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Sample records for pylori clinical strains

  1. Characteristics of clinical Helicobacter pylori strains from Ecuador.

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    Debets-Ossenkopp, Yvette J; Reyes, Germán; Mulder, Janet; aan de Stegge, Birgit M; Peters, José T A M; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Tanca, J; Peña, Amado S; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E

    2003-01-01

    In Ecuador, Helicobacter pylori infections are highly prevalent. A total of 42 H. pylori clinical isolates from 86 patients attending the outpatient clinic of the gastroenterology department of the university hospital of Guayaquil in Ecuador were characterized. Their susceptibility, and cagA and vacA status were determined. Resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin was found in 80.9% and 9.5% of strains, respectively. Neither amoxicillin- nor tetracycline-resistant strains were found. The most prevalent genotype was the cagA(+), vacA s1b,m1 type. This genotype was associated with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Typing by random amplified polymorphic DNA showed no genetic relationship among the strains.

  2. [Clinical significance of infection with cag A and vac A positive Helicobacter pylori strains].

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    Sokić-Milutinović, Aleksandra; Todorović, Vera; Milosavljević, Tomica

    2004-01-01

    Clinical relevance of infection with different Helicobacter pylori strains was reviewed in this paper. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection most probably include acne rosacea and chronic urticaria, while the importance of H. pylori infection for pathogenesis of growth retardation in children, iron deficiency anemia, coronary heart disease, stroke and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura remains vague. The expression of two H. pylori proteins, cytotoxin associated protein (cag A) and vacuolization cytotoxin (vac A) is considered to be related with pathogenicity of the bacterium. It is clear that presence of cag A+ strains is important for development of peptic ulcer; nevertheless, it is also protective against esophageal reflux disease. On the other hand, cag A+ strains are common in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma patients, but it seems that certain subtypes of vac A cytotoxin are more important risk factors. Infection with cag A+ strains is more common in patients with acne rosacea, stroke and coronary heart disease.

  3. Clinical significance of infection with cag A and vac A positive helicobacter pylori strains

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    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical relevance of infection with different Helicobacter pylori strains was reviewed in this paper. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection most probably include acne rosacea and chronic urticaria, while the importance of H. pylori infection for pathogenesis of growth retardation in children, iron deficiency anemia, coronary heart disease, stroke and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura remains vague. The expression of two H. pylori proteins, cytotoxin associated protein (cag A and vacuolization cytotoxin (vac A is considered to be related with pathogenicity of the bacterium. It is clear that presence of cag A+ strains is important for development of peptic ulcer; nevertheless, it is also protective against esophageal reflux disease. On the other hand, cag A+ strains are common in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma patients, but it seems that certain subtypes of vac A cytotoxin are more important risk factors. Infection with cag A+ strains is more common in patients with acne rosacea, stroke and coronary heart disease.

  4. Comparative proteome analysis of Helicobacter pylori clinical strains by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

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    Zhang, Ya-nan; Ding, Shi-gang; Huang, Liu-huan; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Yan-yan; Zhong, Li-jun

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the pathogenic properties of Helicobacter pylori by comparing the proteome map of H. pylori clinical strains. Two wild-type H. pylori strains, YN8 (isolated from biopsy tissue of a gastric cancer patient) and YN14 (isolated from biopsy tissue of a gastritis and duodenal ulcer patient), were used. Proteomic analysis, using a pH range of 3-10 and 5-8, was performed. The individual proteins were identified by quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer and protein database search. Variation in spot patterns directed towards differential protein expression levels was observed between the strains. The gel revealed prominent proteins with several protein "families". The comparison of protein expressions of the two strains reveals a high variability. Differentially present or absent spots were observed. Nine differentially expressed protein spots identified by Q-TOF included adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding protein, disulfide oxidoreductase B (DsbB)-like protein, N utilization substance A (NusA), ATP-dependent protease binding subunit/heat shock protein, hydantoin utilization protein A, seryl-tRNA synthetase, molybdenum ABC transporter ModD, and hypothetical proteins. This study suggests that H. pylori strains express/repress protein variation, not only in terms of the virulence proteins, but also in terms of physiological proteins, when they infect a human host. The difference of protein expression levels between H. pylori strains isolated from gastric cancer and gastritis may be the initiator of inflammation, and result in the different clinical presentation. In this preliminary study, we report seven differential proteins between strains, with molecule weights from approximately 10 kDa to approximately 40 kDa. Further studies are needed to investigate those proteins and their function associated with H. pylori colonization and adaptation to host environment stress.

  5. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori strains of China associated with different clinical outcome.

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    Yuanhai You

    Full Text Available In this study, a whole-genome CombiMatrix Custom oligonucleotide tiling microarray with 90,000 probes covering six sequenced Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori genomes was designed. This microarray was used to compare the genomic profiles of eight unsequenced strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases in Heilongjiang province of China. Since significant genomic variation was found among these strains, an additional 76 H. pylori strains associated with different clinical outcomes were isolated from various provinces of China. These strains were tested by polymerase chain reaction to demonstrate this distinction. We identified several highly variable regions in strains associated with gastritis, gastric ulceration, and gastric cancer. These regions are associated with genes involved in the bacterial type I, type II, and type III R-M systems. They were also associated with the virB gene, which lies on the well-studied cag pathogenic island. While previous studies have reported on the diverse genetic characterization of this pathogenic island, in this study, we find that it is conserved in all strains tested by microarray. Moreover, a number of genes involved in the type IV secretion system, which is related to horizontal DNA transfer between H. pylori strains, were identified in the comparative analysis of the strain-specific genes. These findings may provide insight into new biomarkers for the prediction of gastric diseases.

  6. Linezolid susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori, including strains with multidrug resistance.

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    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Evstatiev, Ivailo; Gergova, Galina; Yaneva, Penka; Mitov, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Only a few studies have evaluated Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to linezolid. The aim of the present study was to assess linezolid susceptibility in H. pylori, including strains with double/multidrug resistance. The susceptibility of 53 H. pylori strains was evaluated by Etest and a breakpoint susceptibility testing method. Helicobacter pylori resistance rates were as follows: amoxicillin, 1.9%; metronidazole, 37.7%; clarithromycin, 17.0%; tetracycline, 1.9%; levofloxacin, 24.5%; and linezolid (>4 mg/L), 39.6%. The linezolid MIC50 value was 31.2-fold higher than that of clarithromycin and 10.5-fold higher than that of levofloxacin; however, 4 of 11 strains with double/multidrug resistance were linezolid-susceptible. The MIC range of the oxazolidinone agent was larger (0.125-64 mg/L) compared with those in the previous two reports. The linezolid resistance rate was 2.2-fold higher in metronidazole-resistant strains and in strains resistant to at least one antibiotic compared with the remaining strains. Briefly, linezolid was less active against H. pylori compared with clarithromycin and levofloxacin, and linezolid resistance was linked to resistance to metronidazole as well as to resistance to at least one antibiotic. However, linezolid activity against some strains with double/multidrug resistance may render the agent appropriate to treat some associated H. pylori infections following in vitro susceptibility testing of the strains. Clinical trials are required to confirm this suggestion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered from some Iranian food items. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Conclusion: The presence of similar genotypes in H. pylori strains of foods and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated foods may be the source of bacteria ...

  8. In vitro activity of Aloe vera inner gel against Helicobacter pylori strains.

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    Cellini, L; Di Bartolomeo, S; Di Campli, E; Genovese, S; Locatelli, M; Di Giulio, M

    2014-07-01

    Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) is a herbal remedy widely used for a variety of illnesses; A. vera leaf extracts have been promoted for detoxification, cure constipation, help flush out toxins and wastes from the body, promote digestion and are used in the treatment of peptic ulcer for cytoprotective action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of A. vera inner gel against both susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains isolated in Abruzzo region, Italy. The inner gel of leaves of a 5-year-old plant of A. vera was extracted, homogenized and tested from 800 to 1.56 mg ml(-1) against 14 clinical strains and one reference strain of H. pylori using the broth microdilution methodology. Furthermore, the sample of A. vera was investigated for the chemical fingerprint of anthraquinones. The inhibitory concentrations of A. vera inner gel were similar to the bactericidal ones, with values ranging from 6.25 to 800 mg ml(-1) . Fifty per cent of the detected strains, independently of their susceptibility profile, were inhibited in their growth at 100 mg ml(-1) . Aloe vera inner gel expresses antibacterial properties against H. pylori and, therefore, in combination with antibiotics, could represent a novel strategy for the treatment of the infection of H. pylori, especially in cases of multiresistance. The study demonstrates that the Aloe vera inner gel expresses antibacterial properties against both susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains. These findings may impact on the antimicrobial resistance phenomenon of H. pylori, proposing the A. vera inner gel as a novel effective natural agent for combination with antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori gastric infection. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Amerindian Helicobacter pylori strains go extinct, as european strains expand their host range.

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    Maria G Domínguez-Bello

    Full Text Available We studied the diversity of bacteria and host in the H. pylori-human model. The human indigenous bacterium H. pylori diverged along with humans, into African, European, Asian and Amerindian groups. Of these, Amerindians have the least genetic diversity. Since niche diversity widens the sets of resources for colonizing species, we predicted that the Amerindian H. pylori strains would be the least diverse. We analyzed the multilocus sequence (7 housekeeping genes of 131 strains: 19 cultured from Africans, 36 from Spanish, 11 from Koreans, 43 from Amerindians and 22 from South American Mestizos. We found that all strains that had been cultured from Africans were African strains (hpAfrica1, all from Spanish were European (hpEurope and all from Koreans were hspEAsia but that Amerindians and Mestizos carried mixed strains: hspAmerind and hpEurope strains had been cultured from Amerindians and hpEurope and hpAfrica1 were cultured from Mestizos. The least genetically diverse H. pylori strains were hspAmerind. Strains hpEurope were the most diverse and showed remarkable multilocus sequence mosaicism (indicating recombination. The lower genetic structure in hpEurope strains is consistent with colonization of a diversity of hosts. If diversity is important for the success of H. pylori, then the low diversity of Amerindian strains might be linked to their apparent tendency to disappear. This suggests that Amerindian strains may lack the needed diversity to survive the diversity brought by non-Amerindian hosts.

  10. Genetic microheterogeneity and phenotypic variation of Helicobacter pylori arginase in clinical isolates

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    Spadafora Domenico

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical isolates of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori display a high level of genetic macro- and microheterogeneity, featuring a panmictic, rather than clonal structure. The ability of H. pylori to survive the stomach acid is due, in part, to the arginase-urease enzyme system. Arginase (RocF hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea, and urease hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which can neutralize acid. Results The degree of variation in arginase was explored at the DNA sequence, enzyme activity and protein expression levels. To this end, arginase activity was measured from 73 minimally-passaged clinical isolates and six laboratory-adapted strains of H. pylori. The rocF gene from 21 of the strains was cloned into genetically stable E. coli and the enzyme activities measured. Arginase activity was found to substantially vary (>100-fold in both different H. pylori strains and in the E. coli model. Western blot analysis revealed a positive correlation between activity and amount of protein expressed in most H. pylori strains. Several H. pylori strains featured altered arginase activity upon in vitro passage. Pairwise alignments of the 21 rocF genes plus strain J99 revealed extensive microheterogeneity in the promoter region and 3' end of the rocF coding region. Amino acid S232, which was I232 in the arginase-negative clinical strain A2, was critical for arginase activity. Conclusion These studies demonstrated that H. pylori arginase exhibits extensive genotypic and phenotypic variation which may be used to understand mechanisms of microheterogeneity in H. pylori.

  11. Frequency of virulence genes in mixed infections with Helicobacter pylori strains from a Mexican population

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    R. González-Vázquez

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The Fisher's exact test did not support a significant association between clinical outcome and genotype. The main circulating genotypes in the Mexican population studied were: cagA+, vacAs1, and vacAm1. Multiplex PCR can be used as a screening test for H. pylori strains. Furthermore, the cagE gene is a good marker for identifying cag-PAI positive strains.

  12. Immunodominant antigens of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases

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    Farshad, S.; Alborzi, A.; Japoni, A.; Hayati, M.; Nasiri, J.; Rafatpour, N.; Saberfirouzi, M.; Lankarani, Kamran B.; Taghavi, Ali R.; Irajian, Gholam R.

    2006-01-01

    To detect the immunogenic proteins in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains isolated from patients with different gastric diseases. We performed this study in the Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, during July 2003 to September 2004. Total proteins of H. pylori strains isolated from the gastric biopsies of 3 groups of patients were separated by 1D-SDS-PAGE and then blotted with the sera of their respective hosts. In SDS-PAGE the members of each group showed high correlation according to similarity in their patterns, resulting in considering them in the same cluster. The patterns of immunoblots differed from that of Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained gels. The blotting method did not recognize some of the protein bands in the SDS-PAGE. Only the bands of 106 and 45 kDa from H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric cancer were significantly (p<0.05) recognized specifically with the sera of their respective patients, and the band of 13 kDa was recognized specifically (p<0.05) with the sera of nonulceric patients. With the exception of these bands, in the patterns of blotting of the sera from all patients no significant differences were observed. By using 1D blotting methods we could find 2 antigenic protein bands (106 and 45 kDa) for H. pylori strains isolated from cancerous patients, and one (13 kDa) for the strains isolated from nonulceric patients, which were specifically recognized with their respective host. (author)

  13. Clinical Manifestations of Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis.

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    Shiota, Seiji; Thrift, Aaron P; Green, Linda; Shah, Rajesh; Verstovsek, Gordana; Rugge, Massimo; Graham, David Y; El-Serag, Hashem B

    2017-07-01

    There are data to suggest the existence of non-Helicobacter pylori gastritis. However, the risk factors and clinical course for H pylori-negative gastritis remain unclear. We aimed to examine the prevalence and determinants of H pylori-negative gastritis in a large multiethnic clinical population. We conducted a cross-sectional study among patents scheduled for an elective esophagastroduodenoscopy or attending selected primary care clinics and eligible for screening colonoscopy at a single Veterans Affairs medical center. We identified cases of H pylor-negative gastritis, H pylori-positive gastritis, and H pylori-negative nongastritis, where gastritis was defined by the presence of neutrophils and/or mononuclear cells. Risk factors for H pylori-negative gastritis were analyzed in logistic regression models. A total of 1240 patients had information from all biopsy sites, of whom 695 (56.0%) had gastritis. H pylori-negative gastritis was present in 123 patients (9.9% of all study subjects and 17.7% of all patients with gastritis). Among all patients with gastritis, African Americans were statistically significantly less likely than non-Hispanic whites to have H pylori-negative gastritis (odds ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.43). Conversely, PPI users were more likely to have H pylori-negative gastritis than H pylori-positive gastritis compared with nonusers (odds ratio, 2.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-3.49). The cumulative incidence of gastric erosions and ulcers were higher in patients with H pylori-negative gastritis than H pylori-negative nongastritis. We found that H pylori-negative gastritis was present in approximately 18% of patients with gastritis. The potential for H pylori-negative gastritis to progress or the risk of gastric cancer of those with gastric mucosal atrophy/intestinal metaplasia remains unclear. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between the iceA gene of Helicobacter pylori and clinical outcomes.

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    Huang, Xiaojun; Deng, Zhaomin; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Wanyi; Wang, Baoning; Li, Mingyuan

    2016-01-01

    The complex pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and the features of the host influence the diverse clinical outcomes. A mass of studies about virulence genes have accelerated the exploration of pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Induced by contact with epithelium gene A (iceA) is one of the biggest concerned virulence genes. In this study, we explored the relationship between iceA and the magnitude of the risk for clinical outcomes and the prevalence of iceA-positive H. pylori in People's Republic of China and other countries. We searched the electronic databases of PubMed, Embase, CNKI, VIP, and Wanfang by literature search strategy. The studies conforming to the inclusion criteria were assessed. With these data, we systematically analyzed the relationship between the iceA gene of H. pylori and clinical outcomes. Nineteen articles with 22 studies, a total of 2,657 cases, were involved in the study. The iceA1 gene was significantly associated with peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio =1.28, 95% confidence interval =1.03-1.60; P=0.03), especially in People's Republic of China (odds ratio =1.40, 95% confidence interval =1.07-1.83; P=0.01). Moreover, the prevalence of iceA1 was significantly higher than iceA2 in People's Republic of China (P<0.0001). The prevalence of both iceA1 and iceA2 was significantly different (P<0.0001) in People's Republic of China and in other countries. The system analysis showed that infection with the iceA1-positive H. pylori significantly increased the overall risk for peptic ulcer disease, especially in People's Republic of China. The iceA2 gene status and clinical outcome of H. pylori infection have no significant correlation. H. pylori iceA1 genotype is the major epidemic strain in People's Republic of China.

  15. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory activities of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains against antibiotic susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains.

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    Boyanova, L; Gergova, G; Markovska, R; Yordanov, D; Mitov, I

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to detect anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (GLB) strains by four cell-free supernatant (CFS) types. Activity of non-neutralized and non-heat-treated (CFSs1), non-neutralized and heat-treated (CFSs2), pH neutralized, catalase-treated and non-heat-treated (CFSs3), or neutralized, catalase- and heat-treated (CFSs4) CFSs against 18 H. pylori strains (11 of which with antibiotic resistance) was evaluated. All GLB strains produced bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs), the neutralized CFSs of two GLB strains inhibited >81% of test strains and those of four GLB strains were active against >71% of antibiotic resistant strains. Two H. pylori strains were BLIS resistant. The heating did not reduce the CFS activity. Briefly, all GLB strains evaluated produced heat-stable BLISs, although GLB and H. pylori strain susceptibility patterns exhibited differences. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance activity can be an advantage for the probiotic choice for H. pylori infection control. In this study, anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (GLB) strains was evaluated by four cell-free supernatant (CFS) types. The GLB strains produced heat-stable bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs) with a strong anti-H. pylori activity and some neutralized, catalase- and heat-treated CFSs inhibited >83% of the test strains. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance production of GLB strains can render them valuable probiotics in the control of H. pylori infection. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. VacA and cagA genotypes status and antimicrobial resistance properties of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from meat products in Isfahan province, Iran.

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    Gilani, A; Razavilar, V; Rokni, N; Rahimi, E

    2017-01-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori has a significant impact on the occurrence of severe clinical syndromes, its exact ways of transmission and origin have not been identified. According to the results of some previously published articles, foods with animal origins play a substantial role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. The present investigation was carried out to study the vacuolating cytotoxin A ( vacA ) and cytotoxin associated gene A ( cagA ) genotypes status and antibiotic resistance properties of H. pylori strains recovered from minced-meat and hamburger samples. A total of 150 meat product samples were collected from supermarkets. All samples were cultured and the susceptive colonies were then subjected to nested-PCR, PCR-based genotyping and disk diffusion methods. 11 out of 150 samples (7.33%) were positive for H. pylori . All the isolates were further identified using the nested-PCR assay. Prevalence of H. pylori in hamburger and minced-meat samples was 1.42% and 12.5%, respectively. S1a , m1a and cagA were the most commonly detected genotypes. The most commonly detected combined genotypes in the H. pylori strains of minced-meat were s1am1a (10%), s1am1b (10%) and s2m1a (10%). Helicobacter pylori strains of meat products harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (90.90%), erythromycin (72.72%), amoxicillin (72.72%), trimethoprim (63.63%), tetracycline (63.63%), and clarithromycin (63.63%). Hamburger and minced-meat samples may be the sources of virulent and resistant strains of H. pylori . Meat products are possible sources of resistant and virulent strains of H. pylori similar to those vacA and cagA genotypes. Using healthy raw materials and observation of personal hygiene can reduce the risk of H. pylori in meat products.

  17. Antibacterial resistance and the success of tailored triple therapy in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from Slovenian children.

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    Butenko, Tita; Jeverica, Samo; Orel, Rok; Homan, Matjaž

    2017-10-01

    Primary Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection occurs predominantly in childhood. Antimicrobial resistance is the leading cause for H. pylori eradication failure. The aims of this study were (i) to establish for the first time the antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori strains in infected Slovenian children not previously treated for H. pylori infection and (ii) to evaluate the effectiveness of tailored triple therapy, assuming that eradication rate with tailored triple therapy will be >90%. Data on all treatment-naive children 1-18 years old and treated for H. pylori infection according to susceptibility testing were retrospectively analyzed. All relevant clinical information and demographical information were retrospectively collected from the hospital information systems and/or patients' medical documentation. The inclusion criteria were met by 107 children (64.5% girls) with a median age of 12.0 years (range 2.0-17.6 years). Primary antimicrobial resistance rates of H. pylori were 1.0% to amoxicillin (AMO), 23.4% to clarithromycin (CLA), 20.2% to metronidazole (MET), 2.8% to levofloxacin (LEV), and 0.0% to tetracycline (TET). Dual resistances were detected to CLA and MET in 11.5% (n=12) of strains, to CLA and LEV in 2.8% (n=3), and to MET and LEV in 2.9% (n=3). Results of treatment success were available for 71 patients (66.2% girls). Eradication of H. pylori was evaluated using the 13C-urea breath test, monoclonal stool antigen test or in some cases with repeated upper GI endoscopy with histology and cultivation/molecular tests. Eradication was achieved in 61 of 71 (85.9%) patients. The primary resistance rates of H. pylori to CLA and MET in Slovenia are high. Our data strongly support the fact that in countries with high prevalence of resistant H. pylori strains susceptibility testing and tailored therapy is essential. © 2017 The Authors Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Helicobacter pylori HopE and HopV porins present scarce expression among clinical isolates

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    Lienlaf, Maritza; Morales, Juan Pablo; Díaz, María Inés; Díaz, Rodrigo; Bruce, Elsa; Siegel, Freddy; León, Gloria; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate how widely Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) HopE and HopV porins are expressed among Chilean isolates and how seroprevalent they are among infected patients in Chile. METHODS: H. pylori hopE and hopV genes derived from strain CHCTX-1 were cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli AD494 (DE3). Gel-purified porins were used to prepare polyclonal antibodies. The presence of both genes was tested by PCR in a collection of H. pylori clinical isolates and their expression was detected in lysates by immunoblotting. Immune responses against HopE, HopV and other H. pylori antigens in sera from infected and non-infected patients were tested by Western blotting using these sera as first antibody on recombinant H. pylori antigens. RESULTS: PCR and Western blotting assays revealed that 60 and 82 out of 130 Chilean isolates carried hopE and hopV genes, respectively, but only 16 and 9, respectively, expressed these porins. IgG serum immunoreactivity evaluation of 69 H. pylori-infected patients revealed that HopE and HopV were infrequently recognized (8.7% and 10.1% respectively) compared to H. pylori VacA (68.1%) and CagA (59.5%) antigens. Similar values were detected for IgA serum immunoreactivity against HopE (11.6%) and HopV (10.5%) although lower values for VacA (42%) and CagA (17.4%) were obtained when compared to the IgG response. CONCLUSION: A scarce expression of HopE and HopV among Chilean isolates was found, in agreement with the infrequent seroconversion against these antigens when tested in infected Chilean patients. PMID:20082477

  19. Ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from children: a contribution to get insight into the virulence of the bacteria.

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    Inês Vitoriano

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major cause for the development of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. In children, with no other etiology for the disease, this rare event occurs shortly after infection. In these young patients, habits of smoking, diet, consumption of alcohol and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and stress, in addition to the genetic susceptibility of the patient, represent a minor influence. Accordingly, the virulence of the implicated H. pylori strain should play a crucial role in the development of PUD. Corroborating this, our in vitro infection assays comparing a pool of five H. pylori strains isolated from children with PUD to a pool of five other pediatric clinical isolates associated with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD showed the greater ability of PUD strains to induce a marked decrease in the viability of gastric cells and to cause severe damage in the cells cytoskeleton as well as an impairment in the production/secretion of mucins. To uncover virulence features, we compared the proteome of these two groups of H. pylori strains. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry allowed us to detect 27 differentially expressed proteins between them. In addition to the presence of genes encoding well established virulence factors, namely cagA, vacAs1, oipA "on" status, homB and jhp562 genes, the pediatric ulcerogenic strains shared a proteome profile characterized by changes in the abundance of: motility-associated proteins, accounting for higher motility; antioxidant proteins, which may confer increased resistance to inflammation; and enzymes involved in key steps in the metabolism of glucose, amino acids and urea, which may be advantageous to face fluctuations of nutrients. In conclusion, the enhanced virulence of the pediatric ulcerogenic H. pylori strains may result from a synergy between their natural ability to better adapt to the hostile human stomach and the expression of the established virulence

  20. Molecular Characterization of H.pylori Strains and Biomarkers in Gastric Cancer

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    2017-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0274 TITLE: Molecular Characterization of H.pylori Strains and Biomarkers in Gastric Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Molecular Characterization of H.pylori Strains and Biomarkers in Gastric Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0274 5c...organoid technology via collaboration with Dr. Mary Estes (Baylor College of Medicine ) and her lab, via one-on-one visits, has guided Dr. Alex Peniche with

  1. Inhibitory and bactericidal potential of crude acetone extracts of Combretum molle (Combretaceae) on drug-resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori.

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    Njume, Collise; Afolayan, Anthony J; Samie, Amidou; Ndip, Roland N

    2011-10-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with a number of gastroduodenal pathologies. Antimicrobial resistance to commonly-used drugs has generated a considerable interest in the search for novel therapeutic compounds from medicinal plants. As an ongoing effort of this search, the susceptibility of 32 clinical strains of H. pylori and a reference strain-NCTC 11,638-was evaluated against five solvent extracts of Combretum molle, a plant widely used for the treatment of gastric ulcers and other stomach-related morbidities in South Africa. The extracts were screened for activity by the agar-well diffusion method, and the most active one of them was tested against the same strains by micro-broth dilution and time kill assays. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. The solvent extracts all demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm. The most potent anti-H. pylori activity was demonstrated by the acetone extract, to which 87.5% of the clinical strains were susceptible. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) values for this extract ranged from 1.25 to 5.0 mg/mL while those for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.94 mg/mL and from 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extract was highly bactericidal at a concentration of 2.5 and 5.0 mg/mL, with complete elimination of the test organisms in 24 hours. Its inhibitory activity was better than that of metronidazole (pmolle may contain therapeutically-useful compounds against H. pylori, which are mostly concentrated in the acetone extract.

  2. Differences in the Antigens of Helicobacter pylori Strains Influence on the Innate Immune Response in the In Vitro Experiments

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    Miha Skvarc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune response to Helicobacter pylori importantly determines the pathogenesis of infection as well as the success of antibiotic eradication of the bacteria. Strains of H. pylori were gathered from 14 patients who failed to eradicate H. pylori infection with antibiotics—therapy resistant strains (TRS—or from patients who were able to eradicate H. pylori infection—therapy susceptible strains (TSS. The THP-1 cells were stimulated with H. pylori antigens. Cathepsin X expression on THP-1 cells and concentration of cytokines in the supernatant of THP-1 cells were measured with a flow cytometer. TSS H. pylori antigens increased the proportion of cathepsin X positive cells compared to TRS H. pylori antigens. TSS H. pylori antigens induced higher secretion of IL-12 and IL-6 compared to TRS H. pylori antigens (P<0.001; 0.02. Polymyxin B, a lipid A inhibitor, lowered the secretion of IL-12 and IL-6 in TRS and TSS. We demonstrated a H. pylori strain-dependent cathepsin X and cytokine expression that can be associated with H. pylori resistance to eradication due to lack of effective immune response. Differences in lipid A of H. pylori might have an influence on the insufficient immune response, especially on phagocytosis.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 230 Helicobacter pylori strains: importance of medium, inoculum, and incubation time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartzen, S H; Andersen, L P; Bremmelgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    No standardized method of susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori is currently available, so before a large agar dilution study comprising 230 H. pylori strains belonging to more than 80 genetically different groups was initiated, we performed a relatively small preliminary study....../spot) as the inoculum and 72 h as the incubation time. A modest inoculum effect was noted for amoxicillin and metronidazole. By the methodology derived from our preliminary study, the susceptibilities of 230 H. pylori strains to six antibiotics were subsequently determined. The results were generally in accord...... with those of others, and apart from metronidazole, the MIC of which for approximately 25% of the strains tested was >8 microg/ml, resistance was low in Denmark. The situation might, however, quickly change when and if the number of indications for antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections increase...

  4. Relationship between the iceA gene of Helicobacter pylori and clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang XJ

    2016-07-01

    increased the overall risk for peptic ulcer disease, especially in People’s Republic of China. The iceA2 gene status and clinical outcome of H. pylori infection have no significant correlation. H. pylori iceA1 genotype is the major epidemic strain in People’s Republic of China. Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, iceA, gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma

  5. Reduced infectivity of waterborne viable but nonculturable Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Fontaine, Clinton; Brewster, Rebecca; Wu, Jianfeng; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne VBNCH. pylori could cause gastric infection. We performed five mouse experiments to assess the infectivity of VBNCH. pylori in various exposure scenarios. VBNC viability was examined using Live/Dead staining and Biolog phenotype metabolism arrays. High doses of VBNCH. pylori in water were chosen to test the "worst-case" scenario for different periods of time. One experiment also investigated the infectious capabilities of VBNC SS1 using gavage. Further, immunocompromised mice were exposed to examine infectivity among potentially vulnerable groups. After exposure, mice were euthanized and their stomachs were examined for H. pylori infection using culture and PCR methodology. VBNC cells were membrane intact and retained metabolic activity. Mice exposed to VBNCH. pylori via drinking water and gavage were not infected, despite the various exposure scenarios (immunocompromised, high doses) that might have permitted infection with VBNCH. pylori. The positive controls exposed to viable, culturable H. pylori did become infected. While other studies that have used viable, culturable SS1 via gavage or drinking water exposures to successfully infect mice, in our study, waterborne VBNC SS1 failed to colonize mice under all test conditions. Future studies could examine different H. pylori strains in similar exposure scenarios to compare the relative infectivity of the VBNC vs the viable, culturable state, which would help inform future risk assessments of H. pylori in water. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. 49 Marked susceptibility of South African Helicobacter pylori strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Helicobacter pylori-associated infection is common in South Africa, as in other developing countries. Antibiotic resistance is recognised as a major cause of treatment failure. We studied the susceptibility and resistance patterns of H. pylori to guide empiric treatment and prevent the emergence of resistance.

  7. Antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains to five antibiotics, including levofloxacin, in Northwestern Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhan Caliskan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic resistance is the main factor that affects the efficacy of current therapeutic regimens against Helicobacter pylori. This study aimed to determine the rates of resistance to efficacy clarithromycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, levofloxacin and metronidazole among H. pylori strains isolated from Turkish patients with dyspepsia. METHODS: H. pylori was cultured from corpus and antrum biopsies that were collected from patients with dyspeptic symptoms, and the antimicrobial susceptibility of H. pylori was determined using the E-test (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, metronidazole and levofloxacin according to the EUCAST breakpoints. Point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of clarithromycin-resistant strains were investigated using real-time PCR. RESULTS: A total of 98 H. pylori strains were isolated, all of which were susceptible to amoxicillin and tetracycline. Of these strains, 36.7% (36/98 were resistant to clarithromycin, 35.5% (34/98 were resistant to metronidazole, and 29.5% (29/98 were resistant to levofloxacin. Multiple resistance was detected in 19.3% of the isolates. The A2143G and A2144G point mutations in the 23S rRNA-encoding gene were found in all 36 (100% of the clarithromycin-resistant strains. Additionally, the levofloxacin MIC values increased to 32 mg/L in our H. pylori strains. Finally, among the clarithromycin-resistant strains, 27.2% were resistant to levofloxacin, and 45.4% were resistant to metronidazole. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that treatment failure after clarithromycin- or levofloxacin-based triple therapy is not surprising and that metronidazole is not a reliable agent for the eradication of H. pylori infection in Turkey.

  8. Analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence factors in Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça Sergio

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of primary resistance of Brazilian H. pylori isolates to metronidazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone. In addition, the vacA, iceA, cagA and cagE genotypes of strains isolated from Brazilian patients were determined and associated with clinical data in an effort to correlate these four virulence markers and antibiotic resistance. Methods H. pylori was cultured in 155 H. pylori-positive patients and MICs for metronidazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were determined by the agar dilution method. Genomic DNA was extracted, and allelic variants of vacA, iceA, cagA and cagE were identified by the polymerase chain reaction. Results There was a strong association between the vacA s1/cagA -positive genotype and peptic ulcer disease (OR = 5.42, 95% CI 2.6–11.3, p = 0.0006. Additionally, infection by more virulent strains may protect against GERD, since logistic regression showed a negative association between the more virulent strain, vacA s1/cagA-positive genotype and GERD (OR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.08–0.8, p = 0.03. Resistance to metronidazole was detected in 75 patients (55%, to amoxicillin in 54 individuals (38%, to clarithromycin in 23 patients (16%, to tetracycline in 13 patients (9%, and to furazolidone in 19 individuals (13%. No significant correlation between pathogenicity and resistance or susceptibility was detected when MIC values for each antibiotic were compared with different vacA, iceA, cagA and cagE genotypes. Conclusion The analysis of virulence genes revealed a specific association between H. pylori strains and clinical outcome, furthermore, no significant association was detected among pathogenicity and resistance or susceptibility.

  9. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by the probiotic strains Lactobacillus johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius ssp. salicinius AP-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pei-Shan; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Teh, Su-Fen; Ou, Chung-Mou; King, V An-Erl

    2012-12-01

    The current therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection includes antimicrobial agents and proton pump inhibitors. We have examined the ability of Lactobacillus spp. to inhibit H. pylori infection. Probiotic strains isolated from samples of adult feces, infant feces, breast milk, and vaginal swab collected from healthy volunteers in Taiwan and commercially available strains were screened for antagonism toward H. pylori. Inhibition liquid culture assay was used to screen potential anti-H. pylori activity. Then, we performed agar plate inhibition assay, and assays to determine the capacity of probiotics for adhesion, and inhibition and killing of H. pylori, and measured the levels of IL-8 and IL-10. Using animal models, we studied regulation of gastric acid and histopathological changes accompanying anti-H. pylori activity. We found that six of the tested strains suppressed urease activity of H. pylori: Lactobacillus acidophilus TYCA08, L. acidophilus TYCA15, L. johnsonii MH-68, and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 were more effective than the others. In vivo, L. johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 alone or in combination, reduced the H. pylori load in the gastric mucosa, and also reduced inflammatory chemokine expression and lymphocyte infiltration. Lactobacillus johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 effectively suppress H. pylori viability, and when used as probiotics, they may help decrease the occurrence of gastritis, and even reduce the risk of H. pylori infection. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Resistance pattern of Helicobacter pylori strains to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Khademi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori resistance to antibiotics has become a global problem and is an important factor in determining the outcome of treatment of infected patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin in gastrointestinal disorders patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, a total of 260 gastric antrum biopsy specimens were collected from patients with gastrointestinal disorders who referred to Endoscopy Section of the Isfahan Hospitals. The E-test and Modified Disk Diffusion Method (MDDM were used to verify the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in 78 H. pylori isolates to the clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. Results: H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin were 15.3, 55.1, and 6.4%, respectively. In this studyΈ we had one multidrug resistance (MDR isolates from patient with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Conclusion: Information on antibiotic susceptibility profile plays an important role in empiric antibiotic treatment and management of refractive cases. According to the results obtained in this study, H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole was relatively high. MDR strains are emerging and will have an effect on the combination therapy.

  11. Aqueous and Organic Solvent-Extracts of Selected South African Medicinal Plants Possess Antimicrobial Activity against Drug-Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori: Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collise Njume

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638 using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC50 values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05 as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05. These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity.

  12. The distribution of cagA and dupA genes in Helicobacter pylori strains in Kurdistan region, northern Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Azad M; Goreal, Amer; Hussein, Nawfal R; Abdullah, Shahla M; Hawrami, Khidir; Assafi, Mahde

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram negative bacteria that causes peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma. H pylori virulence factors, such as cagA and dupA, are important to study in populations as they contribute to disease risk. This study aimed to look at the distribution of the cagA and dupA genes in H pylori strains isolated from patients suffering from gastroduodenal diseases in Kurdistan region, Iraq. A cross-sectional study conducted between June 2011 and January 2012. Biopsies were collected from the Endoscopy Department in Duhok and Sulaimania hospitals, Kurdistan region, northern Iraq. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy examination was performed and 4 gastric biopsies (2 from the antrum and 2 from the corpus) were obtained from 204 patients. H pylori positivity was examined by CLO test; then the association between disease status and virulence factors was assessed by polymerase chain reaction. 154 (75%) of our samples were found to be H pylori + by CLO test. Endoscopic diagnoses for those who were positive were as follows: peptic ulcer disease (PUD) including duodenal ulcer, 45; gastric ulcer, 23; and no ulcer (NPUD), 86. The overall prevalence rates of cagA and dupA were 72.7% and 18.8%, respectively. While a significant association between cagA and PUD was observed (P. ≤.017; OR=0.4; CI=0.18–0.85), no relationship between dupA and PUD could be seen. These data suggested that the presence of cagA may be a predictor of clinical outcome in Kurdistan region, northern Iraq.

  13. Comparative Analysis of two Helicobacter pylori Strains using Genomics and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Karlsson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a gastroenteric pathogen believed to have co-evolved with humans over 100,000 years, shows significant genetic variability. This motivates the study of different H. pylori strains and the diseases they cause in order to identify determinants for disease evolution. In this study, we used proteomics tools to compare two H. pylori strains. Nic25_A was isolated in Nicaragua from a patient with intestinal metaplasia, and P12 was isolated in Europe from a patient with duodenal ulcers. Differences in the abundance of surface proteins between the two strains were determined with two mass spectrometry-based methods, label-free quantification (MaxQuant or the use of tandem mass tags (TMT. Each approach used a lipid-based protein immobilization (LPI™ technique to enrich peptides of surface proteins. Using the MaxQuant software, we found 52 proteins that differed significantly in abundance between the two strains (up- or downregulated by a factor of 1.5; with TMT, we found 18 proteins that differed in abundance between the strains. Strain P12 had a higher abundance of proteins encoded by the cag pathogenicity island, while levels of the acid response regulator ArsR and its regulatory targets (KatA, AmiE, and proteins involved in urease production were higher in strain Nic25_A. Our results show that differences in protein abundance between H. pylori strains can be detected with proteomic approaches; this could have important implications for the study of disease progression.

  14. Nanostructural point-contact sensors for diagnostics of carcinogenic strains of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г. В. Камарчук

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The problem of detecting the different strains of H. pylori has gained great importance today due to the worldwide prevalence of this bacterium and its role in the pathogenesis of a number of serious gastric and extragastric diseases. However, not all H. pylori strains are aggressive and require antibiotic treatment. Thus, the question arises about the necessity of differentiating these bacterium strains with respect to their virulence factors. In accordance with the IV Maastricht Consensus Report, among the variety of ways to diagnose H. pylori infection, non-invasive methods should be given preference. Most of them are based on the analysis of gas which is exhaled by a human. Mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and IR spectroscopy are currently the mostly used ones. However, despite the obvious advantages, these techniques have a number of disadvantages that make them difficult to use in everyday medical practice. Modern sensor devices can become an inexpensive and easy to access alternative to these technologies. Objectives: The aim of the work is to develop a new type of sensor device for selective recognition of H. pylori strains which is based on analysis of a mixture of gases exhaled by human. Such a kind of device can be designed on the basis of a point-contact gas sensor. Materials and methods: Anion-radical salts of the organic conductor TCNQ were chosen as the sensitive material for point-contact sensors. The fundamental properties of point contacts which are used in the Yanson point-contact spectroscopy make it possible to create a point-contact mesoscopic matrix on the basis of this material, which is sensitive to small concentrations of components in complex gas media. The sensors were obtained by electrochemical deposition of salts from a solvent characterized by a high vapor pressure on a textolite substrate. Gas exhaled by a human served as the substance to be analyzed. The measurements were carried out following

  15. Characteristics of Helicobacter pylori-positive and Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and their influence on clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Paik, Jin Ho; Kim, Jung Mogg; Lee, Sang Hyub; Park, Young Soo; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2013-06-01

    To compare clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics of low-grade gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma depending on Helicobacter pylori positivity and to find out a predictive factor for unresponsiveness to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy in Korea. A total of 53 Helicobacter pylori-positive and 13 negative mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma patients were enrolled, and tissues from 21 patients were investigated to examine the presence of t(11;18)(q21;q21) with fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clinicopathologic features such as the endoscopic appearance, dominant site of lesion, depth of invasion, clinical stage, and the existence of MALT1 gene rearrangement were compared between these two groups. Fifty-six patients who underwent H. pylori eradication therapy were divided into responder and nonresponder groups. The two groups were analyzed to calculate odds ratios for resistance to the eradication. Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma patients averaged a more advanced clinical stage than H. pylori-positive (p = .023) patients. The frequency of t(11;18)/API2-MALT1 did not differ between H. pylori-positive (45.5%) and H. pylori-negative cases (55.6%). Thirty-eight of 51 (74.5%) H. pylori-positive patients achieved complete regression after the eradication, while 2 of 5 (40%) H. pylori-negative patients obtained regression. Presence of lesions in both distal and proximal parts of stomach (p = .041) and bearing of t(11;18)(q21;q21) (p = .007) were predictors for nonresponsiveness for H. pylori eradication. Helicobacter pylori eradication could be performed as a primary therapy regardless of H. pylori status, and assessing t(11;18)/API2-MALT1 would be considered after failure to remission by H. pylori eradication. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Role of NADPH-insensitive nitroreductase gene to metronidazole resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kargar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Current anti-H. pylori therapies are based on the use of two antibiotics with a proton pump inhibitor and/or a bismuth component. Metronidazole is a key component of such combination therapies in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the role of rdxA gene in resistant strains of H. pylori isolated from Shahrekord Hajar hospital to metronidazole. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional method, which was carried out on 263 patients who referred to endoscopy department of Hajar hospital, in 2007. Biopsy samples were cultured on selective Brucella agar containing 10% blood and incubated under microerophilic condition at 370C for 3 - 7 days. Suspected colonies were tested by Gram staining, urease, oxidase and catalase activities. Organisms were confirmed to be H. pylori on the basis of the presence of ureC(glmM gene by PCR .Specific primers were used for detection of rdxA gene mutation . Results: Eighty and four strains of H. pylori determined by PCR method. Of the isolated strains, 49 (58.33% were resistant, 7 (8.33% were semi-sensitive to metronidazole and 200bp deletion in rdxA gene was observed in 2 strains. Conclusion: Because of the high metronidazole resistance in patients under study it was necessary to replace it by other antibiotics in therapeutic regimens. On the basis of low frequency of resistance mutation in rdxA gene, sequence analysis for identification of other mechanisms is suggested.

  17. Differences in virulence markers between Helicobacter pylori strains from Iraq and those from Iran: potential importance of regional differences in H. pylori-associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Nawfal R; Mohammadi, Marjan; Talebkhan, Yeganeh; Doraghi, Masoumeh; Letley, Darren P; Muhammad, Merdan K; Argent, Richard H; Atherton, John C

    2008-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma; the latter is common in Iran but not in Iraq. We hypothesized that more virulent H. pylori strains may be found in Iran than in Iraq and so compared established and newly described virulence factors in strains from these countries. We studied 59 unselected dyspeptic patients from Iran and 49 from Iraq. cagA was found in similar proportions of strains from both countries (76% in Iran versus 71% in Iraq) and was significantly associated with peptic ulcer disease in Iraq (P dupA was found in similar proportions of Iranian and Iraqi strains (38% and 32%, respectively) and was associated with peptic ulceration in Iraqi patients (P pylori strains from Iraq and Iran possess virulence factors similar to those in Western countries. The presence of cagA with more phosphorylation motifs in Iranian strains may contribute to the higher incidence of gastric cancer. However, the association between strain virulence markers and disease in Iraq but not Iran suggests that other host and environmental factors may be more important in the disease-prone Iranian population.

  18. Effects of Helicobacter pylori treatment on rosacea: A single-arm clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Parviz; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Herizchi, Hamdieh; Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Mirza-Aghazadeh-Attari, Mohammad; Piri, Reza

    2017-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic dermatological disease. Helicobacter pylori has been discussed as one of its causative factors. In this clinical trial study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of H. pylori standard eradication protocol on the rosacea clinical course. In this single-arm clinical trial, patients ascertained to have H. pylori infection based on serological studies were assessed to examine existence of rosacea. Patients with concurrent rosacea and H. pylori infection were included in the study and underwent standard H. pylori eradication therapy. Rosacea was evaluated using the Duluth rosacea grading score at the beginning, 2 months later and at the end of the trial (day 180). Of 872 patients positive for H. pylori, 167 patients (19.15%) manifested the clinical features of rosacea. The patients with concurrent rosacea were younger (P < 0.001) and with a female sex predominance (P = 0.03) when compared with rosacea-free patients. Of 167 patients, 150 received H. pylori eradication therapy, demonstrating a 92% (138/150) cure rate. The rosacea Duluth score grading on day 0, 60 and 180 among 138 patients significantly decreased in most of the criteria except for telangiectasias (P = 0.712), phymatous changes (P = 0.535) and the existence of peripheral involvement (P = 0.431). The present study concluded that H. pylori eradication leads to improvement of rosacea. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. Functional dyspepsia and dyspepsia associated with Helicobacter pylori infection: Do they have different clinical characteristics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Rodríguez-García

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The patients with dyspepsia infected with Helicobacter pylori had similar clinical characteristics to the non-infected patients and could not be differentiated a priori. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with functional dyspepsia was 58% and increased with age.

  20. Differences in Virulence Markers between Helicobacter pylori Strains from Iraq and Those from Iran: Potential Importance of Regional Differences in H. pylori-Associated Disease▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Nawfal R.; Mohammadi, Marjan; Talebkhan, Yeganeh; Doraghi, Masoumeh; Letley, Darren P.; Muhammad, Merdan K.; Argent, Richard H.; Atherton, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma; the latter is common in Iran but not in Iraq. We hypothesized that more virulent H. pylori strains may be found in Iran than in Iraq and so compared established and newly described virulence factors in strains from these countries. We studied 59 unselected dyspeptic patients from Iran and 49 from Iraq. cagA was found in similar proportions of strains from both countries (76% in Iran versus 71% in Iraq) and was significantly associated with peptic ulcer disease in Iraq (P ≤ 0.01) but not in Iran. cagA alleles encoding four or more tyrosine phosphorylation motifs were found in 12% of the Iranian strains but none of the Iraqi strains (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in the vacA signal-, middle-, or intermediate-region types between Iranian and Iraqi strains. Among the strains from Iran, vacA genotypes showed no specific peptic ulcer associations, but among the strains from Iraq, vacA i1 strains were associated with gastric ulcer (P ≤ 0.02), mimicking their previously demonstrated association with gastric cancer in Iran. dupA was found in similar proportions of Iranian and Iraqi strains (38% and 32%, respectively) and was associated with peptic ulceration in Iraqi patients (P ≤ 0.01) but not Iranian patients. H. pylori strains from Iraq and Iran possess virulence factors similar to those in Western countries. The presence of cagA with more phosphorylation motifs in Iranian strains may contribute to the higher incidence of gastric cancer. However, the association between strain virulence markers and disease in Iraq but not Iran suggests that other host and environmental factors may be more important in the disease-prone Iranian population. PMID:18353934

  1. An engineered Lactococcus lactis strain exerts significant immune responses through efficient expression and delivery of Helicobacter pylori Lpp20 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongguang; Peng, Xiaoyan; Duan, Guangcai; Shi, Qingfeng; Chen, Shuaiyin; Wang, Chen; Fan, Qingtang; Xi, Yuanlin

    2016-12-01

    To produce and deliver Helicobacter pylori lipoprotein Lpp20 via using Lactococcus lactis with aim of developing an efficient way to use this protective antigen in vaccine formulation. An engineered L. lactis strain carrying the lpp20 gene from H. pylori was constructed. The inducible expression of Lpp20 in L. lactis was detected as a 20 kDa intracellular protein by SDS-PAGE. Lpp20 constituted 10 % of the L. lactis cellular proteins. The expression product was highly immunoreactive, as demonstrated by western blot assays using mouse anti-H. pylori sera. Animal experimentation showed that oral vaccination with the engineered strain excited significantly elevated levels of serum Lpp20-specific IgG antibodies in BALB/c mice (P lactis, demonstrating an efficient utilization mode of Lpp20 in anti-H. pylori vaccination.

  2. Population genetic structure of Helicobacter pylori strains from Portuguese-speaking countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleastro, Mónica; Rocha, Raquel; Vale, Filipa F

    2017-08-01

    The human gastric colonizer Helicobacter pylori is useful to track human migrations given the agreement between the bacterium phylogeographic distribution and human migrations. As Portugal was an African and Brazilian colonizer for over 400 years, we hypothesized that Portuguese isolates were likely genetically closer with those from countries colonized by Portuguese in the past. We aimed to characterize the population structure of several Portuguese-speaking countries, including Portugal, Brazil, Angola, and Cape Verde. We included strains isolated in Portugal from Portuguese and from former Portuguese colonies. These strains were typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for seven housekeeping genes. We also retrieved from Multi Locus Sequence Typing Web site additional housekeeping gene sequences, namely from Angola and Brazil. We provided evidence that strains from Portuguese belong to hpEurope and that the introgression of hpEurope in non-European countries that speak Portuguese is low, except for Brazil and Cape Verde, where hpEurope accounted for one quarter and one half of the population, respectively. We found genetic similarity for all strains from Portuguese-speaking countries that belong to hpEurope population. Moreover, these strains showed a predominance of ancestral Europe 2 (AE2) over ancestral Europe 1 (AE1), followed by ancestral Africa 1. H. pylori is a useful marker even for relative recent human migration events and may become rapidly differentiated from founder populations. H. pylori from Portuguese-speaking countries assigned to hpEurope appears to be a hybrid population resulting from the admixture of AE1, AE2 and ancestral hpAfrica1. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Treatment of helicobacter pylori infection; a controlled randomized comparative clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Usmanghani, K.; Mohiuddin, E.; Akram, M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces chronic inflammation of the underlying gastric mucosa and is strongly linked to the development of duodenal and gastric carcinoma. A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Pylorex, a herbal formulation, for treatment of H. pylori infection as compared to triple allopathic therapy (Omeprazole, Amoxicillin, Metronidazole). The therapeutic evaluations of these medicines were conducted on 97 clinically and immunologically diagnosed cases of H. pylori infection. H. pylori was eradicated in 16 (32.6%) out of 49 patients by the use of triple allopathic therapy (Control drugs), and in 9 (18.7%) out of 48 patients by the use of Pylorex (Test drug). Pylorex possesses a therapeutic value for the treatment of H. pylori associated symptoms but the eradication rate is superior in triple allopathic therapy. (author)

  4. Validation of a Novel Immunoline Assay for Patient Stratification according to Virulence of the Infecting Helicobacter pylori Strain and Eradication Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Formichella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection shows a worldwide prevalence of around 50%. However, only a minority of infected individuals develop clinical symptoms or diseases. The presence of H. pylori virulence factors, such as CagA and VacA, has been associated with disease development, but assessment of virulence factor presence requires gastric biopsies. Here, we evaluate the H. pylori recomLine test for risk stratification of infected patients by comparing the test score and immune recognition of type I or type II strains defined by the virulence factors CagA, VacA, GroEL, UreA, HcpC, and gGT with patient’s disease status according to histology. Moreover, the immune responses of eradicated individuals from two different populations were analysed. Their immune response frequencies and intensities against all antigens except CagA declined below the detection limit. CagA was particularly long lasting in both independent populations. An isolated CagA band often represents past eradication with a likelihood of 88.7%. In addition, a high recomLine score was significantly associated with high-grade gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Thus, the recomLine is a sensitive and specific noninvasive test for detecting serum responses against H. pylori in actively infected and eradicated individuals. Moreover, it allows stratifying patients according to their disease state.

  5. In Vitro Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activity of the Probiotic Strain Bacillus subtilis 3 Is Due to Secretion of Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Irina V.; Bressollier, Philippe; Verneuil, Bernard; Fenet, Bernard; Sorokulova, Irina B.; Mégraud, Francis; Urdaci, Maria C.

    2001-01-01

    A limited number of antibiotics can be used against Helicobacter pylori infection, and resistance jeopardizes the success of treatment. Therefore, a search for new agents is warranted. The use of probiotics to enhance gastrointestinal health has been proposed for many years, but the scientific basis of the prophylactic and therapeutic actions of probiotics has not yet been clearly delineated. Probiotic strain Bacillus subtilis 3, whose safety has previously been demonstrated, is known to have antagonistic properties against species of the family Enterobacteriaceae. In the present study, it was also found to inhibit H. pylori. The anti-H. pylori activity present in the cell-free supernatant was not related to pH or organic acid concentration. It was heat stable and protease insensitive. At least two antibiotics, detected by thin-layer chromatography (Rf values, 0.47 and 0.85, respectively) and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis, were found to be responsible for this anti-H. pylori activity. All H. pylori strains tested were sensitive to both compounds. One of these compounds was identified as amicoumacin A, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory properties. MICs for H. pylori determined in solid and liquid media ranged between 1.7 and 6.8 μg/ml and 0.75 and 2.5 μg/ml, respectively. The underestimation of MICs determined in solid medium may be due to physicochemical instability of the antibiotic under these test conditions. An additive effect between amicoumacin A and the nonamicoumacin antibiotic against H. pylori was demonstrated. PMID:11600371

  6. An inverse relationship between CagA+ strains of Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of erosive GERD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somi, Mohammad H.; Fattahi, E.; Fouladi, Rohollah F.; Karimi, M.; Bonyadi, R.; Baballou, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is investigating the association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and its cytogenetic-associated gene A (cag A) strain with reflux esophagitis. In a case-control setting (May 2005-2006), patients with reflux esophagitis (case group) were compared with age and gender matched people suffering from symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease with normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings (control group) in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The rates of H. pylori and its cagA positive infections were separately compared between the 2 groups and the subgroups with different severity of reflux esophagitis. Ninety-two and 93 patients were enrolled in the case and control groups. The rate of H.pylori infection was significantly lower in case group (81.5%versus 87.10%, p=0.29, odd ratio 0.654, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.293 to 1.495). The CagA positive infections were found significantly more frequent in the control group (59.1% versus 40.2%, p=0.01, odd ratio 0.465, 95% CI 0.258 to 0.836). There was no significant difference between the severity subgroups of the disease for H. pylori (p=0.30) or cagA positive infection rates (p=0.40). The cagA positive strains might have a protective effect against reflux esophagitis. (author)

  7. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection.

  8. Helicobacter pylori bab characterization in clinical isolates from Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshul Ansari

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori BabA is an important outer membrane protein that involves in the attachment to the gastric mucosa and enhances the virulence property of the bacterium. This study was aimed to characterize the bab genotypes, to evaluate its association with cagA, vacA and clinical diseases as well as degree of gastric inflammation.H. pylori isolates from four countries were subjected for the characterization of bab. The locus specific forward and bab specific reverse primers were used to get the specific products by PCR, which could distinguish the three locus (A, B and C. The histological activities were evaluated according to the Updated Sydney system.In patients from high risk countries (Bhutan and Myanmar relatively higher frequencies of strains with babA-positivity (91.8% and 90.7%, respectively, babA at locus A (98% and 91.2%, respectively and with single babA (96.8% and 91.2%, respectively were found. Strains with two loci occupied were the most prevalent in Bhutan (84.6%, Myanmar (74.7%, Nepal (58.3% and Bangladesh (56.9%. The genotype babA at locus A/babB at locus B/bab-negative at locus C (babA/babB/- was the most common genotype isolated from Bhutan (82.7%, Myanmar (58.7%, Nepal (32% and Bangladesh (31.4% among all genotypes assessed. This genotype was also associated with the peptic ulcer disease (P = 0.013 when compared to gastritis. babA-positive characteristics and the genotype babA/babB/- exhibited the enhanced histological activities.The higher prevalence of virulence associated babA-positive characteristics and enhanced histological activities in Bhutan than in Myanmar, Nepal and Bangladesh might partly explain why the peoples in Bhutan are at higher risk for developing severe gastric complications.

  9. Helicobacter pylori bab characterization in clinical isolates from Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Shamshul; Kabamba, Evariste Tshibangu; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Aftab, Hafeza; Myint, Thein; Tshering, Lotay; Sharma, Rabi Prakash; Ni, Nwe; Aye, Than Than; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Uchida, Tomohisa; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Mahachai, Varocha; Matsumoto, Takashi; Akada, Junko; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori BabA is an important outer membrane protein that involves in the attachment to the gastric mucosa and enhances the virulence property of the bacterium. This study was aimed to characterize the bab genotypes, to evaluate its association with cagA, vacA and clinical diseases as well as degree of gastric inflammation. H. pylori isolates from four countries were subjected for the characterization of bab. The locus specific forward and bab specific reverse primers were used to get the specific products by PCR, which could distinguish the three locus (A, B and C). The histological activities were evaluated according to the Updated Sydney system. In patients from high risk countries (Bhutan and Myanmar) relatively higher frequencies of strains with babA-positivity (91.8% and 90.7%, respectively), babA at locus A (98% and 91.2%, respectively) and with single babA (96.8% and 91.2%, respectively) were found. Strains with two loci occupied were the most prevalent in Bhutan (84.6%), Myanmar (74.7%), Nepal (58.3%) and Bangladesh (56.9%). The genotype babA at locus A/babB at locus B/bab-negative at locus C (babA/babB/-) was the most common genotype isolated from Bhutan (82.7%), Myanmar (58.7%), Nepal (32%) and Bangladesh (31.4%) among all genotypes assessed. This genotype was also associated with the peptic ulcer disease (P = 0.013) when compared to gastritis. babA-positive characteristics and the genotype babA/babB/- exhibited the enhanced histological activities. The higher prevalence of virulence associated babA-positive characteristics and enhanced histological activities in Bhutan than in Myanmar, Nepal and Bangladesh might partly explain why the peoples in Bhutan are at higher risk for developing severe gastric complications.

  10. Prevalence and Correlation with Clinical Diseases of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA Genotype among Gastric Patients from Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes have significant genetic heterogenicity, resulting in different clinical outcomes. Northeast part of China has reported high prevalence of H. pylori infections and gastric cancer. Hence, we investigated the H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes with clinical outcomes in Northeast China. Gastric tissue samples (n=169, chronic gastritis (GIs, gastric ulcer (GU, and gastric cancer (GC were analysed for 16S rRNA ureA, cagA, and cagA genotypes by PCR. A total of 141 (84% cases were found positive for H. pylori by 16S rRNA and ureA. GC showed high H. pylori infection (93% compared with GIs (72% and GU (84%. The vacAs1am1 was highly found in GC (40% and GU (36%, vacAs1am2 in GIs (33%, vacAs1bm1 (14% and vacAs1bm2 (8% in GU cases, and s2m1 in normal cases (33%, while vacAs1cm1 showed low frequency in GIs (2% and GU (3% and GC showed negative result. The East-Asian cagA strain was highly observed in GC (43%, as compared to GIs (41% and GU (20%. The East-Asian cagA/vacAs1am1 was significantly higher in GC (23% than in GU (22% and GIs (145 patients. The East-Asian type cagA with vacAs1a and vacAm1 is the most predominant genotype in H. pylori strains of Northeast China.

  11. Clinical characteristics of Helicobacter pylori-negative drug-negative peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo Chul; Jeon, Eun Jung; Kim, Dae Bum; Sung, Hea Jung; Kim, Yeon-Ji; Lim, Eun Sun; Kim, Min-Ah; Oh, Jung Hwan

    2015-07-28

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of idiopathic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-negative and drug-negative] peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). A consecutive series of patients who experienced PUB between 2006 and 2012 was retrospectively analyzed. A total of 232 patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into four groups according to the etiologies of PUB: idiopathic, H. pylori-associated, drug-induced and combined (H. pylori-associated and drug-induced) types. We compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes between the groups. When the silver stain or rapid urease tests were H. pylori-negative, we obtained an additional biopsy specimen by endoscopic re-examination and performed an H. pylori antibody test 6-8 wk after the initial endoscopic examination. For a diagnosis of idiopathic PUB, a negative result of an H. pylori antibody test was confirmed. In all cases, re-bleeding was confirmed by endoscopic examination. For the risk assessment, the Blatchford and the Rockall scores were calculated for all patients. For PUB, the frequency of H. pylori infection was 59.5% (138/232), whereas the frequency of idiopathic cases was 8.6% (20/232). When idiopathic PUB was compared to H. pylori-associated PUB, the idiopathic PUB group showed a higher rate of re-bleeding after initial hemostasis during the hospital stay (30% vs 7.4%, P = 0.02). When idiopathic PUB was compared to drug-induced PUB, the patients in the idiopathic PUB group showed a higher rate of re-bleeding after initial hemostasis upon admission (30% vs 2.7%, P ulcer (77% vs 49%, P < 0.01). However, the Blatchford and the Rockall scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Among the patients who experienced drug-induced PUB, no significant differences were found with respect to clinical characteristics, irrespective of H. pylori infection. Idiopathic PUB has unique clinical characteristics such as re-bleeding after initial hemostasis upon admission

  12. Comparison of PCR and common clinical tests for the diagnosis of H. pylori in dyspeptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, N; Mago, V; Gómez, I; Gueneau, P; Guelrud, M; Reyes, N; Pericchi, L R; Domínguez-Bello, M G

    2001-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as a major gastric pathogen. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of common clinical tests to detect H. pylori infection, by comparison with PCR. Serum and gastric biopsy specimens from 106 dyspeptic patients were examined. Serology was performed with Pyloriset Dry test, and biopsies were examined histologically, for rapid urease activity and PCR amplification of an ureA gene segment of H. pylori. PCR primers were specific for H. pylori and required at least 1.47 pg of H. pylori DNA, corresponding to about 800 bacterial cells. According to serology, histology, rapid urease, and PCR, positive results were respectively found in 56%, 86%, 64%, and 85% of dyspeptic patients, primarily with gastritis. Relative to PCR, the sensitivity (and specificity) was 55% (38%) for serology, 86% (13%) for histology, 70% (69%) for urease. When combining histology and urease, Bayesian analysis of data indicated no advantage of using combined methods over rapid urease test alone. Histology should not any longer be considered a gold standard test for Helicobacter pylori. Urea breath test still seems the first option for non invasive diagnostic. If an invasive diagnostic is justified, highly specific and sensitive molecular methods should be used to examine specimens.

  13. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2, and dupA genotypes and correlation with clinical outcome in Malaysian patients with dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Hussein Ali; Hasan, Habsah; Suppian, Rapeah; Hassan, Syed; Andee, Dzulkarnaen Zakaria; Abdul Majid, Noorizan; Zilfalil, Bin-alwi

    2015-01-01

    The severity of disease outcome in dyspepsia has been attributed to Helicobacter pylori virulence genes. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of H. pylori virulence genes (cagA, babA2, and dupA) and to determine whether or not there arises a significant correlation with clinical dyspepsia outcomes. H. pylori genotypes cagA, babA2, and dupA were identified by polymerase chain reactions from gastric biopsy samples in 105 H. pylori-positive patients. The positive rates for cagA, babA2, and dupA genes in H. pylori dyspeptic patients were 69.5%, 41.0%, and 22.9%, respectivel cagA was more prevalent in Indians (39.7%), babA2 was more prevalent in Malays (39.5%), and dupA detection occurred more frequently in both Indians and Malays and at the same rate (37.5%). The Chinese inhabitants had the lowest prevalence of the three genes. Nonulcer disease patients had a significantly higher distribution of cagA (76.7%), babA2 (74.4%), and dupA (75.0%). There was no apparent association between these virulence genes and the clinical outcomes. The lower prevalence of these genes and variations among different ethnicities implies that the strains are geographically and ethnically dependent. None of the virulence genes were knowingly beneficial in predicting the clinical outcome of H. pylori infection in our subjects.

  14. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and microevolution in host and the clinical outcome: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Bakhti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the causative agent in development of gastroduode-nal diseases, such as chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcers, mucosa associated lym-phoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric cancer. H. pylori has been associated with inflammation in cardia, showing the fact that infection with this bacterium could also be a risk factor for gastric cardia cancer. Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. This is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, and ap-proximately 700,000 people succumb each year to gastric adenocarcinoma. It has been estimated that 69% of the Iranian population currently harbor H. pylori infection. The prevalence of duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer is high in Iranian populations. However, this has been largely influenced by geographic and/or ethnic origin. Epidemi-ology studies have shown that host, environmental, and bacterial factors determine the outcome of H. pylori infection. The bacterium contains allelic diversity and high genet-ic variability into core- and virulence-genes and that this diversity is geographically and ethnically structured. The genetic diversity within H. pylori is greater than within most other bacteria, and its diversity is more than 50-fold higher than that of human DNA. The maintenance of high diversification makes this bacterium to cope with particular challenges in individual hosts. It has been reported that the recombination contributed to the creation of new genes and gene family. Furthermore, the microevolution in cagA and vacA genes is a common event, leading to a change in the virulence phenotype. These factors contribute to the bacterial survival in acidic conditions in stomach and protect it from host immune system, causing tissue damage and clinical disease. In this review article, we discussed the correlation between H. pylori virulence factors and clin-ical outcomes, microevolution of H. pylori virulence genes in a single host

  15. Lack of association between Helicobacter pylori infection with dupA-positive strains and gastroduodenal diseases in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Luciana I; Rocha, Gifone A; Rocha, Andreia M C; Soares, Taciana F; Oliveira, Celso A; Bittencourt, Paulo F S; Queiroz, Dulciene M M

    2008-04-01

    Duodenal ulcer-promoting gene (dupA) was recently described as a new putative Helicobacter pylori virulence marker associated with an increased risk for duodenal ulcer and reduced risk for gastric carcinoma in Japan and Korea. Since differences regarding the association among H. pylori markers and H. pylori-associated diseases have been demonstrated around the world, we evaluated the presence of the gene in 482 strains from Brazilian children (34 with duodenal ulcer and 97 with gastritis) and adults (126 with duodenal ulcer, 144 with gastritis and 81 with gastric carcinoma) by PCR using the described primers and an additional set of primers based on Brazilian strain sequences. The results were confirmed by sequencing. The presence of cagA was investigated by PCR and also included in the analysis. dupA was present in 445 (92.32%) and absent in 29 (6.02%) strains. All samples from children with and without duodenal ulcer were dupA-positive (p=1.0). No association was observed among the strains from adults with gastritis (92.36%), duodenal ulcer (87.30%, p=0.30) and gastric carcinoma (87.65%, p=0.31). Conversely, cagA-positve status remained independently associated with duodenal ulcer (children: odds ratios (OR)=5.58, 95% confidence intervals (CI)=1.67-18.50; adults: OR=3.33, 95% CI=2.14-5.19) and gastric carcinoma (OR=6.58, 95% CI=3.51-12.30) in multivariate analyses. The presence of dupA was significantly higher in strains from children than in those from adults (p=0.01). In conclusion, dupA is highly frequent and not associated with H. pylori-associated diseases in both Brazilian adults and children, which points to regional differences in the distribution of the gene.

  16. Extremely low Helicobacter pylori prevalence in North Sulawesi, Indonesia and identification of a Maori-tribe type strain: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Tuda, Josef; Suzuki, Rumiko; Kido, Yasutoshi; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tantular, Indah S; Pusarawati, Suhintam; Nasronudin; Harijanto, Paul N; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Sulawesi in Indonesia has a unique geographical profile with assumed separation from Sundaland. Studies of Helicobacter pylori in this region are rare due to the region's rural location and lack of endoscopy equipment. Indirect methods are, therefore, the most appropriate for measuring H. pylori infection in these areas; with the disposable gastric brush test, we can obtain gastric juice as well as small gastric tissue samples for H. pylori culture. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori infection and evaluated human migration patterns in the remote areas of North Sulawesi. We recruited a total of 251 consecutive adult volunteers and 131 elementary school children. H. pylori infection was determined by urine antibody test. A gastric brush test was used to culture H. pylori. We used next-generation and polymerase chain reaction based sequencing to determine virulence factors and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The overall H. pylori prevalence was only 14.3% for adults and 3.8% for children, and 13.6% and 16.7% in Minahasanese and Mongondownese participants, respectively. We isolated a single H. pylori strain, termed -Manado-1. Manado-1 was East Asian type cagA (ABD type), vacA s1c-m1b, iceA1 positive/iceA2 negative, jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3) galT-negative, oipA "on", and dupA-negative. Phylogenetic analyses showed the strain to be hspMaori type, a major type observed in native Taiwanese and Maori tribes. Our data support that very low H. pylori infection prevalence in Indonesia. Identification of hspMaori type H. pylori in North Sulawesi may support the hypothesis that North Sulawesi people migrated from north.

  17. H. pylori clinical isolates have diverse babAB genotype distributions over different topographic sites of stomach with correlation to clinical disease outcomes

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    Sheu Shew-Meei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intragenomic recombination between babA and babB mediates antigenic variations and may help H. pylori colonization. This study determined whether variable genotypes of babA and babB correlate to different clinical disease outcomes, and can distribute over the different gastric niches. Results This study enrolled 92 clinical strains (45 from peptic ulcer, 27 from gastritis, and 20 from gastric cancer to detect whether the babA and babB are at locus A or B by PCR reactions using the primers designed from the upstream and variable region of the babA and babB genes. Four genotypes of babA and babB (A B, AB B, A AB, AB AB were found. The distribution of the 4 genotypes in 92 clinical strains was significantly different among patients with different gastric diseases (p vs. 9.7%, p p p > 0.05. Besides, the study enrolled 19 patients to verify whether variable genotypes of babAB existed in the different gastric niches. Among the patients infected with more than one babAB genotypes over antrum and corpus, there were higher rate of genotypes as A B or AB AB in isolates from antrum than in those from corpus (75.0 % vs. 16.7%, p  Conclusions The H. pylori isolate with the AB AB genotype correlates with an increased gastric cancer risk, and colonize in an antrum predominant manner.

  18. Extremely High Prevalence of Metronidazole-Resistant Helicobacter pylori Strains in Mountain People (Karen and Hmong) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Gamnarai, Pornpen; Chaithongrat, Supakarn; Uchida, Tomahisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Mahachai, Varocha

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to survey the prevalence, patterns of antibiotic resistance, and clinical factors associated with antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori among the Karen and Hmong mountain people of Thailand. We recruited dyspeptic patients in the Maesod district, Tak Province, Thailand. All subjects underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and three antral gastric biopsies were obtained for rapid urease tests and culture. An epsilometer was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations of amoxicillin (AMX), clarithromycin (CLR), metronidazole (MNZ), levofloxacin (LVX), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and tetracycline (TET). A total of 291 subjects were enrolled; 149 (51.2%) were infected with H. pylori. Helicobacter pylori infection was present in 47.1% of Thai, 51.7% of Karen, and 58.7% of Hmong subjects. Antibiotic resistance was present in 75.8% including AMX (0.8%), TET (0%), CLR (5.6%), MNZ (71.8%), CIP (19.4%), LVX (19.4%), and multidrug resistance in 21.8%. Karen subjects had the highest prevalence of MNZ resistance (84.6%), and Hmong subjects had the highest prevalence of fluoroquinolone (27.3%) and multidrug (34.1%) resistance. MNZ plus fluoroquinolone (14.5%) was the most common multidrug resistance. There was no association between clinical factors and antibiotic resistance. MNZ resistance was prevalent, whereas fluoroquinolone- and multidrug-resistant H. pylori infections are important problems in mountain people of Thailand. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Lactobacillus reuteri strain combination in Helicobacter pylori infection: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, Ruggiero; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Demichina, Antonella; Maurogiovanni, Giovanni; Principi, Beatrice; Scaccianoce, Giuseppe; Ierardi, Enzo; Russo, Francesco; Riezzo, Giuseppe; Di Leo, Alfredo; Cavallo, Luciano; Francavilla, Antonio; Versalovic, James

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to investigate the role of a new probiotic preparation (Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475) in Helicobacter pylori infection. Specific probiotic strains play a role in H. pylori infection for their ability to decrease bacterial load and gastritis, prevent antibiotic-associated side effects, and increase the eradication rate. This is a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study in a tertiary care setting. A total of 100 H. pylori-positive naive patients received either L. reuteri combination (2×10 Colony Forming Units) or placebo during a 3-phase study (pre-eradication, eradication, and follow-up). All underwent C urea breath test (C-UBT), blood assessments of gastrin-17 (G17), endoscopy, and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. Eradication was confirmed by C-UBT 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Fifty patients were allocated in each group. During pre-eradication period, C-UBT δ decreased by 13% in L. reuteri combination as compared with a 4% increase in placebo (-13.2±34% vs. 4.3±27%; Preuteri combination (6.8±2.9 vs. 4±3.1; Preuteri combination as compared with placebo-reported side effects (40.9% vs. 62.8%; Preuteri combination (28% vs. 12%; Preuteri combination and 65.9% in placebo (P=NS). L. reuteri combination increased eradication rate by 9.1% (odds ratio: 1.5). L. reuteri combination alone is able to exert an inhibitory effect on H. pylori growth, and when administered with eradication therapy, it determines a significant reduction in antibiotic-associated side effects. Moreover, L. reuteri combination was able to decrease serum G17 levels and to (not significantly) increase the H. pylori-eradication rate.

  20. Patterns of Adherence of Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates to Epithelial Cells, and its Association with Disease and with Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Jiménez, Flor Elizabeth; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Cerezo, Silvia Giono; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Adherence to the gastric epithelium is one of the most important steps of Helicobacter pylori to remain and cause disease. The aim of this study was to analyze whether H. pylori isolates from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases present differences in the pattern of adherence to gastric epithelial cells (AGS), in the ability to induce IL-8, and in the presence of virulence genes. We tested 75 H. pylori strains isolated from nonatrophic gastritis, gastric cancer, and duodenal ulcer patients. The adhesion pattern and IL-8 induction were determined in AGS cells, and invasion of AGS cells was studied using a gentamicin protection assay. The IL-8 levels induced were determined by ELISA. Helicobacter pylori strains presented diffuse adherence (DA) and localized (LA) adherence patterns, similar to those described for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), were observed in AGS cells. A DA pattern was observed in 57% and LA in 43% of the strains, and DA was more frequent in isolates from patients with gastric cancer (p = 0.044). Strains with a LA pattern induced higher levels of IL-8 (p = 0.042) in AGS cells. The adherence pattern was not associated with neither invasiveness nor with the presence of virulence genes. Our study shows that H. pylori strains present adherence patterns to AGS cells resembling those observed in EPEC and that these patterns may be associated with disease and with activity on AGS cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The role of active efflux in antibiotic - resistance of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori

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    Falsafi T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux pumps that excrete drugs can confer resistance to antibiotics however, in Helicobacter pylori this role is not well established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of active efflux in resistance of H. pylori isolates to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Twelve multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR isolates resistant to at least four antibiotics, including β-lactams, metronidazole, tetracycline, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin; three resistant to only β-lactams, and two hyper-susceptible isolates, were obtained from screening of 96 clinical isolates of H. pylori . Their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs for antibiotics and ethidium-bromide (EtBr were compared in the presence- and absence of a proton-conductor, carbonyl cyanide-m chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP using agar-dilution and disc diffusion. Drug accumulation studies for EtBr and antibiotics were assessed in the presence and absence of CCCP using spectrofluorometry. Results: MIC of EtBr for eight MAR-isolates was decreased two- to four-folds in the presence of CCCP, of which five showed reduced MICs for β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin with CCCP. Accumulation of EtBr by the MAR-isolates was rapid and not dependant on the pattern of multiple resistance. Antibiotic accumulation assay confirmed the presence of energy-dependant efflux of β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin, but no erythromycin in five MAR isolates. Energy-dependant efflux of EtBr or antibiotics was not observed for four MAR-isolates, and three isolates were resistant only to β-lactams. Conclusion: Energy-dependant efflux plays a role in the resistance of H. pylori clinical isolates to structurally unrelated antibiotics in a broadly specific multidrug efflux manner. Difference in the efflux potential of MAR isolates may be related to the presence or absence of functional efflux-pumps in diverse H. pylori

  2. Genotyping of vacA alleles of Helicobacter pylori strains recovered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    commonly detected genotypes in the meat-based foods, viz, vegetable sandwich and ready to eat fish, were vacA ... Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, VacA genotypes, Genotyping, Food items ..... Microbiology and Quality Control, Islamic Azad.

  3. H. Pylori Positivity and Various Pathological, Endoscopic and Clinical Features Correlated with Each Other

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coskun, A.; Yukselen, V.; Yasa, M. H.; Karaoglu, A. O.; Meteoglu, I.; Ergin, F.; Kadikoylu, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between dyspepsia symptom scores and endoscopic appearances, and histopathological findings and helicobacter pylori positivity in patients having dyspepsia symptom. Methods: The study was conducted at the gastroenterology outpatient clinic of Adnan Menderes University, School of Medicine, Aydin, Turkey from April 2012 to July 2012 and comprised patients between 18-65 years of age who were admitted with dyspepsia. Glasgow dyspepsia severity scoring was done with questions posed orally to the patients. In histopathological evaluation of biopsy specimens according to Sydney criteria, chronic inflammation, activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and helicobacter pylori parameters were used. Total number of eosinophils and number of mast cells were recorded. Results: Of the 60 patients with dyspepsia, 38(63.3 percent) were female and 22(36.7 percent) were male. The degree of activation and severity of inflammation increased significantly with increasing helicobacter pylori positivity(r=0.459'p<0.0001; r=0.475'p<0.0001). A significant relationship was found between inflammation, activation and the number of mast cells (p<0.05).There was no relationship between helicobacter pylori intensity and the eosinophil count (r=0.171; p=0.093). There was also a statistically significant correlation between severity of inflammation and activation and the number of eosinophils (r=0.313;p=0.002;r=0.245;p=0.016). Conclusion: Mast cell density was seen to have a role in the inflammatory processes of helicobacter pylori infection. (author)

  4. Is there a link between the lipopolysaccharide of Helicobacter pylori gastric MALT lymphoma associated strains and lymphoma pathogenesis?

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    Philippe Lehours

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the Lewis antigen expression in Helicobacter pylori gastric MALT lymphoma associated strains in comparison to chronic gastritis only strains. Forty MALT strains (19 cagPAI (- and 21 cagPAI (+ and 39 cagPAI frequency-matched gastritis strains (17 cagPAI (- and 22 cagPAI (+ were included in this study. The lipopolyssacharide for each strain was extracted using a hot phenol method and the expression of Le(x and Le(y were investigated using Western Blot. The data were analyzed according to the strains' cagPAI status and vacA genotype. Le(x was identified in 21 (52.5% MALT strains and 29 (74.3% gastritis strains. Le(y was identified in 30 (75% MALT strains and 31 (79.5% gastritis strains. There was an association between cagPAI positivity and Le(x expression among MALT strains (p<0.0001, but not in gastritis strains (p = 0.64. Among cagPAI (- strains, isolates expressing solely Le(y were associated with MALT with an odds ratio of 64.2 (95% CI 4.9-841.0 when compared to strains expressing both Le(x and Le(y. vacA genotypes did not modify the association between Lewis antigen expression and disease status. In conclusion, cagPAI (- MALT strains have a particular Lewis antigen profile which could represent an adaptive mechanism to the host response or participate in MALT lymphomagenesis.

  5. Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Patients with Gastric Ulcer and Non Ulcer Disease using RFLP-PCR of ureAB, vacA , cagA Genes

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    Sh. Farshad

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Different studies show that the reasons for clinically diverse outcomes of infections caused by H. pylori may include host and environmental factors as well as differences in the prevalence or expression of bacterial virulence factors. The aim of this study was to study the distribution of different genotypes of major virulence factors cagA, vacA and ureAB among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric ulcer (ulcerative disease and patients with gastritis (non ulcerative disease.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 65 H. pylori strains, 30 from patients with gastric ulcer and 35 from patients with non ulcerative gastritis disease were investigated by RFLP-PCR.Results: The prevalence of vacA-positive strains in ulcerative patients was significantly more than that in non ulcerative patients (P0.05.Conclusion: It seems that in the patients under our study the presence of cagA gene may not necessarily be a risk factor for ulcer disease, while a homologous genotype of vacA appears to be associated with an increase risk of ulcer development. Lastly, despite the existence of a high degree of genomic variability within ureAB, conserved DNA banding profiles are distributed in our areas.

  6. Analysis of cagA in Helicobacter pylori strains from Colombian populations with contrasting gastric cancer risk reveals a biomarker for disease severity

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    Loh, John T.; Shaffer, Carrie L.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Bravo, Luis E.; McClain, Mark S.; Correa, Pelayo; Cover, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, and the bacterial oncoprotein CagA contributes to gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS We analyzed H. pylori isolates from persons in Colombia and observed that there was marked variation among strains in levels of CagA expression. To elucidate the basis for this variation, we analyzed sequences upstream from the CagA translational initiation site in each strain. RESULTS A DNA motif (AATAAGATA) upstream of the translational initiation site of CagA was associated with high levels of CagA expression. Experimental studies showed that this motif was necessary but not sufficient for high-level CagA expression. H. pylori strains from a region of Colombia with high gastric cancer rates expressed higher levels of CagA than did strains from a region with lower gastric cancer rates, and Colombian strains of European phylogeographic origin expressed higher levels of CagA than did strains of African origin. Histopathological analysis of gastric biopsy specimens revealed that strains expressing high levels of CagA or containing the AATAAGATA motif were associated with more advanced precancerous lesions than those found in persons infected with strains expressing low levels of CagA or lacking the AATAAGATA motif. CONCLUSIONS CagA expression varies greatly among H. pylori strains. The DNA motif identified in this study is associated with high levels of CagA expression, and may be a useful biomarker to predict gastric cancer risk. IMPACT These findings help to explain why some persons infected with cagA-positive H. pylori develop gastric cancer and others do not. PMID:21859954

  7. The internalization of Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the failure of H. pylori eradication.

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    Wang, You-Hua; Lv, Zhi-Fa; Zhong, Yao; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Shu-Ping; Xie, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) internalization involves invasion of cells by the bacterium. Several studies have shown that H. pylori can invade human gastric epithelial cells, immune cells, and Candida yeast in vivo and in vitro. Whether bacterial invasion plays a role in eradication failure is unclear. To investigate the relationship between H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells and H. pylori eradication failure. Forty-two clinical strains isolated from H. pylori-positive patients with different outcomes after treatment with furazolidone-based therapy were examined (17 failures and 25 successes). The H. pylori strains were shown to be susceptible to amoxicillin and furazolidone, and the patients also exhibited good compliance. Genotyping was performed for cagA and vacA (s and m). The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains to amoxicillin, furazolidone, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was determined by E-tests. The levels of H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells were detected by gentamicin colony-forming unit assays. The internalization level in the eradication success group was 5.40±5.78 × 10 -3  cfu/cell, and the median was 6.194 × 10 -3  cfu/cell; the internalization level in the eradication failure group was 8.98±5.40 × 10 -3  cfu/cell, and the median was 10.28 × 10 -3  cfu/cell. The eradication failure group showed a greater invasion level than the eradication success group (Pinternalization levels were compared (P>.05). The results showed that H. pylori invasion of the gastric epithelia might play a role in eradication failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Distinct repeat motifs at the C-terminal region of CagA of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from diseased patients and asymptomatic individuals in West Bengal, India

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    Chattopadhyay Santanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains that express CagA is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The biological function of CagA depends on tyrosine phosphorylation by a cellular kinase. The phosphate acceptor tyrosine moiety is present within the EPIYA motif at the C-terminal region of the protein. This region is highly polymorphic due to variations in the number of EPIYA motifs and the polymorphism found in spacer regions among EPIYA motifs. The aim of this study was to analyze the polymorphism at the C-terminal end of CagA and to evaluate its association with the clinical status of the host in West Bengal, India. Results Seventy-seven H. pylori strains isolated from patients with various clinical statuses were used to characterize the C-ternimal polymorphic region of CagA. Our analysis showed that there is no correlation between the previously described CagA types and various disease outcomes in Indian context. Further analyses of different CagA structures revealed that the repeat units in the spacer sequences within the EPIYA motifs are actually more discrete than the previously proposed models of CagA variants. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that EPIYA motifs as well as the spacer sequence units are present as distinct insertions and deletions, which possibly have arisen from extensive recombination events. Moreover, we have identified several new CagA types, which could not be typed by the existing systems and therefore, we have proposed a new typing system. We hypothesize that a cagA gene encoding higher number EPIYA motifs may perhaps have arisen from cagA genes that encode lesser EPIYA motifs by acquisition of DNA segments through recombination events.

  9. Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT) Lymphoma: Updated Review of Clinical Outcomes and the Molecular Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Saito, Yoshimasa; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2009-06-01

    In most H. pylori-positive patients, gastric low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas regress both endoscopically and histopathologically after H. pylori eradication, but no factors that can be predictive of the response to the eradication have been definitively identified, and there is little information on how to determine the optimal observation period before additional treatment can be started. Here, clinical studies dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of gastric MALT lymphomas and H. pylori published during the last 5 years were systematically reviewed, and studies identifying the molecular approaches involved in the pathogenesis were summarized. Most of the clinical studies indicate a favorable effect of H. pylori eradication on the clinical outcome of gastric MALT lymphomas. Some studies suggest the necessity of additional treatment in nonresponders to H. pylori eradication, while others suggest the adoption of a watch-and-wait strategy. The molecular characteristics of MALT lymphomas could play an important role in prognostic prediction and the selection of further therapeutic intervention after the eradication. This updated review of gastric MALT lymphomas illustrates the potential efficacy of H. pylori eradication in tumor remission, but further molecular characterization is necessary to establish the most suitable therapeutic strategy for patients who do not respond to eradication.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection-induced H3Ser10 phosphorylation in stepwise gastric carcinogenesis and its clinical implications.

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    Yang, Tao-Tao; Cao, Na; Zhang, Hai-Hui; Wei, Jian-Bo; Song, Xiao-Xia; Yi, Dong-Min; Chao, Shuai-Heng; Zhang, Li-Da; Kong, Ling-Fei; Han, Shuang-Yin; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Ding, Song-Ze

    2018-04-15

    Our previous works have demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection can alter histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation status in gastric epithelial cells. However, whether Helicobacter pylori-induced histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation participates in gastric carcinogenesis is unknown. We investigate the expression of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation in various stages of gastric disease and explore its clinical implication. Stomach biopsy samples from 129 patients were collected and stained with histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation, Ki67, and Helicobacter pylori by immunohistochemistry staining, expressed as labeling index. They were categorized into nonatrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and intestinal-type gastric cancer groups. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by either 13 C-urea breath test or immunohistochemistry staining. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients, labeling index of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation was gradually increased in nonatrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia groups, peaked at low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and declined in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and gastric cancer groups. In Helicobacter pylori-infected patients, labeling index of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation followed the similar pattern as above, with increased expression over the corresponding Helicobacter pylori-negative controls except in nonatrophic gastritis patient whose labeling index was decreased when compared with Helicobacter pylori-negative control. Labeling index of Ki67 in Helicobacter pylori-negative groups was higher in gastric cancer than chronic atrophic gastritis and low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia groups, and higher in intestinal metaplasia group compared with chronic atrophic gastritis group. In Helicobacter pylori-positive groups, Ki67 labeling index was increased

  11. Helicobacter pylori strains from a Nigerian cohort show divergent antibiotic resistance rates and a uniform pathogenicity profile.

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    Ute Harrison

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori is a factor preventing its successful eradication. Particularly in developing countries, resistance against commonly used antibiotics is widespread. Here, we present an epidemiological study from Nigeria with 111 isolates. We analyzed the associated disease outcome, and performed a detailed characterization of these isolated strains with respect to their antibiotic susceptibility and their virulence characteristics. Furthermore, statistical analysis was performed on microbiological data as well as patient information and the results of the gastroenterological examination. We found that the variability concerning the production of virulence factors between strains was minimal, with 96.4% of isolates being CagA-positive and 92.8% producing detectable VacA levels. In addition, high frequency of bacterial resistance was observed for metronidazole (99.1%, followed by amoxicillin (33.3%, clarithromycin (14.4% and tetracycline (4.5%. In conclusion, this study indicated that the infection rate of H. pylori infection within the cohort in the present study was surprisingly low (36.6%. Furthermore, an average gastric pathology was observed by histological grading and bacterial isolates showed a uniform pathogenicity profile while indicating divergent antibiotic resistance rates.

  12. Helicobacter pylori with the Intact dupA Cluster is more Virulent than the Strains with the Incomplete dupA Cluster.

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    Wang, Ming-yi; Shao, Chen; Li, Jie; Yang, Ya-Chao; Wang, Shao-bo; Hao, Jun-ling; Wu, Chun-mei; Gao, Xiao-zhong; Shao, Shi-he

    2015-07-01

    The duodenal ulcer promoting gene (dupA), located in the plasticity region of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), is predicted to form a type IV secretory system (T4SS) with vir genes around dupA. In the study, we investigated the association between the dupA cluster status and the virulence of H. pylori in a littoral region of Northeast China. Two hundred and sixty-two H. pylori strains isolated from the chronic gastritis were examined to evaluate the dupA cluster status, cag PAI genes and vacA genotype using PCR and Western blot. Histopathologic evaluations of biopsy specimens were performed to analysis the association between the dupA cluster and the inflammatory response. IL-8 productions in gastric mucosa and from GES-1 cells co-cultured with H. pylori were measured, respectively, to analysis the association between the dupA cluster status and IL-8 production. We found that gastric mucosal inflammatory cell infiltration was significantly higher in patients with dupA-positive H. pylori, including H. pylori with complete dupA cluster (2.71 ± 0.79) and incomplete dupA cluster (2.09 ± 0.61) than in patients with dupA-negative strain (1.73 ± 0.60, p dupA cluster. Gastric mucosal IL-8 levels were higher in the complete dupA cluster group than in other groups (p dupA cluster (1527.9 ± 180.0 pg/ml) than in those with an incomplete dupA cluster (1229.4 ± 75.3 pg/ml, p dupA negative (1201.9 ± 92.3 pg/ml, p dupA cluster in H. pylori is associated with inflammatory cell infiltration and IL-8 secretion, and H. pylori strain with a complete dupA cluster seems to be more virulent than other strains with the incomplete dupA cluster or dupA negative.

  13. IMPACT OF CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS ON THE FREQUENCY AND PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    Sh. F. Gadieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of an investigation conducted to study the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA in relation to the clinical and immunological features of the disease. Objective: to investigate an association between the gastric mucosal (GM colonization with H. pylori and the clinical and immunological features of RA. Material and methods. The investigation enrolled 75 patients (8 men and 67 women aged 20 to 75 years (mean age, 45.5±10.1 years who were diagnosed with RA. The disease duration was 6 months to 30 years (mean 8.3±6.9 years. H. pylori were detected by a histological method. For this purpose, all the patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy using a PENTAXEKP 1000 endoscope (Japan. During endoscopic examination, targeted biopsy was performed, by taking multiple GM biopsy specimens. The degree of H. pylori contamination was compared in patients with seropositive and seronegative RA, as well as depending on the presence or absence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibodies. Results and discussion. The results of the investigation may lead to the conclusion that there is a relationship between the contamination with H. pylori and the immunological manifestations of RA. A direct correlation was found between the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the presence of anti-CCP antibodies. There was also a trend toward the increased spread of H. pylori in patients with seropositive RA as compared to those with seronegative RA. 

  14. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

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    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  15. Novel and Effective Therapeutic Regimens for Helicobacter pylori in an Era of Increasing Antibiotic Resistance

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    Yi Hu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a common gastrointestinal bacterial strain closely associated with the incidence of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. A current research and clinical challenge is the increased rate of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori, which has led to a decreased H. pylori eradication rate. In this article, we review recent H. pylori infection and reinfection rates and H. pylori resistance to antibiotics, and we discuss the pertinent treatments. A PubMed literature search was performed using the following keywords: Helicobacter pylori, infection, reinfection, antibiotic resistance, bismuth, proton pump inhibitors, vonoprazan, susceptibility, quintuple therapy, dual therapy, and probiotic. The prevalence of H. pylori has remained high in some areas despite the decreasing trend of H. pylori prevalence observed over time. Additionally, the H. pylori reinfection rate has varied in different countries due to socioeconomic and hygienic conditions. Helicobacter pylori monoresistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole or levofloxacin was common in most countries. However, the prevalence of amoxicillin and tetracycline resistance has remained low. Because H. pylori infection and reinfection present serious challenges and because H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole or levofloxacin remains high in most countries, the selection of an efficient regimen to eradicate H. pylori is critical. Currently, bismuth-containing quadruple therapies still achieve high eradication rates. Moreover, susceptibility-based therapies are alternatives because they may avoid the use of unnecessary antibiotics. Novel regimens, e.g., vonoprazan-containing triple therapies, quintuple therapies, high-dose dual therapies, and standard triple therapies with probiotics, require further studies concerning their efficiency and safety for treating H. pylori.

  16. Expression of cagA, virB/D Complex and/or vacA Genes in Helicobacter pylori Strains Originating from Patients with Gastric Diseases.

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    Andrzej Szkaradkiewicz

    Full Text Available In order to better understand pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori, particularly in the context of its carcinogenic activity, we analysed expression of virulence genes: cagA, virB/D complex (virB4, virB7, virB8, virB9, virB10, virB11, virD4 and vacA in strains of the pathogen originating from persons with gastric diseases. The studies were conducted on 42 strains of H. pylori isolated from patients with histological diagnosis of non-atrophic gastritis-NAG (group 1, including subgroup 1 containing cagA+ isolates and subgroup 2 containing cagA- strains, multifocal atrophic gastritis-MAG (group 2 and gastric adenocarcinoma-GC (group 3. Expression of H. pylori genes was studied using microarray technology. In group 1, in all strains of H. pylori cagA+ (subgroup 1 high expression of the gene as well as of virB/D was disclosed, accompanied by moderate expression of vacA. In strains of subgroup 2 a moderate expression of vacA was detected. All strains in groups 2 and 3 carried cagA gene but they differed in its expression: a high expression was detected in isolates of group 2 and its hyperexpression in strains of group 3 (hypervirulent strains. In both groups high expression of virB/D and vacA was disclosed. Our results indicate that chronic active gastritis may be induced by both cagA+ strains of H. pylori, manifesting high expression of virB/D complex but moderate activity of vacA, and cagA- strains with moderate expression of vacA gene. On the other hand, in progression of gastric pathology and carcinogenesis linked to H. pylori a significant role was played by hypervirulent strains, manifesting a very high expression of cagA and high activity of virB/D and vacA genes.

  17. Characterization of Lactobacillus salivarius strains B37 and B60 capable of inhibiting IL-8 production in Helicobacter pylori-stimulated gastric epithelial cells.

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    Panpetch, Wimonrat; Spinler, Jennifer K; Versalovic, James; Tumwasorn, Somying

    2016-10-18

    Interleukin (IL)-8 is the key agent for initiating an inflammatory response to infection with Helicobacter pylori. Some strains of Lactobacillus spp. are known to colonize the stomach and suppress inflammation caused by H. pylori. In this study, we characterized two gastric-derived lactobacilli, Lactobacillus salivarius (LS) strains B37 and B60, capable of inhibiting H. pylori-induced IL-8 production by gastric epithelial cells. Conditioned media from LS-B37 and LS-B60 suppressed H. pylori-induced IL-8 production and mRNA expression from AGS cells without inhibiting H. pylori growth. These conditioned media suppressed the activation of NF-κB but did not suppress c-Jun activation. IL-8 inhibitory substances in conditioned media of LS-B37 and LS-B60 are heat-stable and larger than 100 kDa in size. The inhibitory activity of LS-B37 was abolished when the conditioned medium was treated with α-amylase but still remained when treated with either proteinase K, trypsin, lipase or lysozyme. The activity of LS-B60 was abolished when the conditioned medium was treated with either amylase or proteinase K but still remained when treated with lysozyme. Treatment with lipase and trypsin also significantly affected the inhibitory activity of LS-B60 although the conditioned medium retained IL-8 suppression statistically different from media control. These results suggest that L. salivarius strains B37 and B60 produce different immunomodulatory factors capable of suppressing H. pylori-induced IL-8 production from gastric epithelial cells. Our results suggest that the large, heat-stable immunomodulatory substance(s) present in the LCM of LS-B37 is a polysaccharide, while the one(s) of LS-B60 is either complex consisting of components of polysaccharide, lipid and protein or includes multiple components such as glycoprotein and lipoprotein.

  18. From Bench to Bedside to Bug: An Update of Clinically Relevant Advances in the Care of Persons with Helicobacter pylori Associated Diseases

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    N Chiba

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In-depth meetings of the XIth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and Helicobacter pylori led to the presentation and discussion of extensive new data on H pylori and its diseases. The mode of transmission of H pylori remains unclear, and it remains unknown why only a small proportion of infected individuals develop duodenal or gastric ulcer disease and even fewer develop gastric cancer. The role of H pylori eradication in persons with uninvestigated dyspepsia remains controversial. New clinical trials of H pylori treatment show symptom relief and improvement in the quality of life of persons with functional dyspepsia, especially in those with ulcer-like or reflux-like dyspepsia. Clearly the move is toward symptom-based management of persons with dyspepsia, with fewer endoscopies being needed in the otherwise healthy young dyspeptic patients. It remains controversial whether eradicating H pylori in duodenal ulcer or functional dyspepsia increases the risk of subsequent development of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The one-week proton pump inhibitor-based triple regimens remain the gold standard of H pylori therapy, but some of the ranitidine bismuth citrate plus two antibiotic regimens also achieve an 80% H pylori eradication rate on an intention-to-treat basis. While the urea breath test remains the noninvasive test of choice, interesting new data are available on the use of stool antigen testing to diagnose H pylori infection. The number of H pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases grows to include possible liver, vascular, immune and skin conditions.

  19. The clinical value of 14C-urea breath test for diagnosis of helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuwen; Zhang Yongxian; Zhang Jinming; Ding Yong; Shao Mingzhe; Liu Zilai; Tian Jiahe

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a rapid microdose 14 C-urea breath test ( 14 C-UBT) with a simplified protocol for detecting the infection of helicobacter pylori (HP). 244 fasting patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms undergo the 14 C-UBT and 124 cases appear positive. 89 patients of those undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and confirmed as HP infection. The sensitivity and specificity of the 14 C-UBT is 100% when compared with the endoscopy. The test has good diagnostic accuracy with minimal radiation exposure and low cost. Thus, the test is reliable, safe, convenient and cost-effective to clinical use

  20. The study of the oipA and dupA genes in Helicobacter pylori strains and their relationship with different gastroduodenal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souod, Negar; Sarshar, Meysam; Dabiri, Hossein; Momtaz, Hassan; Kargar, Mohammad; Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Abdi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the oipA and dupA genes of Helicobacter pylori isolates from west of Iran; Chaharmahalo Bakhtiyari region and find their relationship with the severity of the gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori is an organism responsible for many gastroduodenal diseases. Many studies suggest that genetic diversity in H . pylori virulence factors such as oipA and dupA genes is high among isolates of different geographic regions and may cause more severe diseases. In this cross-sectional study, gastric biopsy specimens were taken from 150 patients suffering from gastroduodenal diseases. The presence of ureC, dupA and oipA genes was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Overall, 123 (82%) H. pylori strains were isolated from 150 specimens. dupA gene was detected in 41 (33.33%) H.pylori-positive specimens. There was a reverse correlation between this gene and gastric cancer. The oipA gene was found in 88 (71.54%) samples and statistically there was no association between this gene and gastric disorders. As statistical analyses revealed, the presence of the dupA was more common in isolates with the oipA negative. Based on our findings, the presence of dupA gene can be considered as a marker for the onset of severe diseases. However, the oipA gene cannot be regarded for prediction of gastroenterology diseases. Meanwhile, extended molecular epidemiology researches in other populations are recommended.

  1. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2, and dupA genotypes andcorrelation with clinical outcome in Malaysian patients with dyspepsia

    OpenAIRE

    OSMAN, HUSSEIN ALI; HASAN, HABSAH; SUPPIAN, RAPEAH; HASSAN, SYED; ANDEE, DZULKARNAEN ZAKARIA; MAJID, NOORIZAN ABDUL; ZILFALIL, BIN ALWI

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: The severity of disease outcome in dyspepsia has been attributed to Helicobacter pylori virulence genes. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of H. pylori virulence genes (cagA, babA2, and dupA) and to determine whether or not there arises a significant correlation with clinical dyspepsia outcomes. Materials and methods: H. pylori genotypes cagA, babA2, and dupA were identified by polymerase chain reactions from gastric biopsy samples in 105 H. pylori-posit...

  2. Higher frequency of cagA EPIYA-C Phosphorylation Sites in H. pylori strains from first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients

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    Queiroz Dulciene MM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the prevalence of more virulent H. pylori genotypes in relatives of gastric cancer patients and in patients without family histories of gastric cancer. Methods We evaluated prospectively the prevalence of the infection by more virulent H. pylori strains in 60 relatives of gastric cancer patients comparing the results with those obtained from 49 patients without family histories of gastric cancer. H. pylori status was determined by the urease test, histology and presence of H. pylori ureA. The cytotoxin associated gene (cagA, the cagA-EPIYA and vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA were typed by PCR and the cagA EPIYA typing was confirmed by sequencing. Results The gastric cancer relatives were significant and independently more frequently colonized by H. pylori strains with higher numbers of CagA-EPIYA-C segments (OR = 4.23, 95%CI = 1.53–11.69 and with the most virulent s1m1 vacA genotype (OR = 2.80, 95%CI = 1.04–7.51. Higher numbers of EPIYA-C segments were associated with increased gastric corpus inflammation, foveolar hyperplasia and atrophy. Infection by s1m1 vacA genotype was associated with increased antral and corpus gastritis. Conclusions We demonstrated that relatives of gastric cancer patients are more frequently colonized by the most virulent H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes, which may contribute to increase the risk of gastric cancer.

  3. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  4. Are clinical features able to predict Helicobacter pylori gastritis patterns? Evidence from tertiary centers.

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    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Porowska, Barbara; Colacci, Enzo; Trentino, Paolo; Annibale, Bruno; Severi, Carola

    2014-12-01

    Outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection is different according to gastritis extension (i.e. antrum-restricted gastritis or pangastritis). The aim of this study is to evaluate whether different gastritis patterns are associated with specific gastrointestinal symptoms or clinical signs that could be suggestive of the topography of gastritis. 236 consecutive symptomatic outpatients were recruited in two tertiary centers. They filled in a validated and self-administered Rome III modular symptomatic questionnaire, and underwent gastroscopy with histological sampling. 154 patients with Helicobacter pylori infection were included. Clinical presentation did not differ between antrum-restricted gastritis and pangastritis, gastro-esophageal reflux disease being present in 48.2 and 54.1 % of patients and dyspepsia in 51.8 and 45.9 %, respectively. However, pangastritis statistically differed from antrum-restricted gastritis in that the presence of clinical signs (p gastritis pattern whereas their association with signs, accurately detected, is indicative for the presence of pangastritis.

  5. Diversification of the vacAs1m1 and vacAs2m2 strains of Helicobacter pylori in Meriones unguiculatus

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    Sandra Mendoza Elizalde

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Helicobacter pylori exhibits great genetic diversity, and the pathogenic roles of its virulence factors have been widely studied. However, the evolutionary dynamics of H. pylori strains during stomach colonization are not well characterized. Here, we analyzed the microevolutionary dynamics of the toxigenic strain vacAs1m1, the non-toxigenic strain vacAs2m2, and a combination of both strains in an animal model over time. Meriones unguiculatus were inoculated with the following bacteria: group 1–toxigenic strain vacAs1m1/cagA+/cagE+/babA2+; ST181, group 2–non-toxigenic strain vacAs2m2/ cagA+/ cagE+/ babA2+; ST2901, and group 3–both strains. The gerbils were euthanized at different time points (3, 6, 12 and 18 months. In group 1, genetic alterations were observed at 6 and 12 months. With the combination of both strains, group 3 also exhibited genetic alterations at 3 and 18 months; moreover, a chimera, vacA m1-m2, was detected. Additionally, four new sequence types (STs were reported in the PubMLST database for H. pylori. Synonymous and non-synonymous mutations were analyzed and associated with alterations in amino acids. Microevolutionary analysis of the STs (PHYLOViZ identified in each group revealed many mutational changes in the toxigenic (vacAs1m1 and non-toxigenic (vacAs2m2 strains. Phylogenetic assessments (eBURST did not reveal clonal complexes. Our findings indicate that the toxigenic strain, vacAs1m1, and a combination of toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains acquired genetic material by recombination. The allelic combination, vacAs2m1, displayed the best adaptation in the animal model over time, and a chimera, m1-m2, was also identified, which confirmed previous reports.

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines and Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children

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    Colin Macarthur

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to review the principles, methods and issues behind the development of clinical practice guidelines. Practice guidelines have been defined as “systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances”. The ultimate goal of guidelines is to improve patient outcomes; however, they may also be used as tools to decrease health care costs, improve medical education and enhance quality assurance. Evidence-based guidelines use explicit methods to link recommendations to the quality of the underlying research. Following development of the guideline, implementation and evaluation are key steps. The ultimate aim of guideline development is to influence physician knowledge, attitudes and behaviour.

  7. Construction of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain expressing a fusion protein of Omp22 and HpaA from Helicobacter pylori for oral vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongguang; Duan, Guangcai; Shi, Qingfeng; Chen, Shuaiyin; Fan, Qingtang; Sun, Nan; Xi, Yuanlin

    2016-11-01

    To develop orally administrated anti-Helicobacter pylori vaccination, a Lactococcus lactis strain was genetically constructed for fusion expression of H. pylori protective antigens HpaA and Omp22. The fusion gene of omp22 and hpaA with an adapter encoding three glycines was cloned from a plasmid pMAL-c2x-omp22-hpaA into Escherichia coli MC1061 and L. lactis NZ3900 successively using a shutter vector pNZ8110. Expression of the fusion gene in L. lactis was induced with nisin resulting in production of proteins with molecular weights of 50 and 28 kDa. Both of them were immunoreactive with mouse anti-H. pylori sera as determined via western blotting. Oral vaccination of BALB/c mice using the L. lactis strain carrying pNZ8110-omp22-hpaA elicited significant systematic humoral immune response (P lactis with immunogenicity. This is a considerable step towards H. pylori vaccines.

  8. Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains lacking dupA is associated with an increased risk of gastric ulcer and gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Taghvaei, Tarang; Wolfram, Lutz; Kusters, Johannes G

    2012-01-01

    Recently, dupA was reported as a new virulence factor in Helicobacter pylori, but its association with gastroduodenal disorders and its mode of action are still unclear. Here, an association of the dupA status with different disease groups was determined and a biological explanation for the observed associations was tested. In total, 216 H. pylori isolates were obtained from 232 presumed H. pylori-infected patients. A positive association was observed between the occurrence of duodenal ulcer (DU) and the presence of dupA [odds ratio (OR) 24.2; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 10.6-54.8]. In addition, an inverse association between the occurrence of gastric cancer (GC) [OR 0.16; 95 % CI 0.05-0.47] and gastric ulcer (GU) [OR 0.34; 95 % CI 0.16-0.68] with the presence of dupA was observed. A putative explanation for the observed associations might be a more corpus-located infection (pan-gastritis) by the dupA-positive strains due to their increased acid resistance. Indeed, a strong association between dupA-positive H. pylori isolated from gastritis patients and in vitro acid resistance was observed (PdupA-positive strains suggests that these strains are adapted to a stomach with high gastric acid output. This may in part explain the observed associations, as an increased gastric acid output is thought to be typical for an antrum-predominant H. pylori infection and, whilst this is associated with an increased risk of DU formation, it also decreases the risk for the genesis of GUs and GC.

  9. Systematic analysis of phosphotyrosine antibodies recognizing single phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs in CagA of Western-type Helicobacter pylori strains.

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    Judith Lind

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infections is determined by multiple host-pathogen interactions that may develop to chronic gastritis, and sometimes peptic ulcers or gastric cancer. Highly virulent strains encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS that delivers the effector protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at EPIYA-sequence motifs, called A, B and C in Western-type strains, by members of the oncogenic Src and Abl host kinases. Phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs mediate interactions of CagA with host signaling factors--in particular various SH2-domain containing human proteins--thereby hijacking multiple downstream signaling cascades. Observations of tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA are mainly based on the use of commercial phosphotyrosine antibodies, which originally were selected to detect phosphotyrosines in mammalian proteins. Systematic studies of phosphorylated EPIYA-motif detection by the different antibodies would be very useful, but are not yet available. To address this issue, we synthesized phospho- and non-phosphopeptides representing each predominant Western CagA EPIYA-motif, and determined the recognition patterns of seven different phosphotyrosine antibodies in Western blots, and also performed infection studies with diverse representative Western H. pylori strains. Our results show that a total of 9-11 amino acids containing the phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs are necessary and sufficient for specific detection by these antibodies, but revealed great variability in sequence recognition. Three of the antibodies recognized phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs A, B and C similarly well; whereas preferential binding to phosphorylated motif A and motifs A and C was found with two and one antibodies, respectively, and the seventh anti-phosphotyrosine antibody did not recognize any phosphorylated EPIYA-motif. Controls showed that none of the antibodies recognized the corresponding non

  10. Host Epithelial Interactions with Helicobacter Pylori: A Role for Disrupted Gastric Barrier Function in the Clinical Outcome of Infection?

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    Andre G Buret

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori may develop into gastritis, ulceration, adenocarcinoma and mucosal lymphomas. The pathogenic mechanisms that determine the clinical outcome from this microbial-epithelial interaction remain poorly understood. An increasing number of reports suggests that disruptions of epithelial barrier function may contribute to pathology and postinfectious complications in a variety of gastrointestinal infections. The aim of this review is to critically discuss the implications of H pylori persistence on gastric disease, with emphasis on the role of myosin light chain kinase, claudins and matrix metalloproteinases in gastric permeability defects, and their contribution to the development of cancer. These mechanisms and the associated signalling events may represent novel therapeutic targets to control disease processes induced by H pylori, a microbial pathogen that colonizes the stomach of over 50% of the human population.

  11. Relationship between ureB Sequence Diversity, Urease Activity and Genotypic Variations of Different Helicobacter pylori Strains in Patients with Gastric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalehnoei, Hossein; Ahmadzadeh, Alireza; Farzi, Nastaran; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Aghdaei, Hamid Asadzadeh; Azimzadeh, Pendram; Molaei, Mahsa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Association of the severity of Helicobacter pylori induced diseases with virulence entity of the colonized strains was proven in some studies. Urease has been demonstrated as a potent virulence factor for H. pylori. The main aim of this study was investigation of the relationships of ureB sequence diversity, urease activity and virulence genotypes of different H. pylori strains with histopathological changes of gastric tissue in infected patients suffering from different gastric disorders. Analysis of the virulence genotypes in the isolated strains indicated significant associations between the presence of severe active gastritis and cagA+ (P = 0.039) or cagA/iceA1 genotypes (P = 0.026), and intestinal metaplasia and vacA m1 (P = 0.008) or vacA s1/m2 (P = 0.001) genotypes. Our results showed a 2.4-fold increased risk of peptic ulcer (95% CI: 0.483-11.93), compared with gastritis, in the infected patients who had dupA positive strains; however this association was not statistically significant. The results of urease activity showed a significant mean difference between the isolated strains from patients with PUD and NUD (P = 0.034). This activity was relatively higher among patients with intestinal metaplasia. Also a significant association was found between the lack of cagA and increased urease activity among the isolated strains (P = 0.036). While the greatest sequence variation of ureB was detected in a strain from a patient with intestinal metaplasia, the sole determined amino acid change in UreB sequence (Ala201Thr, 30%), showed no influence on urease activity. In conclusion, the supposed role of H. pylori urease to form peptic ulcer and advancing of intestinal metaplasia was postulated in this study. Higher urease activity in the colonizing H. pylori strains that present specific virulence factors was indicated as a risk factor for promotion of histopathological changes of gastric tissue that advance gastric malignancy.

  12. On the importance of developing a new generation of breath tests for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Korenev, Nikolai; Kamarchuk, Lyudmila; Pospelov, Alexander; Kravchenko, Andrey; Bajenov, Leonid; Kabulov, Mels; Amann, Anton; Kamarchuk, Gennadii

    2015-12-15

    State-of-the-art methods for non-invasive detection of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been considered. A reported global tendency towards a non-decreasing prevalence of H. pylori worldwide could be co-influenced by the functional limitations of urea breath tests (UBTs), currently preferred for the non-invasive recognition of H. pylori in a clinical setting. Namely, the UBTs can demonstrate false-positive or false-negative results. Within this context, limitations of conventional clinically exploited H. pylori tests have been discussed to justify the existing need for the development of a new generation of breath tests for the detection of H. pylori and the differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of the bacterium. This paper presents the results of a pilot clinical study aimed at evaluating the development and diagnostic potential of a new method based on the detection of the non-urease products of H. pylori vital activity in exhaled gas. The characteristics of breath of adolescents with H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative functional dyspepsia, together with a consideration of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) status of H. pylori-positive subjects, have been determined for the first time using innovative point-contact nanosensor devices based on salts of the organic conductor tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The clinical and diagnostic relevance of the response curves of the point-contact sensors was assessed. It was found that the recovery time of the point-contact sensors has a diagnostic value for differentiation of the H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease. The diagnostically significant elongation of the recovery time was even more pronounced in patients infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to the CagA-negative patients. Taking into account the operation of the point-contact sensors in the real-time mode, the obtained results are essential prerequisites for the development of a fast and

  13. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Northern Jordan: Endoscopy based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bani-Hani, Kamal E.; Hammouri, Shadi M.

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is considered the most common infection worldwide and is associated with many other disorders. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of this infection among patients undergoing endoscopy in Northern Jordan. Between November 1998 and September 2000, all patients referred from the Gastro-esophageal Clinic to the Endoscopy Unit at Princess Basma Teaching Hospital, Irbid, Northern Jordan were enrolled in this prospective study. For each patient clinical and epidemiological data was collected and endoscopy was performed. At least 3 antral biopsies were obtained from each patient, and these were examined histologically for the presence of gastritis and stained for Helicobacter pylori using modified Giemsa stain. A total of 197 consecutive patients (113 females) with a mean age of 40.2 years (range 15-91 years) were studied. Abdominal pain was the highest presenting symptom. Gastritis 91% and esophagitis 42% were the most frequent endoscopic findings. Gastritis was documented histologically in 183 (93%) of patients. Helicobacter pylori was found in 161 patients (82%), with all of these having histological gastritis. The 11 patients with gastric ulcer, compared to the 51 out of the 59 (86%) patients with duodenal ulcer, showed Helicobacter pylori in their biopsies. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients subjected to an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Jordan is high. This study confirms that Helicobacter pylori is significantly associated with gastritis and peptic ulcer. Further studies are needed to determine the types of Helicobacter pylori strains present in Jordan. (author)

  14. Association of Vac A- and Cag A-specific Helicobacter pylori strain infection with spontaneous preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Woo; Kwon, Han Sung; Sohn, In Sook; Kim, Young Ju; Hwang, Han Sung

    2017-04-01

    To better understand the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) seropositivity and spontaneous preterm birth. A total of 320 pregnant women were classified into two groups: normal control singleton pregnant group (n = 264) and singleton spontaneous preterm birth group (n = 56). Blood samples were collected at the time of delivery, and the H. pylori IgG, various virulence factors and systemic inflammation status were compared between the two groups. Between the two groups, the serum H. pylori IgG, Cytotoxin-associated agntigen A (Cag A), Vacuolating cytotoxin A (Vac A) significantly increased in spontaneous preterm birth group than in the control group. Also, in preterm group, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) as a systemic inflammatory marker is statistically elevated at inflammatory status range. Whereas in the term pregnant group, hsCRP was normal range even though high incidence of H. pylori IgG seropositivity. Also, in the seropositive group, hsCRP is statistically correlated with H. pylori IgG, Cag A and Vac A. There is an association between the presence of antibodies against H. pylori in maternal serum and the development of preterm birth. Furthermore, serology type of H. pylori with Vac A, Cag A relates to preterm birth even though high H. pylori prevalence rate.

  15. [Helicobacter pylori population characteristic in patients with diseases of gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhebrun, A B; Svarval', A V; Balabash, O A; Ferman, R S

    2013-01-01

    Study H. pylori strains circulating in St. Petersburg among patients with various gastrointestinal tract pathology as well as study of frequency of infection by H. pylori based on serological markers data among this group of patients. By using serological method 162 individuals with various chronic diseases of stomach and duodenum were examined. The presence in blood serum of IgG against H. pylori bacterial antigen and IgG against its toxin--CagA was studied. 129 patients were examined bacteriologically, biopsy samples of stomach mucous membrane were studied. PCR in real time format was used for study of H. pylori strains (49) and biopsy samples (36) of stomach mucous membrane. The analysis performed showed that on the territory of St. Petersburg H. pylori strains containing cagA gene predominate (81.63% of the isolated strains). Genotyping of strains by vacA showed that s1m1 genotype was more frequent (in 57.14% of cases). The fraction of CagA positive strains in patients in St. Petersburg is maximum for stomach cancer (90.8%), whereas for peptic ulcer disease and gastritis it is 64.7% and 72.2%, respectively. In patients with stomach and duodenum pathology the parameters of seropositivity for H. pylori were significantly higher than in individuals without clinical manifestations of H. pylori infection (86.72% against 65.09%; p < 0.05). The data obtained on increase of fraction of CagA positive strains among H. pylori circulating in St. Petersburg determine the importance of conducting eradication H. pylori.

  16. The Clinical Correlations of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors and Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria

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    Yi-Chun Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study Aims. The association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU remains controversial. This study explored the role of H. pylori in CSU among different virulent genotypes patients. Patients and Methods. Patients infected by H. pylori were sorted into two groups as group A (with CSU and group B (without CSU. The tissue materials were taken via endoscopy for polymerase chain reaction study to determine virulence factors. After H. pylori eradication therapy, the eradication rate and response of urticaria were evaluated by using C13-UBT and a three-point scale (complete remission, partial remission, or no improvement. Results. The results were comparable between patients of groups A and B in terms of H. pylori infection rates and eradication rate. Longitudinal follow-up of 23.5 months showed complete remission of urticaria in 63.6% but no improvement in 36.4% of the patients after H. pylori eradication. H. pylori infected patients with different virulence factors such as cytotoxin-associated gene A, vacuolating cytotoxin gene A signal region and middle region have similar remission rates for CSU. Conclusions. Current study suggests that H. pylori may play a role in the development and disease course of CSU but may be irrelevant to different virulent genotypes.

  17. Study of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the pediatrics outpatient clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, M A; El-Saadany, Hosam F; Ali, Adel S A; Abdelrahman, D

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the Outpatient Pediatric Clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals. The study was conducted on 100 children suffering from different GIT symptoms mainly recurrent abdominal pain, they were categorized into 3 categories according to their ages. First category below 5 years, second category between 5 and 10 years and last category above 10 years. All subjects underwent full history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Protozoa infection was in 29% of patients, helminthes 10%, chronic constipation 4% and UTI 4%. The patients with apparent etiology were excluded. The data do not support the hypothesis that there is a direct role for H. pylori infection as a causative agent for Recurrent Abdominal Pain (RAP) in children. The mean +/- SD of age of patients were 5.7 +/- 3.7, with range of 1:18 years. Male to female ratio was 1:1.1. H. pylori serum IgG antibodies were in 26 patients (43.3%) and 24 controls (p = 0.71), and H. pylori stool Ag in stool of 22 cases and 20 controls (p = 0.7).

  18. Peptide Extracts from Cultures of Certain Lactobacilli Inhibit Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, Luc; Vincent, Pascal; Makras, Eleftherios; Leroy, Frédéric; Pot, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori inhibition by probiotic lactobacilli has been observed in vitro and in vivo. Carefully selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains could therefore play an important role in the treatment of H. pylori infection and eradication. However, the underlying mechanism for this inhibition is not clear. The aim of this study was to examine if peptide extracts, containing bacteriocins or other antibacterial peptides, from six Lactobacillus cultures (Lactobacillus acidophilus La1, Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, Lactobacillus casei YIT 9029, Lactobacillus gasseri K7, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) contribute to the inhibition of H. pylori. Peptide extracts from cultures of Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were most active, reducing the viability of H. pylori ATCC 43504 with more than 2 log units within 4 h of incubation (P < 0.001). The four other extracts were less or not active. When six clinical isolates of H. pylori were tested for their susceptibility towards five inhibitory peptide extracts, similar observations were made. Again, the peptide extracts from Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were the most inhibitory, while the three other extracts resulted in a much lower inhibition of H. pylori. Protease-treated extracts were inactive towards H. pylori, confirming the proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory substance.

  19. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis and its impact on Chinese clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Lu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis has had a great effect on the field of H. pylori studies worldwide. For the first time H. pylori gastritis was defined entirely as an infectious disease and H. pylori-associated dyspepsia as a new category of organic dyspepsia apart from functional dyspepsia, together with a proposed diagnostic algorithm. Accordingly, the report states that the eradication of H. pylori should be regarded as the first-line treatment for dyspepsia. Moreover, H. pylori eradication before the development of pre-neoplastic changes is recommended to reduce the risk of more serious complications of H. pylori gastritis. Despite the recommendations of this new global consensus, the task of transforming them into feasible and practical recommendations for individual countries will require them to become region-specific, which requires further discussion. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the “point of no return” and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions. PMID:24833876

  1. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the "point of no return" and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions.

  2. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Oktem-Okullu

    Full Text Available The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1, IL-17 (Th17, and FOXP3 (Treg expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer-based models.

  3. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktem-Okullu, Sinem; Tiftikci, Arzu; Saruc, Murat; Cicek, Bahattin; Vardareli, Eser; Tozun, Nurdan; Kocagoz, Tanil; Sezerman, Ugur; Yavuz, Ahmet Sinan; Sayi-Yazgan, Ayca

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1), IL-17 (Th17), and FOXP3 (Treg) expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer-based models.

  4. Helicobacter-pylori Negative Gastritis in Children—A New Clinical Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoram Elitsur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decrease in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection in children in the world gave rise to a new pathological finding termed as Hp-negative gastritis. Unfortunately, the term “Hp-negative gastritis” has not been identified as a pathological process and has the status of a “second cousin”; in most publications it was never mentioned as a subject to be dealt with, but was “left over” data that was never the topic of the manuscripts’ discussions. Only recently has the topic captured the attention of the pathologists who described this phenomenon in adults, yet the pathological and/or clinical spectrum or significance of this phenomenon has not been adequately investigated. In the current manuscript we describe Hp-negative gastritis in children, summarize its clinical prevalence and touch upon the possible etiology, pathology, and/or therapeutic implication. Overall, this review has concluded that Hp-negative gastritis is a pathological phenomenon in children that needs further investigation, and to date, as the title suggests, is a new clinical enigma that needs to be considered.

  5. Primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains among adults and children in a tertiary referral centre in Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dargiene, Gintare; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Jonaitis, Laimas

    2018-01-01

    The study evaluated primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori within the period 2013-2015 and trends of antibiotic consumption over the last decade in Lithuania; 242 adults and 55 children were included in the study. E-tests were performed for amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin......, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. The presence of H. pylori and clarithromycin resistance was additionally tested by PCR. Helicobacter pylori culture was positive in 67 of 242 (28%) adult and in 12 of 55 (21.8%) children samples. Resistance rates among adults by E-tests were as follows: metronidazole......, while it has doubled from 1.10 to 2.22 DDD/1000/children/day in children within 2003-2015. There are no significant changes in the susceptibility of H. pylori to the most widely used antibiotics in adults over the last years in Lithuania; however, clarithromycin resistance among children exceeds 15...

  6. Helicobacter pylori dupA gene is not associated with clinical outcomes in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L T; Uchida, T; Tsukamoto, Y; Kuroda, A; Okimoto, T; Kodama, M; Murakami, K; Fujioka, T; Moriyama, M

    2010-08-01

    The dupA gene of Helicobacter pylori was suggested to be a risk factor for duodenal ulcer but protective against gastric cancer. The present study aimed to re-examine the role of dupA in H. pylori-infected Japanese patients. We found that dupA status was not associated with any gastroduodenal disease, histological score of chronic gastritis or with the extent of interleukin-8 production from gastric cell lines. These results indicate that dupA is unlikely to be a virulence factor of H. pylori in the Japanese population.

  7. Implications of Antibiotic Resistance in the Management of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Canadian Helicobacter Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RH Hunt

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eradication of Helicobacter pylori from the gastric and duodenal mucosa is an important clinical goal in the treatment of infected patients with peptic ulcer disease and other H pylori-associated conditions. Although several oral drug combination regimens are associated with eradication rates of approximately 85% in controlled trials, the success rate in patients infected with a resistant strain of H pylori is closer to 75%. Resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin, which are common components of combination treatment regimens, is of greatest concern. Reported rates of H pylori resistance to various antibiotics vary considerably. In Canada, the data documenting H pylori susceptibility are limited but suggest that resistance to these antibiotics varies geographically and within specific treatment groups. Although susceptibility testing is not a prerequisite for initial treatment of individual patients infected with H pylori, formal efforts to identify and monitor both the causes and prevalence of antibiotic resistance across Canada are a much needed step in the ongoing management of this important infection. Recommended treatment regimens may be useful, even for treating apparently resistant H pylori strains. However, it is important to understand the mechanisms of the development of resistant strains to manage patients with treatment failure better.

  8. Clarithromycin vs. Gemifloxacin in Quadruple Therapy Regimens for Empiric Primary Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Mohsen; Talebi-Taher, Mahshid; Tabatabaie, Khadijeh; Khaleghi, Siamak; Faghihi, Amir-Hossein; Agah, Shahram; Asadi, Reyhaneh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection plays a crucial role in the treatment of peptic ulcer. Clarithromycin resistance is a major cause of treatment failure. This randomized clinical trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a clarithromycin versus gemifloxacin containing quadruple therapy regimen in eradication of H.pylori infection. METHODS In this randomized double blind clinical trial (RCT 2012102011054N2), a total of 120 patients were randomized to two groups of 60 patients each. Patients with proven H.pylori infection were consecutively assigned into two groups to receive OBAG or OBAC in gastroenterology clinic in Rasoul-e- Akram General Hospital in Tehran, Iran. The patients in the OBAG group received omeprazole (20 mg) twice daily, bismuth subcitrate (240 mg) twice daily, amoxicillin (1 gr) twice daily, and gemifloxacin (320 mg) once daily, and those in the OBAC group received omeprazole (20 mg) twice daily, 240 mg of bismuth subcitrate twice daily, amoxicillin (1 gr) twice daily, and clarithromycin (500 mg) twice daily for 10 days. RESULTS Five patients from each group were excluded from the study because of poor compliance, so 110 patients completed the study. The intention-to-treat eradication rate was 61.6% and 66.6% for the OBAC and OBAG groups, respectively. According to the per protocol analysis, the success rates of eradication of H.pylori infection were 67.2% and 72.7% for OBAC and OBAG groups, respectively (p=0.568). CONCLUSION The results of this study suggest that gemifloxacin containing regimen is at least as effective as clarithromycin regimen; hence, this new treatment could be considered as an alternative for the patients who cannot tolerate clarithromycin. PMID:26106468

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Helicobacter pylori from patients with and without peptic ulcer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A M; Fussing, V; Colding, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori plays an important role in peptic ulcer disease, although not all H. pylori-infected persons will develop a peptic ulcer. Currently, H. pylori strains cannot be divided into commensals and pathogens. METHODS: Fifty H. pylori strains were cultured from patients......) profile of H. pylori strains were recorded; randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and urease gene typing were performed and correlated with diagnostic groups. RESULTS: Electron micrographs showed that H. pylori strains from patients with gastric ulcers adhered more frequently through filamentous...... strands and were less frequently found free in mucus than any other diagnostic group (P pylori strains from patients with gastric...

  10. Consensus on the clinical management, screening-to-treat, and surveillance of Helicobacter pylori infection to improve gastric cancer control on a nationwide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lo, Jing-Chuan; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Wu, Chun-Ying; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Lee, Yi-Chia; Hsu, Ping-I; Chang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2017-06-01

    Previous international consensus statements provided general policies for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there are geographic differences in the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori, and in the availability of medications and endoscopy. Thus, nationwide or regional consensus statements are needed to improve control of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. This consensus statement for management of H. pylori in Taiwan has three major sections: (1) optimal diagnosis and indications; (2) current treatment strategies; and (3) screening-to-treat and surveillance for control of gastric cancer. The literature review emphasized recent data for development of draft statements and determination of levels of evidence. Twenty-five Taiwan experts conducted a consensus conference, by a modified Delphi process, to modify the draft statements. Consensus, defined as an agreement of least 80% of the experts, and recommendation grade were determined by anonymous voting. There were 24 consensus statements. Section 1 has seven statements on recommendations for the diagnosis and indications for treatment of H. pylori infection. Section 2 has 10 statements that provide an updated treatment algorithm for first-line, second-line, and third-line regimens. Section 3 has seven statements regarding H. pylori eradication for reducing the risk of gastric cancer, with a cost-benefit analysis. After H. pylori eradication, the consensus highlights the use of endoscopic surveillance and/or chemoprevention to further reduce the burden of gastric cancer. This consensus statement has updated recommendations for improving the clinical management of H. pylori infection in areas such as Taiwan, which have high prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Systematic review and meta-analysis: the relationship between the Helicobacter pylori dupA gene and clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiota Seiji

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2005, the first disease-specific Helicobacter pylori virulence factor that induced duodenal ulcer and had a suppressive action on gastric cancer has been identified, and was named duodenal ulcer promoting gene (dupA. However, the importance of the dupA gene on clinical outcomes is conflicting in subsequent studies. The aim of this study was to estimate the magnitude of the risk for clinical outcomes associated with dupA gene. Methods A meta-analysis of case-control studies which provided raw data on the infection rates with the dupA-positive H. pylori detected by polymerase chain reaction was performed. Results Seventeen studies with a total of 2,466 patients were identified in the search. Infection with the dupA-positive H. pylori increased the risk for duodenal ulcer by 1.41-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.76 overall. Subgroup analysis showed that the summary odds ratio (OR was 1.57 (95% CI, 1.19-2.06 in Asian countries and 1.09 (95% CI, 0.73-1.62 in Western countries. There was no association between the presence of the dupA gene and gastric cancer and gastric ulcer. Publication bias did not exist. Conclusion Our meta-analysis confirmed the importance of the presence of the dupA gene for duodenal ulcer, especially in Asian countries.

  12. Systematic review and meta-analysis: the relationship between the Helicobacter pylori dupA gene and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Matsunari, Osamu; Watada, Masahide; Hanada, Katsuhiro; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-10-31

    In 2005, the first disease-specific Helicobacter pylori virulence factor that induced duodenal ulcer and had a suppressive action on gastric cancer has been identified, and was named duodenal ulcer promoting gene (dupA). However, the importance of the dupA gene on clinical outcomes is conflicting in subsequent studies. The aim of this study was to estimate the magnitude of the risk for clinical outcomes associated with dupA gene. A meta-analysis of case-control studies which provided raw data on the infection rates with the dupA-positive H. pylori detected by polymerase chain reaction was performed. Seventeen studies with a total of 2,466 patients were identified in the search. Infection with the dupA-positive H. pylori increased the risk for duodenal ulcer by 1.41-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.76) overall. Subgroup analysis showed that the summary odds ratio (OR) was 1.57 (95% CI, 1.19-2.06) in Asian countries and 1.09 (95% CI, 0.73-1.62) in Western countries. There was no association between the presence of the dupA gene and gastric cancer and gastric ulcer. Publication bias did not exist. Our meta-analysis confirmed the importance of the presence of the dupA gene for duodenal ulcer, especially in Asian countries.

  13. Phylogeographic origin of Helicobacter pylori determines host-adaptive responses upon coculture with gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheh, Alexander; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Merrell, D Scott; Correa, Pelayo; Wilson, Keith T; Fox, James G

    2013-07-01

    While Helicobacter pylori infects over 50% of the world's population, the mechanisms involved in the development of gastric disease are not fully understood. Bacterial, host, and environmental factors play a role in disease outcome. To investigate the role of bacterial factors in H. pylori pathogenesis, global gene expression of six H. pylori isolates was analyzed during coculture with gastric epithelial cells. Clustering analysis of six Colombian clinical isolates from a region with low gastric cancer risk and a region with high gastric cancer risk segregated strains based on their phylogeographic origin. One hundred forty-six genes had increased expression in European strains, while 350 genes had increased expression in African strains. Differential expression was observed in genes associated with motility, pathogenicity, and other adaptations to the host environment. European strains had greater expression of the virulence factors cagA, vacA, and babB and were associated with increased gastric histologic lesions in patients. In AGS cells, European strains promoted significantly higher interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression than did African strains. African strains significantly induced apoptosis, whereas only one European strain significantly induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that gene expression profiles of clinical isolates can discriminate strains by phylogeographic origin and that these profiles are associated with changes in expression of the proinflammatory and protumorigenic cytokine IL-8 and levels of apoptosis in host epithelial cells. These findings support the hypothesis that bacterial factors determined by the phylogeographic origin of H. pylori strains may promote increased gastric disease.

  14. Probiotics as an adjuvant treatment in Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xin Yan; Liu, Fei

    2017-04-01

    Over 80% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are asymptomatic. Increased resistance to antibiotics and decreased compliance to the therapeutic regimens have led to the failure of eradication therapy. Probiotics, with direct and indirect inhibitory effects on H. pylori in both animal models and clinical trials, have recently been used as a supplementary treatment in H. pylori eradication therapy. Probiotics have been considered useful because of the improvements in H. pylori eradication rates and therapy-related side effects although treatment outcomes using probiotics are controversial due to the heterogeneity of species, strains, doses and therapeutic duration of probiotics. Thus, despite the positive role of probiotics, several factors need to be further considered during their applications. Moreover, adverse events of probiotic use need to be noted. Further investigations into the safety of adjuvant probiotics to H. pylori eradication therapy are required. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. The significance of virulence factors in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Suzuki, Rumiko; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is linked to various gastroduodenal diseases; however, only a small fraction of these patients develop associated diseases. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infection in Africa and South Asia, the incidence of gastric cancer in these areas is much lower than those in other countries. The incidence of gastric cancer tends to decrease from north to south in East Asia. Such geographical differences in the pathology can be explained, at least in part, by the presence of different types of H. pylori virulence factors in addition to host and environmental factors. Virulence factors of H. pylori, such as CagA, VacA, DupA, IceA, OipA and BabA, have been demonstrated to be the predictors of severe clinical outcomes. Interestingly, a meta-analysis showed that CagA seropositivity was associated with gastric cancer compared with gastritis, even in East Asian countries where almost the strains possess cagA. Another meta-analysis also confirmed the significance of vacA, dupA and iceA. However, it is possible that additional important pathogenic genes may exist because H. pylori consists of approximately 1600 genes. Despite the advances in our understanding of the development of H. pylori infection-related diseases, further work is required to clarify the roles of H. pylori virulence factors. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Digestive Diseases © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine.

  16. In vitro synergistic effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa aqueous extract in combination with standard antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Berchová, Kateřina; Majerová, Michaela; Pokorná, Marie; Švajdlenka, Emil

    2016-09-01

    Context The increasing problem of drug-resistant strains has led to the failure of current treatment regimens of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. Recently, a new treatment strategy has been developed to overcome the problem by using natural products in combination with antibiotics to enhance the treatment efficacy. Objective The antimicrobial combinatory effect of the aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) (AEHS) with antibiotics (clarithromycin, CLA; amoxicillin, AMX; metronidazole, MTZ) has been evaluated in vitro against HP strains. Materials and methods Hibiscus calyces (35 g) were brewed in 250 mL of boiled water for 30 min, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution method. The checkerboard assay was used to evaluate the antimicrobial combinatory effect according to the sum of fractional inhibitory concentration (∑FIC) indices. Results In this study, AEHS exerted remarkable bacteriostatic effect against all HP strains tested with MICs values ranging from 9.18 to 16.68 μg/mL. Synergy effect of AEHS with CLA or MTZ was obtained against four of seven HP strains tested with ∑FIC ranging from 0.21 to 0.39. The additive effect of AEHS with AMX was obtained against five of seven HP strains tested with ∑FIC ranging from 0.61 to 0.91. Conclusion This study presents AEHS as a potent therapeutic candidate alone, or in combination with antibiotics for the treatment of HP infection.

  17. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L. Cover

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI. Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed.

  18. Novel sonographic clues for diagnosis of antral gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, Emin; Ucan, Berna; Colak, Bayram; Cinar, Hasibe Gokçe

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether transabdominal sonography may have a predictive role for detection of antral gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in the antrum. A total of 108 patients and 54 control participants were allocated into 3 groups: group 1, controls without any symptoms or findings of antral gastritis and H pylori infection; group 2, patients with symptoms and endoscopic findings consistent with gastritis in the absence of documented H pylori infection; and group 3, patients with symptoms and endoscopic findings consistent with gastritis and documented H pylori infection. These groups were compared in terms of demographics, antral wall thickness, mucosal layer (together with muscularis mucosa) thickness, and mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio. The groups had no statistically significant differences with respect to age, sex, body mass index, and smoking habits. However, it turned out that both antral walls and muscularis mucosa layers were thicker and the mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio was higher in groups 2 and 3 compared to group 1 (P > .001). In addition, group 3 had statistically significantly thicker antral walls and muscularis mucosa layers and a significantly increased mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio than group 2 (P gastritis caused by H pylori infection is associated with characteristic features such as thickening of antral walls and mucosal layers on sonography. These novel clues may be useful in the diagnosis of gastritis, and unnecessary interventions and measures can be avoided in some cases. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. STAT3 polymorphism and Helicobacter pylori CagA strains with higher number of EPIYA-C segments independently increase the risk of gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Gifone A; Rocha, Andreia MC; Gomes, Adriana D; Faria, César LL Jr; Melo, Fabrício F; Batista, Sérgio A; Fernandes, Viviane C; Almeida, Nathálie BF; Teixeira, Kádima N; Brito, Kátia S; Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    Because to date there is no available study on STAT3 polymorphism and gastric cancer in Western populations and taking into account that Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA-C segment deregulates SHP-2/ERK-JAK/STAT3 pathways, we evaluated whether the two variables are independently associated with gastric cancer. We included 1048 subjects: H. pylori-positive patients with gastric carcinoma (n = 232) and with gastritis (n = 275) and 541 blood donors. Data were analyzed using logistic regression model. The rs744166 polymorphic G allele (p = 0.01; OR = 1.76; 95 % CI = 1.44-2.70), and CagA-positive (OR = 12.80; 95 % CI = 5.58-19.86) status were independently associated with gastric cancer in comparison with blood donors. The rs744166 polymorphism (p = 0.001; OR = 1.64; 95 % CI = 1.16-2.31) and infection with H. pylori CagA-positive strains possessing higher number of EPIYA-C segments (p = 0.001; OR = 2.28; 95 % CI = 1.41-3.68) were independently associated with gastric cancer in comparison with gastritis. The association was stronger when host and bacterium genotypes were combined (p < 0.001; OR = 3.01; 95 % CI = 2.29-3.98). When stimulated with LPS (lipopolysaccharide) or Pam3Cys, peripheral mononuclear cells of healthy carriers of the rs744166 GG and AG genotypes expressed higher levels of STAT3 mRNA than those carrying AA genotype (p = 0.04 for both). The nuclear expression of phosphorylated p-STAT3 protein was significantly higher in the antral gastric tissue of carriers of rs744166 GG genotype than in carriers of AG and AA genotypes. Our study provides evidence that STAT3 rs744166 G allele and infection with CagA-positive H. pylori with higher number of EPIYA-C segments are independent risk factors for gastric cancer. The odds ratio of having gastric cancer was greater when bacterium and host high risk genotypes were combined

  20. DNA Fingerprinting of Single Colonies of Helicobacter pylori from Gastric Cancer Patients Suggests Infection with a Single Predominant Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Miehlke, Stephan; Thomas, Rachel; Guiterrez, Oscar; Graham, David Y.; Go, Mae F.

    1999-01-01

    In each of six gastric cancer patients, repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR DNA fingerprints of 18 single colonies of Helicobacter pylori from the gastric antrum, corpus, and cardia were identical and matched that of the parental isolate. In three additional gastric cancer patients, 17 of 18 single-colony DNA fingerprints were identical to each other and to the DNA fingerprint of the corresponding parental isolate.

  1. Different distribution of Helicobacter pylori EPIYA- cagA motifs and dupA genes in the upper gastrointestinal diseases and correlation with clinical outcomes in iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Mohammad Hossein; Bazargani, Abdollah; Khashei, Reza; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Moini, Maryam; Rokni Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the EPIYA-cagA Phosphorylation sites and dupA gene in H. pylori isolates among patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases. Pathogenicity of the cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is associated with EPIYA motifs and higher number of EPIYA-C segments is a risk factor of gastric cancer, while duodenal ulcer-promoting gene (dupA) is determined as a protective factor against gastric cancer. A total of 280 non-repeated gastric biopsies obtained from patients undergoing endoscopy from January 2013 till July 2013. Samples were cultured on selective horse blood agar and incubated in microaerophilic atmosphere. The isolated organisms were identified as H. pylori by Gram staining and positive oxidase, catalase, and urease tests. Various motif types of cagA and the prevalence of dupA were determined by PCR method. Out of 280 specimens, 128 (54.7%) isolated organisms were identified as H. pylori. Of 120 H. pylori isolates, 35.9% were dupA positive and 56.26% were cagA positive, while cagA with ABC and ABCC motifs were 55.5% and 44.5%, respectively. Fifty six percent of the isolates with the ABCC motif have had dupA genes. We also found a significant association between strains with genotypes of dupA-ABC and duodenal ulcer disease (p = 0.007). The results of this study showed that the prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori in Shiraz was as high as in western countries and higher numbers of EPIYA-C segments were seen in gastric cancer patients. We may also use dupA as a prognostic and pathogenic marker for duodenal ulcer disease and cagA with the segment C for gastric cancer and gastric ulcer disease in this region.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF RELATED ANAMNESTIC AND CLINICAL FACTORS ON EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF ANTI-HELICOBACTER PYLORI THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Andreev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a prospective clinical study in which 100 patients with H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease of stomach/duodenum were examined. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of concomitant anamnestic and clinical factors on the efficacy and safety of eradication therapy (ET. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a factor that significantly reduces the efficiency of ET with OR 0.21 (95% CI 0,06-0,69, p = 0,0102. Using a macrolide antibiotics prior to ET during the previous 12 months is associated with a reduction in the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication with OR 0.27 (95% CI 0,08-0,90, p = 0,0342. Despite the lack of statistical significance observed negative effect on the efficiency of ET factors such as smoking and increased BMI. Smoking, female gender, age over 50 years and the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus had no significant impact on the safety profile of ET. 

  3. A highly acid-resistant novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 has antibacterial activity, including that against Helicobacter pylori, and inhibits gastrin-mediated acid production in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Yuji; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Koga, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was isolated from the gastric juice of a healthy Japanese male volunteer, and characterized for its effectiveness in the stomach environment. Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was found to have the strongest acid resistance among several lactobacilli examined (>10% of cells survived at pH 1.0 after 2 h), and such a high acid resistance property was a specific characteristic of this strain of L. johnsonii. When cultured with various virulent bacteria, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of Helicobacter pylori,Escherichia coli O-157, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile, in which case its effectiveness was more potent than that of a type strain of L. johnsonii,JCM2012. In addition to its effect in vitro, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of H. pylori in human intestinal microbiota-associated mice in both its live and lyophilized forms. Moreover, L. johnsonii No. 1088 suppressed gastric acid secretion in mice via decreasing the number of gastrin-positive cells in the stomach. These results taken together suggest that L. johnsonii No. 1088 is a unique lactobacillus having properties beneficial for supporting H. pylori eradication by triple therapy including the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and also for prophylaxis of gastroesophageal reflux disease possibly caused after H. pylori eradication as a side effect of PPI. PMID:25771812

  4. Genotyping analysis of Helicobacter pylori using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis in five regions of China and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jinyong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori is the major causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The population of H. pylori shows a high genomic variability among isolates. And the polymorphism of repeat-units of genomics had participated the important process of evolution. Its long term colonization of the stomach caused different clinical outcomes, which may relate to the high degree of genetic variation of H. pylori. A variety of molecular typing tools have been developed to access genetic relatedness in H. pylori isolates. However, there is still no standard genotyping system of this bacterium. The MLVA (Multi-locus of variable number of tandem repeat analysis method is useful for performing phylogenetic analysis and is widely used in bacteria genotyping; however, there's little application in H. pylori analysis. This article is the first application of the MLVA method to investigate H. pylori from different districts and ethnic groups of China. Results MLVA of 12 VNTR loci with high discrimination power based on 30 candidates were performed on a collection of 202 strains of H. pylori which originated from five regions of China and Japan. Phylogenetic tree was constructed using MLVA profiles. 12 VNTR loci presented with high various polymorphisms, and the results demonstrated very close relationships between genotypes and ethnic groups. Conclusions This study used MLVA methodology providing a new perspective on the ethnic groups and distribution characteristics of H. pylori.

  5. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  6. vacA s1m1 genotype and cagA EPIYA-ABC pattern are predominant among Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from Mexican patients with chronic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrisco-Morales, Josefina; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I; Román-Román, Adolfo; Alarcón-Millán, Judit; De Sampedro-Reyes, José; Cruz-Del Carmen, Iván; Martínez-Carrillo, Dinorah N; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria

    2018-03-01

    Virulent genotypes of Helicobacter pylori vacA s1m1/cagA + /babA2 + have been associated with severe gastric diseases. VacA, CagA and BabA are polymorphic proteins, and their association with the disease is allele-dependent. The aims of this work were: (i) to determine the prevalence of H. pylori by type of chronic gastritis; (ii) to describe the frequency of cagA, babA2 and vacA genotypes in strains from patients with different types of chronic gastritis; (iii) to characterize the variable region of cagA alleles. A total of 164 patients with chronic gastritis were studied. Altogether, 50 H. pylori strains were isolated, and the status of cagA, babA2 and vacA genotypes was examined by PCR. cagA EPIYA segment identification was performed using PCR and sequencing of cagA fragments of six randomly selected strains.Results/Key findings. The overall prevalence of H. pylori was 30.5 %. Eighty percent of the isolated strains were vacA s1m1, and the cagA and babA2 genes were detected in 74 and 32 % of the strains, respectively. The most frequent genotypes were vacA s1m1/cagA + /babA2 - and vacA s1m1/cagA + /babA2 + , with 40 % (20/50) and 28 % (14/50), respectively. In cagA + , the most frequent EPIYA motif was -ABC (78.4 %), and EPIYA-ABCC and -ABCCC motifs were found in 10.8 % of the strains. A modified EPIYT-B motif was found in 66.6 % of the sequenced strains. H. pylori strains carrying vacA s1m1, cagA + and babA2 - genotypes were the most prevalent in patients with chronic gastritis from the south of Mexico. In the cagA + strains, the EPIYA-ABC motif was the most common.

  7. Helicobacter pylori iceA, clinical outcomes, and correlation with cagA: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Watada, Masahide; Matsunari, Osamu; Iwatani, Shun; Suzuki, Rumiko; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Although the iceA (induced by contact with epithelium) allelic types of Helicobacter pylori have been reported to be associated with peptic ulcer, the importance of iceA on clinical outcomes based on subsequent studies is controversial. The aim of this study was to estimate the magnitude of the risk for clinical outcomes associated with iceA. A literature search was performed using the PubMed and EMBASE databases for articles published through April 2011. Published case-control studies examining the relationship between iceA and clinical outcomes (gastritis, peptic ulcer, including gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer) were included. Fifty studies with a total of 5,357 patients were identified in the search. Infection with iceA1-positive H. pylori increased the overall risk for peptic ulcer by 1.26-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.45). However, the test for heterogeneity was significant among these studies. Sensitivity analysis showed that the presence of iceA1 was significantly associated with peptic ulcer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.08-1.44). The presence of iceA2 was inversely associated with peptic ulcer (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.65-0.89). The presence of iceA was not associated with gastric cancer. Most studies examined the cagA status; however, only 15 studies examined the correlation and only 2 showed a positive correlation between the presence of cagA and iceA1. Our meta-analysis confirmed the importance of the presence of iceA for peptic ulcer, although the significance was marginal.

  8. Genotypic comparison of Pantoea agglomerans plant and clinical strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pantoea agglomerans strains are among the most promising biocontrol agents for a variety of bacterial and fungal plant diseases, particularly fire blight of apple and pear. However, commercial registration of P. agglomerans biocontrol products is hampered because this species is currently listed as a biosafety level 2 (BL2 organism due to clinical reports as an opportunistic human pathogen. This study compares plant-origin and clinical strains in a search for discriminating genotypic/phenotypic markers using multi-locus phylogenetic analysis and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphisms (fAFLP fingerprinting. Results Majority of the clinical isolates from culture collections were found to be improperly designated as P. agglomerans after sequence analysis. The frequent taxonomic rearrangements underwent by the Enterobacter agglomerans/Erwinia herbicola complex may be a major problem in assessing clinical associations within P. agglomerans. In the P. agglomerans sensu stricto (in the stricter sense group, there was no discrete clustering of clinical/biocontrol strains and no marker was identified that was uniquely associated to clinical strains. A putative biocontrol-specific fAFLP marker was identified only in biocontrol strains. The partial ORF located in this band corresponded to an ABC transporter that was found in all P. agglomerans strains. Conclusion Taxonomic mischaracterization was identified as a major problem with P. agglomerans, and current techniques removed a majority of clinical strains from this species. Although clear discrimination between P. agglomerans plant and clinical strains was not obtained with phylogenetic analysis, a single marker characteristic of biocontrol strains was identified which may be of use in strain biosafety determinations. In addition, the lack of Koch's postulate fulfilment, rare retention of clinical strains for subsequent confirmation, and the polymicrobial nature of P

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferritin...... in 1987/1988. The examination included a detailed questionnaire on medical history and lifestyle factors, a 7-day food record, and blood samples. Infection with H. pylori was measured serologically by ELISA and Westernblot. RESULTS: In total, 39.2% of 1806 persons aged 18 to 89 yr included in the study...... were H. pylori positive, of whom 57.6% had an infection with a CagA-positive H. pylori strain. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean of ferritin was 54.5 microg/dl among H. pylori-infected compared with 63.8 microg/dl among uninfected persons. A multiple linear regression model with log...

  10. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  11. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your child aspirin, aspirin-containing medicines, ibuprofen, or anti-inflammatory drugs because these may irritate the stomach or cause stomach bleeding. With prolonged antibiotic therapy, H. pylori gastritis and peptic ulcer disease ( ...

  12. [Gastric cancer risk estimate in patients with chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in a clinical setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismendi-Morillo, G; Hernández, I; Mengual, E; Abreu, N; Molero, N; Fuenmayor, A; Romero, G; Lizarzábal, M

    2013-01-01

    Severity of chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection (CGAHpI) could play a role in evaluating the potential risk to develop gastric cancer. Our aim was to estimate the risk for gastric cancer in a clinical setting, according to histopathologic criteria, by applying the gastric cancer risk index (GCRI) METHODS: Histopathologic study of the gastric biopsies (corpus-antrum) from consecutive adult patients that underwent gastroesophageal duodenoscopy was carried out, and the GCRI was applied in patients presenting with CGAHpI. One hundred eleven patients (77% female) with a mean age of 38.6±13.1 years were included. Active Helicobacter pylori infection (aHpi) was diagnosed in 77 cases (69.40%). In 45% of the cases with aHpi, pangastritis (23%) or corpus-predominant gastritis (22%) was diagnosed. Nine cases were diagnosed with intestinal metaplasia (8%), 7 of which (77.70%) were in the aHpi group. Twenty one percent of the patients with aHpi had a GCRI of 2 (18.10%) or 3 (2.50%) points (high risk index), while 79.10% accumulated a GCRI of 0 or 1 points (low risk index). Of the patients with no aHpi, none of them had 3 points (p=0.001). Of the 18 patients that accumulated 2 or 3 points, 6 (33.30%) presented with intestinal metaplasia (all with pangastritis and corpus-predominant gastritis), of which 4 cases (66.60%) had aHpi. The estimated gastric cancer risk in patients with CGAHpI in the clinical setting studied was relatively low and 5% of the patients had a histopathologic phenotype associated with an elevated risk for developing gastric cancer. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. The study of the oipA and dupA genes in Helicobacter pylori strains and their relationship with different gastroduodenal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Souod, Negar; Sarshar, Meysam; Dabiri, Hossein; Momtaz, Hassan; Kargar, Mohammad; Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Abdi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the oipA and dupA genes of Helicobacter pylori isolates from west of Iran; Chaharmahalo Bakhtiyari region and find their relationship with the severity of the gastroduodenal diseases. Background: Helicobacter pylori is an organism responsible for many gastroduodenal diseases. Many studies suggest that genetic diversity in H . pylori virulence factors such as oipA and dupA genes is high among isolates of different geographic regions and m...

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection in Africa: Pathology and microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... Environmental factors are not unique in determining the clinical impact of H. pylori ..... There are various techniques of detecting H. pylori from specimens. ..... urease enzyme that splits urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide.

  15. Correlation of H. pylori infection and infertility; a survey in Yazd infertility clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili M B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a worldwide problem. Many different factors may cause infertility. Among them, bacterial infection of the reproductive system is one of the main factors. Recently, some limited investigation has revealed that H. pylori is capable of causing genital inflammation that may lead to infertility. Although known to be a causative agent of gastritis and duodenal ulcers, this species may be transferred orally to the vagina and asymptomatic infection leads to inflammation of the system and finally manifestation of infertility. In addition, infertility may be due to antibodies synthesized against H. pylori cross-reacting with the genital tissue. Methods: In the present study, 180 women consisting of 90 cases referred to IVF center of Yazd and 90 matched controls were enrolled. Serum was taken from all women for detection of IgG and IgM using the ELISA technique. Results: A total of 117 (65% serum samples were positive for Helicobacter, of which 63.3% were from fertile and 66.7% from infertile women. The serum positive population was found to be predominantly in the age range of 25-35, although some 35-42 year olds were also serum positive. When the prevalence of Helicobacter infection status was compared with marriage duration in both groups, it was found that antibody titer in subjects from marriages with durations of greater than five years was significantly higher than those of five-year marriages. In addition, higher antibody titers were found in infertile women with fallopian tube (FT factor and lower titers in those with polycystic factors. Conclusion: Although the results were not significant, they nevertheless indicate that the Helicobacter antibody titers in infertile women were higher than those of fertile women (P =0.6. Therefore, further studies are necessary to determine the role that Helicobacter infection plays with regard to infertility among women. Since the antibody titer in infertile cases with FT factor was

  16. CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with decreased risk of Barrett's esophagus in a population with high H. pylori infection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortego Javier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim The role that H. pylori infection plays in the development of and Barrett's esophagus (BE is uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that infection with cagA+ Helicobacter pylori strains protects against the development of BE. Methods We studied 104 consecutive patients, residents in an area with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, with BE and 213 sex- and age-matched controls. H. pylori infection and CagA antibody status were determined by western blot serology. Results H. pylori prevalence was higher in patients with BE than in controls (87.5% vs. 74.6%; OR. 2.3; 95% CI: 1.23–4.59. Increasing age was associated with a higher prevalence of H. pylori (p Conclusion Neither H. pylori infection nor H. pylori infection by CagA+ strains reduce the risk of BE in a population with high prevalence of H. pylori infection.

  17. Clinical strains of acinetobacter classified by DNA-DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjernberg, I.; Ursing, J.

    1989-01-01

    A collection of Acinetobacter strains consisting of 168 consecutive clinical strains and 30 type and reference strains was studied by DNA-DNA hybridization and a few phenotypic tests. The field strains could be allotted to 13 DNA groups. By means of reference strains ten of these could be identified with groups described by Bouvet and Grimont (1986), while three groups were new; they were given the numbers 13-15. The type strain of A. radioresistens- recently described by Nishimura et al. (1988) - was shown to be a member of DNA group 12, which comprised 31 clinical isolates. Of the 19 strains of A. junii, eight showed hemolytic acitivity on sheep and human blood agar and an additional four strains on human blood agar only. Strains of this species have previously been regarded as non-hemolytic. Reciprocal DNA pairing data for the reference strains of the DNA gropus were treated by UPGMA clustering. The reference strains for A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii and DNA groups 3 and 13 formed a cluster with about 70% relatedness within the cluster. Other DNA groups joined at levels below 60%. (author)

  18. Clinical strains of acinetobacter classified by DNA-DNA hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjernberg, I; Ursing, J [Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Malmoe General Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1989-01-01

    A collection of Acinetobacter strains consisting of 168 consecutive clinical strains and 30 type and reference strains was studied by DNA-DNA hybridization and a few phenotypic tests. The field strains could be allotted to 13 DNA groups. By means of reference strains ten of these could be identified with groups described by Bouvet and Grimont (1986), while three groups were new; they were given the numbers 13-15. The type strain of A. radioresistens- recently described by Nishimura et al. (1988) - was shown to be a member of DNA group 12, which comprised 31 clinical isolates. Of the 19 strains of A. junii, eight showed hemolytic acitivity on sheep and human blood agar and an additional four strains on human blood agar only. Strains of this species have previously been regarded as non-hemolytic. Reciprocal DNA pairing data for the reference strains of the DNA gropus were treated by UPGMA clustering. The reference strains for A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii and DNA groups 3 and 13 formed a cluster with about 70% relatedness within the cluster. Other DNA groups joined at levels below 60%. (author).

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Raymond, Josette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in children differs from that in adults, from the point of view of epidemiology, host response, clinical features, related diseases, and diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. The prevalence of H. pylori infection, in both children and adults, is decreasing in the Western World as well as in some developing countries, which contrasts with the increase in childhood asthma and allergic diseases. Recurrent abdominal pain is not specific during H. pylori infection in children. The role of H. pylori infection and failure to thrive, children's growth, type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease remains controversial. The main initial diagnosis is based on upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy-based methods. Nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. The infection eradication control is based on validated noninvasive tests. The main cause of treatment failure of H. pylori infection is its clarithromycin resistance. We recommend standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of H. pylori in pediatric patients prior to the initiation of eradication therapy. H. pylori treatment in children should be based on an evaluation of the rate of eradication in the local population, a systematic use of a treatment adapted to the susceptibility profile and a treatment compliance greater than 90%. The last meta-analysis in children did not show an advantage for sequential therapy when compared to a 14-day triple therapy. Finally, the high rate of antibiotic resistance responsible for therapy failure in recent years justifies the necessity of a novel vaccine to prevent H. pylori infection in children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Clinical manifestations and epigenetic mechanisms of gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and long-term follow-up following Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Jiang, Kui; Su, Shuai; Wang, Bangmao; Chen, Guangxia

    2018-01-01

    The current study aimed to summarize the clinical manifestations and identify the epigenetic mechanisms of gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, as well as evaluate the long-term effects of Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) eradication. A total of 122 patients with marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of primary gastric MALT lymphoma were enrolled in the present study. The clinical manifestations of gastric MALT lymphoma, including symptoms, H. pylori state and endoscopic type, were summarized. The response to therapy was evaluated in patients that underwent H. pylori eradication. Survival analysis was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The expression of microRNA-383 (miR-383) in tumor tissues and cell lines was determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assays. and western blot analysis identified zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2) as a direct target gene of miR-383. An MTT assay was used to examine the function of miR-383 and ZEB2 in MALT lymphoma. The clinical symptoms of patients with gastric MALT lymphoma were non-specific and included epigastric pain, abdominal discomfort and bleeding. The majority of endoscopic types were classified as ulcer, erosion and mucosa edema. The H. pylori infection rate was 79.5% (97/122) and a total of 47 patients underwent eradication therapy. Lymphoma remission was achieved in 93.6% (44/47) of patients and complete remission (CR) was achieved in 74.4% (35/47). The median follow-up time was 38 months (range, 10-132 months) and the median time taken to achieve CR was 4 months (range, 3-7 months). The estimated 3-year survival rate was 90.3% and the 5-year survival rate was 76.2%. Therefore, it was determined that patients with stage I or II gastric MALT lymphoma are able to undergo H. pylori eradication as a first-line treatment and that the survival rate of patients undergoing this treatment is high

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007715.htm Helicobacter pylori infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ) is a type of bacteria that ...

  2. Clinical Comparative Study of the Effects of Helicobacter Pylori Colonization on Oral Health in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Asim; Gurbuz, Taskin

    2016-01-01

    To isolate Helicobacter pylori (HP) from the dental plaque of a selected group of children and to compare the oral and salivary findings of patients with those of a healthy control group. A total of 70 children aged 5-15 years were included in this study. An intraoral examination was performed for each patient, and dental plaque and saliva specimens were collected for analysis. Oral health conditions, nutritional habits, tooth brushing frequency, saliva pH levels, flow velocity, and buffering capacities were noted. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison of the DMFT and dft index. The significance level was set at p=0.05. The prevalence of HP in dental plaque was higher in study group than controls (p0.05). Meanwhile, the buffering capacity of saliva was lower in HP gastritis patients (pdental plaque; thus, the oral cavity may be an important reservoir for HP. Good oral hygiene could be a positive contributor to the treatment of gastritis.

  3. Infection with CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strain containing three EPIYA C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Júnior, M; Batista, S A; Vidigal, P V T; Cordeiro, A A C; Oliveira, F M S; Prata, L O; Diniz, A E T; Barral, C M; Barbuto, R C; Gomes, A D; Araújo, I D; Queiroz, D M M; Caliari, M V

    2015-04-27

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains containing high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites in the CagA is associated with significant gastritis and increased risk of developing pre-malignant gastric lesions and gastric carcinoma. However, these findings have not been reproduced in animal models yet. Therefore, we investigated the effect on the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains exhibiting one or three EPIYA-C phosphorilation sites. Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with H. pylori clonal isolates containing one or three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. Control group was composed by uninfected animals challenged with Brucella broth alone. Gastric fragments were evaluated by the modified Sydney System and digital morphometry. Clonal relatedness between the isolates was considered by the identical RAPD-PCR profiles and sequencing of five housekeeping genes, vacA i/d region and of oipA. The other virulence markers were present in both isolates (vacA s1i1d1m1, iceA2, and intact dupA). CagA of both isolates was translocated and phosphorylated in AGS cells. After 45 days of infection, there was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells and in the area of the lamina propria in the infected animals, notably in those infected by the CagA-positive strain with three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. After six months of infection, a high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites was associated with progressive increase in the intensity of gastritis and in the area of the lamina propria. Atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia were also observed more frequently in animals infected with the CagA-positive isolate with three EPIYA-C sites.  We conclude that infection with H. pylori strain carrying a high number of CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in an animal model of H. pylori infection.

  4. Infection with CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strain containing three EPIYA C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ferreira Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains containing high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites in the CagA is associated with significant gastritis and increased risk of developing pre-malignant gastric lesions and gastric carcinoma. However, these findings have not been reproduced in animal models yet. Therefore, we investigated the effect on the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains exhibiting one or three EPIYA-C phosphorilation sites. Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with H. pylori clonal isolates containing one or three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. Control group was composed by uninfected animals challenged with Brucella broth alone. Gastric fragments were evaluated by the modified Sydney System and digital morphometry. Clonal relatedness between the isolates was considered by the identical RAPD-PCR profiles and sequencing of five housekeeping genes, vacA i/d region and of oipA. The other virulence markers were present in both isolates (vacA s1i1d1m1, iceA2, and intact dupA. CagA of both isolates was translocated and phosphorylated in AGS cells. After 45 days of infection, there was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells and in the area of the lamina propria in the infected animals, notably in those infected by the CagA-positive strain with three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. After six months of infection, a high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites was associated with progressive increase in the intensity of gastritis and in the area of the lamina propria. Atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia were also observed more frequently in animals infected with the CagA-positive isolate with three EPIYA-C sites.  We conclude that infection with H. pylori strain carrying a high number of CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in an animal model of H. pylori infection.

  5. Antiadhesive Properties of Abelmoschus esculentus (Okra) Immature Fruit Extract against Helicobacter pylori Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Anna; Glocker, Erik; Borén, Thomas; Hensel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional Asian and African medicine use immature okra fruits (Abelmoschus esculentus) as mucilaginous food to combat gastritis. Its effectiveness is due to polysaccharides that inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates the antiadhesive effect in mechanistic detail. Methodology A standardized aqueous fresh extract (Okra FE) from immature okra fruits was used for a quantitative in vitro adhesion assay with FITC-labled H. pylori J99, 2 clinical isolates, AGS cells, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Bacterial adhesins affected by FE were pinpointed using a dot-blot overlay assay with immobilized Lewisb, sialyl-Lewisa, H-1, laminin, and fibronectin. 125I-radiolabeled Okra FE polymer served for binding studies to different H. pylori strains and interaction experiments with BabA and SabA. Iron nanoparticles with different coatings were used to investigate the influence of the charge-dependence of an interaction on the H. pylori surface. Principal findings Okra FE dose-dependently (0.2 to 2 mg/mL) inhibited H. pylori binding to AGS cells. FE inhibited the adhesive binding of membrane proteins BabA, SabA, and HpA to its specific ligands. Radiolabeled compounds from FE bound non-specifically to different strains of H. pylori, as well as to BabA/SabA deficient mutants, indicating an interaction with a still-unknown membrane structure in the vicinity of the adhesins. The binding depended on the charge of the inhibitors. Okra FE did not lead to subsequent feedback regulation or increased expression of adhesins or virulence factors. Conclusion Non-specific interactions between high molecular compounds from okra fruits and the H. pylori surface lead to strong antiadhesive effects. PMID:24416297

  6. Role Strain in Collegiate Athletic Training Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jolene M; Weidner, Thomas G

    2008-01-01

    Context: Certified athletic trainers who serve as Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) in the collegiate setting are balancing various roles (eg, patient care and related administrative tasks, clinical education). Whether this balancing act is associated with role strain in athletic trainers has not been examined. Objective: To examine the degree of, and contributing factors (eg, socialization experiences, professional and employment demographics, job congruency) to, role strain in collegiate ACIs. Design: Cross-sectional survey design. Setting: Geographically stratified random sample of ACIs affiliated with accredited athletic training education programs at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, II, and III institutions. Patients or Other Participants: 118 collegiate ACIs (47 head athletic trainers, 45 assistant athletic trainers, 26 graduate assistant athletic trainers). Main Outcome Measure(s): The Athletic Training ACI Role Strain Inventory, which measures total degree of role strain, 7 subscales of role strain, socialization experiences, professional and employment characteristics, and congruency in job responsibilities. Results: A total of 49% (n  =  58) of the participants experienced a moderate to high degree of role strain. Role Overload was the highest contributing subscale to total role strain. No differences were noted between total role strain and role occupant groups, NCAA division, or sex. Graduate assistant athletic trainers experienced a greater degree of role incompetence than head athletic trainers did (P  =  .001). Division II ACIs reported a greater degree of inter-role conflict than those in Division I (P  =  .02). Female ACIs reported a greater degree of role incompetence than male ACIs (P  =  .01). Those ACIs who stated that the ACI training provided by their institution did not adequately prepare them for the role as an ACI experienced greater role strain (P < .001). Conclusions: The ACIs in the

  7. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...

  8. A novel RT-PCR for the detection of Helicobacter pylori and identification of clarithromycin resistance mediated by mutations in the 23S rRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Javier Jareño; Keller, Peter M; Zbinden, Reinhard; Wagner, Karoline

    2018-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the commercially available LightMix® RT-PCR assay for Helicobacter pylori detection and identification of clarithromycin (CLR) resistance in culture and clinical specimens (gastric biopsies and stool). The H. pylori LightMix® RT-PCR detects a 97bp long fragment of the 23S rRNA gene and allows the identification of 3 distinct point mutations conferring CLR resistance via melting curve analysis. The performance of the H. pylori LightMix® RT-PCR was evaluated using a set of 60 H. pylori strains showing phenotypical CLR susceptibility or CLR resistance (Minimum inhibitory concentrations from 0.016 to 256mg/L). We found high concordance (95%) between phenotypical CLR resistance screening by E-Test® and the Lightmix® RT-PCR. Discrepant results were verified by sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene that always confirmed the results obtained by Lightmix® RT-PCR. Furthermore, H. pylori was detected in clinical biopsy and stool specimens by Lightmix® RT-PCR that identified the correct H. pylori genotype. The LightMix® RT-PCR is an accurate, sensitive and easy to use test for H. pylori and CLR resistance detection and can therefore be readily implemented in any diagnostic laboratory. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Geographic pathology of Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yi; Ponsioen, Cyriel I. J.; Xiao, Shu-Dong; Tytgat, Guido N. J.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Background and aim. Helicobacter pylori is etiologically associated with gastritis and gastric cancer. There are significant geographical differences between the clinical manifestation of H. pylori infections. The aim of this study was to compare gastric mucosal histology in relation to age among H.

  10. dupA as a risk determinant in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douraghi, Masoumeh; Mohammadi, Marjan; Oghalaie, Akbar; Abdirad, Afshin; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini, Mahmoud Eshagh; Zeraati, Hojat; Ghasemi, Amir; Esmaieli, Maryam; Mohajerani, Nazanin

    2008-05-01

    The Helicobacter pylori duodenal ulcer promoting (dupA) gene has been previously described as a risk marker for duodenal ulcer (DU) development and a protective factor against gastric cancer (GC). Recent studies which have assessed the application of dupA in the prediction of clinical outcomes have been controversial. In the current study, the association of dupA with the clinical outcomes and histopathological changes following H. pylori infection was evaluated in Iranian patients. A total of 157 H. pylori-infected patients with DU (n=30), gastric ulcer (n=23), gastritis (n=68) or GC (n=36) were assessed. The presence of jhp0917 and jhp0918 genes was determined by gene specific PCR. Gastric histopathological changes were recorded according to the updated Sydney system. Seventy-eight (49.7 %) and 71 (45.2 %) of the 157 tested strains, respectively, were positive and negative for both genes. The remaining 8 (5.09 %) of the 157 strains were jhp0917-positive/jhp0918-negative. Univariate analysis showed inverse associations between dupA and histological features including dysplasia as the penultimate stage of GC and lymphoid follicles as a consequence of relatively long-standing H. pylori-associated gastritis. The degrees of nucleotide sequence identity of Iranian strains to Colombian, Brazilian and Indian strains ranged from 86.1 to 100 % for the aligned regions of jhp0917, from 88 to 98.8 % for jhp0918 and from 93.4 to 99.5 % for the partial sequences of the dupA gene. Despite the fact that possession of the dupA gene showed no association with any disease category in our population as reported in several other countries, association of dupA-negative strains of H. pylori with pre-malignant lesions calls for additional studies to evaluate the role of this gene as a protective marker against GC.

  11. Dynamic Expansion and Contraction of cagA Copy Number in Helicobacter pylori Impact Development of Gastric Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungil Jang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for development of gastric disease, including gastric cancer. Patients infected with H. pylori strains that express CagA are at even greater risk of gastric carcinoma. Given the importance of CagA, this report describes a new molecular mechanism by which the cagA copy number dynamically expands and contracts in H. pylori. Analysis of strain PMSS1 revealed a heterogeneous population in terms of numbers of cagA copies; strains carried from zero to four copies of cagA that were arranged as direct repeats within the chromosome. Each of the multiple copies of cagA was expressed and encoded functional CagA; strains with more cagA repeats exhibited higher levels of CagA expression and increased levels of delivery and phosphorylation of CagA within host cells. This concomitantly resulted in more virulent phenotypes as measured by cell elongation and interleukin-8 (IL-8 induction. Sequence analysis of the repeat region revealed three cagA homologous areas (CHAs within the cagA repeats. Of these, CHA-ud flanked each of the cagA copies and is likely important for the dynamic variation of cagA copy numbers. Analysis of a large panel of clinical isolates showed that 7.5% of H. pylori strains isolated in the United States harbored multiple cagA repeats, while none of the tested Korean isolates carried more than one copy of cagA. Finally, H. pylori strains carrying multiple cagA copies were differentially associated with gastric disease. Thus, the dynamic expansion and contraction of cagA copy numbers may serve as a novel mechanism by which H. pylori modulates gastric disease development.

  12. Helicobacter Pylori Seropostivity of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tugba Kos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Until now many researches have showed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be etiological factor of colorectal cancer. The aim of current study was to investigate the frequency of H.pylori infection seropositivity of colorectal cancer patients and compare the clinicopathological features of H.pylori positive patients with negative ones. Material and Method: Seventy four colorectal patients were included in study. Retrospectively, patients clinical features, surgery history and pathological characteristics were screened. Patients group serum samples were collected. H.pylori Ig G level were quantitatively measured with ELISA method and levels above 5 arbU/ml were accepted as seropositive. Results: Patients median age was 60.5 ( range 26-83 and 56.8% (n=42 were male. H.pylori Ig G was positive in 37.8% (n=28 and negative in 62.2% (n=46 of patient group. H.pylori serpositive and negative patients median age of diagnosis were 56 and 64 respectively (p=0.01. There were no significant difference between H.pylori seropositive group when compared with negative group according to age, level of CEA and Ca 19-9, stage, lymph node involvement, perineural and vascular invasion, presence of polyps, differantion, localisation of tumours. Discussion: H.pylori seropositive patients were diagnosed at younger age. Association of this finding with etiology was confusing. Further studies with healthy controls may provide detailed information about whether H.pylori seropositivity is associated with colorectal cancer etiology.

  13. [Clinical effect of triple therapy combined with Saccharomyces boulardii in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Mei; Ou-Yang, Hong-Juan; Duan, Bo-Ping; Xu, Bin; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Tang, Juan; You, Jie-Yu

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy combined with Saccharomyces boulardii in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection among children in terms of Hp eradication rate and incidence of adverse events. A prospective randomised controlled study was conducted on 240 children with a confirmed diagnosis of Hp infection. These patients were randomized into triple therapy (n=120) and probiotics groups (n=120). The triple therapy group received amoxicillin [40 mg/(kg·d), Tid], clarithromycin [15 mg/(kg·d), Bid] and omeprazole [0.7-0.8 mg/(kg·d), Qd], while the probiotics group received Saccharomyces boulardii (250 mg, Bid) in addition to triple therapy. The course of treatment was 14 days in both groups. The adverse events in subjects were recorded by their parents during treatment. Hp eradiation was evaluated by (13)C breath test at 4 weeks after treatment, and the eradication rate and incidence of adverse events were compared between the two groups. The Hp eradication rates were 75.8% (91/120) in the triple therapy group and 85% (102/120) in the probiotics group (P>0.05). Compared with the triple therapy group, the probiotics group had nonsignificantly lower incidence of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain (P>0.05) and significantly lower incidence of stomatitis, constipation and diarrhea (PSaccharomyces boulardii cannot significantly increase Hp eradication rate, but can significantly reduce the incidence of stomatitis, constipation, and diarrhea during treatment.

  14. Genome-Wide Transcription Study of Cryptococcus neoformans H99 Clinical Strain versus Environmental Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Movahed

    Full Text Available The infection of Cryptococcus neoformans is acquired through the inhalation of desiccated yeast cells and basidiospores originated from the environment, particularly from bird's droppings and decaying wood. Three environmental strains of C. neoformans originated from bird droppings (H4, S48B and S68B and C. neoformans reference clinical strain (H99 were used for intranasal infection in C57BL/6 mice. We showed that the H99 strain demonstrated higher virulence compared to H4, S48B and S68B strains. To examine if gene expression contributed to the different degree of virulence among these strains, a genome-wide microarray study was performed to inspect the transcriptomic profiles of all four strains. Our results revealed that out of 7,419 genes (22,257 probes examined, 65 genes were significantly up-or down-regulated in H99 versus H4, S48B and S68B strains. The up-regulated genes in H99 strain include Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase (MVA1, Mitochondrial matrix factor 1 (MMF1, Bud-site-selection protein 8 (BUD8, High affinity glucose transporter 3 (SNF3 and Rho GTPase-activating protein 2 (RGA2. Pathway annotation using DAVID bioinformatics resource showed that metal ion binding and sugar transmembrane transporter activity pathways were highly expressed in the H99 strain. We suggest that the genes and pathways identified may possibly play crucial roles in the fungal pathogenesis.

  15. Job strain as a risk factor for clinical depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, I. E. H.; Nyberg, S. T.; Magnusson Hanson, L. L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adverse psychosocial working environments characterized by job strain (the combination of high demands and low control at work) are associated with an increased risk of depressive symptoms among employees, but evidence on clinically diagnosed depression is scarce. We examined job strain...... as a risk factor for clinical depression. METHOD: We identified published cohort studies from a systematic literature search in PubMed and PsycNET and obtained 14 cohort studies with unpublished individual-level data from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD...... unpublished datasets we included 120 221 individuals and 982 first episodes of hospital-treated clinical depression. Job strain was associated with an increased risk of clinical depression in both published [relative risk (RR) = 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47-2.13] and unpublished datasets (RR = 1...

  16. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori action of 30 Chinese herbal medicines used to treat ulcer diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jun Yan; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2005-04-26

    Infection by Helicobacter pylori has been ascertained to be an important etiologic impetus leading usually to chronic active gastritis and gastric ulcer with growing incidences worldwide. Utilizing as the test pathogen a standard and five clinic strains of Helicobacter pylori, the antibacterial action was assessed in vitro with ethanol extracts of 30 Chinese herbal medicines which have been frequently prescribed since ancient times for treating gastritis-like disorders. Among the 30 tested materials, the ethanol extracts of Abrus cantoniensis (Fabaceae), Saussurea lappa (Asteraceae) and Eugenia caryophyllata (Myrtaceae) were strongly inhibitory to all test strains (MICs: approximately 40 microg/ml), and Hippophae rhamnoides (Elaeagnaceae), Fritillaria thunbergii (Liliaceae), Magnolia officinalis and Schisandra chinensis (Magnoliaceae), Corydalis yanhusuo (Papaveraceae), Citrus reticulata (Rutaceae), Bupleurum chinense and Ligusticum chuanxiong (Apiaceae) substantially active with MICs close to 60.0 microg/ml. As to antibacterial actions of the aqueous extracts of the same drugs, those derived from Cassia obtusifolia (Fabaceae), Fritillaria thunbergii and Eugenia caryophyllata were remarkably inhibitory against all the six Helicobacter pylori strains (MICs: approximately 60 microg/ml). The work compared almost quantitatively the magnitude of the anti-Helicobacter pylori actions of the 30 most prescribed gastritis-treating Chinese herbal drugs, and located as well some source plants where potent anti-Helicobacter pylori phytochemicals could be characterized.

  17. Variation in the number of EPIYA-C repeats in CagA protein from Colombian Helicobacter pylori strains and its ability to induce hummingbird phenotype in gastric epithelial cells Variación en el número de repeticiones EPIYA-C en la proteína CagA de aislamientos colombianos de Helicobacter pylori y su capacidad para inducir fenotipo colibrí en células epiteliales gástricas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mercedes Bravo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Studies using Western Helicobacter pylori strains have shown that a risk factor for gastric cancer is the number of EPIYA-C motifs in the cytotoxin-associated A protein. CagA is delivered into epithelial cells, where it becomes tyrosine phosphorylated in their EPIYA repeats and induces cytoskeleton rearrangements.
    Objectives. The objective of this study was to evaluate H. pylori cagA positive strains isolated from Colombian patients with gastroduodenal diseases for the number of EPIYA-C repeats in cagA and their ability to induce cytoskeleton rearrangements in epithelial cells.
    Materials and methods. We analyzed the 3' EPIYA repeats region of cagA by PCR in 93 H. pylori cagA positive strains from 49 patients with gastritis, 17 with gastric cancer, and 24 with duodenal ulcer. AGS cells exposed to the various H. pylori isolates were evaluated for rearrangements in their cytoskeleton.
    Results. Strains with one EPIYA-C were the most frequent in gastritis and duodenal ulcer patients. Strains with three EPIYA-C were mainly found in gastric cancer. We found a significantly higher risk of gastric cancer for individuals infected with strains harboring three EPIYA-C motifs (OR=12.4, CI95%: 2.32-66.3. Strains from gastric cancer showed significantly higher percentages of induction of cytoskeleton rearrangements in comparison with those from gastritis (p Mann-Whitney<0.005.
    Conclusions. H. pylori strains with three EPIYA-C repeats can confer an increased risk of cancer to infected individuals.Introducción. En los aislamientos de Helicobacter pylori del hemisferio occidental, se ha observado que el número de repeticiones EPIYA-C en la proteína CagA es un factor de riesgo para cáncer gástrico. La proteína CagA es introducida en la célula epitelial y, posteriormente, es fosforilada en las tirosinas presentes en los motivos EPIYA e induce rearreglos en el citoesqueleto.
    Objetivos. Nuestro propósito fue evaluar el n

  18. Establishment of a nested-ASP-PCR method to determine the clarithromycin resistance of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Feng; Jiao, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Wen-Yue; Pu, Han-Ming; Qu, Bao-Jin; Yang, Bing-Ya; Hou, Min; Ji, Min-Jun

    2016-07-07

    To investigate clarithromycin resistance positions 2142, 2143 and 2144 of the 23SrRNA gene in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) by nested-allele specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (nested-ASP-PCR). The gastric tissue and saliva samples from 99 patients with positive results of the rapid urease test (RUT) were collected. The nested-ASP-PCR method was carried out with the external primers and inner allele-specific primers corresponding to the reference strain and clinical strains. Thirty gastric tissue and saliva samples were tested to determine the sensitivity of nested-ASP-PCR and ASP-PCR methods. Then, clarithromycin resistance was detected for 99 clinical samples by using different methods, including nested-ASP-PCR, bacterial culture and disk diffusion. The nested-ASP-PCR method was successfully established to test the resistance mutation points 2142, 2143 and 2144 of the 23SrRNA gene of H. pylori. Among 30 samples of gastric tissue and saliva, the H. pylori detection rate of nested-ASP-PCR was 90% and 83.33%, while the detection rate of ASP-PCR was just 63% and 56.67%. Especially in the saliva samples, nested-ASP-PCR showed much higher sensitivity in H. pylori detection and resistance mutation rates than ASP-PCR. In the 99 RUT-positive gastric tissue and saliva samples, the H. pylori-positive detection rate by nested-ASP-PCR was 87 (87.88%) and 67 (67.68%), in which there were 30 wild-type and 57 mutated strains in gastric tissue and 22 wild-type and 45 mutated strains in saliva. Genotype analysis showed that three-points mixed mutations were quite common, but different resistant strains were present in gastric mucosa and saliva. Compared to the high sensitivity shown by nested-ASP-PCR, the positive detection of bacterial culture with gastric tissue samples was 50 cases, in which only 26 drug-resistant strains were found through analyzing minimum inhibitory zone of clarithromycin. The nested-ASP-PCR assay showed higher detection sensitivity than ASP-PCR and

  19. A novel mechanism of “metal gel-shift” by histidine-rich Ni2+-binding Hpn protein from Helicobacter pylori strain SS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Masumoto, Junya; Morita, Eugene Hayato; Hayashi, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is a universally used method for determining approximate molecular weight (MW) in protein research. Migration of protein that does not correlate with formula MW, termed “gel shifting” appears to be common for histidine-rich proteins but not yet studied in detail. We investigated “gel shifting” in Ni2+-binding histidine-rich Hpn protein cloned from Helicobacter pylori strain SS1. Our data demonstrate two important factors determining “gel shifting” of Hpn, polyacrylamide-gel concentration and metal binding. Higher polyacrylamide-gel concentrations resulted in faster Hpn migration. Irrespective of polyacrylamide-gel concentration, preserved Hpn-Ni2+ complex migrated faster (3–4 kDa) than apo-Hpn, phenomenon termed “metal gel-shift” demonstrating an intimate link between Ni2+ binding and “gel shifting”. To examine this discrepancy, eluted samples from corresponding spots on SDS-gel were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The MW of all samples was the same (6945.66±0.34 Da) and identical to formula MW with or without added mass of Ni2+. MALDI-TOF-MS of Ni2+-treated Hpn revealed that monomer bound up to six Ni2+ ions non-cooperatively, and equilibrium between protein-metal species was reliant on Ni2+ availability. This corroborates with gradually increased heterogeneity of apo-Hpn band followed by compact "metal-gel shift" band on SDS-PAGE. In view of presented data metal-binding and “metal-gel shift” models are discussed. PMID:28207866

  20. Role of dupA in virulence of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi Bezmin Abadi, Amin; Perez-Perez, Guillermo

    2016-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) is a gastric human pathogen associated with acute and chronic gastritis, 70% of all gastric ulcers, 85% of all duodenal ulcers, and both forms of stomach cancer, mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. Recently, attention has focused on possible relationship between presence of certain virulence factor and H. pylori -associated diseases. Some contradictory data between this bacterium and related disorders has been observed since not all the colonized individuals develop to severe disease. The reported diseases plausibility related to H. pylori specific virulence factors became an interesting story about this organism. Although a number of putative virulence factors have been identified including cytotoxin-associated gene a ( cagA ) and vacA , there are conflicting data about their actual participation as specific risk factor for H. pylori -related diseases. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene a ( dupA ) is a virulence factor of H. pylori that is highly associated with duodenal ulcer development and reduced risk of gastric cancer. The prevalence of dupA in H. pylori strains isolated from western countries is relatively higher than in H. pylori strains from Asian countries. Current confusing epidemiological reports will continue unless future sophisticated and molecular studies provide data on functional and complete dupA cluster in H. pylori infected individuals. This paper elucidates available knowledge concerning role of dupA in virulence of H. pylori after a decade of its discovery.

  1. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes status and risk of peptic ulcer in Saudi patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momenah, Aiman M.; Tayeb, Mohammad T.

    2006-01-01

    To determine if there is a significant correlation between different Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) vacA genotypes strains and severe gastric clinical outcomes. A total of 1104 gastric biopsies from 368 patients who presented with symptoms suggestive of chronic gastritis or peptic ulcer were taken from the main hospitals in the western region of Saudi Arabia from July 2004 to July 2005. These samples were cultured for H. pylori, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out to determine vacA genotypes status. One hundred and three (28%) patients were positive for H. pylori using culture technique. The distribution of vacA genotypes was 13 for vacAs1m1, 47 for vacAs1m2 and 43 for vacAs2m2. None of the clinical isolates were vacAs2m1 positive. The study showed a significant correlation between the vacAs1m2 genotype and gastritis cases, and a significant correlation between vacAs1m1 genotype and ulcer cases. The results of this study might be used for the identification of high-risk patients who are infected by vacAs1m1 genotype H. pylori strains. (author)

  2. Prognostic criteria of sensitivity to antibiotics of staphylococcus clinical strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordiy Paliy

    2015-06-01

    Department of Microbiology, Virology and Immunology, Vinnytsya National Pirogov Memorial Medical University Ministry of Health of Ukraine   Abstract In the article, the new data of sensitivity to antibiotics in clinical strains of Staphylococci are presented. For the first time, analytic dependence of dynamic prognostic criteria of the change of sensitivity of S. aureus clinical strains, isolated from patients, was obtained by means of mathematical prediction. There were investigated prognosticated indexes of Staphylococcus strains’ sensitivity to beta-lactams (oxacillin, ceftriaxone, imipenem and meropenem, vancomycin and linezolid. The dynamic of sensitivity decreasing to oxacillin, ceftriaxone, carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, vancomycin (92,5 % and high sensitivity to linezolid in clinical strains of S. aureus were found out. Key words: sensitivity, antibiotics, Staphylococcus, prognostic indexes.

  3. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Heunis, Tiaan; Dippenaar, Anzaan; Warren, Robin M.; van Helden, Paul D.; van der Merwe, Ruben G.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Pain, Arnab; Sampson, Samantha L.; Tabb, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ~9% of all total coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e. large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  4. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Heunis, Tiaan

    2017-08-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ~9% of all total coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e. large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  5. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heunis, Tiaan; Dippenaar, Anzaan; Warren, Robin M; van Helden, Paul D; van der Merwe, Ruben G; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Pain, Arnab; Sampson, Samantha L; Tabb, David L

    2017-10-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of the utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study, we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach, we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ∼9% of all coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here, we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e., large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  6. In vitro bactericidal activity of Jinghua Weikang Capsule and its individual herb Chenopodium ambrosioides L. against antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Xue-Zhi; Li, Ning; Cheng, Hong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the bactericidal effects of Jinghua Weikang Capsule and its major component Chenopodium ambrosioides L. on antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori. Four clinical antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains were isolated and incubated in liquid medium containing Jinghua Weikang Capsule or Chenopodium ambrosioides L. By means of time-kill curve method, the average colony counts and bactericidal rate were calculated at time points of 0, 4, 8 and 24 h after the incubation and the time-kill curves were charted. Both Jinghua Weikang Capsule and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. at a concentration of 0.64 g/L showed obvious bactericidal effect against antibiotic-resistant H. pylori after 4 h of incubation. Jinghua Weikang Capsule and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. are considered to be active against antibiotic-resistant H. pylori in vitro.

  7. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Hsu, Ping-I; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2005-04-01

    Identification of a disease-specific H pylori virulence factors predictive of the outcome of infection remains unachieved. We used the polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot to compare the presence of 14 vir homologue genes with clinical presentation of H pylori infection, mucosal histology, and mucosal interleukin (IL)-8 levels. We examined 500 H pylori strains from East Asia and South America, including 120 with gastritis, 140 with duodenal ulcer (DU), 110 with gastric ulcer (GU), and 130 with gastric cancer. Only 1 gene that encompassed both jhp0917 and jhp0918 called dupA (duodenal ulcer promoting gene) was associated with a specific clinical outcome. dupA was present in 42% of DU vs. 21% of gastritis (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.7-5.7). Its presence was also associated with more intense antral neutrophil infiltration and IL-8 levels and was a marker for protection against gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer (OR for gastric cancer = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9 compared with gastritis). In vitro studies in gastric epithelial cells using dupA -deleted and -complemented mutants showed that the dupA plays roles in IL-8 production, in activation of transcription factors responsible for IL-8 promoter activity, and in increased survivability at low pH. dupA is a novel marker associated with an increased risk for DU and reduced risk for gastric atrophy and cancer. Its association with DU-promoting and -protective effects against atrophy/cancer was evident in both Asian and Western countries.

  8. Pylera for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saleem, Aamir

    2012-02-01

    An ideal antibiotic regimen for Helicobacter pylori should achieve eradication rates of approximately 90%. Current 7-day triple therapy is successful in about two-thirds of patients. A novel treatment is required to achieve higher eradication with minimal induction of bacterial resistance. The aim of this article is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single triple capsule (Pylera) containing bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline, given with omeprazole for the eradication of H. pylori infection. Extensive literature searches were conducted using PubMed data from 1982 to 2007. This search included headings of H. pylori, bismuth and eradication therapy. The triple capsule Pylera, when given with omeprazole, achieved eradication rates ranging between 84 and 97%. Eradication rates were similar for clarithromycin- and metronidazole-resistant strains. Eradication rates with an omeprazole, bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline regimen appeared comparable for metronidazole-resistant and -sensitive strains. This effect is not seen with the use of triple therapy in cases of clarithromycin resistance. Clinical trials did not report any serious side effects from bismuth-based regimens and compliance was similar to standard triple therapy. Bismuth-based triple therapy using Pylera is a simplified, effective and well-tolerated regimen achieving cure rates of above 90%.

  9. The Helicobacter pylori theory and duodenal ulcer disease. A case study of the research process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Gjørup, T

    1995-01-01

    should be selected for H. pylori eradication treatment. CONCLUSION: Descriptive clinical studies and laboratory studies of disease mechanisms were the prevailing types of research about H. pylori. Comparatively few therapeutic intervention studies were done; this fact may have hampered the acceptance......OBJECTIVES: To describe the medical research process from the time of the generation of a new theory to its implementation in clinical practice. The Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) theory, i.e. the theory that H. pylori plays a significant causal role in duodenal ulcer disease was chosen as a case....... MATERIAL: Abstracts from 1984 to 1993, identified in the CD-Rom, Medline system, ("Silverplatter"), using the search terms Campylobacter pylori and Helicobacter pylori, and reviews and editorials about H. pylori in some of the most widespread clinical journals. RESULTS: 2204 papers on H. pylori were...

  10. Clinical Trichophyton rubrum Strain Exhibiting Primary Resistance to Terbinafine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Leidich, Steven D.; Isham, Nancy; Leitner, Ingrid; Ryder, Neil S.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2003-01-01

    The in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of six clinical Trichophyton rubrum isolates obtained sequentially from a single onychomycosis patient who failed oral terbinafine therapy (250 mg/day for 24 weeks) were determined by broth microdilution and macrodilution methodologies. Strain relatedness was examined by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. Data obtained from both broth micro- and macrodilution assays were in agreement and revealed that the six clinical isolates had greatly reduced susceptibilities to terbinafine. The MICs of terbinafine for these strains were >4 μg/ml, whereas they were terbinafine for all six strains were >128 μg/ml, whereas they were 0.0002 μg/ml for the reference strain. The MIC of terbinafine for the baseline strain (cultured at the initial screening visit and before therapy was started) was already 4,000-fold higher than normal, suggesting that this is a case of primary resistance to terbinafine. The results obtained by the broth macrodilution procedure revealed that the terbinafine MICs and MFCs for sequential isolates apparently increased during the course of therapy. RAPD analyses did not reveal any differences between the isolates. The terbinafine-resistant isolates exhibited normal susceptibilities to clinically available antimycotics including itraconazole, fluconazole, and griseofulvin. However, these isolates were fully cross resistant to several other known squalene epoxidase inhibitors, including naftifine, butenafine, tolnaftate, and tolciclate, suggesting a target-specific mechanism of resistance. This is the first confirmed report of terbinafine resistance in dermatophytes. PMID:12499173

  11. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-08-14

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  12. Phylogenomics of Colombian Helicobacter pylori isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Escobar, Andrés Julián; Trujillo, Esperanza; Acevedo, Orlando; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    During the Spanish colonisation of South America, African slaves and Europeans arrived in the continent with their corresponding load of pathogens, including Helicobacter pylori . Colombian strains have been clustered with the hpEurope population and with the hspWestAfrica subpopulation in multilocus sequence typing (MLST) studies. However, ancestry studies have revealed the presence of population components specific to H. pylori in Colombia. The aim of this study was to perform a thorough phylogenomic analysis to describe the evolution of the Colombian urban H. pylori isolates. A total of 115 genomes of H. pylori were sequenced with Illumina technology from H. pylori isolates obtained in Colombia in a region of high risk for gastric cancer. The genomes were assembled, annotated and underwent phylogenomic analysis with 36 reference strains. Additionally, population differentiation analyses were performed for two bacterial genes. The phylogenetic tree revealed clustering of the Colombian strains with hspWestAfrica and hpEurope, along with three clades formed exclusively by Colombian strains, suggesting the presence of independent evolutionary lines for Colombia. Additionally, the nucleotide diversity of horB and vacA genes from Colombian isolates was lower than in the reference strains and showed a significant genetic differentiation supporting the hypothesis of independent clades with recent evolution. The presence of specific lineages suggest the existence of an hspColombia subtype that emerged from a small and relatively isolated ancestral population that accompanied crossbreeding of human population in Colombia.

  13. Clinical relevance of the cagA, tnpA and tnpB genes in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Mobarez, Ashraf Mohhabati; Bonten, Marc J M; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Kusters, Johannes G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous proteins have been proposed as virulence factors for the gram negative gastric bacterium Helicobacter pylori but only for a few this has unequivocally been demonstrated. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association of the putative virulence factors tnpA and tnpB

  14. The Intact dupA Cluster Is a More Reliable Helicobacter pylori Virulence Marker than dupA Alone

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Sung Woo; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Shiota, Seiji; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    The duodenal ulcer promoting (dupA) gene, located in the plasticity region of Helicobacter pylori, is associated with duodenal ulcer development. dupA was predicted to form a type IV secretory system (T4SS) with vir genes around dupA (dupA cluster). We investigated the prevalence of dupA and dupA clusters and clarified associations between the dupA cluster status and clinical outcomes in the U.S. population. In all, 245 H. pylori strains were examined using PCR to evaluate the status of dupA ...

  15. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases...

  16. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7{+-}12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1{+-}25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive ({>=}50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62{+-}66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3{+-}157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection.

  17. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7±12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1±25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive (≥50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62±66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3±157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection

  18. Correlation of Serum Anti- Helicobacter pylori Immunoglobulin A (IGA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgA antibodies has been reported to vary among populations and in relation to strains of Helicobacter pylori bacterium. However, there has been conflicting reports on the association between IgA serological status and the histological variables of chronic gastritis. This study ...

  19. Mental strain among staff at medical rehabilitation clinics in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Mirjam

    2011-01-20

    The aim of the study is to compare the frequency of mental strain effects on employees in somatic and psychosomatic rehabilitation clinics as well as between the different occupational groups. Associations between mental strain effects and working conditions, cooperation in the team and employee satisfaction are also investigated. The present study is cross-sectional with a descriptive-explorative design. It is composed of a survey with standardized questionnaires (Human Service Workload, Questionnaire on Teamwork and Questionnaire on Staff Satisfaction in Medical Rehabilitation) and global items, and was conducted among all employees of twelve rehabilitation teams (five somatic and seven psychosomatic rehabilitation clinics (n=549)). The response rate of the survey averaged 45% (n=252). One in four participants reported being emotionally exhausted. There were significantly more emotionally exhausted employees working in the psychosomatic (31%) than in the somatic rehabilitation clinics (16%) (X(2)=7.403, df=1, pemployee satisfaction (r=-.38 to r=-.50, pintrinsic motivation, dissatisfaction). The results clearly show that the employees in medical rehabilitation clinics have a high stress level at work, a situation which is also known in other health care organizations. Observations of strong associations between cooperation in the team and strain effects confirm the positive impact of social support in the daily work routine. Correlation between the subjective appraisal of working conditions and the impact of strain is mostly high. It can be assumed that the strain effects can be influenced positively with supportive team and human resource development (person-related interventions) and interventions that enhance working conditions (condition-related interventions).

  20. The fate of Helicobacter pylori phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerization chain reaction tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori able to express green fluorescent protein, as well as an ATCC strain, and a clinical isolate of this pathogen were evaluated for their ability to survive predation by Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Ingestion was evaluated by microscopic observation of the GFP-H. pyl...

  1. The expression of Helicobacter pylori tfs plasticity zone cluster is regulated by pH and adherence, and its composition is associated with differential gastric IL-8 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bruno; Nunes, Alexandra; Vale, Filipa F; Rocha, Raquel; Gomes, João Paulo; Dias, Ricardo; Oleastro, Mónica

    2017-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori virulence is associated with different clinical outcomes. The existence of an intact dupA gene from tfs4b cluster has been suggested as a predictor for duodenal ulcer development. However, the role of tfs plasticity zone clusters in the development of ulcers remains unclear. We studied several H. pylori strains to characterize the gene arrangement of tfs3 and tfs4 clusters and their impact in the inflammatory response by infected gastric cells. The genome of 14 H. pylori strains isolated from Western patients, pediatric (n=10) and adult (n=4), was fully sequenced using the Illumina platform MiSeq, in addition to eight pediatric strains previously sequenced. These strains were used to infect human gastric cells, and the secreted interleukin-8 (IL-8) was quantified by ELISA. The expression of virB2, dupA, virB8, virB10, and virB6 was assessed by quantitative PCR in adherent and nonadherent fractions of H. pylori during in vitro co-infection, at different pH values. We have found that cagA-positive H. pylori strains harboring a complete tfs plasticity zone cluster significantly induce increased production of IL-8 from gastric cells. We have also found that the region spanning from virB2 to virB10 genes constitutes an operon, whose expression is increased in the adherent fraction of bacteria during infection, as well as in both adherent and nonadherent fractions at acidic conditions. A complete tfs plasticity zone cluster is a virulence factor that may be important for the colonization of H. pylori and to the development of severe outcomes of the infection with cagA-positive strains. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts of some Vietnamese medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Dung, Pham Phuong; Nhi, Nguyen Vang Thi Yen; Hoang, Nguyen van Minh; Hieu, Tran Trung

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common human infectious bacteria. The infection is highly associated with a number of the most important disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including gastritis, duodenitis, peptic ulceration, and gastric cancer. In addition, widespread use of antimicrobial agents has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance. Metabolites of plants, particularly higher plants, have been suggested as alternative potential sources for antibacterial products due to their safe. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial activities of crude ethanolic extracts of seventeen Vietnamese medicinal plants toward one reference strain and three clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori using broth micro-dilution bioassay. The antibacterial activities of these extracts were also compared with those of seven antibiotics, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, tetracycline, and metronidazole. The extracts of Ampelopsis cantoniensis and Cleistocalyx operculatus showed highest antibacterial activity with MIC (MBC) values of 0.31 - 0.97 (2.5 - 5) mg/mL, followed by the extracts of Hedyotis diffusa and Ardisia silvestris with MIC (MBC) values of 1.04 - 1.94 (7.5 - 10) mg/mL. The remaining plant extracts exhibited moderate, low and very low or no active to the H. pylori strains. Further studies are needed to determine the active compounds from the extracts that showed high antibacterial activity against H. pylori.

  3. Helicobacter pylori hrgA, A Novel Discriminatory Biomarker for Duodenal Ulcer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Talebi-Bezmin-Abadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori is a major human gastric for various gastro duodenal diseases.A number of putative virulence factors such as dupA, homB, tnpA have been described. To date,none were found to be significantly associated with specific H. pylori-related diseases (e.g. gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer.Methods: the primary aim of this study was to test the H. pylori hrgA genotype isolated from 253 Iranian symptomatic patients to investigate possible association with clinical outcomes. The positive culture results were confirmed by glmM (genetic control for H. pylori PCR assay.Results: The results showed hrgA gene was detected in 44/253 strains (17.3%. Prevalence of the hrgA gene was relatively high in strains isolated from duodenal ulcer patients (P=0.0063; Odd ratio: 3.54; CI 95%: 1.42-8.77.Conclusions: In contrast our findings showed that the prevalence of hrgA in our control group (gastritis patients was 22.7% (P>0.05. Conclusively, hrgA gene is a good candidate as a discriminatory biomarker for patients with duodenal ulcer

  4. Right ventricular strain in heart failure: Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Cuspidi, Cesare; Morris, Daniel A; Burkhardt, Franziska; Baudisch, Ana; Haßfeld, Sabine; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burket

    2017-10-01

    The number of studies demonstrating the importance of right ventricular remodelling in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases has increased in the past two decades. Speckle-tracking imaging provides new variables that give comprehensive information about right ventricular function and mechanics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of right ventricular mechanics in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid and Embase databases for studies published from January 2000 to December 2016 in the English language using the following keywords: "right ventricle"; "strain"; "speckle tracking"; "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction"; and "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction". Investigations showed that right ventricular dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular and overall mortality in patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction. The number of studies investigating right ventricular strain in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is constantly increasing, whereas data on right ventricular mechanics in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are limited. Given the high feasibility, accuracy and clinical implications of right ventricular strain in the population with heart failure, it is of great importance to try to include the evaluation of right ventricular strain as a regular part of each echocardiographic examination in patients with heart failure. However, further investigations are necessary to establish right ventricular strain as a standard variable for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Fusidic acid resistance among staphylococci strains isolated from clinical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan Deveci

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate in vitrosusceptibility of fusidic acid to clinic isolates of staphylococci.Materials and methods: The forty-one coagulase negativestaphylococci (CNS and 18 Staphylococcus aureusstrains isolated from various clinical specimens were includedin this study. Staphylococci isolates were identifiedby conventional methods such as colony morphologyonto medium, gram staining, catalase and coagulasetests. According to “Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute(CLSI” criteria, antimicrobial susceptibility testingof isolates was performed by Kirby-Bauer’s disk diffusionmethod.Results: The seventy-two percent of the isolated S.aureuswere defined as methicillin sensitive-S.aureus (MSSA,28% of the isolated S.aureus were defined as methicillinresistant-S.aureus (MRSA. The difference among fusidicacid susceptibility rates of MSSA and MRSA strains wasnot statistically significant (p=0.305. The twenty-nine percentof the isolated CNS were defined as methicillin sensitive-CNS (MS-CNS, 71% of the isolated CNS were definedas methicillin resistant-CNS (MR-CNS. There wasno statistically significant difference between MS-CNSand MR-CNS strains for fusidic acid susceptibility rates(p=0.490. But the difference among fusidic acid susceptibilityrates of CNS and S.aureus strains was statisticallysignificant (p<0.001. CNS strains were found more resistancethan S.aureus strains for fusidic acid.Conclusion: In this study, the resistance rates weredetected to increase for fusidic acid along with methicillinresistance. Among CNS isolates, fusidic acid resistancerates were significantly more elevated than that forS.aureus. Fusidic acid remains as an alternative in thetreatment of infections due to staphylococci.

  6. Evaluation of SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag rapid test against double ELISA with SD H. pylori Ag ELISA and EZ-STEP H. pylori Ag ELISA tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negash, Markos; Kassu, Afework; Amare, Bemnet; Yismaw, Gizachew; Moges, Beyene

    2018-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori antibody titters fall very slowly even after successful treatment. Therefore, tests detecting H. pylori antibody lack specificity and sensitivity. On the other hand, H. pylori stool antigen tests are reported as an alternative assay because of their reliability and simplicity. However, the comparative performance of H. pylori stool antigen tests for detecting the presence of the bacterium in clinical specimens in the study area is not assessed. Therefore, in this study we evaluated the performance of SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag rapid test with reference to the commercially available EZ- STEP ELISA and SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag ELISA tests. Stool samples were collected to analyse the diagnostic performance of SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag rapid test kit using SD H. pylori Ag ELISA kit and EZ- STEP ELISA tests as a gold standard. Serum samples were also collected from each patient to test for the presence of H. pylori antibodies using dBest H. pylori Test Disk. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and kappa value are assessed. P values H. pylori Ag rapid test were: 95.6% (95% CI, 88.8-98.8), 92.5% (95%CI, 89-94.1%), 86.7% (95% CI, 80.5-89.6), and 97.6% (95% CI, 993.9-99.3) respectively. The performance of SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag rapid test was better than the currently available antibody test in study area. Therefore, the SD BIOLINE Ag rapid stool test could replace and be used to diagnose active H. pylori infection before the commencement of therapy among dyspeptic patients.

  7. Analysis of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori in Pakistan reveals high degrees of pathogenicity and high frequencies of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Faisal; Campbell, Barry James; Alfizah, Hanafiah; Varro, Andrea; Zahra, Rabaab; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Pritchard, David Mark

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori contributes to failure in eradicating the infection and is most often due to point and missense mutations in a few key genes. The antibiotic susceptibility profiles of H. pylori isolates from 46 Pakistani patients were determined by Etest. Resistance and pathogenicity genes were amplified, and sequences were analyzed to determine the presence of mutations. A high percentage of isolates (73.9%) were resistant to metronidazole (MTZ), with considerable resistance to clarithromycin (CLR; 47.8%) and amoxicillin (AML; 54.3%) also observed. Relatively few isolates were resistant to tetracycline (TET; 4.3%) or to ciprofloxacin (CIP; 13%). However, most isolates (n = 43) exhibited resistance to one or more antibiotics. MTZ-resistant isolates contained missense mutations in oxygen-independent NADPH nitroreductase (RdxA; 8 mutations found) and NADH flavin oxidoreductase (FrxA; 4 mutations found). In the 23S rRNA gene, responsible for CLR resistance, a new point mutation (A2181G) and 4 previously reported mutations were identified. Pathogenicity genes cagA, dupA, and vacA s1a/m1 were detected frequently in isolates which were also found to be resistant to MTZ, CLR, and AML. A high percentage of CagA and VacA seropositivity was also observed in these patients. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences showed uniform distribution of the 3' region of cagA throughout the tree. We have identified H. pylori isolates in Pakistan which harbor pathogenicity genes and worrying antibiotic resistance profiles as a result of having acquired multiple point and missense mutations. H. pylori eradication regimens should therefore be reevaluated in this setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. ROLE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AND LIFESTYLE HABITS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF GASTRODUODENAL DISEASES IN A POPULATION FROM THE BRAZILIAN AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira VINAGRE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Although more than half of the world's population is colonized with Helicobacter pylori, it remains unknown why this organism is able to produce severe disease in some hosts and be innocuous in others. The clinical outcome of infection is determined by several factors, including differences in the host response to bacterial stimulation, specific virulence factors of the organism and environmental influences, or a combination of these factors. Objectives This study compared the prevalence of H. pylori infection and risk factors (infection with CagA+ strains, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and inadequate eating habits between patients with different gastrointestinal disorders and associated these risk factors with the histopathological findings. Methods In a prospective study, samples were collected from 442 patients and a standardized questionnaire regarding lifestyle habits (excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and eating habits was applied. The presence of H. pylori and of the cagA gene was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Gastric biopsies were obtained for histological assessment. Results The frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, inadequate diet and infection with CagA+ H. pylori was higher among patients with peptic ulcer and adenocarcinoma when compared to those with gastritis. Gastric inflammation was more pronounced in patients infected with CagA+ strains. Conclusion We conclude that infection with CagA+ H. pylori strains, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking and inadequate eating habits increase the risk of developing peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma.

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Helicobacter pylori from patients with and without peptic ulcer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A M; Fussing, V; Colding, H

    2000-01-01

    ) profile of H. pylori strains were recorded; randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and urease gene typing were performed and correlated with diagnostic groups. RESULTS: Electron micrographs showed that H. pylori strains from patients with gastric ulcers adhered more frequently through filamentous...... ulcers were more prone to autoagglutinate than were strains from the other diagnostic groups (P = 0.03). H. pylori strains from gastric ulcer patients were found to be more homogeneous, as determined by RAPD and urease gene typing, than strains from the other diagnostic groups (P ..., a positive correlation was found between a patient's age and the adhesion to AGS cells of the patient's H. pylori strain (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: A combination of an H. pylori autoagglutination test, RAPD, and urease gene typing may be useful in separating gastric ulcer-related strains from duodenal ulcer...

  10. Improved Helicobacter pylori Eradication Rate of Tailored Triple Therapy by Adding Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Streptococcus thermophilus in Northeast Region of Thailand: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweesak Tongtawee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. To evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus to Helicobacter pylori eradication in different periods of therapeutic protocol. Methods. Infected patients were randomized to one-week tailored triple therapy (esomeprazole 20 mg bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid/metronidazole 400 mg tid if clarithromycin resistant, and amoxicillin 1000 mg bid with placebo (group 1, n=100; one week of pretreatment with probiotics (group 2, n=100; and one week of pretreatment with probiotic followed by one week of the same probiotics after treatment (group 3, n=100. Result. PP analysis involved 292 patients, 98 in group 1, 97 in group 2, and 97 in group 3. Successful eradication was observed in 229 patients; by PP analysis, the eradication rates were significantly higher (P<0.01, 95% CI; 0.71–0.97 in group 2 and group 3 than group 1. ITT analysis eradication rates were significantly higher in group 2 and group 3 than group 1 (P<0.01 95% CI; 0.72–0.87, and there is no significant difference between the three groups (P=0.32 in terms of adverse events. Conclusion. Adding probiotics before or before and after tailored treatment can improve Helicobacter pylori eradication rates. This trial is registered with Thai Clinical Trials Registry number: TCTR20141209001.

  11. Improved Helicobacter pylori Eradication Rate of Tailored Triple Therapy by Adding Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Streptococcus thermophilus in Northeast Region of Thailand: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. To evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus to Helicobacter pylori eradication in different periods of therapeutic protocol. Methods. Infected patients were randomized to one-week tailored triple therapy (esomeprazole 20 mg bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid/metronidazole 400 mg tid if clarithromycin resistant, and amoxicillin 1000 mg bid) with placebo (group 1, n=100); one week of pretreatment with probiotics (group 2, n=100); and one week of pretreatment with probiotic followed by one week of the same probiotics after treatment (group 3, n=100). Result. PP analysis involved 292 patients, 98 in group 1, 97 in group 2, and 97 in group 3. Successful eradication was observed in 229 patients; by PP analysis, the eradication rates were significantly higher (P<0.01, 95% CI; 0.71-0.97) in group 2 and group 3 than group 1. ITT analysis eradication rates were significantly higher in group 2 and group 3 than group 1 (P<0.01 95% CI; 0.72-0.87), and there is no significant difference between the three groups (P=0.32) in terms of adverse events. Conclusion. Adding probiotics before or before and after tailored treatment can improve Helicobacter pylori eradication rates. This trial is registered with Thai Clinical Trials Registry number: TCTR20141209001.

  12. Controversies in the Helicobacter pylori/duodenal ulcer story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobsley, Michael; Tovey, Frank I; Holton, John

    2008-12-01

    In patients with Helicobacter pylori-positive duodenal ulcer (DU), the organism must be eradicated to achieve rapid, stable healing. However, evidence is against much else that is commonly accepted. (1) Does H. pylori cause the ulcer? Evidence against includes archaeopathology, geographical prevalence, temporal relationships and H. pylori-negative DU patients. DU can recur after eradication of H. pylori infection, and DUs may remain healed after reduction of acid secretion despite persistent infection. The faster healing of ulcers when H. pylori has been eradicated is due to the organism's interference with neoangiogenesis and the healing of wounded epithelial cells. (2) Does H. pylori infection persist until pharmacologically eradicated? Studies based on current infection show that H. pylori infection is a labile state that can change in 3 months. High rates of gastric acid secretion result in spontaneous cure, whereas low rates permit re-infection. Hydrochloric acid, necessary for producing a DU, is strongly associated with the likelihood of an ulcer. At the start, patients owe their ulcer to gastric hypersecretion of hydrochloric acid; approximately 60% may be H. pylori-negative. If acid is suppressed, the less acid milieu encourages invasion by H. pylori, especially if the strain is virulent.

  13. In vitro characterization of the anti-bacterial activity of SQ109 against Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris O Makobongo

    Full Text Available The most evident challenge to treatment of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium responsible for gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer, is the increasing rate of resistance to all currently used therapeutic antibiotics. Thus, the development of novel therapies is urgently required. N-geranyl-N'-(2-adamantyl ethane-1, 2-diamine (SQ109 is an ethylene diamine-based antitubercular drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB. Previous pharmacokinetic studies of SQ109 revealed that persistently high concentrations of SQ109 remain in the stomach 4 hours post oral administration in rats. This finding, combined with the need for new anti-Helicobacter therapies, prompted us to define the in vitro efficacy of SQ109 against H. pylori. Liquid broth micro-dilution was used for susceptibility studies to determine the antimicrobial activity of SQ109 against a total of 6 laboratory strains and 20 clinical isolates of H. pylori; the clinical isolates included a multi-drug resistant strain. All strains tested were susceptible to SQ109 with MIC and MBC ranges of 6-10 µM and 50-60 µM, respectively. SQ109 killing kinetics were concentration- and time-dependent. SQ109 killed H. pylori in 8-10 h at 140 µM (2MBCs or 4-6 h at 200 µM (~3MBCs. Importantly, though the kinetics of killing were altered, SQ109 retained potent bactericidal activity against H. pylori at low pH. Additionally, SQ109 demonstrated robust thermal stability and was effective at killing slow growing or static bacteria. In fact, pretreatment of cultures with a bacteriostatic concentration of chloramphenicol (Cm synergized the effects of typically bacteriostatic concentrations of SQ109 to the level of five-logs of bacterial killing. A molar-to-molar comparison of the efficacy of SQ109 as compared to metronidazole (MTZ, amoxicillin (AMX, rifampicin (RIF and clarithromycin (CLR, revealed that SQ109 was superior to MTZ, AMX and RIF but not to CLR. Finally, the

  14. In vitro antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus casei against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shymaa Enany

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic infections in humans. Curing H. pylori infection is difficult because of the habitat of the organism below the mucus adherent layer of gastric mucosa. Lactobacilli are known as acid-resistant bacteria and can remain in stomach for a long time than any other organism, we aimed in this study to examine the efficacy of Lactobacillus casei as a probiotic against H. pylori in humans. Particularly, L. casei was opted as it is considered to be one of the widely used probiotics in dairy products. One hundred and seven strains of H. pylori were isolated from dyspeptic patients and were tested for their antibiotic susceptibility to metronidazole (MTZ, clarithromycin (CLR, tetracycline (TET, and amoxicillin (AMX by the disc diffusion method. The strains were examined for their susceptibility toward L. casei - present in fermented milk products - by well diffusion method. It was found that 74.7% strains were resistant to MTZ; 1.8% to MTZ, TET, and CLR; 3.7% to MTZ and CLR; 4.6% to MTZ and TET; and 0.9% were resistant to MTZ, TET, and AMX. The antibacterial activity of L. casei against H. pylori was determined on all the tested H. pylori isolates including antibiotic resistant strains with different patterns. Our study proposed the use of probiotics for the treatment of H. pylori infection as an effective approach.

  15. Usefulness of detection of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori from fecal specimens for young adults treated with eradication therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Takako; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Zaman, Cynthia; Yonezawa, Hideo; Okuda, Masumi; Amagai, Kenji; Fujieda, Shinji; Goto, Mitsuhide; Shibata, Wataru; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2017-10-01

    To prevent Helicobacter pylori infection in the younger generation, it is necessary to investigate the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori. The aim of this study was to evaluate the method of PCR-based sequencing to detect clarithromycin (CAM) resistance-associated mutations using fecal samples as a noninvasive method. DNA extracted from fecal specimens and isolates from gastric biopsy specimens were collected from patients with H. pylori infection. Antibiotic resistance to CAM was analyzed by molecular and culture methods. The detection rates of CAM resistance-associated mutations (A2142C or A2143G) were compared before and after eradication therapy. With CAM resistance of H. pylori evaluated by antibiotic susceptibility test as a gold standard, the sensitivity and the specificity of gene mutation detection from fecal DNA were 80% and 84.8%, respectively. In contrast, using DNA of isolated strains, the sensitivity and the specificity were 80% and 100%. Of the seven cases in which eradication was unsuccessful by triple therapy including CAM, CAM-resistant H. pylori, and resistance-associated mutations were detected in three cases, CAM-resistant H. pylori without the mutation was detected in two patients, and resistance-associated mutation was only detected in one patient. PCR-based sequencing to detect CAM resistance-associated mutations using isolates or fecal samples was useful for finding antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. Although the specificity of the detection from fecal samples compared with antibiotic susceptibility testing was lower than that from isolates, this fecal detection method is suitable especially for asymptomatic subjects including children. Further improvement is needed before clinical application. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Characteristic of clinical strains of gram-negative obligate anaerobes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadzielska, Joanna; Kierzkowska, Marta; Sawicka-Grzelak, Anna; Rokosz, Alicja; Łuczak, Mirosław

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility profiles ofGram-negative strictly anaerobic bacteria isolated from clinical specimens taken from hospitalized patients in 2005-2006. Biochemical identification and antibiotic susceptibility were done in an automated system ATB Expression (bioMerieux sa). From 12262 specimens examined 867 strains of obligate anaerobes were isolated. Gram-negative strictly anaerobic bacteria were cultured in number of 138 strains (15,9%). All cultures were performed on Columbia agar and Schaedler agar media (bioMerieux sa) supplemented with 5% sheep blood and incubated at 37 degrees C for 48-120 h in 85% N2, 10% H2, 5% CO2. Most frequently isolated was Bacteroides spp. (41,3%). For this group beta-lactamase activity was evaluated by using nitrocefin disc test (Cefinase BBL, Becton Dickinson and Co., Cockeysville, MD, USA). Production of ESBLs was detected with the use of two disc diffusion methods: the double-disc synergy test (DDST) according to Jarlier et al. and the diagnostic disc (DD) test according to Appleton. ESBLs were produced by 5,3% strains of Bacteroides spp. For all Bacteroides spp. strains MIC values were determined by gradient diffusion method Etest (AB BIODISK, Sweden). ESBLs and MIC were performed on Wilkins-Chalgren solid medium supplemented with 5% sheep blood (Difco Lab., USA) and all plates were incubated at 35 degrees C for 48 hours in 85% N2, 10% H2, 5% CO2. Most Gram-negative obligate anaerobes isolated from clinical specimens are still susceptible to imipenem (100%), metronidazole (99,3%) and beta-lactam antibiotics with beta-lactamase inhibitors: piperacillin/tazobactam (99,3%), ticarcillin/clavulanate (99.3%), amoxicillin/clavulanate (97.8%).

  17. Detection of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and interleukin-1 polymorphisms in patients with abdominal complaint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anarkhuu, B.; Munguntsetseg, B.; Khosbayar, T.; Enkh-Amar, A.; Bayasgalan, P.; Yadamjav, Ch.; Oyuntsetseg, K.; Bira, N.; Choi, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Gastric Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related death in Mongolia (National Cancer Center, report-2006). Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori affects approximately half the world and results in malignancy in a small subset of this population. There was sufficient evidence that the Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-1994) classified it as a class I carcinogen, the only bacterial agent on this list. The aim of the study is to detect and define the role of H.pylori virulence factors and host IL-1 polymorphisms to prevent further gastric cancer. In the future, this combined bacterial/host genotyping may provide an important opportunity to identify patients who are at high risk for the development of gastric carcinoma long before malignancy occurs. Patients and biopsy specimens. Two biopsy specimens and 5ml of blood samples were collected from each of 59 patients who had abdominal complaint, after informed consent was obtained. All patients lived in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, 100% were of Mongolian nationality. Their mean age was 40.33 years (range, 1575 years). One biopsy specimen was used to test urease, and another was stored for molecular testing. DNA isolation from blood and tissue sample was performed with ''Promega'' kit, according to the manufacturer's instruction. Tissue samples were homogenized treated with proteinase K prior to DNA extraction. H. pylori detection and genotyping. For H.pylori, detection was by UreC primer. For virulence gene typing of H.pylori cagA and vacA, gene specific primer were used. Genotyping of IL-1 polymorphisms. IL-1B polymorphisms were distinguished by 2 methods, 5-nuclease PCR assay and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP). Result. Strain characteristics of H. pylori were investigated in all 59 patients. 66,7% (40/59) and 76,3% (29/36) of the patients were infected with H. pylori by UreC PCR and by urea test, respectively. The vacAs1 genotype was

  18. Biofilm formation enhances Helicobacter pylori survivability in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chow Goon; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Ho, Bow

    2017-04-01

    To date, the exact route and mode of transmission of Helicobacter pylori remains elusive. The detection of H. pylori in food using molecular approaches has led us to postulate that the gastric pathogen may survive in the extragastric environment for an extended period. In this study, we show that H. pylori prolongs its survival by forming biofilm and micro-colonies on vegetables. The biofilm forming capability of H. pylori is both strain and vegetable dependent. H. pylori strains were classified into high and low biofilm formers based on their highest relative biofilm units (BU). High biofilm formers survived longer on vegetables compared to low biofilm formers. The bacteria survived better on cabbage compared to other vegetables tested. In addition, images captured on scanning electron and confocal laser scanning microscopes revealed that the bacteria were able to form biofilm and reside as micro-colonies on vegetable surfaces, strengthening the notion of possible survival of H. pylori on vegetables for an extended period of time. Taken together, the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm on vegetables (a common food source for human) potentially plays an important role in its survival, serving as a mode of transmission of H. pylori in the extragastric environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Helicobacter pylori resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Helicobacter pylori eradication rates have fallen considerably in recent years. Antibiotic resistance is thought to be rising. OBJECTIVES: To examine the levels of resistance to metronidazole (MTZ) and clarithromycin (CLA) in H. pylori, isolates were taken in a reference centre in Ireland from 2007 to 2008 and were compared to a similar cohort from a study in 1997. METHOD: Antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested by E-test. Frequencies of spontaneous metronidazole and clarithromycin resistance were measured on an agar plate containing the antibiotics at concentrations of 2x and 4x minimum inhibition concentration values. Clinical data were obtained from charts, laboratory and endoscopy reports. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-two patients were analyzed, 98 were females. Colonies amenable to culture were grown in 219 patients. Thirty-seven had prior attempts at eradication therapy (all with amoxicillin-CLA-proton pump inhibitor. A total of 31.5% of the patients had strains resistant to MTZ and 13.2% of the patients were noted to have strains resistant to CLA. About 8.6% of the patients had strains resistant to both the agents. CLA resistance was 9.3% in those who had no prior eradication therapy compared with 32.4% of those who had. CLA resistance increased from 3.9%, among treatment-naive patients in 1997, to 9.3% in our study. MTZ resistance was 29.1% in the treatment-naive population. In 1997, MTZ resistance in the treatment-naive cohort was 27.1%. MTZ resistance was more likely to occur in females (35.4 vs. 28.5%) than in males. CONCLUSION: This study shows that resistance to CLA among Irish patients infected with H. pylori has increased since 1997. The future of treatment may well lie in the widespread use of sensitivity testing before the treatment. This would promote an accurate treatment.

  20. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burucoa, Christophe; Axon, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    The study of Helicobacter pylori genetic variability brought us interesting data on the history of mankind. Based on multilocus sequence typing and more recently on whole-genome sequencing, paleomicrobiology still attracts the attention of global researchers in relation to its ancestor roots and coexistence with humans. Three studies determining the prevalence of virulence factors illustrates the controversial results obtained since 30 years by studies trying to associate prevalence of different virulence markers and clinical outcomes of H. pylori infection. Three articles analyzed the prevalence and risk of multiple (genetically distinct isolates) and mixed (susceptible and resistant isolates) infections. A number of studies confirm that H. pylori prevalence is falling worldwide especially in the developed world and in children but that the level of infection is higher in certain ethnic minorities and in Migrants. There is little new in identifying the mode of H. pylori transmission though intrafamilial spread appears to be important. There have, however, been some interesting papers on the presence of the organism in food, water, and the oral cavity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Significant association of the dupA gene of Helicobacter pylori with duodenal ulcer development in a South-east Indian population

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Jawed; Maiti, Sankar; Ghosh, Prachetash; De, Ronita; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Das, Suryasnata; Macaden, Ragini; Devarbhavi, Harshad; Ramamurthy, T.; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.

    2012-01-01

    A novel virulence factor, duodenal ulcer-promoting gene A (dupA), in Helicobacter pylori has been found to be associated with disease in certain populations but not in others. This study analysed a South-east Indian population as part of the debate about the relevance of dupA for the prediction of clinical outcomes. A total of 140 H. pylori strains isolated from duodenal ulcer (DU) (n=83) and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) patients (n=57) were screened by PCR and dot-blot hybridization to determin...

  2. Correlation between virulence markers of Helicobacter pylori in the oral cavity and gastric biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Lucrecia MEDINA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with virulence factors. The presence of these factors is useful as molecular markers in the identification of the high risk for developing severe gastric pathologies. OBJECTIVE: To correlate the presence of virulence markers cagA and bab2A of H. pylori in oral and gastric biopsy samples. METHODS: An observational, prospective, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was carried out between September 2011 and September 2012. Patients suffering dyspepsia with indication for upper gastrointestinal video endoscopy who attended the Gastroenterology Service of the Hospital Dr. Julio C. Perrando were included. Epidemiological investigation was completed. To detect the bacteria and their virulence genes, samples of saliva, dental plaque and gastric biopsy were taken and processed by PCR. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were selected for this study (30 women and 31 men. H. pylori was detected in 31 gastric biopsies and 31 oral samples. Significant difference between oral and gastric samples was found in cagA genotype. Agreement between oral and gastric genotypes was found in 38.7% of samples from the same patient. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in provide information about the genotypes of the Argentinean Northeast H. pylori strains. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infection, the most of patients had less virulent genotypes in oral cavity and gastric tissue. The cagA / babA2 combination was not frequent in the samples studied. There was not a statistical correlation between the virulence genes and gastroduodenal or oral diseases. Although in some patients the same genotype was found both in oral and gastric samples, it cannot be ensure that they corresponding to the same strain because a DNA sequencing was not performed.

  3. Gastric MALT lymphoma: clinical characteristics and prevalence of H. pylori infection in a series of 37 cases Linfoma MALT gástrico: características clínicas y prevalencia de la infección por H. pylori en una serie de 37 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Gisbert

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to perform a retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with gastric MALT lymphoma diagnosed in our hospital during the last 15 years. Methods: patients with gastric MALT lymphoma diagnosed in our hospital during the last 15 years were retrospectively included. Demographic, clinic, analytic, endoscopic, and histological variables were reviewed. The extension study, the staging classification, and the presence of H. pylori infection were assessed. Results: thirty-seven patients with gastric MALT lymphoma were identified. Mean age was 61 years, with 62% of males. The most common presentation symptom was dyspepsia (76%, followed by digestive bleeding (11% and constitutional syndrome (8%. At endoscopy, erosive lesions were identified in 41%, and proliferative or exophytic lesions in 43%. Most lymphomas were classified as low-grade (68%. The stage distribution was EI for 56%, EII for 13%, EIII for 3%, and EIV for 28%. The prevalence of H. pylori infection (histology in all cases, rapid urease test in 19%, and 13C-urea breath test in 24% was 46%. When only low-grade lymphomas in stage EI were considered, H. pylori prevalence increased to 55%. When H. pylori infection was evaluated by 13C-urea breath testing (in addition to histology, the prevalence of H. pylori infection increased to 78%. Conclusions: it is probable that the reduced H. pylori prevalence found in some studies, as in ours, could be explained by false-negative results obtained when only one diagnostic method was used. Therefore, at least two (invasive diagnostic methods should be performed. Furthermore, the performance of a non-invasive diagnostic method (such as a 13C-urea breath test before the exclusion of H. pylori infection should be considered.Objetivo: revisar retrospectivamente las características clínicas y la prevalencia de infección por H. pylori en los pacientes con linfoma MALT gástrico diagnosticados

  4. Distribution of Helicobacter pylori virulence markers in patients with gastroduodenal diseases in a region at high risk of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-yi; Chen, Cheng; Gao, Xiao-zhong; Li, Jie; Yue, Jing; Ling, Feng; Wang, Xiao-chun; Shao, Shi-he

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major human pathogen that is responsible for various gastroduodenal diseases. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori virulence markers in a region at high risk of gastric cancer. One hundred and sixteen H. pylori strains were isolated from patients with gastroduodenal diseases. cagA, the cagA 3' variable region, cagPAI genes, vacA, and dupA genotypes were determined by PCR, and some amplicons of the cagA 3' variable region, cagPAI genes and dupA were sequenced. cagA was detected in all strains. The cagA 3' variable region of 85 strains (73.3%) was amplified, and the sequences of 24 strains were obtained including 22 strains possessing the East Asian-type. The partial cagPAI presented at a higher frequency in chronic gastritis (44.4%) than that of the severe clinical outcomes (9.7%, p dupA and sequencing of dupA revealed an ORF of 2449-bp. The prevalence of dupA was significantly higher in strains from patients with the severe clinical outcomes (40.3%) than that from chronic gastritis (20.4%, p = 0.02). The high rate of East Asian-type cagA, intact cagPAI, virulent vacA genotypes, and the intact long-type dupA may underlie the high risk of gastric cancer in the region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis, based on EPIYA repeats in the cagA gene of Indian Helicobacter pylori, and the implications of sequence variation in tyrosine phosphorylation motifs on determining the clinical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K. Tiwari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The population of India harbors one of the world's most highly diverse gene pools, owing to the influx of successive waves of immigrants over regular periods in time. Several phylogenetic studies involving mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomal variation have demonstrated Europeans to have been the first settlers in India. Nevertheless, certain controversy exists, due to the support given to the thesis that colonization was by the Austro-Asiatic group, prior to the Europeans. Thus, the aim was to investigate pre-historic colonization of India by anatomically modern humans, using conserved stretches of five amino acid (EPIYA sequences in the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori. Simultaneously, the existence of a pathogenic relationship of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs, in 32 H. pylori strains isolated from subjects with several forms of gastric diseases, was also explored. High resolution sequence analysis of the above described genes was performed. The nucleotide sequences obtained were translated into amino acids using MEGA (version 4.0 software for EPIYA. An MJ-Network was constructed for obtaining TPM haplotypes by using NETWORK (version 4.5 software. The findings of the study suggest that Indian H. pylori strains share a common ancestry with Europeans. No specific association of haplotypes with the outcome of disease was revealed through additional network analysis of TPMs.

  6. Helicobacter pylori genomic microevolution during naturally occurring transmission between adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo Linz

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is usually acquired during childhood and, in the absence of treatment, chronic infection persists through most of the host's life. However, the frequency and importance of H. pylori transmission between adults is underestimated. Here we sequenced the complete genomes of H. pylori strains that were transmitted between spouses and analysed the genomic changes. Similar to H. pylori from chronic infection, a significantly high proportion of the determined 31 SNPs and 10 recombinant DNA fragments affected genes of the hop family of outer membrane proteins, some of which are known to be adhesins. In addition, changes in a fucosyltransferase gene modified the LPS component of the bacterial cell surface, suggesting strong diversifying selection. In contrast, virulence factor genes were not affected by the genomic changes. We propose a model of the genomic changes that are associated with the transmission and adaptation of H. pylori to a new human host.

  7. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2010-12-05

    Helicobacter pylori, discovered 27 years ago, has remained the most prevalent infectious agent in the world. In the author's hypothesis, the increase of peptic ulcer prevalence in the 19-20th century could be attributable to the extended worldwide use of gastric tubes for secretory testing which led to the iatrogenic transmission of pathogenic strains. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane proteins (OMP), and duodenal ulcer promoting (dupA) proteins were identified as novel virulence factors, leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which could be future targets of therapy. There is no ideal first-line eradication of the infection and according to expert's opinion, the efficiency of these regimens has fallen gradually in recent years to unacceptably low levels; however, in the author's opinion this is a multifactorial phenomenon which can not be generalized. As alternative drugs, the efficiency of levofloxacin, furazolidone and rifabutin has been proven by meta-analyses. Sequential and bismuth-free quadruple therapies, although highly efficient, are not yet used on a large scale. The recurrence of the infection is 2.27%/year in developed and of 13.0%/year in developing countries. Spontaneous eradication occurred in 8-20% of the children and 5-11% of adults. The prevalence of clarithromycin resistance is increasing worldwide. In Hungary, it has reached 10.9% in county cities, according to a national survey. In a district of Budapest called Ferencváros, the prevalence between 2005 and 2009 was 16-22%, with no increasing trend. The development of enzymatic inhibitors (urease, carbonic anhydrase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase), modified antibiotics and efflux pump inhibitors seem promising ways because these compounds do not lead to resistance; however, none have yet been used in humans.

  8. Oral and gastric Helicobacter pylori: effects and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Nélio; Pereira, Carlos; Resende, Carlos; Amaral, Odete; Ferreira, Manuela; Nelas, Paula; Chaves, Claudia; Duarte, João; Cirnes, Luis; Machado, José Carlos; Ferreira, Paula; Correia, Ilídio J

    2015-01-01

    This study consisted in the comparison of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) present in the stomach and in saliva of a sample of Portuguese adolescents and the assessment of the association between H. pylori infection with socio-demographic variables and prevalence of dental caries. A cross-sectional study was designed including a sample of 447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years old, attending a public school in Sátão, Portugal. A questionnaire about socio-demographic variables and oral health behaviors was applied. Gastric H. pylori infection was determined using the urease breath test (UBT). Saliva collection was obtained and DNA was extracted by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in order to detect the presence of oral H. pylori. The prevalence of gastric H. pylori detected by UBT was 35.9%. Within the adolescents with a gastric UBT positive, only 1.9% were positive for oral H. pylori. The presence of gastric H. pylori was found to be associated with age (>15years, Odds ratio (OR)=1.64, 95%CI=1.08-2.52), residence area (urban, OR=1.48, 95%CI=1.03-2.29) and parents´ professional situation (unemployed, OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.02-1.23). Among those with detected dental caries during the intra-oral observation, 37.4% were positive for gastric H. pylori and 40.2% negative for the same bacterial strain (p=0.3). The oral cavity cannot be considered a reservoir for infection of H. pylori. Gastric H. pylori infection was found to be associated with socio-demographic variables such as age, residence area and socioeconomic status.

  9. Oral and gastric Helicobacter pylori: effects and associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Veiga

    Full Text Available This study consisted in the comparison of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori present in the stomach and in saliva of a sample of Portuguese adolescents and the assessment of the association between H. pylori infection with socio-demographic variables and prevalence of dental caries.A cross-sectional study was designed including a sample of 447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years old, attending a public school in Sátão, Portugal. A questionnaire about socio-demographic variables and oral health behaviors was applied. Gastric H. pylori infection was determined using the urease breath test (UBT. Saliva collection was obtained and DNA was extracted by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR in order to detect the presence of oral H. pylori.The prevalence of gastric H. pylori detected by UBT was 35.9%. Within the adolescents with a gastric UBT positive, only 1.9% were positive for oral H. pylori. The presence of gastric H. pylori was found to be associated with age (>15years, Odds ratio (OR=1.64, 95%CI=1.08-2.52, residence area (urban, OR=1.48, 95%CI=1.03-2.29 and parents´ professional situation (unemployed, OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.02-1.23. Among those with detected dental caries during the intra-oral observation, 37.4% were positive for gastric H. pylori and 40.2% negative for the same bacterial strain (p=0.3.The oral cavity cannot be considered a reservoir for infection of H. pylori. Gastric H. pylori infection was found to be associated with socio-demographic variables such as age, residence area and socioeconomic status.

  10. dupA polymorphisms and risk of Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Dulciene M M; Rocha, Gifone A; Rocha, Andreia M C; Moura, Sílvia B; Saraiva, Ivan E B; Gomes, Luciana I; Soares, Taciana F; Melo, Fabrício F; Cabral, Mônica M D A; Oliveira, Celso A

    2011-03-01

    The dupA of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested as a virulence marker associated with the development of duodenal ulcer disease. However, the studies performed in different geographical areas have shown that there are variations in the prevalence of dupA and its association with H. pylori clinical outcomes. Our group did not observe associations between the presence of dupA and H. pylori clinical outcomes in Brazil. On the other hand, we observed 2 mutations in the sequence of dupA that lead to stop codons: a deletion of an adenine at position 1311 and an insertion of an adenine at position 1426 of the gene. Our aim was to evaluate associations of the presence of dupA with duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer, considering dupA-positive only those H. pylori strains that do not have the mutations in the gene sequence. We also evaluated the effect of infection with a strain carrying an intact dupA on the gastric mucosa histology and IL-8 gastric levels. Colonization with strains that had the intact dupA was negatively associated with gastric carcinoma (p=0.001, OR=0.32, 95% CI=0.16-0.66). The presence of dupA was also associated with an increased degree of antral mucosa inflammation (p=0.01) and with decreased corpus atrophy (pdupA without the stop codon polymorphisms is associated with a lower risk of development of gastric carcinoma in Brazilian subjects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Short report: evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication with bismuth sucralfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijers, M. H.; Noach, L. A.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    In a pilot study we have evaluated the clinical efficacy of bismuth sucralfate to eradicate H. pylori. Ten consecutive patients with chronic dyspepsia and H. pylori associated gastritis were treated with bismuth sucralfate (220 mg bismuth per tablet, 4 tablets per day for 4 weeks). If a 14C urea

  12. changing patterns of the prevalence of helicobacter pylori among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study described the prevalence of H. pylori among large numbers of ... the gastric antrum for Rapid Urease Test (RUT) in identifying H. Pylori. Data on patient characteristics, clinical diagnosis and findings upon endoscopy were analyzed by simple ..... factors to be taken into account when planning treatment include compli-.

  13. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Patients and methods Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. Results A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, pgastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status. PMID:28860835

  14. Differential effects of multiplicity of infection on Helicobacter pylori-induced signaling pathways and interleukin-8 gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Birgit; Kilian, Petra; Reboll, Marc Rene; Resch, Klaus; DiStefano, Johanna Kay; Frank, Ronald; Beil, Winfried; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab

    2011-02-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection. We used four different H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastritis or duodenal ulcer disease to examine their differential effects on signaling pathways and IL-8 gene response in gastric epithelial cells. IL-8 mRNA level is elevated in response to high (100) multiplicity of infection (MOI) independent of cagA, vacA, and dupA gene characteristics. By lower MOIs (1 or 10), only cagA ( + ) strains significantly induce IL-8 gene expression. This is based on differential regulation of IL-8 promoter activity. Analysis of intracellular signaling pathways indicates that H. pylori clinical isolates induce IL-8 gene transcription through NF-κB p65, but by a MOI-dependent differential activation of MAPK pathways. Thus, the major virulence factors of H. pylori CagA, VacA, and DupA might play a minor role in the level of IL-8 gene response to a high bacterial load.

  15. Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, B.A.; Fishman, E.K.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Jones, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the CT scans of patients with Helicobacter pylori (formerly Campylobacter pylori) infection and histologic gastritis reviewed to determine if the inflammatory changes can mimic the CT appearance of gastric neoplasm. Records were obtained of 288 consecutive cases of biopsy-confirmed. Helicobacter pylori gastritis, spanning a 21-month period from July 1988 to March 1990. Abdominal CT scans had been performed in 70 of these cases and were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Seven of the 70 cases of confirmed Helicobacter pylori gastritis were suggestive of malignancy on CT

  16. Roles of the plasticity regions of Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2008-05-01

    Putative virulence genes of Helicobacter pylori are generally classified into three categories: strain-specific genes, phase-variable genes and genes with variable structures/genotypes. Among these, there has recently been considerable interest in strain-specific genes found outside of the cag pathogenicity island, especially genes in the plasticity regions. Nearly half of the strain-specific genes of H. pylori are located in the plasticity regions in strains 26695 and J99. Strain HPAG1, however, seems to lack a typical plasticity region; instead it has 43 HPAG1-specific genes which are either undetectable or incompletely represented in the genomes of strains 26695 and J99. Recent studies showed that certain genes or combination of genes in this region may play important roles in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases. Most previous studies have focused on the plasticity region in strain J99 (jhp0914-jhp0961) and the jhp0947 gene and the duodenal ulcer promoting (dupA) gene are good candidate markers for gastroduodenal diseases although there are some paradoxical findings. The jhp0947 gene is reported to be associated with an increased risk of both duodenal ulcers and gastric cancers, whereas the dupA gene, which encompasses jhp0917 and jhp0918, is reported to be associated with an increased risk of duodenal ulcers and protection against gastric cancers. In addition, recent studies showed that approximately 10-30 % of clinical isolates possess a 16.3 kb type IV secretion apparatus (tfs3) in the plasticity region. Studies on the plasticity region have only just begun, and further investigation is necessary to elucidate the roles of genes in this region in gastroduodenal pathogenesis.

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection and extragastric disorders in children: A critical update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, Lucia; Osborn, John F; Tromba, Valeria; Romaggioli, Sara; Bascetta, Stefano; Chiesa, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a highly prevalent, serious and chronic infection that has been associated causally with a diverse spectrum of extragastric disorders including iron deficiency anemia, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, growth retardation, and diabetes mellitus. The inverse relation of H. pylori prevalence and the increase in allergies, as reported from epidemiological studies, has stimulated research for elucidating potential underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Although H. pylori is most frequently acquired during childhood in both developed and developing countries, clinicians are less familiar with the pediatric literature in the field. A better understanding of the H. pylori disease spectrum in childhood should lead to clearer recommendations about testing for and treating H. pylori infection in children who are more likely to develop clinical sequelae. A further clinical challenge is whether the progressive decrease of H. pylori in the last decades, abetted by modern clinical practices, may have other health consequences. PMID:24587617

  18. Innovative Perspectives of Integrated Chinese Medicine on H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Shi, Zong-Ming; Chen, Yao; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Xue-Zhi

    2018-06-08

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) treatment requires the development of more effective therapies, mainly owing to the challenges posed by the bacterial resistance to antibiotics. In China, critically high infection and antibiotic resistance rates have limited the application of classic H. pylori eradication therapies. Consequently, researchers are attempting to find new solutions by drawing from traditional medicine. This article reviews basic scientific and clinical progress in the use of integrated Chinese and Western medicine (IM) to treat H. pylori; describes the conflicting results between in vivo and in vitro studies in this regard; discusses the observed clinical effects of IM, with emphasis on traditional patent medicines; and proposes a role for IM in both the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori, including the use of tongue manifestation as an early diagnostic method and capitalizing on IM's direct and indirect methods for enhancing antibiotic effect.

  19. N-acetylcysteine prevents the development of gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sungil; Bak, Eun-Jung; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen, causing various gastric diseases ranging from gastritis to gastric adenocarcinoma. It has been reported that combining N-acetylcysteine (NAC) with conventional antibiotic therapy increases the success rate of H. pylori eradication. We evaluated the effect of NAC itself on the growth and colonization of H. pylori, and development of gastritis, using in vitro liquid culture system and in vivo animal models. H. pylori growth was evaluated in broth culture containing NAC. The H. pylori load and histopathological scores of stomachs were measured in Mongolian gerbils infected with H. pylori strain 7.13, and fed with NAC-containing diet. In liquid culture, NAC inhibited H. pylori growth in a concentration-dependent manner. In the animal model, 3-day administration of NAC after 1 week from infection reduced the H. pylori load; 6-week administration of NAC after 1 week from infection prevented the development of gastritis and reduced H. pylori colonization. However, no reduction in the bacterial load or degree of gastritis was observed with a 6-week administration of NAC following 6-week infection period. Our results indicate that NAC may exert a beneficial effect on reduction of bacterial colonization, and prevents the development of severe inflammation, in people with initial asymptomatic or mild H. pylori infection.

  20. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plant extracts traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; Miguel, Obdulio Gomes; Cunico, Miriam Machado; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Kussen, Gislene Maria Botão; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2010-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of plant extracts obtained from Bixa orellana L., Chamomilla recutita L., Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., Malva sylvestris L., Plantago major L. and Rheum rhaponticum L. has been evaluated against two reference strains and eleven clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. All the plant species chosen are used in popular Brazilian cuisine and folk medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Initial screening was made by the disk diffusion test and then minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the agar dilution method. The results presented in this work demonstrated that among the plant preparations analyzed, B. orellana L., C. recutita L., I. paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. and M. sylvestris L. were capable of inhibiting the in vitro growth of H. pylori. PMID:24031496

  1. The Helicobacter pylori HpyAXII restriction–modification system limits exogenous DNA uptake by targeting GTAC sites but shows asymmetric conservation of the DNA methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Olivier; Salama, Nina R.

    2008-01-01

    The naturally competent organism Helicobacter pylori encodes a large number of restriction–modification (R–M) systems that consist of a restriction endonuclease and a DNA methyltransferase. R–M systems are not only believed to limit DNA exchange among bacteria but may also have other cellular functions. We report a previously uncharacterized H. pylori type II R–M system, M.HpyAXII/R.HpyAXII. We show that this system targets GTAC sites, which are rare in the H. pylori chromosome but numerous in ribosomal RNA genes. As predicted, this type II R–M system showed attributes of a selfish element. Deletion of the methyltransferase M.HpyAXII is lethal when associated with an active endonuclease R.HpyAXII unless compensated by adaptive mutation or gene amplification. R.HpyAXII effectively restricted both unmethylated plasmid and chromosomal DNA during natural transformation and was predicted to belong to the novel ‘half pipe’ structural family of endonucleases. Analysis of a panel of clinical isolates revealed that R.HpyAXII was functional in a small number of H. pylori strains (18.9%, n = 37), whereas the activity of M.HpyAXII was highly conserved (92%, n = 50), suggesting that GTAC methylation confers a selective advantage to H. pylori. However, M.HpyAXII activity did not enhance H. pylori fitness during stomach colonization of a mouse infection model. PMID:18978016

  2. Molecular methods for typing of Helicobacter pylori and their applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Hartzen, S H; Roshanisefat, H

    1999-01-01

    .g. the urease genes. Furthermore, reproducibility, discriminatory power, ease of performance and interpretation, cost and toxic procedures of each method are assessed. To date no direct comparison of all the molecular typing methods described has been performed in the same study with the same H. pylori strains....... However, PCR analysis of the urease gene directly on suspensions of H. pylori or gastric biopsy material seems to be useful for routine use and applicable in specific epidemiological situations....

  3. Colony variation of Helicobacter pylori: pathogenic potential is correlated to cell wall lipid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukholm, G; Tannaes, T; Nedenskov, P; Esbensen, Y; Grav, H J; Hovig, T; Ariansen, S; Guldvog, I

    1997-05-01

    Differences in expression of disease after infection with Helicobacter pylori have so far been connected with host factors and bacterial interstrain variation. In this study, spontaneous and ecology-mediated intrastrain variation was examined. Four clinical isolates of H. pylori were shown to give rise to two colony forms. Bacterial morphology was examined by electron microscopy. Bacterial fractions were examined for proteins using ion exchange chromatography and SDS-PAGE; for lipids using thin-layer chromatography, lipid anion-exchange chromatography, column chromatography on silica gel, 31P-NMR, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Bacterial in vitro invasiveness and adhesiveness were examined in two different systems, and urease and VacA toxin were assayed by Western blot analysis. H. pylori was shown to give rise to two colony forms: at normal pH the population was dominated by L colonies. One strain was chosen for further studies. Bacteria from L colonies retained VacA toxin and urease, did not invade or adhere to epithelial cells, and contained normal quantities of phosphatidylethanolamine. In a small frequency, spontaneous S colonies were formed. Bacteria from these colonies released VacA and urease, adhered to and invaded epithelial cells and contained increased amounts of lysophosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine. After addition of HCl to the culture medium (pH6), almost only S colonies were formed. The results demonstrate that environmental factors, such as HCl, can change the bacterial cell wall, and thereby enhance expression of virulence factors of H. pylori in vitro. A similar in vivo variation would have implications for our understanding of the interaction between HCl secretion in the gastric mucosa and H. pylori in the development of peptic ulcer disease.

  4. Helicobacter pylori genotyping from positive clotests in patients with duodenal ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattar Rejane

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the seroprevalence of H. pylori may be high in the normal population, a minority develops peptic ulcer. Colonization of the gastric mucosa by more pathogenic vacA strains of H. pylori seems to be associated with enhanced gastric inflammation and duodenal ulcer. H. pylori genotyping from positive CLOtests was developed to determine the vacA genotypes and cagA status in 40 duodenal ulcer patients and for routine use. The pathogenic s1b/ m1/ cagA genotype was the most frequently occurring strain (17/42.5%; only two (5% patients presented the s2/ m2 genotype, the less virulent strain. Multiple strains were also detected in 17 (42.5% patients. Multiple strains of H. pylori colonizing the human stomach have been underestimated, because genotyping has been performed from cultures of H. pylori. We concluded that genotyping of H. pylori from a positive CLOtest had the advantages of reducing the number of biopsies taken during endoscopy, eliminating the step of culturing H. pylori, and assuring the presence of H. pylori in the specimen being processed.

  5. Emergence of Tetracycline Resistance in Helicobacter pylori: Multiple Mutational Changes in 16S Ribosomal DNA and Other Genetic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailidiene, Daiva; Bertoli, M. Teresita; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Dailide, Giedrius; Pascasio, Mario Alberto; Kupcinskas, Limas; Berg, Douglas E.

    2002-01-01

    Tetracycline is useful in combination therapies against the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We found 6 tetracycline-resistant (Tetr) strains among 159 clinical isolates (from El Salvador, Lithuania, and India) and obtained the following four results: (i) 5 of 6 Tetr isolates contained one or two nucleotide substitutions in one part of the primary tetracycline binding site in 16S rRNA (AGA965-967 [Escherichia coli coordinates] changed to gGA, AGc, guA, or gGc [lowercase letters are used to represent the base changes]), whereas the sixth (isolate Ind75) retained AGA965-967; (ii) PCR products containing mutant 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) alleles transformed recipient strains to Tetr phenotypes, but transformants containing alleles with single substitutions (gGA and AGc) were less resistant than their Tetr parents; (iii) each of 10 Tetr mutants of reference strain 26695 (in which mutations were induced with metronidazole, a mutagenic anti-H. pylori agent) contained the normal AGA965-967 sequence; and (iv) transformant derivatives of Ind75 and of one of the Tetr 26695 mutants that had acquired mutant rDNA alleles were resistant to tetracycline at levels higher than those to which either parent strain was resistant. Thus, tetracycline resistance in H. pylori results from an accumulation of changes that may affect tetracycline-ribosome affinity and/or other functions (perhaps porins or efflux pumps). We suggest that the rarity of tetracycline resistance among clinical isolates reflects this need for multiple mutations and perhaps also the deleterious effects of such mutations on fitness. Formally equivalent mutations with small but additive effects are postulated to contribute importantly to traits such as host specificity and virulence and to H. pylori's great genetic diversity. PMID:12435699

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Helicobacter Activities of Eryngium foetidum (Apiaceae), Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae), and Galinsoga ciliata (Asteraceae) against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouitcheu Mabeku, Laure Brigitte; Eyoum Bille, Bertrand; Nguepi, Eveline

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of extracts of Bidens pilosa, Galinsoga ciliata, and Eryngium foetidum against 6 clinical strains of Helicobacter pylori in vitro and in vivo. Broth microdilution method was used in vitro. In vivo, Swiss mice were inoculated with H. pylori and divided into 5 groups; the control group received the vehicle and the four others received 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg of methanol extract of Eryngium foetidum and ciprofloxacin (500 mg/kg) for 7 days, respectively. Helicobacter pylori colonization and number of colonies in gastric biopsies culture were assessed on days 1 and 7 after treatment. The lowest MIC value (64 μg/mL) and the best spectrum of bactericidal effect (MBC/MIC = 1) were obtained with the methanol extract of Eryngium foetidum. The number of H. pylori infected animals was 17% (plant-extract) and 0% (ciprofloxacin) compared to 100% for the infected untreated group. Plant-extract (381.9 ± 239.5 CFU) and ciprofloxacin (248 ± 153.2 CFU) significantly reduced bacterial load in gastric mucosa compared to untreated, inoculated mice (14350 ± 690 CFU). Conclusion. The present data provided evidence that methanol extract of Eryngium foetidum could be a rich source of metabolites with antimicrobial activity to fight Helicobacter pylori infections.

  7. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and CagA-Positive Infections and Global Variations in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Young Park

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a major health burden and is the fifth most common malignancy and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Development of gastric cancer involves several aspects, including host genetics, environmental factors, and Helicobacter pylori infection. There is increasing evidence from epidemiological studies of the association of H. pylori infection and specific virulence factors with gastric cancer. Studies in animal models indicate H. pylori is a primary factor in the development of gastric cancer. One major virulence factor in H. pylori is the cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA, which encodes the CagA protein in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI. Meta-analysis of studies investigating CagA seropositivity irrespective of H. pylori status identified that CagA seropositivity increases the risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.87, 95% CI: 1.95–4.22 relative to the risk of H. pylori infection alone (OR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.58–3.39. Eradicating H. pylori is a strategy for reducing gastric cancer incidence. A meta-analysis of six randomised controlled trials (RCTs suggests that searching for and eradicating H. pylori infection reduces the subsequent incidence of gastric cancer with a pooled relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.46–0.95. The introduction in regions of high gastric cancer incidence of population-based H. pylori screening and treatment programmes, with a scientifically valid assessment of programme processes, feasibility, effectiveness and possible adverse consequences, would impact the incidence of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer. Given the recent molecular understanding of the oncogenic role of CagA, targeting H. pylori screening and treatment programmes in populations with a high prevalence of H. pylori CagA-positive strains, particularly the more oncogenic East Asian H. pylori CagA strains, may be worth further investigation to optimise the benefits of such strategies.

  8. Helicobacter pylori induces cell migration and invasion through casein kinase 2 in gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Do Yeon; Yu, Da Yeon; Kim, Shin; Lee, Yong Chan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is causally linked with gastric carcinogenesis. Virulent H. pylori strains deliver bacterial CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Induction of high motility and an elongated phenotype is considered to be CagA-dependent process. Casein kinase 2 plays a critical role in carcinogenesis through signaling pathways related to the epithelial mesenchymal transition. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on the casein kinase 2-mediated migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells. AGS or MKN28 cells as human gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori strains Hp60190 (ATCC 49503, CagA(+)) and Hp8822 (CagA(-)) were used. Cells were infected with H. pylori at multiplicity of infection of 100 : 1 for various times. We measured in vitro kinase assay to examine casein kinase 2 activity and performed immunofluorescent staining to observe E-cadherin complex. We also examined β-catenin transactivation through promoter assay and MMP7 expression by real-time PCR and ELISA. H. pylori upregulates casein kinase 2 activity and inhibition of casein kinase 2 in H. pylori-infected cells profoundly suppressed cell invasiveness and motility. We confirmed that casein kinase 2 mediates membranous α-catenin depletion through dissociation of the α-/β-catenin complex in H. pylori-infected cells. We also found that H. pylori induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and increases MMP7 expressions mediated through casein kinase 2. We show for the first time that CagA(+) H. pylori upregulates cellular invasiveness and motility through casein kinase 2. The demonstration of a mechanistic interplay between H. pylori and casein kinase 2 provides important insights into the role of CagA(+) H. pylori in the gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and CagA-Positive Infections and Global Variations in Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, David; Crabtree, Jean E.

    2018-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major health burden and is the fifth most common malignancy and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Development of gastric cancer involves several aspects, including host genetics, environmental factors, and Helicobacter pylori infection. There is increasing evidence from epidemiological studies of the association of H. pylori infection and specific virulence factors with gastric cancer. Studies in animal models indicate H. pylori is a primary factor in the development of gastric cancer. One major virulence factor in H. pylori is the cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA), which encodes the CagA protein in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI). Meta-analysis of studies investigating CagA seropositivity irrespective of H. pylori status identified that CagA seropositivity increases the risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.87, 95% CI: 1.95–4.22) relative to the risk of H. pylori infection alone (OR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.58–3.39). Eradicating H. pylori is a strategy for reducing gastric cancer incidence. A meta-analysis of six randomised controlled trials (RCTs) suggests that searching for and eradicating H. pylori infection reduces the subsequent incidence of gastric cancer with a pooled relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.46–0.95). The introduction in regions of high gastric cancer incidence of population-based H. pylori screening and treatment programmes, with a scientifically valid assessment of programme processes, feasibility, effectiveness and possible adverse consequences, would impact the incidence of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer. Given the recent molecular understanding of the oncogenic role of CagA, targeting H. pylori screening and treatment programmes in populations with a high prevalence of H. pylori CagA-positive strains, particularly the more oncogenic East Asian H. pylori CagA strains, may be worth further investigation to optimise the benefits of such strategies. PMID:29671784

  10. B-Cell and T-Cell Immune Responses to Experimental Helicobacter pylori Infection in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurgalieva, Zhannat Z.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Zheng, Carl Q.; Elliott, Susan N.; Ernst, Peter B.; Osato, Michael; Estes, Mary K.; Graham, David Y.

    2005-01-01

    The acute antibody and T-cell immune response to Helicobacter pylori infection in humans has not been studied systematically. Serum from H. pylori-naive volunteers challenged with H. pylori and cured after 4 or 12 weeks was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for anti-H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgA established using bacterial lysates from homologous (the infecting strain) and heterologous H. pylori. Proteins recognized by IgM antibody were identified by mass spectrometry of immunoreactive bands separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Mucosal T-cell subsets (CD4, CD8, CD3, and CD30 cells) were assessed by immunohistochemistry. All 18 infected volunteers developed H. pylori-specific IgM responses to both homologous or heterologous H. pylori antigens. H. pylori antigens reacted with IgM antibody at 4 weeks postinfection. IgM Western blotting showed immunoreactivity of postinfection serum samples to multiple H. pylori proteins with molecular weights ranging between 9,000 (9K) to 150K with homologous strains but only a 70K band using heterologous antigens. Two-dimensional electrophoresis demonstrated that production of H. pylori-specific IgM antibodies was elicited by H. pylori flagellins A and B, urease B, ABC transporter binding protein, heat shock protein 70 (DnaK), and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase. Mucosal CD3, CD4, and CD8 T-cell numbers increased following infection. IgM antibody responses were detected to a range of homologous H. pylori antigens 2 to 4 weeks postchallenge. The majority of H. pylori proteins were those involved in motility and colonization and may represent targets for vaccine development. PMID:15845507

  11. [The prevalence of dupA (duodenal ulcer-promoting gene) of Helicobacter pylori in children and adolescents--own observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzecka, Monika; Szaflarska-Popławska, Anna; Gasiorowska, Joanna; Gorzkiewicz, Marta; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2013-05-01

    The strains of Helicobacter pylori are described by many common features which determine their virulence. The genes which are connected with much higher virulence of some strains are vacA, cagA, oipA, dupA. Duodenal Ulcer Promoting Gene--dupA is the new virulence factor coexisting with a duodenum ulcer. There is a rationale that shows a protective character of dupA with reference to a stomach cancer. The dupA gene probably causes increasingly higher releasing of pro-infectious IL-8 via stomach cells and it influences the production of IL-12 and other cytokines. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of dupA gene's appearance in the Polish children's group and in the Polish teenagers' group infected with H. pylori. The research was also aimed to determine the coexistence of dupA gene and duodenum ulcer disease or erosion infection of duodenum's mucous membrane. The endoscopic examination of the upper part of digestive duct was performed in 119 qualified patients with dyspeptic symptoms and with suspicion of stomach and duodenum's mucous membrane infection. The segments were taken for histopathological identification of H. pylori and for genetic indicating via PCR method. To confirm the presence of H. pylori in the extract the amplification of DNA fragment sized 860 pz was used. The presence of dupA gene was detected by PCR reaction with using the starters which include the fragment of jhp0917-jhp0918 sequence in the plastic H. pylori's genome area. To confirm the infection the urea breathing test was taken. 88 patients confirm the infection of H. pylori. The presence of dupA gene was found in 20 patients--a group A (22.7%), whereas in 68 patients dupA gene was not found--a group B (77.2%). Pathological changes in duodenum was found in 20 patients infected with H. pylori (22.7%), included 4 patients in the group A (20%) and 16 in the group B (23.5%). There was an infection (swelling, redness, congestion) in duodenum was found in the group A in all cases

  12. Clinical trial: a randomized trial of early endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori testing and empirical therapy for the management of dyspepsia in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, A E; Elliott, C A; Miller, P; Hawkey, C J; Logan, R F A

    2009-01-01

    Early endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori eradication and empirical acid suppression are commonly used dyspepsia management strategies in primary care but have not been directly compared in a single trial. To compare endoscopy, H. pylori test and refer, H. pylori test and treat and empirical acid suppression for dyspepsia in primary care. Patients presenting to their general practitioner with dyspepsia were randomized to endoscopy, H. pylori'test and treat', H. pylori test and endoscope positives, or empirical therapy with symptoms, patient satisfaction, healthcare costs and cost effectiveness at 12 months being the outcomes. At 2 months, the proportion of patients reporting no or minimal dyspeptic symptoms ranged from 74% for those having early endoscopy to 55% for those on empirical therapy (P = 0.009), but at 1 year, there was little difference among the four strategies. Early endoscopy was associated with fewer subsequent consultations for dyspepsia (P = 0.003). 'Test and treat' resulted in fewer endoscopies overall and was most cost-effective over a range of cost assumptions. Empirical therapy resulted in the lowest initial costs, but the highest rate of subsequent endoscopy. Gastro-oesophageal cancers were found in four patients randomized to the H. pylori testing strategies. While early endoscopy offered some advantages 'Test and treat' was the most cost-effective strategy. In older patients, early endoscopy may be an appropriate strategy in view of the greater risk of malignant disease. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: relationship with the gastric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-08-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available.

  14. Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains with Deficient Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafopoulou, Konstantina; Xavier, Basil Britto; Hotterbeekx, An; Janssens, Lore; Lammens, Christine; Dé, Emmanuelle; Goossens, Herman; Tsakris, Athanasios; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2015-01-01

    In two pairs of clinical colistin-susceptible/colistin-resistant (Csts/Cstr) Acinetobacter baumannii strains, the Cstr strains showed significantly decreased biofilm formation in static and dynamic assays (P Cstr strain and a frameshift mutation in CarO and the loss of a 47,969-bp element containing multiple genes associated with biofilm production in the other. PMID:26666921

  15. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  16. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Human Rotavirus G8P[8] Outbreak Strain, Japan, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kenji; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Ono, Mayumi; Ohara, Toshio; Fujibayashi, Shinsuke; Tahara, Yasuo; Kubo, Noriaki; Nakata, Shuji; Higashidate, Yoshihito; Fujii, Yoshiki; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Yoto, Yuko; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    During March-July 2014, rotavirus G8P[8] emerged as the predominant cause of rotavirus gastroenteritis among children in Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan. Clinical characteristics were similar for infections caused by G8 and non-G8 strains. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses suggest the strains were generated by multiple reassortment events between DS-1-like P[8] strains and bovine strains from Asia.

  17. Helicobacter pylori cagA and iceA genotypes status and risk of peptic ulcer in Saudi patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momenah, Aiman M.; Tayeb, Mohammad T.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to determine the prevalence of cagA+ and iceA genotypes among Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolates from a group of Saudi patients with gastric complaints, and to find out any significant correlation between these strains and severe gastric clinical outcomes such as peptic ulcer and gastric cancer in Saudi population. A total of 1104 gastric biopsies from 368 patients who presented with symptoms suggestive of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, or gastric carcinoma were taken from the main hospitals in the Western region of Saudi Arabia from July 2004 to July 2005. We cultured the samples for H. pylori and a polymerase chain reaction was carried out to check for the presence or absence of cagA gene and the status of iceA genotypes. Among the 368 suspected patients to be infected with H. pylori by means of clinical features and endoscopic findings; 103 (28%) were positive using culture technique. The relation of the presence of cagA and the development of cases to gastritis and ulcer was statistically significant (p=0.0001). Furthermore, this study revealed that 100% of ulcer cases were infected with iceA1 with a statistically significant correlation (p=0.0001), while 94.6% of gastritis and 90.9% of normal were infected with iceA2 (p=0.0001). Moreover cagA+/iceA1 combined genotypes was statistically correlated with peptic ulcer (100%) but not cagA-/iceA1 (0%; p=0.0001).Certain H. pylori genotypes were more virulent than others. Multiple clinical implications based on these finding might be studied further.(author)

  18. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

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    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  19. ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT FOR INACTIVATING HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light from a low-pressure source to determine log inactivation versus applied fluence. Results indicate that H. pylori is readily inactivated at UV fluences typically used in water treatment r...

  20. Human Gastric Mucosal Hydrophobicity Does dot Decrease with Helicobacter Pylori Infection or Chronological Age

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    Mohammed S Al-Marhoon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infection with cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe gastric diseases. Previous studies in humans have reported a decreased gastric hydrophobicity with H pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to differentiate between the effect of cagA+ and cagA- strains on gastric mucus hydrophobicity.

  1. Helicobacter pylori in Vegetables and Salads: Genotyping and Antimicrobial Resistance Properties

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    Emad Yahaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available From a clinical and epidemiological perspective, it is important to know which genotypes and antibiotic resistance patterns are present in H. pylori strains isolated from salads and vegetables. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to find this purpose. Three hundred eighty washed and unwashed vegetable samples and fifty commercial and traditional salad samples were collected from Isfahan, Iran. Samples were cultured and those found positive for H. pylori were analyzed using PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion method. Seven out of 50 (14% salad and 52 out of 380 (13.68% vegetable samples harbored H. pylori. In addition, leek, lettuce, and cabbage were the most commonly contaminated samples (30%. The most prevalent virulence genes were oipA (86.44% and cagA (57.625. VacA s1a (37.28% and iceA1 (47.45% were the most prevalent genotypes. Forty different genotypic combinations were recognized. S1a/cagA+/iceA1/oipA+ (33.89%, s1a/cagA+/iceA2/oipA (30.50%, and m1a/cagA+/iceA1/oipA+ (28.81% were the most prevalent combined genotypes. Bacterial strains had the highest levels of resistance against metronidazole (77.96%, amoxicillin (67.79%, and ampicillin (61.01%. High similarity in the genotyping pattern of H. pylori among vegetable and salad samples and human specimens suggests that vegetable and salads may be the sources of the bacteria.

  2. Helicobacter pylori resistance rates for levofloxacin, tetracycline and rifabutin among Irish isolates at a reference centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, A

    2013-04-27

    INTRODUCTION: Helicobacter pylori eradication rates using conventional triple therapies are falling, making viable second-line and rescue regimens necessary. Levofloxacin, tetracycline and rifabutin are three efficacious antibiotics for rescue therapy. AIM: We aimed to assess the resistance rates for H. pylori against these antibiotics in an Irish cohort. METHODS: Gastric biopsies were collected from 85 patients infected with H. pylori (mean age 46 years) in the Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin in 2008 and 2009. Susceptibility to antibiotics was tested using the Etest. Clinical information was obtained from endoscopy reports and chart review. RESULTS: 50.6 % of patients were females. Mean age was 47 years. Ten had prior attempts at eradication therapy with amoxicillin-clarithromycin-PPI, two had levofloxacin-based second-line therapy. 11.7 % [95 % CI (6.5-20.3 %)] (N = 10) had strains resistant to levofloxacin. There were no strains resistant to rifabutin or tetracycline. Levofloxacin resistance in the under 45 age group was 2.6 % (1\\/38) compared to 19.1 % (9\\/47) of above 45 age group (p = 0.02). DISCUSSION: The levofloxacin rates illustrated in this study are relatively low by European standards and in line with other studies from the United Kingdom and Germany, with younger patients having very low levels of resistance. Levofloxacin, tetracycline and rifabutin are all valid options for H. pylori eradication in Irish patients but the importance of compliance cannot be underestimated.

  3. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Oscar A; Núñez-Villena, Felipe; Soto, Sarita E; Ugalde, José Manuel; López-Solís, Remigio; Toledo, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat) was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR) by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  4. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori

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    Oscar A Cerda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  5. Electrocardiogram of Clinically Healthy Mithun (Bos frontalis): Variation among Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Sagar; Das, Pradip Kumar; Ghosh, Probal Ranjan; Das, Kinsuk; Vupru, Kezha V.; Rajkhowa, Chandan; Mondal, Mohan

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to establish the normal electrocardiogram in four different genetic strains of mithun (Bos frontalis). Electrocardiography, cardiac electrical axis, heart rate, rectal temperature and respiration rate were recorded in a total of 32 adult male mithun of four strains (n = 8 each). It was found that the respiration and heart rates were higher (P electrocardiogram of mithun revealed that the amplitude and duration of P wave, QRS complex and T wave were different among four different genetic strains of mithun and the electrical axis of QRS complex for Nagamese and Mizoram mithuns are dissimilar to bovine species. PMID:20886013

  6. Primary Antibiotic Resistance of Helicobacter pylori in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is the most important factor leading to the failure of eradication regimens; thus, it is important to obtain regional antibiotic resistance information. This review focuses on the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone in China. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biomedical databases from the earliest date of each database to October 2016. The search terms included the following: H. pylori, antibiotic (including clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone) resistance with or without China or different regions of China. The data analysis was performed using MedCalc 15.2.2. Each article was weighted according to the number of isolated H. pylori strains. A pooled proportion analysis was performed. Twenty-three studies (14 studies in English and 9 in Chinese) were included in this review. A total of 6274, 6418, 3921, 5468, 2802, and 275 H. pylori strains were included in this review to evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone, respectively. Overall, the primary resistance rates of clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were 28.9, 63.8, 28.0, 3.1, 3.9, and 1.7%, respectively. In China, the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was high and increased over time, whereas the resistance rates to amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were low and stable over time.

  7. Comparative Genomics of H. pylori and Non-Pylori Helicobacter Species to Identify New Regions Associated with Its Pathogenicity and Adaptability

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    De-Min Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Helicobacter is a group of Gram-negative, helical-shaped pathogens consisting of at least 36 bacterial species. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, infecting more than 50% of the human population, is considered as the major cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. However, the genetic underpinnings of H. pylori that are responsible for its large scale epidemic and gastrointestinal environment adaption within human beings remain unclear. Core-pan genome analysis was performed among 75 representative H. pylori and 24 non-pylori Helicobacter genomes. There were 1173 conserved protein families of H. pylori and 673 of all 99 Helicobacter genus strains. We found 79 genome unique regions, a total of 202,359bp, shared by at least 80% of the H. pylori but lacked in non-pylori Helicobacter species. The operons, genes, and sRNAs within the H. pylori unique regions were considered as potential ones associated with its pathogenicity and adaptability, and the relativity among them has been partially confirmed by functional annotation analysis. However, functions of at least 54 genes and 10 sRNAs were still unclear. Our analysis of protein-protein interaction showed that 30 genes within them may have the cooperation relationship.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTIPLE-LOCUS VARIABLE NUMBER OF TANDEM REPEAT ANALYSIS (MLVA FOR HELICOBACTER PYLORI AND ITS APPLICATION TO HELICOBACTER PYLORI ISOLATES FROM ROSTOV REGION,RUSSIA

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    Sorokin VM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stomach infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the second most common infectious disease of humans. The severe pathological consequences of this infection include gastric and duodenal ulcer disease, the development of gastric mucosal atrophy, gastric carcinoma, and, more rarely, malignant tumors of the lymphoma. H. pylori infections cause very high morbidity and mortality and are of particular concern in developing countries, where H. pylori prevalences as high as 90% have been reported. The population of H. pylori shows a high genomic variability among isolates. And the polymorphism of repeat-units of genomics had participated the important process of evolution. A variety of molecular typing tools have been developed to access genetic relatedness in H. pylori isolates. However, there is still no standard genotyping system of this bacterium. The MLVA (Multi-Locus of Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis method is useful for performing phylogenetic analysis and is widely used in bacteria genotyping; however, there's little application in H. pylori analysis. This article is the first application of the MLVA method to investigate H. pylori isolates in Russia. MLVA of 4 VNTR loci with high discrimination power based on 10 candidates were performed on a collection of 22 strains of H. pylori which originated from Rostov region of Russia. This method provides a starting point on which improvements to the method and comparisons to other techniques can be made.

  9. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stomach. It is the main cause of peptic ulcers, and it can also cause gastritis and stomach ... inflammation. This can lead to gastritis or a peptic ulcer. Researchers aren't sure how H. pylori spreads. ...

  10. Modified Sequential Therapy Regimen versus Conventional Triple Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Duodenal Ulcer Patients in China: A Multicenter Clinical Comparative Study

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    Ying-Qun Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Antimicrobial resistance has decreased eradication rates for Helicobacter pylori infection worldwide. To observe the effect of eradicating Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and the treatment of duodenal ulcer by 2 kinds of modified sequential therapy through comparing with that of 10-day standard triple therapy. Methods. A total of 210 patients who were confirmed in duodenal ulcer active or heal period by gastroscopy and H. pylori positive confirmed by rapid urease test, serum anti-H. pylori antibody (ELASE, or histological examination enrolled in the study. All the patients were randomly divided into three groups: group A (70 cases and group B (70 cases were provided 10-day modified sequential therapy; group C (70 cases was provided 10-day standard triple therapy. Patients of group A received 20 mg of Esomeprazole, 500 mg of Clarithromycin for the first 5 days, followed by 20 mg of Esomeprazole, 500 mg of Clarithromycin, and 1000 mg of Amoxicillin for the remaining 5 days. Group B received 20 mg of Esomeprazole, 1000 mg of Amoxicillin for the first 5 days, followed by 20 mg of Esomeprazole, 500 mg of Clarithromycin, and 1000 mg of Amoxicillin for the remaining 5 days. Group C received 20 mg of Esomeprazole, 500 mg of Clarithromycin, and 1000 mg of Amoxicillin for standard 10-day therapy. All drugs were given twice daily. H. pylori eradication rate was checked four to eight weeks after taking the medicine by using a 13C urea breath test. In the first, second, third, seventh, twenty-first, thirty-fifth days respectively, the symptoms of patients such as epigastric gnawing, burning pain, and acidity were evaluated simultaneously. Results. Overall, 210 patients accomplished all therapy schemes, 9 case patients were excluded. The examination result indicated that the H. pylori eradication rate of each group was as follows: group A 92.5% (62/67, group B 86.8% (59/68, and group C 78.8% (52/66. The H. pylori

  11. Inhibitory effect of green tea catechins in combination with sucralfate on Helicobacter pylori infection in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Fumiyo; Harada, Noboru; Yamada, Masami; Murohisa, Binzaburo; Oguni, Itaro

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori has been reported. It is desirable to develop an effective method to prevent the occurrence of resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori. Green tea catechins (GTCs) have been reported to have an antibacterial effect. Therefore, the possibility of eradicating Helicobacter pylori by the oral administration of GTCs was investigated. Solutions of GTCs and solutions of GTCs adsorbed to sucralfate (GTC-scf), at concentrations of 20 mg GTCs and/or 20 mg sucralfate/ml were prepared. Then 1 ml of the GTC-scf or the GTC solution was administered daily, for 10 days to Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori. Then the stomachs were extirpated and homogenized. The homogenate was spread on selective medium plates. After 5-day culture, colony-forming units (CFU) of Helicobacter pylori were counted. The CFU of Helicobacter pylori was significantly decreased by GTC-scf. GTC-scf may have a bactericidal effect on Helicobacter pylori infection.

  12. Randomized Controlled Trial for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in a Naive Portuguese Population: Is Sequential Treatment Superior to Triple Therapy in Real World Clinical Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boal Carvalho, Pedro; Magalhães, Joana; Dias de Castro, Francisca; Rosa, Bruno; Cotter, José

    2017-03-31

    Helicobacter pylori eradication has become increasingly difficult as resistances to several antibiotics develop. We aimed to compare Helicobacter pylori eradication rates between triple therapy and sequential therapy in a naive Portuguese population. Prospective randomized trial including consecutive patients referred for first-line Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment. previous gastric surgery/neoplasia, pregnancy/lactancy, allergy to any of the drugs. The compared eradication regimens were triple therapy (pantoprazol, amoxicillin and clarithromycin 12/12 hours, 14 days) and sequential therapy (pantoprazol 12/12 hours for 10 days, amoxicillin 12/12 hours for days 1 - 5 and clarithromycin plus metronidazol 12/12 hours during days 6 - 10). Eradication success was confirmed with urea breath test. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS v21.0 and a p-value population, we found a satisfactory global Helicobacter pylori eradication rate of 82%, with no statistical differences observed in the efficacy of the treatment between triple and sequential regimens. These results support the use of either therapy for the first-line eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  13. Helicobacter pylori genetic diversification in the Mongolian gerbil model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Amber C; Loh, John T; Chopra, Abha; Leary, Shay; Lin, Aung Soe; McDonnell, Wyatt J; Dixon, Beverly R E A; Noto, Jennifer M; Israel, Dawn A; Peek, Richard M; Mallal, Simon; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2018-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori requires genetic agility to infect new hosts and establish long-term colonization of changing gastric environments. In this study, we analyzed H. pylori genetic adaptation in the Mongolian gerbil model. This model is of particular interest because H. pylori -infected gerbils develop a high level of gastric inflammation and often develop gastric adenocarcinoma or gastric ulceration. We analyzed the whole genome sequences of H. pylori strains cultured from experimentally infected gerbils, in comparison to the genome sequence of the input strain. The mean annualized single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rate per site was 1.5e -5 , which is similar to the rates detected previously in H. pylori- infected humans. Many of the mutations occurred within or upstream of genes associated with iron-related functions ( fur , tonB1 , fecA2 , fecA3 , and frpB3 ) or encoding outer membrane proteins ( alpA, oipA, fecA2, fecA3, frpB3 and cagY ). Most of the SNPs within coding regions (86%) were non-synonymous mutations. Several deletion or insertion mutations led to disruption of open reading frames, suggesting that the corresponding gene products are not required or are deleterious during chronic H. pylori colonization of the gerbil stomach. Five variants (three SNPs and two deletions) were detected in isolates from multiple animals, which suggests that these mutations conferred a selective advantage. One of the mutations (FurR88H) detected in isolates from multiple animals was previously shown to confer increased resistance to oxidative stress, and we now show that this SNP also confers a survival advantage when H. pylori is co-cultured with neutrophils. Collectively, these analyses allow the identification of mutations that are positively selected during H. pylori colonization of the gerbil model.

  14. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins

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    Christian Thöle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL led to reduced binding to 3ʹ-sialyl lactose, sialylated Lea and Lex. A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity.

  15. Prevalence of cagA and vacA among Helicobacter pylori-infected patients in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Kiani, Faezeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Soroush, Setareh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Delpisheh, Ali; Emaneini, Mohammad; Bogdanović, Lidija; Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-07-30

    The varieties of infections caused by Helicobacter pylori may be due to differences in bacterial genotypes and virulence factors as well as environmental and host-related factors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients in Iran and analyze their relevance to the disease status between two clinical groups via a meta-analysis method. Different databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus, SID, Magiran, Science Direct, and Medlib were investigated, and 23 relevant articles from the period between 2001 and 2012 were finally analyzed. The relevant data obtained from these papers were analyzed by a random-effects model. Data were analyzed using R software and STATA. The prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients was 70% (95% CI, 64-75) and 41% (95% CI, 24.3-57.7), respectively. The prevalence of duodenal ulcers, peptic ulcers, and gastritis among cagA+ individuals was 53% (95% CI, 20-86), 65% (95% CI, 34-97), and 71% (95% CI, 59-84), respectively. Odds ratio (OR) between cagA-positive compared with cagA-negative patients showed a 1.89 (95% CI, 1.38-2.57) risk of ulcers. In conclusion, the frequency of cagA gene among H. pylori strains is elevated in Iran and it seems to be more frequently associated with gastritis. Therefore, any information about cagA and vacA prevalence among different H. pylori-infected clinical groups in the country can help public health authorities to plan preventive policies to reduce the prevalence of diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  16. Human immune responses to H. pylori HLA Class II epitopes identified by immunoinformatic methods.

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    Songhua Zhang

    Full Text Available H. pylori persists in the human stomach over decades and promotes several adverse clinical sequelae including gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer that are linked to the induction and subsequent evasion of chronic gastric inflammation. Emerging evidence indicates that H. pylori infection may also protect against asthma and some other immune-mediated conditions through regulatory T cell effects outside the stomach. To characterize the complexity of the CD4+ T cell response generated during H. pylori infection, computational methods were previously used to generate a panel of 90 predicted epitopes conserved among H. pylori genomes that broadly cover HLA Class II diversity for maximum population coverage. Here, these sequences were tested individually for their ability to induce in vitro responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by interferon-γ ELISpot assay. The average number of spot-forming cells/million PBMCs was significantly elevated in H. pylori-infected subjects over uninfected persons. Ten of the 90 peptides stimulated IFN-γ secretion in the H. pylori-infected group only, whereas two out of the 90 peptides elicited a detectable IFN-γ response in the H. pylori-uninfected subjects but no response in the H. pylori-infected group. Cytokine ELISA measurements performed using in vitro PBMC culture supernatants demonstrated significantly higher levels of TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β1 in the H. pylori-infected subjects, whereas IL-17A expression was not related to the subjects H. pylori-infection status. Our results indicate that the human T cell responses to these 90 peptides are generally increased in actively H. pylori-infected, compared with H. pylori-naïve, subjects. This information will improve understanding of the complex immune response to H. pylori, aiding rational epitope-driven vaccine design as well as helping identify other H. pylori epitopes with potentially immunoregulatory effects.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  18. Helicobacter pylori colonization ameliorates glucose homeostasis in mice through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Kronsteiner, Barbara; Carbo, Adria; Lu, Pinyi; Viladomiu, Monica; Pedragosa, Mireia; Zhang, Xiaoying; Sobral, Bruno W; Mane, Shrinivasrao P; Mohapatra, Saroj K; Horne, William T; Guri, Amir J; Groeschl, Michael; Lopez-Velasco, Gabriela; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    There is an inverse secular trend between the incidence of obesity and gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that can affect the secretion of gastric hormones that relate to energy homeostasis. H. pylori strains that carry the cag pathogenicity island (PAI) interact more intimately with gastric epithelial cells and trigger more extensive host responses than cag(-) strains. We hypothesized that gastric colonization with H. pylori strains differing in cag PAI status exert distinct effects on metabolic and inflammatory phenotypes. To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic and inflammatory markers in db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity experimentally infected with isogenic forms of H. pylori strain 26695: the cag PAI wild-type and its cag PAI mutant strain 99-305. H. pylori colonization decreased fasting blood glucose levels, increased levels of leptin, improved glucose tolerance, and suppressed weight gain. A response found in both wild-type and mutant H. pylori strain-infected mice included decreased white adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) and increased adipose tissue regulatory T cells (Treg) cells. Gene expression analyses demonstrated upregulation of gastric PPAR γ-responsive genes (i.e., CD36 and FABP4) in H. pylori-infected mice. The loss of PPAR γ in immune and epithelial cells in mice impaired the ability of H. pylori to favorably modulate glucose homeostasis and ATM infiltration during high fat feeding. Gastric infection with some commensal strains of H. pylori ameliorates glucose homeostasis in mice through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism and modulates macrophage and Treg cell infiltration into the abdominal white adipose tissue.

  19. Helicobacter pylori colonization ameliorates glucose homeostasis in mice through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism.

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    Josep Bassaganya-Riera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an inverse secular trend between the incidence of obesity and gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that can affect the secretion of gastric hormones that relate to energy homeostasis. H. pylori strains that carry the cag pathogenicity island (PAI interact more intimately with gastric epithelial cells and trigger more extensive host responses than cag(- strains. We hypothesized that gastric colonization with H. pylori strains differing in cag PAI status exert distinct effects on metabolic and inflammatory phenotypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic and inflammatory markers in db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity experimentally infected with isogenic forms of H. pylori strain 26695: the cag PAI wild-type and its cag PAI mutant strain 99-305. H. pylori colonization decreased fasting blood glucose levels, increased levels of leptin, improved glucose tolerance, and suppressed weight gain. A response found in both wild-type and mutant H. pylori strain-infected mice included decreased white adipose tissue macrophages (ATM and increased adipose tissue regulatory T cells (Treg cells. Gene expression analyses demonstrated upregulation of gastric PPAR γ-responsive genes (i.e., CD36 and FABP4 in H. pylori-infected mice. The loss of PPAR γ in immune and epithelial cells in mice impaired the ability of H. pylori to favorably modulate glucose homeostasis and ATM infiltration during high fat feeding. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Gastric infection with some commensal strains of H. pylori ameliorates glucose homeostasis in mice through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism and modulates macrophage and Treg cell infiltration into the abdominal white adipose tissue.

  20. Helicobacter pylori: From Bench to Bedside

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    N Chiba

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exponential increase in research in the field of Helicobacter pylori a paradigm shift has occurred. It is now recognized that H pylori is a chronic infection of the stomach causing inflammation. Some patients remain asymptomatic, while others may develop dyspepsia, duodenal or gastric ulcer, gastric cancer or a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. However, the role of H pylori in contributing to nonulcer dyspepsia or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy remains controversial. An effective vaccine against H pylori is years away. Major interest has focused on the questions "who should be investigated and therefore treated" and "what is the latest gold standard for eradication of H pylori"? In Europe, guidelines have been developed to help the practitioner answer these important questions. Canadian guidelines will soon be available. For persons with known peptic ulcer disease there should be unequivocal acceptance that the good clinical practice of eradicating H pylori will result in substantial savings in health care expenses. The original 'classical triple therapy' (bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline [BMT] has now been surpassed by the combination of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI plus two antibiotics (metronidazole plus clarithromycin; amoxicillin plus clarithromycin; or amoxicillin plus metronidazole, each given twice a day for one week. In Canada, the regimen of omeprazole plus one antibiotic (amoxicillin or clarithromycin was approved recently but gives an eradication rate that is lower than the current target of 90%. According to the European (Mäastricht recommendations, if a single treatment attempt with PPI plus two antibiotics fails, PPI plus BMT is recommended.

  1. Indications for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: a systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J; Sherman, P M

    1994-01-15

    To determine (a) the advantages and disadvantages of treatment options for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and (b) whether eradication of H. pylori is indicated in patients with duodenal ulcer, nonucler dyspepsia and gastric cancer. A MEDLINE search for articles published in English between January 1983 and December 1992 with the use of MeSH terms Helicobacter pylori (called Campylobacter pylori before 1990) and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, dyspepsia and clinical trial. Six journals and Current Contents were searched manually for pertinent articles published in that time frame. For duodenal ulcer the search was limited to studies involving adults, studies of H. pylori eradication and randomized clinical trials comparing anti-H. pylori therapy with conventional ulcer treatment. For nonulcer dyspepsia with H. pylori infection the search was limited to placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials. The quality of each study was rated independently on a four-point scale by each author. For the studies of duodenal ulcer the outcome measures assessed were acute ulcer healing and time required for healing, H. pylori eradication and ulcer relapse. For the studies of nonulcer dyspepsia with H. pylori infection the authors assessed H. pylori eradication, the symptoms used as outcome measures and whether validated outcome measures had been used. Eight trials involving duodenal ulcer met our inclusion criteria: five were considered high quality, two were of reasonable quality, and one was weak. Six trials involving nonulcer dyspepsia met the criteria, but all were rated as weak. Among treatment options triple therapy with a bismuth compound, metronidazole and either amoxicillin or tetracycline achieved the highest eradication rates (73% to 94%). Results concerning treatment indications for duodenal ulcer were consistent among all of the studies: when anti-H. pylori therapy was added to conventional ulcer treatment acute ulcers healed more rapidly. Ulcer relapse rates

  2. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  3. Evaluation of a new test, genotype HelicoDR, for molecular detection of antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambau, Emmanuelle; Allerheiligen, Vera; Coulon, Céline; Corbel, Céline; Lascols, Christine; Deforges, Lionel; Soussy, Claude-James; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Megraud, Francis

    2009-11-01

    The eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori by standard therapy is decreasing due to antibiotic resistance, mainly to clarithromycin. Our aim was to provide a new molecular test to guide the treatment of new and relapsed cases. We first studied 126 H. pylori strains for phenotypic (MIC) and genotypic resistance to clarithromycin (rrl mutation) and levofloxacin (gyrA mutation) and then developed a DNA strip genotyping test on the basis of the correlation results and literature data. Clinical strains (n = 92) and gastric biopsy specimens containing H. pylori (n = 105) were tested blindly with the new molecular test GenoType HelicoDR. The presence of mutations or the absence of hybridization with wild-type sequences was predictive, in rrl for clarithromycin resistance in 91 cases (mostly the A2147G mutation) and in gyrA for levofloxacin resistance in 58 cases (mutations at codon 87 or 91). Genotyping revealed a mix of genotypes in 33% of the cases, reflecting a coinfection or selection for resistant mutants. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting resistance were 94% and 99% for clarithromycin and 87% and 98.5% for levofloxacin, respectively. The concordance scores were 0.96 for clarithromycin and 0.94 for levofloxacin. With global resistance rates of 46% for clarithromycin and 25% for levofloxacin, which were observed for consecutive positive biopsy specimens from 2007 and 2008, the positive and negative predictive values for detecting resistance were 99% and 94% for clarithromycin and 96% and 96% for fluoroquinolone. GenoType HelicoDR is efficient at detecting mutations predictive of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori when applied to strains or directly to gastric biopsy specimens.

  4. Response to gaseous NO2 air pollutant of P. fluorescens airborne strain MFAF76a and clinical strain MFN1032

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    Tatiana eKondakova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2, an air pollutant of increasing interest in biology, results in several toxic effects to human health and also to the air microbiota. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial response to gaseous NO2. Two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, namely the airborne strain MFAF76a and the clinical strain MFN1032 were exposed to 0.1, 5 or 45 ppm concentrations of NO2, and their effects on bacteria were evaluated in terms of motility, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, as well as expression of several chosen target genes. While 0.1 and 5 ppm of NO2 did not lead to any detectable modification in the studied phenotypes of the two bacteria, several alterations were observed when the bacteria were exposed to 45 ppm of gaseous NO2. We thus chose to focus on this high concentration. NO2-exposed P. fluorescens strains showed reduced swimming motility, and decreased swarming in case of the strain MFN1032. Biofilm formed by NO2-treated airborne strain MFAF76a showed increased maximum thickness compared to non-treated cells, while NO2 had no apparent effect on the clinical MFN1032 biofilm structure. It is well known that biofilm and motility are inversely regulated by intracellular c-di-GMP level. The c-di-GMP level was however not affected in response to NO2 treatment. Finally, NO2-exposed P. fluorescens strains were found to be more resistant to ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. Accordingly, the resistance nodulation cell division (RND MexEF-OprN efflux pump encoding genes were highly upregulated in the two P. fluorescens strains. Noticeably, similar phenotypes had been previously observed following a NO treatment. Interestingly, an hmp-homologue gene in P. fluorescens strains MFAF76a and MFN1032 encodes a NO dioxygenase that is involved in NO detoxification into nitrites. Its expression was upregulated in response to NO2, suggesting a possible common pathway between NO and NO2 detoxification. Taken

  5. Genetic fine structure analysis of helicobacter pylori isolates before and after treatment

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    Rekha T

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eradication of H. pylori infection cures peptic ulcer disease and conversely, relapse is associated with reappearance of H. pylori infection. However, it is not clear whether the recurrence of ulcers following H. pylori eradication is due to recrudescence (identical strain of the previous infection or as a result of exogenous reinfection (different strain by another strain. The aim of the present study was to analyze the FAFLP patterns of pre and post treatment H. pylori samples to check if the recurrence was due to recrudescence or reinfection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 24 of 30 duodenal ulcer (DU subjects screened for H. pylori infection were positive for H. pylori infection. The treatment regime included pantoprazole, ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin. The patients were called for a repeat endoscopy after one month and screened for H. pylori infection. FAFLP analysis and PCR for the cagA and vacA gene was performed for the pre and post treatment samples. RESULTS: Of the 24 positive H.pylori patients, only 6 were negative after treatment and the remaining 18 were positive for H.pylori infection. The analysis of the pre and post treatment samples of the 18 patients showed that the FAFLP profiles of the initial and follow-up pools were similar to one another. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that in the present series of patients, reinfection was due to recrudescence of infection due to incomplete eradication. The study also suggests that DNA fingerprinting by FAFLP provides discriminatory and complementary data for identifying strains of H. pylori while monitoring therapy.

  6. Sensitivity of Amoxicillin-Resistant Helicobacter pylori to Other Penicillins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Maria P.; Graham, David Y.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.; Realdi, Giuseppe; Osato, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivities to penicillins and to a penicillin and β-lactamase inhibitor combination agent were determined for Helicobacter pylori strains that were sensitive, moderately resistant, or highly resistant to amoxicillin. All strains were resistant to nafcillin and oxacillin. Moderately resistant strains showed an intermediate zone of inhibition to ticarcillin, mezlocillin, piperacillin, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. High-level resistance was associated with the smallest zone size for all penicillins tested. PMID:10390249

  7. Recent Advances in Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: From the Petri Dish to the Playgound

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    Peng-Yuan Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is acquired in childhood, plays a causative role in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, and is associated with the development of gastric cancer. The present review focuses on recent advances in the scientific knowledge of H pylori infection in children, including clinical sequelae, diagnosis and treatment. In addition, recent insights regarding both bacterial and host factors that mediate human diseases associated with H pylori infection are discussed.

  8. Detection of antibiotic resistance in clinical bacterial strains from pets

    OpenAIRE

    Poeta, P.; Rodrigues, J.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of different bacterial strains and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance were investigated in several infection processes of pets as skin abscess with purulent discharge, bronco alveolar fluid, earwax, urine, mammary, and eye fluid. Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were the most detected in the different samples. A high frequency of antimicrobial resistance has been observed and this could reflect the wide use of antimicrobials in pets, making the effectiveness ...

  9. A novel one-step Helicobacter pylori saliva antigen test

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    Bi-Ling Yang

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: The one-step HPS test exhibited a high sensitivity and low specificity compared with the other tests, indicating that it is not sufficiently accurate for use in a clinical setting for diagnosing H. pylori infection. However, the test is simple to use (requiring only a saliva sample, inexpensive, and noninvasive in its application, and thus appealing for use in population-based prevalence surveys of the epidemiology of H. pylori infection.

  10. The role of helicobacter pylori infection in the pathogenesis of chronic urticaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazzawi, I.M.; Obidat, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria (ICU) and to see if eradication of the bacterium affects the course of the urticaria. Patients and Methods: One hundred patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria and 43 healthy subjects (matched for age and sex) underwent serological testing for H. pylori infection. All patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria were examined for Helicobacter pylori infection with the /sup 13/C-urea test as well as the serological testing. Gastric biopsy was obtained from 36 patients. Patients with proven Helicobacter pylori infection were given treatment for 2 weeks. Six weeks afterwards they were tested again for Helicobacter pylori infection, and their urticaria was clinically assessed. Results: There was no significant difference in the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection between : idiopathic chronic urticaria patients and healthy subjects. Helicobacter pylori was detected in 76% of patients and 69.8% of controls. Out of the 76 patients treated, only 24 showed complete remission of their urticaria after successfully eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection, the others only having some improvement in their symptoms. Conclusion: Patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria have similar high rates of H. pylori infection as healthy subjects. Bacterium eradication is associated with improvement of urticaria symptoms, suggesting a possible role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of this skin disorder. (author)

  11. First case of Helicobacter pylori infection resistant to seven antibiotics in Iran

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    Amin Talebi Bezmin Abadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection with common antibiotics is typically recommended for several digestive conditions, including peptic ulcers. However, reports of resistant H. pylori isolates are increasing, and unfortunately, these do not respond to currently available therapeutic regimens. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with two peptic ulcers in the duodenal antrum. An H. pylori strain was isolated, and tested for antibiotic resistance using agar dilution and disk diffusion. The isolated strain was found to be resistant to all seven antibiotics that were tested. Therefore, constant monitoring for antibiotic resistance should be performed prior to initiating antibiotic therapy.

  12. Vacuolating Cytotoxin of Helicobacter pylori Plays a Role during Colonization in a Mouse Model of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Salama, Nina R.; Otto, Glen; Tompkins, Lucy; Falkow, Stanley

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of gastritis and ulcer disease in humans, secretes a toxin called VacA (vacuolating cytotoxin) into culture supernatants. VacA was initially characterized and purified on the basis of its ability to induce the formation of intracellular vacuoles in tissue culture cells. H. pylori strains possessing different alleles of vacA differ in their ability to express active toxin. Those strains expressing higher toxin levels are correlated with more severe gast...

  13. The cag PAI is intact and functional but HP0521 varies significantly in Helicobacter pylori isolates from Malaysia and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H-M A; Andres, S; Nilsson, C; Kovach, Z; Kaakoush, N O; Engstrand, L; Goh, K-L; Fock, K M; Forman, D; Mitchell, H

    2010-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori-related disease is at least partially attributable to the genotype of the infecting strain, particularly the presence of specific virulence factors. We investigated the prevalence of a novel combination of H. pylori virulence factors, including the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), and their association with severe disease in isolates from the three major ethnicities in Malaysia and Singapore, and evaluated whether the cag PAI was intact and functional in vitro. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect dupA, cagA, cagE, cagT, cagL and babA, and to type vacA, the EPIYA motifs, HP0521 alleles and oipA ON status in 159 H. pylori clinical isolates. Twenty-two strains were investigated for IL-8 induction and CagA translocation in vitro. The prevalence of cagA, cagE, cagL, cagT, babA, oipA ON and vacA s1 and i1 was >85%, irrespective of the disease state or ethnicity. The prevalence of dupA and the predominant HP0521 allele and EPIYA motif varied significantly with ethnicity (p < 0.05). A high prevalence of an intact cag PAI was found in all ethnic groups; however, no association was observed between any virulence factor and disease state. The novel association between the HP0521 alleles, EPIYA motifs and host ethnicity indicates that further studies to determine the function of this gene are important.

  14. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie SW; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes. PMID:26523098

  15. Helicobacter pylori management in ASEAN: The Bangkok consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rojborwonwitaya, Jarin; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chotivitayatarakorn, Peranart; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Pisespongsa, Pises; Mairiang, Pisaln; Rani, Aziz; Leow, Alex; Mya, Swe Mon; Lee, Yi-Chia; Vannarath, Sengdao; Rasachak, Bouachanh; Chakravuth, Oung; Aung, Moe Myint; Ang, Tiing-Leong; Sollano, Jose D; Trong Quach, Duc; Sansak, Inchaya; Wiwattanachang, Olarn; Harnsomburana, Piyathida; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Fock, Kwong-Ming; Goh, Khean-Lee; Sugano, Kentaro; Graham, David

    2018-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection remains to be the major cause of important upper gastrointestinal diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori management in ASEAN: the Bangkok consensus report gathered key opinion leaders for the region to review and evaluate clinical aspects of H. pylori infection and to develop consensus statements, rationales, and grades of recommendation for the management of H. pylori infection in clinical practice in ASEAN countries. This ASEAN Consensus consisted of 34 international experts from 10 ASEAN countries, Japan, Taiwan, and the United States. The meeting mainly focused on four issues: (i) epidemiology and disease association; (ii) diagnostic tests; (iii) management; and (iv) follow-up after eradication. The final results of each workshop were presented for consensus voting by all participants. Statements, rationale, and recommendations were developed from the available current evidence to help clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori and its clinical diseases. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Intercellular communication in Helicobacter pylori: luxS is essential for the production of an extracellular signaling molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, M H; Cover, T L

    2000-06-01

    Individual bacteria of numerous species can communicate and coordinate their actions via the production, release, and detection of extracellular signaling molecules. In this study, we used the Vibrio harveyi luminescence bioassay to determine whether Helicobacter pylori produces such a factor. Cell-free conditioned media from H. pylori strains 60190 and 26695 each induced >100-fold-greater luminescence in V. harveyi than did sterile culture medium. The H. pylori signaling molecule had a molecular mass of 100-fold-greater luminescence in the V. harveyi bioassay than did conditioned medium from either mutant strain. Production of the signaling molecule was restored in an H. pylori luxS null mutant strain by complementation with a single intact copy of luxS placed in a heterologous site on the chromosome. In addition, Escherichia coli DH5alpha produced autoinducer activity following the introduction of an intact copy of luxS from H. pylori. Production of the signaling molecule by H. pylori was growth phase dependent, with maximal production occurring in the mid-exponential phase of growth. Transcription of H. pylori vacA also was growth phase dependent, but this phenomenon was not dependent on luxS activity. These data indicate that H. pylori produces an extracellular signaling molecule related to AI-2 from V. harveyi. We speculate that this signaling molecule may play a role in regulating H. pylori gene expression.

  17. Distribution of Helicobacter pylori cagA, cagE, oipA and vacA in different major ethnic groups in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Hossein; Maleknejad, Parviz; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Feizabadi, Mohammad M; Jafari, Fereshteh; Rezadehbashi, Maryam; Nakhjavani, Farrokh A; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Zali, Mohammad R

    2009-08-01

    There are geographical variations in Helicobacter pylori virulence genes; cagA, cagE, vacA and oipA. The present study compared the distribution of these genotypes in major ethnic groups residing in Tehran, Iran and their association with clinical outcomes. A total of 124 H. pylori-positive patients living in Tehran were enrolled in this study. The ethnic distribution was 74 Persians, 33 Turks and 17 other ethnics including Kurds, Lurs, Afghanis and Arabs. The presence of the cagA, cagE and oipA genes and vacA alleles (signal [s] and middle [m] region) were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from H. pylori DNA. The cagA-positive status was predominant in all three ethnic groups (e.g. 65% in Persians and 73% in Turks). In contrast, the cagE-positive status was less than half in Persians (47%) and Turks (30%), whereas it was 77% in other ethnicities (P = 0.008). The predominant vacA genotypes were s1 and m1 in all three ethnic groups (e.g. 68% in Persians and 70% in Turks were s1). There was no significant association between cagA and cagE status or vacA genotypes and clinical outcomes. The oipA-positive strains were more common in non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) (63%) than in peptic ulcer patients (15%) (P = 0.001) in Persians, but the association was not observed in other ethnic groups. There are some differences in the H. pylori genotypes among the ethnic groups in Iran. However, none of these markers seemed to be clinically helpful in predicting the clinical presentation of a H. pylori infection in Iran.

  18. Optimal initiation of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Lee, Dong Ho; Jang, Eun Sun; Kim, Jaihwan; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hayng; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-02-28

    To evaluate when Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy (ET) should be started in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). Clinical data concerning adults hospitalized with PUB were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Age, sex, type and stage of peptic ulcer, whether endoscopic therapy was performed or not, methods of H. pylori detection, duration of hospitalization, and specialty of the attending physician were investigated. Factors influencing the confirmation of H. pylori infection prior to discharge were determined using multiple logistic regression analysis. The H. pylori eradication rates of patients who received ET during hospitalization and those who commenced ET as outpatients were compared. A total of 232 patients with PUB were evaluated for H. pylori infection by histology and/or rapid urease testing. Of these patients, 53.7% (127/232) had confirmed results of H. pylori infection prior to discharge. In multivariate analysis, duration of hospitalization and ulcer stage were factors independently influencing whether H. pylori infection was confirmed before or after discharge. Among the patients discharged before confirmation of H. pylori infection, 13.3% (14/105) were lost to follow-up. Among the patients found to be H. pylori-positive after discharge, 41.4% (12/29) did not receive ET. There was no significant difference in the H. pylori eradication rate between patients who received ET during hospitalization and those who commenced ET as outpatients [intention-to-treat: 68.8% (53/77) vs 60% (12/20), P=0.594; per-protocol: 82.8% (53/64) vs 80% (12/15), P=0.723]. Because many patients with PUB who were discharged before H. pylori infection status was confirmed lost an opportunity to receive ET, we should confirm H. pylori infection and start ET prior to discharge.

  19. Cluster analysis of Helicobacter pylori genomic DNA fingerprints suggests gastroduodenal disease-specific associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, M F; Chan, K Y; Versalovic, J; Koeuth, T; Graham, D Y; Lupski, J R

    1995-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is now accepted as the most common cause of chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. The etiologies of many infectious diseases have been attributed to specific or clonal strains of bacterial pathogens. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA between repetitive DNA sequences, REP elements (REP-PCR), has been utilized to generate DNA fingerprints to examine similarity among strains within a bacterial species. Genomic DNA from H. pylori isolates obtained from 70 individuals (39 duodenal ulcers and 31 simple gastritis) was PCR-amplified using consensus probes to repetitive DNA elements. The H. pylori DNA fingerprints were analyzed for similarity and correlated with disease presentation using the NTSYS-pc computer program. Each H. pylori strain had a distinct DNA fingerprint except for two pairs. Single-colony DNA fingerprints of H. pylori from the same patient were identical, suggesting that each patient harbors a single strain. Computer-assisted cluster analysis of the REP-PCR DNA fingerprints showed two large clusters of isolates, one associated with simple gastritis and the other with duodenal ulcer disease. Cluster analysis of REP-PCR DNA fingerprints of H. pylori strains suggests that duodenal ulcer isolates, as a group, are more similar to one another and different from gastritis isolates. These results suggest that disease-specific strains may exist.

  20. Mechanism of H. pylori intracellular entry: an in vitro study

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    Hui eLiu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of H. pylori reside on gastric epithelial cell surfaces and in the overlying mucus, but a small fraction of H. pylori enter host epithelial and immune cells. To explore the role of the nudA invasin in host cell entry, a ΔnudA deletion derivative of strain J99 was constructed and transformants were verified by PCR and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. AGS cells were inoculated with either wild type (WT strain J99 or its ΔnudA mutant to determine the fraction of bacteria that were bound to the cells and inside these cells using the gentamicin protection assay. We observed no significant difference between either the density of H. pylori bound to AGS cell membranes or the density of intracellular H. pylori. To further explore this finding, separate chambers of each culture were fixed in glutaraldehyde for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and immunogold TEM. This addition to the classical gentamicin assay demonstrated that there were significantly more intracellular, and fewer membrane-bound, H. pylori in WT-infected AGS cells than in ΔnudA allele infected cells. Thus, the sum of intracellular and membrane-bound H. pylori was similar in the two groups. Since no other similar TEM study has been performed, it is at present unknown whether our observations can be reproduced by others Taken together however, our observations suggest that the classical gentamicin protection assay is not sufficiently sensitive to analyze H. pylori cell entry and that the addition of TEM to the test demonstrate that nudA plays a role in H. pylori entry into AGS cells in vitro. In addition, deletion of the invasin gene appears to limit H. pylori to the AGS cell surface, where it may be partly protected against gentamicin. In contrast, this specific environment may render H. pylori more vulnerable to host defense and therapeutic intervention, and less prone to trigger normal immune, carcinogenic, and other developmental response pathways.

  1. Risks and Benefits of Helicobacter pylori Eradication: Current Status

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    Richard H Hunt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with diseases known to be associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, such as peptic ulcer, treatment of the underlying infection is the standard of care. However, in most major consensus management guidelines, including those published in Canada, widespread testing for H pylori infection is not recommended. This practice is not encouraged because of insufficient evidence of cost-benefit in gastric cancer prevention, the potential for increases in antibiotic resistance and the controversial hypothesis of potential negative effects of eradication in certain clinical entities. For example, there is insufficient evidence to recommend against eradicating H pylori discovered in a patient with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The management guidelines designed specifically in Canada should, therefore, continue to be applied, with H pylori diagnosed and treated in appropriately selected patients.

  2. Helicobacter pylori cagA+ Is Associated with Milder Duodenal Histological Changes in Chilean Celiac Patients

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    Yalda Lucero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available HIGHLIGHTSWhat is already known about this subject?Celiac disease (CD has a high clinical and histological diversity and the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain elusive.H. pylori is a bacterium that chronically infect gastric and duodenal mucosa activating both a Th1/Th17 and T-reg pathways.The role of H. pylori (and the effect of their virulence factors in CD have not yet completely elucidated.What are the new findings?cagA+ H. pylori strains are associated to milder histological damage in infected CD patients.In active-CD patients the presence of cagA+ H. pylori is associated to an increase in T-reg markers, contrasting with a downregulation in cagA+ infected potential-CD individuals.How might it impact on clinical practice in the foreseeable future?The identification of microbiological factors that could modulate inflammation and clinical expression of CD may be used in the future as preventive strategies or as supplementary treatment in patients that cannot achieve complete remission, contributing to the better care of these patients.Background: Mechanisms underlying the high clinical and histological diversity of celiac disease (CD remain elusive. Helicobacter pylori (Hp chronically infects gastric and duodenal mucosa and has been associated with protection against some immune-mediated conditions, but its role (specifically of cagA+ strains in CD is unclear.Objective: To assess the relationship between gastric Hp infection (cagA+ strains and duodenal histological damage in patients with CD.Design: Case-control study including patients with active-CD, potential-CD and non-celiac individuals. Clinical presentation, HLA genotype, Hp/cagA gene detection in gastric mucosa, duodenal histology, Foxp3 positive cells and TGF-β expression in duodenal lamina propria were analyzed.Results: We recruited 116 patients, 29 active-CD, 37 potential-CD, and 50 non-CD controls. Hp detection was similar in the three groups (~30–40%, but cag

  3. Methodology optimization and diversification for the investigation of virulence potential in Haemophilus influenzae clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giucă, Mihaela Cristina; Străuţ, Monica; Surdeanu, Maria; Nica, Maria; Ungureanu, Vasilica; Mihăescu, Grigore

    2011-01-01

    Ten Haemophilus influenzae strains were isolated from patients aged between 1.6 - 24 years, with various diagnoses (acute meningitis, acute upper respiratory infection, otitis media and acute sinusitis). Identification was based on phenotypic and molecular characteristics; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by diffusion method according to CLSI standards 2011 for seven antibiotics. The results of molecular testing showed that all the studied strains produced an amplicon of 1000 bp with ompP2 primers indicating that all strains were H. influenzae. For six strains, the PCR amplicon obtained with bexA specific primers, proving that the strains were capsulated. The results of phenotypic testing showed that four strains were ampicillin nonsusceptible and (beta-lactamase-positive. The virulence potential of H. influenzae clinical strains was investigated by phenotypic methods, including the assessment of the soluble virulence factors on specific media containing the biochemical substratum for the investigated enzymatic factor, as well as the adherence and invasion capacity to HeLa cells monolayer using Cravioto modified method. The studied strains exhibited mainly a diffuse adherence pattern and different adherence indexes. Interestingly, two strains isolated from the same pacient (blood and CSF) showed a different degree of invasiveness, the strain isolated from blood being 20 times more invasive than the one isolated from CSF.

  4. Infezioni da H.pylori. Diagnosi: il ruolo del gastroenterologo

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    Claudia Guatti Zuliani

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of H. pylori infection: the role of gastroenterologist Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection can be diagnosed by invasive techniques requiring endoscopy and biopsy (histological examination, rapid urease test, culture and by non invasive techniques (serology, urea breath test, detection of H. pylori antigen stool specimen.At present, no single test can be absolutely relied upon to detect colonization by H. pylori and a combination of two tests is recommended if feasible.Nevertheless, in routine dayto- day clinical practice H. pylori diagnosis is often by a single test and consequently the choice of the more suitable test is even more important. Choosing among them is not easy, and several issues need to be considered, such as the clinical situation, (i.e. present symptoms and past medical history, age of patients, if it is first diagnosis or follow-up after treatment.., sensitivity and specificity of the test, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy, the availability of the test, the local expertise . Since the “Ideal test” is not relied, the gastroenterologist or clinician as well, has the important role of deciding which test to employ. A good knowledge of advantages and vantages of each test is so necessary to make the best choose as possible.

  5. Bactericidal activities of the cationic steroid CSA-13 and the cathelicidin peptide LL-37 against Helicobacter pylori in simulated gastric juice

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    Janmey Paul A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains of H. pylori motivates a search for new agents with therapeutic potential against this family of bacteria that colonizes the stomach, and is associated with adenocarcinoma development. This study was designed to assess in vitro the anti-H. pylori potential of cathelicidin LL-37 peptide, which is naturally present in gastric juice, its optimized synthetic analog WLBU2, and the non-peptide antibacterial agent ceragenin CSA-13. Results In agreement with previous studies, increased expression of hCAP-18/LL-37 was observed in gastric mucosa obtained from H. pylori infected subjects. MBC (minimum bactericidal concentration values determined in nutrient-containing media range from 100-800 μg/ml for LL-37, 17.8-142 μg/ml for WLBU2 and 0.275-8.9 μg/ml for ceragenin CSA-13. These data indicate substantial, but widely differing antibacterial activities against clinical isolates of H. pylori. After incubation in simulated gastric juice (low pH with presence of pepsin CSA-13, but not LL-37 or WLBU2, retained antibacterial activity. Compared to LL-37 and WLBU2 peptides, CSA-13 activity was also more resistant to inhibition by isolated host gastric mucins. Conclusion These data indicate that cholic acid-based antimicrobial agents such as CSA-13 resist proteolytic degradation and inhibition by mucin and have potential for treatment of H. pylori infections, including those caused by the clarithromycin and/or metronidazole-resistant strains.

  6. Lymphocytic gastritis is not associated with active Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jennifer A; Roberts, Cory A; Lager, Donna J; Putcha, Rajesh V; Jain, Rajeev; Lewin, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG), characterized by marked intra-epithelial lymphocytosis in the gastric mucosa, has been frequently associated with both celiac disease (CD) and H. pylori gastritis. The aim of this study was to review and correlate the morphology of LG with the presence of CD and H. pylori. Gastric biopsies diagnosed with LG from 1/1/2006 to 8/1/2013 at our institution and corresponding small bowel biopsies, when available, were reviewed for verification of the diagnosis and to assess for the presence of H. pylori and CD. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for H. pylori was performed on all gastric biopsies. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were obtained from the medical record. Fifty-four of the 56 cases that met inclusion criteria demonstrated significant intra-epithelial lymphocytosis as the predominant histologic abnormality; however, none were associated with H. pylori infection by IHC staining. Two cases that also showed a prominent intra-epithelial and lamina propria neutrophilic infiltrate were both positive for H. pylori and were excluded from further study. Of the 36 small bowel biopsies available, 19 (53%) showed changes in CD. LG is not a distinct clinicopathologic entity, but a morphologic pattern of gastric injury that can be secondary to a variety of underlying etiologies. When restricted to cases with lymphocytosis alone, LG is strongly associated with CD and not with active H. pylori infection. However, cases that also show significant neutrophilic infiltrate should be regarded as "active chronic gastritis" and are often associated with H. pylori infection. A morphologic diagnosis of LG should prompt clinical and serologic workup to exclude underlying CD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Relevance of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors for vaccine development Relevancia de los factores de virulencia de helicobacter pylori para el desarrollo de vacunas

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    Luz del Carmen Hernández-Hernández

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk for a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes, ranging from peptic ulcer disease to gastric cancer. However, the infection induces gastric and duodenal ulceration or gastric cancer in only a minority of infected subjects because H. pylori strains are genetically diverse and express different virulence factors. Individuals infected with strains that express these virulence factors probably develop severe diseases such as gastric cancer. Nevertheless, the ancient relationship between H. pylori and humans suggests that some strains could be beneficial to human health, which means that generalized administration of antibiotic therapy could eventually cause problems. The development of vaccines based on virulence factors that provide long-term protection is the best strategy for control and/or elimination of pathogenic strains. The different immunization schemes and formulations designed to evaluate the vaccines based on virulence factors in animal models have offered promising results. However, it is necessary to determine whether or not these results can be reproduced in humans. This article reviews recent vaccination studies that explore this possibility: oral vaccines using urease or inactivated whole cells plus LT as adjuvant and urease expressed in Salmonella spp. vectors, as well as a parenteral multicomponent vaccine plus aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant. Although these studies have achieved limited success, they have established support for the development of an effective vaccine against this infection.La infección por Helicobacter pylori incrementa el riesgo de un amplio espectro de cuadros clínicos, que van de la úlcera péptica al cáncer gástrico. Sin embargo, la infección sólo induce ulceración gástrica y duodenal o cáncer gástrico en la minoría de los sujetos infectados debido que las cepas de H. pylori son genéticamente diversas y expresan diferentes factores de virulencia. As

  8. The presence of dupA in Helicobacter pylori is not significantly associated with duodenal ulceration in Belgium, South Africa, China, or North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argent, Richard H; Burette, Alain; Miendje Deyi, Véronique Y; Atherton, John C

    2007-11-01

    A previous study suggested that Helicobacter pylori strains possessing dupA are positively associated with duodenal ulceration and negatively associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. We determined the prevalence of dupA in H. pylori strains recovered from 4 independent populations and found a significant association with gastric cancer but not with duodenal ulceration.

  9. Geographic distribution of methyltransferases of Helicobacter pylori: evidence of human host population isolation and migration

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    Vítor Jorge MB

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. This ubiquitous association between H. pylori and humans is thought to be present since the origin of modern humans. The H. pylori genome encodes for an exceptional number of restriction and modifications (R-M systems. To evaluate if R-M systems are an adequate tool to determine the geographic distribution of H. pylori strains, we typed 221 strains from Africa, America, Asia, and Europe, and evaluated the expression of different 29 methyltransferases. Results Independence tests and logistic regression models revealed that ten R-M systems correlate with geographical localization. The distribution pattern of these methyltransferases may have been originated by co-divergence of regional H. pylori after its human host migrated out of Africa. The expression of specific methyltransferases in the H. pylori population may also reflect the genetic and cultural background of its human host. Methyltransferases common to all strains, M. HhaI and M. NaeI, are likely conserved in H. pylori, and may have been present in the bacteria genome since the human diaspora out of Africa. Conclusion This study indicates that some methyltransferases are useful geomarkers, which allow discrimination of bacterial populations, and that can be added to our tools to investigate human migrations.

  10. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin and its allelic mosaicism as a predictive marker for Iranian dyspeptic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, M; Oghalaie, A; Mohajerani, N

    2003-01-01

    can serve as screening markers for such a population, H. pylori strains were isolated from one hundred and thirty two dyspeptic patients. H. pylori genomic DNA was extracted and underwent PCR-amplification for the cytotoxin alleles. Genotyping of the signal sequence region of the vacA gene identified...

  11. VacA, cagA, iceA and oipA genotypes status and antimicrobial resistance properties of Helicobacter pylori isolated from various types of ready to eat foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmatinezhad, Behsan; Momtaz, Hassan; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2016-01-20

    Despite the high clinical standing of Helicobacter pylori, its exact routes of transmission and origin have not been determined. Based on the contentious hypothesis, foods play an important roles in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. The present study was carried out to investigate the vacA, cagA, oipA and iceA genotypes status of H. pylori isolated from the various types of ready to eat foods. A total of 550 ready to eat food samples were cultured and tested. H. pylori-positive strains were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Seventy four out of 550 (13.45 %) samples were positive for H. pylori. Olvie salad (36 %), restaurant salad (30 %), fruit salad (28 %) and soup (22 %) were the most commonly contaminated. H. pylori strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against amoxicillin (94.59 %), ampicillin (93.24 %), metronidazole (89.18 %) and tetracycline (72.97 %). The most commonly detected genotypes were vacA s1a (78.37 %), vacA m2 (75.67 %), vacA m1a (51.35 %) and cagA (41.89 %). The prevalence of iceA1, iceA2 and oipA genotypes were 13.51, 4.05 and 18.91 %, respectively. S1am2 (70.27 %), s1am1a (39.18 %) and m1am2 (31.08 %) were the most commonly detected combined genotypes. Of 40 different genotypic combinations, s1a/cagA+/iceA1/oipA- (12.16 %), s1a/cagA+/iceA1/oipA+ (10.81 %) and s1a/cagA-/iceA1/oipA+ (10.81 %) were the most prevalent. The present investigation showed that some types of ready to eat food samples maybe the sources of resistant and virulent strains of H. pylori. Warily use of antibiotics with respect to the results of disk diffusion method and careful health monitoring on food and staffs of food producing companies maybe reduce the risk of H. pylori in foods.

  12. Effect of Pretreatment with Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Streptococcus thermophillus on Tailored Triple Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Eradication: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays an important role in gastric cancer and typical eradication regimens are no longer effective in many countries, including Thailand. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Streptococcus thermophillus on tailored triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication. This prospective single-center study was conducted in Thailand. Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis patients were randomized to 2 groups: group 1 (n=100) was tailored triple therapy with placebo (esomeprazole 20 mg bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid or metronidazole 400 mg tid if clarithromycin resistance and amoxicillin 1000 mg bid), and group 2 was tailored triple therapy plus pretreatment with probiotic containing yogurt. Successful eradication was defined as both negative histology and negative rapid urease test at four weeks after treatment. A total of 200 infected patients were enrolled. PP analysis involved 194 patients: 96 in the tailored triple therapy with placebo group (group 1) and 98 the in tailored triple therapy plus pretreatment with probiotic containing yogurt group (group 2). Successful eradication was observed in 170 (87.6%) patients; by PP analysis, the eradication rate was significantly higher in group 2 (P=0.04, 95%CI; 0.02-0.13) than in group 1. ITT analysis also showed that the value was significantly higher in the tailored triple threapy plus pretreatment with probiotic containing yogurt group (group 2) (89/100; 89%) than in the tailored triple therapy with placebo group (group 1) (P=0.01, 95%CI; 0.04-0.15). In terms of adverse events, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Pretreatment with probiotic containing yogurt can improve Helicobacter pylori eradication rates with tailored triple therapy. Adding probiotics does not reduce adverse effects of the medication.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Protein 18 (Hp1125 Is Involved in Persistent Colonization by Evading Interferon-γ Signaling

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    Yuqun Shan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane proteins (OMPs can induce an immune response. Omp18 (HP1125 of H. pylori is a powerful antigen that can induce significant interferon-γ (IFN-γ levels. Previous studies have suggested that IFN-γ plays an important role in H. pylori clearance. However, H. pylori has multiple mechanisms to avoid host immune surveillance for persistent colonization. We generated an omp18 mutant (H. pylori 26695 and H. pylori SS1 strain to examine whether Omp18 interacts with IFN-γ and is involved in H. pylori colonization. qRT-PCR revealed that IFN-γ induced Omp18 expression. qRT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed reduced expressions of virulence factors CagA and NapA in H. pylori 26695 with IFN-γ treatment, but they were induced in the Δomp18 strain. In C57BL/6 mice infected with H. pylori SS1 and the Δomp18 strain, the Δomp18 strain conferred defective colonization and activated a stronger inflammatory response. Signal transducer phosphorylation and transcription 1 (STAT1 activator was downregulated by the wild-type strain but not the Δomp18 strain in IFN-γ-treated macrophages. Furthermore, Δomp18 strain survival rates were poor in macrophages compared to the wild-type strain. We concluded that H. pylori Omp18 has an important function influencing IFN-γ-mediated immune response to participate in persistent colonization.

  14. CCR2 mediates Helicobacter pylori-induced immune tolerance and contributes to mucosal homeostasis.

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    Sun, Xia; Zhang, Min; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Huffnagle, Gray B; Kao, John Y

    2017-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that H. pylori infection leads to increased induction of regulatory T cells in local and systemic immune compartments. Here, we investigate the role of CCR2 in the tolerogenic programing of dendritic cells in a mouse model of H. pylori infection. CCR2 deficient (CCR2KO) mice and wild-type (Wt) mice infected with H. pylori SS1 strain were analyzed by qPCR and FACS analysis. In vitro, bone marrow-derived DC on day 6 from CCR2KO and Wt mice cocultured with or without H. pylori were examined to determine the impact of CCR2 signaling on dendritic cells function by qPCR, ELISA, and FACS analyses. Acute H. pylori infection was associated with a threefold increase in CCR2 mRNA expression in the gastric mucosa. H. pylori-infected CCR2KO mice exhibited a higher degree of mucosal inflammation, that is, increased gastritis scores and pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels, but lower degree of H. pylori gastric colonization compared to infected Wt mice. Peripheral H. pylori-specific immune response measured in the CCR2KO spleen was characterized by a higher Th17 response and a lower Treg response. In vitro, CCR2KO bone marrow-derived DC was less mature and shown a lower Treg/Th17 ratio. Moreover, blockade of CCR2 signaling by MCP-1 neutralizing antibody inhibited H. pylori-stimulated bone marrow-derived DC maturation. Our results indicate that CCR2 plays an essential role in H. pylori-induced immune tolerance and shed light on a novel mechanism of CCR2-dependent DC Treg induction, which appears to be important in maintaining mucosal homeostasis during H. pylori infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Gentamicin-intercalated smectite as a new therapeutic option for Helicobacter pylori eradication.

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    Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Jung, Da Hyun; Lee, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Soon Young; Song, Yungoo; Kang, Il-Mo; Song, Young Goo

    2018-02-12

    Novel antibacterial strategies against Helicobacter pylori are needed because H. pylori strains are acquiring resistance to antibiotics. We evaluated the efficacy of gentamicin-intercalated smectite hybrid (S-GEN)-based treatment regimens in a murine model of H. pylori infection. Two groups of 10 rats were administered either smectite or S-GEN to measure coverage of the gastric mucosa. To evaluate anti-H. pylori efficacy, mice were divided into eight groups of 10 mice each given different treatments, and H. pylori eradication was assessed by a Campylobacter-like organism (CLO) test and H. pylori PCR of the gastric mucosa, and H. pylori antigen and H. pylori PCR analysis of mouse faeces. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines were examined. S-GEN was retained in the gastric mucosal layer with a >60% distribution ratio for up to 1 h, and the S-GEN-based triple regimen decreased bacterial burden in vivo compared with that of untreated mice or mice treated with other regimens. The cure rates in the CLO test and H. pylori PCR from gastric mucosa were 70%, 60%, 80%, 50%, 60% and 60% in Groups III-VIII, respectively. Those for H. pylori PCR in the faeces of mice were 90% and 100% in Group III with standard therapy and Group V with triple therapy including S-GEN, respectively. S-GEN triple therapy also reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that S-GEN is a promising and effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Relationship of interleukin-1B gene promoter region polymorphism with Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Ivy Bastos; Vianna, Júlia Silveira; Halicki, Priscila Cristina Bartolomeu; Lara, Caroline; Tadiotto, Thássia Fernanda; da Silva Maciel, João Batista; Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; von Groll, Andrea; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida

    2015-09-29

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. The severity of damage is determined by the interplay between environmental/behavioral factors, bacterial pathogenicity genes and host genetic polymorphisms that can influence the secretion levels of inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, this study aimed to identify polymorphisms in the IL-1B and IL-1RN genes and their associations with H. pylori infection, cagA gene of H. pylori, and gastroduodenal diseases. Gastric biopsy samples from 151 patients infected with H. pylori and 76 uninfected individuals were analyzed. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by histology and PCR. Polymorphisms at positions -511, -31 and +3954 of the IL-1B gene were detected by PCR-RFLP, and an analysis of the VNTR polymorphism of the IL-1RN gene was performed by PCR. It was observed that the presence of the T/T genotype at position -511 and the C/C genotype at position -31 were associated with H. pylori infection and with an increased risk of gastritis in H. pylori-positive patients. Additionally, strains from patients H. pylori-positive carrying the cagA gene was significantly related with the T/T genotype at position -511 of IL-1B.  No association of polymorphisms at position +3954 of IL-1B and in the IL-1RN with H. pylori infection and with risk of severe gastric diseases was found. We demonstrated that polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL-1B gene (at positions -511 and -31) are associated with an enhanced risk of H. pylori infection as well as gastritis in H. pylori-positive patients.

  17. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  18. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on IL-8, IL-1beta and COX-2 expression in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartchewsky, Waldemar; Martini, Mariana Rocha; Masiero, Mariana; Squassoni, Aline Candido; Alvarez, Marisa Claudia; Ladeira, Marcelo Sady; Salvatore, Daisy; Trevisan, Miriam; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is related to gastric cancer development, and chronic inflammation is presumed to be the main cause. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of H. pylori cagA, vacA, iceA, and babA genotypes on COX-2, IL-1beta, and IL-8 expression. Of the 217 patients included in the study, 26 were uninfected, 127 had chronic gastritis and were H. pylori-positive, and 64 had gastric cancer. Bacterial genotypes were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the expression values were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. An association was found between the infection with cagA, vacA s1m1 strains and gastric cancer development. Regarding the 3' region of the cagA gene, we also found an association between the infection with cagA EPIYA-ABCCC strains and clinical outcome. Higher levels of IL-8, IL-1beta, and COX-2 were detected in gastric mucosa from infected patients with chronic gastritis, and they were also associated with the infection by cagA, vacA s1m1 strains. The IL-8 and IL-1beta levels decrease significantly from chronic gastritis to gastric cancer, while the relative expression remained unaltered when COX-2 expression was analyzed among patients with gastritis and cancer. Since inflammatory response to H. pylori infection plays an important role in cellular proliferation and gastric mucosal damage, the up-regulation of IL-1beta, IL-8, and COX-2 in patients with chronic gastritis has an important clinical implication in gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

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    Sahara Shu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori strains found in Southeast Asia and examined their association with gastroduodenal disease. Methods To determine the cagA status, cagA EPIYA motifs, and vacA genotypes of H. pylori, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 previous reports for 1,281 H. pylori strains detected from several Southeast Asian countries. Results The respective frequencies of cagA-positive and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotypes among examined subjects were 93% (1,056/1,133, 98% (1,010/1,033, 58% (581/1,009, and 96% (248/259, respectively. Stratification showed significant variation in the frequencies of cagA status and vacA genotypes among countries and the individual races residing within each respective country. The frequency of the vacA m-region genotype in patients infected with East Asian-type strains differed significantly between the northern and southern areas of Vietnam (p vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains was associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio: 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.12, p = 0.046 and 2.83, 1.50-5.34, p = 0.001, respectively in the examined Southeast Asian populations. Conclusions Both Western- and East Asian-type strains of H. pylori are found in Southeast Asia and are predominantly cagA-positive and vacA s1 type. In Southeast Asia, patients infected with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains have an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease. Thus, testing for this genotype and the presence of cagA may have clinical usefulness.

  20. Processing plant persistent strains of Listeria monocytogenes appear to have a lower virulence potential than clinical strains in selected virulence models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne; Thomsen, L.E.; Jørgensen, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    cell line, Caco-2; time to death in a nematode model, Caenorhabditis elegans and in a fruit fly model, Drosophila melanogaster and fecal shedding in a guinea pig model. All strains adhered to and grew in Caco-2 cells in similar levels. When exposed to 10(6) CFU/ml, two strains representing......% killed C elegans worms was longer (110 h) for the RAPD type 9 strains than for the other four strains (80 h). The Scott A strain and one RAPD type 9 strain were suspended in whipping cream before being fed to guinea pigs and the persistent RAPD type 9 strain was isolated from feces in a lower level...... to contaminate food products, and it is important to determine their virulence potential to evaluate risk to consumers. We compared the behaviour of food processing persistent and clinical L. monocytogenes strains in four virulence models: Adhesion, invasion and intracellular growth was studied in an epithelial...

  1. Pleiotropic Actions of Helicobacter pylori Vacuolating Cytotoxin, VacA

    OpenAIRE

    Isomoto, Hajime; Moss, Joel; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori produces a vacuolating cytotoxin, VacA, and most virulent H. pylori strains secrete VacA. VacA binds to two types of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP), RPTPα and RPTPβ, on the surface of host cells. VacA bound to RPTPβ, relocates and concentrates in lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. VacA causes vacuolization, membrane anion-selective channel and pore formation, and disruption of endosomal and lysosomal activity in host cells. Secreted VacA is processed in...

  2. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure of eradicat...

  3. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  4. Human lactoferrin increases Helicobacter pylori internalisation into AGS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coray, Dorien S; Heinemann, Jack A; Tyrer, Peter C; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2012-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori has high global infection rates and can cause other undesirable clinical manifestations such as duodenal ulcer (DU) and gastric cancer (GC). Frequencies of re-infection after therapeutic clearance and rates of DU versus GC vary geographically and differ markedly between developed and developing countries, which suggests additional factors may be involved. The possibility that, in vivo, lactoferrin (Lf) may play a subtle role in modulating micronutrient availability or bacterial internalisation with implications for disease etiology is considered. Lf is an iron binding protein produced in mammals that has antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties. Some bacteria that regularly colonise mammalian hosts have adapted to living in high Lf environments and we investigated if this included the gastric pathogen H. pylori. We found that H. pylori was able to use iron from fully iron-saturated human Lf (hLf) whereas partially iron-saturated hLf (apo) did not increase H. pylori growth. Instead, apo-hLf increased adherence to and internalisation of bacteria into cultured epithelial cells. By increasing internalisation, we speculate that apo-human lactoferrin may contribute to H. pylori's ability to persistence in the human stomach, an observation that potentially has implications for the risk of H. pylori-associated disease.

  5. Role of dental plaque, saliva and periodontal disease in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Pradeep S; Kamath, Kavitha P; Anil, Sukumaran

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. Although H. pylori may be detected in the stomach of approximately half of the world's population, the mechanisms of transmission of the microorganism from individual to individual are not yet clear. Transmission of H. pylori could occur through iatrogenic, fecal-oral, and oral-oral routes, and through food and water. The microorganism may be transmitted orally and has been detected in dental plaque and saliva. However, the role of the oral cavity in the transmission and recurrence of H. pylori infection has been the subject of debate. A large number of studies investigating the role of oral hygiene and periodontal disease in H. pylori infection have varied significantly in terms of their methodology and sample population, resulting in a wide variation in the reported results. Nevertheless, recent studies have not only shown that the microorganism can be detected fairly consistently from the oral cavity but also demonstrated that the chances of recurrence of H. pylori infection is more likely among patients who harbor the organism in the oral cavity. Furthermore, initial results from clinical trials have shown that H. pylori-positive dyspeptic patients may benefit from periodontal therapy. This paper attempts to review the current body of evidence regarding the role of dental plaque, saliva, and periodontal disease in H. pylori infection.

  6. [Presence of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies and feces of pediatric patients with celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M G; Medina, M L; Martín, G T; Dikstein, B C; Picón, S O; Gorodner, J O; Merino, L A

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main etiologic agent of chronic gastritis and it is an important cause of gastric damage. The celiac disease can affect the morphology and the function of the gastrointestinal tract from the stomach to the colon and it is frequently associated with chronic gastritis. to assess the presence of H. pylori in gastric biopsies and in feces of pediatric patients with celiac disease and to relate it with the symptoms. Pediatric patients with celiac disease attending the Gastroenterology Service at the "Avelino Castelán" Hospital in Resistencia (Argentina) were included in the study. Gastric biopsies samples were obtained by endoscopy for histological studies, the symptoms and socio-epidemiological characteristics were recorded and the polimerase chain reaction(PCR) was applied in feces in order to detect the presence of H. pylori. Thirty one patients with celiac disease were studied (16 female and 15 male; age range:1-14 years; median 6.7 years); 14 (45.2%) were positive for H. pylori in gastric biopsy and among them, only 2 (14.2%) were positive for H. pylori in stool samples. There were not significant differences between symptoms between H. pylori positive and negative patients. 45.2% of the patients with celiac disease were infected by H. pylori. There was no correlation between the frequencies of bacterial detection in feces and in gastric biopsies. The clinical manifestations of celiac disease did not increase in children infected with H. pylori.

  7. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with protection against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Perry

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a lifelong and typically asymptomatic infection of the stomach, profoundly alters gastric immune responses, and may benefit the host in protection against other pathogens. We explored the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.We first examined M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma and H. pylori antibody responses in 339 healthy Northern Californians undergoing routine tuberculin skin testing. Of 97 subjects (29% meeting criteria for latent tuberculosis (TB infection (LTBI, 45 (46% were H. pylori seropositive. Subjects with LTBI who were H. pylori-seropositive had 1.5-fold higher TB antigen-induced IFN-gamma responses (p = 0.04, ANOVA, and a more Th-1 like cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to those who were H. pylori seronegative. To explore an association between H. pylori infection and clinical outcome of TB exposure, we evaluated H. pylori seroprevalence in baseline samples from two high risk TB case-contact cohorts, and from cynomolgus macaques experimentally challenged with M. tuberculosis. Compared to 513 household contacts who did not progress to active disease during a median 24 months follow-up, 120 prevalent TB cases were significantly less likely to be H. pylori infected (AOR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.0.36-0.83, p = 0.005, though seroprevalence was not significantly different from non-progressors in 37 incident TB cases (AOR: 1.35 [95% CI 0.63-2.9] p = 0.44. Cynomolgus macaques with natural H. pylori infection were significantly less likely to progress to TB 6 to 8 months after M. tuberculosis challenge (RR: 0.31 [95% CI 0.12-0.80], p = 0.04.H. pylori infection may induce bystander effects that modify the risk of active TB in humans and non-human primates. That immunity to TB may be enhanced by exposure to other microbial agents may have important implications for vaccine development and disease control.

  8. Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zare Javid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped, microaerophilic organism that colonizes the stomach of humans and causes chronic-active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancers, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach and MALT (mucosal-associated lymphoid tumor lymphomas. H. pylori colonizes the stomach of over 50 % the world’s human population, primarily those who reside in developing nations. Infection is generally first acquired in children, who may be entirely asymptomatic, and then persists for life, unless specific eradication therapy is initiated. All infected individuals have mucosal inflammation in the stomach in response to the organism, but only a subset will develop disease complications, such as an ulcer in the stomach or proximal duodenum and cancer in either the body or the antrum of the stomach. It is estimated that the lifetime risk of developing peptic ulceration is roughly 15%. However, this is an exceedingly important disease, because it has serious morbidity and mortality. Eradication of H. pylori infection is not successful when using antibiotics as monotherapy or dual therapy using combinations of an acid-suppressing agent and an antibiotic or two antibiotics without acid blockage. Multiple studies show that some probiotic strains can inhibit the growth of H. pylori. To date, probiotics do not appear to have a role as sole therapy for use in the prevention or treatment of H. pylori infection. However, there is increasing evidence that a variety of probiotic agents are useful as adjunctive therapy, which can both enhance the success of eradicating the gastric pathogen while, reduce the frequency and severity of adverse effects arising from the other agents that are employed in current combination treatment regimens. Future studies should assess the role of prebiotics and synbiotics and products derived from probiotics as additional options for use in the prevention and treatment of H. pylori infection

  9. Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltin, Doron

    2016-02-01

    The ideal treatment regimen for the eradication Helicobacter pylori infection has yet to be identified. Probiotics, particularly Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces, have been suggested as adjuncts to antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori. There is in vitro evidence that probiotics dampen the Th1 response triggered by H. pylori, attenuate H. pylori associated hypochlorhydria and secrete bacteriocidal metabolites. Probiotics interact with the innate host immune system through adherence to the gastric epithelium and secretion of bacterial adhesins. In prospective human studies, probiotic monotherapy effectively decrease H. pylori density (expired (13)CO2) by 2.0%-64.0%. Probiotic monotherapy has also been shown to eradicate H. pylori in up to 32.5%, although subsequent recrudescence is likely. Eleven meta-analyses have evaluated the efficacy of probiotics as adjuvants to antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. The addition of a probiotic increased treatment efficacy, OR 1.12-2.07. This benefit is probably strain-specific and may only be significant with relatively ineffective antibiotic regimens. The pooled prevalence of adverse effects was 12.9%-31.5% among subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with 24.3%-45.9% among controls. Diarrhea in particular was significantly reduced in subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with controls (OR 0.16-0.47). A reduction in adverse events other than diarrhea is variable. Despite the apparent benefit on efficacy and side effects conferred by probiotics, the optimal probiotic species, dose and treatment duration has yet to be determined. Further studies are needed to identify the probiotic, antibiotic and patient factors which might predict benefit from probiotic supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Caveolin-1 protects B6129 mice against Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Hitkova

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (Cav1 is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS, infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies ("humming bird" compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1. Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1 to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87 and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1 to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells.

  11. Competitive Fitness of Fluconazole-Resistant Clinical Candida albicans Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Christina; Hampe, Irene A I; Hertlein, Tobias; Ohlsen, Knut; Rogers, P David; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2017-07-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can develop resistance to the widely used antifungal agent fluconazole, which inhibits ergosterol biosynthesis. Resistance is often caused by gain-of-function mutations in the transcription factors Mrr1 and Tac1, which result in constitutive overexpression of multidrug efflux pumps, and Upc2, which result in constitutive overexpression of ergosterol biosynthesis genes. However, the deregulated gene expression that is caused by hyperactive forms of these transcription factors also reduces the fitness of the cells in the absence of the drug. To investigate whether fluconazole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates have overcome the fitness costs of drug resistance, we assessed the relative fitness of C. albicans isolates containing resistance mutations in these transcription factors in competition with matched drug-susceptible isolates from the same patients. Most of the fluconazole-resistant isolates were outcompeted by the corresponding drug-susceptible isolates when grown in rich medium without fluconazole. On the other hand, some resistant isolates with gain-of-function mutations in MRR1 did not exhibit reduced fitness under these conditions. In a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, three out of four tested fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates did not exhibit a significant fitness defect. However, all four fluconazole-resistant isolates were outcompeted by the matched susceptible isolates in a mouse model of gastrointestinal colonization, demonstrating that the effects of drug resistance on in vivo fitness depend on the host niche. Collectively, our results indicate that the fitness costs of drug resistance in C. albicans are not easily remediated, especially when proper control of gene expression is required for successful adaptation to life within a mammalian host. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. The association of dupA and Helicobacter pylori-related gastroduodenal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, N R

    2010-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of ulceration and gastric cancer. Recently, a novel virulence factor, duodenal ulcer promoting gene A (dupA), has been identified and found to associate with disease in some populations but not others. We investigated the relationship of dupA genotypes and H. pylori-related clinical outcomes by meta-analysis using previous reports of 2,358 patients from around the world. dupA-positive genotypes was found in 48% and was associated with duodenal ulcer (p = 0.001, odds ratio [OR] = 1.4, confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-1.7). The prevalence of dupA-positivity and its association with disease differed among the various regions around the world. In South America, the highest prevalence was recorded (Colombia and Brazil) and a significant relationship was found between dupA-negative strains and both gastric ulcer (GU) and gastric cancer (GC) (for GU, p = 0.001, OR = 0.2, CI = 0.1-0.4 and for GC, p = 0.001, OR = 0.3, CI = 0.2-0.6). In China, a significant correlation between dupA-positive strains and GU (p = 0.001, OR = 5.5, CI = 2.4-12.4) and GC (p = 0.009, OR = 2, Cl = 1.1-3.1) was found. To conclude, dupA promotes duodenal ulceration in some populations and GU and GC in others. This is typical of other virulence factors, such as cagA. Hence, it was concluded that the H. pylori virulence factor, dupA, is a true virulence factor.

  13. Inflammation, Immunity, and Vaccines for Helicobacter pylori Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walduck, Anna; Andersen, Leif P; Raghavan, Sukanya

    2015-01-01

    studies that contribute with new insights in the host response to H. pylori infection. Also, the adaptive immune response to H. pylori and particularly the role of IL-22 have been addressed in some studies. These advances may improve vaccine development where new strategies have been published. Two major...... studies analyzed H. pylori genomes of 39 worldwide strains and looked at the protein profiles. In addition, multi-epitope vaccines for therapeutic use have been investigated. Studies on different adjuvants and delivery systems have also given us new insights. This review presents articles from the last...... year that reveal detailed insight into immunity and regulation of inflammation, the contribution of immune cells to the development of gastric cancer, and understanding mechanisms of vaccine-induced protection....

  14. Antibiotics resistance of Helicobacter pylori in children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in Hangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaoli; Yin, Guofeng; Liu, Mingnan; Peng, Kerong; Zhao, Hong; Jiang, Mizu

    2018-03-12

    The decreasing eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori is mainly because of the progressive increase in its resistance to antibiotics. Studies on antimicrobial susceptibility of H. pylori in children are limited. This study aimed to investigate the resistance rates and patterns of H. pylori strains isolated from children. Gastric mucosa biopsy samples obtained from children who had undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were cultured for H. pylori, and susceptibility to six antibiotics (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, gentamicin, furazolidone, metronidazole, and levofloxacin) was tested from 2012-2014. A total of 545 H. pylori strains were isolated from 1390 children recruited. The total resistance rates of H. pylori to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin were 20.6%, 68.8%, and 9.0%, respectively. No resistance to amoxicillin, gentamicin, and furazolidone was detected. 56.1% strains were single resistance, 19.6% were resistant to more than one antibiotic, 16.7% for double resistance, and 2.9% for triple resistance in 413 strains against any antibiotic. And the H. pylori resistance rate increased significantly from 2012-2014. There was no significant difference in the resistance rates to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin between different gender, age groups, and patients with peptic ulcer diseases or nonulcer diseases. Antibiotic resistance was indicated in H. pylori strains isolated from children in Hangzhou, and it increased significantly during the 3 years. Our data strongly support current guidelines, which recommend antibiotic susceptibility tests prior to eradication therapy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Repeat-Associated Plasticity in the Helicobacter pylori RD Gene Family▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, Joshua R.; Dick, Jonathan J.; Meinersmann, Richard J.; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is remarkable for its ability to persist in the human stomach for decades without provoking sterilizing immunity. Since repetitive DNA can facilitate adaptive genomic flexibility via increased recombination, insertion, and deletion, we searched the genomes of two H. pylori strains for nucleotide repeats. We discovered a family of genes with extensive repetitive DNA that we have termed the H. pylori RD gene family. Each gene of this family is composed of a conserved 3′ region, a variable mid-region encoding 7 and 11 amino acid repeats, and a 5′ region containing one of two possible alleles. Analysis of five complete genome sequences and PCR genotyping of 42 H. pylori strains revealed extensive variation between strains in the number, location, and arrangement of RD genes. Furthermore, examination of multiple strains isolated from a single subject's stomach revealed intrahost variation in repeat number and composition. Despite prior evidence that the protein products of this gene family are expressed at the bacterial cell surface, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot studies revealed no consistent seroreactivity to a recombinant RD protein by H. pylori-positive hosts. The pattern of repeats uncovered in the RD gene family appears to reflect slipped-strand mispairing or domain duplication, allowing for redundancy and subsequent diversity in genotype and phenotype. This novel family of hypervariable genes with conserved, repetitive, and allelic domains may represent an important locus for understanding H. pylori persistence in its natural host. PMID:19749042

  16. Repeat-associated plasticity in the Helicobacter pylori RD gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, Joshua R; Dick, Jonathan J; Meinersmann, Richard J; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I; Blaser, Martin J

    2009-11-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is remarkable for its ability to persist in the human stomach for decades without provoking sterilizing immunity. Since repetitive DNA can facilitate adaptive genomic flexibility via increased recombination, insertion, and deletion, we searched the genomes of two H. pylori strains for nucleotide repeats. We discovered a family of genes with extensive repetitive DNA that we have termed the H. pylori RD gene family. Each gene of this family is composed of a conserved 3' region, a variable mid-region encoding 7 and 11 amino acid repeats, and a 5' region containing one of two possible alleles. Analysis of five complete genome sequences and PCR genotyping of 42 H. pylori strains revealed extensive variation between strains in the number, location, and arrangement of RD genes. Furthermore, examination of multiple strains isolated from a single subject's stomach revealed intrahost variation in repeat number and composition. Despite prior evidence that the protein products of this gene family are expressed at the bacterial cell surface, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot studies revealed no consistent seroreactivity to a recombinant RD protein by H. pylori-positive hosts. The pattern of repeats uncovered in the RD gene family appears to reflect slipped-strand mispairing or domain duplication, allowing for redundancy and subsequent diversity in genotype and phenotype. This novel family of hypervariable genes with conserved, repetitive, and allelic domains may represent an important locus for understanding H. pylori persistence in its natural host.

  17. In vitro efficacy of fosfomycin against clinical strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Karadağ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fosfomycin is an alternative drug for treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections. This study aimed to investigate in vitro activity of fosfomycin against ethicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, methicillinresistant coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VR E. faecium, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter isolates Methods: Clinical isolates of MRSA, MRCoNS, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. and VRE isolates which were isolated from rectal swaps were identified with Vitek 2 Compact (Biomeriux, France and BD Phoenix (BD USA automated systems. The Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine the susceptibility to fosfomycin. Results: All the MRSA (n=40, MRCoNS (n=40, and VR E. faecium (n=62 isolates were susceptible to fosfomycin. The fosfomycin susceptibility rates for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and Enterobacter spp. were 97.5% (39 of 40, 97.3% (36 of 37, and 86.9% (20 of 23, respectively. One (2.7% isolate of K. pneumoniae and three (13.1% isolates of Enterobacter spp. showed intermediate susceptibility to fosfomycin. Resistance to fosfomycin was detected in only one (2.5% isolate of E. coli. Conclusion:Based on the results of our study, fosfomycin is highly active against a collection of several gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug resistant isolates, and is an alternative drug in the treatment option.J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014;4(2: 55-58

  18. Application of methylation in improving plasmid transformation into Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huilin; Xu, Linlin; Rong, Qianyu; Xu, Zheng; Ding, Yunfei; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Yulong; Li, Boqing; Ji, Xiaofei

    2018-05-23

    Helicobacter pylori is an important gastrointestinal pathogen. Its strains possess different levels of powerful restriction modification systems, which are significant barriers to genetic tools used for studying the role of functional genes in its pathogenesis. Methylating vectors in vitro was reported as an alternative to overcome this barrier in several bacteria. In this study we used two H. pylori-E. coli shuttle plasmids and several single/double-crossover homologous recombination gene-targeting plasmids, to test the role of methylation in H. pylori transformation. According to our results, transformants could be obtained only after shuttle plasmids were methylated before transformation. It is helpful in gene complementation and over-expression although at a low frequency. The frequency of gene-targeting transformation was also increased after methylation, especially for the single-crossover recombination plasmids, the transformants of which could only be obtained after methylation. For the double-crossover recombination targeting plasmids, the initial yield of transformants was 0.3-0.8 × 10 2 CFUs per microgram plasmid DNA. With the help of methylation, the yield was increased to 0.4-1.3 × 10 2 CFUs per microgram plasmid DNA. These results suggest that in vitro methylation can improve H. pylori transformation by different plasmids, which will benefit the pathogenic mechanism research. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Probiotic BIFICO cocktail ameliorates Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Jing; Liu, Wei; Chang, Zhen; Shen, Hui; He, Li-Juan; Wang, Sha-Sha; Liu, Lu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Xu, Guo-Tong; An, Mao-Mao; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2015-06-07

    To determine the protective effect of triple viable probiotics on gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and elucidate the possible mechanisms of protection. Colonization of BIFICO strains in the mouse stomach was determined by counting colony-forming units per gram of stomach tissue. After treatment with or without BIFICO, inflammation and H. pylori colonization in the mouse stomach were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa staining, respectively. Cytokine levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Milliplex. The activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and MAPK signaling in human gastric epithelial cells was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA expression in the mouse stomach. We demonstrated that BIFICO, which contains a mixture of Enterococcus faecalis, Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus, was tolerant to the mouse stomach environment and was able to survive both the 8-h and 3-d courses of administration. Although BIFICO treatment had no effect on the colonization of H. pylori in the mouse stomach, it ameliorated H. pylori-induced gastritis by significantly inhibiting the expression of cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, G-CSF and MIP-2 (P gastritis by inhibiting the inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells.

  20. Evolution of Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to antibiotics during a 10-year period in Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupcinskas, Limas; Rasmussen, Lone; Jonaitis, Laimas

    2013-01-01

    .5 times, the total macrolide consumption remains one of the lowest in Europe. We have not observed any significant changes in the susceptibility of H. pylori to the most widely used antibiotics during the recent 10-year period. The low resistance rate to clarithromycin might be related to the policy......The study evaluated the changes in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori strains with primary resistance to antibiotics during the last 10 years in Lithuania. H. pylori susceptibilities to antibiotics were tested in 89 patients in 1998, in 81 patients in 2001 and in 90 patients in 2007...

  1. Effect on cell surface hydrophobicity and susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annuk, H; Hirmo, S; Türi, E; Mikelsaar, M; Arak, E; Wadström, T

    1999-03-01

    Effects on aqueous extracts of medicinal plants on ten Helicobacter pylori strains were studied by the salt aggregation test to determine the possibility to modulate their cell surface hydrophobicity and by an agar diffusion assay for detection of antimicrobial activity. It was established that aqueous extracts of bearberry and cowberry leaves enhance cell aggregation of all H. pylori strains tested by the salt aggregation test, and the extract of bearberry possessed a remarkable bacteriostatic activity. Pure tannic acid showed a result similar to that of bearberry and cowberry extracts which contained a large amount of tannins. In contrast, extracts of wild camomile and pineapple-weed, which blocked aggregation of H. pylori, contained small amounts of tannins and did not reveal any antimicrobial activity. Tannic acid seems to be the component of bearberry and cowberry aqueous extracts with the highest activity to decrease cell surface hydrophobicity as well as in antibacterial activity against H. pylori.

  2. Helicobacter pylori eradication: gastric cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Ford, Alexander Charles

    2015-12-01

    The principal effect of Helicobacter pylori infection is lifelong chronic gastritis, affecting up to 20% of younger adults but 50% to 80% of adults born in resource-rich countries before 1950. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of H pylori eradication treatment on the risk of developing gastric cancer? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 208 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 166 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 124 studies and the further review of 42 full publications. Of the 42 full articles evaluated, one systematic review was added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for two PICO combinations. In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for one intervention based on information about the effectiveness and safety of H pylori eradication treatment for the prevention of gastric cancer.

  3. Occurance of Staphylococcus nepalensis strains in different sources including human clinical material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Dana; Pantůcek, Roman; Petrás, Petr; Koukalová, Dagmar; Sedlácek, Ivo

    2006-10-01

    Five isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci were obtained from human urine, the gastrointestinal tract of squirrel monkeys, pig skin and from the environment. All key biochemical characteristics of the tested strains corresponded with the description of Staphylococcus xylosus species. However, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from analysed strains corresponded with those of Staphylococcus nepalensis reference strains, except for two strains which differed in one residue. Ribotyping with EcoRI and HindIII restriction enzymes, whole cell protein profile analysis performed by SDS-PAGE and SmaI macrorestriction analysis were used for more precise characterization and identification of the analysed strains. Obtained results showed that EcoRI and HindIII ribotyping and whole cell protein fingerprinting are suitable and reliable methods for the differentiation of S. nepalensis strains from the other novobiocin resistant staphylococci, whereas macrorestriction analysis was found to be a good tool for strain typing. The isolation of S. nepalensis is sporadic, and according to our best knowledge this study is the first report of the occurrence of this species in human clinical material as well as in other sources.

  4. VacA, CagA, IceA and OipA Genotype Status of Helicobacter pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    particularly can ease loneliness, reduce allergies, anxiety, depression, stress, and a variety of human diseases, and .... isolated from food stuff was also statistically analyzed. ..... Helicobacter pylori strains from the high-altitude desert of Ladakh ...

  5. Emerging Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Histopathologic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Mohamed H; Elhawari, Soha A; Yousef, Salem; Radwan, Mohamed I; Abdel-Aziz, Hesham R

    2016-02-01

    There is growing evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that emphasizes the efficacy of probiotics in the management of Helicobacter (H) pylori infection; it increased the eradication rate, improved patient clinical manifestations and lowered treatment associated side effects. In this review we documented the potential ability of probiotics to ameliorate H. pylori induced histological features. We searched the available literature for full length articles focusing the role of probiotics on H. pylori induced gastritis from histologic perspectives. Probiotics lowered H. pylori density at the luminal side of epithelium, improved histological inflammatory and activity scores both in the gastric corpus and antrum. This effect persists for long period of time after discontinuation of probiotic supplementation and this is probably through an immune mechanism. The current evidence support the promising role of probiotics in improving H. pylori induced histopathological features both in gastric antrum and corpus and for long periods of time. Because increased density of H. pylori on the gastric mucosa is linked to more severe gastritis and increased incidence of peptic ulcers, we can infer that a reduction of the density might help to decrease the risk of developing pathologies, probably the progression toward atrophic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. These effects together with improving the H. pylori eradication rates and amelioration of treatment related side effects might open the door for probiotics to be added to H. pylori eradication regimens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Rolle verschiedener sekretierter oder translokalisierter Effektormoleküle des gastrischen Pahogens Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Judith

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori is estimated to colonize the human stomach in almost 50% of the world population and has established itself as survival specialist by avoiding host cell recognition and elimination. Pathologic effects due to its persistence are depending on a multitude of host-pathogen interactions and infection may develop from simple symptoms to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer or even cancer formation. More virulent strains of H. pylori encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS) able to translocate ...

  7. Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    90%, the sequential therapy seems to have a potential of becoming the standard first-line treatment for H pylori infection in the interim, while search is being made for the ideal antimicrobial monotherapy. . Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, Dyspepsia, Gastric cancer, Gastric Ulcer, Duodenal ulcer. INTRODUCTION. 1. Since the ...

  8. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000

  9. Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains of Pandemic Serotypes Identified from Clinical and Environmental Samples from Jiangsu, China

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    Jingjiao eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus has emerged as a major foodborne pathogen in China, Japan, Thailand and other Asian countries. In this study, 72 strains of V. parahaemolyticus were isolated from clinical and environmental samples between 2006 and 2014 in Jiangsu, China. The serotypes and six virulence genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDR and TDR-related hemolysin (TRH genes were assessed among the isolates. Twenty five serotypes were identified and O3:K6 was one of the dominant serotypes. The genetic diversity was assessed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST analysis, and 48 sequence types (STs were found, suggesting this V. parahaemolyticus group is widely dispersed and undergoing rapid evolution. A total of 25 strains of pandemic serotypes such as O3:K6, O5:K17 and O1:KUT were identified. It is worth noting that the pandemic serotypes were not exclusively identified from clinical samples, rather, nine strains were also isolated from environmental samples; and some of these strains harbored several virulence genes, which may render those strains pathogenicity potential. Therefore, the emergence of these environmental pandemic V. parahaemolyticus strains may poses a new threat to the public health in China. Furthermore, six novel serotypes and 34 novel STs were identified among the 72 isolates, indicating that V. parahaemolyticus were widely distributed and fast evolving in the environment in Jiangsu, China. The findings of this study provide new insight into the phylogenic relationship between V. parahaemolyticus strains of pandemic serotypes from clinical and environmental sources and enhance the MLST database; and our proposed possible O- and K- antigen evolving paths of V. parahaemolyticus may help understand how the serotypes of this dispersed bacterial population evolve.

  10. Frequency of virulence factors in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Bagheri, Nader; Zamanzad, Behnam; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-03-01

    The outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been related to specific virulence-associated bacterial genotypes. The vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), cagA gene, oipA and babA2 gene are important virulence factor involving gastric diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between virulence factors of H. pylori and histopathological findings. Gastroduodenoscopy was performed in 436 dyspeptic patients. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, virulence factors and for histopathological assessment. The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect virulence factors of H. pylori using specific primers. vacA genotypes in patients infected with H. pylori were associated with cagA, iceA1 and iceA2. In the patients with H. pylori infection there was a significant relationship between cagA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and chronic inflammation (P = 0.013) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.034). Neutrophil infiltration was found to be more severe in the s1 group than in the s2 group (P = 0.042). Also was a significant relationship between oipA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.018). No significant relationships were observed between other vacA genotypes and histopathological parameters. H. pylori strains showing cagA, vacA s1 and oipA positivity are associated with more severe gastritis in some histological features but virulence factors of H. pylori do not appear to determine the overall pattern of gastritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Motility and Chemotaxis Mediate the Preferential Colonization of Gastric Injury Sites by Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Eitaro; Closson, Chet; Matthis, Andrea L.; Schumacher, Michael A.; Engevik, Amy C.; Zavros, Yana; Ottemann, Karen M.; Montrose, Marshall H.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a pathogen contributing to peptic inflammation, ulceration, and cancer. A crucial step in the pathogenic sequence is when the bacterium first interacts with gastric tissue, an event that is poorly understood in vivo. We have shown that the luminal space adjacent to gastric epithelial damage is a microenvironment, and we hypothesized that this microenvironment might enhance H. pylori colonization. Inoculation with 106 H. pylori (wild-type Sydney Strain 1, SS1) significantly delayed healing of acetic-acid induced ulcers at Day 1, 7 and 30 post-inoculation, and wild-type SS1 preferentially colonized the ulcerated area compared to uninjured gastric tissue in the same animal at all time points. Gastric resident Lactobacillus spp. did not preferentially colonize ulcerated tissue. To determine whether bacterial motility and chemotaxis are important to ulcer healing and colonization, we analyzed isogenic H. pylori mutants defective in motility (ΔmotB) or chemotaxis (ΔcheY). ΔmotB (106) failed to colonize ulcerated or healthy stomach tissue. ΔcheY (106) colonized both tissues, but without preferential colonization of ulcerated tissue. However, ΔcheY did modestly delay ulcer healing, suggesting that chemotaxis is not required for this process. We used two-photon microscopy to induce microscopic epithelial lesions in vivo, and evaluated accumulation of fluorescently labeled H. pylori at gastric damage sites in the time frame of minutes instead of days. By 5 min after inducing damage, H. pylori SS1 preferentially accumulated at the site of damage and inhibited gastric epithelial restitution. H. pylori ΔcheY modestly accumulated at the gastric surface and inhibited restitution, but did not preferentially accumulate at the injury site. H. pylori ΔmotB neither accumulated at the surface nor inhibited restitution. We conclude that bacterial chemosensing and motility rapidly promote H. pylori colonization of injury sites, and thereby biases

  12. Crosstalk between Helicobacter pylori and gastric epithelial cells is impaired by docosahexaenoic acid.

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    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori colonizes half of the world's population leading to gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori strains resistant to antibiotics are increasing which raises the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been shown to decrease H. pylori growth and its associated-inflammation through mechanisms poorly characterized. We aimed to explore DHA action on H. pylori-mediated inflammation and adhesion to gastric epithelial cells (AGS and also to identify bacterial structures affected by DHA. H. pylori growth and metabolism was assessed in liquid cultures. Bacterial adhesion to AGS cells was visualized by transmission electron microscopy and quantified by an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Inflammatory proteins were assessed by immunoblotting in infected AGS cells, previously treated with DHA. Bacterial total and outer membrane protein composition was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Concentrations of 100 µM of DHA decreased H. pylori growth, whereas concentrations higher than 250 µM irreversibly inhibited bacteria survival. DHA reduced ATP production and adhesion to AGS cells. AGS cells infected with DHA pre-treated H. pylori showed a 3-fold reduction in Interleukin-8 (IL-8 production and a decrease of COX2 and iNOS. 2D electrophoresis analysis revealed that DHA changed the expression of H. pylori outer membrane proteins associated with stress response and metabolism and modified bacterial lipopolysaccharide phenotype. As conclusions our results show that DHA anti-H. pylori effects are associated with changes of bacteria morphology and metabolism, and with alteration of outer membrane proteins composition, that ultimately reduce the adhesion of bacteria and the burden of H. pylori-related inflammation.

  13. The role of environmental tobacco exposure and Helicobacter pylori infection in the risk of chronic tonsillitis in children

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    Chen Li’e

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a chronic infectious pathogen with high prevalence. This study investigated the interaction between environmental tobacco exposure and H. pylori infection on the incidence of chronic tonsillitis in Chinese children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study performed in an outpatient clinic in China. METHODS: Pediatric patients with chronic tonsillitis were enrolled. H. pylori infection was determined according to the presence of H. pylori CagA IgG antibodies. Serum cotinine levels and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS exposure were determined for all participants. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in H. pylori infection between the children with chronic tonsillitis and children free of disease, but there was a significant difference in ETS between the two groups (P = 0.011. We next studied the association between ETS and chronic tonsillitis based on H. pylori infection status. In the patients with H. pylori infection, there was a significant difference in ETS distribution between the chronic tonsillitis and control groups (P = 0.022. Taking the participants without ETS as the reference, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that those with high ETS had higher susceptibility to chronic tonsillitis (adjusted OR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.67-3.25; adjusted P < 0.001. However, among those without H. pylori infection, ETS did not predispose towards chronic tonsillitis. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that tobacco exposure should be a putative mediator risk factor to chronic tonsillitis among children with H. pylori infection.

  14. Typical and atypical symptoms of gastro esophageal reflux disease: Does Helicobacter pylori infection matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Laurino; Ciccaglione, Antonio Francesco; Marzio, Leonardo

    2015-11-06

    To analyze whether the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could affect the quality of symptoms in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. one hundred and forty-four consecutive patients referred to our Unit for suspected GERD were recruited for the study. All patients underwent esophageal pH-metric recording. For those with a positive test, C13 urea breath test was then performed to assess the H. pylori status. GERD patients were stratified according to the quality of their symptoms and classified as typical, if affected by heartburn and regurgitation, and atypical if complaining of chest pain, respiratory and ears, nose, and throat features. H. pylori-negative patients were also asked whether they had a previous diagnosis of H. pylori infection. If a positive response was given, on the basis of the time period after successful eradication, patients were considered as "eradicated" (E) if H. pylori eradication occurred more than six months earlier or "recently eradicated" if the therapy had been administered within the last six months. Patients without history of infection were identified as "negative" (N). χ (2) test was performed by combining the clinical aspects with the H. pylori status. one hundred and twenty-nine of the 144 patients, including 44 H. pylori-positive and 85 H. pylori-negative (41 negative, 21 recently eradicated, 23 eradicated more than 6 mo before), were eligible for the analysis. No difference has been found between H. pylori status and either the number of reflux episodes (138 ± 23 vs 146 ± 36, respectively, P = 0.2, not significant) or the percentage of time with pH values < 4 (6.8 ± 1.2 vs 7.4 ± 2.1, respectively, P = 0.3, not significant). The distribution of symptoms was as follows: 13 typical (30%) and 31 atypical (70%) among the 44 H. pylori-positive cases; 44 typical (52%) and 41 atypical (48%) among the 85 H. pylori-negative cases, (P = 0.017 vs H. pylori+; OR = 2.55, 95%CI: 1.17-5.55). Furthermore

  15. A neglected cause for chronic spontaneous urticaria in children: Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akelma, A Z; Cizmeci, M N; Mete, E; Tufan, N; Bozkurt, B

    2015-01-01

    The aetiology of chronic urticaria is usually considered idiopathic. There is a paucity of research both on the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the aetiology of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CU) in children and also on which patients H. pylori should be investigated. All paediatric and adult patients who presented to the allergy outpatient clinic due to CU between January 2011 and July 2012 were included in this prospective, randomised study. Stool samples from all patients were examined for the H. pylori antigen. Paediatric and adult patients who had a positive stool test for the H. pylori antigen were reassessed following eradication therapy. Thirty-two children with CU and 35 adults with CU were enrolled in the study. Ten of the 32 (31.2%) children and 18 of the 35 (51.4%) adults were H. pylori positive (p=0.09). All children with positive-H. pylori were older than eight years of age. There was a significant positive correlation between age and the frequency of H. pylori infection (p0.05). Following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms recovered in 15 of the adults (83.3%) and 10 of the paediatric (100%) patients (p=0.172). In the current study we found that H. pylori is common among children with CU, particularly after eight years of age. We suggest that CU patients with an unknown aetiology should be routinely screened for H. pylori even if they do not present with GI symptoms and that those with H. pylori-positive results may receive treatment. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Significant Reduction in Helicobacter pylori Load in Humans with Non-viable Lactobacillus reuteri DSM17648: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Caterina; Busjahn, Andreas; Mehling, Heidrun; Arya, Stefanie; Boettner, Mewes; Habibi, Hajar; Lang, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Reducing the amount of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach by selective bacterial-bacterial cell interaction was sought as an effective and novel method for combating the stomach pathogen. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM17648 was identified as a highly specific binding antagonist to H. pylori among more than 700 wild-type strains of Lactobacillus species. Applying a stringent screening procedure, the strain DSM17648 was identified as selective binder to H. pylori cells under in vivo gastric conditions. The strain DSM17648 co-aggregates the pathogen in vivo and in vitro. The specific co-aggregation occurs between Lact. reuteri DSM17648 and different H. pylori strains and serotypes, as well as H. heilmannii, but not with Campylobacter jejuni or other commensal oral and intestinal bacteria. Lact. reuteri DSM17648 was shown in a proof-of-concept single-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study to significantly reduce the load of H. pylori in healthy yet infected adults. Reducing the amount of H. pylori in the stomach by selective bacterial-bacterial cell interaction might be an effective and novel method for combating the stomach pathogen. Lact. reuteri DSM17648 might prove useful as an adhesion blocker in antibiotic-free H. pylori therapies.

  17. Transcription pattern of UL131A-128 mRNA in clinical strains of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) mRNA was obtained from human embryonic lung fibroblast cells infected by HCMV clinical strains from urine samples of infants at different kinetic periods. The cDNA of UL131A-128 mRNAs was amplified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and analysed by ...

  18. Does clinical rehabilitation impose sufficient cardiorespiratory strain to improve aerobic fitness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, A.D.; Eken, M.M.; van Bezeij, T.; Valent, L.; Houdijk, J.H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cardiorespiratory strain experienced by patients over a day and during different types of rehabilitation therapies during a clinical rehabilitation programme. In addition, to investigate the use of the Borg scale as an instrument to monitor exercise intensity. Design:

  19. cagA positive Helicobacter pylori in Brazilian children related to chronic gastritis

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    Luciano Lobo Gatti

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium. It colonizes the gastric mucosa of humans and persists for decades if not treated. Helicobacter pylori infection affects more than half of the world's population and invariably results in chronic gastritis. The cagA gene is present in about 60 to 70% of H. pylori strains; it encodes a high-molecular-weight protein (120 to 140 kDa and several investigators have noted a correlation between strains that possess cagA and the severity of gastric mucosal inflammation. We examined the relation between cagA status in H. pylori strains and chronic gastritis with inflammatory processes in children from Marília, São Paulo, Brazil. One-hundred-twenty-one children were analyzed histopathologically and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect H. pylori and cagA. We then looked for an association between cagA presence and inflammatory infiltration. Using histology and PCR, we found 47% H. pylori positive infection; 29 children were diagnosed with chronic gastritis, while 28 showed normal mucosa by histopathological analysis. CagA presence was genotyped in both groups, and an inflammatory infiltrate was studied in all infected children with chronic gastritis. We found cagA strains in 20 of 29 (69% children with chronic gastritis and 18 of 28 (64% with normal mucosa, demonstrating a strong relationship between the strains and the inflammatory process. We found a positive association between an inflammatory process associated with H. pylori of cagA+ strains and chronic gastritis development.

  20. Detection of Helicobacter pylori CagA gene and Its Association with Endoscopic Appearance in Balinese Dyspepsia Patients

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    I Ketut Mariadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection causes various abnormalities in the stomach. Only particular strain can cause severe problems in the stomach. CagA is a microbial virulent factor which is associated with more severe stomach problems, such as: peptic ulcer and stomach cancer. We would like to know the prevalence of CagA in Balinese population, and the association of H. Pylori CagA status with the severity of endoscopic appearance in dyspepsia patients. Method: Study design being used was analytic cross sectional study, involving 71 dyspepsia patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination in Surya Husada Hospital and Balimed Hospital in June-December 2013. Sample was chosen in consecutive manner. Later, polymerase chain reaction (PCR examinations of the stomach mucous biopsy tissue to determine H. pylori infection status and CagA status were performed. Further, Chi square test was used to identify the difference in proportion of H. pylori and CagA between mild and severe endoscopic appearance. Results: In this study, we found that the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 22.5% using PCR examination. Prevalence of CagA positive in H. pylori positive was 62.5%. There was significant association between status of H. Pylori infection and severity of endoscopic appearance (p = 0.038; OR= 2.67; 95% CI = 1.18-6.05. Status of CagA in H. pylori infected patients was not associated with the severity of endoscopic appearance. Additionally, there was significant association between patients’ age and severity of endoscopic appearance. Conclusion: The prevalence of CagA in H. pylori positive was 62.5%. H. pylori infection was associated with severity of endoscopic appearance and CagA status in H. pylori infected patients was not associated with severity of endoscopic appearance.

  1. The diagnostic value of endoscopy and Helicobacter pylori tests for peptic ulcer patients in late post-treatment setting

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    Kull Ingrid

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for management of peptic ulcer patients after the treatment are largely directed to detection of H. pylori infection using only non-invasive tests. We compared the diagnostic value of non-invasive and endoscopy based H. pylori tests in a late post-treatment setting. Methods Altogether 34 patients with dyspeptic complaints were referred for gastroscopy 5 years after the treatment of peptic ulcer using a one-week triple therapy scheme. The endoscopic and histologic findings were evaluated according to the Sydney classification. Bacteriological, PCR and cytological investigations and 13C-UBT tests were performed. Results Seventeen patients were defined H. pylori positive by 13C-UBT test, PCR and histological examination. On endoscopy, peptic ulcer persisted in 4 H. pylori positive cases. Among the 6 cases with erosions of the gastric mucosa, only two patients were H. pylori positive. Mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were revealed both in the H. pylori positive and H. pylori negative cases. Bacteriological examination revealed three clarithromycin resistant H. pylori strains. Cytology failed to prove validity for diagnosing H. pylori in a post-treatment setting. Conclusions In a late post-treatment setting, patients with dyspepsia should not be monitored only by non-invasive investigation methods; it is also justified to use the classical histological evaluation of H. pylori colonisation, PCR and bacteriology as they have shown good concordance with 13C-UBT. Moreover, endoscopy and histological investigation of a gastric biopsy have proved to be the methods with an additional diagnostic value, providing the physician with information about inflammatory, atrophic and metaplastic lesions of the stomach in dyspeptic H. pylori positive and negative patients. Bacteriological methods are suggested for detecting the putative antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori, aimed at successful eradication of infection in

  2. The characterization of Helicobacter pylori DNA associated with ancient human remains recovered from a Canadian glacier.

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    Treena Swanston

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of nearly half of the world's population. Genotypic characterization of H. pylori strains involves the analysis of virulence-associated genes, such as vacA, which has multiple alleles. Previous phylogenetic analyses have revealed a connection between modern H. pylori strains and the movement of ancient human populations. In this study, H. pylori DNA was amplified from the stomach tissue of the Kwäday Dän Ts'ìnchi individual. This ancient individual was recovered from the Samuel Glacier in Tatshenshini-Alsek Park, British Columbia, Canada on the traditional territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations and radiocarbon dated to a timeframe of approximately AD 1670 to 1850. This is the first ancient H. pylori strain to be characterized with vacA sequence data. The Tatshenshini H. pylori strain has a potential hybrid vacA m2a/m1d middle (m region allele and a vacA s2 signal (s region allele. A vacA s2 allele is more commonly identified with Western strains, and this suggests that European strains were present in northwestern Canada during the ancient individual's time. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the vacA m1d region of the ancient strain clusters with previously published novel Native American strains that are closely related to Asian strains. This indicates a past connection between the Kwäday Dän Ts'ìnchi individual and the ancestors who arrived in the New World thousands of years ago.

  3. Molecular Aspects of H. pylori-Related MALT Lymphoma

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    Scott R. Owens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori-related extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue is a paradigm for malignancy arising in an inflammatory background. While the diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis is often straightforward, distinction between severe gastritis and early lymphoma can be difficult and requires careful assessment of clinical findings in addition to histological features and immunohistochemical results. A number of cytogenetic abnormalities have been discovered in H. pylori-related lymphomas and several have clinical importance, related to the responsiveness of lymphoma to H. pylori eradication therapy, but routine molecular studies are not widely utilized. While molecular methods may be used in equivocal cases, a trial of conservative therapy is warranted given the propensity for these lymphomas to regress with eradication of the organism. Once therapy is initiated, care must be taken to avoid a premature assignment of disease refractoriness because complete response can take several months to more than a year. Cases truly refractory to H. pylori eradication therapy may be treated with adjuvant chemoradiation with a high response rate.

  4. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

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    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  5. CD44 plays a functional role in Helicobacter pylori-induced epithelial cell proliferation.

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    Nina Bertaux-Skeirik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxin-associated gene (Cag pathogenicity island is a strain-specific constituent of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori that augments cancer risk. CagA translocates into the cytoplasm where it stimulates cell signaling through the interaction with tyrosine kinase c-Met receptor, leading cellular proliferation. Identified as a potential gastric stem cell marker, cluster-of-differentiation (CD CD44 also acts as a co-receptor for c-Met, but whether it plays a functional role in H. pylori-induced epithelial proliferation is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that CD44 plays a functional role in H. pylori-induced epithelial cell proliferation. To assay changes in gastric epithelial cell proliferation in relation to the direct interaction with H. pylori, human- and mouse-derived gastric organoids were infected with the G27 H. pylori strain or a mutant G27 strain bearing cagA deletion (∆CagA::cat. Epithelial proliferation was quantified by EdU immunostaining. Phosphorylation of c-Met was analyzed by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis for expression of CD44 and CagA. H. pylori infection of both mouse- and human-derived gastric organoids induced epithelial proliferation that correlated with c-Met phosphorylation. CagA and CD44 co-immunoprecipitated with phosphorylated c-Met. The formation of this complex did not occur in organoids infected with ∆CagA::cat. Epithelial proliferation in response to H. pylori infection was lost in infected organoids derived from CD44-deficient mouse stomachs. Human-derived fundic gastric organoids exhibited an induction in proliferation when infected with H. pylori that was not seen in organoids pre-treated with a peptide inhibitor specific to CD44. In the well-established Mongolian gerbil model of gastric cancer, animals treated with CD44 peptide inhibitor Pep1, resulted in the inhibition of H. pylori-induced proliferation and associated atrophic gastritis. The current study reports a unique

  6. Outer membrane vesicles enhance the carcinogenic potential of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2008-12-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of gastric carcinogenesis. These non-invasive bacteria colonize the gastric mucosa and constitutively shed small outer membrane vesicles (OMV). In this study, we investigated the direct effect of H.pylori OMV on cellular events associated with carcinogenesis. We observed increased micronuclei formation in AGS human gastric epithelial cells treated with OMV isolated from a toxigenic H.pylori strain (60190). This effect was absent in OMV from strain 60190v:1 that has a mutant vacA, indicating VacA-dependent micronuclei formation. VacA induces intracellular vacuolation, and reduced acridine orange staining indicated disruption in the integrity of these vacuoles. This was accompanied by an alteration in iron metabolism and glutathione (GSH) loss, suggesting a role for oxidative stress in genomic damage. Increasing intracellular GSH levels with a GSH ester abrogated the VacA-mediated increase in micronuclei formation. In conclusion, OMV-mediated delivery of VacA to the gastric epithelium may constitute a new mechanism for H.pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  7. Assessment of Helicobacter pylori eradication by virgin olive oil.

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    Castro, Manuel; Romero, Concepción; de Castro, Antonio; Vargas, Julio; Medina, Eduardo; Millán, Raquel; Brenes, Manuel

    2012-08-01

     A recent study conducted by Medina et al. disclosed that virgin olive oil has a bactericidal effect in vitro against Helicobacter pylori because of its contents of certain phenolic compounds with dialdehydic structures. We carried out two clinical trials to evaluate the effect of virgin olive oil on H. pylori-infected individuals.  Two different pilot studies were performed with 60 H. pylori-infected adults. In the first study, thirty subjects who tested positive for H. pylori received 30 g of washed virgin olive oil for 14 days, and after 1 month, the patients took 30 g of unwashed virgin olive oil for another 14 days. In a second study, a group of 30 subjects received 30 g of a different virgin olive oil for 14 days. Helicobacter pylori-infection status was checked by the urea breath test.  Helicobacter pylori was eradicated in 8 of 30 individuals when microorganism status was checked after 4-6 weeks from the first clinical intervention although 12 of 30 individuals did not show H. pylori infection at 24-72 hour of the last oil dose. Eradication rates were 27 and 40% by intention to treat and per protocol, respectively. Moreover, only 3 of 30 individuals were H. pylori negative after 4-6 weeks from the second clinical intervention but 5 of 30 were negative at 24-72 hour of the last oil dose. Eradication rates were 10 and 11% by intention to treat and per protocol, respectively. It must also be noted that 13 subjects withdrew from the studies because of taste and nausea drawbacks.  The administration of virgin olive oil showed moderate effectiveness in eradicating H. pylori. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, especially with longer periods, different administration conditions, and several types of olive oils. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The intact dupA cluster is a more reliable Helicobacter pylori virulence marker than dupA alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung Woo; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Shiota, Seiji; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    The duodenal ulcer promoting (dupA) gene, located in the plasticity region of Helicobacter pylori, is associated with duodenal ulcer development. dupA was predicted to form a type IV secretory system (T4SS) with vir genes around dupA (dupA cluster). We investigated the prevalence of dupA and dupA clusters and clarified associations between the dupA cluster status and clinical outcomes in the U.S. population. In all, 245 H. pylori strains were examined using PCR to evaluate the status of dupA and the adjacent vir genes predicted to form T4SS, in addition to the status of cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The associations between dupA cluster status and interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-12 production were also examined. The presence of dupA and all adjacent vir genes were defined as a complete dupA cluster. Many variations related to the status of dupA and dupA cluster genes were identified. Concurrent H. pylori infection and the presence of a complete dupA cluster increases duodenal ulcer risk compared to H. pylori infection with incomplete dupA cluster or without the dupA gene independent on the cag PAI status (adjusted odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.13 to 4.03). Gastric mucosal IL-8 levels were also significantly higher in the complete dupA cluster group than in other groups (P=0.01). In conclusion, although the causal relationship between the dupA cluster and duodenal ulcer development is not proved, the presence of a complete dupA cluster but not dupA alone, is associated with duodenal ulcer development.

  9. VacA and cagA genotypes of Helicobacter pylori isolated from raw meat in Isfahan province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Ali; Razavilar, Vadood; Rokni, Nordahr; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Foods with animal origins play a substantial role in the transmission of Helicobacter pylori . The present investigation was carried out to study the vacA and cagA genotypes status of H. pylori isolated from various types of meat samples. Two hundred and twenty meat samples were collected and cultured. H. pylori -positive strains were analyzed for the presence of vacA and cagA genotypes. Eleven out of 220 (5.00%) samples were positive for H. pylori . Findings were confirmed by nested PCR. Prevalence of H. pylori in the meat samples of slaughterhouses and butcheries were 72.20% and 27.70%, respectively. The most commonly detected genotypes in the meat samples of slaughterhouses and butcheries were vacA m1a (66.66%) and vacA s1a (37.50%), respectively. The S1am1a was the most commonly detected genotype. Meat sampled from butcheries had the higher prevalence of H. pylori and its genotypes than those of slaughterhouses ( p meat samples could be the potential sources of virulent strains of H. pylori . Application of sanitary measures in the storage, transportation and sale of meat is essential for reducing the levels of H. pylori cross contamination.

  10. A comparative study of clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa.

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    Di Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been isolated from 10%-20% of human chronic cholecystitis specimens but the characteristics of "Helicobacter pylori positive cholecystitis" remains unclear. This study aims to compare the clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa. METHODS: Three hundred and twenty-six chronic cholecystitis patients were divided into two groups according to whether Helicobacter pylori could be detected by culture, staining or PCR for Helicobacter 16s rRNA gene in gallbladder mucosa. Positive samples were sequenced for Helicobacter pylori-specific identification. Clinical parameters as well as pathological characteristics including some premalignant lesions and the expression levels of iNOS and ROS in gallbladder were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa was detected in 20.55% of cholecystitis patients. These patients had a higher prevalence of acid regurgitation symptoms (p = 0.001, more histories of chronic gastritis (p = 0.005, gastric ulcer (p = 0.042, duodenal ulcer (p = 0.026 and higher presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach as compared to patients without Helicobacter pylori infection in the gallbladder mucosa. Helicobacter pylori 16s rRNA in gallbladder and gastric-duodenal mucosa from the same individual patient had identical sequences. Also, higher incidences of adenomyomatosis (p = 0.012, metaplasia (p = 0.022 and higher enhanced expressions of iNOS and ROS were detected in Helicobacter pylori infected gallbladder mucosa (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori existed in stomach. Helicobacter pylori is also correlated with gallbladder premalignant lesions including metaplasia and adenomyomatosis. The potential mechanism might be related with higher ROS

  11. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic Ghanaian patients.

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    Archampong, Timothy Nii Akushe; Asmah, Richard Harry; Wiredu, Edwin Kwame; Gyasi, Richard Kwasi; Nkrumah, Kofi Nyaako; Rajakumar, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative urease-producing bacterium causally linked with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is more frequent and acquired at an earlier age in developing countries compared to European populations. The incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic Ghanaian patients was 75.4%. However, epidemiological factors associated with infection vary across populations. This study used a cross-sectional design to consecutively sample dyspeptic patients at the Endoscopy Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra between 2010 and 2012. The study questionnaire elicited their epidemiological clinical characteristics. Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by rapid-urease examination of antral biopsies at upper Gastro-intestinal endoscopy. The sample population of dyspeptic patients attending the Endoscopy Unit for upper GI endoscopy yielded 242 patients of which 47.5% were females. The age distribution of H. pylori-infection was even across most age - groups, ranging from 69.2% (61 - 70) years to 80% (21 - 30) years. Helicobacter pylori prevalence decreased across areas mapping to the three residential classes in accordance with increasing affluence with rural areas having the highest prevalence. The unemployed and patients in farming had relatively high Helicobacter pylori infection rates of 92.3% and 91.7% respectively. Helicobacter pylori is endemic in Ghana but the persistently high prevalence across age groups despite significant community anti-microbial use suggests likely recrudescence or re-infection from multiple sources in a developing country. Socio-cultural factors such as residential class and farming may be facilitating factors for its continued prevalence.

  12. Rosacea and Helicobacter pylori: links and risks

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    Lazaridou E

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Lazaridou,1 Chrysovalantis Korfitis,2 Christina Kemanetzi,1 Elena Sotiriou,1 Zoe Apalla,1 Efstratios Vakirlis,1 Christina Fotiadou,1 Aimilios Lallas,1 Demetrios Ioannides1 1First Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Dermatology, 401 General Army Hospital, Athens, Greece Abstract: Rosacea is a chronic skin disease characterized by facial erythema and telangiectasia. Despite the fact that many hypotheses have been proposed, its etiology remains unknown. In the present review, the possible link and clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of rosacea are being sought. A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed using the terms “rosacea”, “H.pylori”, “gastrointestinal disorders and H.pylori”, “microorganisms and rosacea”, “pathogenesis and treatment of rosacea”, and “risk factors of rosacea”, and selected publications were studied and referenced in text. Although a possible pathogenetic link between H. pylori and rosacea is advocated by many authors, evidence is still interpreted differently by others. We conclude that further studies are needed in order to fully elucidate the pathogenesis of rosacea. Keywords: eradication, Helicobacter pylori, pathogenesis, rosacea

  13. Update on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection. Position paper from the Catalan Society of Digestology.

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    Sánchez Delgado, Jordi; García-Iglesias, Pilar; Titó, Llúcia; Puig, Ignasi; Planella, Montse; Gené, Emili; Saló, Joan; Martínez-Cerezo, Francesc; Molina-Infante, Javier; Gisbert, Javier P; Calvet, Xavier

    2018-04-01

    More than 30 years after its discovery, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection remains the most common cause of gastric and duodenal diseases. H. pylori is the leading cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric MALT lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Several consensuses have recently been published on the management of H. pylori infection. The general guidelines of the Spanish consensus, the Toronto Consensus and the Maastricht V Consensus of 2016 are similar but concrete recommendations can vary significantly. In addition, the recommendations of some of these consensuses are decidedly complex. This position paper from the Catalan Society of Digestology is an update of evidence-based recommendations on the management and treatment of H. pylori infection. The aim of this document is to review this information in order to make recommendations for routine clinical practice that are simple, specific and easily applied to our setting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori Adenotonsillar Colonization and Frequency of Adenotonsillitis in Children

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    Oğuz Güçlü

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are insufficient data in the literature on the presence of Helicobacter pylori in tonsil and adenoid tissue of patients with only airway obstruction. This study examined the presence of H. pylori in surgical cases with airway obstruction or recurrent infection. Aims: To investigate the relationship between H. pylori adenotonsillar colonisation and the frequency of adenotonsillitis and to compare paediatric and adult patients according to H. pylori tonsillar colonisation. Study Design: Prospective clinical trial. Methods: Patients scheduled for adenoidectomy or tonsillectomy were classified into three groups based on indications: paediatric infection (n=29, paediatric obstruction (n=29 and adult infection (n=12. Tissue samples obtained from patients were examined for the presence of H. pylori by culture, rapid urease test and polymerase chain reaction. Results: Forty-nine tonsil tissues were examined. Positive results were found in two specimens with the rapid urease test (4.1% and three with polymerase chain reaction examination (6.1%. Only three positive polymerase chain reaction results (5.8% were identified in 52 adenoid tissue samples. There were no statistically significant differences in the presence of H. pylori between paediatric infection and obstruction groups or between paediatric infection and adult infection groups. Conclusion: In our study, there was a low incidence of H. pylori colonisation in tonsil and adenoid tissues. Regarding H. pylori colonisation, there was no significant difference between paediatric infection and obstruction groups. Also, no significant difference was found between adult and paediatric cases.

  15. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors in patients with benign peptic ulcer disease

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    Depender Kumar Timshina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess and compare the risk factors in patients with benign gastric and duodenal ulcers and to correlate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in benign peptic ulcer disease. Methods: A total of 30 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer disease were included in this study after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Their clinical profile and endoscopic findings were noted. Antral biopsies were subjected to histopathological examination and urease test for detection of H. pylori. Results were correlated. The study was cleared by the Institute Research Council and the Ethics committee. Results: The male: female ratio was 11:4. Overall, H. pylori infection was prevalent in 93.3% of the patients. Patients who took spicy food had a significantly higher rate of H. pylori positivity (P=0.04. Smoking, alcohol intake and NSAIDs did not affect H. pylori status in patients. There was no significant association between the site of the ulcer and H. pylori infection. Conclusions: Based on our observations we conclude that prevalence of H. pylori infection is similar in duodenal and gastric ulcers and intake of spicy food is a significant risk factor.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and dementia: can actual data reinforce the hypothesis of a causal association?

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    Adriani, A; Fagoonee, S; De Angelis, C; Altruda, F; Pellicano, R

    2014-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is involved in the development of several gastroduodenal diseases. Since the latest decade, several studies have reported on the link between chronic H. pylori infection and a variety of extragastric manifestations, including dementia. To identify the publications on the association between H. pylori and dementia, a MEDLINE search was conducted. Although case-control studies reported controversial data, a recent longitudinal population-based cohort study found that after 20 years of follow-up, 28.9% of H. pylori-positive versus 21.1% of H. pylori-negative subjects developed dementia. After correction for confounding factors, the infection was significantly associated with higher risk of developing dementia (P=0.04). Moreover, in another study evaluating the effect of H. pylori eradication on the progression of dementia in Alzheimer's disease patients with peptic ulcer, the cure of the bacterium was associated with a decreased risk of dementia progression compared to persistent infection. To date, defining H. pylori as a target for prevention or treatment of dementia remains a topic with much controversy but of essence, as any relationship would reduce, due to the cost-effectiveness of the therapy, a burden on the National Health Care budget. The need for extensive studies with appropriate epidemiological and clinical approaches is crucial to investigate a potential causal relationship.

  17. Performance of a Multiplex Serological Helicobacter pylori Assay on a Novel Microfluidic Assay Platform

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    Angela Filomena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori occurs in 50% of the world population, and is associated with the development of ulcer and gastric cancer. Serological diagnostic tests indicate an H. pylori infection by detecting antibodies directed against H. pylori proteins. In addition to line blots, multiplex assay platforms provide smart solutions for the simultaneous analysis of antibody responses towards several H. pylori proteins. We used seven H. pylori proteins (FliD, gGT, GroEL, HpaA, CagA, VacA, and HP0231 and an H. pylori lysate for the development of a multiplex serological assay on a novel microfluidic platform. The reaction limited binding regime in the microfluidic channels allows for a short incubation time of 35 min. The developed assay showed very high sensitivity (99% and specificity (100%. Besides sensitivity and specificity, the technical validation (intra-assay CV = 3.7 ± 1.2% and inter-assay CV = 5.5 ± 1.2% demonstrates that our assay is also a robust tool for the analysis of the H. pylori-specific antibody response. The integration of the virulence factors CagA and VacA allow for the assessment of the risk for gastric cancer development. The short assay time and the performance of the platform shows the potential for implementation of such assays in a clinical setting.

  18. Lon protease affects the RdxA nitroreductase activity and metronidazole susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori.

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    Tu, I-Fan; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Yang, Feng-Ling; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    The lon gene of Helicobacter pylori strains is constitutively expressed during growth. However, virtually nothing is understood concerning the role of Lon in H. pylori. This study examined the function and physiological role of Lon in H. pylori (HpLon) using a trapping approach to identify putative Lon binding partners in the bacterium. Protease-deficient Lon was expressed and served as the bait in trapping approach to capture the interacting partners in H. pylori. The antibiotic susceptibility of wild-type and lon derivative mutants was determined by the E test trips and the disc diffusion assay. The effect of HpLon on RdxA activity was detected the change in NADPH oxidation and metronidazole reduction by spectrophotometer. Lon in Helicobacter pylori (HpLon) interacting partners are mostly associated with metronidazole activation. lon mutant presents more susceptible to metronidazole than that of the wild type, and this phenotype is recovered by complementation of the wild-type Lon. We found that the ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities (AAA(+) ) module of HpLon causes a decrease in both NADPH oxidase and Mtz reductase activity in RdxA, a major Mtz-activating enzyme in H. pylori. Metronidazole resistance of H. pylori causes the serious medical problem worldwide. In this study, HpLon is involved in metronidazole susceptibility among H. pylori strains. We provide the evidence that HpLon alters RdxA activity in vitro. The decrease in metronidazole activation caused by HpLon is possibly prior to accumulate mutation in rdxA gene before the metronidazole-resistant strains to be occurred. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

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    António M. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  20. Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal pathology: New threats of the old friend

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    Sechi Leonardo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. It infects over 50% of the worlds' population, however, only a small subset of infected people experience H. pylori-associated illnesses. Associations with disease-specific factors remain enigmatic years after the genome sequences were deciphered. Infection with strains of Helicobacter pylori that carry the cytotoxin-associated antigen A (cagA gene is associated with gastric carcinoma. Recent studies revealed mechanisms through which the cagA protein triggers oncopathogenic activities. Other candidate genes such as some members of the so-called plasticity region cluster are also implicated to be associated with carcinoma of stomach. Study of the evolution of polymorphisms and sequence variation in H. pylori populations on a global basis has provided a window into the history of human population migration and co-evolution of this pathogen with its host. Possible symbiotic relationships were debated since the discovery of this pathogen. The debate has been further intensified as some studies have posed the possibility that H. pylori infection may be beneficial in some humans. This assumption is based on increased incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD, Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus following H. pylori eradication in some countries. The contribution of comparative genomics to our understanding of the genome organisation and diversity of H. pylori and its pathophysiological importance to human healthcare is exemplified in this review.

  1. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Anemia in Taiwanese Adults

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    Hsiang-Yao Shih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA are common in adults. Although the most common causes of IDA usually arise from the gastrointestinal tract, the association between chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and anemia remains unclear. Aim. To evaluate the association of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and IDA. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 882 patients from January 2010 to April 2013. The status of Helicobacter pylori (H.p infection was confirmed and blood samples from the same participants were taken on the same day to check the level of hemoglobin, serum iron, ferritin, and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC. Results. No significant difference was noted from the demographic data. The average level of hemoglobin (Hb was not different between negative and positive groups, pos 13.57 g/dL versus neg 13.65 g/dL (P=0.699. Although the levels of serum IDA related parameters were expected in positive group (lower serum iron and ferritin and higher TIBC these differences did not reach statistical significance (P=0.824 for iron, P=0.360 for ferritin, and P=0.252 for TIBC. Conclusion. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is not attributed to IDA. The levels of hemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin, and TIBC remain unaffected after chronic H.p infection. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to prove the association.

  2. Genetic relationships between clinical and non-clinical strains of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1A as revealed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and multilocus restriction typing

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    Virdi Jugsharan S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic relationships among 81 strains of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A isolated from clinical and non-clinical sources were discerned by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE and multilocus restriction typing (MLRT using six loci each. Such studies may reveal associations between the genotypes of the strains and their sources of isolation. Results All loci were polymorphic and generated 62 electrophoretic types (ETs and 12 restriction types (RTs. The mean genetic diversity (H of the strains by MLEE and MLRT was 0.566 and 0.441 respectively. MLEE (DI = 0.98 was more discriminatory and clustered Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A strains into four groups, while MLRT (DI = 0.77 identified two distinct groups. BURST (Based Upon Related Sequence Types analysis of the MLRT data suggested aquatic serotype O:6,30-6,31 isolates to be the ancestral strains from which, clinical O:6,30-6,31 strains might have originated by host adaptation and genetic change. Conclusion MLEE revealed greater genetic diversity among strains of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A and clustered strains in four groups, while MLRT grouped the strains into two groups. BURST analysis of MLRT data nevertheless provided newer insights into the probable evolution of clinical strains from aquatic strains.

  3. Toxin Gene Analysis of a Variant Strain of Clostridium difficile That Causes Human Clinical Disease

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    Sambol, Susan P.; Merrigan, Michelle M.; Lyerly, David; Gerding, Dale N.; Johnson, Stuart

    2000-01-01

    A toxin variant strain of Clostridium difficile was isolated from two patients with C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD), one of whom died from extensive pseudomembranous colitis. This strain, identified by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) as type CF2, was not detected by an immunoassay for C. difficile toxin A. Culture supernatants of CF2 failed to elicit significant enterotoxic activity in the rabbit ileal loop assay but did produce atypical cytopathic effects in cell culture assay. Southern hybridization, PCR amplification, and DNA sequence analyses were performed on the toxin A (tcdA) and toxin B (tcdB) genes of type CF2 isolate 5340. Type CF2 5340 tcdA exhibited a 1,821-bp truncation, due to three deletions in the 3′ end of the gene, and a point mutation in the 5′ end of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon at tcdA position 139. Type CF2 5340 tcdB exhibited multiple nucleotide base substitutions in the 5′ end of the gene compared to tcdB of the standard toxigenic strain VPI 10463. Type CF2 5340 toxin gene nucleotide sequences and deduced amino acid sequences showed a strong resemblance to those of the previously described variant C. difficile strain 1470, a strain reported to have reduced pathogenicity and no association with clinical illness in humans. REA of strain 1470 identified this strain as a distinct type (CF1) within the same REA group as the closely related type CF2. A review of our clinical-isolate collection identified five additional patients infected with type CF2, three of whom had documented CDAD. PCR amplification of the 3′ end of tcdA demonstrated identical 1.8-kb deletions in all seven type CF2 isolates. REA type CF2 is a toxin variant strain of C. difficile that retains the ability to cause disease in humans but is not detected in clinical immunoassays for toxin A. PMID:10992443

  4. cagA Status and Eradication Treatment Outcome of Anti-Helicobacter pylori Triple Therapies in Patients with Nonulcer Dyspepsia

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    Broutet, Nathalie; Marais, Armelle; Lamouliatte, Hervé; de Mascarel, Antoine; Samoyeau, Roland; Salamon, Roger; Mégraud, Francis

    2001-01-01

    The differences in eradication rates reported in clinical trials aiming to cure Helicobacter pylori infection cannot be entirely explained by the type of regimen, bacterial resistance, or lack of compliance. Using data from a clinical trial, a logistic regression model was constructed to determine whether cagA status, assessed by PCR, affects the outcome of eradication. Resistance to clarithromycin (10% of the strains) predicted failure perfectly. In the model (n = 156), a cagA-lacking strain (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], (1.1 to 4.7), tobacco smoking OR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.3 to 7.0), and a double dose of proton pump inhibitor in the treatment regimen (OR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.7) were associated with the treatment outcome. The exact role of cagA in the outcome of H. pylori eradication therapy has not been explored. However, the type of histological lesions which it causes in the gastric mucosa may be implicated. Regardless of the mechanism involved, cagA status is a good predictive marker of eradication outcome. PMID:11283049

  5. Antifungal activity of terrestrial Streptomyces rochei strain HF391 against clinical azole -resistant Aspergillus fumigatus

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    Hadizadeh, S; Forootanfar, H; Shahidi Bonjar, GH; Falahati Nejad, M; Karamy Robati, A; Ayatollahi Mousavi, SA; Amirporrostami, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Actinomycetes have been discovered as source of antifungal compounds that are currently in clinical use. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) due to Aspergillus fumigatus has been identified as individual drug-resistant Aspergillus spp. to be an emerging pathogen opportunities a global scale. This paper described the antifungal activity of one terrestrial actinomycete against the clinically isolated azole-resistant A. fumigatus. Materials and Methods: Soil samples were collected from various locations of Kerman, Iran. Thereafter, the actinomycetes were isolated using starch-casein-nitrate-agar medium and the most efficient actinomycetes (capable of inhibiting A. fumigatus) were screened using agar block method. In the next step, the selected actinomycete was cultivated in starch-casein- broth medium and the inhibitory activity of the obtained culture broth was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Results: The selected actinomycete, identified as Streptomyces rochei strain HF391, could suppress the growth of A. fumigatus isolates which was isolated from the clinical samples of patients treated with azoles. This strain showed higher inhibition zones on agar diffusion assay which was more than 15 mm. Conclusion: The obtained results of the present study introduced Streptomyces rochei strain HF391 as terrestrial actinomycete that can inhibit the growth of clinically isolated A. fumigatus. PMID:28680984

  6. Molecular Typing of Acinetobacter Baumannii Clinical Strains in Tehran by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

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    Neda Farahani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective : Currently, Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen insofar as its hospital outbreaks have been described from various geographical areas. Since the discrimination of strains within a species is important for delineating nosocomial outbreaks, this study was conducted with the aim of genotyping the A. baumannii clinical strains in Tehran via the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE method, which is the most accurate method used for the typing of bacterial species.   Materials & methods: This study was performed on 70 isolates of acinetobacter baumannii isolated from patients from Baqiyatallah, Rasoole Akram, and Milad hospitals in Tehran. Cultural and biochemical methods were used for the identification of the isolates in species level, and then susceptibility tests were carried out on 50 isolates of A. baumannii using the disk diffusion method. The PFGE method was performed on the isolates by Apa I restriction enzyme. Finally, the results of the PFGE were analyzed. Result: Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from hospitals in Tehran showed seven different genetic patterns, two of which were sporadic . Also, genotypic profiles were different in each hospital, and different patterns of genetic resistance to common antibiotics were observed. Conclusion: A lthough diversity was observed among the strains of A. baumannii by the PFGE method in Tehran, no epidemic strains were found among them.  

  7. Helicobacter Pylori Related Functional Dyspepsia in a Defined Malaysian Population

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    Nafeeza, M.I.; Isa, M.R.; Kudva, M.V.; Ishak, M.S.; Mazlam, M.Z.; Haron, A.; Najib, R.; Shahimi, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia among the three main races in Malaysia. Gastric antral biopsies from 233 (98 males, 135 females; age range: 17–75 years, mean age 39.5 years) patients attending the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) gastroenterology clinic were assessed for the presence of H. pylori by culture and histology. About a third of the cases (79 of 233 (34%); 34 males, 45 females; mean age 42.6 yrs) were positive for H...

  8. Development of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the stomach. However, gastric cancer only develops in a minority of infected individuals. Such clinical diversity is caused by variations in the interactions between H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and environmental factors. Based on evidence from three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori has a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. Two large-scale, prospective, epidemiological studies have recently been reported in Japan and have confirmed that H. pylori infection constitutes a high risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, at least in males. In order to obtain evidence that eradication of H. pylori leads to a reduction in the occurrence of gastric cancer, reversibility of precancerous lesions, gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia should be proven after eradication treatment. A biopsy specimen from the lesser curvature of the corpus is the most sensitive for evaluating the regression of gastric atrophy on histology, and the evaluation needs be conducted at least 13 months after treatment. In a Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens, it has been demonstrated that H. pylori can lead to the development of gastric cancer. Experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori interact with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster; it encodes the type IV secretion machinery system forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird phenotype, a growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are

  9. The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a potential acetone carboxylase that enhances its ability to colonize mice

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    Weinberg Michael V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and is the etiological agent of peptic ulcer disease. All three H. pylori strains that have been sequenced to date contain a potential operon whose products share homology with the subunits of acetone carboxylase (encoded by acxABC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 and Rhodobacter capsulatus strain B10. Acetone carboxylase catalyzes the conversion of acetone to acetoacetate. Genes upstream of the putative acxABC operon encode enzymes that convert acetoacetate to acetoacetyl-CoA, which is metabolized further to generate two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Results To determine if the H. pylori acxABC operon has a role in host colonization the acxB homolog in the mouse-adapted H. pylori SS1 strain was inactivated with a chloramphenicol-resistance (cat cassette. In mouse colonization studies the numbers of H. pylori recovered from mice inoculated with the acxB:cat mutant were generally one to two orders of magnitude lower than those recovered from mice inoculated with the parental strain. A statistical analysis of the data using a Wilcoxin Rank test indicated the differences in the numbers of H. pylori isolated from mice inoculated with the two strains were significant at the 99% confidence level. Levels of acetone associated with gastric tissue removed from uninfected mice were measured and found to range from 10–110 μmols per gram wet weight tissue. Conclusion The colonization defect of the acxB:cat mutant suggests a role for the acxABC operon in survival of the bacterium in the stomach. Products of the H. pylori acxABC operon may function primarily in acetone utilization or may catalyze a related reaction that is important for survival or growth in the host. H. pylori encounters significant levels of acetone in the stomach which it could use as a potential electron donor for microaerobic respiration.

  10. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and their role in peptic ulcer diseases in Turkey.

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    Tuncel, I E; Hussein, N R; Bolek, B K; Arikan, S; Salih, B A

    2010-01-01

    The role of virulence factors present in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains and the characterization of such factors being predictive of specific disease is still not clear. In this study, the cagA, vacA alleles and the recently characterized vacA i-region and dupA and their association with the severity of the disease was determined. Antral biopsies from 91patients with peptic ulcer (PU) (n = 41), gastritis (n = 48) and gastric cancer (GC) (n = 2) were analyzed for the presence of H. pylori by the CLO-test and PCR. A 79/91 (86%) patients were positive for H. pylori by either PCR or by both PCR and CLO-test. PCR-based typing of H. pylori isolates was performed on DNA extracted directly from biopsy samples. The cagA+ strains were found more likely to be associated with vacA s1 than s2. The vacA i1 allele detected in 16/23 (70%) of samples had significant association with duodenal ulcers than those 16/37 (44%) of gastritis (P dupA and duodenal ulcer. This study provided more evidence that the vacA i1 allele is one of the virulence factors of H. pylori that had significant association with severe outcome.

  11. Significant association of the dupA gene of Helicobacter pylori with duodenal ulcer development in a South-east Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Jawed; Maiti, Sankar; Ghosh, Prachetash; De, Ronita; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Das, Suryasnata; Macaden, Ragini; Devarbhavi, Harshad; Ramamurthy, T; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2012-09-01

    A novel virulence factor, duodenal ulcer-promoting gene A (dupA), in Helicobacter pylori has been found to be associated with disease in certain populations but not in others. This study analysed a South-east Indian population as part of the debate about the relevance of dupA for the prediction of clinical outcomes. A total of 140 H. pylori strains isolated from duodenal ulcer (DU) (n = 83) and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) patients (n = 57) were screened by PCR and dot-blot hybridization to determine the presence of the ORFs jhp0917 and jhp0918. Part of jhp0917-jhp0918 was sequenced to search for the C/T insertion that characterizes dupA and the levels of dupA transcripts were also assessed. The PCR and dot-blot results indicated the presence of jhp0917 and jhp0918 in 37.3 % (31/83) and 12.2 % (7/57) of H. pylori strains isolated from DU and NUD patients, respectively. Sequencing analysis showed insertion of a C at nt 1386 in the 3' region of jhp0917, forming the dupA gene in 35 strains. RT-PCR analysis detected the dupA transcript in 28 of these 35 strains. The expression level of the dupA transcript varied from strain to strain, as shown by real-time PCR. The results demonstrated that analysis based on PCR only for dupA may produce an erroneous interpretation. The prevalence of dupA was significantly greater among strains isolated from patients with DU than from patients with NUD in this population (P = 0.001, odds ratio = 4.26, confidence interval = 1.60-11.74). Based on these findings, dupA can be considered a biomarker for DU patients in India. The reported discrepancies for this putative virulence marker in different populations may be due to the genome plasticity of H. pylori.

  12. DETECTION OF Helicobacter pylori IN GASTRIC MUCOSA OF SHEEP: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

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    A. Rella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is an organism widespread in humans and sometimes responsible for serious illnesses. It has been hypothesized the existence of animal reservoirs, and that the infection route by H. pylori involves multiple pathways including food-borne transmission as the microorganism has been detected from sheep, goat and cow milk. This work reports the preliminary results of a survey conducted in order to investigate the presence of H. pylori in gastric mucosa of sheep slaughtered in Apulia region (Italy employing a Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR assay for the detection of the phosphoglucosamine mutase gene (glmM, as screening method followed by conventional bacteriological isolation. Out of the 50 gastric mucosa samples examined, 3 (6% resulted positive for the presence of glmMgene, but at this time no strains were isolated. The results deserve further investigations to asses the role of ruminants as possible reservoirs of H. pylori.

  13. Elevated interleukin-32 expression is associated with Helicobacter pylori-related gastritis.

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    Liu-Sheng Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin-32 (IL-32 is a recently discovered proinflammatory cytokine involved in inflammatory diseases. We investigated the expression of IL-32 and its regulation mechanism in the inflammatory response of patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection. DESIGN AND METHODS: IL-32 mRNA and protein expression in gastric tissues was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. The regulation of IL-32 in human gastric epithelia cell line AGS was investigated by different cytokine stimulation and different H. pylori strain infection. RESULTS: Gastric IL-32 mRNA and protein expression were elevated in patients with H. pylori infection and positively correlated with gastritis. In H. pylori-infected patients, the mRNA level of IL-32 was also correlated with that of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α. In vitro IL-1β and TNF-α could upregulate IL-32 mRNA and protein level in AGS cells, which was dependent on NF-κB signal pathway. The regulation of IL-32 expression in response to H. pylori-infection could be weakened by using neutralizing antibodies to block IL-1β and TNF-α. Moreover, H. pylori-infected AGS cells also induced IL-32 mRNA and protein expression, which was dependent on CagA. CONCLUSIONS: IL-32 level is elevated in patients with H. pylori infection and its expression is regulated by proinflammatory stimuli, suggesting that IL-32 may play a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related gastritis.

  14. Early or late antibiotic intervention prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhua; Lee, Dong Soo; Morrissey, Rhiannon; Aponte-Pieras, Jose R; Rogers, Arlin B; Moss, Steven F

    2014-12-01

    H. pylori infection causes gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Eradicating H. pylori prevents ulcers, but to what extent this prevents cancer remains unknown, especially if given after intestinal metaplasia has developed. H. pylori infected wild-type (WT) mice do not develop cancer, but mice lacking the tumor suppressor p27 do so, thus providing an experimental model of H. pylori-induced cancer. We infected p27-deficient mice with H. pylori strain SS1 at 6-8 weeks of age. Persistently H. pylori-infected WT C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Mice in the eradication arms received antimicrobial therapy (omeprazole, metronidazole and clarithromycin) either "early" (at 15 weeks post infection, WPI) or "late" at 45 WPI. At 70 WPI, mice were euthanized for H. pylori determination, histopathology and cytokine/chemokine expression. Persistently infected mice developed premalignant lesions including high-grade dysplasia, whereas those given antibiotics did not. Histologic activity scores in the eradication groups were similar to each other, and were significantly decreased compared with controls for inflammation, epithelial defects, hyperplasia, metaplasia, atrophy and dysplasia. IP-10 and MIG levels in groups that received antibiotics were significantly lower than controls. There were no significant differences in expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α or MIP-1β among the three groups. Thus, H. pylori eradication given either early or late after infection significantly attenuated gastric inflammation, gastric atrophy, hyperplasia, and dysplasia in the p27-deficient mice model of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, irrespective of the timing of antibiotic administration. This was associated with reduced expression of IP-10 and MIG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxyntic gastric atrophy in Helicobacter pylori gastritis is distinct from autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Varbanova, Mariya; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Reinhold, Dirk; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Jechorek, Doerthe; Weigt, Jochen; Link, Alexander; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To assess characteristics of oxyntic gastric atrophy (OGA) in autoimmune gastritis (AIG) compared with OGA as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients undergoing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy from July 2011 to October 2014 were prospectively included (N=452). Gastric biopsies were obtained for histology and H. pylori testing. Serum gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII and antibodies against H. pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A protein were determined in all patients. Antibodies against parietal cells and intrinsic factor were determined in patients with advanced (moderate to severe) OGA. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were calculated for serum biomarkers and compared with histology. Overall, 34 patients (8.9%) had advanced OGA by histology (22 women, age 61±15 years). Current or past H. pylori infection and AIG were present in 14/34 and 22/34 patients, respectively. H. pylori-negative AIG patients (N=18) were more likely to have another autoimmune disease (OR 6.3; 95% CI 1.3 to 29.8), severe corpus atrophy (OR 10.1; 95% CI 1.9 to 54.1) and corpus intestinal metaplasia (OR 26.9; 95% CI 5.3 to 136.5) compared with H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA. Antrum atrophy was present in 39% of H. pylori-negative AIG patients. The diagnostic performance of G17, PG I and PGI/II was excellent for AIG patients (AUC=0.83, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively), but limited for H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA (AUC=0.62, 0.75 and 0.67, respectively). H. pylori-negative AIG has a distinct clinical, morphological and serological phenotype compared with advanced OGA in H. pylori gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sugano (Kentaro); J. Tack (Jan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); D.Y. Graham (David Y.); E. El-Omar; S. Miura (Soichiro); K. Haruma (Ken); M. Asaka (Masahiro); N. Uemura (Naomi); P. Malfertheiner

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate

  17. Importance of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA status for the efficacy of antibiotic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.-J. van Doorn (Leen-Jan); P.M. Schneeberger (Peter); N. Nouhan (N.); A.P. Plaisier (Anton); W.G.V. Quint (Wim); W.A. de Boer (Wink)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBackground - Virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori are associated with peptic ulcer disease and may be also associated with the efficacy of treatment. Aims - To determine the relation between the vacA and the cagA status of H pylori, clinical disease, and treatment outcome. Patients -

  18. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.

  19. High Seroprevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Inmates: A Case Control Study in a Northern Mexican City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Saenz-Soto, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in inmates has not been previously studied. Therefore, we determine the seroepidemiology of H. pylori infection in inmates. Methods Through a case-control study, inmates from a state correctional facility in Durango, Mexico and subjects without incarceration of the same city were examined for the presence of anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, incarceration, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the inmates was also investigated. Results Antibodies to H. pylori were found in 140 (83.3%) of 168 inmates and in 101 (60.1%) of 168 controls. Seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies was significantly higher in inmates than in controls (OR = 3.32; 95% CI: 1.93 - 5.71; P = 0.000002). The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was not influenced by gender, age, or socioeconomic status of inmates. Seropositivity to H. pylori was found in 3 of 3 inmates with peptic ulcer and in 1 of 2 inmates with gastritis. The seroprevalence of H. pylori exposure was high regardless the jail section, duration (years) in incarceration and number of incarcerations. Multivariate analysis revealed that H. pylori exposure was positively associated with having tattoos (OR = 3.34; 95% CI: 1.14 - 9.70; P = 0.02), and negatively associated with drug abuse (OR = 0.28; 95% CI: 0.11 - 0.70; P = 0.007). Conclusions Seroprevalence of H. pylori exposure in inmates is higher than those found in non-incarcerated people and other populations in the region. Results indicate that inmates may represent a new risk group for H. pylori exposure. Results warrant for further research on the potential role of incarceration and behavioral features of inmates for H. pylori infection. PMID:27785257

  20. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification as a Fast Noninvasive Method of Helicobacter pylori Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Farideh; Abiri, Ramin; Aryan, Ehsan; Ahmadi Jouybari, Touraj; Navabi, Jafar; Alvandi, Amirhooshang

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is etiologically associated with some important health problems such as gastric cancer. Because of the high clinical importance of H. pylori infection, development of a noninvasive test for the detection of H. pylori is desirable. In this study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) targeted ureC of H. pylori was evaluated on 100 stool specimens and compared with a stool antigen test. Culture and rapid urease test were considered as gold standards. The overall detection rate of the fecal antigen test and LAMP was 58% and 82%, respectively. The analytical sensitivity of the fecal antigen test and LAMP was 500 and 10 H. pylori cells/g and 10 fg DNA/reaction, which is equal to six H. pylori genome. LAMP technique has been characterized by high sensitivity and low detection limit for the detection of H. pylori in stool specimen. Clinical diagnostic performance of LAMP was better than the stool antigen test. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. In vitro and in vivo bactericidal activity of Tinospora sagittata (Oliv.) Gagnep. var. craveniana (S.Y.Hu) Lo and its main effective component, palmatine, against porcine Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Rong, Qian; Xu, Min; Dong, Qi; Zhang, Yuli; Li, Yinglun; Ye, Gang; Zhao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Tinospora sagittata (Oliv.) Gagnep. var. craveniana (S.Y.Hu) Lo (TSG) is a traditional Chinese herb that has been used for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infection and has anti-bacterial and anti-ulcer activity. Our study investigated the bactericidal effects of TSG and its major component, palmatine, against a Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strain isolated from pig and the standard strain H. pylori SS1 in vitro and in vivo. Methods H. pylori was isolated from pig and na...

  2. Cell-cycle inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-asparaginase.

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    Claudia Scotti

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application.

  3. Effect of propolis in gastric disorders: inhibition studies on the growth of Helicobacter pylori and production of its urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltas, Nimet; Karaoglu, Sengul Alpay; Tarakci, Cemre; Kolayli, Sevgi

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in alternative approaches to inhibit Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and thus treat many stomach diseases. Propolis is a pharmaceutical mixture containing many natural bioactive substances. The aim of this study was to use propolis samples to treat H. pylori. The anti-H. pylori and anti-urease activities of 15 different ethanolic propolis extracts (EPEs) were tested. The total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents of the EPE were also measured. The agar-well diffusion assay was carried out on H. pylori strain J99 and the inhibition zones were measured and compared with standards. All propolis extracts showed high inhibition of H. pylori J99, with inhibition diameters ranging from 31.0 to 47.0 mm. Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitory activity was measured using the phenol-hypochlorite assay; all EPEs showed significant inhibition against the enzyme, with inhibition concentrations (IC 50 ; mg/mL) ranging from 0.260 to 1.525 mg/mL. The degree of inhibition was related to the phenolic content of the EPE. In conclusion, propolis extract was found to be a good inhibitor that can be used in H. pylori treatment to improve human health.

  4. Detection of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori by polymerase chain reaction using residual samples from rapid urease test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sik Jeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, which corresponds to a high infection rate. Furthermore, the incidence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori has increased with the recent rise in use of antibiotics for H. pylori elimination, suggesting growing treatment failures. Aim: The study was aimed to assess the use of residual samples from rapid urease test (RUT for biomolecular testing as an effective and accurate method to detect antibiotic-resistant H. pylori. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective study performed using data obtained from medical records of previously isolated H. pylori strains. Materials and Methods: RUT was conducted for 5440 biopsy samples from individuals who underwent health examination in South Korea. Subsequently, 469 RUT residual samples were randomly selected and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect antibiotic-resistant H. pylori. Statistical Analysis Used: The Chi-square test was used to analyse categorical data. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed a concordance between the results of PCR and conventional RUT in 450 of 469 samples, suggesting that the H. pylori PCR test is a time- and cost-effective detection method. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that PCR test can aid physicians to prescribe the appropriate antibiotics at the time of diagnosis, thus preventing the reduction in H. pylori eradication due to antibiotic resistance, averting progression to serious diseases and increasing the treatment success rate.

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is significantly high in rural and suburban population of Ernakulam district, Kerala. Early detection and prompt treatment are essential for prevention of serious complications. Keywords: Gastrointestinal complications, Helicobacter pylori infection, Histopathological ...

  6. HELICOBACTER PYLORI: THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF PEPTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Helicobacter pylori by treatment with antibiotics in peptic ulcer patients resulted in the healing of the ulcer. ... and gastric cancers. .... H. pyloris cause chronic active gastritis in humans and ... of the night when the stomach is empty and is.

  7. The Genetic Analysis of an Acinetobacter johnsonii Clinical Strain Evidenced the Presence of Horizontal Genetic Transfer.

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    Sabrina Montaña

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter johnsonii rarely causes human infections. While most A. johnsonii isolates are susceptible to virtually all antibiotics, strains harboring a variety of β-lactamases have recently been described. An A. johnsonii Aj2199 clinical strain recovered from a hospital in Buenos Aires produces PER-2 and OXA-58. We decided to delve into its genome by obtaining the whole genome sequence of the Aj2199 strain. Genome comparison studies on Aj2199 revealed 240 unique genes and a close relation to strain WJ10621, isolated from the urine of a patient in China. Genomic analysis showed evidence of horizontal genetic transfer (HGT events. Forty-five insertion sequences and two intact prophages were found in addition to several resistance determinants such as blaPER-2, blaOXA-58, blaTEM-1, strA, strB, ereA, sul1, aacC2 and a new variant of blaOXA-211, called blaOXA-498. In particular, blaPER-2 and blaTEM-1 are present within the typical contexts previously described in the Enterobacteriaceae family. These results suggest that A. johnsonii actively acquires exogenous DNA from other bacterial species and concomitantly becomes a reservoir of resistance genes.

  8. Anti-Helicobacter pylori metabolites from Rhizoctonia sp. Cy064, an endophytic fungus in Cynodon dactylon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y M; Li, Y; Liu, J Y; Song, Y C; Tan, R X

    2004-07-01

    A new benzophenone, named rhizoctonic acid (1), together with three known compounds monomethylsulochrin (2), ergosterol (3) and 3beta,5alpha,6beta-trihydroxyergosta-7,22-diene (4) were isolated through bioassay-guided fractionations from the culture of Rhizoctonia sp. (Cy064), an endophytic fungus in the leaf of Cynodon dactylon. The structure of the new acid 1 was elucidated to be 5-hydroxy-2-(2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-4-methylbenzoyl)-3-methoxybenzoic acid by a combination of spectral analyses. Furthermore, the structure of monomethylsulochrin 2 was confirmed by 13C-NMR analysis. All four metabolites were subjected to a more detailed in vitro assessment of their antibacterial action against five clinically isolated and one reference (ATCC 43504) Helicobacter pylori strains.

  9. Association between cagA, vacAi, and dupA genes of Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal pathologies in Chilean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Osses, Esteban; Sáez, Katia; Sanhueza, Enrique; Hebel, Sonja; González, Carlos; Briceño, Carlos; García Cancino, Apolinaria

    2017-09-01

    In addition to the already known cagA gene, novel genetic markers have been associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) virulence: the dupA and vacAi genes. These genes might play an important role as specific markers to determine the clinical outcome of the disease, especially the vacAi gene, which has been expected to be a good marker of severe pathologies like gastric adenocarcinoma. In the present study, the association of cagA, dupA, and vacAi genes with gastroduodenal pathologies in Chilean patients was studied. One hundred and thirty-two patients positive for H. pylori were divided into two groups-non-severe and severe gastric pathologies-and investigated for the presence of cagA, dupA, and vacAi H. pylori virulence genes by PCR. The cagA gene was detected in 20/132 patients (15.2%), the vacAi1 gene was detected in 54/132 patients (40.9%), the vacAi2 gene was detected in 26/132 patients (19.7%), and the dupA gene was detected in 50/132 (37.9%) patients. Logistic regression model analysis showed that the vacAi1 isoform gene in the infected strains and the severity of the diseases outcome were highly associated, causing severe gastric damage that may lead to gastric cancer (p dupA gene was associated significantly with non-severe clinical outcome (p = 0.0032; OR = 0.25; 95% CI 0.09-0.65). In addition, dupA gene exerts protection against severe gastric pathologies induced by vacAi1 by delaying the outcome of the disease by approximately 20 years.

  10. What Do We Do about Helicobacter pylori?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Hawkey

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs cause ulcers by different mechanisms. Under some circumstances, patients infected with H pylori may be less prone to NSAID-associated ulcers than those who are H pylori-negative. Eradication trials have yielded differing results. However, those who have studied patients who have a past history of ulcer disease and are already established on NSAIDs have shown no benefit from H pylori eradication.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of Helicobacter pylori from Malaysia identifies three distinct lineages suggestive of differential evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narender; Mariappan, Vanitha; Baddam, Ramani; Lankapalli, Aditya K; Shaik, Sabiha; Goh, Khean-Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Perkins, Tim; Benghezal, Mohammed; Hasnain, Seyed E; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Marshall, Barry J; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2015-01-01

    The discordant prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and its related diseases, for a long time, fostered certain enigmatic situations observed in the countries of the southern world. Variation in H. pylori infection rates and disease outcomes among different populations in multi-ethnic Malaysia provides a unique opportunity to understand dynamics of host-pathogen interaction and genome evolution. In this study, we extensively analyzed and compared genomes of 27 Malaysian H. pylori isolates and identified three major phylogeographic lineages: hspEastAsia, hpEurope and hpSouthIndia. The analysis of the virulence genes within the core genome, however, revealed a comparable pathogenic potential of the strains. In addition, we identified four genes limited to strains of East-Asian lineage. Our analyses identified a few strain-specific genes encoding restriction modification systems and outlined 311 core genes possibly under differential evolutionary constraints, among the strains representing different ethnic groups. The cagA and vacA genes also showed variations in accordance with the host genetic background of the strains. Moreover, restriction modification genes were found to be significantly enriched in East-Asian strains. An understanding of these variations in the genome content would provide significant insights into various adaptive and host modulation strategies harnessed by H. pylori to effectively persist in a host-specific manner. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Eradication rate of Helicobacter Pylori infection is directly influenced by adherence to therapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotilea, Kallirroi; Mekhael, Joyce; Salame, Assaad; Mahler, Tania; Miendje-Deyi, Veronique Yvette; Cadranel, Samy; Bontems, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Current commonly accepted strategies to eradicate Helicobacter pylori in children are a 10-day sequential treatment or a triple therapy for 7-14 days. To avoid further expensive and possibly risky investigations as well as induction of secondary antimicrobial resistance, a success rate of elimination strategies over 90% in a per-protocol analysis is the target goal but rates observed in clinical trials are lower. Antimicrobial resistance is a well-recognized risk factor for treatment failure; therefore, only a treatment tailored to susceptibility testing should be recommended. Adherence to therapy is also a risk factor for treatment failure but that has been poorly studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of adherence to therapy on the elimination rates obtained with different treatment regimens. Cohort study analysis of children, aged 2-17 years, treated for Helicobacter pylori infection between October 2011 and December 2013. As a routine clinical practice, children infected with a strain susceptible to clarithromycin and to metronidazole received either a sequential regimen or a 10-day triple therapy while children infected with a strain resistant to clarithromycin or metronidazole received a 10-day triple regimen tailored to antimicrobial susceptibility. The eradication rate was assessed by a negative 13 C-urea breath test performed at least 8 weeks after the end of the treatment and adherence evaluated using a diary. One hundred forty-five children (67 girls/78 boys, median age 9.7 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 118 being infected with a strain susceptible to both clarithromycin and metronidazole, 10 with a clarithromycin resistant, and 17 with a metronidazole resistant strain. A sequential regimen was prescribed in 44, a triple therapy containing clarithromycin in 84 and containing metronidazole in 17. Follow-up data were available for 130/145 and clearance of the infection observed in 105 of them. A concordance of more than

  13. ( Asteraceae ) methanol extracts against Helicobacter pylori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol vehicle did not affect H. pylori growth. Conclusion: The observed antibacterial effect of G. glutinosum extracts may be of benefit as an adjuvant treatment of diseases caused by H. pylori. Key words: Gymnosperma glutinosum, Helicobacter pylori, methanol extract, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC).

  14. Helicobacter Pylori : Serological Testing and Treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with dyspepsia and eradication of H. pylori after a non-invasive testing is an integral part of most management guidelines. This study evaluated the benefit of serological testing and treatment of H. pylori in Nigerian patients presenting with uninvestigated dyspepsia.

  15. Novel Functions for Glycosyltransferases Jhp0562 and GalT in Lewis Antigen Synthesis and Variation in Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl, Mary Ann; Kienesberger, Sabine; Blaser, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Lewis (Le) antigens are fucosylated oligosaccharides present in the Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide. Expression of these antigens is believed to be important for H. pylori colonization, since Le antigens also are expressed on the gastric epithelia in humans. A galactosyltransferase encoded by β-(1,3)galT is essential for production of type 1 (Lea and Leb) antigens. The upstream gene jhp0562, which is present in many but not all H. pylori strains, is homologous to β-(1,3)galT but is of ...

  16. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis group strains to cefoxitin, cefoperazone and ticarcillin/clavulanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEIXOTO JÚNIOR Arnaldo Aires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 40 strains of the B. fragilis group was isolated from clinical specimens in two hospital centers in Fortaleza from 1993 to 1997. The most frequently isolated species was Bacteroides fragilis (19 strains and most isolates came from intra-abdominal and wound infections. The susceptibility profile was traced for cefoxitin, cefoperazone and ticarcillin-clavulanate by using the agar dilution reference method. All isolates were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate (128/2mug/ml. Resistance rates of 15 and 70% were detected to cefoxitin (64mug/ml and cefoperazone (64mug/ml, respectively. Such regional results permit a better orientation in choosing this group of antibiotics for prophylaxis and therapy especially in relation to cefoxitin, which is frequently used in the hospital centers studied.

  17. [The antibacterial activity of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum L.) against clinical strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Wasiela, Małgorzata; Głowacka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial properties of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum L.) essential oil against clinical strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibacterial activity of oregano essential oil was investigate against 2 tested and 20 clinical bacterial strains of Escherichia coli and 20 clinical strains o Pseudomonas aeruginosa come from patients with different clinical conditions. The agar dilution method was used for microbial growth inhibition at various concentrations ofoil. Susceptibility testing to antibiotics was carried out using disc-diffusion method. The results of experiments showed that the tested oil was active against all of the clinical strains from both genus of bacteria, but strains of Escherichia coli were more sensitive to tested oil. Essential oil from Origanum heracleoticum L. inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains with different patters of resistance. The obtained outcomes will enable further investigations using oregano essential oil obtained from Origanum heracleoticum L. as alternative antibacterial remedies enhancing healing process in bacterial infections and as an effective means for the prevention of antibiotic-resistant strain development.

  18. Disease association with two Helicobacter pylori duplicate outer membrane protein genes, homB and homA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleastro, Monica; Cordeiro, Rita; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Queiroz, Dulciene; Mégraud, Francis; Monteiro, Lurdes; Ménard, Armelle

    2009-06-22

    homB encodes a Helicobacter pylori outer membrane protein. This gene was previously associated with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and was shown to induce activation of interleukin-8 secretion in vitro, as well as contributing to bacterial adherence. Its 90%-similar gene, homA, was previously correlated with gastritis. The present study aimed to evaluate the gastric disease association with homB and homA, as well as with the H. pylori virulence factors cagA, babA and vacA, in 415 H. pylori strains isolated from patients from East Asian and Western countries. The correlation among these genotypes was also evaluated. Both homB and homA genes were heterogeneously distributed worldwide, with a marked difference between East Asian and Western strains. In Western strains (n = 234, 124 PUD and 110 non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), homB, cagA and vacA s1 were all significantly associated with PUD (p = 0.025, p = 0.014, p = 0.039, respectively), and homA was closely correlated with NUD (p = 0.072). In East Asian strains (n = 138, 73 PUD and 65 NUD), homB was found more frequently than homA, and none of these genes was associated with the clinical outcome. Overall, homB was associated with the presence of cagA (p = 0.043) and vacA s1 (p homA was found more frequently in cagA-negative (p = 0.062) and vacA s2 (p homA copy number were observed, with a clear geographical specificity, suggesting an involvement of these genes in host adaptation. A correlation between the homB two-copy genotype and PUD was also observed, emphasizing the role of homB in the virulence of the strain. The global results suggest that homB and homA contribute to the determination of clinical outcome.

  19. Synergistic effect of eugenol with Colistin against clinical isolated Colistin-resistant Escherichia coli strains

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    Yi-ming Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial infections have become more challenging to treat due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Combined antibiotics prove to be a relatively effective method to control such resistant strains. This study aim to investigate synergistic activity of eugenol combined with colistin against a collection of clinical isolated Escherichia coli (E.coli strains, and to evaluate potential interaction. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI of the bacteria were determined by disk diffusion assay, broth microdilution method and checkerboard assay, respectively. The mcr-1 mRNA expression was measured by Real-time PCR. To predict possible interactions between eugenol and MCR-1, molecular docking assay was taken. Results For total fourteen strains including eight colistin-resistant strains, eugenol was determined with MIC values of 4 to 8 μg/mL. Checkerboard dilution test suggested that eugenol exhibited synergistic activity when combined with colistin (FICI ranging from 0.375 to 0.625. Comparison analysis of Real-time PCR showed that synergy could significantly down-regulate expression of mcr-1 gene. A metal ion coordination bond with catalytic zinc atom and a hydrogen bond with crucial amino acid residue Ser284 of MCR-1 were observed after molecular docking, indicating antibacterial activity and direct molecular interactions of eugenol with MCR-1 protein. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that eugenol exhibited synergistic effect with colistin and enhanced its antimicrobial activity. This might further contribute to the antibacterial actions against colistin-resistant E.coli strains. Graphical abstract Synergistic effect of eugenol with colistin against colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates.

  20. Fluorescence In Vivo Hybridization (FIVH) for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in a C57BL/6 Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Leite, Marina; Cappoen, Davie

    2016-01-01

    ). Finally, the efficiency of FIVH to detect H. pylori SS1 strain in C57BL/6 infected mice was evaluated ex vivo in mucus samples, in cryosections and paraffin-embedded sections by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: H. pylori SS1 strain infecting C57BL/6 mice was successfully detected...... by the Cy3_HP_LNA/2OMe_PS probe in the mucus, attached to gastric epithelial cells and colonizing the gastric pits. The specificity of the probe for H. pylori was confirmed by microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: In the future this methodology can be used in combination with a confocal laser endomicroscope for in vivo......INTRODUCTION: In this study, we applied fluorescence in vivo hybridization (FIVH) using locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes targeting the bacterial rRNA gene for in vivo detection of H. pylori infecting the C57BL/6 mouse model. A previously designed Cy3_HP_LNA/2OMe_PS probe, complementary...

  1. Searching for Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae in primary endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to search samples from primary endodontic infections for the presence of two common human bacterial pathogens - Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Genomic DNA isolated from samples taken from 25 root canals of teeth with asymptomatic (chronic) apical periodontitis and 25 aspirates from acute apical abscess was initially amplified by the multiple displacement amplification approach and then used as template in species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of H. pylori and C. pneumoniae. All clinical samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. However, no clinical sample was positive for either H. pylori or C. pneumoniae. Neither H. pylori nor C. pneumoniae were found in samples from primary endodontic infections. These findings suggest that these species are not candidate endodontic pathogens and that the necrotic root canal does not serve as a reservoir for these human pathogens in healthy patients.

  2. Helicobacter pylori eradication using tetracycline and furazolidone versus amoxicillin and azithromycin in lansoprazole based triple therapy: an open randomized clinical trial Erradicação de Helicobacter pylori com o uso de tetraciclina e furazolidona versus amoxicilina e azitromicina em terapia tríplice com lansoprazol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cidrão Frota

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optimal anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment has not yet been established. AIM: To evaluate H. pylori eradication using tetracycline and furazolidone versus amoxicillin and azithromycin in lansoprazole based triple therapy in northeastern of Brazil. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and four patients with H. pylori infection, as determined by rapid urease testing and histology, were randomly assigned to receive either: lansoprazole (30 mg q.d., tetracycline (500 mg q.i.d., and furazolidone (200 mg t.i.d. for 7 days (LTF; n = 52; or lansoprazole (30 mg b.i.d. and amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d. for 1 week, plus azithromycin (500 mg q.d. for the first 3 days (LAAz; n = 52. H. pylori eradication was assessed 3 months following completion of therapy by means of rapid urease testing, histology and a 14C-urea breath test. RESULTS: H. pylori eradication was achieved in 46 of 52 (88.4%, 95% CI: 77.5%-95.1% patients in LTF group and in 14 of 52 (26.9%, 95% CI: 16.2%-40,1% patients in LAAz group. On a per-protocol analysis, eradication rates were 91.8% (95% CI: 81.4%-97.3% and 28.5% (95% CI: 17.2%-42.3%, respectively in LTF and LAAz groups. CONCLUSION: The LAAz regimen yielded unacceptably low eradication rates. On the other hand, the LTF scheme represents a suitable alternative for H. pylori eradication.RACIONAL: Ainda não está estabelecida a melhor terapêutica anti-H. pylori. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a erradicação de H.pylori usando tetraciclina e furazolidona versus amoxicilina e azitromicina em terapia tríplice com lansoprazol no nordeste do Brasil. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Cento e quatro pacientes infectados por H. pylori, diagnosticado através do teste rápido da urease e histologia, foram selecionados aleatoriamente para receber: lansoprazol (30 mg q.d., tetraciclina (500 mg q.i.d., furazolidona (200 mg t.i.d. por 7 dias (LTF; n = 52; ou lansoprazol (30 mg b.i.d. e amoxicilina (1 g b.i.d. por 1 semana, mais azitromicina (500 mg q.d. nos primeiros 3

  3. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

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    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates. Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis.

  4. A novel one-step Helicobacter pylori saliva antigen test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bi-Ling; Yeh, Chun; Kwong, Wei-Gang; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2015-02-01

    A rapid, reliable, and sufficiently accurate test for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection is required for screening dyspeptic patients before a referral for endoscopy. The purpose of this article is two-fold: first, to evaluate the accuracy of a one-step H. pylori saliva antigen (HPS) test; and second, to compare noninvasive and invasive H. pylori tests in Taiwanese population. A total of 104 consecutive dyspeptic patients admitted for gastroenterology into the outpatient department underwent a one-step HPS test, rapid urease test, histology, and (13)C-urea breath test (13)C-UBT (proto C-13 urea kit). The accuracy of the HPS test was compared with a gold standard defined by at least two positive H. pylori test results from three H. pylori tests (histology, rapid urease test, and (13)C-UBT). The 104 patients eligible for analysis (mean age: 58 years, range 22-87 years), 21 (20%) were gold standard positive. Among them, the positive of the one-step H. pylori saliva Ag test, rapid urease test, (13)C-UBT, histology were (52; 50%), (17; 16%), (27; 25%) and (22; 21%) respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the HPS tests, rapid urease test, (13)C-UBTs, and histology were 71.43% and 55.42%, 76.19% and 98.80%, 100% and 92.77%, and 85.71% and 95.18%, respectively, relative to the gold standard. The one-step HPS test exhibited a sensitivity of 71.43%, nearly equivalent to that of the rapid urea test. The one-step HPS test exhibited a high sensitivity and low specificity compared with the other tests, indicating that it is not sufficiently accurate for use in a clinical setting for diagnosing H. pylori infection. However, the test is simple to use (requiring only a saliva sample), inexpensive, and noninvasive in its application, and thus appealing for use in population-based prevalence surveys of the epidemiology of H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  5. Clinical feasibility and validation of 3D principal strain analysis from cine MRI: comparison to 2D strain by MRI and 3D speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriano, Alessandro; Heydari, Bobak; Narous, Mariam; Exner, Derek V; Mikami, Yoko; Attwood, Monica M; Tyberg, John V; Lydell, Carmen P; Howarth, Andrew G; Fine, Nowell M; White, James A

    2017-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) strain analysis is constrained by geometry-dependent reference directions of deformation (i.e. radial, circumferential, and longitudinal) following the assumption of cylindrical chamber architecture. Three-dimensional (3D) principal strain analysis may overcome such limitations by referencing intrinsic (i.e. principal) directions of deformation. This study aimed to demonstrate clinical feasibility of 3D principal strain analysis from routine 2D cine MRI with validation to strain from 2D tagged cine analysis and 3D speckle tracking echocardiography. Thirty-one patients undergoing cardiac MRI were studied. 3D strain was measured from routine, multi-planar 2D cine SSFP images using custom software designed to apply 4D deformation fields to 3D cardiac models to derive principal strain. Comparisons of strain estimates versus those by 2D tagged cine, 2D non-tagged cine (feature tracking), and 3D speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) were performed. Mean age was 51 ± 14 (36% female). Mean LV ejection fraction was 66 ± 10% (range 37-80%). 3D principal strain analysis was feasible in all subjects and showed high inter- and intra-observer reproducibility (ICC range 0.83-0.97 and 0.83-0.98, respectively-p analysis is feasible using routine, multi-planar 2D cine MRI and shows high reproducibility with strong correlations to 2D conventional strain analysis and 3D STE-based analysis. Given its independence from geometry-related directions of deformation this technique may offer unique benefit for the detection and prognostication of myocardial disease, and warrants expanded investigation.

  6. A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Irina; Freitas, Daniela P; Magalhães, Ana; Faria, Fátima; Lopes, Célia; Faustino, Augusto M; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2014-08-01

    The gastric mucosa of dogs is often colonized by non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH), while H. pylori is the predominant gastric Helicobacter species in humans. The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. The glycosylation profile in body and antral compartments of the canine gastric mucosa, with focus on the expression of histo-blood group antigens was evaluated. The in vitro binding capacity of FITC-labeled H. pylori and NHPH to the canine gastric mucosa was assessed in cases representative of the canine glycosylation pattern. The canine gastric mucosa lacks expression of type 1 Lewis antigens and presents a broad expression of type 2 structures and A antigen, both in the surface and glandular epithelium. Regarding the canine antral mucosa, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion score whereas in the body region the SabA-positive H. pylori strain was the strain that adhered more. The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. Helicobacter pylori and NHPH strains differ in their ability to adhere to canine gastric mucosa. Among the NHPH, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion capacity in agreement with its reported colonization of the canine stomach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Urease Plays an Important Role in the Chemotactic Motility of Helicobacter pylori in a Viscous Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Mizote, Tomoko; Okita, Kiwamu; Nakazawa, Teruko

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori exhibits chemotactic responses to urea, flurofamide, acetohydroxamic acid, and sodium bicarbonate. In buffer, the chemotactic activities of a urease-positive strain were higher than those of the isogenic urease-negative strain. Moreover, the chemotactic activities of the urease-positive strain were increased in a viscous solution containing 3% polyvinylpyrrolidone, whereas those of the urease-negative mutant were not. These results are in accordance with the fact that the ...

  8. Genetic diversity of clinical and environmental strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Weltevreden isolated in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, K L; Goh, Y L; Radu, S; Noorzaleha, S; Yasin, R; Koh, Y T; Lim, V K E; Rusul, G; Puthucheary, S D

    2002-07-01

    The incidence of food-borne salmonellosis due to Salmonella enterica serotype Weltevreden is reported to be on the increase in Malaysia. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping method was used to assess the extent of genetic diversity and clonality of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden strains from humans and the environment. PFGE of XbaI-digested chromosomal DNA from 95 strains of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden gave 39 distinct profiles with a wide range of Dice coefficients (0.27 to 1.00), indicating that PFGE is very discriminative and that multiple clones of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden exist among clinical and environmental isolates. Strains of one dominant pulsotype (pulsotype X1/X2) appeared to be endemic in this region, as they were consistently recovered from humans with salmonellosis between 1996 and 2001 and from raw vegetables. In addition, the sharing of similar PFGE profiles among isolates from humans, vegetables, and beef provides indirect evidence of the possible transmission of salmonellosis from contaminated raw vegetables and meat to humans. Furthermore, the recurrence of PFGE profile X21 among isolates found in samples of vegetables from one wet market indicated the persistence of this clone. The environment in the wet markets may represent a major source of cross-contamination of vegetables with Salmonella serotype Weltevreden. Antibiotic sensitivity tests showed that the clinical isolates of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden remained drug sensitive but that the vegetable isolates were resistant to at least two antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to compare clinical and environmental isolates of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden in Malaysia.

  9. Genetic Diversity of Clinical and Environmental Strains of Salmonella enterica Serotype Weltevreden Isolated in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, K. L.; Goh, Y. L.; Radu, S.; Noorzaleha, S.; Yasin, R.; Koh, Y. T.; Lim, V. K. E.; Rusul, G.; Puthucheary, S. D.

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of food-borne salmonellosis due to Salmonella enterica serotype Weltevreden is reported to be on the increase in Malaysia. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping method was used to assess the extent of genetic diversity and clonality of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden strains from humans and the environment. PFGE of XbaI-digested chromosomal DNA from 95 strains of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden gave 39 distinct profiles with a wide range of Dice coefficients (0.27 to 1.00), indicating that PFGE is very discriminative and that multiple clones of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden exist among clinical and environmental isolates. Strains of one dominant pulsotype (pulsotype X1/X2) appeared to be endemic in this region, as they were consistently recovered from humans with salmonellosis between 1996 and 2001 and from raw vegetables. In addition, the sharing of similar PFGE profiles among isolates from humans, vegetables, and beef provides indirect evidence of the possible transmission of salmonellosis from contaminated raw vegetables and meat to humans. Furthermore, the recurrence of PFGE profile X21 among isolates found in samples of vegetables from one wet market indicated the persistence of this clone. The environment in the wet markets may represent a major source of cross-contamination of vegetables with Salmonella serotype Weltevreden. Antibiotic sensitivity tests showed that the clinical isolates of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden remained drug sensitive but that the vegetable isolates were resistant to at least two antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to compare clinical and environmental isolates of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden in Malaysia. PMID:12089269

  10. Virulence factor genotypes of Helicobacter pylori affect cure rates of eradication therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    The cure rates of Helicobacter pylori infection by using a combination of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and antimicrobial agents are mainly influenced by bacterial susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and the magnitude of acid inhibition during the treatment. Currently used empirical triple therapies do not reliably produce a > or =80% cure rate on an intention-to-treat basis. Therefore, tailored regimens based on relevant microbiological findings and pharmacogenomics are recommended for attaining an acceptable > or =95% cure rate. Recently, virulence factors of H. pylori, such as cagA and vacA, are reported to be major factors determining the cure rates. Individuals infected with strains with cagA-negative and vacA s2 genotypes have significantly increased risk of eradication failure of H. pylori infection. These virulence factors enhance gastric mucosal inflammation and are associated with the development of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. H. pylori virulence factors induce proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- which influence mucosal inflammation and/or gastric acid secretion. When physicians select an H. pylori eradication regimen with an acceptable cure rate, they might need to consider H. pylori virulence factors, especially cagA and vacA.

  11. Role of adjuvant therapy in the treatment of helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasymenko O.N.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the effect of combined probiotic containing Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium infantis, Enterococcus faecium, on H.pylori eradication efficacy in the treatment of children with chronic H.pylori- associated gastroduodenitis in the scheme of "triple" therapy of H.pylori eradication. Determination of total serum Ig M , A, G protein to Ag SagA H. pylori, breathing "Helik" test, rapid urease "Helpil" test ; that of concentration of serum sCD14 was conducted. The study group included 20 children who received standard "triple" eradication therapy for 7 days and 1 caps. of probiotic 3 times a day for 4 weeks, control group (20 children – who received only standard eradication therapy. It is shown that combined use of probiotics in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection enhances effectiveness of eradication of H.pylori. In the basis of action of probiotic strains of the drug is an anti-inflammatory effect mediated by the impact on non-specific mechanisms of innate immunity, provided by molecular mechanism responsible for induction of sCD14 synthesis.

  12. A Novel Assay for Easy and Rapid Quantification of Helicobacter pylori Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skindersoe, Mette E; Rasmussen, Lone; Andersen, Leif P; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2015-06-01

    Reducing adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastric epithelial cells could be a new way to counteract infections with this organism. We here present a novel method for quantification of Helicobacter pylori adhesion to cells. Helicobacter pylori is allowed to adhere to AGS or MKN45g cells in a 96-well microtiter plate. Then wells are added saponin, which lyses the cells without affecting the bacteria. After addition of alamarBlue(®) (resazurin) and 1- to 2-hour incubation, fluorescence measurements can be used to quantify the number of adherent bacteria. By use of the method, we demonstrate that adhesion of both a sabA and babA deletion mutant of H. pylori is significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The method offers a number of applications and may be used to compare the adherence potential of different strains of H. pylori to either cells or different materials or to screen for potential anti-adhesive compounds. The results presented here suggest that this easy and reproducible assay is well suited for quantitative investigation of H. pylori adhesion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A novel system of cytoskeletal elements in the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

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    Barbara Waidner

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori relies upon its capacity to adapt to a hostile environment and to escape from the host response. Therefore, cell shape, motility, and pH homeostasis of these bacteria are specifically adapted to the gastric mucus. We have found that the helical shape of H. pylori depends on coiled coil rich proteins (Ccrp, which form extended filamentous structures in vitro and in vivo, and are differentially required for the maintenance of cell morphology. We have developed an in vivo localization system for this pathogen. Consistent with a cytoskeleton-like structure, Ccrp proteins localized in a regular punctuate and static pattern within H. pylori cells. Ccrp genes show a high degree of sequence variation, which could be the reason for the morphological diversity between H. pylori strains. In contrast to other bacteria, the actin-like MreB protein is dispensable for viability in H. pylori, and does not affect cell shape, but cell length and chromosome segregation. In addition, mreB mutant cells displayed significantly reduced urease activity, and thus compromise a major pathogenicity factor of H. pylori. Our findings reveal that Ccrp proteins, but not MreB, affect cell morphology, while both cytoskeletal components affect the development of pathogenicity factors and/or cell cycle progression.

  14. vacA Genotype Status of Helicobacter pylori Isolated from Foods with Animal Origin

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    Elnaz Saeidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to controversial theories and results of studies, foods with animal origins play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to human. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of vacA genotypes of H. pylori, isolated from milk and meat samples of cow, sheep, goat, camel, and buffalo. Eight hundred and twenty raw milk and meat samples were collected from various parts of Iran. Samples were cultured and those found positive for H. pylori were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes of vacA gene. Out of 420 milk and 400 meat samples, 92 (21.90% and 105 (26.25% were positive for H. pylori, respectively. The most commonly detected genotypes in the vacA gene were s1a (86.80%, m1a (79.18%, s1b (69.54%, and m1b (63.45% and detected combined genotypes were mostly m1as1a (68.52%, m1as1b (60.40%, m1bs1b (55.83%, and m1bs1a (53.29%. High presence of bacteria in the milk and meat samples of sheep represents that sheep may be the natural host of H. pylori. High presence of H. pylori strains in milk and meat samples similar to vacA genotypes in human being suggests that milk and meat samples could be the sources of bacteria for human.

  15. vacA Genotype Status of Helicobacter pylori Isolated from Foods with Animal Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Elnaz; Sheikhshahrokh, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    According to controversial theories and results of studies, foods with animal origins play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to human. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of vacA genotypes of H. pylori, isolated from milk and meat samples of cow, sheep, goat, camel, and buffalo. Eight hundred and twenty raw milk and meat samples were collected from various parts of Iran. Samples were cultured and those found positive for H. pylori were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes of vacA gene. Out of 420 milk and 400 meat samples, 92 (21.90%) and 105 (26.25%) were positive for H. pylori, respectively. The most commonly detected genotypes in the vacA gene were s1a (86.80%), m1a (79.18%), s1b (69.54%), and m1b (63.45%) and detected combined genotypes were mostly m1as1a (68.52%), m1as1b (60.40%), m1bs1b (55.83%), and m1bs1a (53.29%). High presence of bacteria in the milk and meat samples of sheep represents that sheep may be the natural host of H. pylori. High presence of H. pylori strains in milk and meat samples similar to vacA genotypes in human being suggests that milk and meat samples could be the sources of bacteria for human.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection: An overview of bacterial virulence factors and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and disease outcomes are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial virulence factors, host, and environmental factors. After H. pylori enters the host stomach, four steps are critical for bacteria to establish successful colonization, persistent infection, and disease pathogenesis: (1 Survival in the acidic stomach; (2 movement toward epithelium cells by flagella-mediated motility; (3 attachment to host cells by adhesins/receptors interaction; (4 causing tissue damage by toxin release. Over the past 20 years, the understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis has been improved by studies focusing on the host and bacterial factors through epidemiology researches and molecular mechanism investigations. These include studies identifying the roles of novel virulence factors and their association with different disease outcomes, especially the bacterial adhesins, cag pathogenicity island, and vacuolating cytotoxin. Recently, the development of large-scale screening methods, including proteomic, and transcriptomic tools, has been used to determine the complex gene regulatory networks in H. pylori. In addition, a more available complete genomic database of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases worldwide is helpful to characterize this bacterium. This review highlights the key findings of H. pylori virulence factors reported over the past 20 years.

  17. Epstein Barr virus and Helicobacter pylori co-infection are positively associated with severe gastritis in pediatric patients.

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    María G Cárdenas-Mondragón

    Full Text Available H. pylori infection is acquired during childhood and causes a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa, which is considered the main risk factor to acquire gastric cancer (GC later in life. More recently, infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV have also been associated with GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory responses and its relationship with H. pylori infection remains poorly studied. Here, we assessed whether EBV infection in children correlated with the stage of gastritis and whether co-infection with H. pylori affected the severity of inflammation.333 pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain were studied. From them, gastric biopsies were taken and inflammation graded according to the Sydney system; peripheral blood was drawn and antibodies against EBV (IgG and IgM anti-VCA and H. pylori (IgG anti-whole bacteria and anti-CagA were measured in sera. We found that children infected only by EBV presented mild mononuclear (MN and none polymorphonuclear (PMN cell infiltration, while those infected by H. pylori presented moderate MN and mild PMN. In contrast, patients co-infected with both pathogens were significantly associated with severe gastritis. Importantly, co-infection of H. pylori CagA+/EBV+ had a stronger association with severe MN (PR 3.0 and PMN (PR 7.2 cells than cases with single H. pylori CagA+ infection.Co-infection with EBV and H. pylori in pediatric patients is associated with severe gastritis. Even single infections with H. pylori CagA+ strains are associated with mild to moderate infiltration arguing for a cooperative effect of H. pylori and EBV in the gastric mucosa and revealing a critical role for EBV previously un-appreciated. This study points out the need to study both pathogens to understand the mechanism behind severe damage of the gastric mucosa, which could identified children with increased risk to present more serious lesions later in life.

  18. Impact of Maternal Helicobacter pylori Infection on Trace Elements (Copper, Iron and Zinc and Pregnancy Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel I Akubugwo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: H. pylori infection has been suggested to interfere with micronutrient metabolism and influence pregnancy outcomes. Objectives: This study therefore seeks to document the prevalence of H. pylori seroposivity among pregnant women and to determine its impact on some trace element status and pregnancy outcomes. Materials and methods: Three hundred and forty nine consenting pregnant women aged 15-40 years (mean; 27. 04 ± 4. 75 years and gestational age ≤ 25 weeks (mean 21.77 ± 3.14 wks attending antenatal clinic at Federal Medical Centre, Abakaliki, between July 2007 and September 2008 participated in the study. H. Pylori antibody (IgG was determined by a new generation ELISA method. Plasma copper, iron and zinc were analysed using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Bulk Scientific AVG 210 Model while haemoglobin and albumin were analysed using standard haematological and biochemical techniques. Both maternal sociodemographic and anthropometric parameters were recorded at recruitment. The women were followed-up till delivery after which neonatal anthropometrics and other birth outcomes were recorded. Results: H. pylori seroprevalence of 24.1% (84/349 was recorded with higher prevalence in multiparous and older women. H. pylori infected women had significantly higher BMI (29.00 ± 3.89 vs. 26.86 ± 4.10, p = 0.020 and lower (p > 0.05 plasma levels of Cu, Fe, Zn, albumin, and haemoglobin when compared to non-infected women. Also H. pylori infected women had significantly (p < 0.05 higher rates of convulsion and concomitant illnesses than their non-infected counterparts, although there was no difference in the two groups for other pregnancy outcomes. Conclusion: H. pylori infection during pregnancy seems to interfere with trace element metabolism and contribute significantly to increased maternal morbidity. Prior to confirmation of these findings in a well controlled randomised trial, it is suggested that pregnant women be

  19. Review: Impact of Helicobacter pylori on Alzheimer's disease: What do we know so far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulberis, Michael; Kotronis, Georgios; Thomann, Robert; Polyzos, Stergios A; Boziki, Marina; Gialamprinou, Dimitra; Deretzi, Georgia; Katsinelos, Panagiotis; Kountouras, Jannis

    2018-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori has changed radically gastroenterologic world, offering a new concept in patients' management. Over time, more medical data gave rise to diverse distant, extragastric manifestations and interactions of the "new" discovered bacterium. Special interest appeared within the field of neurodegenerative diseases and particularly Alzheimer's disease, as the latter and Helicobacter pylori infection are associated with a large public health burden and Alzheimer's disease ranks as the leading cause of disability. However, the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and Alzheimer's disease remains uncertain. We performed a narrative review regarding a possible connection between Helicobacter pylori and Alzheimer's disease. All accessible relevant (pre)clinical studies written in English were included. Both affected pathologies were briefly analyzed, and relevant studies are discussed, trying to focus on the possible pathogenetic role of this bacterium in Alzheimer's disease. Data stemming from both epidemiologic studies and animal experiments seem to be rather encouraging, tending to confirm the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori infection might influence the course of Alzheimer's disease pleiotropically. Possible main mechanisms may include the bacterium's access to the brain via the oral-nasal-olfactory pathway or by circulating monocytes (infected with Helicobacter pylori due to defective autophagy) through disrupted blood-brain barrier, thereby possibly triggering neurodegeneration. Current data suggest that Helicobacter pylori infection might influence the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. However, further large-scale randomized controlled trials are mandatory to clarify a possible favorable effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology, before the recommendation of short-term and cost-effective therapeutic regimens against Helicobacter pylori-related Alzheimer's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  20. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kazanowska-Dygdała

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients. The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  1. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection as a cause of gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer and nonulcer dyspepsia: a systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J; Sherman, P M

    1994-01-15

    To evaluate current evidence for a causal relation between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer and nonulcer dyspepsia. A MEDLINE search for articles published in English between January 1983 and December 1992 with the use of MeSH terms Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, dyspepsia and clinical trial; abstracts were excluded. Six journals and Current Contents were searched manually for pertinent articles published in that time frame. Original studies with at least 25 patients, case reports and reviews that examined the relation between H. pylori and the four gastrointestinal disorders; 350 articles were on gastritis, 122 on duodenal ulcer, 44 on gastric cancer and 96 on nonulcer dyspepsia. The quality of the studies was rated independently on a four-point scale. The strength of the evidence was assessed using a six-point scale for each of the eight established guidelines for determining a causal relation. There was conclusive evidence of a causal relation between H. pylori infection and histologic gastritis. Koch's postulates for the identification of a microorganism as the causative agent of a disease were fulfilled for H. pylori as a causative agent of gastritis. There was strong evidence that H. pylori is the main cause of duodenal ulcers not induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but all of Koch's postulates were not fulfilled. There was moderate epidemiologic evidence of an association between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. There was a lack of convincing evidence of a causal association between H. pylori and nonulcer dyspepsia. The evidence supports a strong causal relation between H. pylori infection and gastritis and duodenal ulcer and a moderate relation between such infection and gastric cancer. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of H. pylori in these disorders. Thus far, there is no evidence of a causal relation between H. pylori and nonulcer

  3. Immunoproteomics of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with atrophic body gastritis, a predisposing condition for gastric cancer.

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    Lahner, Edith; Bernardini, Giulia; Possenti, Silvia; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa; Annibale, Bruno

    2011-02-01

    Atrophic body gastritis is considered an outcome of H. pylori infection at high risk for gastric cancer. Immunoproteomics has been used to detect H. pylori antigens, which may act as potential markers for neoplastic disease and may be used in specific serological tests. We used immunoproteome technology to identify H. pylori antigens, recognized by sera from patients with atrophic body gastritis. Here, we performed 2DE protein maps of H. pylori strain 10K, probed against single sera from 3 groups of H. pylori-positive patients (atrophic body gastritis; intestinal-type gastric cancer; peptic ulcer) and negative controls. Immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 155 immunoreactive spots were detected corresponding to 14.1% of total spots detected in our reference map of H. pylori strain 10K. Sera from atrophic body gastritis (40.5±2%) and gastric cancer patients (25.9±1.8%) showed a significantly higher and stronger mean immunoreactivity versus H. pylori antigens compared to peptic ulcer patients (11.2±1.3%). The average intensity of immunoreactivity of sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients was significantly stronger compared to peptic ulcer patients. Sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients differentially recognized 17 H. pylori spots. Immunoproteome technology may discriminate between different H. pylori-related disease phenotypes showing a serological immunorecognition pattern common to patients with gastric cancer and atrophic body gastritis, its precursor condition. This tool may be promising for developing specific serological tests to identify patients with gastritis at high risk for gastric cancer, to be evaluated in prospective investigations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Urease plays an important role in the chemotactic motility of Helicobacter pylori in a viscous environment.

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    Nakamura, H; Yoshiyama, H; Takeuchi, H; Mizote, T; Okita, K; Nakazawa, T

    1998-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori exhibits chemotactic responses to urea, flurofamide, acetohydroxamic acid, and sodium bicarbonate. In buffer, the chemotactic activities of a urease-positive strain were higher than those of the isogenic urease-negative strain. Moreover, the chemotactic activities of the urease-positive strain were increased in a viscous solution containing 3% polyvinylpyrrolidone, whereas those of the urease-negative mutant were not. These results are in accordance with the fact that the mutant strain did not show swarming in motility agar regardless of having flagella. Incubation of the wild-type strain with flurofamide resulted in partial inhibition of the chemotactic activities in the viscous solution. In addition, incubation with acetohydroxamic acid, a low-molecular-weight, diffusible urease inhibitor, resulted in complete loss of chemotactic activity in the viscous solution. The inhibition of the chemotactic activity by urease inhibitors paralleled the inhibition of urease. The chemotactic activity of H. pylori was also inhibited by the proton carrier carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, showing that H. pylori utilizes proton motive force for motility. These results indicate that cytoplasmic urease plays an important role in the chemotactic motility of H. pylori under a condition that mimics the ecological niche of the bacterium, the gastric mucous layer.

  5. Clinical strains of Lactobacillus reduce the filamentation of Candida albicans and protect Galleria mellonella against experimental candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Dos Santos Velloso, Marisol; Figueiredo, Lívia Mara Alves; Martins, Carolina Pistille; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2018-05-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and can grow as yeast or filaments, depending on the environmental conditions. The filamentous form is of particular interest because it can play a direct role in adherence and pathogenicity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three clinical strains of Lactobacillus on C. albicans filamentation as well as their probiotic potential in pathogen-host interactions via an experimental candidiasis model study in Galleria mellonella. We used the reference strain Candida albicans ATCC 18804 and three clinical strains of Lactobacillus: L. rhamnosus strain 5.2, L. paracasei strain 20.3, and L. fermentum strain 20.4. First, the capacity of C. albicans to form hyphae was tested in vitro through association with the Lactobacillus strains. After that, we verified the ability of these strains to attenuate experimental candidiasis in a Galleria mellonella model through a survival curve assay. Regarding the filamentation assay, a significant reduction in hyphae formation of up to 57% was observed when C. albicans was incubated in the presence of the Lactobacillus strains, compared to a control group composed of only C. albicans. In addition, when the larvae were pretreated with Lactobacillus spp. prior to C. albicans infection, the survival rate of G. mellonela increased in all experimental groups. We concluded that Lactobacillus influences the growth and expression C. albicans virulence factors, which may interfere with the pathogenicity of these microorganisms.

  6. Genotyping of Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strains from clinical and nonclinical origins by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Fábio; Falcão, Juliana P

    2014-06-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A (B1A) strains are considered mainly nonpathogenic. However, some studies considered strains of this biotype to be the causal agents of infections in humans and animals. In South America, there are no studies that have compared clinical and nonclinical strains of B1A typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and none that have compared the capability of different enzymes on typing these strains. This study typed 51 Y. enterocolitica B1A strains isolated in Brazil and Chile by PFGE, testing the enzymes XbaI, NotI, and XhoI. The resulting dendrograms discriminated the strains in 47, 40, and 49 pulsotypes generated by the cleavage with the enzymes XbaI, NotI, and XhoI, respectively. The majority of the strains were grouped independently of their clinical or nonclinical origins. The high discriminatory power of PFGE confirmed the heterogeneity of B1A strains but could not divide the strains studied into clusters that differed in the frequency of some virulence genes as observed in studies using other methodologies.

  7. Helicobacter pylori eradication and reflux disease onset: did gastric acid get "crazy"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2013-02-14

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is highly prevalent in the general population. In the last decade, a potential relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication and GORD onset has been claimed. The main putative mechanism is the gastric acid hypersecretion that develops after bacterial cure in those patients with corpus-predominant gastritis. We performed a critical reappraisal of the intricate pathogenesis and clinical data available in this field. Oesophagitis onset after H. pylori eradication in duodenal ulcer patients has been ascribed to a gastric acid hypersecretion, which could develop following body gastritis healing. However, the absence of an acid hypersecretive status in these patients is documented by both pathophysiology and clinical studies. Indeed, duodenal ulcer recurrence is virtually abolished following H. pylori eradication. In addition, intra-oesophageal pH recording studies failed to demonstrated increased acid reflux following bacterial eradication. Moreover, oesophageal manometric studies suggest that H. pylori eradication would reduce--rather than favor--acid reflux into the oesophagus. Finally, data of clinical studies would suggest that H. pylori eradication is not significantly associated with either reflux symptoms or erosive oesophagitis onset, some data suggesting also an advantage in curing the infection when oesophagitis is already present. Therefore, the legend of "crazy acid" remains--as all the others--a fascinating, but imaginary tale.

  8. Population Genetic Structure and Isolation by Distance of Helicobacter pylori in Senegal and Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Bodo; Vololonantenainab, Clairette Romaine Raharisolo; Seck, Abdoulaye; Carod, Jean-François; Dia, Daouda; Garin, Benoit; Ramanampamonjy, Rado Manitrala; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Raymond, Josette; Breurec, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has probably infected the human stomach since our origins and subsequently diversified in parallel with their human hosts. The genetic population history of H. pylori can therefore be used as a marker for human migration. We analysed seven housekeeping gene sequences of H. pylori strains isolated from 78 Senegalese and 24 Malagasy patients and compared them with the sequences of strains from other geographical locations. H. pylori from Senegal and Madagascar can be placed in the previously described HpAfrica1 genetic population, subpopulations hspWAfrica and hspSAfrica, respectively. These 2 subpopulations correspond to the distribution of Niger-Congo speakers in West and most of subequatorial Africa (due to Bantu migrations), respectively. H. pylori appears as a single population in Senegal, indicating a long common history between ethnicities as well as frequent local admixtures. The lack of differentiation between these isolates and an increasing genetic differentiation with geographical distance between sampling locations in Africa was evidence for genetic isolation by distance. The Austronesian expansion that started from Taiwan 5000 years ago dispersed one of the 10 subgroups of the Austronesian language family via insular Southeast Asia into the Pacific and Madagascar, and hspMaori is a marker for the entire Austronesian expansion. Strain competition and replacement of hspMaori by hpAfrica1 strains from Bantu migrants are the probable reasons for the presence of hspSAfrica strains in Malagasy of Southeast Asian descent. hpAfrica1 strains appear to be generalist strains that have the necessary genetic diversity to efficiently colonise a wide host spectrum. PMID:24498084

  9. Clinical development of a novel inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine based on attenuated Sabin poliovirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdijk, Pauline; Rots, Nynke Y; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2011-05-01

    Following achievement of polio eradication, the routine use of all live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines should be discontinued. However, the costs per vaccine dose for the alternative inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) are significantly higher and the current production capacity is not sufficient for worldwide distribution of the vaccine. In order to achieve cost-prize reduction and improve affordability, IPV production processes and dose-sparing strategies should be developed to facilitate local manufacture at a relatively lower cost. The use of attenuated Sabin instead of wild-type polio strains will provide additional safety during vaccine production and permits production in low-cost settings. Sabin-IPV is under development by several manufacturers. This article gives an overview of results from clinical trials with Sabin-IPV and discusses the requirements and challenges in the clinical development of this novel IPV.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, Galit H.; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L.; Fox, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. PMID:25728540

  11. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, Galit H; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L; Fox, James G

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

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    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  13. Association of helicobacter pylori dupA with the failure of primary eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Nguyen, Lam Tung; Murakami, Kazunari; Kuroda, Akiko; Mizukami, Kazuhiro; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether the presence of dupA Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) influences the cure rate of primary eradication therapy. Several virulence factors of H. pylori have been reported to affect the efficacy of the eradication rate. However, no study has investigated whether the presence of dupA affects eradication failure. The presence of dupA was evaluated in 142 H. pylori strains isolated from 142 patients with gastrointestinal diseases. Of these patients, 104 received primary eradication therapy for 1 week. The risk factors for eradication failure were determined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Among 142 strains, 44 (31.0%) were dupA positive. There was no association between dupA status and gastroduodenal diseases (P>0.05). The clarithromycin (CLR) resistance rate was generally lower in the dupA-positive than in the dupA-negative group (20.4% vs. 35.7%, P=0.06). However, dupA prevalence was higher in the eradication failure group than in the success group (36.3% vs. 21.9%). Among the CLR-resistant H. pylori infected group, the successful eradication rate was significantly lower in patients infected with dupA-positive H. pylori than dupA-negative H. pylori (P=0.04). In multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, and type of disease, not only CLR resistance but also dupA presence was independent risk factors for eradication failure (adjusted odds ratio=3.71; 95% confidence interval,1.07-12.83). Although CLR resistant was more reliable predictor, the presence of dupA may also be an independent risk factor for eradication failure.

  14. FLOW MEDIATED DILATION AND CAROTID INTIMA MEDIA THICKNESS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC GASTRITIS ASSOCIATED WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judaki, Arezo; Norozi, Siros; Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza Hafezi; Ghavam, Samira Mis; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Rahmani, Asghar

    2017-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is one of the early stages of vascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial dysfunction markers in patients with chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. By a cross sectional study, basic and clinical information of 120 participants (40 patients with positive H. pylori infection, 40 patients with negative H. pylori infection and 40 healthy people) were analyzed. Carotid intima media thickness and flow-mediated dilation levels were measured in all patients and controls. Soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were measured with Elisa for all subjects. IgG level was assessed in chronic gastritis patients. The flow-mediated dilation level in patients with positive H. pylori infection (0.17%±0.09) was significantly lower than those with negative H. pylori infection (0.21% ±0.10, Pgastritis. The levels of flow-mediated dilation, carotid intima media thickness and sICAM-1 were higher among patients with positive H. pylori infection. Patients with chronic gastritis associated with H. pylori infection are at risk of endothelial dysfunction due to flow-mediated dilation and carotid intima media thickness abnormalities and increased level of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1.

  15. Involvement of the Helicobacter pylori plasticity region and cag pathogenicity island genes in the development of gastroduodenal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, A R; Proença-Módena, J L; Sales, A I L; Fukuhara, Y; da Silveira, W D; Pimenta-Módena, J L; de Oliveira, R B; Brocchi, M

    2008-11-01

    Infection by Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of several gastroduodenal diseases, including gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers), and gastric adenocarcinoma. Although a number of putative virulence factors have been reported for H. pylori, there are conflicting results regarding their association with specific H. pylori-related diseases. In this work, we investigated the presence of virB11 and cagT, located in the left half of the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), and the jhp917-jhp918 sequences, components of the dupA gene located in the plasticity zone of H. pylori, in Brazilian isolates of H. pylori. We also examined the association between these genes and H. pylori-related gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric and duodenal ulcers in an attempt to identify a gene marker for clinical outcomes related to infection by H. pylori. The cagT gene was associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric ulcers, whereas the virB11 gene was detected in nearly all of the samples. The dupA gene was not associated with duodenal ulcers or any gastroduodenal disease here analyzed. These results suggest that cagT could be a useful prognostic marker for the development of peptic ulcer disease in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. They also indicate that cagT is associated with greater virulence and peptic ulceration, and that this gene is an essential component of the type IV secretion system of H. pylori.

  16. PCR detection of Helicobacter pylori in string-absorbed gastric juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Bello, M G; Cienfuentes, C; Romero, R; García, P; Gómez, I; Mago, V; Reyes, N; Gueneau de Novoa, P

    2001-04-20

    Molecular methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection have been shown to be highly sensitive in gastric biopsies and cultures. The objective of this work was to compare PCR detection of H. pylori DNA in string-absorbed gastric juice and in gastric biopsies. The study was performed in 47 dyspeptic adult patients undergoing endoscopy, and infection was detected by amplification of a segment of H. pylori ureA gene. Of the 29 patients positive in biopsy analysis, 23 (79%) were also positive in the gastric string. PCR analysis of gastric strings is a sensitive and safe procedure to detect H. pylori when endoscopy is not indicated, and may be of great clinical and epidemiological usefulness in determining effectiveness of eradication therapies, typing virulence genes and detecting antibiotic resistance mutations.

  17. Erradicación de H. pylori y su relación con la resistencia a los antibióticos y el estatus de CYP2C19 Helicobacter pylori erradication and its relation to antibiotic resistance and CYP2C19 status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Garza González

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: determinar la eficacia del rabeprazol (RPZ, amoxicilina (Am y claritromicina (Cla (7 vs. 14 días en la erradicación de H. pylori y determinar el efecto de la resistencia a los antibióticos y el genotipo de CYP2C19. Material y métodos: inicialmente, se determinó el genotipo de CYP2C19 a 100 sujetos sanos para determinar el tamaño de muestra del ensayo clínico. Posteriormente, 59 pacientes H. pylori+ recibieron al azar RPZ (20 mg diarios, Cla (500 mg cada 12 horas y Am (1.000 mg cada 12 horas (7 vs. 14 días. Se determinó la CMI para Am y Cla por el método de dilución en agar. El genotipo CYP2C19 fue determinado por PCR-RFLP. Resultados: en el análisis por protocolo (PP, las tasas de erradicación fueron del 89,7 y 72% para los grupos de 7 y 14 días respectivamente (p = 0,159. En el análisis de intención de tratamiento (IT, las tasas de erradicación fueron del 86,7 y 62,1% en los grupos de 7 y 14 días respectivamente (p = 0,06. Ninguna cepa presentó resistencia a Am y 4 cepas fueron resistentes a Cla: 3 (11,1% en el grupo de 14 días y 1 (4% en el grupo de 7 días. Las tasas de erradicación no fueron afectadas por la resistencia de la cepa o el genotipo de CYP2C19. Conclusiones: las terapias de 7 y 14 días fueron eficaces para la erradicación de H. pylori. Al parecer, la resistencia de la cepa y el genotipo de CYP2C19, no influenciaron las tasas de erradicación de H. pylori en la población estudiada.Objective: to assess the efficacy of rabeprazole (RPZ, amoxicillin (Am, and clarithromycin (Cla (7 vs. 14 days in the eradication of H. pylori, and to determine the effect of strain-specific antibiotic resistance and host CYP2C19 status. Material and methods: first, we determined the CYP2C19 status of 100 healthy subjects to establish a sample size for the clinical