlke

    2006-01-01

    Tnfection with H pylori is the most important known etiological factor associated with gastric cancer. While colonization of the gastric mucosa with H pylori results in active and chronic gastritis in virtually all individuals infected, the likelihood of developing gastric cancer depends on environmental, bacterial virulence and host specific factors. The majority of all gastric cancer cases are attributable to H pylori infection and therefore theoretically preventable. There is evidence from animal models that eradication of H pylori at an early time point can prevent gastric cancer development. However, randomized clinical trials exploring the prophylactic effect of H pylori eradication on the incidence of gastric cancer in humans remain sparse and have yielded conflicting results. Better markers for the identification of patientsat risk for H pylori induced gastric malignancy are needed to allow the development of a more efficient public eradication strategy. Meanwhile, screening and treatment of H pylori in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients as well as certain high-risk populations might be beneficial.

  17. Helicobacter pylori HP0231 Influences Bacterial Virulence and Is Essential for Gastric Colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhong

    Full Text Available The Dsb protein family is responsible for introducing disulfide bonds into nascent proteins in prokaryotes, stabilizing the structure of many proteins. Helicobacter pylori HP0231 is a Dsb-like protein, shown to catalyze disulfide bond formation and to participate in redox homeostasis. Notably, many H. pylori virulence factors are stabilized by the formation of disulfide bonds. By employing H. pylori HP0231 deficient strains we analyzed the effect of lack of this bacterial protein on the functionality of virulence factors containing putative disulfide bonds. The lack of H. pylori HP0231 impaired CagA translocation into gastric epithelial cells and reduced VacA-induced cellular vacuolation. Moreover, H. pylori HP0231 deficient bacteria were not able to colonize the gastric mucosa of mice, probably due to compromised motility. Together, our data demonstrate an essential function for H. pylori HP0231 in gastric colonization and proper function of bacterial virulence factors related to gastric pathology.

  18. Severe gastritis decreases success rate of Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Ismail Hakki; Sapmaz, Ferdane; Güliter, Sefa; Atasoy, Pınar

    2016-05-01

    In several studies, different risk factors other than antibiotic resistance have been documented with Helicobacter pylori eradication failure. We aimed in this study to investigate the relationship of gastric density of H. pylori, the occurrence/degree of gastric atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia (IM) with success rate of H. pylori eradication. Two hundred consecutive treatment naive patients who received bismuth containing standart quadruple treatment due to H. pylori infection documented by histopathological examination of two antral or two corpal biopsies entered this retrospective study. The updated Sydney system was used to grade the activity of gastritis, density of H. pylori colonization, atrophy, and IM. Stages III and IV of operative link for gastritis assessment (OLGA) or the operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) stages was considered as severe gastritis. H. pylori eradication was determined via stool H. pylori antigen test performed 4 weeks after the end of therapy. The presence of gastric atrophy and IM was significantly higher in patients with eradication failure (p = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Severe gastritis (OLGA III-IV and OLGIM III-IV) rates were higher in eradication failure group. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that OLGA and OLGIM stages were to be independent risk factors for eradication failure (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Our results suggested that histopathologically severe gastritis may cause H. pylori eradication failure. In addition, we found that H. pylori density was not a risk factor for treatment failure in patients who receive quadruple treatment.

  19. Characterization of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Patients with Gastric Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, infection due to Helicobacter Pylori is recognized as a medical problem worldwide. It causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, lymphatic proliferative disorders and it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Objective: To characterize Helicobacter Pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcer and to relate this infection to gastric histological diagnoses. Methods: An observational, descriptive, correlational retrospective study in patients with gastric ulcers at the Dr.Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital was carried out from January 2005 to December 2007. Endoscopy and mucous gastric biopsy were performed for the histological and diagnostic study of the infection due to Helicobacter Pylori by means of the hematoxiline-eosine and giemsa stain respectively. The sample was composed by 137 patients. Results: the frequency of infection due to Helicobacter pylori was 59,1 % prevailing in the age groups 51-60 years old (34,6 % and 61-70 yearsold. (30,8 %. The highest frequency of malignant ulcers were located at the antral region (85,7 % with predominance of Helicobacter Pylori (80 %. There was a 95 % reliability between the relationship of Helicobacter Pylori and the histological diagnoses. The patients under the diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori showed a greater probability to present cancer (OR 4,32 IC: 0,58-39,44 and worsened chronic gastritis (OR 2,59 IC: 0,61-11,30. Chronic gastritis did not constitute a risk factor for acute gastritis(OR 0,86 IC: 0,09-7,08. Conclusions: The probability of suffering from gastric cancer, chronic gastritis and worsened chronic gastritis was greater in all those patients who presented with Helicobacter pylori infection but in this study Helicobacter pylori did not constitute a risk factor for acute gastritis

  20. Immunity and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Harris

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria called Helicobacter pylori arrived to the American continent 12,000 years ago (1, reaching South America roughly 5,400-4,600 years AC according to research by Pelayo Correa, a Colombian pathologist who found Helicobacter in stool next to Chinchorro mummies in the North of Arica close to the Pacific Ocean. In 2005, Barry Marshall was awarded the Nobel Prize for his studies on Helicobacter pylori together with Robin Warren.

  1. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  2. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takafumi Ando; Yasuyuki Goto; Osamu Maeda; Osamu Watanabe; Kazuhiro Ishiguro; Hidemi Goto

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most frequent cancer in the world, accounting for a large proportion of all cancer cases in Asia, Latin America, and some countries in Europe. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) is regarded as playing a specific role in the development of atrophic gastritis, which represents the most recognized pathway in multistep intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis. Recent studies suggest that a combination of host genetic factors, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental and lifestyle factors determine the severity of gastric damage and the eventual clinical outcome of H pylori infection. The seminal discovery of H pylori as the leading cause of gastric cancer should lead to effective eradication strategies. Prevention of gastric cancer requires better screening strategies to identify candidates for eradication.

  3. Beyond the stomach: An updated view of Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testerman, Traci L; Morris, James

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an extremely common, yet underappreciated, pathogen that is able to alter host physiology and subvert the host immune response, allowing it to persist for the life of the host. H. pylori is the primary cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In the United States, the annual cost associated with peptic ulcer disease is estimated to be $6 billion and gastric cancer kills over 700000 people per year globally. The prevalence of H. pylori infection remains high (> 50%) in much of the world, although the infection rates are dropping in some developed nations. The drop in H. pylori prevalence could be a double-edged sword, reducing the incidence of gastric diseases while increasing the risk of allergies and esophageal diseases. The list of diseases potentially caused by H. pylori continues to grow; however, mechanistic explanations of how H. pylori could contribute to extragastric diseases lag far behind clinical studies. A number of host factors and H. pylori virulence factors act in concert to determine which individuals are at the highest risk of disease. These include bacterial cytotoxins and polymorphisms in host genes responsible for directing the immune response. This review discusses the latest advances in H. pylori pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. Up-to-date information on correlations between H. pylori and extragastric diseases is also provided. PMID:25278678

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with reduced prevalence of colonic diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Lars Erik; Jepsen, Peter; Tøttrup, Anders; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

    2017-08-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a common disorder with increasing incidence in Western societies. The intestinal microbiome may be among etiological factors. Helicobacter pylori may protect against some intestinal diseases, and incidence of H. pylori is decreasing in Western societies. Thus, we aimed to determine whether H. pylori is associated to decreased prevalence of registered colonic diverticular disease. In a historical cohort study, patients were enrolled from primary health care centers after urea breath test for H. pylori and then followed for a median of 6 years. The patient's diagnostic codes and country of birth were acquired from nationwide Danish administrative registries. We used logistic regression to compare prevalence and Cox regression to compare incidence of diverticular disease between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients, adjusting for confounding variables. Patients infected with H. pylori had lower prevalence of colonic diverticular disease (0.87% vs 1.14%, OR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.50-0.78). This phenomenon was observed whether we studied all registered diagnoses or only cases registered as primary diagnoses at discharge. After urea breath test, we observed no statistical difference in incidence rates of diverticular disease. H. pylori is associated with reduced prevalence of colonic diverticular disease. The inverse association was absent after the urea breath test. Thus, we speculate that H. pylori may provide protection from colonic diverticular disease. Alternatively, H. pylori is a marker for other factors affecting disease development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Infection Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Hyperemesis Gravidarum: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several studies have shown a possible involvement of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in individuals with hyperemesis gravidarum (HG, but the relationship remains controversial. This meta-analysis was performed to validate and strengthen the association between HG and H. pylori infection. Methods. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases up to March 20, 2014, were searched to select studies on the prevalence of H. pylori infection between pregnant women with HG and the normal pregnant control subjects. Results. Of the HG cases, 1289 (69.6% were H. pylori-positive; however, 1045 (46.2% were H. pylori-positive in control group. Compared to the non-HG normal pregnant controls, infection rate of H. pylori was significantly higher in pregnant women with HG (OR = 3.34, 95% CI: 2.32–4.81, P<0.001. Subgroup analysis indicated that H. pylori infection was a risk factor of HG in Asia, Africa, and Oceania, especially in Africa (OR = 12.38, 95% CI: 7.12–21.54, P<0.001. Conclusions. H. pylori should be considered one of the risk factors of HG, especially in the developing countries. H. pylori eradication could be considered to relieve the symptoms of HG in some intractable cases.

  6. The presence of Helicobacter Pylori in postmenopausal women is not a factor to the decrease of bone mineral density A presença do Helicobacter pylori em mulheres na pós-menopausa não constitui fator de risco para a diminuição da densidade mineral óssea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Kakehasi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis affects approximately 30% of postmenopausal women. Gastrectomy, pernicious anemia, and more recently Helicobacter pylori infection, have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. A reduced parietal cell mass is a common feature in these conditions. AIM: To study a possible relationship between chronic gastritis, parietal cell density of the oxyntic mucosa and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, as chronic gastritis, Helicobacter pylori infection and osteoporosis are frequently observed in the elderly. METHODS: Fifty postmenopausal women (61.7 ± 7 years were submitted to gastroduodenal endoscopy and bone densitometry by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Glandular atrophy was evaluated objectively by the determination of parietal cell density. Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by histology, urease test and breath test with 13C. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients (64% presented chronic multifocal gastritis, and 20 of them (40% showed signs of gastric mucosa atrophy. Lumbar spine osteoporosis was found in 18 patients (36%. The parietal cell density in patients with and without osteoporosis was 948 ± 188 and 804 ± 203 cells/mm², respectively. Ten osteoporotic patients (55% and 24 non-osteoporotic patients (75% were infected by Helicobacter pylori. CONCLUSION: Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis presented a well-preserved parietal cell density in comparison with their counterparts without osteoporosis. Helicobacter pylori infection was not different between the two groups. We concluded that neither atrophic chronic gastritis nor Helicobacter pylori seem to be a reliable risk factor to osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.RACIONAL: A osteoporose afeta aproximadamente 30% das mulheres na pós-menopausa. Gastrectomia, anemia perniciosa e mais recentemente, a infecção pelo H. pylori, têm sido implicados na patogênese da osteoporose. A diminuição da massa de células parietais constitui

  7. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detec

  8. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  9. Factors affecting growth and antibiotic susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori: effect of pH and urea on the survival of a wild-type strain and a urease-deficient mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, J E; Larsson, H

    1996-06-01

    This study investigated how pH and the presence of urea affect the survival and growth of Helicobacter pylori and whether these factors affect susceptibility to antibiotics in vitro. The viability of a wild-type strain and a urease-deficient mutant of H. pylori was studied after incubation for 1 h in buffers at different pH values at 37 degrees C under microaerophilic conditions. Viable counts were not affected at pH 5 and pH 7. In buffer at pH 3, there were no viable organisms, but urea (6.25 mM) protected the wild-type strain, which survived well. At pH 9, urea further reduced the viability of H. pylori and flurofamide almost abolished the effect of urea on the wild-type strain. Neither urea nor flurofamide affected the viability of the urease-deficient mutant under the same conditions. Growth was also pH dependent and was enhanced in shake-cultures. At pH 5, urea supported growth of the wild-type strain, but at pH 7 a toxic effect on the bacteria was observed. Growth of H. pylori at pH 5.9 was poor, and susceptibility to amoxycillin, erythromycin and clarithromycin was markedly less than at pH 7.2 and 7.9. The bactericidal activities of metronidazole and tetracycline were similar at the different pH values studied. At neutral pH the killing rates of amoxycillin and clarithromycin were growth rate dependent. Susceptibility to metronidazole was enhanced in stationary cultures. The interaction obtained between the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, and amoxycillin at pH 7 was of additive type. These results suggest that pH and growth conditions may be important in the antibacterial efficacy of different antibiotics in vivo and also provide a possible explanation for the potentiating effect of omeprazole with antibiotics in the treatment of H. pylori infections.

  10. Potential implications of Helicobacter pylori-related neutrophil-activating protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jannis Kountouras; Ioannis Venizelos; Christos Zavos; Georgia Deretzi; Emmanuel Gavalas; Dimitrios Chatzopoulos; Panagiotis Katsinelos; Elena Tsiaousi; Stergios Gagalis; Stergios A Polyzos

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) virulence factors promote the release of various chemoattractants/inflammatory mediators, including mainly the neutrophilattractant chemokine interleukin-8 and neutrophilactivating protein (NAP), involved in H. pylori-induced gastric pathologies. Co-administration of Chios mastic gum (CMG), which inhibits H. pylori NAP, with an H. pylori eradication regimen might add clinical benefits against H. pylori-related gastric pathologies, but possibly not CMG as main therapy. Although H. pylori NAP and other H. pylori-related cytotoxins [i.e., vaculating cytotoxin (VacA)] appear to play a major role in generating and maintaining the H. pylori-associated gastric inflammatory response and H. pylori NAP is a promising vaccine candidate against H. pylori infection (H. pylori-I), concerns regarding its potential drawbacks, particularly neurogenic ones, due to possible crossmimicry, should be considered. Possible cross-mimicry between H. pylori NAP and/or bacterial aquaporin (AQP) and neural tissues may be associated with the anti-AQP-4 antibody-related neural damage in multiple sclerosis (MS)/neuromyelitis optica patients. Moreover, the sequence homology found between H. pylori VacA and human Na+/K+-ATPase A subunit suggests that antibodies to VacA involve ion channels in abaxonal Schwann cell plasmalemma resulting in demyelination in some patients. A series of factors have been implicated in inducing blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, including inflammatory mediators (e.g., cytokines and chemokines induced by H. pylori-I) and oxidative stress. BBB disruption permits access of AQP4-specific antibodies and T lymphocytes to the central nervous system, thereby playing a major role in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. Relative studies show a strong association between H. pylori-I and MS. H. pylori-I induces humoral and cellular immune responses that, owing to the sharing of homologous epitopes (molecular mimicry), cross-react with components of

  11. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Farshad, Shohreh

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative motile bacterium causative agent of acute and chronic digestive and extra-digestive human infections. According to different reports worldwide, H. pylori symptomatic and asymptomatic infections are a global problem. The statistical investigations show a percentage of 50 for people who are involved in H. pylori acute/chronic digestive and/or extra-digestive infections around the world. This review focuses on digestive and extra-digestive diseases caused by H. pylori, the related virulence factors, diagnostic techniques including non-invasive and invasive diagnostics and treatment. There is an abundance of diagnostics for detection and identification of H. pylori. The availability, cost, and the condition of test performance may differ from place to place. To increase the level of reliability in association with diagnostic tools for detecting H. pylori, several techniques must be applied at once as multi-diagnostic technique. Furthermore, there are several pharmacotherapies which can be used for complete eradication of H. pylori infection.

  12. Fluoroquinolone-based protocols for eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispo, Antonio; Capone, Pietro; Castiglione, Fabiana; Pasquale, Luigi; Rea, Matilde; Caporaso, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a widespread pathogen infecting about 40% of people living in urban areas and over 90% of people living in the developing regions of the world. H. pylori is well-documented as the main factor in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease, chronic gastritis, and gastric malignancies such as cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-lymphoma; hence, its eradication is strongly recommended. The Maastricht IV consensus, which focused on the management of H. pylori infection, set important new strategies in terms of treatment approaches, particularly with regards to first- and second-line treatment protocols and led to improved knowledge and understanding of H. pylori resistance to antibiotics. In recent years, various fluoroquinolone-based protocols, mainly including levofloxacin, have been proposed and effectively tested at all therapeutic lines for H. pylori eradication. The aim of the present paper is to review the scientific literature focused on the use of fluoroquinolones in eradicating H. pylori. PMID:25083067

  13. Iron deficiency and Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendt, N; Kool, P; Teesalu, K; Lillemäe, K; Maaroos, H-I; Oona, M

    2011-09-01

    To examine the relationship between iron deficiency (ID) and Helicobacter pylori infection in school-aged children. Altogether 363 children from ambulatory admission were consecutively enrolled in the study. Haemoglobin (Hb), soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), IgG against H. pylori and IgA against tissue transglutaminase were measured. The criteria for ID were sTfR > 5.7 mg/L in children aged 7-12 years and sTfR > 4.5 mg/L in older children, for anaemia Hb Iron deficiency was found in 17% of the children, 5% had also anaemia. H. pylori colonization was detected in 27% and serum markers for coeliac disease in 0.6% of the children. The prevalence of ID and H. pylori seropositivity was higher in older children (23% and 29%, vs 9% and 22%, respectively). Children with H. pylori were significantly shorter [length SDS 1.0 (0.98-1.01) vs 0.98 (0.97-0.99)]. Older children had risk for ID (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.3, p = 0.03). Although the prevalence of H. pylori seropositivity was higher in the ID group, it was not significantly associated with ID in multivariate analysis. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity was not associated with ID. The associated factor for ID was age. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  14. Clinical Outcome of Eradication Therapy for Gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma according to H. pylori Infection Status

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    Ju Seok Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To evaluate the long-term outcome of H. pylori eradication therapy for gastric MALT lymphoma according to the presence of H. pylori infection. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients between January 2001 and June 2014. The clinicopathologic characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative gastric MALT lymphoma groups. Results. Fifty-four patients were enrolled: 12 H. pylori-negative and 42 H. pylori-positive patients. The tumor was located more frequently in both the proximal and distal parts of the stomach (P=0.001, and the percentage of multiple lesions was significantly greater in the H. pylori-negative group (P=0.046. Forty-seven patients received initial eradication therapy, and 85% (35/41 of H. pylori-positive patients and 50% (3/6 of H. pylori-negative patients achieved complete remission after eradication therapy. The presence of multiple lesions was a predictive factor for unresponsiveness to H. pylori eradication (P=0.024. The efficacy of eradication therapy (P=0.133, complete remission (CR maintenance period, and relapse after eradication therapy were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions. H. pylori eradication therapy could be an effective first-line treatment for localized H. pylori-negative gastric MALT lymphoma, especially for single lesions.

  15. Helicobacter pylori: the primary cause of duodenal ulceration or a secondary infection?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Hobsley; Fl Tovey

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION It is generally accepted that Helicobacter pylori ( H.pylori) infection has a role in duodenal ulceration .Eradicaton of H .pylori accelerates healing compared with placebo in the absence of control of gastric secretion and reduces ulcer recurrence .There is increasing evidence ,however ,that is may not be the primary cause of duodenal ulceration ,but that is may be a secondary factor in a nnmber of cases .This possibility is supported by four sets of observations : 1 Geographical distribution:

  16. Nickel-Responsive Induction of Urease Expression in Helicobacter pylori Is Mediated at the Transcriptional Level

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.; Kuipers, Ernst J; Waidner, Barbara; Davies, Beverly J.; de Vries, Nicolette; Penn, Charles W.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Kist, Manfred; Bereswill, Stefan; Kusters, Johannes G.

    2001-01-01

    The nickel-containing enzyme urease is an essential colonization factor of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, as it allows the bacterium to survive the acidic conditions in the gastric mucosa. Although urease can represents up to 10% of the total protein content of H. pylori, expression of urease genes is thought to be constitutive. Here it is demonstrated that H. pylori regulates the expression and activity of its urease enzyme as a function of the availability of the cofactor nickel....

  17. Recent Advances in Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: From the Petri Dish to the Playgound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Yuan Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is acquired in childhood, plays a causative role in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, and is associated with the development of gastric cancer. The present review focuses on recent advances in the scientific knowledge of H pylori infection in children, including clinical sequelae, diagnosis and treatment. In addition, recent insights regarding both bacterial and host factors that mediate human diseases associated with H pylori infection are discussed.

  18. Expression, purification and immuno-characteristics of recombination UreB protein of H.pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Wu; Quan Ming Zou; Hong Guo; Xiao Peng Yuan; Wei Jun Zhang; Dong Shui Lu; Xu Hu Mao

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Helicobacter pylori (H . pylori) is associated with the development of chronic gastritis ,peptic ulcer and gastric cancer and gastric MALT lymphoma[1-9],H .pylori has many antigens ,including urease ,heat shock protein and vacuolating cytotoxin and so on ,and urease is an important factor in the colinization of the gastric mucosa and suspected to cause damage to the gastric mucosa[10-14].At the same time ,urdase is also one of the important protective antigens .

  19. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Iranian Adolescents: the CASPIAN- III Study

    OpenAIRE

    Enayatollah Kalantar; Mohammad Javad gharavi; Mojgan Oshaghi; Behnaz Gharegozlou; Sara Mohammadi; Ramin Heshmat; Shervin Ghaffari Hoseini; Mohammad Esmaeil Motlagh; Mostafa Qorbani; Roya Kelishadi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a common bacterial infection, with considerably high morbidity and mortality worldwide. This bacterium represents a key factor in the etiology of various chronic infections ranging from gastritis, peptic ulcer disease to gastric cancer; but the prevalence has large variations in different communities. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence H. pylori infection in a nationally representative sample of Iranian adolescents.Materials and ...

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection--a boon or a bane: lessons from studies in a low-prevalence population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Mahendra Raj, Sundramoorthy; Graham, David Y

    2013-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is etiologically associated with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer diseases which are both important public health burdens which could be largely eliminated by H. pylori eradication. However, some investigators urge caution based on the hypothesis that eradication of H. pylori may result in an increase in the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal adenocarcinoma, and childhood asthma. The ethnic Malays of northeastern Peninsular Malaysia have long had a low prevalence of H. pylori infection and, as expected, the incidence of gastric cancer and its precursor lesions is exceptionally low. The availability of a population with a low H. pylori prevalence and generally poor sanitation allows separation of H. pylori from the hygiene hypothesis and direct testing of whether absence of H. pylori is associated with untoward consequence. Contrary to predictions, in Malays, erosive esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, distal esophageal cancers, and childhood asthma are all of low incidence. This suggests that H. pylori is not protective rather the presence of H. pylori infection is likely a surrogate for poor hygiene and not an important source of antigens involved in the hygiene hypothesis. Helicobacter pylori in Malays is related to transmission from H. pylori-infected non-Malay immigrants. The factors responsible for low H. pylori acquisition, transmission, and burden of H. pylori infection in Malays remain unclear and likely involves a combination of environmental, host (gene polymorphisms), and strain virulence factors. Based on evidence from this population, absence of H. pylori infection is more likely to be boon than a bane. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Helicobacter pylori phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages

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    Borlace Glenn N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a micro-aerophilic, spiral-shaped, motile bacterium that is the principal cause of gastric and duodenal ulcers in humans and is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Despite provoking a strong innate and adaptive immune response in the host, H. pylori persists in the gastric mucosa, avoiding eradication by macrophages and other phagocytic cells, which are recruited to the site of infection. Here we have characterised the critical degradative process of phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages for five genotypically and phenotypically distinct clinical strains of H. pylori. Results All of the H. pylori strains examined showed some disruption to the phagosome maturation process, when compared to control E. coli. The early endosome marker EEA1 and late endosome marker Rab7 were retained on H. pylori phagosomes, while the late endosome-lysosome markers CD63, LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 were acquired in an apparently normal manner. Acquisition of EEA1 by H. pylori phagosomes appeared to occur by two distinct, strain specific modes. H. pylori strains that were negative for the cancer associated virulence factor CagA were detected in phagosomes that recruited large amounts of EEA1 relative to Rab5, compared to CagA positive strains. There were also strain specific differences in the timing of Rab7 acquisition which correlated with differences in the rate of intracellular trafficking of phagosomes and the timing of megasome formation. Megasomes were observed for all of the H. pylori strains examined. Conclusions H. pylori appeared to disrupt the normal process of phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages, appearing to block endosome fission. This resulted in the formation of a hybrid phagosome-endosome-lysosome compartment, which we propose has reduced degradative capacity. Reduced killing by phagocytes is consistent with the persistence of H. pylori in the host, and would

  2. H pylori infection among 1000 southern Iranian dyspeptic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood Reza Hashemi; Mohammad Rahnavardi; Bavand Bikdeli; Mohsen Dehghani Zahedani

    2006-01-01

    AIS: To describe the frequency of H pylori infection among 1000 southern Iranian dyspeptic patients.METHODS: A prospective study was performed in a referral hospital in south of Iran from 1999 to 2005. One thousand dyspeptic patients (518 males, mean ± SD age of 49.12 ± 12.82 years) consecutively underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Multiple gastric antral biopsy samples were taken from all patients for rapid ureasetest and histopathologic examination (96.9% satisfactory samples). Patients were considered H pylori-infected if one or both tests were positive.RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-one patients (67.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 64.2%-70.0%) were H pylori-infected.H pylori positivity was significantly more frequent in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD)than in those with non-ulcer dyspepsia (P < 0.001).Male-to-female ratio for duodenal and gastric ulcers was 2.7:1 and 1.5:1, respectively. Moreover, the duodenalto-gastric ulcer ratio was 1.95:1. The frequency of H pylori infection among those with endoscopic diagnosis of gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and normal mucosa was 70.1% (398/568), 86.2% (150/174),71.9% (64/89), and 33.5% (54/161), respectively. H pylori infection, male sex, and older age were independently associated with PUD in multivariate analysis.H pylori positivity was associated with chronic gastritis, and chronic active gastritis with odds ratios of 34.21 (95% CI: 12.19%-96.03%) and 81.21 (95% CI:28.85%-228.55%), respectively.CONCLUSION: H pylori and PUD are highly frequent in dyspeptic patients from south of Iran. H pylori is a cardinal risk factor for chronic active or inactive gastritis.

  3. Prevention of the metabolic syndrome insulin resistance and the atherosclerotic diseases in Africans infected by Helicobacter pylori infection and treated by antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Nkondi Nsenga, J; Vangu Ngoma, D

    2007-10-18

    To report on the association between certain components of the metabolic syndrome/Insulin resistance, gender, cardiovascular diseases and Helicobacter (H.) pylori seropositivity/Infection and the response of these cardiovascular risk factors to Helicobacter pylori titers after an antibiotic course. In 205 consecutive Africans referred to the cardiovascular Center of LOMO MEDICAL in Kinshasa for management of their cardiovascular diseases, the proportions of seropositives for H. pylori and H. pylori infection (H. pylori seropositivity and histologically proven H. pylori gastritis) were investigated. The association between traditional cardiovascular risk factors, certain components of the metabolic syndrome and each H. pylori disease group (seropositivity or infection) was evaluated. The response of the cardio-metabolic level to H. pylori antibody titers after an antibiotic course was also evaluated for patients with H. pylori infection. Baseline levels of H. pylori antibody titer and cardio-metabolic parameters were compared with those after the antibiotic treatment. A total of 62.4% of participants were tested positive for the H. pylori antibody. Out of all participants, 25% had H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis without H. pylori. Men were more (pchange (p50 mg/dL. This study adds evidence for supporting the association of seropositivity to H. pylori with cardiovascular diseases and elevated number of components of metabolic syndrome. In these Africans with low triglyceride levels, H. pylori infection per se might generate atherosclerosis or metabolic syndrome, particularly in men with H. pylori-seropositive. H. pylori infection might be one of the risk factors of atherosclerosis thorough inflammation (fibrinogen) and modulation of glucose and lipid profiles, which may be prevented by low antibiotics in developing countries.

  4. Mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance and molecular testing

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiro eNishizawa; Hidekazu eSuzuki

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main factor affecting the efficacy of current treatment methods against infection caused by this organism. The traditional culture methods for testing bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are expensive and require 10 to 14 days. Since resistance to clarithromycin, fluoroquinolone, and tetracycline seems to be exclusively caused by specific mutations in a small region of the responsible gene, molecular methods offer an attracti...

  5. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  6. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on outcomes in resected gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Jennifer M; Ozbek, Umut; Harpaz, Noam; Holcombe, Randall F; Ang, Celina

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is a known risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) and has been linked with gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Studies examining the relationship between H. pylori infection, GC characteristics and prognosis are limited and have yielded conflicting results. We report on the clinicopathologic characteristics and oncologic outcomes of gastric and GEJ cancer patients with and without a history of H. pylori treated at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients over the age of 18 years who underwent curative resection for GEJ and GC at Mount Sinai Hospital between 2007 and 2012 who had histopathologic documentation of the presence or absence of H pylori infection. Demographic, clinical, pathologic, treatment characteristics and outcomes including recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared. Ninety-five patients were identified. The majority of patients were male (61%), white (36%) or Asian (34%), with median age at diagnosis 64. Tumors were stage I (51%), stage II (23%), stage III (25%), and stage IV (1%). H pylori infection status was documented at the time of cancer diagnosis in 89 (94%) patients, and following cancer diagnosis and treatment in 6 (6%) patients. Younger age at diagnosis, Asian race and Lauren histologic classification were associated with H Pylori infection. H pylori positive patients exhibited higher 5-year OS and 5-year RFS compared to H pylori negative patients, though the difference was not statistically significant in either univariate or multivariate analyses. In this retrospective series of predominantly early stage GC and GEJ cancers, H. pylori positive patients were significantly younger at cancer diagnosis and were more frequently Asian compared to H. pylori negative patients. Other demographic and histologic classifications except for Lauren histologic classification were similar between the two groups. H pylori positive patients appeared

  7. [Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors vacA and cagA in individuals from two regions in Colombia with opposing risk for gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Esperanza; Martínez, Teresa; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The overall prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is high in Colombia; however, in the country´s Andean region, gastric cancer rates far surpass those in coastal areas. Helicobacter pylori genotypes cagA positive and vacA s1 and m1 are associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. To compare the distribution of H. pylori genotypes associated with virulence in two regions in Colombia with opposing risk for gastric cancer. Four hundred and one gastric antral biopsies were obtained and analyzed from 401 individuals diagnosed with non-atrophic gastritis, atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia: 256 came from the high-risk area cities of Tunja and Bogotá, and 145 from the low-risk area cities of Barranquilla, Santa Marta and Cartagena. Genotyping of virulence genes vacA and cagA was performed by PCR. No difference was observed in the frequency of H. pylori infection between the two areas (77.3% vs 77.9 %, p=non significant, ns). The presence of cagA was higher in the low-risk area (77.9% vs. 69.2 %, p=ns). The vacA s1 allele was also more prevalent in the low-risk area (61.8 % vs 72.0 %, p=ns). The vacA m1 allele was more prevalent in the high-risk area (57.2 % vs 42.8 %, p=ns). The cagA positive s1m1 combination was also more frequent in the low-risk area (48.9% vs 38.9%, p=ns). The differences in the risk of gastric cancer in these two geographic areas cannot be explained by differences in the prevalence of infection by H. pylori or by differences in the virulence of circulating strains.

  8. Helicobacter pylori genetic diversity and gastro-duodenal diseases in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaletchumy, Selva Perumal; Seevasant, Indran; Tan, Mun Hua; Croft, Laurence J; Mitchell, Hazel M; Goh, Khean Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2014-12-11

    Helicobacter pylori infection results in diverse clinical conditions ranging from chronic gastritis and ulceration to gastric adenocarcinoma. Among the multiethnic population of Malaysia, Indians consistently have a higher H. pylori prevalence as compared with Chinese and Malays. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori, Indians have a relatively low incidence of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. In contrast, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease incidence is high in Chinese. H. pylori strains from Chinese strains predominantly belong to the hspEAsia subpopulation while Indian/Malay strains mainly belong to the hspIndia subpopulation. By comparing the genome of 27 Asian strains from different subpopulations, we identified six genes associated with risk of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. This study serves as an important foundation for future studies aiming to understand the role of bacterial factors in H. pylori-induced gastro-duodenal diseases.

  9. L-forms of H. Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Chao-Pin Li; Yu-Bao Cui; Ye Tian; Qing-Gui Yang

    2003-01-01

    bothH. pyloriL-forms and vegetative forms were (51.69±5.28) %, (34.75±5.89) %, (27.15±7.45) %, (1.48±0.47), (2.16±0.38) mg/L, (119.45±5.44) ng/L and (123.64±6.24) ng/L respectively, compared with those in patients with simple infection of H. pylorivegetative forms,the percentage of CD4+, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ and the level of IL-2 increased, but the level of IL-6 and IL-8decreased, statistical difference was found between them (P<0.001-P<0.05).CONCLUSION: L-forms variation often occurs in patients with peptic ulcers who are infected byH. pylori, which is commonly found in male patients and related to ages. The L-forms variation of H. pylori can be an important factor causing disorder of cellular immune function in the patients with peptic ulcers who are infected by H. pylori.

  10. Helicobacter pylori in Iran: A systematic review on the association of genotypes and gastroduodenal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Elham; Poursina, Farkhondeh; de Wiele, Tom Van; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is known as a major etiologic factor for a variety of gastroduodenal diseases. In Iran, with a high rate of H. pylori infection close to 90%, numerous studies have revealed many aspects of interaction between the bacterium, mucosal surface and induction of disease outcome. The organism is genetically diverse and several virulence factors are attributed to the more virulent strains. The well-characterized virulence factors of H. pylori are cytotoxin associated gene A and vacuolating cytotoxin gene A. The distribution pattern of H. pylori genotypes and its association with disease status varies geographically. The present review focused on the virulence factors and genotyping of H. pylori in relation to gastroduodenal disorders in different regions of Iran. Methods: In total, 398 studies were reported on different aspects related to H. pylori in our electronic search from 1995-2011. H. pylori infection and its virulence factors in association with disease status were investigated in 159 reports. Looking specifically at the gastrointestinal tract disorders, the most relevant reports including 37 papers were selected. Results: We found no correlation of cagA genotype and disease status in the majority of studies, whereas vacA was demonstrated as a useful marker in predicting the disease outcome. The results of reports on other virulence factors of H. pylori such as blood group antigen-binding adhesion gene A, the induced by contact with epithelium gene A, the outer inflammatory protein A, the duodenal ulcer promoting gene A, and Helicobacter outer membrane gene and their relation with disease status were contradictory. Conclusions: Although different markers of H. pylori were emphasized as useful when predicting disease outcomes in some studies, the inconsistent researches and the scarcity of data made any conclusion or even comparison impossible. Considering the gap of information observed during our search

  11. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  12. Human gastric mucins differently regulate Helicobacter pylori proliferation, gene expression and interactions with host cells.

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    Emma C Skoog

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcers and cancer. The main components of the mucus layer are heavily glycosylated mucins, to which H. pylori can adhere. Mucin glycosylation differs between individuals and changes during disease. Here we have examined the H. pylori response to purified mucins from a range of tumor and normal human gastric tissue samples. Our results demonstrate that mucins from different individuals differ in how they modulate both proliferation and gene expression of H. pylori. The mucin effect on proliferation varied significantly between samples, and ranged from stimulatory to inhibitory, depending on the type of mucins and the ability of the mucins to bind to H. pylori. Tumor-derived mucins and mucins from the surface mucosa had potential to stimulate proliferation, while gland-derived mucins tended to inhibit proliferation and mucins from healthy uninfected individuals showed little effect. Artificial glycoconjugates containing H. pylori ligands also modulated H. pylori proliferation, albeit to a lesser degree than human mucins. Expression of genes important for the pathogenicity of H. pylori (babA, sabA, cagA, flaA and ureA appeared co-regulated in response to mucins. The addition of mucins to co-cultures of H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells protected the viability of the cells and modulated the cytokine production in a manner that differed between individuals, was partially dependent of adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric cells, but also revealed that other mucin factors in addition to adhesion are important for H. pylori-induced host signaling. The combined data reveal host-specific effects on proliferation, gene expression and virulence of H. pylori due to the gastric mucin environment, demonstrating a dynamic interplay between the bacterium and its host.

  13. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and vomiting induced by gastrointestinal cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yiwei; Ji, Chushu; He, Yifu; Pan, Yueyin

    2017-07-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most common adverse reactions to chemotherapy. To discuss the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). A total of 112 patients with malignant tumours of the gastrointestinal tract was selected. Based on the 14C-urea breath test results, the patients were divided into H. pylori-positive (n = 59) and H. pylori-negative (n = 53) groups. Both groups received prophylactic antiemetic treatment during chemotherapy. The incidence of nausea and vomiting and their effects on the patients' life functions was recorded using the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) Antiemetic Tool (MAT) and the Functional Living Index Emesis (FLIE) from 0-120 h after chemotherapy. Records of the H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative groups were compared. The rates of nausea and vomiting remission were higher in the H. pylori -negative group than in the H. pylori -positive group. The proportions of no effect in daily life (NIDL) patients in the nausea and vomiting section were 73.4 and 75.5% in the H. pylori -negative group respectively. There was a higher proportion of NIDL patients in the H. pylori -negative group than in the H. pylori -positive group (P pylori infection was a factor affecting the nausea scores on the FLIE (odds ratio = 0.757, 95% confidence interval 0.597-0.960, P = 0.021). H. pylori infection in patients with cancer may be a factor that increases CINV. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  14. Association between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Chronic Urticaria: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyuan Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some studies have shown the possible involvement of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in chronic urticaria, but the relationship remains controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively assess the association between H. pylori infection and chronic urticaria. Methods. Observational studies comparing the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with chronic urticaria and control subjects were identified through a systematic search in MEDLINE and EMBASE up to July 2014. H. pylori infection was confirmed by serological or nonserological tests. For subgroup analyses, studies were separated by region, publication year, and H. pylori detection method to screen the potential factors resulting in heterogeneity. Results. 16 studies involving 965 CU cases and 1235 controls were included. Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in urticarial patients than in controls (OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.12–2.45; P=0.01. This result persisted in subanalysis of nine high-quality studies (OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.03–1.80; P=0.03. Subgroup analysis showed that detection method of H. pylori is also a potential influential factor for the overall results. Conclusions. Our present meta-analysis suggests that H. pylori infection is significantly, though weakly, associated with an increased risk of chronic urticaria.

  15. cag Pathogenicity island-dependent upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-7 in infected patients with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghiani, Marzieh; Bagheri, Nader; Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Rashidi, Reza; Mahsa, Majid; Shafigh, Mohammedhadi; Salimi, Elaheh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2017-07-12

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been involved in the pathogenesis of most important gastroduodenal diseases. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a large family of zincendopeptidases which play important roles in degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and various inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we examined MMP-7 mRNA levels in the gastric mucosa of patients with H. pylori infection and evaluated the effects of virulence factors, such as vacA (vacuolating cytotoxin A) and cagA (cytotoxin-associated gene), in H. pylori-infected patients upon the MMP-7 mRNA mucosal levels. We also determined the correlation between mucosal MMP-7 mRNA levels and the types of disease. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 50 H. pylori-infected patients and 50 uninfected individuals. Mucosal MMP-7 mRNA expression level in H. pylori-infected and non-infected gastric biopsies was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The presences of cagA and vacA virulence factors was evaluated using PCR. MMP-7 expression was significantly higher in biopsies of patients infected with H .pylori compared to uninfected individuals. In addition, mucosal MMP-7 mRNA expression in H. pylori-infected patients significantly associated with the cagA status and the types of disease. Our results suggest that MMP-7 might be involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori. Peptic ulcer was associated with cag pathogenicity island-dependent MMP-7 upregulation.

  16. Helicobacter pylori:Effect of coexisting diseases and update on treatment regimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen-Shong; Chang; Hsiao-Yun; Hu

    2015-01-01

    The presence of concomitant diseases is an independentpredictive factor for non-Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) peptic ulcers. Patients contracting concomitant diseases have an increased risk of developing ulcer disease through pathogenic mechanisms distinct from those of H. pylori infections. Factors other than H. pylori seem critical in peptic ulcer recurrence in end stage renal disease(ESRD) and cirrhotic patients. However, early H. pylori eradication is associated with a reduced risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in patients with ESRD and liver cirrhosis. Resistances to triple therapy are currently detected using culture-based and molecular methods. Culture susceptibility testing before first- or second-line therapy is unadvisable. Using highly effective empiric first-line and rescue regimens can yield acceptable results. Sequential therapy has been included in a recent consensus report as a valid first-line option for eradicating H. pylori in geographic regions with high clarithromycin resistance. Two novel eradication regimens, namely concomitant and hybrid therapy, have proven more effective in patients with dual-(clarithromycin- and metronidazole-) resistant H. pylori strains. We aim to review the prevalence of and eradication therapy for H. pylori infection in patients with ESRD and cirrhosis. Moreover, we summarized the updated H. pylori eradication regimens.

  17. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Osborn, John F.; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the human stomach for many decades without adverse consequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children wit...

  18. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia; Pacifico; Caterina; Anania; John; F; Osborn; Flavia; Ferraro; Claudio; Chiesa

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the hu-man stomach for many decades without adverse con-sequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent a...

  19. Relatedness of Helicobacter pylori populations to gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Shu-Hui Zhan; Li-Li Wang; Yong-Ning Xin; Man Jiang; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects half of the human population.The infection is associated with chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and peptic ulcers.It is also a major risk factor for gastric cancer.Phylogenetic analysis of global strains reveals there are seven populations of H.pylori,including hpAfrica1,hpAfrica2,hpEastAsia,hpEurope,hpNEAfrica,hpAsia2 and hpSahul.These populations are consistent with their geographical origins,and possibly result from geographical separation of the bacterium leading to reduced bacterial recombination in some populations.For each population,H.pylori has evolved to possess genomic contents distinguishable from others.The hpEurope population is distinct in that it has the largest genome of 1.65 mbp on average,and the highest number of coding sequences.This confers its competitive advantage over other populations but at the cost of a lower infection rate.The large genomic size could be a cause of the frequent occurrence of the deletion of the cag pathogenicity island in H.pylori strains from hpEurope.The incidence of gastric cancer varies among different geographical regions.This can be attributed in part to different rates of infection of H.pylori.Recent studies found that different populations of H.pylori vary in their carcinogenic potential and contribute to the variation in incidence of gastric cancer among geographical regions.This could be related to the ancestral origin of H.pylori.Further studies are indicated to investigate the bacterial factors contributing to differential virulence and their influence on the dinical features in infected individuals.

  20. Helicobacter Pylori Infection is Positively Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Taiwanese Adults: a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsung-Po; Hung, Hui-Fang; Chen, Meng-Kan; Lai, Ho-Hsien; Hsu, Wen-Feng; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Yang, Kuen-Cheh

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection and metabolic syndrome have been reported to be positively associated. However, only a few studies have focused on this issue, and H. pylori serum antigen was used to diagnose infection in most of them. We aimed to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome factors and H. pylori infection, as diagnosed via a (13)C-urea breath test. This cross-sectional study consisted of 3578 subjects (18-64 years old) enrolled from one health management center between 2008 and 2013. H. pylori infection was defined as a positive urea breath test. The risk of metabolic syndrome from H. pylori infection was assessed using a multiple logistic regression model. The prevalence of the H. pylori was similar in both genders (20.6% in men and 19.7% in women). H. pylori -infected participants had significantly higher body mass index, fasting glucose, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides, and lower high-density lipoprotein (p pylori -infected subjects than uninfected ones (men: 12.4% vs. 7.4%, p pylori infection prevalence increased with metabolic score (P for trend pylori infection is positively associated with metabolic syndrome, especially in females. The causal relationship between H. pylori infection and metabolic syndrome warrants further investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Helicobacter Pylori in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis patients with and without type II diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Sambashivaiah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This randomized controlled study evaluated the association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori with chronic periodontitis patients with and without type II Diabetes Mellitus. H. pylori is considered to be a pathogen responsible for gastritis, peptic ulcers and a risk factor for gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of H. pylori with chronic periodontitis patients with and without type II diabetes mellitus before and after treatment. The prevalence of H. pylori in periodontal pockets was determined by rapid urease test in a 36 patients, which were grouped as Group 1 (Healthy subjects, Group II (chronic periodontitis patients and Group III (Chronic periodontitis patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus, 12 in each group before treatment by collecting plaque samples. After treatment, 12 plaque samples were collected and prevalence H. pylori was detected. Group II and Group III had a significantly higher rate of positive results for H. pylori compared to healthy subjects before treatment. After treatment, H. pylori were not detected in Group II and in Group III Only one of 12 chronic periodontitis patients with Type II diabetes mellitus had H. pylori in the periodontal pocket. The prevalence of H. pylori did not differ significantly between the chronic periodontitis patients with and without type II diabetes mellitus. Meticulous scaling and root planning will reduce the prevalence of H. pylori in periodontal pockets.

  2. Enhancement of adherence of Helicobacter pylori to host cells by virus: possible mechanism of development of symptoms of gastric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Nakano, Takashi; Suzuki, Youichi; Ooi, Yukimasa; Sano, Kouichi

    2017-06-01

    It remains unclear why gastric disease does not develop in all cases of Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study, we analyzed whether simian virus 5 (SV5) enhanced adherence of H. pylori to adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (AGS). H. pylori in AGS (harboring SV5) and SV5-infected Vero cells, and an agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 were observed by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherent rate of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells and treated with an anti-SV5 antibody was determined. H. pylori adhered to the surface of AGS cells near SV5 particles, as shown by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherence of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells was significantly enhanced compared with that to Vero cells. In contrast, the adherence of H. pylori to Vero cells was decreased by treatment with the anti-SV5 antibody. Agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 was observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Agglutination did not occur when SV5 was treated with the anti-SV5 antibody before mixing. These findings demonstrated that SV5 enhanced the adherence of H. pylori to host cells, suggesting that a persistently infected virus may be a factor enhancing the pathogenicity of H. pylori in humans.

  3. Logistic Regression Analysis on Influencing Factors of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Eradication with Triple Therapy%幽门螺杆菌三联根除疗法影响因素的Logistic回归分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴蓉; 周刚

    2011-01-01

    the independent factors of H. pylori eradication.

  4. Structural modifications of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: An idea for how to live in peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Miszczyk, Eliza; Rudnicka, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the findings and concepts underlying the “persistence mechanisms” of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a spiral-shaped, Gram-negative rod bacterium that was discovered as a gastric pathogen by Marshall and Warren in 1984. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of nearly half of the human population. Infections appear in early childhood and, if not treated, persist for life. The presence or absence of symptoms and their severity depend on multiple bacterial components, host susceptibility and environmental factors, which allow H. pylori to switch between pathogenicity and commensalism. Many studies have shown that H. pylori components may facilitate the colonization process and the immune response of the host during the course of H. pylori infection. These H. pylori-driven interactions might result from positive or negative modulation. Among the negative immunomodulators, a prominent position is occupied by a vacuolating toxin A (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) protein. However, in light of the recent studies that are presented in this review, it is necessary to enrich this panel with H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Together with CagA and VacA, LPS suppresses the elimination of H. pylori bacteria from the gastric mucosa by interfering with the activity of innate and adaptive immune cells, diminishing the inflammatory response, and affecting the adaptive T lymphocyte response, thus facilitating the development of chronic infections. The complex strategy of H. pylori bacteria for survival in the gastric mucosa of the host involves both structural modifications of LPS lipid A to diminish its endotoxic properties and the expression and variation of Lewis determinants, arranged in O-specific chains of H. pylori LPS. By mimicking host components, this phenomenon leaves these bacteria “invisible” to immune cells. Together, these mechanisms allow H. pylori to survive and live for many years within their hosts. PMID:25110419

  5. In Vivo Accumulation of Helicobacter pylori Products, NOD1, Ubiquitinated Proteins and Proteasome in a Novel Cytoplasmic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Cell internalization and intracellular fate of H. pylori products/virulence factors in vivo by human gastric epithelium, the main target of H. pylori-induced pathologies (i.e., peptic ulcer and cancer), are still largely unknown. Investigating gastric endoscopic biopsies from dyspeptic patients by means of ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, here we show that, in human superficial-foveolar epithelium and its metaplastic or dysplastic foci, H. pylori virulence factors accumulated in a discret...

  6. Seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Tepehuanos Aged 15 Years and Older in Durango, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in Tepehuanos (an indigenous ethnic group living in rural Mexico. The prevalence of anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies was examined in 156 Tepehuanos in Durango State, Mexico, using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. In addition, sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of Tepehuanos associated with seropositivity were investigated. In total, 103 (66% of the 156 participants (mean age years had Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies. Fifty-four (52.4% of the 103 seropositive individuals had Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody levels higher than 100 U/mL. Males and females had comparable seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody levels. The seroprevalence was significantly higher in women with pregnancies than those without this obstetric characteristic. Logistic regression showed that Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with low education (OR = 3.37; 95% CI: 1.13–10.00; and laborer occupation (OR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.14–6.42; . This is the first report of seroprevalence and contributing factors for Helicobacter pylori infection in Tepehuanos and of the association of Helicobacter pylori infection with laborer occupation. Results warrants further research.

  7. Prominent role of γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase on the growth of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Gong; Bow Ho

    2004-01-01

    AIM: γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) has been reported as a virulence and colonizing factor of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori). This study examined the effect of GGT on the growth of H pylori.METHODS: Standard H pylori strain NCTC 11637 and 4clinical isolates with different levels of GGT activity as measured by an enzymatic assay were used in this study. Growth inhibition and stimulation studies were carried out by culturing H pylori in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with specific GGT inhibitor (L-serine sodium borate complex, SBC)or enhancer (glutathione together with glycyl-glycine),respectively. The growth profiles of H pyloriwere determined based on viable bacterial count at time interval.RESULTS: Growth was more profuse for H pylori isolates with higher GGT activity than those present with lower GGT activity. However, in the presence of SBC, growth of H pylori was retarded in a dose dependent manner (P = 0.034). In contrast, higher growth rate was observed when GGT activity was enhanced in the presence of glutathione and glycyl-glycine.CONCLUSION: Higher GGT activity provides an advantage to the growth of H pylori in vitro. Inhibition of GGT activity by SBC resulted in growth retardation. The study shows that GGT plays an important role on the growth of H pylori.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  9. "Helicobacter Pylori Attachment To 7 Mamalian Cell Lines "

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    N. Rahimi-Fard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of chronic –active gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers in humans, and a co-factor in the occurrence of gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tumors, Adhesion of H.pylori to the gastric mucosa is a critical and also initial step in the pathogenesis of the disease. Bacterial adhesion inhibitory agents provide a novel pharmacologic approach to the management of infectious diseases. Materials and Methods: 22 H. pylori strains, isolated from the antral biopsies of 49 patients with dyspepsia, gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer,…were assayed by ELISA (UPRto investigate the diversity of attachment to 7 mamalian cell lines. Results: The concentration of H.pylori and cell suspention ,the condition and temperature, can alter the attachment rate.Best bacterial concentration was equal to 1 Mc farland,and for cell suspension was 5*10 cells/ml.90 minutes in 37C incubation period result in maximum attachment. H.pylori can attach to all 7 cell lines, there are no significant differences between 22 H.pylori strains in attachment to cells. The attachment pattern of H.pylori to the cells showed significant reduction respectly from HepII, HeLa, SW742, AGS,HT29/219, HT29 to Caco-2.Maximum attachment were seen to HepII, HeLa and SW742 cells, and among these HepII was the best cells for this purpose. Conclusion: Our studies suggest that Hep II, HeLa and SW742 cells could serve as a suitable in-vitro model for the study of H.pylori adhesions, attachment, inhibition of attachment and detachment assays and among these Hep II cell is prefer recommended.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Antigens Inducing Early Immune Response in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji Hyun; Youn, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Eun A; Jun, Jin Su; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae Young; Woo, Hyang Ok; Youn, Hee Shang; Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Park, Jin Sik; Baik, Seung Chul; Lee, Woo Kon; Cho, Myung Je; Rhee, Kwang Ho

    2017-07-01

    To identify the Helicobacter pylori antigens operating during early infection in sera from infected infants using proteomics and immunoblot analysis. Two-dimensional (2D) large and small gel electrophoresis was performed using H. pylori strain 51. We performed 2D immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA), and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody immunoblotting using small gels on sera collected at the Gyeongsang National University Hospital from 4-11-month-old infants confirmed with H. pylori infection by pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. Immunoblot spots appearing to represent early infection markers in infant sera were compared to those of the large 2D gel for H. pylori strain 51. Corresponding spots were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The peptide fingerprints obtained were searched in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. Eight infant patients were confirmed with H. pylori infection based on urease tests, histopathologic examinations, and pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. One infant showed a 2D IgM immunoblot pattern that seemed to represent early infection. Immunoblot spots were compared with those from whole-cell extracts of H. pylori strain 51 and 18 spots were excised, digested in gel, and analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. Of the 10 peptide fingerprints obtained, the H. pylori proteins flagellin A (FlaA), urease β subunit (UreB), pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR), and translation elongation factor Ts (EF-Ts) were identified and appeared to be active during the early infection periods. These results might aid identification of serological markers for the serodiagnosis of early H. pylori infection in infants. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  11. Role of food in environmental transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Mohammad; Vahedi, Amin; Maghdouri, Zahra; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a gram-negative bacterium that has infected more than half of the world's population. This pathogen colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is usually acquired during childhood. It is an important cause of peptic ulcers, chronic gastritis and stomach cancer. Among the risk factors for acquisition of H. pylori infection, poor socioeconomic status, poor sanitization and hygiene practices, and contaminated food and water, are the most significant ones. The main route of H. pylori transmission is still unknown. Studies show that H.pylori bacteria can spread directly from one person to the other, or indirectly from an infected person to the environment. Person to person transmission is divided into fecal-oral, gastric-oral, oral-oral, sexual routes. Presently, interpersonal pathways are more acceptable than environmental exposure routes. Literatures indicate the presence and survival of H. pylori in food samples, such as milk, vegetables and meat, and suggest these foods may play an important role in the environmental transmission of this pathogen. In addition, other studies report the presence of H. pylori in the gastric tissue of some animals (e.g. sheep and cow) and therefore, it is likely they participate in the food chain transmission as reservoirs besides human. Although there are findings which indicate the probable role of food products in the environmental transmission of H. pylori, there is still not enough direct evidence to confirm this and more studies are needed. However, attention to food contamination sources (unhygienic water) and controlling them may prevent transmission of pathogens associated with health.

  12. Helicobacter pylori Eradication and Gastric Cancer: When Is the Horse Out of the Barn?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. de Vries; E.J. Kuipers; E.A.J. Rauws

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Therefore, H. pylori eradication may be an important approach in the prevention of gastric cancer. However, long-term data proving the efficacy of this approach are lacking. This report describes two patients who de

  13. Endoscopic gastric atrophy is strongly associated with gastric cancer development after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Osamu; Yamaji, Yutaka; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hata, Keisuke

    2017-05-01

    Risk factors for gastric cancer during continuous infection with Helicobacter pylori have been well documented; however, little has been reported on the risk factors for primary gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication. We conducted a retrospective, endoscopy-based, long-term, large-cohort study to clarify the risk factors for gastric cancer following H. pylori eradication. Patients who achieved successful H. pylori eradication and periodically underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy surveillance thereafter at Toyoshima Endoscopy Clinic were enrolled. The primary endpoint was the development of gastric cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's proportional hazards models. Gastric cancer developed in 15 of 1232 patients. The cumulative incidence rates were 1.0 % at 2 years, 2.6 % at 5 years, and 6.8 % at 10 years. Histology showed that all gastric cancers (17 lesions) in the 15 patients were of the intestinal type, within the mucosal layer, and pylori, and gastric ulcers were marginally associated. Multivariate analysis identified higher grade of gastric atrophy (hazard ratio 1.77; 95 % confidence interval 1.12-2.78; P = 0.01) as the only independently associated parameter. Endoscopic gastric atrophy is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development after H. pylori eradication. Further long-term studies are required to determine whether H. pylori eradication leads to regression of H. pylori-related gastritis and reduces the risk of gastric cancer.

  14. Genome Sequence of a Helicobacter pylori Strain Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Intestinal Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Olguín-Ruiz, Gabriela Edith; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Torres-López, Roberto Carlos; Avilés-Jiménez, Francisco; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains are the major risk factor for gastric cancer. Strains vary in their content of disease-associated genes, so genome-wide analysis of cancer-isolated strains will help elucidate their pathogenesis and genetic diversity. We present the draft genome sequence of H. pylori isolated from a Mexican patient with intestinal gastric cancer. PMID:24459275

  15. Metabolic Interaction of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Jong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a barrier, gut commensal microbiota can protect against potential pathogenic microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Crosstalk between gut microbes and immune cells promotes human intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been implicated in the development of many human metabolic disorders like obesity, hepatic steatohepatitis, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Certain microbes, such as butyrate-producing bacteria, are lower in T2D patients. The transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but the exact pathogenesis remains unclear. H. pylori in the human stomach cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancers. H. pylori infection also induces insulin resistance and has been defined as a predisposing factor to T2D development. Gastric and fecal microbiota may have been changed in H. pylori-infected persons and mice to promote gastric inflammation and specific diseases. However, the interaction of H. pylori and gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism also remains unknown. Further studies aim to identify the H. pylori-microbiota-host metabolism axis and to test if H. pylori eradication or modification of gut microbiota can improve the control of human metabolic disorders.

  16. Effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastric epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Shatha; Lina, Taslima T; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium has cells with features that make them a powerful line of defense in innate mucosal immunity. Features that allow gastrointestinal epithelial cells to contribute in innate defense include cell barrier integrity, cell turnover, autophagy, and innate immune responses. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a spiral shape gram negative bacterium that selectively colonizes the gastric epithelium of more than half of the world’s population. The infection invariably becomes persistent due to highly specialized mechanisms that facilitate H. pylori’s avoidance of this initial line of host defense as well as adaptive immune mechanisms. The host response is thus unsuccessful in clearing the infection and as a result becomes established as a persistent infection promoting chronic inflammation. In some individuals the associated inflammation contributes to ulcerogenesis or neoplasia. H. pylori has an array of different strategies to interact intimately with epithelial cells and manipulate their cellular processes and functions. Among the multiple aspects that H. pylori affects in gastric epithelial cells are their distribution of epithelial junctions, DNA damage, apoptosis, proliferation, stimulation of cytokine production, and cell transformation. Some of these processes are initiated as a result of the activation of signaling mechanisms activated on binding of H. pylori to cell surface receptors or via soluble virulence factors that gain access to the epithelium. The multiple responses by the epithelium to the infection contribute to pathogenesis associated with H. pylori. PMID:25278677

  17. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  18. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie SW; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes. PMID:26523098

  19. Primary Antibiotic Resistance of Helicobacter pylori in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is the most important factor leading to the failure of eradication regimens; thus, it is important to obtain regional antibiotic resistance information. This review focuses on the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone in China. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biomedical databases from the earliest date of each database to October 2016. The search terms included the following: H. pylori, antibiotic (including clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone) resistance with or without China or different regions of China. The data analysis was performed using MedCalc 15.2.2. Each article was weighted according to the number of isolated H. pylori strains. A pooled proportion analysis was performed. Twenty-three studies (14 studies in English and 9 in Chinese) were included in this review. A total of 6274, 6418, 3921, 5468, 2802, and 275 H. pylori strains were included in this review to evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone, respectively. Overall, the primary resistance rates of clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were 28.9, 63.8, 28.0, 3.1, 3.9, and 1.7%, respectively. In China, the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was high and increased over time, whereas the resistance rates to amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were low and stable over time.

  20. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie S W; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-10-28

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes.

  1. Biopatologia do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeira Marcelo Sady Plácido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori induz inflamação persistente na mucosa gástrica com diferentes lesões orgânicas em humanos, tais como gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. Os fatores determinantes desses diferentes resultados incluem a intensidade e a distribuição da inflamação induzida pelo H. pylori na mucosa gástrica. Evidências recentes demonstram que cepas do H. pylori apresentam diversidade genotípica, cujos produtos acionam o processo inflamatório por meio de mediadores e citocinas, que podem levar a diferentes graus de resposta inflamatória do hospedeiro, resultando em diferentes destinos patológicos. Cepas H. pylori com a ilha de patogenicidade cag induzem resposta inflamatória mais grave, através da ativação da transcrição de genes, aumentando o risco para desenvolvimento de úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. O estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo induzido pela inflamação desempenha importante papel na carcinogênese gástrica como mediador da formação ou ativação de cancerígenos, danos no DNA, bem como de alterações da proliferação celular e da apoptose.

  2. Recent acquisition of Helicobacter pylori by Baka pygmies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Nell

    Full Text Available Both anatomically modern humans and the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori originated in Africa, and both species have been associated for at least 100,000 years. Seven geographically distinct H. pylori populations exist, three of which are indigenous to Africa: hpAfrica1, hpAfrica2, and hpNEAfrica. The oldest and most divergent population, hpAfrica2, evolved within San hunter-gatherers, who represent one of the deepest branches of the human population tree. Anticipating the presence of ancient H. pylori lineages within all hunter-gatherer populations, we investigated the prevalence and population structure of H. pylori within Baka Pygmies in Cameroon. Gastric biopsies were obtained by esophagogastroduodenoscopy from 77 Baka from two geographically separated populations, and from 101 non-Baka individuals from neighboring agriculturalist populations, and subsequently cultured for H. pylori. Unexpectedly, Baka Pygmies showed a significantly lower H. pylori infection rate (20.8% than non-Baka (80.2%. We generated multilocus haplotypes for each H. pylori isolate by DNA sequencing, but were not able to identify Baka-specific lineages, and most isolates in our sample were assigned to hpNEAfrica or hpAfrica1. The population hpNEAfrica, a marker for the expansion of the Nilo-Saharan language family, was divided into East African and Central West African subpopulations. Similarly, a new hpAfrica1 subpopulation, identified mainly among Cameroonians, supports eastern and western expansions of Bantu languages. An age-structured transmission model shows that the low H. pylori prevalence among Baka Pygmies is achievable within the timeframe of a few hundred years and suggests that demographic factors such as small population size and unusually low life expectancy can lead to the eradication of H. pylori from individual human populations. The Baka were thus either H. pylori-free or lost their ancient lineages during past demographic fluctuations. Using

  3. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  4. Exopolysaccharide production by Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a widespread Gram-negative bacterium that infects the stomach of humans leading to the onset of several gastric disorders, such as, gastritis, gastric ulcers, and cancers. Studies from developing countries with low socioeconomic status and poor management of the drinking water suggest that it may serve as an environmental reservoir of H. pylori and therefore contribute to human infection. It has been reported that H. pylori has the ability to form microbi...

  5. Effect of Volatile Oil of Amomum on Expressions of Platelet Activating Factor and Mastocarcinoma-related Peptide in the Gastric Membrane of Chronic Gastritis Patients with Helicobacter-pylori Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Guo-dong; HUANG Yuan-hua; XIAO Mei-zhen; HUANG Dao-fu; LIU Juan; LI Jia-bang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of volatile oil of amomum (VOA) on the expressions of mastocarcinoma-related peptide (PS2) and platelet activating factor (PAF) in helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis (HPG) and to analyze its potential mechanism. Methods: Eighty patients with HPG were randomly assigned to two groups, 42 patients in the treated group treated with 0.5 mL VOA, thrice per day; and the 38 patients in the control group receiving Western tertiary medicinal treatment. Gastroscopic picture and helicobacter pylori (HP) infection (by quick urease and Warthin-Starry stain) of the gastro-membrane, expressions of PS2 and PAF (by immunohistochemical assay and Western blotting) as well as the contents of aminohexose and phospholipid (by Neuhaus method) in the gastric membrane of all patients were detected before treatment and 4 weeks after treatment. The clinical efficacy in the two groups was compared. Results: The total effective rate in the treated group was 88.1%, which was significantly higher than that in the control group (78.9%, P 0.05). Conclusion: The mechanism of VOA for anti-gastritis might be related with its action in increasing the expression of PS2 and decreasing the expression of PAF, and thus regulating the hydrophobicity of the gastric membrane.

  6. 不同胃黏膜病变中TFF3表达与幽门螺杆菌的关系%THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TREFOIL FACTOR 3 EXPRESSION AND HELICOBACTER pylori INFECTION IN DIFFERENT GASTRIC LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄亚平; 张凌云; 余海英; 雷琳

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察三叶因子3 (trefoil factor 3,TFF3)在胃癌前病变及胃癌的表达,及其与幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,H.pylori)感染的相关性,探讨H.pylori感染与胃癌发生的关系.方法 收集慢性浅表性胃炎(chronic superficial gastritis,CSG),慢性萎缩性胃炎伴中、重度肠上皮化生(intestinal metaplasia,IM),慢性萎缩性胃炎伴中、重度不典型增生(dysplasia,Dys)各30例,胃癌(gastric cancer,GC)40例,采用免疫组织化学SP法检测TFF3蛋白的表达.采用warthin-starry银染法及尿素酶试验检测胃黏膜H.pylori感染.结果 CSG、IM、Dys、GC组织中H.pylori感染的胃黏膜组织中,TFF3的表达高于无H.pylori感染的患者(P<0.05).结论 H.pylori感染可能通过上调TFF3的表达,在胃癌发生、发展过程中发挥重要作用.

  7. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  8. H. PYLORI AND GASTROPATHY IN DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Koval V. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 11 years the prevalence of diabetes in Ukraine has increased rapidly – from 1.8 to 2.8%. This especially concerns children and adolescents. The progression and compensation of the diabetes depend on many factors. In today’s medical literature the role of Helicobacter рylori in the development and progression of diabetic gastroparesis is widely discussed. In addition, the issue of the necessity and feasibility of H. Pylori eradication in these patients is ...

  9. Genetic determinants and clinico-pathological outcomes of helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwasola, A O

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral Gram-negative bacterium with a relatively small genome and is known to be the most common human bacterial infection worldwide, infecting about half of the world's population. The bacterium represents one of the most successful human pathogens, inducing severe clinical symptoms only in a small subset of individuals, thus signifying a highly balanced degree of co-evolution of H. pylori and humans. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection varies greatly among countries and among population groups within the same country, but is falling in most developed countries. The clinical course of H. pylori infection is highly variable and is influenced by both microbial and host factors including genetic susceptibility while the pattern and distribution of inflammation correlate strongly with the risk of clinical sequelae, namely duodenal or gastric ulcers, mucosal atrophy, gastric carcinoma, or gastric lymphoma. Cytokine gene polymorphisms directly influence inter-individual variation in the magnitude of cytokine response, and this clearly contributes to an individual's ultimate clinical outcome. Polymorphisms in genes coding for innate immune factors have also been incriminated in the pathogenesis of H. pylori related disease, while promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is considered an important factor in carcinogenesis and known to be present in H. pylori associated gastric tumors. Functional genomics may fill many of the gaps in our understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection and accelerate the development of novel therapies, including H. pylori specific antimicrobial agents.

  10. Helicobacter pylori colonization and pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, spontaneous prematurity, and small for gestational age birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Wouter J; Schalekamp-Timmermans, Sarah; Holster, I Lisanne; Jaddoe, Vincent W; Hofman, Albert; Moll, Henriëtte A; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I; Blaser, Martin J; Steegers, Eric A P; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2017-04-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), small for gestational age (SGA), and spontaneous preterm birth (PTB) each may be complications of impaired placental function in pregnancy. Although their exact pathogenesis is still unknown, certain infectious agents seem to play a role. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization has been associated with increased risk for PE. Our aim was to assess the association between H. pylori colonization and PE, SGA, and PTB. We measured IgG anti-H. pylori and CagA antibodies in serum of pregnant women (median 20.5 weeks, range 16.5-29.4) who participated in a population-based prospective cohort study. Delivery and medical records were assessed. Information on demographics, education, and maternal risk factors was collected by questionnaire. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess associations between H. pylori colonization and PE, SGA, and PTB. In total, 6348 pregnant women were assessed. H. pylori positivity was found in 2915 (46%) women, of whom 1023 (35%) also were CagA-positive. Pregnancy was complicated by PE, SGA, or PTB in 927 (15%) women. H. pylori colonization was associated with PE (aOR 1.51; 95%CI 1.03-2.25). Differentiation according to CagA status revealed the same risk. H. pylori was positively related with SGA, mainly explained by CagA-positive strains (aOR 1.34; 1.04-1.71). No association was observed between H. pylori and PTB. Our data suggest that H. pylori colonization may be a risk factor for PE and SGA. If these associations are confirmed by future studies and shown to be causal, H. pylori eradication may reduce related perinatal morbidity and mortality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Successful isolation of Helicobacter pylori after prolonged incubation from a patient with failed eradication therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Yin; Li-Hua He; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori), a gastric pathogen, is a major cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, and is an important risk factor for the development of gastric malignancies. Culture of the bacterium from gastric biopsy is essential for the determination of drug resistance of H pylori. However, the isolation rates of H pylori from infected individuals vary from 23.5% to 97% due to a number of factors such as biopsy preparation, cultural environment, medium and the method adopted. In the present case, we found that a prolonged incubation period of up to 19 d allowed successful isolation of H pylori from a patient who received triple therapy that failed to eradicate the bacterium.

  12. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  13. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  14. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; de Laat, L; van Oijen, A H; de Boer, W A

    2012-03-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detect halitosis. In this study a possible relation between H. pylori and halitosis was evaluated, using an objective method (gas chromatography, GC) to detect the VSCs, responsible for the halitosis. The levels of the VSCs hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in mouth breath and in stomach air of 11 H. pylori positive patients and of 38 H. pylori negative patients, all with gastric pathology. Halitosis was also established by organoleptic scoring (OLS) of mouth-breath. The levels of H(2)S, MM and DMS in the mouth-breath and stomach air of the H. pylori positive patients did not differ significantly from those of the H. pylori negative patients. OLS of the mouth-breath resulted in 9 patients with halitosis, 1 out of the H. pylori positive group and 8 out of the H. pylori negative group, which is not statistically different. The concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach. The patients with gastric pathology were also compared with control patients without gastric pathology and with normal volunteers. No significant differences in VSCs in mouth breath were observed between these groups. Thus, in this study no association between halitosis and H. pylori infection was found. Halitosis, as established by GC and OLS, nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach.

  15. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarkar, Zohreh; Jafarnejad, Majid; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2011-01-01

    Background: Coronary Artery Disease is known as the main cause of death in industrialized countries. Relation between this disease and some infections such as Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) has been shown in several studies. The purpose of this study was to dermine the relationship between Hypylori and mycardical infarctions. Methods: Seventy-three myocardial infarction patients and 78 individuals with no history of this disease were compared. Patients and control matched for age and sex person to person by the match method. Levels of serum IgA and IgG antibodies against H. pylori were measured by Elisa method. Also, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, HDL measured in both groups and data were compared between two groups in terms of relation with cardiac risk factors. Results: From 151 participants, 73 were patients and 78 were control subjects. The percentage of IgG positive cases against H. pylori was 57.5% in the case group and 32.1% in the control group (p=0.002, OR: 2.87 CI: 95%; 1.5-5.6). Meanwhile, there was no significant difference in IgA positive cases between the two groups (42.5% and 48.7% in the case and control groups, respectively) (p=0.44; OR: 0.78 95% CI; 0.41-1.48). The study showed 74.2% of cases in the case group and 45.2% in the control group were positive for both IgG and IgA (p=0.01; OR: 3.5 95% CI; 1.3-9.5). No significant differences were found between two groups in terms of relation between H. pylori related antibodies level and heart disease classic risk factors (smoking, hypertension,…), sex, and age, but between dyslipidemia and H. pylori related antibodies was significant differences in case group (p=0.05). Conclusion: According to the results, it seems there is a relation between H. pylori infection and myocardial infarction. Also, between dislipidemia and H. Pylori antibodies in case group were significant difference. Therefore, H. pylori can be a new risk factor for atherosclerosis or can be exacerbate effect of other risk factors

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2000-01-01

    @@ IS THERE ANYTHING NEW? Helicobacter pylori has been for many years a forgotten bacterium, since the first report on this spiral organism dated from the 19th century[1]. As early as in 1906, an association between a spiral organism and gastric carcinoma was suggested[2].Doenges reported in 1938 that on autopsy not less than 40% of human stomachs were found to be invaded by spiral organisms[3].

  17. First detected Helicobacter pylori infection in infancy modifies the association between diarrheal disease and childhood growth in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    WINDLE, HENRY

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In endemic settings, Helicobacter pylori infection can occur shortly after birth and may be associated with a reduction in childhood growth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study investigated what factors promote earlier age of first H. pylori infection and evaluated the role of H. pylori infection in infancy (6-11 months) versus early childhood (12-23 months) on height. We included 183 children near birth from a peri-urban shanty town outside of Lima, Peru. Field-workers c...

  18. First detected Helicobacter pylori infection in infancy modifies the association between diarrheal disease and childhood growth in Peru.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaganath, D; Saito, M; Gilman, RH; Queiroz, DM; Rocha, GA; Cama, V; Cabrera, L; Kelleher, D; Windle, HJ; Crabtree, JE; Checkley, W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In endemic settings, Helicobacter pylori infection can occur shortly after birth and may be associated with a reduction in childhood growth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study investigated what factors promote earlier age of first H. pylori infection and evaluated the role of H. pylori infection in infancy (6-11 months) versus early childhood (12-23 months) on height. We included 183 children near birth from a peri-urban shanty town outside of Lima, Peru. Field-workers collected da...

  19. Nitroimidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wouden, EJ; Thijs, JC; Van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a nitroimidazole-containing regimen for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection is decreased by nitroimidazole resistance. Nitroimidazoles are metabolized by H. pylori by several nitro-reductases of which an oxygen-insensitive NADPH nitroreductase encoded by the rdxA gene is t

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  1. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  2. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Kusters (Johannes); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection

  3. The short-term effects of Helicobacter pylori eradication on symptoms of functional dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Tezer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection is major etiologic factor of chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Functional dyspepsia (FD is defined as “persistent or recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen in patient who has no definite structural or biochemical explanation of their symptoms. It is uncertain whether treatment of H.pylori infection relieves symptoms in patients with FD. We searched short term effects of H.pylori eradication for symptoms in patients with FD.Material and method: We enrolled patients with dyspeptic symptoms which were diagnosed FD and satisfied en-rollment criteria of trial. Endoscopic biopsy was taken from each patient during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. H.pylori infected patients were assigned to seven days of treatment with 30 mgr of lansoprozole twice daily, 1000 mg of amoksisilin twice daily, and 500 mg levofloxacin once daily. Patients were assessed whether treatment was suc-cessful or not by 14C urea breathe test after 6-8 week. Also pretreatment and post treatment symptom scores were questioned.Results: There were 99 female and 68 male patients. After treatment 114 patients (68% was negative for H. pylori, 53 patients (32% remained positive. Mean of age and proportion of sex was similar in H.pylori (+ and (- groups. While 111 (97.4% of H.pylori (- patients’ symptom scores decreased, 38 (71.7% of H.pylori (+ patients’ scores de-creased. There was significant differences between two groups (p=0.001.Conclusion: Eradication of H.pylori relieves the symptoms of functional dyspepsia. New trials for long term effect of H.pylori eradication on symptoms must be conducted in future.

  4. Present and past Helicobacter pylori infection in Mexican school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Eugenia; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Mera, Robertino; Vilchis, Jenny; Moran, Segundo; Rivera, Octavio; Coria, Rafael; Torres, Javier; Correa, Pelayo; Duque, Ximena

    2014-02-01

    In developing countries, more than 50% of children have serological evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, serological tests for H. pylori did not differentiate between active and past infection. The objectives of this study were to estimate the frequency of active and past H. pylori infection utilizing functional urea breath test (UBT) and serological tests and evaluate factors associated with the infection. A total of 675 school children, 6-13 years of age, participated. UBT was performed to detect active H. pylori infection. Blood samples were obtained to determine iron status and Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to the H. pylori whole-cell and to Cag A antigens by antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Weight, height, and sociodemographic characteristics were recorded. A total of 37.9% (95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 34.2-41.6) of school children had active or past H. pylori infection; of them, 73.8% (CI95% 68.4-79.2) were carrying CagA-positive strain, 26.5% (CI95% 23.2-29.8) had active infection, and 11.4% (95%CI: 9.0-13.8) had evidence of past H. pylori infection. School children with iron deficiency and low height for age had higher risk of H. pylori infection: [OR to active or past infection was 2.30 (CI 95% 1.01-5.23) and to active infection it was 2.64 (CI 95% 1.09-6.44)] compared to school children with normal iron status and height for age or with normal iron status but low height for age or with iron deficiency and normal height for age. The estimated prevalence of infection depends of the test utilized. Frequency of H. pylori infection and carrying CagA-positive strains was high in this population. Malnutrition was associated with active H. pylori infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Does the antibody production ability affect the serum anti-Helicobacter pylori Ig G titer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun Ah Chung; Sun-Young Lee; Hee Won Moon; Jeong Hwan Kim; In-Kyung Sung; Hyung Seok Park; Chan Sup Shim; Hye Seung Han

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between serum titers of anti-Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) immunoglobulin G(IgG) and hepatitis B virus surface antibody(HBsA b).METHODS: Korean adults were included whose samples had positive Giemsa staining on endoscopic biopsy and were studied in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen(HBsA g)/HBsA b serologic assay,pepsinogen(PG) assay,and H.pylori serologic test on the same day.Subjects were excluded if they were positive for HBs Ag,had a recent history of medication,or had other medical condition(s).We analyzed the effects of the following factors on serum titers of HBsA b and the anti-H.pylori IgG : Age,density of H.pylori infiltration in biopsy samples,serum concentrations of PG Ⅰ and PG Ⅱ,PG Ⅰ/Ⅱ ratio,and white blood cell count.RESULTS: Of 111 included subjects,74(66.7%) exhibited a positive HBsA b finding.The serum anti-H.pylori IgG titer did not correlate with the serum HBsA b titer(P = 0.185); however,it correlated with the degree of H.pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy(P < 0.001) and serum PG Ⅱ concentration(P = 0.042).According to the density of H.pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy,subjects could be subdivided into those with a marked(median: 3.95,range 0.82-4.00)(P = 0.458),moderate(median: 3.37,range 1.86-4.00),and mild H.pylori infiltrations(median: 2.39,range 0.36-4.00)(P < 0.001).Subjects with a marked H.pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy had the highest serological titer,whereas in subjects with moderate and mild H.pylori infiltrations titers were correspondingly lower(P < 0.001).After the successful eradication,significant decreases of the degree of H.pylori infiltration(P < 0.001),serum anti-H.pylori IgG titer(P < 0.001),and serum concentrations of PG I(P = 0.028) and PG Ⅱ(P = 0.028) were observed.CONCLUSION: The anti-H.pylori IgG assay can be used to estimate the burden of bacteria in immunocompetent hosts with H.pylori infection,regardless of the HBsA b titer after HBV vaccination.

  6. Role of gastritis pattern on Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Angelo; Severi, Carola; Vannella, Lucy; Hassan, Cesare; Sbrozzi-Vanni, Andrea; Annibale, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori eradication rate following standard triple therapy is decreasing. Identification of predictive factors of therapy success would be useful for H. pylori management in clinical practice. This study aimed to evaluate the role of different gastritis patterns on the efficacy of the currently suggested 14-day triple therapy regimen. One-hundred and seventeen, consecutive, non-ulcer dyspeptic patients, with H. pylori infection diagnosed at endoscopy, were enrolled. All patients received a 14-day, triple therapy with lansoprazole 30 mg, clarithromycin 500 mg and amoxicillin 1 g, all given twice daily. Bacterial eradication was assessed with (13)C-urea breath test 4-6 weeks after completion of therapy. H. pylori infection was cured in 70.1% at ITT analysis and 83.7% at PP analysis. The eradication rate tended to be lower in patients with corpus-predominant gastritis as compared to those with antral-predominant gastritis at both ITT (66.1 vs 74.5%) and PP (80.4 vs 87.2%) analyses. The multivariate analysis failed to identify factors associated with therapy success. However, 14-day triple therapy does not achieve acceptable H. pylori cure rate in Italy, and should be not recommended in clinical practice.

  7. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and atherothrombotic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yang; Xiaoli Zhao; Yongjun Gao; Zhidong Zheng; Jilai Li; Jichen Du; Xinyi Li; Xianhao Xu; Yingying Su

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Helicobacterpylod infection is associated with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease, but the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and ischemic stroke remains unclear.The present study assessed the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on atherothrombotic stroke.This study included 115 individuals with atherothrombotic stroke, all of whom were patients receiving treatment at the Department of Neurology, Aerospace Central Hospital (Aerospace Clinical Medical College Affiliated to Peking University) in China, from March 2006 to July 2009.In addition, 131 controls without the history of cardiovascular disease,cerebrovascular disease or atherothrombosis were also enrolled in the study.Results show that the Helicobacter pylori-IgG positive rate was greater in the atherothrombotic stroke patients than in the controls, but the difference was not statistically significant (67.8% vs.61.8%, OR=1.301,95%CI:0.769-2.203, P= 0.327).After correction for potential risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection and known risk factors for ischemic stroke, no significant difference was detected between them (OR= 1.278, 95%Cl: 0.667-2.449, P= 0.459).These results indicate that there is no specific correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and atherothrombotic stroke.This finding requires further verification in large-sample prospective studies.

  8. Salty food intake and risk of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugane, S; Tei, Y; Takahashi, T; Watanabe, S; Sugano, K

    1994-05-01

    To clarify the risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection, which is considered to play an etiologic role in atrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer, various parameters including diet and socioeconomic characteristics were compared between H. pylori-infected and non-infected men. In a cross-sectional study of 634 men aged 40 to 49 years selected randomly from five areas with different rates of gastric cancer mortality, 474 of 628 men evaluated were positive for IgG antibody against H. pylori. After logistic regression analysis adjusted for area, the results showed a significant association between frequent intake of pickled vegetables and prevalence of H. pylori antibody (odds ratios against men who consume habits were not significantly associated with the prevalence of infection in this population. Although there are limitations in a cross-sectional study such as this, consumption of salty foods appears to increase the risk of H. pylori infection, which could be a marker of salty food intake or an intermediate risk factor in the etiologic sequence between salty food intake and gastric cancer.

  9. Recent Insights into Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics have been useful in the treatment of H. pylori-related benign and malignant gastroduodenal diseases. However, emergence of antibiotic resistance often decreases the eradication rates of H. pylori infections. Many factors have been implicated as causes of treatment failure, but the main antibiotic resistance mechanisms described to date are due to point mutations on the bacterial chromosome, a consequence of a significantly phenotypic variation in H. pylori. The prevalence of antibiotic (e.g., clarithromycin, metronidazole, tetracycline, amoxicillin, and furazolidone resistance varies among different countries; it appears to be partly determined by geographical factors. Since the worldwide increase in the rate of antibiotic resistance represents a problem of relevance, some studies have been performed in order to identify highly active and well-tolerated anti-H. pylori therapies including sequential, concomitant quadruple, hybrid, and quadruple therapy. These represent a promising alternatives in the effort to overcome the problem of resistance. The aim of this paper is to review the current status of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori eradication, highlighting the evolutionary processes in detail at alternative approaches to treatment in the past decade. The underlying resistance mechanisms will be also followed.

  10. Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltin, Doron

    2016-02-01

    The ideal treatment regimen for the eradication Helicobacter pylori infection has yet to be identified. Probiotics, particularly Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces, have been suggested as adjuncts to antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori. There is in vitro evidence that probiotics dampen the Th1 response triggered by H. pylori, attenuate H. pylori associated hypochlorhydria and secrete bacteriocidal metabolites. Probiotics interact with the innate host immune system through adherence to the gastric epithelium and secretion of bacterial adhesins. In prospective human studies, probiotic monotherapy effectively decrease H. pylori density (expired (13)CO2) by 2.0%-64.0%. Probiotic monotherapy has also been shown to eradicate H. pylori in up to 32.5%, although subsequent recrudescence is likely. Eleven meta-analyses have evaluated the efficacy of probiotics as adjuvants to antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. The addition of a probiotic increased treatment efficacy, OR 1.12-2.07. This benefit is probably strain-specific and may only be significant with relatively ineffective antibiotic regimens. The pooled prevalence of adverse effects was 12.9%-31.5% among subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with 24.3%-45.9% among controls. Diarrhea in particular was significantly reduced in subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with controls (OR 0.16-0.47). A reduction in adverse events other than diarrhea is variable. Despite the apparent benefit on efficacy and side effects conferred by probiotics, the optimal probiotic species, dose and treatment duration has yet to be determined. Further studies are needed to identify the probiotic, antibiotic and patient factors which might predict benefit from probiotic supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of Patients with Helicobacter pylori-Negative Peptic Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Hernández Conde

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: the rate of Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers is increasing. Treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other ulcerogenic drugs plays a significant role.Objective: to characterize patients with Helicobacter pylori-negative peptic ulcer. Methods: a case series study of patients attended by the Gastroenterology Service of the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital was conducted in the year 2009. Demographic, epidemiological, clinical, endoscopic and histological variables were studied. Mean and standard deviation were analyzed; logistic regression, t-Student and Chi-square tests were used. Results: A total of 269 gastric ulcers, 239 duodenal ulcers and 41 combined were diagnosed; 115 cases were Helicobacter pylori-negative and 434 were positive. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were associated with 33,9 % of H. pylori-negative patients and 22.8% of the positive patients. Ulcerative syndrome occurred in 47 % and 45% in both groups. All H. pylori-negative duodenal ulcers were located in the duodenal bulb as well as 96, 6 % of the positive. The antrum was the most common location for gastric ulcerations (92.3% negative; 90.5% positive. Multiple ulcers predominated in the duodenum while double ulcers prevailed in the stomach, all negative for H.pylori. Antral gastritis predominated (73. 0 % H. pilory- negative, the level of activity was higher in the positive cases (97. 0 % and intestinal metaplasia was similar for both groups. Conclusions: in patients with H. pylori-negative peptic ulcer, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be taken into consideration as one of the main factors associated with this entity.

  12. Characterization of the Cag pathogenicity island in Helicobacter pylori from naturally infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Emma C; Deck, Samuel L; Entwistle, Hasan D; Hansen, Lori M; Solnick, Jay V

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori commonly infects the epithelial layer of the human stomach and in some individuals causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma or gastric lymphoma. Helicobacter pylori is a genetically diverse species, and the most important bacterial virulence factor that increases the risk of developing disease, versus asymptomatic colonization, is the cytotoxin associated gene pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Socially housed rhesus macaques are often naturally infected with H. pylori similar to that which colonizes humans, but little is known about the cagPAI. Here we show that H. pylori strains isolated from naturally infected rhesus macaques have a cagPAI very similar to that found in human clinical isolates, and like human isolates, it encodes a functional type IV secretion system. These results provide further support for the relevance of rhesus macaques as a valid experimental model for H. pylori infection in humans.

  13. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori cagA genotype among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sueptrakool Wisessombat; Chatruthai Meethai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in dyspepsia patients and its relation to virulence factor cagA gene. Methods: In total, 110 gastric biopsies from dyspeptic patients were comparatively studied using rapid urease test and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Multiplex PCR detected three genes of 16S rRNA, cagA, and ureC. H. pylori was detected in 14 gastric biopsies (13%). Significantly higher numbers of female were infected. Furthermore,cag A gene was found in all H. pylori-positive specimens. In addition, the result indicated that the multiplex PCR with annealing temperature at 57 oC was able to effectively amplify specific products. Conclusions:The results confirmed high prevalence of cagA gene in H. pylori among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand.

  14. A cross-sectional survey of dental caries, oral hygiene, and Helicobacter pylori infection in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Yue, Ji; Han, Shufang; Deng, Tianzheng; Fu, Chongjian; Zhu, Guoxiong; Chen, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We explored the epidemiological risk factors for dental caries to help explain differences in the prevalence of adult dental caries. We examined 841 people for the presence of Helicobacter pylori in their dental plaque and for dental caries. Of the 841 subjects, 574 (68.25%) were infected with H pylori, and 516 (61.36%) were diagnosed with dental caries. Among the 574 subjects with H pylori, the prevalence of dental caries was 73.52% (422/574), while the prevalence among the 267 cases without H pylori was 35.21% (94/267). A correlation existed between the presence of H pylori and the occurrence of dental caries (χ(2) = 112.8, P oral cavity is associated with dental caries and poor dental hygiene.

  15. Previous antibacterial treatment due to concomitant infections in preschool children is associated with a lower Helicobacter pylori positivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugule, Ilva; Rumba, Ingrida; Ejderhamn, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Use of antimicrobial agents has been proposed as 1 of the factors that contribute to the loss of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of a previous treatment with antibiotics on the prevalence of H. pylori infection in preschool children. Parents of 146 asymptomatic children (aged 0.5-5 y; no antibiotic treatment during the previous 4 weeks) completed a questionnaire about previous treatment with antibiotics and socioeconomic status. Infection with H. pylori was assessed by the monoclonal stool antigen test. H. pylori positivity was 18% (27/146). It was significantly lower in children who had been treated with antibiotics previously compared to those who had been never treated (12.5% (12/96) vs 30% (15/50), p=0.01). It is concluded that previous antibiotic treatment for concomitant infections is associated with a lower prevalence of H. pylori infection in preschool children.

  16. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the “point of no return” and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions. PMID:24833876

  17. Helicobacter pylori serology in a birth cohort of New Zealanders from age to 26

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Paul Fawcett; Gill O. Barbezat; Richie Poulton; Barry J. Milne; Harry H.X. Xia; Nicholas J. Talley

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (DMHDS) at age 26 in order toinvestigate seroconversion and seroreversion from age 11 to 26 and the association of seropositivity with risk factors for H pylori infection. METHODS: Participants in the DMHDS at age 26 and retrospectively at age 21 were tested for H pylori antibodies using two commercially available ELISA kits. Gender, socioeconomic status (SES), smoking, educational attainment and employment at age 26 were tested for association with H pylori seropositivity.RESULTS: At ages 21 and 26, seroprevalence of H pylori using one or other kit was 4.2% (n = 795) and 6.3% (n = 871) respectively. Seroreversion rate was lower than serocon version rate (0.11% vs0.53% per person-year) in contrast to the period from age 11 to 21 when seroreversion rate exceeded seroconversion rate (0.35% vs 0.11% per person-year). Serology in those tested at ages 11, 21, and 26 remained unchanged in 93.6% of the sample. Seroprevalence at age 26 was lower among those with a secondary school qualification (P = 0.042) but was not associated with gender, SES, smoking or employment status. CONCLUSION: H pylori seroprevalence in a New Zealandbirth cohort remains low between ages 11 and 26. H pylori infection remains stable from childhood to adulthood although seroreversion seems to be more common in the adolescent years than in young adults.

  18. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the "point of no return" and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions.

  19. Effects of EGFR Inhibitor on Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastric Epithelial Pathology in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Robinson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori transactivates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR and predisposes to gastric cancer development in humans and animal models. To examine the importance of EGFR signalling to gastric pathology, this study investigated whether treatment of Mongolian gerbils with a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, EKB-569, altered gastric pathology in chronic H. pylori infection. Gerbils were infected with H. pylori and six weeks later received either EKB-569-supplemented, or control diet, for 32 weeks prior to sacrifice. EKB-569-treated H. pylori-infected gerbils had no difference in H. pylori colonisation or inflammation scores compared to infected animals on control diet, but showed significantly less corpus atrophy, mucous metaplasia and submucosal glandular herniations along with markedly reduced antral and corpus epithelial proliferation to apoptosis ratios. EKB-569-treated infected gerbils had significantly decreased abundance of Cox-2, Adam17 and Egfr gastric transcripts relative to infected animals on control diet. EGFR inhibition by EKB-569 therefore reduced the severity of pre-neoplastic gastric pathology in chronically H. pylori-infected gerbils. EKB-569 increased gastric epithelial apoptosis in H. pylori-infected gerbils which counteracted some of the consequences of increased gastric epithelial cell proliferation. Similar chemopreventative strategies may be useful in humans who are at high risk of developing H.pylori-induced gastric adenocarcinoma.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection and dementia: can actual data reinforce the hypothesis of a causal association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, A; Fagoonee, S; De Angelis, C; Altruda, F; Pellicano, R

    2014-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is involved in the development of several gastroduodenal diseases. Since the latest decade, several studies have reported on the link between chronic H. pylori infection and a variety of extragastric manifestations, including dementia. To identify the publications on the association between H. pylori and dementia, a MEDLINE search was conducted. Although case-control studies reported controversial data, a recent longitudinal population-based cohort study found that after 20 years of follow-up, 28.9% of H. pylori-positive versus 21.1% of H. pylori-negative subjects developed dementia. After correction for confounding factors, the infection was significantly associated with higher risk of developing dementia (P=0.04). Moreover, in another study evaluating the effect of H. pylori eradication on the progression of dementia in Alzheimer's disease patients with peptic ulcer, the cure of the bacterium was associated with a decreased risk of dementia progression compared to persistent infection. To date, defining H. pylori as a target for prevention or treatment of dementia remains a topic with much controversy but of essence, as any relationship would reduce, due to the cost-effectiveness of the therapy, a burden on the National Health Care budget. The need for extensive studies with appropriate epidemiological and clinical approaches is crucial to investigate a potential causal relationship.

  1. Effects of Helicobacter pylori treatment on rosacea: A single-arm clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Parviz; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Herizchi, Hamdieh; Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Mirza-Aghazadeh-Attari, Mohammad; Piri, Reza

    2017-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic dermatological disease. Helicobacter pylori has been discussed as one of its causative factors. In this clinical trial study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of H. pylori standard eradication protocol on the rosacea clinical course. In this single-arm clinical trial, patients ascertained to have H. pylori infection based on serological studies were assessed to examine existence of rosacea. Patients with concurrent rosacea and H. pylori infection were included in the study and underwent standard H. pylori eradication therapy. Rosacea was evaluated using the Duluth rosacea grading score at the beginning, 2 months later and at the end of the trial (day 180). Of 872 patients positive for H. pylori, 167 patients (19.15%) manifested the clinical features of rosacea. The patients with concurrent rosacea were younger (P pylori eradication therapy, demonstrating a 92% (138/150) cure rate. The rosacea Duluth score grading on day 0, 60 and 180 among 138 patients significantly decreased in most of the criteria except for telangiectasias (P = 0.712), phymatous changes (P = 0.535) and the existence of peripheral involvement (P = 0.431). The present study concluded that H. pylori eradication leads to improvement of rosacea. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  2. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer:An Asian enigma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kartar Singh; Uday C Ghoshal

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) has been etiologically linked to gastric cancer. H pylori infection is more frequent in less developed Asian countries like India,Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Thailand and is acquired at early age than in more developed Asian countries like Japan and China. Frequency of gastric cancer, however,is very low in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Thailand compared to that in Japan and China. Similar enigma has been reported from Africa as compared to the West.Seroprevalence of H pylori infection in adult populations of India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Thailand varies from 55% to 92%. In contrast, seroprevalence of H pylori in Chinese and Japanese adults is 44% and 55%,respectively. Annual incidence rate of gastric cancer in India, Bangladesh, and Thailand is 10.6, 1.3, 7.1 per 100000 populations, respectively; in contrast, that in China and Japan is 32-59 and 80-115 per 100 000 populations,respectively. Several studies from India failed to show higher frequency of H pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer than controls. Available evidences did not support difference in H pylori strains as an explanation for this enigma. Despite established etiological role of H pylori, situation is somewhat enigmatic in Asian countries because in countries with higher frequency of infection,there is lower rate of gastric cancer. Host's genetic makeup and dietary and environmental factors might explain this enigma. Studies are urgently needed to solve this issue.

  3. Diagnosis and epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier; Ramírez Lázaro, María-José; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2013-09-01

    A limited amount of new information was published in the field of diagnosis and epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori this last year. Besides some improvement in current tests, it is interesting to note the attempts to identify severe disease, for example gastric cancer, by breath analysis using nanomaterial-based sensors. In contrast, the predictive value for gastric cancer and atrophy of pepsinogen determinations was found inadequate. Prevalence studies of H. pylori infection have been carried out in adults and children around the world in the general population but also in specific communities. The usual risk factors were found. In addition, a Japanese study highlighted the role of grandmothers in the familial transmission of H. pylori. A study showed that the infection may not always readily establish itself in children, given the number of transient infections observed. It was also noted that after eradication, a first-year relapse is likely to be a recurrence of the previous infection, while later on it is probably a reinfection with a new strain.

  4. Mutagenicity and clastogenicity of extracts of Helicobacter pylori detected by the Ames test and in the micronucleus test using human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Ohta, Kaori; Yuhara, Yuta; Ayabe, Yuka; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Oguma, Keiji; Otsuka, Takanao

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close association between infection with Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) and the development of gastric carcinoma. Chronic H.pylori infection increases the frequency of mutation in gastric epithelial cells. However, the mechanism by which infection of H.pylori leads to mutation in gastric epithelial cells is unclear. We suspected that components in H.pylori may be related to the mutagenic response associated with DNA alkylation, and could be detected with the Ames test using a more sensitive strain for alkylating agents. Our investigation revealed that an extract of H.pylori was mutagenic in the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium YG7108, which is deficient in the DNA repair of O(6)-methylguanine. The extract of H.pylori may contain methylating or alkylating agents, which might induce O (6)-alkylguanine in DNA. Mutagenicity of the alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in the Ames test with S.typhimurium TA1535 was enhanced significantly in the presence of the extract of H.pylori. The tested extracts of H.pylori resulted in a significant induction of micronuclei in human-derived lymphoblastoid cells. Heat instability and dialysis resistance of the extracts of H.pylori suggest that the mutagenic component in the extracts of H.pylori is a heat-unstable large molecule or a heat-labile small molecule strongly attached or adsorbed to a large molecule. Proteins in the extracts of H.pylori were subsequently fractionated using ammonium sulphate precipitation. However, all fractions expressed enhancing effects toward MNU mutagenicity. These results suggest the mutagenic component is a small molecule that is absorbed into proteins in the extract of H.pylori, which resist dialysis. Continuous and chronic exposure of gastric epithelial cells to the alkylative mutagenic component from H.pylori chronically infected in the stomach might be a causal factor in the gastric carcinogenesis

  5. Role of childhood infection in the sequelae of H. pylori disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul R; Smythies, Lesley E; Smith, Phillip D; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of Helicobacter pylori infection plays a fundamental role in the development of H. pylori-associated complications. Since the majority of infected persons acquire the bacteria during early childhood, an examination of the immunobiology of H. pylori infection in children compared with that of adults may help identify host factors that contribute to persistent infection. Therefore, we begin our review of the role of persistence in H. pylori disease with an assessment of the clinical features of H. pylori infection in children. We next review the bacterial factors that promote colonization and evasion of host defense mechanisms. We then focus our attention on the early host immunological factors that promote persistence of the infection and its complications in humans and mouse models. We also highlight topics in which further research is needed. An examination of how immunological factors cause divergent manifestations of H. pylori infection in children compared with adults may provide new insight for therapeutic modification or prevention of persistent H. pylori infection and its complications. PMID:24275060

  6. Molecular characterization of Helicobacter pylori VacA induction of IL-8 in U937 cells reveals a prominent role for p38MAPK in activating transcription factor-2, cAMP response element binding protein, and NF-kappaB activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Nakayama, Masaaki; Isomoto, Hajime;

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori VacA induces multiple effects on susceptible cells, including vacuolation, mitochondrial damage, inhibition of cell growth, and enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. To assess the ability of H. pylori to modulate the production of inflammatory mediators, we examined the mechan......Helicobacter pylori VacA induces multiple effects on susceptible cells, including vacuolation, mitochondrial damage, inhibition of cell growth, and enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. To assess the ability of H. pylori to modulate the production of inflammatory mediators, we examined...... the mechanisms by which VacA enhanced IL-8 production by promonocytic U937 cells, which demonstrated the greatest VacA-induced IL-8 release of the cells tested. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580), ERK1/2 (PD98059), IkappaBalpha ((E)-3-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-2-propenenitrile), Ca(2+) entry (SKF96365......+) in mediating activation of MAPK and the canonical NF-kappaB pathway. VacA stimulated translocation of NF-kappaBp65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA of activating transcription factor (ATF)-2 or CREB, which...

  7. The Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin CagA is essential for suppressing host heat shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Lang, Ben; J Gorrell, Rebecca; Tafreshi, Mona; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Kwok, Terry; T Price, John

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections typically elicit a strong Heat Shock Response (HSR) in host cells. However, the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has the unique ability to repress this response, the mechanism of which has yet to be elucidated. This study sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms by which H. pylori down-modulates host HSP expression upon infection. Examination of isogenic mutant strains of H. pylori defective in components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS), identified the secretion substrate, CagA, to be essential for down-modulation of the HSPs HSPH1 (HSP105), HSPA1A (HSP72), and HSPD1 (HSP60) upon infection of the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Ectopic expression of CagA by transient transfection was insufficient to repress HSP expression in AGS or HEK293T cells, suggesting that additional H. pylori factors are required for HSP repression. RT-qPCR analysis of HSP gene expression in AGS cells infected with wild-type H. pylori or isogenic cagA-deletion mutant found no significant change to account for reduced HSP levels. In summary, this study identified CagA to be an essential bacterial factor for H. pylori-mediated suppression of host HSP expression. The novel finding that HSPH1 is down-modulated by H. pylori further highlights the unique ability of H. pylori to repress the HSR within host cells. Elucidation of the mechanism by which H. pylori achieves HSP repression may prove to be beneficial in the identification of novel mechanisms to inhibit the HSR pathway and provide further insight into the interactions between H. pylori and the host gastric epithelium.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Infection Rates in Patients Undergoing Endoscopy in the Interior of Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Feng Yih; Chong, Hock Chin; Tan, Yew Eng; Heng, Sophia Si Ling; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Ridwan, Hashim

    2016-04-01

    Very limited data are available on the Helicobacter pylori infection among the population of interior Borneo. We aimed to investigate the H. pylori infection rate among an endoscoped interior Borneo population and to report the differences between the infected and noninfected patients. We retrospectively analyzed the data of the rapid urease test (RUT) records in Endoscopy Unit Hospital Keningau from January 2009 to May 2014. Student's t-test, chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were used accordingly. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for H. pylori infection. Birth cohort was analyzed against H. pylori infection rate with chi-square test. Overall, there were 215 of 774 (27.8%) positive RUTs. Patients with H. pylori infection were younger (47.66 ± 14.93 vs 50.50 ± 15.02 years, p = .019), more likely to be female (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.12-2.13, p = .008) and originated from the Pensiangan district (OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.01-2.64, p = .047). Chinese patients were less likely infected with H. pylori (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.16-0.80, p = .013). Birth cohort was significantly associated with H. pylori infection rate (χ(2) (7) = 14.71, p = .040) with an increasing trend of H. pylori infection rate in patients born later (χ(2) (1) = 5.26, p = .022). The overall H. pylori infection rate in this population was unexpectedly low. Accordingly, it may be a recent arrival in this community. Gender, age, dietary practice, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity were among the factors associated with H. pylori infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Caveolin-1 Protects B6129 Mice against Helicobacter pylori Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitkova, Ivana; Yuan, Gang; Anderl, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Claus; Schmid, Roland M.; Vogelmann, Roger; Ebert, Matthias P. A.; Burgermeister, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC) where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES) but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS), infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies (“humming bird”) compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1). Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1) to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87) and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1) to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs) in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells. PMID:23592983

  10. Caveolin-1 protects B6129 mice against Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Hitkova

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (Cav1 is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS, infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies ("humming bird" compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1. Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1 to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87 and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1 to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells.

  11. The study of mutation in 23S rRNA resistance gene of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin in patients with gastrointestinal disorders in Isfahan - Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Farzad; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Fazeli, Hossein; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Adibi, Peyman; Madhi, Masoumeh; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori antimicrobial resistance is an important factor responsible for treatment failure. The purpose of this study was evaluating the prevalence of point mutations in clarithromycin-resistant clinical isolates of H. pylori in Isfahan city of Iran. Thirty isolates of H. pylori from 130 biopsy specimens were isolated by culture and confirmed by biochemical and PCR tests. The MIC of clarithromycin antibiotic for 30 clinical isolates of H. pylori was determined by E-test method. The point mutations in the 288 bp of 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori were investigated in four clarithromycin-resistant clinical isolates by PCR followed by sequencing. Among 30 isolates of H. pylori, 4 cases were resistant to clarithromycin. One point mutation was found at position T2243C in the 23S rRNA gene in all resistance isolates. In our study, H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin associated with point mutation at position 2243 (T2243C).

  12. High Dietary Salt Intake Exacerbates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Radin, Jana N.; Loh, John T.; Zhang, Feng; Washington, M. Kay; Peek, Richard M.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Cover, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, and H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis is dependent on the actions of a bacterial oncoprotein known as CagA. Epidemiological studies have shown that high dietary salt intake is also a risk factor for gastric cancer. To investigate the effects of a high-salt diet, we infected Mongolian gerbils with a wild-type (WT) cagA+ H. pylori strain or an isogenic cagA mutant strain and main...

  13. Analysis of Helicobacter pylori genotypes in clinical gastric wash samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Oikawa, Ritsuko; Ono, Shoko; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Kudo, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Kato, Mototsugu; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a key factor in the development of gastric cancer; indeed, clearance of H. pylori helps prevent gastric cancer. However, the relationship between gastric cancer and the abundance and diversity of H. pylori genotypes in the stomach remains unknown. Here, we present, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of H. pylori genotypes in gastric washes. A method was first developed to assess diversity and abundance by pyrosequencing and analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a gene associated with clarithromycin resistance. This method was then validated using arbitrarily mixed plasmids carrying 23S rRNA with single nucleotide polymorphisms. Multiple strains were detected in many of 34 clinical samples, with frequency 24.3 ± 24.2 and 26.3 ± 33.8 % for the A2143G and A2144G strains, respectively. Importantly, results obtained from gastric washes were similar to those obtained from biopsy samples. The method provides opportunities to investigate drug resistance in H. pylori and assess potential biomarkers of gastric cancer risk, and should thus be validated in large-scale clinical trials.

  14. Helicobacter pylori update: gastric cancer, reliable therapy, and possible benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to the development of diverse gastric and extragastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, therefore there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to the development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk-these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma. When tested, these hypotheses have not been confirmed and are therefore most likely false. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of Helicobacter pylori genes that contribute to stomach colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David N; Shepherd, Benjamin; Kraemer, Petra; Hall, Michael K; Sycuro, Laura K; Pinto-Santini, Delia M; Salama, Nina R

    2007-02-01

    Chronic infection of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori leads to a variety of pathological sequelae, including peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, resulting in significant human morbidity and mortality. Several genes have been implicated in disease related to H. pylori infection, including the vacuolating cytotoxin and the cag pathogenicity island. Other factors important for the establishment and maintenance of infection include urease enzyme production, motility, iron uptake, and stress response. We utilized a C57BL/6 mouse infection model to query a collection of 2,400 transposon mutants in two different bacterial strain backgrounds for H. pylori genetic loci contributing to colonization of the stomach. Microarray-based tracking of transposon mutants allowed us to monitor the behavior of transposon insertions in 758 different gene loci. Of the loci measured, 223 (29%) had a predicted colonization defect. These included previously described H. pylori virulence genes, genes implicated in virulence in other pathogenic bacteria, and 81 hypothetical proteins. We have retested 10 previously uncharacterized candidate colonization gene loci by making independent null alleles and have confirmed their colonization phenotypes by using competition experiments and by determining the dose required for 50% infection. Of the genetic loci retested, 60% have strain-specific colonization defects, while 40% have phenotypes in both strain backgrounds for infection, highlighting the profound effect of H. pylori strain variation on the pathogenic potential of this organism.

  16. Probiotic BIFICO cocktail ameliorates Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Jing; Liu, Wei; Chang, Zhen; Shen, Hui; He, Li-Juan; Wang, Sha-Sha; Liu, Lu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Xu, Guo-Tong; An, Mao-Mao; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2015-06-07

    To determine the protective effect of triple viable probiotics on gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and elucidate the possible mechanisms of protection. Colonization of BIFICO strains in the mouse stomach was determined by counting colony-forming units per gram of stomach tissue. After treatment with or without BIFICO, inflammation and H. pylori colonization in the mouse stomach were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa staining, respectively. Cytokine levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Milliplex. The activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and MAPK signaling in human gastric epithelial cells was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA expression in the mouse stomach. We demonstrated that BIFICO, which contains a mixture of Enterococcus faecalis, Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus, was tolerant to the mouse stomach environment and was able to survive both the 8-h and 3-d courses of administration. Although BIFICO treatment had no effect on the colonization of H. pylori in the mouse stomach, it ameliorated H. pylori-induced gastritis by significantly inhibiting the expression of cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, G-CSF and MIP-2 (P gastritis by inhibiting the inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells.

  17. Review of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-02-01

    Chronic renal failure patients receiving hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis often encounter gastrointestinal troubles over their long treatment period. Helicobacter pylori infection has close association with development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, and is thought to be one of the major risk factors for gastrointestinal troubles in dialysis patients. However, it is unclear whether H. pylori infection is directly associated with progression of renal dysfunction and prognosis of chronic renal failure patients. Recent consensus shows that the prevalence of H. pylori infection in chronic renal failure patients is significantly lower than in subjects with normal renal function. In the natural history of H. pylori infection in hemodialysis patients, the prevalence of infection decreases as dialysis periods progressed, in particular within the first four years after the start of treatment. However, the chance of natural eradication becomes rare for patients receiving dialysis treatment for a long time. Moreover, chronic renal failure patients with H. pylori infection have a higher incidence of gastroduodenal diseases, and therefore, are recommended to receive eradication therapies, especially for those receiving treatment for a long time and with higher risks of complication. Intensive endoscopic check-ups for the prevention of gastrointestinal events and the discovery of peptic ulcer and neoplastic diseases at an early phase may be required.

  18. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data indicate that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness demonstrates the sophisticated relationship among H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori’s activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism. PMID:26385073

  19. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  20. Analysis of T4SS-induced signaling by H. pylori using quantitative phosphoproteomics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glowinski, Frithjof; Holland, Carsten; Thiede, Bernd; Jungblut, Peter R; Meyer, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    .... A major virulence determinant of H. pylori is the type IV secretion system (T4SS), which is used to inject the virulence factor CagA into the host cell, triggering a wide range of cellular signaling events...

  1. Mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance and molecular testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro eNishizawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the main factor affecting the efficacy of current treatment methods against infection caused by this organism. The traditional culture methods for testing bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are expensive and require 10 to 14 days. Since resistance to clarithromycin, fluoroquinolone, and tetracycline seems to be exclusively caused by specific mutations in a small region of the responsible gene, molecular methods offer an attractive alternative to the above-mentioned techniques. The technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR is an accurate and rapid method for the detection of mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. This review highlights the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori and the molecular methods for antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  2. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  3. Myeloid HIF-1 is protective in Helicobacter pylori-mediated gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Pavle; Heinis, Mylène; Mathieu, Jacques R R; Corriden, Ross; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Delga, Stéphanie; Mounier, Rémi; Rouquette, Alexandre; Raymond, Josette; Lamarque, Dominique; Emile, Jean-François; Nizet, Victor; Touati, Eliette; Peyssonnaux, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection triggers chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa that may progress to gastric cancer. The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the central mediators of cellular adaptation to low oxygen levels (hypoxia), but they have emerged recently as major transcriptional regulators of immunity and inflammation. No studies have investigated whether H. pylori affects HIF signaling in immune cells and a potential role for HIF in H. pylori-mediated gastritis. HIF-1 and HIF-2 expression was examined in human H. pylori-positive gastritis biopsies. Subsequent experiments were performed in naive and polarized bone marrow-derived macrophages from wild-type (WT) and myeloid HIF-1α-null mice (HIF-1(Δmyel)). WT and HIF-1(Δmyel) mice were inoculated with H. pylori by oral gavage and sacrificed 6 mo postinfection. HIF-1 was specifically expressed in macrophages of human H. pylori-positive gastritis biopsies. Macrophage HIF-1 strongly contributed to the induction of proinflammatory genes (IL-6, IL-1β) and inducible NO synthase in response to H. pylori. HIF-2 expression and markers of M2 macrophage differentiation were decreased in response to H. pylori. HIF-1(Δmyel) mice inoculated with H. pylori for 6 mo presented with a similar bacterial colonization than WT mice but, surprisingly, a global increase of inflammation, leading to a worsening of the gastritis, measured by an increased epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, myeloid HIF-1 is protective in H. pylori-mediated gastritis, pointing to the complex counterbalancing roles of innate immune and inflammatory phenotypes in driving this pathology. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Oxyntic gastric atrophy in Helicobacter pylori gastritis is distinct from autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Varbanova, Mariya; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Reinhold, Dirk; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Jechorek, Doerthe; Weigt, Jochen; Link, Alexander; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To assess characteristics of oxyntic gastric atrophy (OGA) in autoimmune gastritis (AIG) compared with OGA as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients undergoing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy from July 2011 to October 2014 were prospectively included (N=452). Gastric biopsies were obtained for histology and H. pylori testing. Serum gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII and antibodies against H. pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A protein were determined in all patients. Antibodies against parietal cells and intrinsic factor were determined in patients with advanced (moderate to severe) OGA. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were calculated for serum biomarkers and compared with histology. Overall, 34 patients (8.9%) had advanced OGA by histology (22 women, age 61±15 years). Current or past H. pylori infection and AIG were present in 14/34 and 22/34 patients, respectively. H. pylori-negative AIG patients (N=18) were more likely to have another autoimmune disease (OR 6.3; 95% CI 1.3 to 29.8), severe corpus atrophy (OR 10.1; 95% CI 1.9 to 54.1) and corpus intestinal metaplasia (OR 26.9; 95% CI 5.3 to 136.5) compared with H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA. Antrum atrophy was present in 39% of H. pylori-negative AIG patients. The diagnostic performance of G17, PG I and PGI/II was excellent for AIG patients (AUC=0.83, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively), but limited for H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA (AUC=0.62, 0.75 and 0.67, respectively). H. pylori-negative AIG has a distinct clinical, morphological and serological phenotype compared with advanced OGA in H. pylori gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Brain-gut axis in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, Jacek; Kłopocka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the main pathogenic factor for upper digestive tract organic diseases. In addition to direct cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects, H. pylori infection may also induce abnormalities indirectly by affecting the brain-gut axis, similar to other microorganisms present in the alimentary tract. The brain-gut axis integrates the central, peripheral, enteric and autonomic nervous systems, as well as the endocrine and immunological systems, with gastrointestinal functions and environmental stimuli, including gastric and intestinal microbiota. The bidirectional relationship between H. pylori infection and the brain-gut axis influences both the contagion process and the host’s neuroendocrine-immunological reaction to it, resulting in alterations in cognitive functions, food intake and appetite, immunological response, and modification of symptom sensitivity thresholds. Furthermore, disturbances in the upper and lower digestive tract permeability, motility and secretion can occur, mainly as a form of irritable bowel syndrome. Many of these abnormalities disappear following H. pylori eradication. H. pylori may have direct neurotoxic effects that lead to alteration of the brain-gut axis through the activation of neurogenic inflammatory processes, or by microelement deficiency secondary to functional and morphological changes in the digestive tract. In digestive tissue, H. pylori can alter signaling in the brain-gut axis by mast cells, the main brain-gut axis effector, as H. pylori infection is associated with decreased mast cell infiltration in the digestive tract. Nevertheless, unequivocal data concerning the direct and immediate effect of H. pylori infection on the brain-gut axis are still lacking. Therefore, further studies evaluating the clinical importance of these host-bacteria interactions will improve our understanding of H. pylori infection pathophysiology and suggest new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24833851

  6. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Iranian Adolescents: the CASPIAN- III Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Kalantar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori is a common bacterial infection, with considerably high morbidity and mortality worldwide. This bacterium represents a key factor in the etiology of various chronic infections ranging from gastritis, peptic ulcer disease to gastric cancer; but the prevalence has large variations in different communities. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence H. pylori infection in a nationally representative sample of Iranian adolescents.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, serum samples of 882 Iranian adolescents, aged 10-18 years, were examined for seroprevalence of H.pylori. They were randomly selected from the samples obtained in the third survey of a national surveillance program (the CASPIAN III study. Seroprevalence of H. pylori was examined by detection of H. pylori immunoglobulinA (IgA, immunoglobulinG (IgG and immunoglobulinM (IgM in sera by using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA.Results: The study participants had a mean age of 14.82 + 2.77 years. Overall, 51.7% of students were boys and 61.52% were urban residents.  The H. pylori IGM and IGA seropositivity had no significant association with demographic characteristics (p>0.05. The H. pylori IgG seropositivity were significantly different in boys and girls (69.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 66.7-72.7 vs. 76.3%, 95%CI= 73.5-79. 1, respectively, P=0.03.Conclusion: The seroprevalence of H. pylori IgG in Iranian adolescents is high, and girls had greater risk of H. pylori IgG seropositivity compared to boys. Preventive strategies and health education are recommended to reduce the prevalence of this infection in Iranian adolescent.

  7. PBX1 attributes as a determinant of connexin 32 downregulation in Helicobacter pylori-related gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Can-Xia; Zhang, Lin-Fang; Huang, Li-Hua; Hu, Ting-Zi; Li, Rong; Xia, Xiu-Juan; Xu, Lin-Yong; Luo, Ling; Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Ming

    2017-08-07

    To clarify the mechanisms of connexin 32 (Cx32) downregulation by potential transcriptional factors (TFs) in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric carcinogenesis. Approximately 25 specimens at each developmental stage of gastric carcinogenesis [non-atrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and gastric carcinoma (GC)] with H. pylori infection [H. pylori (+)] and 25 normal gastric mucosa (NGM) without H. pylori infection [H. pylori (-)] were collected. After transcriptional factor array analysis, the Cx32 and PBX1 expression levels of H. pylori-infected tissues from the developmental stages of GC and NGM with no H. pylori infection were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Regarding H. pylori-infected animal models, the Cx32 and PBX1 mRNA expression levels and correlation between the gastric mucosa from 10 Mongolian gerbils with long-term H. pylori colonization and 10 controls were analyzed. PBX1 and Cx32 mRNA and protein levels were further studied under the H. pylori-infected condition as well as PBX1 overexpression and knockdown conditions in vitro. Incremental PBX1 was first detected by TF microarray in H. pylori-related gastric carcinogenesis. The identical trend of PBX1 and Cx32 expression was confirmed in the developmental stages of H. pylori-related clinical specimens. The negative correlation of PBX1 and Cx32 was confirmed in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils. Furthermore, decreased PBX1 expression was detected in the normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1 with H. pylori infection. Enforced overexpression or RNAi-mediated knockdown of PBX1 contributed to the diminished or restored Cx32 expression in GES-1 and the gastric carcinoma cell line BGC823, respectively. Finally, dual-luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells showed that Cx32 promoter activity decreased by 30% after PBX1 vector co-transfection, indicating PBX1 as a transcriptional downregulator

  8. Helicobacter pylori Activates IL-6-STAT3 Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells: Potential Roles for Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Juan-Yu; Lee, Hee Geum; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Han, Hyeong-Jun; Ngo, Hoang-Kieu-Chi; Park, Sin-Aye; Woo, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Jeong-Sang; Na, Hye-Kyung; Cha, Young-Nam; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying H. pylori-mediated STAT3 activation is still not fully understood. In this study, we investigated H. pylori-induced activation of STAT3 signaling in AGS human gastric cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. AGS cells were cocultured with H. pylori, and STAT3 activation was assessed by Western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and immunocytochemistry. To demonstrate the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in H. pylori-activated STAT3 signaling, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was utilized. The expression and production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The interaction between IL-6 and IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) was determined by the immunoprecipitation assay. H. pylori activates STAT3 as evidenced by increases in phosphorylation on Tyr(705) , nuclear localization, DNA binding and transcriptional activity of this transcription factor. The nuclear translocation of STAT3 was also observed in H. pylori-inoculated mouse stomach. In the subsequent study, we found that H. pylori-induced STAT3 phosphorylation was dependent on IL-6. Notably, the increased IL-6 expression and the IL-6 and IL-6R binding were mediated by ROS produced as a consequence of H. pylori infection. H. pylori-induced STAT3 activation is mediated, at least in part, through ROS-induced upregulation of IL-6 expression. These findings provide a novel molecular mechanism responsible for H. pylori-induced gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Relationship between H. pylori Infection and Osteoporosis in Japan

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    Daisuke Asaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. H. pylori infection causes a chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa. However, this local inflammation may result in extra-digestive conditions. Our aim is to investigate the relationship between H. pylori infection and osteoporosis in Japan. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted among outpatients at the Juntendo University Hospital between 2008 and 2014. Participants for patient profile, H. pylori infection status, comorbidity, internal medical therapies, lumbar dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, and bone turnover marker were collected and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for reflux esophagitis, hiatal hernia, peptic ulcer disease (PUD, and endoscopic gastric mucosal atrophy (EGA was performed. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was performed in accordance with the Japanese criteria. We investigated risk factors of osteoporosis. Results. Of the eligible 200 study subjects, 41 cases were of osteoporosis. Bivariate analysis showed that age, being female, BMI, alcohol, smoking, H. pylori, bone-specific ALP, PUD, and EGA were related to osteoporosis. Multivariate analysis showed that age (OR 1.13; 95%CI 1.07–1.20, being female (OR 4.77; 95%CI 1.78–12.77, BMI (OR 0.79; 95%CI 0.68–0.92, H. pylori (OR 5.33; 95%CI 1.73–16.42, and PUD (OR 4.98; 95%CI 1.51–16.45 were related to osteoporosis. Conclusions. H. pylori infection may be a risk factor of osteoporosis in Japan.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases. PMID:27667993

  11. Anti-Helicobacter Pylori Activities of Shoya Powder and Essential Oils of Thymus Vulgaris and Eucalyptus Globulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, D; Mobarez, A Mohabati; Tohidpour, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori, an infective agent of more than 50% of the world population is prominent to be the main causative factor in the etiologies of chronic, active or type B gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tumors. A high prevalence of this bacterium in dental plaque is always reported. Pharmacological treatment of H. pylori infections includes administration of 3-fold therapeutic regimens which are typically used to suppress H. pylori activity. However, antibiotic resistance frequently develops as a consequence of such treatment. Thus, searching for alternative therapies for H. pylori infections is of special interest. Materials and Methods: In this study, anti H. pylori activities of a traditional antimicrobial drug so-called Shoya and also essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus were investigated using antimicrobial analysis and serological screening methods. Results: The agar dilution method results revealed the Shoya with the highest inhibitory effect against H. pylori. Also serological screening on tested mice showed a significant effect of this drug in lowering the sera amount of anti H. pylori specific IgA and IgG titers. Both of the essential oils showed different degrees of antibacterial effect against H. pylori. Conclusion: The obtained results showed the antibacterial effect of Shoya powder and Essential oils from Thymus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus and purposes new therapeutical alternatives to control the H. pylori infection. Additional studies and clinical trials are necessary to approve the use of these data in health care and pharmacopeia systems. PMID:22927892

  12. Periodontal disease and Helicobacter pylori infection: a community-based study using serology and rapid urease test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, Krishnavilasom J; Nandakumar, Krishnankutty; Shenoy, Kottacherry T; Janam, Presanthila

    2016-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the prevalence of periodontal disease and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and their associations within a predefined Indian population. A community-based cross-sectional study of 500 selected individuals using a questionnaire, oral examination, rapid urease testing of dental plaque, and serological examination for immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori was carried out. Periodontal disease and H. pylori infection were prevalent in more than 50% of the population. Age, smoking, and diabetic status of the individuals were risk factors for periodontal disease after multivariate analysis, and a lack of proper sewage and waste disposal facilities were found to increase the risk of H. pylori infection. Although there was no association between periodontal disease and H. pylori seropositivity in the community, a highly-significant association was found between periodontal disease and colonization of H. pylori in dental plaque. Because periodontal disease is associated with the increased colonization of H. pylori, new treatment modalities, such as plaque control measures, should be employed for the complete management of H. pylori-associated gastric disease. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Annexin A4: A novel molecular marker for gastric cancer with Helicobacter pylori infection using proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Ling; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lee, Po-Huang; Chang, King-Jen; Lai, Yo-Ping; Wang, Jin-Town; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2008-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori was reported to be an important risk factor for the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Here, we used a proteomic approach to find differentially expressed proteins between the normal and tumor tissue of gastric cancer patients infected with H. pylori. In our results, we found annexin A4 was over-expressed in patients infected with H. pylori and was found in tumor cells, and over-expressed in gastric cancer SCM-1 cells after H. pylori infection. Ca(2+ ) can be induced by H. pylori and interact with annexin A4 Ca(2+) binding site to block the calmodulin-activated chloride conductance activation; therefore, it produces a new environment that benefits the malignant existence of H. pylori and raises the risk for gastric cancer. We also found interleuken-8 (IL-8) expression levels were increased in H. pylori infected SCM-1 cells. Combined with previous reports and our results, we summarize that the over-expression of annexin A4 in SCM-1 cells with H. pylori infection may subsequently induce IL-8 which can further cause tumor angiogenesis. In this paper, we show that annexin A4 is a potential novel molecular marker for gastric cancer with H. pylori infection, and our results may provide a new insight in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. Copyright © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The role of environmental tobacco exposure and Helicobacter pylori infection in the risk of chronic tonsillitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li'e, Chen; Juan, Che; Dongying, Jiang; Guiling, Feng; Tihua, Zheng; Yanfei, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a chronic infectious pathogen with high prevalence. This study investigated the interaction between environmental tobacco exposure and H. pylori infection on the incidence of chronic tonsillitis in Chinese children. Cross-sectional study performed in an outpatient clinic in China. Pediatric patients with chronic tonsillitis were enrolled. H. pylori infection was determined according to the presence of H. pylori CagA IgG antibodies. Serum cotinine levels and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure were determined for all participants. There was no significant difference in H. pylori infection between the children with chronic tonsillitis and children free of disease, but there was a significant difference in ETS between the two groups (P = 0.011). We next studied the association between ETS and chronic tonsillitis based on H. pylori infection status. In the patients with H. pylori infection, there was a significant difference in ETS distribution between the chronic tonsillitis and control groups (P = 0.022). Taking the participants without ETS as the reference, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that those with high ETS had higher susceptibility to chronic tonsillitis (adjusted OR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.67-3.25; adjusted P chronic tonsillitis. Our findings suggest that tobacco exposure should be a putative mediator risk factor to chronic tonsillitis among children with H. pylori infection.

  15. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases.

  16. Helicobacter pylori-induced sonic hedgehog expression is regulated by NFκB pathway activation: The use of a novel in vitro model to study epithelial response to infection

    OpenAIRE

    Schumacher, MA; R. Feng; Aihara, E; Engevik, AC; Montrose, MH; Ottemann, KM; Zavros, Y

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection leads to acute induction of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the stomach that is associated with the initiation of gastritis. The mechanism by which H. pylori induces Shh is unknown. Shh is a target gene of transcription factor Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB). We hypothesize that NFκB mediates H. pylori-induced Shh. Materials and Methods: To visualize Shh ligand expression in response to H. pylori infection in vivo, we used a mouse model...

  17. Prospective study of Helicobacter pylori antigens and gastric noncardia cancer risk in the Nutrition Intervention Trial cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Gwen; Freedman, Neal D; Michel, Angelika; Fan, Jin-Hu; Taylor, Philip R.; Pawlita, Michael; Qiao, You-Lin; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Abnet, Christian C.; DAWSEY, Sanford M.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylon (H. pylori) infection is the strongest known risk factor for gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). We used multiplex serology to determine whether seropositivity to 15 H. pylori proteins is associated with the subsequent development of non-cardia gastric cancer in Linxian, China.

  18. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-02-08

    The author reviews the main achievements in Helicobacter pylori research in the past 2 years. Of the more than 1000 microRNAs described thus far, sets of over- and underexpressed samples were identified that are associated with either gastric cancer or precancerous lesions, and some of them could be either markers or therapeutic targets in the near future. Meta-analyses involved 95 new publications: the association between infection and oesophageal, colorectal, pancreatic and liver carcinomas is supported by the increased odds ratios, but the results do not reach the strength seen in gastric carcinoma. Epstein-Barr virus is an emerging pathogen: 10% of gastric cancers are virus-associated; the prevalence of the virus in normal mucosa, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently being studied. Current Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens frequently achieve suboptimal results: a few optimisation methods are presented, although not all are supported by the meta-analyses. In 2013, the European Helicobacter Study Group proposed the development of a pan-European registry; data from 5792 patients registered so far indicated that many therapeutic regimens resulted in a low eradication rate. In 2013, the Healthy Stomach Initiative was started with the aim of supporting and disseminating research performed in the field of healthy and diseased stomachs.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  20. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  1. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  2. Systematic review: Helicobacter pylori and the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk in patients taking aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, E H; Johnston, D E; Fisher, C R; Koerner, R J; Newton, J L; Gray, C S

    2010-10-01

    Aspirin is widely used to modify the risk of recurrent vascular events. It is, however, associated with increased upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. The influence of Helicobacter pylori on this risk is uncertain. To determine the influence of H. pylori on upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk in patients taking aspirin. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched. All studies providing data regarding H. pylori infection in adults taking aspirin and presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding were included. A total of 13 studies that included 1 case-control, 10 cohort studies and 2 randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) were analysed. The case-control study (n = 245) determined H. pylori to be a significant independent risk factor for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The cohort studies were heterogeneous, varying in inclusion criteria, doses and duration of aspirin used, mode of H. pylori testing and causative GI pathology considered. Comprising 5465 patients, H. pylori infection was tested for in 163 (0.03%) aspirin users with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The RCTs yielded no significant results. The current data are not sufficient to allow meta-analyses. The widely held belief that H. pylori is a risk factor for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in regular aspirin users is not supported by the very limited evidence available. 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  4. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: from molecular pathogenesis to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hua-Wen

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) was originally identified as a virulence factor of H. pylori for its ability to activate neutrophils to generate respiratory burst by releasing reactive oxygen species. Later on, HP-NAP was also found to be involved in the protection of H. pylori from DNA damage, supporting the survival of H. pylori under oxidative stress. This protein is highly conserved and expressed by virtually all clinical isolates of H. pylori. The majority of patients infected with H. pylori produced antibodies specific for HP-NAP, suggesting its important role in immunity. In addition to acting as a pathogenic factor by activating the innate immunity through a wide range of human leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells, HP-NAP also mediates adaptive immunity through the induction of T helper cell type I responses. The pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of HP-NAP not only make it play an important role in disease pathogenesis but also make it a potential candidate for clinical use. Even though there is no convincing evidence to link HP-NAP to a disease outcome, recent findings supporting the pathogenic role of HP-NAP will be reviewed. In addition, the potential clinical applications of HP-NAP in vaccine development, clinical diagnosis, and drug development will be discussed.

  5. OLGA and OLGIM stage distribution according to age and Helicobacter pylori status in the Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ji Hyung; Choi, Il Ju; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Lee, Jong Yeul; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Nam, Su Youn; Kim, Chan Gyoo

    2014-04-01

    The Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment (OLGA) and the Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Assessment (OLGIM) staging systems have been suggested to provide risk assessment for gastric cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the distribution of OLGA and OLGIM staging by age and Helicobacter pylori status. We studied 632 subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy for gastric cancer screening. Helicobacter pylori status and histologic changes were assessed using the updated Sydney system. Stage III and IV OLGA or OLGIM stages were considered as high-risk stages. The rate of H. pylori infection was 59.0% (373/632). Overall, the proportion of high OLGA and OLGIM stages was significantly increased with older age (p pylori infection (OR = 8.46) were independent risk factors for high-risk OLGA stages. These risk factors were the same for high-risk OLGIM stages. In the H. pylori-positive subgroup, the proportion of high-risk OLGA stages was low (6.9%) before the age of 40, but increased to 23.0%, 29.1%, and 41.1% for those in their 40s, 50s, and 60s, respectively (p pylori-negative group, with a respective prevalence of 10.3% and 3.4% even among those in their 60s. Because high-risk OLGA and OLGIM stages are uncommon under the age of 40, H. pylori treatment before that age may reduce the need for endoscopic surveillance for gastric cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Genotypes Associated with Gastric Histo-Pathological Damages in a Moroccan Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui Boukhris, Samia; Amarti, Afaf; El Rhazi, Karima; El Khadir, Mounia; Benajah, Dafr-Allah; Ibrahimi, Sidi Adil; Nejjari, Chakib; Mahmoud, Mustapha; Souleimani, Abdellah; Bennani, Bahia

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori persistent infection induces chronic gastritis and is associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma development. The severity of these diseases is related to human’s genetic diversity, H. pylori genetic variability and environmental factors. To identify the prevalence of histo-pathological damages caused by H. pylori infection in Moroccan population, and to determine their association to H. pylori genotypes, a prospective study has been conducted during 3 years on patients attending the gastroenterology department of Hassan II University Hospital (CHU) of Fez, Morocco. A total of 801 Moroccan adults’ patients were recruited; H. pylori was diagnosed and genotyped by PCR in biopsy specimens and histological exam was performed. We found a high rate of glandular atrophy. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity and glandular atrophy showed statistically significant association with H. pylori infection. However, intestinal metaplasia was inversely associated to this infection and no association was observed with gastric cancer cases. A statistically significant association was found between intestinal metaplasia and vacAs1 and vac Am1 genotypes in patients aged 50 years and more but not in younger. This last genotype is also associated to gastric cancer. In this study, gastric cancer showed no significant association with H. pylori. Further studies are warranted to determine the role of other etiological agents such as Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and possibly environmental and dietetic factors in the occurrence of this pathology. PMID:24349327

  7. A review of Helicobacter pylori diagnosis, treatment, and methods to detect eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-González, Elvira; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco Javier

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) affects nearly half of the world's population and, thus, is one of the most frequent and persistent bacterial infections worldwide. H. pylori is associated with peptic ulcer disease, gastric ulcers, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Various diagnostic methods exist to detect infection, and the choice of one method or another depends on several factors, such as accessibility, advantages and disadvantages of each method, cost, and the age of patients. Once H. pylori infection is diagnosed, the clinician decides whether treatment is necessity, according to the patient's clinical condition. Typically, eradication of H. pylori is recommended for treatment and prevention of the infection. Cure rates with the standard triple therapy are acceptable, and effective quadruple therapies, sequential therapies, and concomitant therapies have been introduced as key alternatives to treat H. pylori infection. In this work, we review the main diagnostic methods used to identify H. pylori infection and to confirm eradication of infection. In addition, key factors related to treatment are reviewed.

  8. Determinants of Ethnic or Geographical Differences in Infectivity and Transmissibility of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo A Fallone

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is variable in different countries. There are two distinct patterns of H pylori prevalence with respect to age depending on the geographical region studied. The first pattern is widespread infection early in childhood with elevated prevalence rates of close to 80% throughout adulthood, and the second is increasing prevalence with age. This variability in pattern suggests a difference in infectivity or transmissibility of H pylori infection. Potential determinants of these differences are reviewed including environmental, bacterial and host factors. The most important determinant is likely socioeconomic class, which affects living conditions and sanitation, thus altering exposure to the bacterium. Host factors also play a role, perhaps via host receptors for H pylori. Bacterial factors may also contribute, although compelling evidence is lacking.

  9. Gastric Carcinogenesis and Underlying Molecular Mechanisms: Helicobacter pylori and Novel Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Nishizawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen-derived free radicals that are released from activated neutrophils are one of the cytotoxic factors of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal injury. Increased cytidine deaminase activity in H. pylori-infected gastric tissues promotes the accumulation of various mutations and might promote gastric carcinogenesis. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA is delivered into gastric epithelial cells via bacterial type IV secretion system, and it causes inflammation and activation of oncogenic pathways. H. pylori infection induces epigenetic transformations, such as aberrant promoter methylation in tumor-suppressor genes. Aberrant expression of microRNAs is also reportedly linked to gastric tumorogenesis. Moreover, recent advances in molecular targeting therapies provided a new interesting weapon to treat advanced gastric cancer through anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2 therapies. This updated review article highlights possible mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis including H. pylori-associated factors.

  10. What exists beyond cagA and vacA? Helicobacter pylori genes in gastric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Débora Menezes; Pereira, Eliane dos Santos; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in more than half the world's population and has been associated with several gastric disorders, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The clinical outcome of this infection depends on host and bacterial factors where H. pylori virulence genes seem to play a relevant role. Studies of cagA and vacA genes established that they were determining factors in gastric pathogenesis. However, there are gastric cancer cases that are cagA-negative. Several other virulence genes have been searched for, but these genes remain less well known that cagA and vacA. Thus, this review aimed to establish which genes have been suggested as potentially relevant virulence factors for H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal diseases. We focused on the cag-pathogenicity island, genes with adherence and motility functions, and iceA based on the relevance shown in several studies in the literature.

  11. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Qing Wang; Ying-Nin Xin; Ni Li; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic sequences have been determined for a number of strains of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and related bacteria.With the development of microarray analysis and the wide use of subtractive hybridization techniques,comparative studies have been carried out with respect to the interstrain differences between H pylori and inter-species differences in the genome of related bacteria.It was found that the core genome of H pylori constitutes 1111 genes that are determinants of the species properties.A great pool of auxillary genes are mainly from the categories of cag pathogenicity islands,outer membrane proteins,restriction-modification system and hypothetical proteins of unknown function.Persistence of H pylori in the human stomach leads to the diversification of the genome.Comparative genomics suggest that a host jump has occurs from humans to felines.Candidate genes specific for the development of the gastric diseases were identified.With the aid of proteomics,population genetics and other molecular methods,future comparative genomic studies would dramatically promote our understanding of the evolution,pathogenesis and microbiology of H pylori.

  12. Screening Helicobacter pylori genes induced during infection of mouse stomachs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aparna Singh; Nathaniel Hodgson; Ming Yan; Jungsoo Joo; Lei Gu; Hong Sang; Emmalena Gregory-Bryson

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of in vivo environment on gene expression in Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) as it relates to its survival in the host.METHODS:In vivo expression technology (IVET) systems are used to identify microbial virulence genes.We modified the IVET-transcriptional fusion vector,pIVET8,which uses antibiotic resistance as the basis for selection of candidate genes in host tissues to develop two unique IVET-promoter-screening vectors,pIVET11 and pIVET12.Our novel IVET systems were developed by the fusion of random Sau3A DNA fragments of H.pylori and a tandem-reporter system of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase and beta-galactosidase.Additionally,each vector contains a kanamycin resistance gene.We used a mouse macrophage cell line,RAW 264.7 and mice,as selective media to identify specific genes that H.pylori expresses in vivo.Gene expression studies were conducted by infecting RAW 264.7 cells with H.pylori.This was followed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to determine the relative expression levels of in vivo induced genes.RESULTS:In this study,we have identified 31 in vivo induced (ivi) genes in the initial screens.These 31 genes belong to several functional gene families,including several well-known virulence factors that are expressed by the bacterium in infected mouse stomachs.Virulence factors,vacA and cagA,were found in this screen and are known to play important roles in H.pylori infection,colonization and pathogenesis.Their detection validates the efficacy of these screening systems.Some of the identified ivi genes have already been implicated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of H.pylori and other bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae.Transcription profiles of all ivi genes were confirmed by real time PCR analysis of H.pylori RNA isolated from H.pylori infected RAW 264.7 macrophages.We compared the expression profile of H.pylori and RAW 264.7 coculture with that of H.pylori only

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection- recent developments in diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Isabel Lopes Filipa F Vale Mónica Oleastro

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods,a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication...

  14. Anti-bacterial effects of enzymatically-isolated sialic acid from glycomacropeptide in a Helicobacter pylori-infected murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Koh, Hong Bum; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Cho, Hyang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization of the stomach mucosa and duodenum is the major cause of acute and chronic gastroduodenal pathology in humans. Efforts to find effective anti-bacterial strategies against H. pylori for the non-antibiotic control of H. pylori infection are urgently required. In this study, we used whey to prepare glycomacropeptide (GMP), from which sialic acid (G-SA) was enzymatically isolated. We investigated the anti-bacterial effects of G-SA against H. pylori in vitro and in an H. pylori-infected murine model. MATERIALS/METHODS The anti-bacterial activity of G-SA was measured in vitro using the macrodilution method, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production was measured in H. pylori and AGS cell co-cultures by ELISA. For in vivo study, G-SA 5 g/kg body weight (bw)/day and H. pylori were administered to mice three times over one week. After one week, G-SA 5 g/kg bw/day alone was administered every day for one week. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of G-SA. In addition, real-time PCR was performed to measure the genetic expression of cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). RESULTS G-SA inhibited the growth of H. pylori and suppressed IL-8 production in H. pylori and in AGS cell co-cultures in vitro. In the in vivo assay, administration of G-SA reduced levels of IL-1β and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines whereas IL-10 level increased. Also, G-SA suppressed the expression of cagA in the stomach of H. pylori-infected mice. CONCLUSION G-SA possesses anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect in an experimental H. pylori-infected murine model. G-SA has potential as an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of H. pylori infection and H. pylori-induced gastric disease prevention. PMID:28194260

  15. Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque and stomach of patients from Northern Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mnica; Baraúna; Assumpo; Luisa; Caricio; Martins; Hivana; Patricia; Melo; Barbosa; Katarine; Antonia; dos; Santos; Barile; Sintia; Silva; de; Almeida; Paulo; Pimentel; Assumpo; Tereza; Cristina; de; Oliveira; Corvelo

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To establish whether virulence factor genes vacA and cagA are present in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) retrieved from gastric mucosa and dental plaque in pa-tients with dyspepsia. METHODS: Cumulative dental plaque specimens and gastric biopsies were submitted to histological exami-nation, rapid urease test and polymerase chain reac-tion (PCR) assays to detect the presence of cagA and vacA polymorphisms.RESULTS: Detection of H. pylori from dental plaque and gastric biopsy samples was greater by PCR co...

  16. Association of autoimmune type atrophic corpus gastritis with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lea; Irene; Veijola; Aino; Mirjam; Oksanen; Pentti; Ilmari; Sipponen; Hilpi; Iris; Kaarina; Rautelin

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the association between Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)infection and autoimmune type atrophic gastritis. METHODS:Twenty-three patients with different grades of atrophic gastritis were analysed using enzyme immunoassay-based serology,immunoblot-based serology,and histology to reveal a past or a present H.pylori infection.In addition,serum markers for gastric atrophy(pepsinogenⅠ,pepsinogenⅠ/Ⅱand gastrin)and autoimmunity[parietal cell antibodies(PCA), and intrinsic factor(IF),antibodies]were determi...

  17. What Do We Do about Helicobacter pylori?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Hawkey

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs cause ulcers by different mechanisms. Under some circumstances, patients infected with H pylori may be less prone to NSAID-associated ulcers than those who are H pylori-negative. Eradication trials have yielded differing results. However, those who have studied patients who have a past history of ulcer disease and are already established on NSAIDs have shown no benefit from H pylori eradication.

  18. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haim Shmuely; Noam Domniz; Jacob Yahav

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro antiHelicobacter pylori(H.pylori)activity,but are less effective in vivo.The anti-H.pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane,anti-adhesion,inhibition of bacterial enzymes andbacterial grown.We,herein,review treatment effects of cranberry,garlic,curcumin,ginger and pistacia gum against H.pylori in both in vitro,animal studies and in vivo studies.

  19. Comparison of three diagnostic methods to confirm Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Opavski Nataša

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Helicobacter pylori induces gastric inflammation in host and such gastritis increases the risk of gastric and duodenal ulceration as well as adenocarcinoma. Because peptic ulcer disease is the major cause of morbidity, accurate diagnosis of H. pylori infection is very important. Unfortunately, there is no gold standard among diagnostic tests for Helicobacter infections. If gastroscopy is performed, histopathology and urease test are the most often used. Still, culturing of this bacterium is essential for drug susceptibility testing and analysis of virulence factors. Objective The aim of this study was to compare three diagnostic procedures - histopathology, urease test and culture, which are used to verify H. pylori infection. Method Three pairs of gastric mucosal biopsy specimens were collected from each of 28 dyspeptic patients undergoing endoscopy. Nineteen patients were not pretreated with antibiotics, while nine had received eradication therapy earlier. One pair of biopsy specimens was used for histopathologic examination, the second for urease test and the third was simultaneously cultured on nonselective and selective solid media. Isolate was identified as H. pylori on the basis of colony morphology, morphological properties and biochemical tests. Results In 14 out of 28 patients, H. pylori infection was confirmed on the basis of results of all diagnostic procedures. The concordance of these three methods was very good, because the results of histopathology, urease test and culture corresponded in 26 from 28 patients. Conclusion The conclusion of our study is that culture, as the method with high degree of concordance with other two procedures and the only that can give information on drug susceptibility of Helicobacter, is recommended for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection along with histopathology and urease test.

  20. Metabolic consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is still the most prevalent infection of the world. Colonization of the stomach by this agent will invariably induce chronic gastritis which is a low-grade inflammatory state leading to local complications (peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, lymphoma) and remote manifestations. While H. pylori does not enter circulation, these extragastric manifestations are probably mediated by the cytokines and acute phase proteins produced by the inflammed mucosa. The epidemiologic link between the H. pylori infection and metabolic changes is inconstant and controversial. Growth delay was described mainly in low-income regions with high prevalence of the infection, where probably other nutritional and social factors contribute to it. The timely eradication of the infection will lead to a more healthy development of the young population, along with preventing peptic ulcers and gastric cancer An increase of total, low density lipoprotein and high density liporotein cholesterol levels in some infected people creates an atherogenic lipid profile which could promote atherosclerosis with its complications, myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Well designed and adequately powered long-term studies are required to see whether eradication of the infection will prevent these conditions. In case of glucose metabolism, the most consistent association was found between H. pylori and insulin resistance: again, proof that eradication prevents this common metabolic disturbance is expected. The results of eradication with standard regimens in diabetics are significantly worse than in non-diabetic patients, thus, more active regimens must be found to obtain better results. Successful eradication itself led to an increase of body mass index and cholesterol levels in some populations, while in others no such changes were encountered. Uncertainities of the metabolic consequences of H. pylori infection must be clarified in the future.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases in Vietnam: a cross-sectional, hospital-based study

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    Okimoto Tadayoshi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of H. pylori infection in Vietnam is reportedly high, but the spectrum of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases has not been systematically investigated. Moreover, despite the similarities of ethnicity and diet, the age-standardized incidence rate of gastric cancer in the northern city of Hanoi is higher than that in the southern city of Ho Chi Minh, but the reason for this phenomenon is unknown. The virulence of Vietnamese H. pylori has also not been investigated in detail. Methods Individuals undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy were randomly recruited. H. pylori infection status was determined based on the combined results of culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urine test and serum ELISA. Peptic ulcer (PU and gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed by endoscopy, and chronic gastritis was determined histologically. H. pylori virulence factors were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Results Among the examined patients, 65.6% were infected with H. pylori. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in those over 40 years of age than in those aged ≤40. Chronic gastritis was present in all H. pylori-infected individuals, 83.1% of whom had active gastritis, and 85.3% and 14.7% had atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. PU was present in 21% of infected patients, whereas its incidence was very low in non-infected individuals. The prevalence of PU was significantly higher in Hanoi than in Ho Chi Minh. The prevalence of vacA m1, which has been identified as an independent risk factor for PU in Vietnam, was significantly higher among H. pylori isolates from Hanoi than among those from Ho Chi Minh. Conclusions H. pylori infection is common in Vietnam and is strongly associated with PU, active gastritis, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. vacA m1 is associated with an increased risk for PU and might contribute to the difference in the prevalence of PU and gastric cancer between

  2. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Children With Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefichaijan; Mosayebi; Sharafkhah; Kahbazi; Heydarbagi; Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have reported an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization and the occurrence of asthma or other allergies. However, data are inconsistent, and few studies have been performed in children. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate H. pylori seropositivity in children with and without asthma. Patients and Methods This cross-sect...

  3. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces th...... vaccine for H. pylori that will represent a novel and very important bullet against both infection and gastric cancer....

  4. How host regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis protects against peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Poshmaal; Ng, Garrett Z; Sutton, Philip

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent of a range of gastrointestinal pathologies including peptic ulcer disease and the major killer, gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection with this bacterium induces a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa (gastritis). It is this gastritis that, over decades, eventually drives the development of H. pylori-associated disease in some individuals. The majority of studies investigating H. pylori pathogenesis have focused on factors that promote disease development in infected individuals. However, an estimated 85% of those infected with H. pylori remain completely asymptomatic, despite the presence of pathogenic bacteria that drive a chronic gastritis that lasts many decades. This indicates the presence of highly effective regulatory processes in the host that, in most cases, keeps a check on inflammation and protect against disease. In this minireview we discuss such known host factors and how they prevent the development of H. pylori-associated pathologies.

  5. In vivo treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection with liposomal linolenic acid reduces colonization and ameliorates inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Gao, Weiwei; Obonyo, Marygorret; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is marked by a vast prevalence and strong association with various gastric diseases, including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. Because of the rapid emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics, current treatment regimens show a rapid decline of their eradication rates. Clearly, novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori are urgently needed. Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of liposomal linolenic acid (LipoLLA) for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The LipoLLA formulation with a size of ∼100 nm was prone to fusion with bacterial membrane, thereby directly releasing a high dose of linolenic acids into the bacterial membrane. LipoLLA penetrated the mucus layer of mouse stomach, and a significant portion of the administered LipoLLA was retained in the stomach lining up to 24 h after the oral administration. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated because of the H. pylori infection. Finally, a toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this study indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. PMID:25422427

  6. Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal pathology: New threats of the old friend

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    Sechi Leonardo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. It infects over 50% of the worlds' population, however, only a small subset of infected people experience H. pylori-associated illnesses. Associations with disease-specific factors remain enigmatic years after the genome sequences were deciphered. Infection with strains of Helicobacter pylori that carry the cytotoxin-associated antigen A (cagA gene is associated with gastric carcinoma. Recent studies revealed mechanisms through which the cagA protein triggers oncopathogenic activities. Other candidate genes such as some members of the so-called plasticity region cluster are also implicated to be associated with carcinoma of stomach. Study of the evolution of polymorphisms and sequence variation in H. pylori populations on a global basis has provided a window into the history of human population migration and co-evolution of this pathogen with its host. Possible symbiotic relationships were debated since the discovery of this pathogen. The debate has been further intensified as some studies have posed the possibility that H. pylori infection may be beneficial in some humans. This assumption is based on increased incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD, Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus following H. pylori eradication in some countries. The contribution of comparative genomics to our understanding of the genome organisation and diversity of H. pylori and its pathophysiological importance to human healthcare is exemplified in this review.

  7. Diet, Helicobacter pylori strain-specific infection, and gastric cancer risk among Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplein, Meira; Zheng, Wei; Li, Honglan; Peek, Richard M; Correa, Pelayo; Gao, Jing; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Cai, Qiuyin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the association of diet and gastric cancer is equivocal, and the majority of previous studies have not evaluated the interaction of diet and infection with Helicobacter pylori, the leading risk factor for gastric cancer. We examined these associations among 226 cases and 451 controls nested within a prospective cohort. Dietary intakes were calculated from validated food frequency questionnaires. Blood levels of 15 antibodies to Helicobacter pylori proteins were assessed using multiplex serology. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression. Among individuals infected with high-risk Helicobacter pylori (sero-positivity to 5-6 virulent H. pylori proteins), increasing intake of red meat, heme iron, and sodium increased risk (comparing highest tertile to lowest: ORs [95% confidence interval {CI}]: 1.85 [1.01-3.40]; 1.95 [1.06-3.57]; and 1.76 [0.91-3.43], respectively) while increasing intake of fruit decreased gastric cancer risk (comparing highest tertile of intake to lowest: OR [95% CI]: 0.52 [0.28-0.94]). No associations of diet with risk were found among individuals infected with low-risk H. pylori (P for interaction for red meat and sodium: 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). In this population with over 90% prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection, categorizing individuals using H. pylori multiplex serology may identify individuals for whom a diet intervention may be effective.

  8. [Helicobacter pylori infection in Uruguayan patients of African origin: clinical, endoscopic and genetic characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Nicolás; Fernández, Lucía; Pérez Pérez, Guillermo; Saona, Gustavo; Raisler, Katherine; Eugenia Torres, María; Olivares, Asalia; Stein, Silvana; Cohen, Henry

    2010-09-01

    Prevalence of H pylori varies in different regions around the world and its associated clinical manifestations are more severe in certain ethnic groups. Prevalence of H pylori in different groups is scarcely known in Uruguay. To determine the prevalence, clinical and endoscopic characteristics of H pylori infection in Uruguayan patients of African origin. Fifty Afro-descendant patients attending the Clinics of Gastroenterology at Hospital de Clínicas in Montevideo, were studied. They were all examined by upper endoscopy and H pylori infection was determined by histology, urease test and culture. Presence of cagA was ascertained by PCR. The prevalence of H pylori infection determined by histology and urease test in Afro-descendants was 70%. No relationship was found between symptoms that led to consultation and the presence of infection. It was not possible either to establish a relationship between H pylori and endoscopic findings. CagA gene was detected in 62% of cases, but there was no relationship between its presence and the endoscopic findings. The prevalence of H pylori infection in Afro-descendant Uruguayan patients is high, comparable with that found in other developing regions. However, an association of the presence of infection with symptoms or endoscopic findings was not found. CagA did not result in a risk factor for the presence of more severe gastroduodenal lesions in this group of patients.

  9. Identification of Helicobacter pylori infection in symptomatic patients in Surabaya, Indonesia, using five diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, M; Shiota, S; Suzuki, R; Matsuda, M; Uchida, T; Kido, Y; Kawamoto, F; Maimunah, U; Adi, P; Rezkitha, Y; Nasronudin; Nusi, I; Yamaoka, Y

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia is controversial. We examined the H. pylori infection rate in 78 patients in a hospital in Surabaya using five different tests, including culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urease test, and urine antibody test. Furthermore, we analysed virulence factors in H. pylori strains from Indonesia. The H. pylori infection rate was only 11.5% in all patients studied, and 2.3% of Javanese patients and 18.0% of Chinese patients were infected (P = 0.01). Although severe gastritis was not observed, activity and inflammation were significantly higher in patients positive for H. pylori than in patients negative for H. pylori. Among genotypes identified from five isolated strains, cagA was found in four; two were vacA s1m1. All cagA-positive strains were oipA 'on' and iceA1 positive. We confirmed both a low H. pylori infection rate and a low prevalence of precancerous lesions in dyspeptic patients in a Surabaya hospital, which may contribute to the low incidence of gastric cancer in Indonesia.

  10. Helicobacter pylori in First Nations and Recent Immigrant Populations in Canada

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    Nicola L Jones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diminishing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among most segments of the Canadian population has led to changes in the etiologies and patterns of associated upper gastrointestinal diseases, including fewer peptic ulcers and their complications. Canadian Aboriginals and recent immigrants are among populations in which the prevalence of H pylori infection remains high and, therefore, the health risks imposed by H pylori remain a significant concern. Population-based strategies for H pylori eradication in groups with a low prevalence of infection are unlikely to be cost effective, but such measures are attractive in groups in which the prevalence rates of infection remain substantial. In addition to a lower prevalence of peptic ulcers and dyspepsia, the public health value of eradication may be particularly important if this leads to a reduction in the prevalence of gastric cancer in high prevalence groups. Therefore The Canadian Helicobacter Study Group held a conference that brought together experts in the field to address these issues, the results of which are reviewed in the present article. Canadians with the highest prevalence of H pylori infection are an appropriate focus for considering the health advantages of eradicating persistent infection. In Canadian communities with a high prevalence of both H pylori and gastric cancer, there remains an opportunity to test the hypothesis that H pylori infection is a treatable risk factor for malignancy.

  11. Nutrition and Helicobacter pylori: Host Diet and Nutritional Immunity Influence Bacterial Virulence and Disease Outcome

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    Kathryn P. Haley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of greater than 50% of the world’s human population making it arguably one of the most successful bacterial pathogens. Chronic H. pylori colonization results in gastritis in nearly all patients; however in a subset of people, persistent infection with H. pylori is associated with an increased risk for more severe disease outcomes including B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma and invasive adenocarcinoma. Research aimed at elucidating determinants that mediate disease progression has revealed genetic differences in both humans and H. pylori which increase the risk for developing gastric cancer. Furthermore, host diet and nutrition status have been shown to influence H. pylori-associated disease outcomes. In this review we will discuss how H. pylori is able to create a replicative niche within the hostile host environment by subverting and modifying the host-generated immune response as well as successfully competing for limited nutrients such as transition metals by deploying an arsenal of metal acquisition proteins and virulence factors. Lastly, we will discuss how micronutrient availability or alterations in the gastric microbiome may exacerbate negative disease outcomes associated with H. pylori colonization.

  12. Cytokines, cytokine gene polymorphisms and Helicobacter pylori infection: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Camila A; Marques, Cintia Rodrigues; Costa, Ryan dos Santos; da Silva, Hugo Bernardino F; Alcantara-Neves, Neuza M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a flagellated, spiral-shaped, microaerophilic Gram-negative bacillus that colonises the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population. Infection is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcer disease and stomach cancer. Immunity against H. pylori is mainly related to Th1/Th17 skewing, and the activation of regulatory T cells is the main strategy used to limit inflammatory responses, which can result in the pathogen persistence and can lead to chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer. Furthermore, host genetic factors that affect cytokines may determine differences in the susceptibility to many diseases. In this review, we present the cytokine profiles and the main cytokine gene polymorphisms associated with resistance/susceptibility to H. pylori and discuss how such polymorphisms may influence infection/disease outcomes.

  13. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Osawa

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primar-ily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lym-phoid tissue lymphorna. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in Hpylori injected sub-jects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in associa-tion with atrophic gastritis induced by Hpylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentra-tion. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may re-sult from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations be-fore and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels.

  14. The Importance of Toll-like Receptors in NF-κB Signaling Pathway Activation by Helicobacter pylori Infection and the Regulators of this Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Liu, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a common pathogenic bacterium in the stomach that infects almost half of the population worldwide and is closely related to gastric diseases and some extragastric diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Both the Maastricht IV/Florence consensus report and the Kyoto global consensus report have proposed the eradication of H. pylori to prevent gastric cancer as H.pylori has been shown to be a major cause of gastric carcinogenesis. The interactions between H. pylori and host receptors induce the release of the proinflammatory cytokines by activating proinflammatory signaling pathways such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a central role in inflammation, immune response, and carcinogenesis. Among these receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are classical pattern recognition receptors in the recognition of H. pylori and the mediation of the host inflammatory and immune responses to H. pylori. TLR polymorphisms also contribute to the clinical consequences of H. pylori infection. In this review, we focus on the functions of TLRs in the NF-κB signaling pathway activated by H. pylori, the regulators modulating this response, and the functions of TLR polymorphisms in H.pylori-related diseases.

  15. Investigation of Helicobacter pylori infection among symptomatic children in Hangzhou from 2007 to 2014: a retrospective study with 12,796 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaoli; Ping, Mingfang; Yin, Guofeng

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim The infection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is acquired in childhood and the prevalence vary greatly in different countries and regions. The study aimed to investigate the characteristics of H. pylori infection among children with gastrointestinal symptoms in Hangzhou, a representative city of eastern China. Methods A systematic surveillance of H. pylori infection according to the 13C-urea breath test was conducted from January 2007 to December 2014 in the Children’s hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine. The demographic information and main symptoms of every subject were recorded. Results A total of 12,796 subjects were recruited and 18.6% children evaluated as H. pylori positive. The annual positive rates decreased from 2007 to 2014 (χ2 = 20.461, p pylori infection. Age, gender, gastrointestinal symptoms and history of H. pylori infected family member were all significantly associated with H. pylori infection (all p pylori infection rates in children with gastrointestinal symptoms were lower than most of those reported in mainland China. Further studies are required to determine the prevalence in the general population. Comprehensively understanding of the characteristics and the possible risk factors of H. pylori infection will be helpful to its management strategies in children in China. PMID:28168109

  16. Cell-cycle inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-asparaginase.

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    Claudia Scotti

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application.

  17. Cell-Cycle Inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Claudia; Sommi, Patrizia; Pasquetto, Maria Valentina; Cappelletti, Donata; Stivala, Simona; Mignosi, Paola; Savio, Monica; Chiarelli, Laurent Roberto; Valentini, Giovanna; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Merrell, Douglas Scott; Franchini, Silvia; Verona, Maria Luisa; Bolis, Cristina; Solcia, Enrico; Manca, Rachele; Franciotta, Diego; Casasco, Andrea; Filipazzi, Paola; Zardini, Elisabetta; Vannini, Vanio

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application. PMID:21085483

  18. Impact of Helicobacter pylori on the healing process of the gastric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnich, Eliza; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicińska, Paulina; Hinc, Krzysztof; Obuchowski, Michał; Gajewski, Adrian; Moran, Anthony P; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the impact of selected well defined Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antigens on gastric barrier cell turnover. METHODS In this study, using two cellular models of gastric epithelial cells and fibroblasts, we have focused on exploring the effects of well defined H. pylori soluble components such as glycine acid extract antigenic complex (GE), subunit A of urease (UreA), cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on cell turnover by comparing the wound healing capacity of the cells in terms of their proliferative and metabolic activity as well as cell cycle distribution. Toxic effects of H. pylori components have been assessed in an association with damage to cell nuclei and inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. RESULTS We showed that H. pylori GE, CagA and UreA promoted regeneration of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which is necessary for effective tissue healing. However, in vivo increased proliferative activity of these cells may constitute an increased risk of gastric neoplasia. In contrast, H. pylori LPS showed a dose-dependent influence on the process of wound healing. At a low concentration (1 ng/mL) H. pylori LPS accelerated of healing epithelial cells, which was linked to significantly enhanced cell proliferation and MTT reduction as well as lack of alterations in cell cycle and downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) production as well as cell nuclei destruction. By comparison, H. pylori LPS at a high concentration (25 ng/mL) inhibited the process of wound repair, which was related to diminished proliferative activity of the cells, cell cycle arrest, destruction of cell nuclei and downregulation of the EGF/STAT3 signalling pathway. CONCLUSION In vivo H. pylori LPS driven effects might lead to the maintenance of chronic inflammatory response and pathological disorders on the level of the gastric mucosal barrier. PMID:27672275

  19. Comparative Analysis of the Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Human Dendritic Cells, Macrophages, and Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Moos, Verena; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Hagen, Jana; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Pang, Ervinna; Belogolova, Elena; Churin, Yuri; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, gastric cancer, or lymphoma. Myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most likely involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses. To study the interaction of human APC subsets with H. pylori, we infected monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived (classically activated; M1) macrophages with H. pylori and analyzed phenotypic alterations, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and immunostimulation. Since we detected CD163+ (alternatively activated; M2) macrophages in gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive patients, we also included monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in the study. Upon H. pylori infection, monocytes secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12p40 (partially secreted as IL-23) but not IL-12p70. Infected DCs became activated, as shown by the enhanced expression of CD25, CD80, CD83, PDL-1, and CCR7, and secreted IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-23. However, infection led to significantly downregulated CD209 and suppressed the constitutive secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). H. pylori-infected M1 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD32, downregulated CD11b and HLA-DR, and secreted mainly IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, and IL-23. Activation of DCs and M1 macrophages correlated with increased capacity to induce T-cell proliferation and decreased phagocytosis of dextran. M2 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD206 and secreted IL-10 but produced less of the proinflammatory cytokines than M1 macrophages. Thus, H. pylori affects the functions of human APC subsets differently, which may influence the course and the outcome of H. pylori infection. The suppression of MIF in DCs constitutes a novel immune evasion mechanism exploited by H. pylori. PMID:22615251

  20. Is There a Link Between H. Pylori and the Epidemiology of Crohn's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ayesha; Talley, Nicholas J; Walker, Marjorie; Koloski, Natasha; Morrison, Mark; Burger, Daniel; Andrews, Jane M; McGuckin, Michael; Jones, Mike; Holtmann, Gerald

    2017-03-09

    Case control studies suggest an inverse association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and Crohn's disease (CD). It is possible this could be accounted for by confounders such as antibiotic therapy. Analyzing the geographic distribution of H. pylori and the links with the incidence and prevalence of CD would be an alternative approach to circumvent these confounders. The literature was searched for studies published between 1990 and 2016 that reported incidence or prevalence data for CD in random population samples in developed countries (GDP per capita >20,000 USD/year). Corresponding prevalence studies for H. pylori in these same regions were then sought matched to the same time period (±6 years). The association between the incidence and prevalence of CD and H. pylori prevalence rates were assessed before and after adjusting for GDP and life expectancy. A total of 19 CD prevalence and 22 CD incidence studies from 10 European countries, Japan, USA, and Australia with date-matched H. pylori prevalence data were identified. The mean H. pylori prevalence rate was 43.4% (range 15.5-85%), and the mean rates for incidence and prevalence for CD were 6.9 and 91.0/100,000 respectively. The incidence (r = -0.469, p H. pylori infection. Our data demonstrate a significant inverse association between geographic distribution of H. pylori and CD. Thus, it is highly unlikely that the findings of previous case control studies were simply due to confounding factors such as concomitant antibiotic use in CD patients.

  1. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with the Lewis and ABO blood groups in dyspeptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryana, Kamran; Keramati, Mohammad Reza; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Akbari, Hedieh

    2013-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a basic risk factor for chronic gastritis, and gastric carcinoma. Based on some studies, the reason is binding of H. pylori to H and Le(b) antigens in gastric mucosa. However, some other findings have not determined any association between the infection and these antigens. Because of this controversy and the fact that H. pylori infection and gastric adenocarcinoma are common diseases in Iran, the assessment of the association of H. pylori infection with these blood groups could be valuable. In a cross sectional study on 135 adult dyspeptic patients in Mashhad, Iran, from 2009 to 2010, H. pylori infection was evaluated by using the Heliprobe (14)C-urea breath test and the ABO and Lewis blood group antigens were determined by the tube method. Association between the Lewis and ABO phenotypes with H. pylori infection were analysed by Fisher's exact test. A P ≤ 0.05 was considered to be significant. 68 (50.4%) patients were positive for H. pylori infection. The frequencies of the ABO, Lewis and secretion phenotypes were not significant in the infected and non-infected patients. We also did not find a significant association between Le(a) and Le(b) antigens and this infection. We could not establish a significant association between the Lewis, ABO and secretion phenotypes with H. pylori infection. Diversity of sequences of blood group antigen b-binding adhesion (babA gene) of H. pylori may be a reason why our findings are different from other studies in other geographic areas.

  2. Hybrid Therapy Regimen for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Jian Liu; Li-Ya Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) eradication remains a challenge with increasing antibiotic resistance.Hybrid therapy has attracted widespread attention because of initial report with good efficacy and safety.However,many issues on hybrid therapy are still unclear such as the eradication efficacy,safety,compliance,influencing factors,correlation with antibiotic resistance,and comparison with other regimens.Therefore,a comprehensive review on the evidence of hybrid therapy for H.pylori infection was conducted.Data Sources:The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to September 30,2015,searching by the terms of"Helicobacterpylori" or "H.pylori",and "hybrid".Study Selection:Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results:Totally,1871 patients of 12 studies received hybrid therapy.The eradication rates were 77.6-97.4% in intention-to-treat and 82.6-99.1% in per-protocol analyses.Compliance was 93.3-100.0%,overall adverse effects rate was 14.5-67.5%,and discontinued medication rate due to adverse effects was 0-6.7%.H.pylori culture and sensitivity test were performed only in 13.3% patients.Pooled analysis showed that the eradication rates with dual clarithromycin and metronidazole susceptible,isolated metronidazole or clarithromycin resistance,and dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance were 98.5%,97.6%,92.9%,and 80.0%,respectively.Overall,the efficacy,compliance,and safety of hybrid therapy were similar with sequential or concomitant therapy.However,hybrid therapy might be superior to sequential therapy in Asians.Conclusions:Hybrid therapy showed wide differences in the efficacy but consistently good compliance and safety across different regions.Dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance were the key factor to efficacy.Hybrid therapy was similar to sequential or concomitant therapy in the efficacy,safety,and compliance.

  3. Etude des interactions entre Helicobacter pylori et les cellules épithéliales gastriques

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    Mustapha, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori causes inflammation that can persist asymptomatically or evolve into more severe pathologies such as gastric or peptic ulcers, MALT lymphoma and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island is one of the major virulence factors of this bacterium. Several cytokines and antimicrobial peptides are involved in modulating the inflammatory response of the gastric epithelial mucosa during infection with H. pylori. This work has focused on the study of the interacti...

  4. The assessment of carotid intima media thickness and serum Paraoxonase-1 activity in Helicobacter pylori positive subjects

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    Akbas Halide S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis has been increasingly discussed. Although the seroepidemiological studies have suggested a relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and atherosclerosis; the issue is still controversial. It is well known that abnormal lipid profil is related to atherosclerosis and the measurement of carotid-intima media thickness (CIMT is one of the surrogate marker of atherosclerosis. The serum concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C has been known to have an inverse correlation with the development of atherosclerosis. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1 is a major anti-atherosclerotic component of HDL-C. PON1 activity is related to lipid peroxidation and prospective cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to investigate CIMT and serum PON1 activities along with lipid parameters in H. pylori positive and negative subjects. Methods Thirty H. pylori positive subjects and thirty-one negative subjects were enrolled. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by the presence of positivity of stool H. pylori antigen test or Carbon 14 labeled urea breath test. Serum PON1 activity was measured spectrophotometrically. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors were investigated and laboratory analysis included measurement of serum triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C. We assessed CIMT by high-resolution ultrasound of both common carotid arteries. Results We found that the mean and maximum values of right and overall CIMT in H. pylori positive subjects were significantly thicker than those of H. pylori negative subjects. There was no significant differences in serum HDL-C, LDL-C, TC levels and TC/HDL-C ratios between two groups. Serum TG levels of H. pylori positive subjects were significantly higher than those of H. pylori negative subjects (p = 0.014. We found that PON1

  5. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effect of the Vacuolation of Helicobacter Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic test in vitro combined with cytochemical stain, fluorescent stain, transmission electronmicrograph was used to study the vacuolated effect by helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) (Toxin+) and its pathological mechanism. 78.26 % patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori was infected with H.pylori (Toxin+), while 42.86 % patients with gastritis was infected with H.pylori (Toxin+). It was positive in vacuole with acridine orange and acid phosphatase stain. Transmission electronmicrograph of vacuole revealed the presence of abounding membrane. There was a closed relationship between infection with H.pylori (Toxin+) and peptic ulcer disease. The vacuole induced by H.pylori (Toxin+) was autophagosome, which was pathological phenomenon induced by toxin.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders.

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    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been linked to peptic ulcer disease, gastric lymphoma, and gastric carcinoma. Apart from its well-demonstrated role in gastroduodenal diseases, some authors have suggested a potential role of Helicobacter pylori infection in several extra-intestinal pathologies including haematological, cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic, autoimmune, and dermatological diseases. Some studies suggest an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and skin diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria and rosacea. There have also been few case reports documenting association between Helicobacter pylori and psoriasis vulgaris, Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases; most of the studies do not show relevant relationships of these diseases with Helicobacter pylori infections. This review discusses skin diseases that are believed to be associated with Helicobacter pylori.

  8. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Asymptomatic Children in Birjand, Eastern Iran

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    Kokab Namakin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori is the cause of serious diseases including gastric cancer and gastric mucosa–associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.50% of world population is infected by this microorganism and it -based on epidemiologic studies - is mainly acquired during childhood . there is not enough evidence about prevalence of this infection in children and its risk factors so encourage us to study on it.Method : we tested 282 apparently healthy 9-12 year old students in a population based cross sectional study for Helicobacter pylori colonization using H pylori Antigen EIA Test Kit (ACON company.a short socio demographic questionnaire was used to assess risk factors.Findings: the overall prevalence of H pylori colonization in 282 students is 13.1%. we found statistically significant relationship between H pylori colonization and sex, duration of breast feeding, and family crowding but there is not significant relationship with age , family history of dyspepsia , number of days in week consuming yogurt and economically stratified living region in present study.Conclusion: Helicobacter Pylori is a big concern even in young asymptomatic children and it needs to be further studied about its potential risk factors and how to manage them for the goal of prevention.

  9. Coinfection with Helicobacter pylori and Opisthorchis viverrini Enhances the Severity of Hepatobiliary Abnormalities in Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangtakot, Rungtiwa; Pinlaor, Somchai; Itthitaetrakool, Upsornsawan; Chaidee, Apisit; Chomvarin, Chariya; Sangka, Arunnee; Wilailuckana, Chotechana; Pinlaor, Porntip

    2017-04-01

    Persistent infection with Opisthorchis viverrini causes hepatobiliary abnormalities, predisposing infected individuals to cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). In addition, Helicobacter pylori is highly prevalent in most countries and is a possible risk factor for CCA; however, its role in enhancing hepatobiliary abnormality is unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of coinfection with H. pylori and O. viverrini on hepatobiliary abnormality. Hamsters were divided into four groups: (i) normal, (ii) H. pylori infected (HP), (iii) O. viverrini infected (OV), and (iv) O. viverrini and H. pylori infected (OV+HP). At 6 months postinfection, PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to test for the presence of H. pylori in the stomach, gallbladder, and liver. In the liver, H. pylori was detected in the following order: OV+HP, 5 of 8 (62.5%); HP, 2 of 5 (40%); OV, 2 of 8 (25%). H. pylori was not detected in normal (control) liver tissues. Coinfection induced the most severe hepatobiliary abnormalities, including periductal fibrosis, cholangitis, and bile duct hyperplasia, leading to a significantly decreased survival rate of experimental animals. The greatest thickness of periductal fibrosis was associated with a significant increase in fibrogenesis markers (expression of alpha smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor beta). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that the highest expression levels of genes for proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha) were also observed in the OV+HP group. These results suggest that coinfection with H. pylori and O. viverrini increased the severity of hepatobiliary abnormalities to a greater extent than either single infection did.

  10. Induction of CD69 expression by cagPAI-positive Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Mori; Chie Ishikawa; Masachika Senba

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and elucidate the molecular mech-anism that regulates inducible expression of CD69 by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection.METHODS: The expression levels of CD69 in a T-cell line, Jurkat, primary human peripheral blood mononu-clear cells (PBMCs), and CD4+T cells, were assessed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. Activation of CD69 promoter was detected by reporter gene. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in Jurkat cells infected with H. pylori was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The role of NF-κB signaling in H. pylori -induced CD69 expression was analyzed using inhibitors of NF-κB and dominant-negative mutants. The isogenic mutants with disrupted cag pathogenicity island ( cagPAI) and virD4 were used to elucidate the role of cagPAI-encoding type Ⅳ secretion system and CagA in CD69 expression.RESULTS: CD69 staining was detected in mucosal lymphocytes and macrophages in specimens of pa-tients with H. pylori -positive gastritis. Although cagPAI-positive H. pylori and an isogenic mutant of virD4 induced CD69 expression, an isogenic mutant of cag-PAI failed to induce this in Jurkat cells. H. pylori also induced CD69 expression in PBMCs and CD4+T cells. The activation of the CD69 promoter by H. pylori was mediated through NF-κB. Transfection of dominant-negative mutants of IκBs, IκB kinases, and NF-κB-inducing kinase inhibited H. pylori -induced CD69 activation. Inhibitors of NF-κB suppressed H. pylori -induced CD69 mRNA expression.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that H. pylori in-duces CD69 expression through the activation of NF-κB. cagPAI might be relevant in the induction of CD69 expression in T cells. CD69 in T cells may play a role in H. pylori -induced gastritis.

  11. Astaxanthin and β-carotene in Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Inflammation: A Mini-review on Action Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a dominant bacterium living in the human gastric tissues. In H. pylori-infected tissues, the infiltrated inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to gastric inflammation with production of various mediators. According to numerous epidemiological studies, dietary carotenoids may prevent gastric inflammation due to their antioxidant properties. Recent studies showed that antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of astaxanthin and β-carotene may contribute to inhibition of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation. Astaxanthin changes H. pylori-induced activation of T helper cell type 1 response towards T helper cell type 2 response in the infected tissues. Astaxanthin inhibits the growth of H. pylori. Even though astaxanthin reduces H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation, it does not reduce cytokine levels in the infected tissues. β-Carotene suppresses ROS-mediated inflammatory signaling, including mitogen-activated protein kinases and redox-sensitive transcription factors, and reduces expression of inflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in the infected tissues. Therefore, consumption of astaxanthin- and β-carotene-rich foods may be beneficial to prevent H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation. This review will summarize anti-inflammatory mechanisms of astaxanthin and β-carotene in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation.

  12. Chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori

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    Yadav Mukesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP have recently emerged as a novel eliciting factor for chronic urticaria (CU. The possible association between HP and CU has enormous potential, as eradicating HP could cure CU. Aims and Objectives: We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of HP infection and effect of bacterium eradication on skin lesions in patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU. Settings and Design: Four hundred sixty patients of CU attending the allergy clinic, SMS hospital, Jaipur during the period February 6, 2004, to February 6, 2006, were screened for possible eliciting factors. Patients with CIU were enrolled and others were excluded. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight patients of CIU and similar number of age and sex matched controls, attending the allergy clinic, SMS Hospital, Jaipur were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endoscopy with antral biopsy for urease and histopathology to identify HP-associated gastritis. Infected patients were given HP eradication therapy. Eradication of bacterium was confirmed by fecal antigen assay. Subjective response to treatment was judged using chronic urticaria quality-of-life questionnaire (CU-Q 2 oL while objective response to treatment was judged by need for ′rescue medication′ (antihistaminics. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi square and paired′t′ test for their level of significance. Results: HP associated gastritis was present in 48 (70.58% patients, out of which 39 (81.25% patients responded to eradication therapy. Ten (50.00% patients without HP associated gastritis showed response to symptomatic therapy. Overall 49 (72.05% patients responded and 19 (27.94% showed no response. The value of χ2 was 28.571 (P = 0.003, which showed significant association between presence of HP and response to eradication regimen. Conclusion: The response of HP eradication therapy in infected patients of CIU is significant. HP should be included in diagnostic

  13. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

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    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  14. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. A diagnosis of infection is thus an important part of a treatment strategy of many gastrointestinal tract diseases. Many diagnostic tests are available but all have some limitations in different clinical situations and laboratory settings. A single gold standard cannot available, but be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in daily clinical practice in all areas, so several techniques have been developed to give reliable results, especially focusing on real time endoscopic features. The narrow band imaging system (NBI) and high resolution endoscopy are imaging techniques for enhanced visualization of infected mucosa and premalignant gastric lesions. The aim of this article is to review the current diagnostic options and possible future developments detection of Helicobacter pylori infection.

  15. Approach to Helicobacter pylori infection in geriatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizginer, Sevdenur; Ordulu, Zehra; Kadayifci, Abdurrahman

    2014-08-06

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and its complications increase with age. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic throughout the life but 10%-20% develops peptic ulcer disease and 1% gastric malignancies. The incidence of ulcers and their complications are more common in the older population resulting in higher hospitalization and mortality rates. The increased use of medications causing gastric mucosal damage and the decreased secretion of protective prostaglandins in elderly are major factors increasing gastric mucosal sensitivity to the destructive effects of H. pylori. Due to higher prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, upper GI endoscopy is mostly preferred in elderly for the diagnosis of infection. Therefore, "endoscopy and treat" strategy may be more appropriate instead of "test and treat" strategy for dyspeptic patients in older age. Urea breath test and stool antigen test can be used for control of eradication, except for special cases requiring follow-up with endoscopy. The indications for treatment and suggested eradication regimens are similar with other age groups; however, the eradication failure may be a more significant problem due to high antibiotic resistance and low compliance rate in elderly. Multidrug usage and drug interactions should always be considered before starting the treatment. This paper reviews briefly the epidemiology, diagnosis, disease manifestations, and treatment options of H. pylori in the geriatric population.

  16. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: A review of current trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olokoba, A B; Obateru, O A; Bojuwoye, M O

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the formation of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer. Eradication of H. Pylori has been recommended as treatment and prevention for these complications. This review is based on a search of Medline, the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, and citation lists of relevant publications. Subject heading and key words used include H. Pylori, current treatment and emerging therapy. Only articles in English were included. There has been a substantial decline in the H. pylori eradication rates over the years, despite the use of proton pump inhibitor and bismuth salts for triple and quadruple therapies respectively. The reasons for eradication failure are diverse, among them, antibiotic resistance is an important factor in the treatment failure. Primary resistance to clarithromycin or metronidazole significantly affects the efficacy of eradication therapy. This has led to the introduction of second line, third line "rescue," and sequential therapies for resistant cases. Subsequently, new antibiotic combinations with proton-pump inhibitors and bismuth salts are being studied in the last decade, to find out the antibiotics that are capable of increasing the eradication rates. Some of these antibiotics include Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Rifaximin, Rifampicin, Furazolidone based therapies. Studies are ongoing to determine the efficacy of Lactoferrin based therapy.

  17. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: A review of current trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Olokoba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the formation of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer. Eradication of H. Pylori has been recommended as treatment and prevention for these complications. This review is based on a search of Medline, the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, and citation lists of relevant publications. Subject heading and key words used include H. Pylori, current treatment and emerging therapy. Only articles in English were included. There has been a substantial decline in the H. pylori eradication rates over the years, despite the use of proton pump inhibitor and bismuth salts for triple and quadruple therapies respectively. The reasons for eradication failure are diverse, among them, antibiotic resistance is an important factor in the treatment failure. Primary resistance to clarithromycin or metronidazole significantly affects the efficacy of eradication therapy. This has led to the introduction of second line, third line "rescue," and sequential therapies for resistant cases. Subsequently, new antibiotic combinations with proton-pump inhibitors and bismuth salts are being studied in the last decade, to find out the antibiotics that are capable of increasing the eradication rates. Some of these antibiotics include Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Rifaximin, Rifampicin, Furazolidone based therapies. Studies are ongoing to determine the efficacy of Lactoferrin based therapy.

  18. Seroepidemiology of Campylobacter pylori infection in various populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégraud, F; Brassens-Rabbé, M P; Denis, F; Belbouri, A; Hoa, D Q

    1989-01-01

    Campylobacter pylori infection has been recognized as being strongly associated with chronic gastritis and duodenal ulceration, but the prevalence of C. pylori infection in a normal population is not known. A serological survey was conducted in four countries with different geographical and socioeconomic status, in a randomly chosen population as representative as possible, by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a sonic extract of two strains as the antigen. The test had a specificity of 94% when 600 ELISA units was used as the threshold. In France, few children were infected before the age of 10 years. The prevalence then increased gradually to 36.7% in the sixth decade of life. This increasing prevalence of infection with age was also observed in Algeria, Vietnam, and the Ivory Coast but at a higher rate (80 to 90%). In Vietnam, as in France, few children were infected, whereas in Africa, C. pylori infection occurred earlier. The prevalence of infection did not differ with sex for a particular age group; it also did not differ with respect to gastric symptoms, smoking and drinking habits, or urban or rural residence when these potential risk factors were studied. The epidemiological data available on peptic ulcer disease in developing countries compared with developed countries led to the speculation that infection with C. pylori is not a sufficient condition to develop this disease. PMID:2549098

  19. Approach to Helicobacter pylori infection in geriatric population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sevdenur; Cizginer; Zehra; Ordulu; Abdurrahman; Kadayifci

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infection and its complications increase with age. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic throughout the life but 10%-20% develops peptic ulcer disease and 1% gastric malignancies. The incidence of ulcers and their complications are more common in the older population resulting in higher hospitalization and mortality rates. The increased use of medications causing gastric mucosal damage and the decreased secretion of protective prostaglandins in elderly are major factors increasing gastric mucosal sensitivity to the destructive effects of H. pylori. Due to higher prevalence of gastrointestinal(GI) malignancies,upper GI endoscopy is mostly preferred in elderly for the diagnosis of infection. Therefore,"endoscopy and treat" strategy may be more appropriate instead of "test and treat" strategy for dyspeptic patients in older age. Urea breath test and stool antigen test can be used for control of eradication,except for special cases requiring follow-up with endoscopy. The indications for treatment and suggested eradication regimens are similar with other age groups; however,the eradication failure may be a more significant problem due to high antibiotic resistance and low compliance rate in elderly. Multidrug usage and drug interactions should always be consid-ered before starting the treatment. This paper reviews briefly the epidemiology,diagnosis,disease manifesta-tions,and treatment options of H. pylori in the geriatric population.

  20. Structural Insights into Polymorphic ABO Glycan Binding by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonens, Kristof; Gideonsson, Pär; Subedi, Suresh; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Romaõ, Ema; Mendez, Melissa; Nordén, Jenny; Fallah, Mahsa; Rakhimova, Lena; Shevtsova, Anna; Lahmann, Martina; Castaldo, Gaetano; Brännström, Kristoffer; Coppens, Fanny; Lo, Alvin W; Ny, Tor; Solnick, Jay V; Vandenbussche, Guy; Oscarson, Stefan; Hammarström, Lennart; Arnqvist, Anna; Berg, Douglas E; Muyldermans, Serge; Borén, Thomas; Remaut, Han

    2016-01-13

    The Helicobacter pylori adhesin BabA binds mucosal ABO/Le(b) blood group (bg) carbohydrates. BabA facilitates bacterial attachment to gastric surfaces, increasing strain virulence and forming a recognized risk factor for peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. High sequence variation causes BabA functional diversity, but the underlying structural-molecular determinants are unknown. We generated X-ray structures of representative BabA isoforms that reveal a polymorphic, three-pronged Le(b) binding site. Two diversity loops, DL1 and DL2, provide adaptive control to binding affinity, notably ABO versus O bg preference. H. pylori strains can switch bg preference with single DL1 amino acid substitutions, and can coexpress functionally divergent BabA isoforms. The anchor point for receptor binding is the embrace of an ABO fucose residue by a disulfide-clasped loop, which is inactivated by reduction. Treatment with the redox-active pharmaceutic N-acetylcysteine lowers gastric mucosal neutrophil infiltration in H. pylori-infected Le(b)-expressing mice, providing perspectives on possible H. pylori eradication therapies.

  1. Type IV secretion system in Helicobacter pylori: a new insight into pathogenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Qiao; SHAO Shi-he; CUI Lei-lei; MU Run-hong; JU Xiao-li; DONG Su-rong

    2007-01-01

    Objective To review the research progress on Type IV secretion system (T4SS) in Helicobacter pylori.Data sources The data used in this review were identified by searching of PUBMED (1995-2007) online resources Study selection Mainly original articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators of this field were selected.Results The research progress on T4SS in Helicobacter pylori was summarized.The structure and function was discussed.Conclusions T4SS is not only involved in toxin secretion and injection of virulence factors into eukaryotic host target cells,but also involved in horizontal DNA transfer to other bacteria and eukaryotic cells,through DNA uptake from or release into the extracellular milieu.It provides a new insight into the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori and a novel target for antimicrobials development.However,many challenges remain for us in understanding the biological role of T4SS in Helicobacter pylori.

  2. Stress-induced hemorrhagic gastric ulcer after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyamoto Mitsuaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of gastric ulcers, and Helicobacter pylori eradication drastically reduces ulcer recurrence. It has been reported, however, that severe physical stress is closely associated with gastric ulceration even in Helicobacter pylori -negative patients. Case presentation We report the cases of a 47-year-old Japanese man and a 69-year-old Japanese man who developed psychological stress-induced hemorrhagic gastric ulcers, in both of whom Helicobacter pylori had been successfully eradicated. Conclusion Our cases strongly suggest that not only physical but also psychological stress is still an important pathogenic factor for peptic ulceration and accordingly that physicians should pay attention to the possible presence of psychological stress in the management of patients with peptic ulcers.

  3. Helicobacter pylori Antibody Reactivities and Colorectal Cancer Risk in a Case-control Study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Fernández de Larrea-Baz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC, while others have not confirmed this hypothesis. This work aimed to assess the relation of CRC with H. pylori seropositivity and with seropositivity to 16 H. pylori proteins, in the MultiCase-Control study, MCC-Spain.Methods: MCC-Spain is a multicase-control study carried out in Spain from 2008 to 2013. In total, 2,140 histologically-confirmed incident CRC cases and 4,098 population-based controls were recruited. Controls were frequency-matched by sex, age, and province. Epidemiological data were collected through a questionnaire fulfilled by face-to-face interviews and a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire. Seroreactivities against 16 H. pylori proteins were determined in 1,488 cases and 2,495 controls using H. pylori multiplex serology. H. pylori seropositivity was defined as positivity to ≥4 proteins. Multivariable logistic regression mixed models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI.Results:H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with increased CRC risk (OR = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.71–1.16. Among H. pylori seropositive subjects, seropositivity to Cagδ showed a lower CRC risk, and risk decreased with increasing number of proteins seropositive. Seropositivity to the most recognized virulence factors, CagA and VacA, was not associated with a higher CRC risk. No statistically significant heterogeneity was identified among tumor sites, although inverse relations were stronger for left colon cancer. An interaction with age and sex was found: H. pylori seropositivity was associated with a lower CRC risk in men younger than 65 and with a higher risk in older women.Conclusions: Our results suggest that neither H. pylori seropositivity, nor seropositivity to the virulence factor CagA are associated with a higher CRC risk. A possible effect modification by age and sex was

  4. Cytotoxic isolates of Helicobacter pylori from Peptic Ulcer Diseases decrease K+-dependent ATPase Activity in HeLa cells

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    Archana Ayyagari

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a Gram negative bacterium that plays a central role in the etiology of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases. However, not all H. pylori positive cases develop advanced disease. This discriminatory behavior has been attributed to the difference in virulence of the bacteria. Among all virulence factors, cytotoxin released by H. pylori is the most important factor. In this work, we studied variation in H. pylori isolates from Indian dyspeptic patients on the basis of cytotoxin production and associated changes in K+-dependent ATPase (one of its targets enzyme activity in HeLa cells. Methods The patients were retrospectively grouped on the basis of endoscopic and histopathological observation as having gastritis or peptic ulcer. The HeLa cells were incubated with the broth culture filtrates (BCFs of H. pylori isolates from patients of both groups and observed for the cytopathic effects: morphological changes and viability. In addition, the K+-dependent ATPase activity was measured in HeLa cells extracts. Results The cytotoxin production was observed in 3/7 (gastritis and 4/4 (peptic ulcer H. pylori isolates. The BCFs of cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains reduced the ATPase activity of HeLa cells to 40% of that measured with non-cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains (1.33 μmole Pi/mg protein and 3.36 μmole Pi/mg protein, respectively, p Conclusions Our results suggest that the isolation of cytotoxic H. pylori is more common in severe form of acid peptic diseases (peptic ulcer than in gastritis patients from India. Also the cytotoxin released by H. pylori impairs the ion-transporting ATPase and is a measure of cytotoxicity.

  5. Protective effect of Korean Red Ginseng extract against Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils

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    Minkyung Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation includes induction of inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL-8 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, which are mediated by oxidant-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB. High levels of lipid peroxide (LPO and increased activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO, a biomarker of neutrophil infiltration, are observed in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa. Panax ginseng Meyer, a Korean herb medicine, is widely used in Asian countries for its biological activities including anti-inflammatory efficacy. The present study aims to investigate whether Korean Red Ginseng extract (RGE inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils. One wk after intragastric inoculation with H. pylori, Mongolian gerbils were fed with either the control diet or the diet containing RGE (200 mg RGE/gerbil for 6 wk. The following were determined in gastric mucosa: the number of viable H. pylori in stomach; MPO activity; LPO level; mRNA and protein levels of keratinocyte chemoattractant factor (KC, a rodent IL-8 homolog, IL-1β, and iNOS; protein level of phospho-IκBα (which reflects the activation of NF-κB; and histology. As a result, RGE suppressed H. pylori-induced mRNA and protein levels of KC, IL-1β, and iNOS in gastric mucosa. RGE also inhibited H. pylori-induced phosphorylation of IκBα and increases in LPO level and MPO activity of gastric mucosa. RGE did not affect viable H. pylori colonization in the stomach, but improved the histological grade of infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, intestinal metaplasia, and hyperplasia. In conclusion, RGE inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by suppressing induction of inflammatory mediators (KC, IL-1β, iNOS, MPO activity, and LPO level in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa.

  6. Prospective study of Helicobacter pylori antigens and gastric noncardia cancer risk in the nutrition intervention trial cohort.

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    Murphy, Gwen; Freedman, Neal D; Michel, Angelika; Fan, Jin-Hu; Taylor, Philip R; Pawlita, Michael; Qiao, You-Lin; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2015-10-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the strongest known risk factor for gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). We used multiplex serology to determine whether seropositivity to 15 H. pylori proteins is associated with the subsequent development of noncardia gastric cancer in Linxian, China. We included 448 GNCA cases and 1242 controls from two time points within the Linxian General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial, Linxian. H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was defined as positivity to ≥4 of the 15 included antigens. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were adjusted for major GNCA risk factors. In addition, we undertook a meta-analysis combining H. pylori multiplex serology data from both time points. H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was associated with a significant increase in risk of GNCA at one time point (1985; OR: 3.44, 95% CI: 1.91, 6.19) and this association remained significant following adjustment for H. pylori or CagA ELISA seropositivity (OR: 2.92, 95% CI: 1.56, 5.47). Combining data from both time points in a meta-analysis H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of GNCA, as were six individual antigens: GroEL, HP0305, CagA, VacA, HcpC and Omp. CagM was inversely associated with risk of GNCA. We identified six individual antigens that confer an increase in risk of GNCA within this population of high H. pylori seroprevalence, as well as a single antigen that may be inversely associated with GNCA risk. We further determined that the H. pylori multiplex assay provides additional information to the conventional ELISA methods on risk of GNCA.

  7. EFFECT OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION ON ANTRAL MUCOSAL TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-α AND PLATELET-DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR LEVELS%幽门螺杆菌感染对胃窦粘膜TNF-α和PDGF水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国安; 刘小朋; 张信; 陈紫榕; 施水兰; 史玉波

    1999-01-01

    检测幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter Pylori,Hp)感染胃炎患者胃窦粘膜体外培养上清液中肿瘤坏死因子(Tumor Necrosis Factor-α,TNF-α)和血小板源生长因子(Platelet-derived Growth Factor,PDGF)水平.结果表明,Hp阳性胃炎患者胃窦粘膜TNF-α含量和PDGF活性均明显高于Hp阴性患者和正常对照组,合并活动性胃炎患者胃窦TNF-α含量和PDGF活性也明显高于非活动性胃炎.

  8. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in newly arrived refugees attending the Migrant Health Service, South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Nur R; Benson, Jill; Grocke, Kathryn; Vather, Deeva; Zimmerman, Jessica; Moody, Tessa; Mwanri, Lillian

    2017-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the refugee population attending the Migrant Health Service, South Australia, identify demographic factors associated with infection and compare prevalence of infection in refugees with that of the nonrefugee population in Australia. Cross-sectional study conducted between October 2010 and August 2013. Monoclonal stool antigen testing for H. pylori infection is performed as part of a comprehensive health assessment for newly arrived refugees. The sample population included 922 adults and children. Outcome measures were (i) prevalence of H. pylori infection (ii) association between demographic factors such as sex, ethnicity and age, and H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection was detected in 198 (21.5%) participants (95% CI 18.9%-24.3%). The odds of infection were lower in females OR 0.71 (95% CI 0.51-0.98) compared to males. Compared to Middle Eastern participants, the odds of infection were 1.75 (95% CI 1.17-2.62) times higher in African and 1.90 (95% CI 1.10-3.26) times higher in Burmese participants. Infection was not associated with age. H. pylori infection is common among newly arrived refugees. The long latency of infection to development of complications and the availability of testing and relatively effective eradication regimens all add weight to a decision to screen in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Konstantopoulos, Panagiotis; Mantzaris, Gerassimos J

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most widely spread infectious diseases in humans. It can cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies and has been associated with extra-gastric disorders. H. pylori elicit a chronic systemic inflammatory response which, under certain conditions, may trigger autoimmune reactions and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, it is thought to result from complex interactions between environmental factors and microbiota in the gut of individuals who are genetically susceptible. Several bacterial and viral agents have been implicated in the aetiology of IBD. In theory, H. pylori infection could be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD by inducing alterations in gastric and/or intestinal permeability or by causing immunological derangements resulting in absorption of antigenic material and autoimmunity via various immunological pathways. Similar mechanisms may also be responsible for the co-existence of IBD with other autoimmune diseases and/or extra-intestinal manifestations. However, the epidemiological data fail to support this association. In fact, various studies indicate that the prevalence of H. pylori infection is low in patients with IBD, suggesting a protective role for this infection in the development of IBD. In this report, we aim to shed light on proposed mechanisms and confounding factors underlying the potential link between H. pylori infection and IBD. PMID:24914359

  10. Interplay of the Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori with Toll-Like Receptors

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    Suneesh Kumar Pachathundikandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are crucial for pathogen recognition and downstream signaling to induce effective immunity. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is a paradigm of persistent bacterial infections and chronic inflammation in humans. The chronicity of inflammation during H. pylori infection is related to the manipulation of regulatory cytokines. In general, the early detection of H. pylori by TLRs and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs is believed to induce a regulatory cytokine or chemokine profile that eventually blocks the resolution of inflammation. H. pylori factors such as LPS, HSP-60, NapA, DNA, and RNA are reported in various studies to be recognized by specific TLRs. However, H. pylori flagellin evades the recognition of TLR5 by possessing a conserved N-terminal motif. Activation of TLRs and resulting signal transduction events lead to the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators through activation of NF-κB, MAP kinases, and IRF signaling pathways. The genetic polymorphisms of these important PRRs are also implicated in the varied outcome and disease progression. Hence, the interplay of TLRs and bacterial factors highlight the complexity of innate immune recognition and immune evasion as well as regulated processes in the progression of associated pathologies. Here we will review this important aspect of H. pylori infection.

  11. Coexistence of Helicobacter pylori and Intestinal Parasitosis in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökşen, Bülent; Appak, Yeliz Çağan; Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Ecemiş, Talat; Kasırga, Erhun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of coinfection with Helicobacter pylori and intestinal parasitosis in children with chronic abdominal pain (CAP) and to investigate the common risk factors in the development of both infections. Ninety patients with CAP were enrolled in this study. Blood samples of each case were screened for human preformed IgG (HpIgG) antibodies, and stool samples were tested for HpSA and also examined for intestinal parasites by direct wet-mount, formalin-ethyl-acetate concentration, and Trichrome staining procedures. Cellophane tape test was used for Enterobius vermicularis. Children tested positive for HpIgG and/or HpSA were accepted as H. pylori positive. The risk factors were compared with a questionnaire. The incidence of Giardia intestinalis was 14.8% in the H. pylori-positive group and was found to be statistically higher than that in the H. pylori-negative group (1.6%). The positivity rates of H. pylori were found to be statistically higher in children attending school and using drinking water from taps. The incidences of parasitosis were significantly higher in children with a low maternal education level and with a history of parasitosis treatment in the family. The most common etiologies of CAP in children are H. pylori infection and intestinal parasitosis. İmprovement of hygienic conditions would be beneficial in preventing both infections.

  12. Role of Helicobacter pylori eradication in aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug users

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George V. Papatheodoridis; Athanasios J. Archimandritis

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including aspirin at any dosage and formulation represent well-established risk factors for the development of uncomplicated and complicated peptic ulcer disease accounting for the majority of such cases. Although the interaction between H pylori and NSAID/aspirin use in the same individuals was questioned in some epidemiological studies, it has now become widely accepted that they are at least independent risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. According to data from randomized intervention trials, naive NSAID users certainly benefit from testing for H pylori infection and, if positive,H pylori eradication therapy prior to the initiation of NSAID. A similar strategy is also suggested for naive aspirin users, although the efficacy of such an approach has not been evaluated yet. Strong data also support that chronic aspirin users with a recent ulcer complication should be tested for H pyloriinfection and, if positive, receive H pylori eradication therapy after ulcer healing, while they appear to benefit from additional long-term therapy with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI).A similar approach is often recommended to chronic aspirin users at a high risk of ulcer complication. H pylori eradication alone does not efficiently protect chronic NSAID users with a recent ulcer complication or those at a high-risk, who certainly should be treated with long-term PPI therapy, but H pylori eradication may be additionally offered even in this setting. In contrast, testing for H pylorior PPI therapy is not recommended for chronic NSAID/aspirin users with no ulcer complications or those at a low risk of complications.

  13. Pan-genomic analyses identify key Helicobacter pylori pathogenic loci modified by carcinogenic host microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Jennifer M; Chopra, Abha; Loh, John T; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Watson, Mark; Leary, Shay; Beckett, Amber C; Wilson, Keith T; Cover, Timothy L; Mallal, Simon; Israel, Dawn A; Peek, Richard M

    2017-09-18

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer; however, the majority of infected individuals do not develop disease. Pathological outcomes are mediated by complex interactions among bacterial, host and environmental constituents, and two dietary factors linked with gastric cancer risk are iron deficiency and high salt. We hypothesised that prolonged adaptation of H. pylori to in vivo carcinogenic microenvironments results in genetic modification important for disease. Whole genome sequencing of genetically related H. pylori strains that differ in virulence and targeted H. pylori sequencing following prolonged exposure of bacteria to in vitro carcinogenic conditions were performed. A total of 180 unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified among the collective genomes when compared with a reference H. pylori genome. Importantly, common SNPs were identified in isolates harvested from iron-depleted and high salt carcinogenic microenvironments, including an SNP within fur (FurR88H). To investigate the direct role of low iron and/or high salt, H. pylori was continuously cultured in vitro under low iron or high salt conditions to assess fur genetic variation. Exposure to low iron or high salt selected for the FurR88H variant after only 5 days. To extend these results, fur was sequenced in 339 clinical H. pylori strains. Among the isolates examined, 17% (40/232) of strains isolated from patients with premalignant lesions harboured the FurR88H variant, compared with only 6% (6/107) of strains from patients with non-atrophic gastritis alone (p=0.0034). These results indicate that specific genetic variation arises within H. pylori strains during in vivo adaptation to conditions conducive for gastric carcinogenesis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Dispepsia ed Helicobacter pylori

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    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Helicobacter pylori (HP eradication on functional dyspepsia has been analysed in several clinical trials, including large, controlled and well-designed studies as well as small, flowed studies. The results of these studies indicate that HP infection does not play a major role in the aetiology of this disease and that HP eradication improves dyspeptic symptoms in no more than 15% of patients as compared to placebo. From a practical point of view 15 patients need to be treated for one to benefit while, in duodenal ulcer, 1.4 patient need to be treated for one to benefit. It remains to be elucidated if HP eradication in functional dyspepsia is useful to reduce the risk of developing organic dyspepsia (namely peptic ulcer in functional dyspepsia. In uninvestigated dyspepsia the management of HP infection in primary care has been fully debated.Two therapeutics strategies have been proposed: test and scope and test and treat. The value of test and treat strategy over alternative strategies has been demonstrated in several decision analyses. HP test and scope increases costs in primary care without improving symptoms and saves only 15% of endoscopies.

  15. [Helicobacter pylori antibiotic sensitivity by microdilution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, F; Rivera, P; Hernández, F; Hevia, F; Guillén, F; Tamayo, G

    2000-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as the major aetiologic agent of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers and also a risk factor for gastric cancer; eradication of H pylori prevents peptic ulcer recurrence and may also decrease the prevalence of gastric cancer in high risk populations around the world. Currently the only accepted indication for treatment is ulcer disease and maltosa, infected with Helicobacter pilory. However treatment is difficult and easily develops resistance. The elaboration of an antibiotic profile is recommended after a treatment failure. There is a lack of information in developing countries so the aim of this work was to determine the antibiotic profile of 51 strains isolated from patients gastric biopsies attended at Hospital San Juan de Dios in Costa Rica, using egg yolk broth and finding a resistance of 63.0% to metronidazole with a breakpoint of 8.0 microg/ml and 20.0% resistance to tetracycline (MIC1.0 microg/ml), 6.0% to clarithromicyn with a MIC of 0.125 microg/ml. There was no resistance to amoxicilin (MIC 0.015 microg/ml). The microdilution technique is very laborious, but highly reproducible with results accordingly to previous work, and we recommended it for the designing of therapeutical scheme.

  16. Expressions of MMPs and TIMP-1 in Gastric Ulcers May Differentiate H. pylori-Infected from NSAID-Related Ulcers

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    Hsiu-Chi Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Two major causes of gastric ulcers are Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use. Aims. This study aimed to determine if there were different expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 between H. pylori-infected and NSAID-related ulcers. Methods. The 126 gastric ulcer patients (H. pylori infected n=46; NSAID related n=30; combined with two factors n=50 provided ulcer and nonulcer tissues for assessment of MMP-3, -7, and -9 and TIMP-1 expression by immunohistochemical staining. Results. Gastric ulcer tissues had significantly higher MMP-3, -7, and -9 and TIMP-1 expressions than nonulcer tissues (P<0.05. H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers had even higher MMP-7, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 expressions in epithelial cells than NSAID-related gastric ulcers (P<0.05. In patients with the two combined factors, gastric ulcers expressed similar proportions of antral ulcers and MMP-7 and MMP-9 intensities to NSAID-related gastric ulcers, but lower MMP-9 and TIMP-1 than H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers (P<0.05. Conclusions. H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers express higher MMP-7, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 than NSAID-related ulcers. In patients with the two combined factors, ulcer location and MMP-7 and MMP-9 intensities are similar to NSAID use.

  17. Protein interaction network related to Helicobacter pylori infection response

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    Kyu Kwang Kim; Han Bok Kim

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To understand the complex reaction of gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) in a systematic manner using a protein interaction network. METHODS: The expression of genes significantly changed on microarray during H pylori infection was scanned from the web literary database and translated into proteins. A network of protein interactions was constructed by searching the primary interactions of selected proteins. The constructed network was mathematically analyzed and its biological function was examined. In addition, the nodes on the network were checked to determine if they had any further functional importance or relation to other proteins by extending them.RESULTS: The scale-free network showing the relationship between inflammation and carcinogenesis was constructed. Mathematical analysis showed hub and bottleneck proteins, and these proteins were mostly related to immune response. The network contained pathways and proteins related to H pylori infection, such as the JAK-STAT pathway triggered by interleukins. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kB, TLR4, and other proteins known to function as core proteins of immune response were also found.These immune-related proteins interacted on the network with pathways and proteins related to the cell cycle, cell maintenance and proliferation, and transcription regulators such as BRCA1, FOS, REL, and zinc finger proteins. The extension of nodes showed interactions of the immune proteins with cancerrelated proteins. One extended network, the core network, a summarized form of the extended network, and cell pathway model were constructed. CONCLUSION: Immune-related proteins activated by H pylori infection interact with proto-oncogene proteins. The hub and bottleneck proteins are potential drug targets for gastric inflammation and cancer.

  18. Detection and location of Helicobacter pylori in human gastric carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Lian Tang; Run-Liang Gan; Bi-Hua Dong; Ri-Chen Jiang; Rong-Jun Tang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To define the infection status of Helicobacter pylori in 109 patients with gastric cancers and Hpylorilocalization in gastric carcinoma tissues in South China.METHODS: The incidence of Hpyloriinfection in gastric carcinomas was estimated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), simultaneously; both morphological features and the localization of H pylori in gastric carcinomas were demonstrated by Warthin-Starry (WS) staining. The relationships between Hpylori infection and the clinicalpathologic factors of gastric carcinomas were analyzed by software SPSS10.0.RESULTS: Hpyloriwas found in 42 (39.03%) and 58(53.21%) cases of 109 patients with gastric carcinomas by PCRand WS, respectively. H pyloriinfection rate detected in gastric carcinomas by WS was higher than that by PCR (x2 = 9.735,P<0.005<0.01). WS stain showed that H pylori existed in the gastric antrum mucus, mucosal gland of normal tissues adjacent to gastric carcinomas and the gland, mucus pool of cancer tissues. The positive rate of H pyloriin normal tissues adjacent to carcinomas was higher than that in cancer tissues (x2 = 15.750, P<0.005<0.01). No significant differences in age, sex, site,histological types and lymph node metastasis were found between H pylorFpositive gastric carcinomas and H pylorinegative cases by both methods, but there were statistically significant differences of H pylori positive rate between early and advanced stage of gastric carcinomas (x2=4.548or 5.922, P = 0.033 or 0.015<0.05).CONCLUSION: These results suggested that H pylori infection might play a certain role in the early stage of carcinogenesis of human gastric mucosa epithelia.

  19. "RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HELICOBACTER PYLORI SEROPOSITIVITY AND HYPEREMESIS GRAVIDARUM"

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    A. Jamal

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe nausea and vomiting associated with weight loss, ketonemia, and electrolyte imbalance in pregnancy is called hyperemesis gravidarum (HG. Its cause is unknown but there are some hypotheses like hormonal mechanisms, psychological and emotional factors and Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to find an association between (HG and H. pylori infection. For this purpose in a prospective study from Aug. 2001 to Feb. 2002, the serum antibodies against H. pylori in 39 patients with HG was compared with IgG titers of 55 asymptomatic pregnant women at the same gestational age as controls. Venous blood was taken after the patients had given their written consent. Specific serum antibodies (immunoglobulin IgG directed against H. pylori was measured by fluorescent enzyme-immunoassay. IgG titers less than 15 was considered negative, IgG titers more than 20 were regarded positive and IgG titers between 15-20 were considered as suspicious and required repeating the test after 2-4 weeks. Chi square, Mann Whitney and Student t test were used for statistical analysis of the data. Positive serum IgG concentrations were found in 26 of the 39 hyperemesis patients (66.7% compared with 23 of 55 controls (41.8%. The difference was statistically significant(P<0.015. The mean IgG titers in hyperemesis group were 25 compared to 10.5 in control group(P<0.05. It seems that H. pylori infection is significantly associated with HG.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Capsaicin and Piperine on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Chronic Gastritis in Mongolian Gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Takeshi; Shi, Liang; Takasu, Shinji; Cho, Young-Man; Kiriyama, Yuka; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Tatematsu, Masae; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Spices have been used for thousands of years, and recent studies suggest that certain spices confer beneficial effects on gastric disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible chemopreventive effects of spice-derived compounds on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced gastritis. We examined the inhibitory effects of curcumin, capsaicin, and piperine on H. pylori in vitro by determining the colony-forming units and real-time RT-PCR in H. pylori stimulated AGS gastric cancer cells. For in vivo analysis, 6-week-old SPF male Mongolian gerbils were infected with H. pylori, fed diets containing 5000 ppm curcumin, 100 ppm capsaicin, or 100 ppm piperine, and sacrificed after 13 weeks. All three compounds inhibited in vitro proliferation of H. pylori, with curcumin being the most effective. Infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells was suppressed by piperine both in the antrum and corpus of H. pylori-infected gerbils. Capsaicin also decreased neutrophils in the antrum and corpus and mononuclear cell infiltration and heterotopic proliferative glands in the corpus. mRNA expression of Tnf-α and formation of phospho-IκB-α in the antrum were reduced by both capsaicin and piperine. In addition, piperine suppressed expression of Il-1β, Ifn-γ, Il-6, and iNos, while H. pylori UreA and other virulence factors were not significantly attenuated by any compounds. These results suggest that capsaicin and piperine have anti-inflammatory effects on H. pylori-induced gastritis in gerbils independent of direct antibacterial effects and may thus have potential for use in the chemoprevention of H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with metabolic parameters and dietary habits among medical undergraduate students in southeastern of Iran

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    Omid Eslami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, there is still inconclusive evidence on the extra-gastric manifestations of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection. This study aimed to determine whether there is an association between H.pylori infection with metabolic syndrome and dietary habits among medical undergraduate students in south-eastern of Iran, Zahedan. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done among 363 undergraduate students in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences during spring 2014. All subjects completed a questionnaire including demographic factors and dietary habits. Serum H. pylori-specific IgG antibodies, total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, and fasting blood sugar (FBS levels were measured after an overnight fast. Results: The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was 45.7%. H. pylori-positive subjects had lower mean levels of TC and TG and higher levels of HDL-C compared to H. pylori-negative subjects. In addition, lower levels of LDL-C (P = 0.044 and FBS (P = 0.05 were observed among subjects with positive H pylori infection. Only rare consumption of raw vegetables (odds ratio [OR] =3.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.37–5.24 as well as higher levels of FBS (OR = 1.031, 95% CI = 1.001–1.99 were significantly associated with higher odds of H. pylori infection in both the univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: In a small population of young students in southeastern of Iran, H. pylori infection was associated with low consumption of raw vegetables and higher serum blood glucose.

  2. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  3. Immunohistochemical Expressions of MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6 in Normal, Helicobacter pylori Infected and Metaplastic Gastric Mucosa of Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung-Sook; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Jun, Jin-Su; Park, Ji-Hoe; Ko, Gyung-Hyuck; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate expression of gastric mucins in children and adolescents and to assess their relations with age and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Gastric biopsies were collected from 259 pediatric and adulthood patients with gastrointestinal symptoms among all of patients undergone gastroduodenoscopy from 1990 to 2004 at Gyeongsang National University hospital and assorted based on H. pylori infection, age, and intestinal metaplasia as follows; H. pylori infection before 5 years of age or not, H. pylori infection between 5 and 9 years of age or not, H. pylori infection between 10 and 14 years of age or not, H. pylori infection between 20 and 29 years of age or not and intestinal metaplasia between 21 and 35 years of age. Total 810 tissue slides from the subjects were examined regarding expressions of Mucin2 (MUC2), Mucin5AC (MUC5AC), and Mucin6 (MUC6) in nine groups using immunohistochemical stains. A semiquantitative approach was used to score the staining extent of tissue slide. Increased expressions of MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6 were noted in intestinal metaplasia compared with subjects infected with H. pylori between 20 and 29 years. Gastric expressions of MUC5AC were decreased in older than 5 years with H. pylori compared with in older than 5 years without H. pylori (p pylori status. Some nuclear expressions of MUC2 and MUC6 were noted in children without intestinal metaplasia. MUC5AC might be affected by chronic H. pylori infection. In addition to biomarkers for intestinal metaplasia or prognostic factors for gastric cancer in adults, MUC2 and MUC6 in children might have an another role, based on ectopic gastric nuclear expressions of MUC2 and MUC6 in children without intestinal metaplasia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

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    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  5. Prevalencia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori en el linfoma MALT gástrico: una revisión sistemática Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric MALT lymphoma: a systematic review

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    L. M. Asenjo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: realizar una revisión sistemática de los estudios que evalúan la prevalencia de H. pylori en los pacientes con linfoma MALT, así como analizar los factores de los que depende. Métodos: se efectuó una búsqueda bibliográfica en Pubmed seleccionando aquellos artículos en los que se estudiaba la prevalencia de H. pylori en pacientes con linfoma MALT. Resultados: se identificaron 38 estudios, incluyendo un total de 1.844 pacientes. La prevalencia media global de infección por H. pylori fue del 79%. En pacientes en los que se utilizaron 2 o más métodos para el diagnóstico de H. pylori la prevalencia fue del 85%, frente al 77% cuando se empleó un método diagnóstico (p Objective: to perform a systematic review of studies evaluating H. pylori prevalence in patients with MALT lymphoma, and to analyze predictive factors of response. Methods: a literature search in Pubmed was performed of papers studying H. pylori prevalence in patients with MALT lymphoma. Results: 38 studies were identified including 1,844 patients. The average prevalence of H. pylori infection was 79%. In patients diagnosed with H. pylori infection using 2 or more methods prevalence was 85%, whereas it was 77% when only one diagnostic method was used (p < 0.0001. H. pylori prevalence in patients diagnosed by histology was 75%, whereas it was 85% when serology was used (p < 0.0001. H. pylori prevalence in high-grade lymphomas was 60%, and 79% in low-grade lymphomas (p < 0.0001. H. pylori infection was detected in 74% of lymphomas confined to the submucosa, but only in 44% of those reaching deeper beyond the submucosa (p < 0.0001. Conclusions: H. pylori prevalence in patients with MALT lymphoma is variable, and seems to depend, at least partly, on the number and type of diagnostic methods used, histologic grade, and deep tumor invasion. If appropriate diagnostic methods are used, and if only low-grade lymphomas are considered, H. pylori prevalence is high, nearly

  6. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and microevolution in host and the clinical outcome: review article

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    Seyedeh Zahra Bakhti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the causative agent in development of gastroduode-nal diseases, such as chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcers, mucosa associated lym-phoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric cancer. H. pylori has been associated with inflammation in cardia, showing the fact that infection with this bacterium could also be a risk factor for gastric cardia cancer. Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. This is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, and ap-proximately 700,000 people succumb each year to gastric adenocarcinoma. It has been estimated that 69% of the Iranian population currently harbor H. pylori infection. The prevalence of duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer is high in Iranian populations. However, this has been largely influenced by geographic and/or ethnic origin. Epidemi-ology studies have shown that host, environmental, and bacterial factors determine the outcome of H. pylori infection. The bacterium contains allelic diversity and high genet-ic variability into core- and virulence-genes and that this diversity is geographically and ethnically structured. The genetic diversity within H. pylori is greater than within most other bacteria, and its diversity is more than 50-fold higher than that of human DNA. The maintenance of high diversification makes this bacterium to cope with particular challenges in individual hosts. It has been reported that the recombination contributed to the creation of new genes and gene family. Furthermore, the microevolution in cagA and vacA genes is a common event, leading to a change in the virulence phenotype. These factors contribute to the bacterial survival in acidic conditions in stomach and protect it from host immune system, causing tissue damage and clinical disease. In this review article, we discussed the correlation between H. pylori virulence factors and clin-ical outcomes, microevolution of H. pylori virulence genes in a single host

  7. Susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection: results of an epidemiological investigation among gastric cancer patients.

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    Panic, Nikola; Mastrostefano, Elena; Leoncini, Emanuele; Persiani, Roberto; Arzani, Dario; Amore, Rosarita; Ricci, Riccardo; Sicoli, Federico; Sioletic, Stefano; Bulajic, Milutin; D' Ugo, Domenico; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the clinical, demographic, lifestyle factors and selected genetic polymorphisms that affect the susceptibility towards Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in gastric cancer patients. Histological confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma cases that underwent curative gastrectomy between 2002 and 2012 were included. Gastric biopsy samples were obtained to determine the H. pylori status, and further cagA status and vacA m and s genotypes by polymerase chain reaction. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires, and blood samples were collected for EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, IL1B, IL1-RN, MTHFR and p53 genotyping. Proportions were compared in univariate analysis, while the relation between putative risk factors and H. pylori status and genotype were measured using logistic regression analysis. One hundred forty-nine gastric cancer patients were included, of which 78.5% were H. pylori positive. Among positive patients 50% were cagA+, 72.5% vacA m1 and 80.7% vacA s1. The presence of cagA was less frequent among vacA m1 (p = 0.031) and vacA s1 (p = 0.052) subtypes. The presence of father history for any cancer was a significant risk factor for H. pylori infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 8.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-64.55]. EPHX1 exon 3 T > C (OR = 0.35, CI 95% 0.13-0.94), IL1B-511 T > C (OR = 0.38, CI 95% 0.15-0.97) and IL1-RN VNTR (OR = 0.19, CI 95% 0.06-0.58) polymorphisms were protective towards H. pylori infection in the univariate analysis. Wine consumption was associated with higher risk of carrying the H. pylori vacA m1 virulent subtype (p = 0.034). Lastly, cardiovascular diseases were less common among cagA positive subjects (p = 0.023). Father history of any cancer is a risk factor for H. pylori infection. Polymorphisms in IL1B-511, IL1-RN and EPHX1 exon 3 genes might be protective towards H. pylori infection.

  8. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

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    Li, Guanggang; Wulan, Hasi; Song, Zongchang; Paik, Paul A; Tsao, Ming L; Goodman, Gary M; MacEachern, Paul T; Downey, Robert S; Jankowska, Anna J; Rabinowitz, Yaron M; Learch, Thomas B; Song, David Z; Yuan, Ji J; Zheng, Shihang; Zheng, Zhendong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  9. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

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    Guanggang Li

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  10. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in dyspeptic patients and its relationship with HIV infection, ABO blood groups and life style in a university hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feleke Moges; Afework Kassu; Getahun Mengistu; Solomon Adugna; Berhanu Andualem; Takeshi Nishikawa; Fusao Ota

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) among dyspeptic patients and to assess the relationship between H pylori infection, blood group, HIV infection and life style of the patients.METHODS: In a hospital-based cross-sectional study,patients attending Outpatient Department of University of Gondar Hospital were enrolled. Socio-demographic information was collected using questionnaires. Serum was analyzed for anti-H pylori IgG antibodies using a commercial kit. HIV serostatus was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Blood grouping was performed by slide agglutination tests.RESULTS: A total of 215 dyspeptic patients were included in the study. One hundred and sixteen patients (54%) were females and 99 (46%) were males. Anti-H pylori IgG antibodies were detected in sera of 184 (85.6%) patients. The prevalence was significantly higher in patients aged 50 years and above. Twenty point five percent of the patients were found to be seropositive for HIV. No significant association was found between sex,ABO blood groups, consumption of spicy diets, socioeconomic status and seropositivity for H pylori. However,alcohol consumption was significantly associated with H pylori serology.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H pylori infection is associated with a history of alcohol intake and older age.The effect of different diet, alcohol and socioeconomic status as risk factors for H pylori infection needs further study.

  11. H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study whether H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis.METHODS:The subjects were divided into three groups:H pylori-infected cholecystitis group,H pylorinegative cholecystitis group and control group.Pathologic changes of the gallbladder were observed by optic and electronic microscopes and the levels of interleukin-1,6 and 8(IL-1,6 and 8)were detected by radioimmunoassay.RESULTS:Histological evidence of chronic cholecystitis including degeneration,necrosis,inflammatory cell infiltration,were found in the region where H pylori-colonized.Levels of IL-1,6 and 8 in gallbladder mucosa homogenates were significantly higher in H pylori-infected cholecystitis group than those in H pylori-negative cholecystitis group and control group.CONCLUSION:H pylori infection may be related to cholecystitis.

  12. Evaluation on antibiotic resistance of helicobacter pylori isolated from patients admitted to tooba medical center, Sari

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    Amin Talebi BezminAbadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 17 March, 2009; Accepted 8 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Helicobacter pylori, which infect approximately one half of the world’s population, are an important risk factor in chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is now widely recommended as the most effective treatment of peptic ulcer disease. One of the most important reasons for treatment failure is H. pylori resistance to the antimicrobials usage in therapy. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility patterns of H. pylori isolates in 6 routine anti-microbial agents in Northern Iran.Materials and methods: 125 patients from Tooba Medical Center in Sari with endoscopic evidence of dyspepsia complaints were used for obtaining gastric biopsies specimens. Biopsies were sent to the laboratory in thioglycolate broth (transport medium. Bacteria were primarily cultured on Columbia agar supplemented with 7% horse blood, 7% fetal calf serum. Urease, Catalase and Oxidase activities were used for H. pylori identification. Bacterial suspensions equivalent to 3 Mc. Farlands were spread on plates, along with antibiotic disks and placed in the diameter zone. Inhibition was measured after 3 days of incubation in micro-aerophilic condition.Results: H. pylori were isolated from 116(92.8% subjects, a total of 125 biopsy specimens. Resistance to metronidazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, furazolidone and ciprofloxacin were 71%, 35%, 25%, 9%, 24% and 25%, respectively. Multiple resistance (amoxicillin-clarithromycin-metronidazole were found in (65% of the isolates.Conclusion: Comparison of our data with previous results showed that prevalence of H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, furazolidone and metronidazole has increased in Iran considerably. Resistance to amoxicillin in our study was too high in comparison with foreign studies. The present study demonstrates the need for continuous monitoring of the antimicrobial

  13. Common coinfections of Giardia intestinalis and Helicobacter pylori in non-symptomatic Ugandan children.

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    Johan Ankarklev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis and the pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori are well known for their high prevalences in human hosts worldwide. The prevalence of both organisms is known to peak in densely populated, low resource settings and children are infected early in life. Different Giardia genotypes/assemblages have been associated with different symptoms and H. pylori with induction of cancer. Despite this, not much data are available from sub-Saharan Africa with regards to the prevalence of different G. intestinalis assemblages and their potential association with H. pylori infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fecal samples from 427 apparently healthy children, 0-12 years of age, living in urban Kampala, Uganda were analyzed for the presence of H. pylori and G. intestinalis. G. intestinalis was found in 86 (20.1% out of the children and children age 1<5 years had the highest rates of colonization. H. pylori was found in 189 (44.3% out of the 427 children and there was a 3-fold higher risk of concomitant G. intestinalis and H. pylori infections compared to non-concomitant G. intestinalis infection, OR = 2.9 (1.7-4.8. No significant association was found in the studied population with regard to the presence of Giardia and gender, type of toilet, source of drinking water or type of housing. A panel of 45 G. intestinalis positive samples was further analyzed using multi-locus genotyping (MLG on three loci, combined with assemblage-specific analyses. Giardia MLG analysis yielded a total of five assemblage AII, 25 assemblage B, and four mixed assemblage infections. The assemblage B isolates were highly genetically variable but no significant association was found between Giardia assemblage type and H. pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows that Giardia assemblage B dominates in children in Kampala, Uganda and that the presence of H. pylori is an associated risk factor for G

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric autoimmune diseases: is there a link?

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    Presotto, Fabio; Sabini, Beatrice; Cecchetto, Attilio; Plebani, Mario; De Lazzari, Franca; Pedini, Beniamino; Betterle, Corrado

    2003-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is thought to be involved in atrophic body gastritis. We explored the prevalence of H. pylori infection in asymptomatic subjects with gastric parietal cell antibodies, as well as in patients with pernicious anemia, to evaluate a possible role of H. pylori gastric infection in gastric autoimmunity. We studied 79 consecutive asymptomatic subjects with parietal cell antibodies, 24 patients with pernicious anemia, and 66 parietal cell antibody-negative controls. All patients underwent gastric biopsies for histology and detection of H. pylori. Red blood cell count and volume, serum levels of gastrin, pepsinogen I, iron, folic acid, vitamin B12, and circulating antibodies to H. pylori and to intrinsic factor were also determined. We found an atrophic body gastritis in 14 of the 79 asymptomatic subjects with parietal cell antibodies (18%) and in 2 of the 66 controls (3%) (p =.01). Mean levels of gastrin were increased (p antibodies were detected in 46 parietal cell antibody-positive subjects (58%) compared with 26 controls (39%) (p =.03). In patients with pernicious anemia we found an atrophic body gastritis in 18 of 24 cases (75%) (p antibodies and/or with pernicious anemia), H. pylori was found in 44 of 72 of those without atrophy (61%) but in 6 of 31 with gastric body atrophy (19%) (p detection of H. pylori infection in subjects with early gastric autoimmunity, indicated by the presence of parietal cell antibodies, suggests that H. pylori could have a crucial role in the induction and/or the maintenance of autoimmunity at the gastric level.

  15. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography.

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    Frydman, Galit H; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L; Fox, James G

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity and Childhood Neurodevelopment, the Rhea Birth Cohort in Crete, Greece.

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    Karachaliou, Marianna; Chatzi, Leda; Michel, Angelika; Kyriklaki, Andriani; Kampouri, Mariza; Koutra, Katerina; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; Kogevinas, Manolis; de Sanjose, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    Limited evidence exists on the association between exposure to Helicobacter pylori infection early in life, including fetal life, and neurodevelopment in childhood. We used prospective data on 352 mother-child pairs and cross-sectional data on 674 children to assess the association of maternal and child's H. pylori seropositivity correspondingly on child's neurodevelopment at age four in the Rhea birth cohort in Crete, Greece. Blood levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies to 12 H. pylori proteins were measured using multiplex serology. Child's neurodevelopment at age four was assessed using the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities. Linear regression models were used to explore the associations after adjusting for potential confounders. Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence (95% CI) in cord blood, representing maternal status, was 41.5% (36.3%, 46.8%) and in 4 years old children was 6.5% (95% CI 4.8%, 8.7%). Children of H. pylori seropositive mothers had lower score in the general cognitive (-3.87, 95% CI -7.02, -0.72), verbal (-2.96, 95% CI -6.08, 0.15), perceptual performance (-3.37, 95% CI -6.60, -0.15), quantitative (-2.85, 95% CI -6.28, 0.58), and memory scale (-3.37, 95% CI -6.67, -0.07) compared to those of seronegative mothers. Seropositivity in cord blood specifically to GroEl and NapA - two of the 12 H. pylori proteins investigated - was associated with lower scores in almost all scales. At age four, H. pylori seropositive children performed worst in neurodevelopment assessment compared to their seronegative counterparts although no association reached statistically significant level. Helicobacter pylori infection in early life may be an important but preventable risk factor for poor neurodevelopment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The influence of mucus microstructure and rheology in H. pylori infection

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    Rama eBansil

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has evolved to survive in the highly acidic environment of the stomach and colonize on the epithelial surface of the gastric mucosa. Its pathogenic effects are well known to cause gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In order to infect the stomach and establish colonies on the mucus epithelial surface, the bacterium has to move across the gel-like gastric mucus lining of the stomach under acidic conditions. In this review we address the question of how the bacterium gets past the protective mucus barrier from a biophysical perspective. We begin by reviewing the molecular structure of gastric mucin and discuss the current state of understanding concerning mucin polymerization and low pH induced gelation. We then focus on the viscoelasticity of mucin in view of its relevance to the transport of particles and bacteria across mucus, the key first step in H. pylori infection. The second part of the review focuses on the motility of H. pylori in mucin solutions and gels, and how infection with H. pylori in turn impacts the viscoelastic properties of mucin. We present recent microscopic results tracking the motion of H. pylori in mucin solutions and gels. We then discuss how the biochemical strategy of urea hydrolysis required for survival in the acid is also relevant to the mechanism that enables flagella driven swimming across the mucus gel layer. Other aspects of the influence of H. pylori infection such as, altering gastric mucin expression, its rate of production and its composition, and the influence of mucin on factors controlling H. pylori virulence and proliferation are briefly discussed with references to relevant literature.

  18. The importance of vacA, cagA, and iceA genotypes of Helicobacter pylori infection in peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arents, NLA; van Zwet, AA; Thijs, JC; Kooistra-Smid, AMD; van Slochteren, KR; Degener, JE; Kleibeuker, JH; van Doorn, LJ

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between the presence of H. pylori virulence factors and clinical outcome in H. pylori infected patients. METHODS: DNA was isolated from an antral biopsy sample and vacA, cagA, and iceA genotype were determined by PCR and a reverse hybridization technique in 183 p

  19. Possible involvement of put A gene in Helicobacter pylori colonization in the stomach and motility.

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    Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Inatsu, Sakiko; Mizote, Tomoko; Nagata, Yoko; Aoyama, Kazue; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Nagata, Kumiko

    2008-02-01

    H. pylori is a gram-negative bacterium associated with gastric inflammation and peptic ulcer and considered a risk factor for gastric cancer in its natural habitat. However, the energy metabolism of H. pylori in the stomach remains to be clarified. H. pylori shows rather high respiratory activity with L-proline and significantly large amounts of L-proline are present in the gastric juice from H. pylori infected patients. We constructed a disrupted mutant of the put A gene, which encodes the proline utilization A (Put A) flavin-linked enzyme, in order to examine the role of put A in the gastric colonization of H. pylori. The put A disrupted mutant, DeltaputA, was constructed by inserting a chloramphenicol resistant gene into put A. DeltaputA did not show respiratory activity using L-proline and could not incorporate L-proline into cells. DeltaputA also did not show motility in response to amino acids and did not display the swarming activity observed with the wild-type. DeltaputA had lost its ability to colonize the stomach of nude mice, an ability possessed by the wild-type. These findings indicate that put A may play an important role in H. pylori colonization on the gastric mucus layer.

  20. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: a state of the art review.

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    Ishaq, Sauid; Nunn, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. It is now well- established that Helicobacter pylori infection predispose individuals toward gastric adenocarcinoma later in life. It has since been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Research suggests that the oncogenic effects of Helicobacter pylori can occur through a variety of mechanisms, including the indirect inflammatory effects of Helicobacter pylori on the gastric mucosa and the direct epigenetic effects of Helicobacter pylori on individual cells. Whilst infected with Helicobacter pylori, a combination of environmental and host-dependent factors determines the likelihood of developing gastric cancer. Controversy remains regarding the effects of eradication of Helicobacter pylori on the prevention of further progression of gastric lesions and the possibility for regression of atrophic gastritis. The aim of this review is to synthesis different elements that contribute to the step-wise progression of normal gastric mucosa to gastric adenocarcinoma. This review helps clinicians to better identify those infected individuals who are at high risk of developing gastric cancer and implement the necessary investigations and treatment.

  1. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with lipid profiles: The Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study

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    Hussain Darabi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection may contribute to the development of extra-gastrointestinal manifestations like cardiovascular diseases. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Athrosclerotic plaques is a strong evidence for this association which may play a role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with classic cardiovascular risk factor such as hypertension and lipid profile. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of H. pylori infection on lipid profiles in a large community- based study. Material and Methods: A total of 1754 (50.8% Female & 49.2% male subjects (age >25 years old were selected randomely from Monica Healthy Heart Study project. H. pylori status was determined by IgG ELISA method. Subjects with titers > 30 Iu/ml were cansidered seropositive. Data were analazed by using statistical software Spss version 18 and probability values 0.05 Conclusion: According to this large – scale population- based study in large northern cities of Persian Gulf, there was no significant association between H.pylori IgG seropositivity and lipid profiles in both men and women.

  2. Helicobacter pylori upregulates the expression of p16(INK4) in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Mei, Juan; Zhang, Ning; Tao, Jing; Tian, Hua; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that p16(INK4) protein is over expressed in gastric cancer. However, whether H. pylori infection induces p16(INK4) in human gastric epithelial cells remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to analyze the molecular mechanism of H. pylori-induced p16(INK4) expression. Expression of p16(INK4) mRNA and Sp1 mRNA were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR. Expression of p16(INK4) protein was assessed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. A luciferase assay was used to monitor activation of the p16(INK4) gene promoter and to explore the binding of transcription factors to this promoter. H. pylori upregulates the expression of p16(INK4) in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells. p16 promoter is highly actived in SGC7901 cells by H. pylori. Sp1 activates the expression of p16(INK4)-Luc and promotes the protein level of p16(INK4). H. pylori upregulates the expression of p16(INK4) in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells via the p16(INK4) promoter, and Sp1 is involved in the activation of p16(INK4) promoter by H. pylori.

  3. Pseudomembranous colitis associated with a triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifan, Anca; Girleanu, Irina; Cojocariu, Camelia; Sfarti, Catalin; Singeap, Ana Maria; Dorobat, Carmen; Grigore, Lucia; Stanciu, Carol

    2013-11-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common chronic bacterial infections in humans, affecting half of world's population. Therapy for H. pylori infection has proven to be both effective and safe. The one-week triple therapy including proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin or metronidazole is still recommended as a first-line treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection in countries with low clarithromycin resistance. Generally, this therapy is well-tolerated, with only a few and usually minor side effects. However, rare but severe adverse effects such as pseudomembranous colitis have been reported, Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection being the main causative factor in all cases. We report the cases of two women who developed pseudomembranous colitis after a 1-wk triple therapy consisting of pantoprazole 20 mg bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid, and amoxicillin 1 g bid to eradicate H. pylori infection. A limited colonoscopy showed typical appearance of pseudomembranous colitis, and the stool test for C. difficile toxins was positive. Rapid resolution of symptoms and negative C. difficile toxins were obtained in both patients with oral vancomycin. No relapse occurred during a four and eleven-month, respectively, follow up. These cases suggest that physicians should have a high index of suspicion for pseudomembranous colitis when evaluate patients with diarrhea following H. pylori eradication therapy.

  4. How long will it take to reduce gastric cancer incidence by eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John F; Cattaruzza, Maria S; Ferri, Anna M; De Angelis, Flora; Renzi, Davide; Marani, Alessandra; Vaira, Dino

    2013-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. The objective of this article is to estimate how the number of clinically diagnosed cases caused by H. pylori would reduce in the years after the eradication of the infection from a population. It is assumed that the eradication of H. pylori will prevent the start of some new gastric tumors, but those that have passed the "point of no return" will continue to develop until diagnosed clinically. The observed reduction in the number of clinically diagnosed cases of gastric cancer will depend on the form and parameters of the distribution of the time t taken for tumor to develop into a clinical case after passing the "point of no return." This analysis assumes that the time t follows normal and log-normal distributions with means 5, 10, and 15 years. If the mean value of time t were 5 years, H. pylori caused cases should be almost eliminated after 10 years, whereas if the mean were 10 years, the number of cases should be halved. If the mean were 15 years, the reduction would only be about 15% after 10 years. The eradication of H. pylori from a population will reduce the incidence of gastric cancer, but the follow-up time needed to show and evaluate the reduction may be longer than that that has been used in studies published so far. ©2013 AACR.

  5. Lack of association between gastric cancer and hopQ alleles in Helicobacter pylori

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    Kazemi Elham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen. The presence of these bacteria in the stomach can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid production. Acute inflammation can directly damage to the peripheral cells that are responsible for the secretion of acid. The risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors (such as cagA. The HopQ is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. This gene has been shown in two types. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQ alleles (types I and II and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies the of patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy individuals were collected. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR for was done for desired genes via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed by PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+ genotypes were determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotypes hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+.

  6. Mixed Infections of Helicobacter pylori Isolated from Patients with Gastrointestinal Diseases in Taiwan

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    Chih-Ho Lai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Persistent Helicobacter pylori infection may induce several upper gastrointestinal diseases. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA, are thought to be associated with the severity of disease progression. The distribution of vacA and cag-pathogenicity island (cag-PAI alleles varies in H. pylori isolated from patients in different geographic regions. Aim. To assess the association between mixed infection of H. pylori clinical isolates from Taiwanese patients and the severity of gastrointestinal diseases. Methods. A total of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. Six distinct and well-separated colonies were isolated from each patient and 420 colonies were analyzed to determine the genotypes of virulence genes. Results. The prevalence of mixed infections of all H. pylori-infected patients was 28.6% (20/70. The rate of mixed infections in patients with duodenal ulcer (47.6% was much higher than that with other gastrointestinal diseases (P<0.05. Conclusions. H. pylori mixed infections show high genetic diversity that may enhance bacterial adaptation to the hostile environment of the stomach and contribute to disease development.

  7. Association of H. pylori infection with gastric carci noma: a Meta analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Bo Xue; Yong-Yong Xu; Yi Wan; Bo-Rong Pan; Jun Ren; Dai-Ming Fan

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To follow the principles of evidence based medicine to reach the integrated results of these studies. METHODS: Twenty-one papers of case-control studies were selected, including 11 on gastric cancer, 7 on precancerous lesion of stomach and 3 on lymphoma of stomach: Meta analysis was used to sum up the odds ratios (OR) of these studies. RESULTS: H. Pylori vsgastric cancer (intestinal and diffuse type): the odds ratio from the fixed effect model is 3.0016(95% Cl 2.4197-3.7234, P < 0.001 ). H. Pylori vs precancerous lesion of stomach: a random effect model was used to calculate the summary odds ratio and its value is 2.5635 (95% Cl: 1.8477-3.5566, P < 0.01). H. Pylori vs lymphoma of stomach: though the quantity of literature is too small to make Meta analysis, the data of these 3 studies show that lymphoma of stomach is highly associated with H. Pylori infections. CONCLUSION: Since it had been revealed that H. Pylori infection pre-exists in gastric carcinoma and precancerous lesions, the results of Meta analysis present a strong evidence to support the conclusion that H. Pylori infection is a risk factor for gastric carcinoma.

  8. Mixed Infections of Helicobacter pylori Isolated from Patients with Gastrointestinal Diseases in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ju-Chun; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Li, Ju-Pi; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Wu, Hua-Shan; Sun, Yu-Chen; Lin, Mei-Ling; Lee, Ju-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Persistent Helicobacter pylori infection may induce several upper gastrointestinal diseases. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), are thought to be associated with the severity of disease progression. The distribution of vacA and cag-pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) alleles varies in H. pylori isolated from patients in different geographic regions. Aim. To assess the association between mixed infection of H. pylori clinical isolates from Taiwanese patients and the severity of gastrointestinal diseases. Methods. A total of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. Six distinct and well-separated colonies were isolated from each patient and 420 colonies were analyzed to determine the genotypes of virulence genes. Results. The prevalence of mixed infections of all H. pylori-infected patients was 28.6% (20/70). The rate of mixed infections in patients with duodenal ulcer (47.6%) was much higher than that with other gastrointestinal diseases (P < 0.05). Conclusions. H. pylori mixed infections show high genetic diversity that may enhance bacterial adaptation to the hostile environment of the stomach and contribute to disease development. PMID:27738429

  9. Clinical significance of infection with cag A and vac A positive helicobacter pylori strains

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    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical relevance of infection with different Helicobacter pylori strains was reviewed in this paper. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection most probably include acne rosacea and chronic urticaria, while the importance of H. pylori infection for pathogenesis of growth retardation in children, iron deficiency anemia, coronary heart disease, stroke and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura remains vague. The expression of two H. pylori proteins, cytotoxin associated protein (cag A and vacuolization cytotoxin (vac A is considered to be related with pathogenicity of the bacterium. It is clear that presence of cag A+ strains is important for development of peptic ulcer; nevertheless, it is also protective against esophageal reflux disease. On the other hand, cag A+ strains are common in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma patients, but it seems that certain subtypes of vac A cytotoxin are more important risk factors. Infection with cag A+ strains is more common in patients with acne rosacea, stroke and coronary heart disease.

  10. Resistance pattern of Helicobacter pylori strains to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin in Isfahan, Iran

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    Farzad Khademi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori resistance to antibiotics has become a global problem and is an important factor in determining the outcome of treatment of infected patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin in gastrointestinal disorders patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, a total of 260 gastric antrum biopsy specimens were collected from patients with gastrointestinal disorders who referred to Endoscopy Section of the Isfahan Hospitals. The E-test and Modified Disk Diffusion Method (MDDM were used to verify the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in 78 H. pylori isolates to the clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. Results: H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin were 15.3, 55.1, and 6.4%, respectively. In this studyΈ we had one multidrug resistance (MDR isolates from patient with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Conclusion: Information on antibiotic susceptibility profile plays an important role in empiric antibiotic treatment and management of refractive cases. According to the results obtained in this study, H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole was relatively high. MDR strains are emerging and will have an effect on the combination therapy.

  11. Resistance pattern of Helicobacter pylori strains to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Farzad; Faghri, Jamshid; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Moghim, Sharareh; Fazeli, Hossein; Adibi, Peyman; Mirzaei, Nasrin; Akbari, Mojtaba; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2013-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) resistance to antibiotics has become a global problem and is an important factor in determining the outcome of treatment of infected patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin in gastrointestinal disorders patients. In this study, a total of 260 gastric antrum biopsy specimens were collected from patients with gastrointestinal disorders who referred to Endoscopy Section of the Isfahan Hospitals. The E-test and Modified Disk Diffusion Method (MDDM) were used to verify the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in 78 H. pylori isolates to the clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin were 15.3, 55.1, and 6.4%, respectively. In this study, we had one multidrug resistance (MDR) isolates from patient with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Information on antibiotic susceptibility profile plays an important role in empiric antibiotic treatment and management of refractive cases. According to the results obtained in this study, H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole was relatively high. MDR strains are emerging and will have an effect on the combination therapy.

  12. Lactobacillus plantarum B7 inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth and attenuates gastric inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chompoonut Sunanliganon; Duangporn Thong-Ngam; Somying Tumwasorn; Naruemon Klaikeaw

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine the anti-Helicobacter property of Lactobacillus plantarum B7 (L.plantarum) B7 supernatants in vitro and the protective effects of L.plantarum B7 on serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α),gastric malondialdehyde (MDA) level,apoptosis,and histopathology in Helicobacter pylori (H.pylorl)-induced gastric inflammation in rats.METHODS:In vitro,the inhibition of H,pylori growth was examined using L.plantarum B7 supernatants at pH 4 and pH 7 and at the concentration of 1×,5× and 10× on plates inoculated with H.pylori.The inhibitory effect of H.pylori was interpreted by the size of the inhibition zone.In vitro,male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups including group 1 (control group),group 2 (H.pylori infected group),group 3 (H.pylori infected with L.plantarum B7 10é CFUs/mL treated group) and group 4 (H.pylori infected with L.plantarum B7 1010 CFUs/mL treated group).One week after H.pylori inoculation,L.plantarum B7 106 CFUs/mL or 1010 CFUs/mL were fed once daily to group 3 and group 4,respectively,for one week.Blood and gastric samples were collected at the end of the study.RESULTS:In vitro,at intact pH 4,mean inhibitory zone diameters of 8.5 mm and 13 mm were noted at concentrations of 5× and 10× of L.plantarum B7supernatant disks,respectively.At adjusted pH 7,L.plantarum B7 supernatants at concentrations of 5 × and 10× yielded mean inhibitory zone diameters of 6.5 mm and 11 mm,respectively.In the in vitro study,in group 2,stomach histopathology revealed mild to moderate H.pylori colonization and inflammation.The level of gastric MDA and epithelial cell apoptosis were significantly increased compared with group 1.The serum TNF-α level was significant decreased in group 3compared with group 2 (P < 0.05).In addition,L.plantarum B7 treatments resulted in a significant improvement in stomach pathology,and decreased gastric MDA level and apoptotic epithelial cells.CONCLUSION:L.plantarum B7 supernatant inhibits H.pylori

  13. Differences in interleukin 8 expression in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosa tissues from patients in Bhutan and the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Iwatani, Shun; Cruz, Modesto; Jiménez Abreu, José A; Tronilo, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Disla, Mildre; Terao, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Tshering, Lotay; Mitsui, Takahiro; Shiota, Seiji; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of Helicobacter pylori infection vary geographically. H pylori strains, disease presentation, and environments differ markedly in Bhutan and Dominican Republic. The aims were to compare the strains, histology, and expression of interleukin (IL) 8 and IL-10 from gastric mucosa from the 2 countries. H pylori status was assessed by the combination of rapid urease test, culture, and histology. Histology was evaluated using the updated Sydney System, and cytokines in gastric biopsies were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were 138 subjects from Bhutan and 155 from Dominican Republic. The prevalence of H pylori infection was 65% and 59%, respectively. The genotype of cagA was predominantly East Asian type in Bhutan versus Western type in Dominican Republic. Gastritis severity was significantly higher in H pylori-infected subjects from Bhutan than those from Dominican Republic. IL-8 expression by H pylori infection was 5.5-fold increased in Bhutan versus 3-fold in Dominican Republic (P < .001); IL-10 expression was similar. IL-8 expression levels among H pylori-infected cases tended to be positively correlated with polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte infiltration scores in both countries. IL-8 expression among those with grade 2 and 3 polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte infiltration was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Dominican Republic. The difference in IL-8 expression in the 2 countries is reflected in the different disease pattern between them. Whether the dominant factor is differences in H pylori virulence, in host-H pylori-environmental interactions, genetic factors or all remains unclear. However, severity of inflammation appears to be a critical factor in disease pathogenesis. We compared IL-8 messenger RNA levels between the high gastric cancer risk country, Bhutan (mainly East Asian-type H pylori), and the lower gastric cancer risk country, Dominican Republic (mainly Western-type H pylori).

  14. Gastrin and antral G cells in course of Helicobacter pylori eradication: Six months follow up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aleksandra Sokic-Milutinovic; Vera Todorovic; Tomica Milosavljevic; Marjan Micev; Neda Drndarevic; Olivera Mitrovic

    2005-01-01

    apparatus. However, differences between DU and gastritis group were identified.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection induces antral G cell hyperfunction resulting in increased gastrin synthesis and secretion. After eradication therapy complete morphological and functional recovery is observed in patients with gastritis. In the DU patients some other factors unrelated to the H pylori infection influence antral G cell morphology and function.

  15. H pylori seropositivity and cytokine gene polymorphisms

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    Yasuaki Saijo; Eiji Yoshioka; Tomonori Fukui; Mariko Kawaharada; Fumihiro Sata; Hirokazu Sato; Reiko Kishi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the pro- and antiinflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms, IL1B-511C/T,IL1B-31C/T, IL6-634C/G, TNF-1031T/C, TNF-857C/T, and IL10-1082A/G, interact with s