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Sample records for pylori clearance tests

  1. Creatinine clearance test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum creatinine clearance; Kidney function - creatinine clearance; Renal function - creatinine clearance ... Creatinine is a chemical waste product of creatine. Creatine is a chemical the body makes to supply ...

  2. Helicobacter Pylori : Serological Testing and Treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with dyspepsia and eradication of H. pylori after a non-invasive testing is an integral part of most management guidelines. This study evaluated the benefit of serological testing and treatment of H. pylori in Nigerian patients presenting with uninvestigated dyspepsia.

  3. Tests for H. pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcers and many cases of stomach inflammation (chronic gastritis). How the Test is Performed There are several ... treating bleeding, or making sure there is no cancer. Why the Test is Performed Testing is most ...

  4. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plasma Free Metanephrines Platelet Count Platelet Function Tests Pleural Fluid Analysis PML-RARA Porphyrin Tests Potassium Prealbumin ... collected and then the person is given a liquid to drink. Another breath sample is collected at ...

  5. Natural History of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Mexican Schoolchildren: Incidence and Spontaneous Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Ximena; Vilchis, Jenny; Mera, Robertino; Trejo-Valdivia, Belem; Goodman, Karen J.; Mendoza, Maria-Eugenia; Navarro, Fabiola; Roque, Victoria; Moran, Segundo; Torres, Javier; Correa, Pelayo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to estimate the incidence and spontaneous clearance rate of Helicobacter pylori infection and the effect of some variables on these outcomes in schoolchildren. Methods From May 2005 to December 2010, 718 schoolchildren enrolled in 3 public boarding schools in Mexico City participated in the follow-up. At the beginning of the study and every 6 months thereafter, breath samples were taken to detect H pylori infection; blood samples and anthropometric measurements were taken to evaluate nutritional status. Data on sociodemographic characteristics were collected. Results The prevalence of H pylori infection was 38%. The incidence rate was 6.36%/year. Schoolchildren with anemia or iron deficiency at the beginning of the study (who received iron supplements) showed a higher infection acquisition rate than those with normal iron nutritional status, hazard ratio (HR) 12.52 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.01%–39.12%), P <0.001 and HR 2.05 (95% CI 1.09%–3.87%), P = 0.027, respectively. The spontaneous clearance rate of the infection was 4.74%/year. The spontaneous clearance rate was higher in children who had iron deficiency (who received iron supplements), HR 5.02 (95% CI 1.33%–18.99%), P = 0.017, compared with those with normal nutritional iron status. It was lower in schoolchildren with ≥2 siblings compared with schoolchildren with 1 or no siblings, HR 0.23 (95% CI 0.08%–0.63%), P = 0.004. Conclusions H pylori infection status is dynamic in schoolchildren. Variables related to health status and infection transmission, such as iron status and number of siblings, are important for the incidence and spontaneous clearance of H pylori infection. PMID:22227999

  6. Invasive Tests for Helicobacter Pylori in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien Q Huynh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary indications for upper gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy in children is the presence of persistent and severe upper abdominal symptoms. Upper GI endoscopies are performed to allow the physician to confirm or rule out upper GI pathology. Additionally, upper GI endoscopies with mucosal biopsies are the gold standard for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and its complications in children. The gastric biopsies can be used for the rapid urease test, histological examination and bacterial culture to determine antibiotic sensitivity. DNA extracted in these biopsies can also be subjected to genotyping using molecular methods to determine the presence of H pylori infection, antibiotic resistance mutations and H pylori virulence factors.

  7. Evaluation of SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag rapid test against double ELISA with SD H. pylori Ag ELISA and EZ-STEP H. pylori Ag ELISA tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negash, Markos; Kassu, Afework; Amare, Bemnet; Yismaw, Gizachew; Moges, Beyene

    2018-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori antibody titters fall very slowly even after successful treatment. Therefore, tests detecting H. pylori antibody lack specificity and sensitivity. On the other hand, H. pylori stool antigen tests are reported as an alternative assay because of their reliability and simplicity. However, the comparative performance of H. pylori stool antigen tests for detecting the presence of the bacterium in clinical specimens in the study area is not assessed. Therefore, in this study we evaluated the performance of SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag rapid test with reference to the commercially available EZ- STEP ELISA and SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag ELISA tests. Stool samples were collected to analyse the diagnostic performance of SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag rapid test kit using SD H. pylori Ag ELISA kit and EZ- STEP ELISA tests as a gold standard. Serum samples were also collected from each patient to test for the presence of H. pylori antibodies using dBest H. pylori Test Disk. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and kappa value are assessed. P values H. pylori Ag rapid test were: 95.6% (95% CI, 88.8-98.8), 92.5% (95%CI, 89-94.1%), 86.7% (95% CI, 80.5-89.6), and 97.6% (95% CI, 993.9-99.3) respectively. The performance of SD BIOLINE H. pylori Ag rapid test was better than the currently available antibody test in study area. Therefore, the SD BIOLINE Ag rapid stool test could replace and be used to diagnose active H. pylori infection before the commencement of therapy among dyspeptic patients.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen test: a reliable non-invasive test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, O. J.; Bosman, D. K.; van't Hoff, B. W.; Taminiau, J. A.; ten Kate, F. J.; van der Ende, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen (HpSA) test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective cohort study in an academic medical centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 106 consecutive children who underwent gastroscopy were

  9. A novel one-step Helicobacter pylori saliva antigen test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-Ling Yang

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: The one-step HPS test exhibited a high sensitivity and low specificity compared with the other tests, indicating that it is not sufficiently accurate for use in a clinical setting for diagnosing H. pylori infection. However, the test is simple to use (requiring only a saliva sample, inexpensive, and noninvasive in its application, and thus appealing for use in population-based prevalence surveys of the epidemiology of H. pylori infection.

  10. The accuracy of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test in diagnosing H-pylori in treated and untreated patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arents, NL; van Zwet, AA; Thijs, JC; de Jong, A; Pool, MO; Kleibeuker, JH

    Objective and design To evaluate the performance of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA test) in detecting H. pylori infection and monitoring the effect of treatment. This was done in two separate studies using either a biopsy or the C-13-urea breath test based 'gold standard' (in

  11. A novel one-step Helicobacter pylori saliva antigen test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bi-Ling; Yeh, Chun; Kwong, Wei-Gang; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2015-02-01

    A rapid, reliable, and sufficiently accurate test for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection is required for screening dyspeptic patients before a referral for endoscopy. The purpose of this article is two-fold: first, to evaluate the accuracy of a one-step H. pylori saliva antigen (HPS) test; and second, to compare noninvasive and invasive H. pylori tests in Taiwanese population. A total of 104 consecutive dyspeptic patients admitted for gastroenterology into the outpatient department underwent a one-step HPS test, rapid urease test, histology, and (13)C-urea breath test (13)C-UBT (proto C-13 urea kit). The accuracy of the HPS test was compared with a gold standard defined by at least two positive H. pylori test results from three H. pylori tests (histology, rapid urease test, and (13)C-UBT). The 104 patients eligible for analysis (mean age: 58 years, range 22-87 years), 21 (20%) were gold standard positive. Among them, the positive of the one-step H. pylori saliva Ag test, rapid urease test, (13)C-UBT, histology were (52; 50%), (17; 16%), (27; 25%) and (22; 21%) respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the HPS tests, rapid urease test, (13)C-UBTs, and histology were 71.43% and 55.42%, 76.19% and 98.80%, 100% and 92.77%, and 85.71% and 95.18%, respectively, relative to the gold standard. The one-step HPS test exhibited a sensitivity of 71.43%, nearly equivalent to that of the rapid urea test. The one-step HPS test exhibited a high sensitivity and low specificity compared with the other tests, indicating that it is not sufficiently accurate for use in a clinical setting for diagnosing H. pylori infection. However, the test is simple to use (requiring only a saliva sample), inexpensive, and noninvasive in its application, and thus appealing for use in population-based prevalence surveys of the epidemiology of H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  12. Activity calibration in breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasilewka-Radwanska, M.; Pysklak, S.; Gilewicz-Wolter, J.; Kuc, T.; Jung, A.; Niziol, J.; Kopanski, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Cienciala, A.

    1996-01-01

    Some technical and measurement problems of the breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori are briefly discussed. Calibrated results obtained for population of 108 cases indicate difference between HP+ (infected with Helicobacter pylori) and HP- (non infected with Helicobacter pylori) in exhaled 14 C activity not less than 3.9 kBq while the lower limit for HP+ cases was set at 6.8 kBq at the detection limit: 0.9 Bq/mmol of CO 2 . It was estimated that in exhalation way up to 29% of the taken activity was removed in HP+ cases during first 35 minutes. Radiation hazard for the patient system is negligibly small - dose equipment not exceeds 0.29% of the natural (environmental) yearly exposure. (author)

  13. 14C-urea breath test as a method to detect Campylobacter pylori colonization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauws, E. A.; van Royen, E. A.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1989-01-01

    Campylobacter pylori may cause type B gastritis. C. pylori produces urease, and the presence of this enzyme in gastric mucosal biopsies is a marker for colonization with the microorganism. The value of a breath test to detect C. pylori colonization in non-ulcer dyspepsia patients was investigated.

  14. Confirmation of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, C.M.; Bhasin, D.K.; Sharma, B.C.; Roy, P.; Vaiphei, K.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the 14 C-urea breath test (UBT). 14 C-UBT is being used as a highly reliable test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. There is paucity of reports on the utility of this test to confirm the H. pylori eradication after its treatment. The study was conducted to determine the utility of 14 C-UBT in confirming the eradication of H. pylori

  15. Validation of 14 C-urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattar, Rejane; Silva, Fernando Marcuz; Alexandrino, Ana Maria; Laudanna, Antonio Atilio

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the 14 C-urea breath test for use in diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Thirty H. pylori positive patients, based on histologic test and thirty H. pylori negative patients by histology and anti-H pylori IgG entered the study. Fasting patients drank 5 uCi of 14 C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath samples were collected at O, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. The difference of cpm values between the two groups was significant at all the time intervals, besides time 0 (p 14 C-urea breath test is highly accurate for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis. It is fast, simple and should be the non-invasive test used after treating Helicobacter pylori infection. (author)

  16. Study on Urea Breath Test (UBT) a tool for helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolekar, R.V.; Bhade, S.P.D.; Reddy, Priyanka; Singh, Rajvir; Gadgil, Anita; Bhandarkar, Prashant; Roy, N.; Patil, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori commonly called as H. pylori resides in the gastric epithelial mucosa and induces an inflammatory response leading to gastritis, peptic nicer disease and gastric malignancies. Detection and eradication of H.pylori infection is thus an important measure to prevent these. H.pylori has a worldwide prevalence rate of about 50%, with a higher prevalence in developing countries. Urea breath test, an outpatient noninvasive technique achieves up to 95% sensitivity and specificity at half the cost compared to histology, in detecting H. Pylori infection. Indian studies on the use of UBT and its standard protocol are sparse. The present paper discusses the application of Carbon-14 Urea breath test for the diagnosis of H pylori bacterial infection in 261 adult patients

  17. On the importance of developing a new generation of breath tests for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Korenev, Nikolai; Kamarchuk, Lyudmila; Pospelov, Alexander; Kravchenko, Andrey; Bajenov, Leonid; Kabulov, Mels; Amann, Anton; Kamarchuk, Gennadii

    2015-12-15

    State-of-the-art methods for non-invasive detection of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been considered. A reported global tendency towards a non-decreasing prevalence of H. pylori worldwide could be co-influenced by the functional limitations of urea breath tests (UBTs), currently preferred for the non-invasive recognition of H. pylori in a clinical setting. Namely, the UBTs can demonstrate false-positive or false-negative results. Within this context, limitations of conventional clinically exploited H. pylori tests have been discussed to justify the existing need for the development of a new generation of breath tests for the detection of H. pylori and the differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of the bacterium. This paper presents the results of a pilot clinical study aimed at evaluating the development and diagnostic potential of a new method based on the detection of the non-urease products of H. pylori vital activity in exhaled gas. The characteristics of breath of adolescents with H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative functional dyspepsia, together with a consideration of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) status of H. pylori-positive subjects, have been determined for the first time using innovative point-contact nanosensor devices based on salts of the organic conductor tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The clinical and diagnostic relevance of the response curves of the point-contact sensors was assessed. It was found that the recovery time of the point-contact sensors has a diagnostic value for differentiation of the H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease. The diagnostically significant elongation of the recovery time was even more pronounced in patients infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to the CagA-negative patients. Taking into account the operation of the point-contact sensors in the real-time mode, the obtained results are essential prerequisites for the development of a fast and

  18. Diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori : A prospective evaluation of their accuracy, without selecting a single test as the gold standard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J C; van Zwet, A A; Thijs, W J; Oey, H B; Karrenbeld, A; Stellaard, F; Luijt, D S; Meyer, B C; Kleibeuker, J H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the accuracy of six commonly used diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori in a prospective study without using any specific test as the gold standard (the patient was regarded as H. pylori-infected if two or more tests, whatever their nature, were positive). METHODS: In 105

  19. The tear turnover and tear clearance tests - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaszczuk, Izabela K; Montes Mico, Robert; Iskander, D Robert; Expósito, Alejandro Cerviño

    2018-03-01

    The aim is to provide a summary of methods available for the assessment of tear turnover and tear clearance rates. The review defines tear clearance and tear turnover and describes their implication for ocular surface health. Additionally, it describes main types of techniques for measuring tear turnover, including fluorescein tear clearance tests, techniques utilizing electromagnetic spectrum and tracer molecule and novel experimental techniques utilizing optical coherence tomography and fluorescein profilometry. Areas covered: Internet databases (PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar) and most frequently cited references were used as a principal resource of information on tear turnover rate and tear clearance rate, presenting methodologies and equipment, as well as their definition and implications for the anterior eye surface health and function. Keywords used for data-search were as follows: tear turnover, tear clearance, fluorescein clearance, scintigraphy, fluorophotometry, tear flow, drainage, tear meniscus dynamics, Krehbiel flow and lacrimal functional unit. Expert commentary: After decades, the topic of tear turnover assessment has been reintroduced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to propose less invasive, less time consuming and simpler methodologies for the assessment of tear dynamics that have the potential to be utilized in clinical practice.

  20. Comparison of PCR and common clinical tests for the diagnosis of H. pylori in dyspeptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, N; Mago, V; Gómez, I; Gueneau, P; Guelrud, M; Reyes, N; Pericchi, L R; Domínguez-Bello, M G

    2001-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as a major gastric pathogen. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of common clinical tests to detect H. pylori infection, by comparison with PCR. Serum and gastric biopsy specimens from 106 dyspeptic patients were examined. Serology was performed with Pyloriset Dry test, and biopsies were examined histologically, for rapid urease activity and PCR amplification of an ureA gene segment of H. pylori. PCR primers were specific for H. pylori and required at least 1.47 pg of H. pylori DNA, corresponding to about 800 bacterial cells. According to serology, histology, rapid urease, and PCR, positive results were respectively found in 56%, 86%, 64%, and 85% of dyspeptic patients, primarily with gastritis. Relative to PCR, the sensitivity (and specificity) was 55% (38%) for serology, 86% (13%) for histology, 70% (69%) for urease. When combining histology and urease, Bayesian analysis of data indicated no advantage of using combined methods over rapid urease test alone. Histology should not any longer be considered a gold standard test for Helicobacter pylori. Urea breath test still seems the first option for non invasive diagnostic. If an invasive diagnostic is justified, highly specific and sensitive molecular methods should be used to examine specimens.

  1. Validation of {sup 14} C-urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattar, Rejane; Silva, Fernando Marcuz; Alexandrino, Ana Maria; Laudanna, Antonio Atilio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Gastroenterologia]. E-mail: shiroineko@uol.com.br

    1999-02-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the {sup 14} C-urea breath test for use in diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Thirty H. pylori positive patients, based on histologic test and thirty H. pylori negative patients by histology and anti-H pylori IgG entered the study. Fasting patients drank 5 uCi of {sup 14} C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath samples were collected at O, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. The difference of cpm values between the two groups was significant at all the time intervals, besides time 0 (p < 0.0001). At 20 min, the test gave 100% sensitivity and specificity with a cut-off value of 562 cpm. Females were higher expirers than males (p=0.005). {sup 14} C-urea breath test is highly accurate for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis. It is fast, simple and should be the non-invasive test used after treating Helicobacter pylori infection. (author)

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 230 Helicobacter pylori strains: importance of medium, inoculum, and incubation time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartzen, S H; Andersen, L P; Bremmelgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    No standardized method of susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori is currently available, so before a large agar dilution study comprising 230 H. pylori strains belonging to more than 80 genetically different groups was initiated, we performed a relatively small preliminary study....../spot) as the inoculum and 72 h as the incubation time. A modest inoculum effect was noted for amoxicillin and metronidazole. By the methodology derived from our preliminary study, the susceptibilities of 230 H. pylori strains to six antibiotics were subsequently determined. The results were generally in accord...... with those of others, and apart from metronidazole, the MIC of which for approximately 25% of the strains tested was >8 microg/ml, resistance was low in Denmark. The situation might, however, quickly change when and if the number of indications for antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections increase...

  3. Detection of helicobacter pylori in nasal polyps using rapid urease test and ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Kaviani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nasal polyposis is an inflammatory condition of unknown etiology. Recently concerns regarding gastroesophageal reflux or helicobacter pylori as a possible pathologic cause of nasal polyps have been increasing. The present study was planned to investigate the presence of helicobacter pylori in nasal polyps. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was undertaken enrolling 37 patients with nasal polyps who had undergone nasal endoscopic sinus surgery and 38 control subjects. Biopsy specimens of nasal polyps and inferior turbinates were assessed by rapid urease test. Blood samples of both study and control subjects were evaluated for anti H.pylori IgG by ELISA. H. pylori status was regarded positive, if both tests were positive. Results: Seropositivity was more common in the patients with nasal polyps (66.2% than control subjects (36.8% (P

  4. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of non invasive tests for helicobacter pylori infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, A.; Haseeb, H.A.H.; Bilal, R.; Latif, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To compare urea breath and stool antigen in children, with histological diagnosis for Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. Children between 3 and 15 years of age reporting in pediatric outpatient department with upper gastrointestinal symptoms were included. All the participating children underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 3 tests namely: histopathological identification of H. pylori (the traditional gold standard), urea breath test and stool antigen test were carried out on each child. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were calculated for each noninvasive test used in the study. A total of 54 patients completed the study with a mean age of 8.2 years. On histological examination, 72% (39) were positive for H. pylori infection. On gross endoscopic examination, only 9 patients had signs of gastritis as compared to 39 histological positives. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of stool antigen test were: 77%, 73% and 89% respectively whereas the same for urea breath test were: 79%, 80% and 91% respectively. Both the noninvasive tests were found to be sensitive and specific as compared with histological identification, for the diagnosis of H. pylori in our pediatric population. The accuracy of urea breath test was better than the stool antigen test but later was easier to perform and could fulfill the criteria for a rapid bedside diagnostic test. (author)

  5. Helicobacter pylori diagnostic tests in children: review of the literature from 1999 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Kalach, Nicolas; Elitsur, Yoram; Koletzko, Sibylle

    2010-01-01

    The array of tests that can be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection is large, and it can be confusing to define which test to use particularly in children where results may not be comparable to those obtained in adult patients. Using PubMed, we reviewed the English literature from January 1999 to May 2009 to identify articles that determined sensitivity and specificity of H. pylori invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests in children. We excluded articles that presented a review of the literature, abstracts, case reports, or series where children's results could not be separated from adult populations. Of the tissue based methods, rapid urease tests have better sensitivity than histology to detect presence of H. pylori; however, histology can detect the pathology associated with disease including gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and other conditions that could be the cause of the child's symptoms. Culture of gastric tissues or stool has 100% specificity but sensitivity is low. Of the serologic tests, immunoblot has the best sensitivity. The urea breath tests have >75% sensitivity for detection of H. pylori before and after treatment. Immunoassays in stool using monoclonal antibodies have >95% sensitivity for detection of H. pylori before and after treatment. PCR testing can be performed in tissue and stool samples and can detect genes associated to antibiotic resistance. In summary, the current commercial non-invasive tests have adequate sensitivity and specificity for detecting the presence of H. pylori; however, endoscopy with histopathology is the only method that can detect H. pylori and lesions associated with the infection.

  6. Comparison of Salivary Anti Helicobacter pylori IgG with Serum IgG and Bacteriological Tests in Detecting Helicobacter pylori Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ghasemian safaei

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for detecting anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori specific IgG antibodies in specimens of oral fluid and serum with bacteriological tests. Methods: Antral biopsy specimens, as well as serum and oral fluid samples were collected from 97 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The presence or absence of current H. pylori infection was determined by culture, histology and urease detection. Anti-H. pylori specific IgG was detected in serum and oral fluid, using an established lab-made, and a commercial ELISA kit. The obtained data were compared with results of bacteriological tests. Results: In all, 62 (64% of 97 patients were positive for H. pylori by one or more of the gold standard tests (culture, histology and urease detection. Lab-made enzyme-linked immunoassay of oral fluid had a sensitivity and specificity of 92% and 83% respectively. A sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 83%, respectively, was obtained with the commercial kit. Lab-made enzyme-linked immunoassay of serum samples had a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 88%, respectively. A sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 86% was obtained with the commercial kit. Conclusion: Detection of anti-H. pylori specific IgG in oral fluid by ELISA is comparable in sensitivity and specificity with serum based methods. Oral fluid based ELISA could provide a reliable, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Saliva testing may have a role in epidemiological studies. Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, ELISA, Oral fluid

  7. 14C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S.J.; Tytgat, K.M.; Hollingsworth, J.; Jalali, S.; Rshid, F.A.; Bowen, B.M.; Goldie, J.; Goodacre, R.L.; Riddell, R.H.; Hunt, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The high urease activity of Helicobacter pylori can be used to detect this bacterium by noninvasive breath tests. We have developed a 14 C-urea breath test which uses 5 microCi 14 C with 50 mg nonradioactive urea. Breath samples are collected at baseline and every 30 min for 2 h. Our study compared the outcome of the breath test to the results of histology and culture of endoscopically obtained gastric biopsies in 84 patients. The breath test discriminated well between the 50 positive patients and the 34 patients negative for Helicobacter pylori: the calculated sensitivity was 100%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 93%, and negative predictive value 100%. Treatment with bismuth subsalicylate and/or ampicillin resulted in lower counts of exhaled 14 CO 2 which correlated with histological improvement in gastritis. The 14 C-urea breath test is a better gold standard for the detection of Helicobacter pylori than histology and/or culture

  8. The diagnostic value of endoscopy and Helicobacter pylori tests for peptic ulcer patients in late post-treatment setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kull Ingrid

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for management of peptic ulcer patients after the treatment are largely directed to detection of H. pylori infection using only non-invasive tests. We compared the diagnostic value of non-invasive and endoscopy based H. pylori tests in a late post-treatment setting. Methods Altogether 34 patients with dyspeptic complaints were referred for gastroscopy 5 years after the treatment of peptic ulcer using a one-week triple therapy scheme. The endoscopic and histologic findings were evaluated according to the Sydney classification. Bacteriological, PCR and cytological investigations and 13C-UBT tests were performed. Results Seventeen patients were defined H. pylori positive by 13C-UBT test, PCR and histological examination. On endoscopy, peptic ulcer persisted in 4 H. pylori positive cases. Among the 6 cases with erosions of the gastric mucosa, only two patients were H. pylori positive. Mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were revealed both in the H. pylori positive and H. pylori negative cases. Bacteriological examination revealed three clarithromycin resistant H. pylori strains. Cytology failed to prove validity for diagnosing H. pylori in a post-treatment setting. Conclusions In a late post-treatment setting, patients with dyspepsia should not be monitored only by non-invasive investigation methods; it is also justified to use the classical histological evaluation of H. pylori colonisation, PCR and bacteriology as they have shown good concordance with 13C-UBT. Moreover, endoscopy and histological investigation of a gastric biopsy have proved to be the methods with an additional diagnostic value, providing the physician with information about inflammatory, atrophic and metaplastic lesions of the stomach in dyspeptic H. pylori positive and negative patients. Bacteriological methods are suggested for detecting the putative antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori, aimed at successful eradication of infection in

  9. Evaluation of a new rapid lateral flow chromatography test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaklikkaya, N.; Dinc, U.; Dabanca, Pinar A.; Aydin, F.; Erturk, M.; Akdogan, Remzi A.; Ozgur, O.; Uzun, Dogan Y.; Gungor, E.; Arslan, M.; Cobanoglu, U.

    2006-01-01

    The rapid, simple and non-invasive diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is important in implementing chemotherapy in appropriate manner, and in assessing persistent H. pylori infection after eradication therapy. The Immuno Card STAT HpSA kit (Meridian Bioscience, Europe) is a lateral flow chromatography test which utilizes a monoclonal anti-H. pylori antibody. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of the ImmunoCard STAT HpSA test before and after eradication therapy on patients referred to undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Sixty-five consecutive patients who were referred to undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at the Department of Gastroenterology, Karadeniz Technical University Medical School, Turkey between February and August 2005 were included in this study. The ImmunoCard STAT HpSA was compared with 4 invasive tests (histology, gram staining, rapid urease test, and culture). The reference method was defined as positive when 2 of the 4 invasive tests were positive. A negative H. pylori status was considered when all 4 tests present concordant negative results. Overall, the ImmunoCard STAT HpSA test had 77.8% sensitivity, 79.3% specificity, 82.4% positive predictive value (PPV) and 74.2% negative predictive value (NPV) in all patients. With regard to pre-treatment values, the sensitivity was 70.6%, specificity 70.6%, PPV 100% and NPV 100% while on post-treatment group the sensitivity was 84.2%, specificity 64.7%, PPV 72.7% and NPV 78.6%. Our results indicate that the ImmunoCard STAT HpSA test is a rapid, simple, and helpful procedure not only to determine H. pylori infection but also to assess the success of eradication therapy. (author)

  10. Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) for the diagnosis of gastric infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruqui, A.N.; Majid, U.; Ahmed, L.; Khalil, M.; Hussan, M.U.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen test (HpSA), compared with endoscopic histopathology for the diagnosis of gastric Helicobecter pylori infection. A total of 50 patients underwent endoscopy for gastric antral mucosal tissue biopsy for histopathology of H.pylori and advised for HpSA. Patient's information including age, gender, past history, presenting signs and symptoms, results of HpSA and histopathology were recorded. Sensitivity analysis was performed to calculate sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of HpSA. Among 50 patients, 48% males and 52% females (M: F 1: 1.08), a total of 27 (54%) were true positive while 20 (40%) were true negative. Two patients were false negative and only one was false positive. Sensitivity of HpSA was, therefore, 93.1%, specificity 95% and positive and negative predictive values were 96.42% and 90.9% respectively. Helicobacter pylori stool antigen was an accurate and reliable test for the diagnosis of gastric H. pylori infection. (author)

  11. Rapid paper disk test for identification of Helicobacter pylori in mixed cultures of gerbil gastric homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Juarez, Israel; Rangel-Vega, Adrian; Romero, Irma

    2010-10-01

    A method denominated rapid paper disk test (RPDT) was developed to identify H. pylori colonies in complex cultures obtained from gerbil gastric homogenates. Identification is based on a characteristic reaction pattern (RP) for H. pylori colonies given by the combination of the urease-oxidase activities on a paper disk. Compared to the RPs obtained from gerbil's intestinal tract isolated bacteria, H. pylori RP is completely distinguishable, even from those of bacteria that share one or both activities as are Aerococcus urinae, Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus brevis, Corynebacterium pseudogenitalium, and Staphylococcus simulans, as well as from those produced by collection strains Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This method allows the practical quantification of H. pylori colonies in highly contaminated plates. RPDT has the following advantages over other methodologies that use indicators in the medium: it employs two of the three routinely used H. pylori biochemical identification tests, the reagents do not interfere with bacterial viability, there are no restrictions in relation to the medium used, and it is a simple, fast, and low-cost method. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Review: Diagnostic accuracy of PCR-based detection tests for Helicobacter Pylori in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadangi, Fatemeh; Yassi, Maryam; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin

    2017-12-01

    Although different methods have been established to detect Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, identifying infected patients is an ongoing challenge. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide pooled diagnostic accuracy measures for stool PCR test in the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were carried out on various sources, including MEDLINE, Web of Sciences, and the Cochrane Library from April 1, 1999, to May 1, 2016. This meta-analysis adheres to the guidelines provided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses report (PRISMA Statement). The clinical value of DNA stool PCR test was based on the pooled false positive, false negative, true positive, and true negative of different genes. Twenty-six of 328 studies identified met the eligibility criteria. Stool PCR test had a performance of 71% (95% CI: 68-73) sensitivity, 96% (95% CI: 94-97) specificity, and 65.6 (95% CI: 30.2-142.5) diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) in diagnosis of H. pylori. The DOR of genes which showed the highest performance of stool PCR tests was as follows: 23S rRNA 152.5 (95% CI: 55.5-418.9), 16S rRNA 67.9 (95%CI: 6.4-714.3), and glmM 68.1 (95%CI: 20.1-231.7). The sensitivity and specificity of stool PCR test are relatively in the same spectrum of other diagnostic methods for the detection of H. pylori infection. In descending order of significance, the most diagnostic candidate genes using PCR detection were 23S rRNA, 16S rRNA, and glmM. PCR for 23S rRNA gene which has the highest performance could be applicable to detect H. pylori infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Periodontal disease and Helicobacter pylori infection: a community-based study using serology and rapid urease test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, Krishnavilasom J; Nandakumar, Krishnankutty; Shenoy, Kottacherry T; Janam, Presanthila

    2016-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the prevalence of periodontal disease and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and their associations within a predefined Indian population. A community-based cross-sectional study of 500 selected individuals using a questionnaire, oral examination, rapid urease testing of dental plaque, and serological examination for immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori was carried out. Periodontal disease and H. pylori infection were prevalent in more than 50% of the population. Age, smoking, and diabetic status of the individuals were risk factors for periodontal disease after multivariate analysis, and a lack of proper sewage and waste disposal facilities were found to increase the risk of H. pylori infection. Although there was no association between periodontal disease and H. pylori seropositivity in the community, a highly-significant association was found between periodontal disease and colonization of H. pylori in dental plaque. Because periodontal disease is associated with the increased colonization of H. pylori, new treatment modalities, such as plaque control measures, should be employed for the complete management of H. pylori-associated gastric disease. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. 14C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S. J.; Tytgat, K. M.; Hollingsworth, J.; Jalali, S.; Rshid, F. A.; Bowen, B. M.; Goldie, J.; Goodacre, R. L.; Riddell, R. H.; Hunt, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The high urease activity of Helicobacter pylori can be used to detect this bacterium by noninvasive breath tests. We have developed a 14C-urea breath test which uses 5 microCi 14C with 50 mg nonradioactive urea. Breath samples are collected at baseline and every 30 min for 2 h. Our study compared

  15. Detection of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori by polymerase chain reaction using residual samples from rapid urease test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sik Jeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, which corresponds to a high infection rate. Furthermore, the incidence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori has increased with the recent rise in use of antibiotics for H. pylori elimination, suggesting growing treatment failures. Aim: The study was aimed to assess the use of residual samples from rapid urease test (RUT for biomolecular testing as an effective and accurate method to detect antibiotic-resistant H. pylori. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective study performed using data obtained from medical records of previously isolated H. pylori strains. Materials and Methods: RUT was conducted for 5440 biopsy samples from individuals who underwent health examination in South Korea. Subsequently, 469 RUT residual samples were randomly selected and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect antibiotic-resistant H. pylori. Statistical Analysis Used: The Chi-square test was used to analyse categorical data. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed a concordance between the results of PCR and conventional RUT in 450 of 469 samples, suggesting that the H. pylori PCR test is a time- and cost-effective detection method. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that PCR test can aid physicians to prescribe the appropriate antibiotics at the time of diagnosis, thus preventing the reduction in H. pylori eradication due to antibiotic resistance, averting progression to serious diseases and increasing the treatment success rate.

  16. Carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Campylobacter pylori associated gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, B.J.; Surveyor, I.

    1988-01-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Campylobacter pylori (CP), an organism suspected of causing chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. To detect gastric urease, we examined 32 patients who were being evaluated for possible peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given 10 microCi (370 kBq) of 14 C-labeled urea. Breath samples were collected in hyamine at intervals between 1 and 30 min. The amount of 14 C collected at these times was expressed as: body weight X (% of administered dose of 14 C in sample)/(mmol of CO 2 collected). The presence of C. pylori colonization was also determined by examination of multiple endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens. On average, patients who were proven to have C. pylori infection exhaled 20 times more labeled CO 2 than patients who were not infected. The difference between infected patients and C. pylori negative control patients was highly significant at all time points between 2 and 30 min after ingestion of the radionuclide (p less than 0.0001). The noninvasive urea breath is less expensive than endoscopic biopsy of the stomach and more accurate than serology as a means of detecting Campylobacter pylori infection. Because the test detects actual viable CP organisms, it can be used to confirm eradication of the bacterium after antibacterial therapy

  17. New monoclonal antibody-based test for Helicobacter pylori urease in gastric tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Ho Dong; Park, Hyeuk; Choi, Seung; Beom, Jae Won; Kim, Woo Jong; Park, Chang Kook; Lee, Young Jik; Park, Ju Young; Kim, Hyung Rag; Park, Chul; Joo, Young Eun; Jung, Young Do

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate a new monoclonal antibody for Helicobacter pylori urease in gastric tissue. A total of 107 volunteers were enrolled. All subjects underwent a (13)C-urea breath test and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Gastric aspirates were analyzed for pH and ammonia. Six biopsy specimens in the gastric antrum and body were obtained for a rapid urease test and histology. The new monoclonal antibody-based H. pylori urease test (HPU) was performed to rapidly and qualitatively detect urease in two biopsy specimens. H. pylori infection was diagnosed in 73 subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of the HPU was 89% and 74%, respectively. The subjects were divided into two groups: one with true-positive and true-negative HPU results (n = 90) and the other with false-positive and false-negative HPU results (n = 17). Across all subjects, ammonia levels were 900.5 ± 646.7 and 604.3 ± 594.3 μmol/L (p > 0.05), and pH was 3.37 ± 1.64 and 2.82 ± 1.51 (p > 0.05). Sensitivity was higher in the presence of atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia. HPU detected H. pylori in approximately 10 min. Gastric aspirate ammonia and pH levels did not affect the test results. Sensitivity was good in the presence of atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia.

  18. The Utility of the helicobacter pylori stool antigen test in managing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion and recommendations: The HPSAT may be used in the test and treat strategy for young patients with dyspep- sia without alarm signs and symptoms in low resource settings. However, because of its low validity in predicting H.pylori associated disease, it is important to follow up patients so that if symptoms ...

  19. Utilization of urea micro dose with 14 C in breath test to detect the Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chausson, Yvon; Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga V.; Passos, Maria do Carmo F.; Andrade, Angela A.M.; Simal, Carlos J.R.; Paula Castro, Luiz de; Fernandes, M.L.; Yazaki, F.R.

    1995-01-01

    A lower dose is used in the 14 C-urea breath test to detect the Helicobacter pylori (Hp). Such dose produce trivial radiation doses. The results shown that the use of this desirable dose is possible. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig

  20. Test Rig for Evaluating Active Turbine Blade Tip Clearance Control Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2003-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor and high pressure turbine can provide dramatic improvements in specific fuel consumption, time-on-wing, compressor stall margin and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities of both military and commercial gas turbine engines. The preliminary design of a mechanically actuated active clearance control (ACC) system for turbine blade tip clearance management is presented along with the design of a bench top test rig in which the system is to be evaluated. The ACC system utilizes mechanically actuated seal carrier segments and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. The purpose of this active clearance control system is to improve upon current case cooling methods. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, re-burst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). The active turbine blade tip clearance control system design presented herein will be evaluated to ensure that proper response and positional accuracy is achievable under simulated high-pressure turbine conditions. The test rig will simulate proper seal carrier pressure and temperature loading as well as the magnitudes and rates of blade tip clearance changes of an actual gas turbine engine. The results of these evaluations will be presented in future works.

  1. Investigation of the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection using the {sup 14}C-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Aydogan, Fusun; Motor, Vicdan Koksaldi; Ilhan, Ozgur; Daglioglu, Mutlu Cihan; Coskun, Mesut; Parlakfikirer, Nihan; Keskin, Ugurcan, E-mail: drayhant@hotmail.com [Medical Faculty, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: to investigate the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection by evaluating for the presence of H. pylori infection in patients with glaucoma using the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT). Methods: Using 14C-UBT, H. pylori infection positivity was compared between a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and a control group with normal intraocular pressure and a normal optic disc or normal perimetry. Results: the 14C-UBT was positive in 18 (51.42%) out of 35 patients in the glaucoma group and in 15 (42.85%) out of 35 patients in the control group. H. pylori infection positivity rates were similar between the glaucoma and control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: according to the 14C-UBT, there is no association between primary open-angle glaucoma and H. pylori infection. (author)

  2. Investigation of the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection using the 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Aydogan, Fusun; Motor, Vicdan Koksaldi; Ilhan, Ozgur; Daglioglu, Mutlu Cihan; Coskun, Mesut; Parlakfikirer, Nihan; Keskin, Ugurcan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection by evaluating for the presence of H. pylori infection in patients with glaucoma using the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT). Methods: Using 14C-UBT, H. pylori infection positivity was compared between a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and a control group with normal intraocular pressure and a normal optic disc or normal perimetry. Results: the 14C-UBT was positive in 18 (51.42%) out of 35 patients in the glaucoma group and in 15 (42.85%) out of 35 patients in the control group. H. pylori infection positivity rates were similar between the glaucoma and control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: according to the 14C-UBT, there is no association between primary open-angle glaucoma and H. pylori infection. (author)

  3. Diagnostic Methods of Helicobacter pylori Infection for Epidemiological Studies: Critical Importance of Indirect Test Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Among the methods developed to detect H. pylori infection, determining the gold standard remains debatable, especially for epidemiological studies. Due to the decreasing sensitivity of direct diagnostic tests (histopathology and/or immunohistochemistry [IHC], rapid urease test [RUT], and culture), several indirect tests, including antibody-based tests (serology and urine test), urea breath test (UBT), and stool antigen test (SAT) have been developed to diagnose H. pylori infection. Among the indirect tests, UBT and SAT became the best methods to determine active infection. While antibody-based tests, especially serology, are widely available and relatively sensitive, their specificity is low. Guidelines indicated that no single test can be considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and that one should consider the method's advantages and disadvantages. Based on four epidemiological studies, culture and RUT present a sensitivity of 74.2-90.8% and 83.3-86.9% and a specificity of 97.7-98.8% and 95.1-97.2%, respectively, when using IHC as a gold standard. The sensitivity of serology is quite high, but that of the urine test was lower compared with that of the other methods. Thus, indirect test validation is important although some commercial kits propose universal cut-off values.

  4. 14C-urea breath test in the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artiko, V.M.; Obradovic, V.B.; Petrovic, N.S.; Davidovic, B.M.; Grujic-Adanja, G.S.; Nastic-Miric, D.R.; Milosavljevic, T.N.

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is supposed to be one of the major causes of digestive and other diseases. Among a lot of invasive and non-invasive methods for its detection, none is ideal. The aim is an assessment of the Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach using breath test and comparison to other diagnostic methods, as well as following up the effects of therapy. In 17 patients with digestive discomfort, breath test, rapid urease test and histology were performed, while in 47 patients with proven HP infection the effect of therapy was followed up using breath test and clinical findings. Breath test was performed after per oral administration of the capsule of 14 C urea (37 kBq). Findings of the breath and urease tests were in accordance in 14/17 patients (83%) while breath test and histology in 16/17 patients (94%). During follow-up of the therapeutic effects, breath test and clinical findings were in accordance in 43/47 patients (98%). Breath test can be useful in diagnosis but is a method of choice in following up the patients after therapy for H. pylori infection, because it is non-invasive, fast and precise. (author)

  5. Almagate interference in breath test results for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Pons

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection by Helicobacter pylori is common and affects both genders at any age. The 13C-urea breath test is a widely used test for the diagnosis of this infection. However, multiple drugs used for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection symptoms have interactions with this breath test that generate false negative results. This observational study was to assess the potential interaction between almagate and the breath test. Methods: Thirty subjects on almagate therapy who underwent a breath test were included. If the result was negative, almagate was withdrawn for a month and the breath test was then repeated. Results: In general, 51.9 % of assessed subjects had a negative result after the first test, and 100 % of these also had a negative result after the second test. Conclusions: It was concluded that the use of almagate does not interfere in breath test results. These results provide a drug therapy option for the treatment of symptoms associated with Helicobacter pylori infection during the diagnostic process.

  6. A methodological aspect of the 14C-urea breath test used in Helicobacter pylori diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J.; Witkowska, B.

    1996-01-01

    The main purpose of those investigations was optimisation of the performing time of the breath test with 14 C-labelled urea which reveals Helicobacter pylori infection. It was analysed 117 species, preselected according to endoscopy and histopathology results, 56 of them have suffered from chronic gastritis and 61 from gastric ulcer disease. Using microbiology diagnosis (culture + IFP test) it was found that 86 species were H. pylori infected. This group of patients were next subject to investigations with the breath test with 14 C-labelled urea. Measurements of radioactivity of breathe air have been carried out for 30 minutes. The obtained results allow us to maintain that the optimal time of duration of the test described above is 30 minutes. (author)

  7. Economic evaluation of empirical antisecretory therapy versus Helicobacter pylori test for management of dyspepsia: a randomized trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarbol, Dorte Ejg; Bech, Mickael; Kragstrup, Jakob; Havelund, Troels; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2006-01-01

    An economic evaluation was performed of empirical antisecretory therapy versus test for Helicobacter pylori in the management of dyspepsia patients presenting in primary care. A randomized trial in 106 general practices in the County of Funen, Denmark, was designed to include prospective collection of clinical outcome measures and resource utilization data. Dyspepsia patients (n = 722) presenting in general practice with more than 2 weeks of epigastric pain or discomfort were managed according to one of three initial management strategies: (i) empirical antisecretory therapy, (ii) testing for Helicobacter pylori, or (iii) empirical antisecretory therapy, followed by Helicobacter pylori testing if symptoms improved. Cost-effectiveness and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of the strategies were determined. The mean proportion of days without dyspeptic symptoms during the 1-year follow-up was 0.59 in the group treated with empirical antisecretory therapy, 0.57 in the H. pylori test-and-eradicate group, and 0.53 in the combination group. After 1 year, 23 percent, 26 percent, and 22 percent, respectively, were symptom-free. Applying the proportion of days without dyspeptic symptoms, the cost-effectiveness for empirical treatment, H. pylori test and the combination were 12,131 Danish kroner (DKK), 9,576 DKK, and 7,301 DKK, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness going from the combination strategy to empirical antisecretory treatment or H. pylori test alone was 54,783 DKK and 39,700 DKK per additional proportion of days without dyspeptic symptoms. Empirical antisecretory therapy confers a small insignificant benefit but costs more than strategies based on test for H. pylori and is probably not a cost-effective strategy for the management of dyspepsia in primary care.

  8. The clinical value of 14C-urea breath test for diagnosis of helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuwen; Zhang Yongxian; Zhang Jinming; Ding Yong; Shao Mingzhe; Liu Zilai; Tian Jiahe

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a rapid microdose 14 C-urea breath test ( 14 C-UBT) with a simplified protocol for detecting the infection of helicobacter pylori (HP). 244 fasting patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms undergo the 14 C-UBT and 124 cases appear positive. 89 patients of those undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and confirmed as HP infection. The sensitivity and specificity of the 14 C-UBT is 100% when compared with the endoscopy. The test has good diagnostic accuracy with minimal radiation exposure and low cost. Thus, the test is reliable, safe, convenient and cost-effective to clinical use

  9. The 14C-urea breath-test for the detection of gastric Campylobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surveyor, I.; Goodwin, C.S.; Mullan, B.P.; Geelhoed, E.; Warren, J.R.; Murray, R.N.; Waters, T.E.; Sanderson, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-three patients who were undergoing endoscopy were studied. The radioactivity in exhaled breath which was sampled within five minutes of 14 C -urea administration was attributed to the presence of urease enzyme in mouth organisms and was discounted. The time-radioactivity curves for breath samples from five to 30 minutes after the administration of 14 C-urea gave an excellent separation between subjects with negative results of the examination of gastric-biopsy samples and patients with microbiological and histological evidence of infection with Campylobacter (C.) pylori. The area under the time-radioactivity curve at between five and 30 minutes after the administration of 14 C-urea in 24 patients with negative microbiological results was 6.9±4.4 area units; in 35 of 39 patients with positive microbiological results, this area was greater than 40 area units. Measured against the results of the microbiological examination of gastricbiopsy samples, the sensitivity of breath-testing was 90% and the specificity was 100%. Measured against the results of histological examination for the presence of C. pylori infection, breath-testing had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 93%. A positive breath-test result also correlated well (P=0.0001) with the serological antibody test-result. The role of non-invasive tests - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and 14 C-urea breath-testing - in the management of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease is discussed. We consider that the 14 C-urea breath-test has an important role in the noninvasive confirmation of gastric infection with C. pylori and in the follow-up of patients after treatment. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Evaluation of the effect of presence of blood in the stomach on endoscopic diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mittal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Presence of blood in the stomach has been thought to affect the performance of diagnostic tests used in detecting Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in the stomach. This study evaluated the effect of blood on the efficacy of rapid urease test (RUT and microscopic appearance of the biopsy after staining with Giemsa stain. Materials and Methods: Patients with bleeding oesophageal varices who met the inclusion criteria were tested for H. pylori by RUT and microscopic examination of the biopsy. A repeat endoscopy, RUT and histology were done one month following initial presentation. The performance of the diagnostic tests was evaluated with and without the presence of intraluminal blood. A combined result of the two tests, RUT and histology, carried out in presence or absence of blood for the diagnosis of H. pylori, when considered together was considered as the gold standard. Results: Thirty six patients included in the study were in the ages ranging between 15-60 years (mean age = 44.14 years ±2.1. The combination of tests at both visits showed 20/36 (55.6% patients were positive for H. pylori. The decrease in H. pylori positivity in the presence of blood was significant for RUT (8.3% vs. 38.9%; P=0.005 and combined test (19.4% vs. 47.2%; P=0.02 but the decrease in positivity for histology (11.1% vs 30.6% was not significant (P=0.08. In the presence of blood, the sensitivity of RUT, histology and combined tests were 15%, 20% and 35%, respectively. In the absence of blood, the sensitivity of RUT, histology and combination of tests was 70%, 55% and 85%, respectively. Conclusion: Blood in the stomach significantly decreased the sensitivity of RUT, histology and the combination of both. Negative results of these tests in acute upper gastro intestinal (GI bleeding should therefore be interpreted carefully.

  11. Proficiency testing criteria for clearance level in solid waste gamma measurement in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Wang, Jeng-Jong; Chiu, Huang-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    To guarantee the measurement quality for clearance level in solid waste material, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) established the criteria for proficiency testing of clearance level measurement. INER and the Taiwan Accreditation Foundation (TAF) organized the Technique Committee Meeting twice to discuss these criteria in 2011. The participating laboratories must completely conform to the ISO/IEC 17025, and they also must meet the requirements of the criteria. According to the criteria, the participating laboratories analyzed the minimum detectable amount (MDA) and that should be less than 20% of the clearance level (AMDA) given in the Atomic Energy Council's (AEC) "Regulations on Clearance Level for Radioactive Waste Management". The testing results should conform to the deviation and traceability requirements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy of the 14 C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Ana Thereza Britto; Secaf, Marie; Modena, Jose Luiz Pimenta; Troncon, Luiz Ernesto de Almeida; Oliveira, Ricardo Brandt de

    2002-01-01

    The development of simple, accurate and low-expense techniques for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection has great relevance. The objective was to determine the accuracy of a rapid 14 C-urea breath test (UBT) employing a very simple device for breathed air collection. One hundred and thirty-seven adult patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the Clinical Hospital. The main measurements were histology for Helicobacter pylori (HP); urease test; urea breath test (UBT). One hundred and fifteen patients were infected by HP (HP +) according to both histology and the urease test, and 22 patients were HP-negative (HP-), according to the same two tests. UBT was capable of discriminating between HP + and HP- in a way that was similar to the combination of urease test and histology. When this combination of results is taken as the 'gold standard' for HP infection, the sensitivity and specificity of UBT are both greater than 90% for a range of cut-off points and breathed air collection times. It was concluded that the rapid UBT employing a simple device for air collection has a high accuracy in determining HP infection. (author)

  13. Advantages and disadvantages of current diagnostic tests for the detection of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégraud, F

    1996-01-01

    Current tests used to detect Helicobacter pylori are either invasive (histological detection, culture, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), smear examination) or non-invasive (serology, 13C-urea breath test). These tests vary in their sensitivity and specificity, and the choice of test will depend on the situation, for example, whether the test is to detect infection or the success of eradication treatment. The accuracy of histological tests depends, to a large degree, on the expertise of the pathologist, while the accuracy of culture can depend on the conditions in which the specimen is transported and processed. When performed under optimal conditions, both techniques give very good results. The PCR test has similar sensitivity and specificity to histological and culture tests but a strict protocol must be followed to avoid contamination with H. pylori DNA. The rapid urease test (with a reading taken 1 hour later) is suitable for diagnosis before treatment but its sensitivity decreases after treatment. Smear examination has limited sensitivity. The urea breath test and serology (specific IgG detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with purified antigens) have sensitivities close to those using the best of the biopsy methods. Other points to consider when selecting a test are its availability, the rapidity of the results (which can range from a few minutes to 2 weeks), possibilities for retrospective analysis, quantification and the detection of pathogenic properties, the globality of certain tests that present an overall picture of the stomach, thus avoiding errors in sampling, and the cost of the test. Important added value can be gained from certain tests: histology allows evaluation of the status of the mucosa, culture allows strain typing and tests for antibiotic susceptibility, and the breath test can confirm successful eradication without endoscopy. When the diagnostic tests are performed correctly, most of them are highly accurate.

  14. Turnover of carbon in the 13C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Vladimir E.; Andreazzi, Mariana; Cury, Caio S.; Bassetto Junior, Carlos A.Z.; Rodrigues, Maria A.M.; Ducatti, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of 13 C-urea breath test ( 13 C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of 13 C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the 13 C in the 13 C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio 13 C/ 12 C in expired CO 2 from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to 13 C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  15. A Novel Stool PCR Test for Helicobacter pylori May Predict Clarithromycin Resistance and Eradication of Infection at a High Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Erin; Saracino, Ilaria; Fiorini, Giulia; Clark, Courtney; Slepnev, Vladimir; Patel, Denise; Gomez, Clarissa; Ponaka, Reddy; Elagin, Vecheslav; Vaira, Dino

    2017-08-01

    Clarithromycin-based regimens are commonly used as a first-line therapy for Helicobacter pylori -positive patients; however, resistance to clarithromycin has led to treatment failures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using stool samples to detect the presence of H. pylori DNA while concurrently detecting mutations associated with resistance to clarithromycin. For this purpose, total DNA was extracted from 294 raw stool specimens from H. pylori -positive and -negative patients. TaqMan real-time PCR amplification was used to detect the presence of H. pylori as well as to predict the phenotype of the organism and the related outcome for patients treated with clarithromycin. Clarithromycin resistance was determined upon analysis of the PCR result. Patients were also tested by a urea breath test and were subjected to esophagogastroduodenoscopy, followed by histology, culture, and a rapid urease test, in order to obtain a consensus patient infection status. Of 294 total stool samples, 227 were deemed true positive. The sensitivity of H. pylori detection by PCR was 93.8%. Of 213 true-positive samples that were sequenced, 36.2% showed point mutations associated with clarithromycin resistance (A2142C, A2142G, A2143G). The final correlation of the mutant genotypes as determined by sequencing with the eradication of infection was 86%. We found that Helicobacter pylori DNA can be detected in human stool specimens with high sensitivity and can therefore be used to determine the presence of the bacterium without obtaining a biopsy sample. Moreover, genotypic resistance to clarithromycin can be predicted without obtaining a biopsy sample, facilitating the choice of the right therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Contributions of Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Testing to Airplane Flutter Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jose A.; Florance, James R.

    2000-01-01

    The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) became in operational in 1960, and since that time has achieved the status of the world's premier wind tunnel for testing large in aeroelastically scaled models at transonic speeds. The facility has many features that contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelastic testing. This paper will briefly describe these capabilities and features, and their relevance to aeroelastic testing. Contributions to specific airplane configurations and highlights from the flutter tests performed in the TDT aimed at investigating the aeroelastic characteristics of these configurations are presented.

  17. Testing for Helicobacter pylori in dyspeptic patients suspected of peptic ulcer disease in primary care: cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, C. F.; Numans, M. E.; de Wit, N. J.; Smout, A. J.; Moons, K. G.; Verheij, T. J.; Hoes, A. W.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop an easily applicable diagnostic scoring method to determine the presence of peptic ulcers in dyspeptic patients in a primary care setting; to evaluate whether Helicobacter pylori testing adds value to history taking. Design: Cross sectional study. SETTING: General

  18. [Drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: a network Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Q Y; Yu, R B; Shi, R H

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and the risk of adverse effect of drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter ( H .) pylori infection. Methods: Literature retrieval was conducted by using major databases. Related papers published up to June 2015 were considered eligible if they were randomized control trials comparing different pharmacological formulations for H. pylori infection and used in a network Meta-analysis and a single rate Meta-analysis to evaluate the relative and absolute rates of H. pylori eradication and the risk of adverse effect. The Jadad score was used to evaluate the methodological quality. Funnel plot was constructed to evaluate the risk of publication bias. Begg's rank correlation test or Egger's regression intercept test was done for the asymmetry of funnel plot. Results: Twenty randomized control trials for the treatment of 6 753 initial treated patients with H. pylori infection were included. Drug susceptibility test guided therapy was significantly superior to concomitant therapy, hybrid therapy, sequential therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy. The culture-based therapy had the highest likelihood of improving clinical efficacy, with lowest risk of adverse effect. Concomitant therapy had the highest probability of causing adverse effect despite its effectiveness. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy were associated with lower risk of adverse effect and higher effectiveness. Conclusion: Drug susceptibility test guided therapy showed superiority to other 4 interventions for H. pylori eradication mentioned above. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy might be applied in the settings where the culture-based strategy is not available.

  19. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among Nigerian patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pylori positive. Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori among dyspeptics using biopsy based methods is high in the South-Western part of Nigeria. It is therefore important to test and treat H. pylori among Nigerians with dyspepsia.

  20. Neuropsychometric Test in Royal Netherlands Navy Mine-Clearance Divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Issues in Hypo-and Hyperbaric Conditions [les Questions medicales a caractere oprationel liees aux conditions hypobares ou hyperbares ] To order the...Digit Memo Sjan Test (F/B DMST-F/B Learnin /memoie Paper presented at the RTO HFM Symposium on "Operational Medical Issues in Hypo- and Hyperbaric ... Hyperbaric Medicine Annual Meeting 1995, Florida, USA. Abstract 46: 35. 6. Baker EL, R Letz, A Fidler. A computer-administered Neurobehavioural Evaluation

  1. Proficiency testing criteria for clearance level in solid waste gamma measurement in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Wang, Jeng-Jong; Chiu, Huang-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    To guarantee the measurement quality for clearance level in solid waste material, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) established the criteria for proficiency testing of clearance level measurement. INER and the Taiwan Accreditation Foundation (TAF) organized the Technique Committee Meeting twice to discuss these criteria in 2011. The participating laboratories must completely conform to the ISO/IEC 17025, and they also must meet the requirements of the criteria. According to the criteria, the participating laboratories analyzed the minimum detectable amount (MDA) and that should be less than 20% of the clearance level (AMDA) given in the Atomic Energy Council's (AEC) “Regulations on Clearance Level for Radioactive Waste Management”. The testing results should conform to the deviation and traceability requirements. - Highlights: • The participating laboratories must completely conform to the ISO/IEC 17025 • The proficiency testing items were basically in two categories, box and barrel types • Analyzed the MDA and that should be less than 20% of the release level given in the AEC. • The are three limitations: MDA< AMDA, -0.25< Bi<+0.5, and En≤1.0 and uncertainty<20%

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing before first-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with dual or triple antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Angel; Montes, Milagrosa; Ibarra, Begoña; Tamayo, Esther; Alonso, Horacio; Mendarte, Usua; Lizasoan, Jacobo; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2017-05-14

    To evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial susceptibility-guided therapy before first-line treatment for infection in patients with dual or triple antibiotic resistance. A total of 1034 patients infected by Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) during 2013-2014 were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. 157 of 1034 (15%) patients showed resistance to two (127/1034; 12%) and to three (30/1034; 3%) antibiotics. Sixty-eight patients with dual H. pylori -resistance (clarithromycin, metronidazole or levofloxacin) were treated for 10 d with triple therapies: OAL (omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and levofloxacin 500 mg b.i.d.) 43 cases, OAM (omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and metronidazole 500 mg b.i.d.) 12 cases and OAC (omeprazole 20 mg b.id., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.) 13 cases based on the antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Twelve patients showed triple H. pylori -resistance (clarithromycin, metronidazole and levofloxacin) and received for 10 d triple therapy with OAR (omeprazole 20 mg b.id., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and rifabutin 150 mg b.i.d.). Eradication was confirmed by 13C-urea breath test. Adverse effects and compliance were assessed by a questionnaire. Intention-to-treat eradication rates were: OAL (97.6%), OAM (91.6%), OAC (92.3%) and OAR (58.3%). Cure rate was significantly higher in naïve patients treated with OAR-10 compared to patients who had two or three previous treatment failures (83% vs 33%). Adverse events rates for OAL, OAM, OAC and OAR were 22%, 25%, 23% and 17%, respectively, all of them mild-moderate. Antimicrobial susceptibility-guided triple therapies during 10 d for first-line treatment leads to an eradication rate superior to 90% in patients with dual antibiotic H. pylori resistance.

  3. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF UREA BREATH TEST FOR HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN CHILDREN WITH DYSPEPSIA IN COMPARISON TO HISTOPATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser HONAR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - Helicobacter pylori infection is the gram negative bacillus with the close association with chronic antral gastritis. Objective - In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of urea breath test (UBT with carbon isotope 13 in comparison with histopathology of gastric antrum for detection of H. pylori infection in children with dyspepsia. Methods - This cross-sectional study was performed at specialized laboratory of Shiraz Gastroenterohepatology Research Center and Nemazee Hospital, Iran, during a 12-months period. This study investigated the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of UBT in comparison with biopsy-based tests. We included a consecutive selection of 60 children who fulfilled Rome III criteria for dyspepsia. All children were referred for performing UBT with carbon isotope 13 (C13 as well as endoscopy. Biopsies were taken from antrum of stomach and duodenum. The pathologic diagnosis was considered as the standard test. Results - The mean age of the participants was 10.1±2.6 (range 7-17 years. From our total 60 patients, 28 (46.7% had positive UBT results and 32 (53.3% had negative UBT results. Pathologic report of 16 (57.1% out of 28 patients who had positive UBT were positive for H. pylori and 12 (42.9% ones were negative. Sensitivity and specificity of C13-UBT for detection of H. pylori infection were 76.2% and 69.2% respectively. Conclusion - Sensitivity and specificity of C13-UBT for detection of H. pylori infection were 76.2% and 69.2% respectively. Another multicenter study from our country is recommended.

  4. Using Glucose Tolerance Tests to Model Insulin Secretion and Clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Shannon

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies described in this paper is to develop theoretically and to validate experimentally mathematical compartment models which can be used to predict plasma insulin levels in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. In the case of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, the C-peptide levels in the plasma were measured as part of routine glucose tolerance tests in order to estimate the prehepatic insulin secretion rates. In the case of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM, a radioactive labelled insulin was used to measure the absorption rate of insulin after a subcutaneous injection of insulin. Both models gave close fits between theoretical estimates and experimental data, and, unlike other models, it is not necessary to seed these models with initial estimates.

  5. Prospective study to evaluate the number and the location of biopsies in rapid urease test for diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Abou Rached

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori can cause a wide variety of illnesses such as peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. The diagnosis and eradication of H. pylori are crucial. The diagnosis of H. pylori is usually based on the rapid urease test (RUT and gastric antral biopsy for histology. The aim of this study is to evaluate the numbers of needed biopsies and their location (antrum/fundus to obtain optimal result for the diagnosis of H. pylori. Three hundred fifty consecutive patients were recruited, 210 fulfill the inclusion criteria and had nine gastric biopsies for the detection of H. pylori infection: two antral for the first RUT (RUT1, one antral and one fundic for the second (RUT2, one antral for the third (RUT3 and two antral with two fundic for histology (HES, Giemsa, PAS. The reading of the 3 types of RUT was performed at 1 hour, 3 hours and 24 hours and biopsies were read by two experienced pathologists not informed about the result of RUT. Results of RUT were considered positive if H. pylori was found on histology of at least one biopsy. The RUT1 at 1h, 3h and 24h has a sensitivity of 72%, 82% and 89% and a specificity of 100%, 99% and 87% respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV was 100%, 99% and 85% respectively and the negative predictive value (NPV of 81%, 87% and 90%. The RUT2 at 1h, 3h and 24h, respectively, had a sensitivity of 86%, 87% and 91% and a specificity of 99%, 97% and 90%. The PPV was 99%, 96% and 88% and NPV of 89%, 90%, 94%. The RUT3 at 1h, 3h and 24h, respectively, had a sensitivity of 70%, 74% and 84% and a specificity of 99%, 99% and 94%. The PPV was 99%, 99% and 92% and NPV of 79%, 81% and 87%. The best sensitivity and specificity were obtained for RUT1 read at 3h, for RUT2 read 1h and 3h, and the RUT3 read at 24h.This study demonstrates that the best sensitivity and specificity of rapid test for urease is obtained when fundic plus antral biopsy

  6. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabakaran, K.; Fernandes, V.; McDonald, J.

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  7. Audit of Helicobacter pylori Testing in Microbiology Laboratories in England: To Inform Compliance with NICE Guidance and the Feasibility of Routine Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalie Allison

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE guidance recommends that dyspeptic patients are tested for Helicobacter pylori using a urea breath test, stool antigen test, or serology. Antibiotic resistance in H. pylori is globally increasing, but treatment in England is rarely guided by susceptibility testing or surveillance. Aims. To determine compliance of microbiology laboratories in England with NICE guidance and whether laboratories perform culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST. Methods. In 2015, 170 accredited English microbiology laboratories were surveyed, by email. Results. 121/170 (71% laboratories responded; 96% provided H. pylori testing (78% on site. 94% provided H. pylori diagnosis using stool antigen; only four provided serology as their noninvasive test; 3/4 of these encouraged urea breath tests in their acute trusts. Only 22/94 (23% of the laboratories performed H. pylori cultures from gastric biopsies on site; 9/22 performed AST, but the vast majority processed less than one specimen/week. Conclusions. Only five laboratories in England do not comply with NICE guidance; these will need the guidance reinforced. National surveillance needs to be implemented; culture-based AST would need to be centralised. Moving forward, detection of resistance in H. pylori from stool specimens using molecular methods (PCR needs to be explored.

  8. Can the C-14 urea breath test reflect the extent and degree of ongoing helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lee, Seung Ok; Lee, Soo Taik; Jeong, Myung Ja

    2001-01-01

    The C-14 urea breath test (C-14 UBT) is the most specific noninvasive method to detect Helicobacter (H) pylori infection. We investigated if the C-14 UBT can reflect the presence and degree of H. pylori detected by gastroduodenoscopic biopsies (GBx). One hundred fifty patients (M:F=83:67,age 48.6±11.2 yrs) underwent C-14 UBT, rapid urease test (CLO test) and GBx on the same day. For the C-14 UBT, a single breath sample was collected at 10 minutes after ingestion of C-14 urea (137 KBq) capsule and counting was done in a liquid scintillation counter for 1 minute, and the results were classified as positive (≥200 dpm), intermediate ( 50 ∼ 199 dpm) or negative ( < 50 dpm). The results of CLO tests were classified as positive or negative according to color change. The results of GBx on giemsa stain were graded 0 (normal) to 4(diffuse) according to the distribution of H. pylori by the Wyatt method. We compared C-14 UBT results with GBx grade as a gold standard. In the assessment of the presence of H. pylori infection, the C-14 UBT global performance yielded sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of 92.5%, 88.4%, 97.1%, 88.4% and 91.3%, respectively. However, the CLO test had sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of 83.2%, 81.4%, 91.8%, 81.4% and 82.7%, respectively. The quantitative values of the C-14 UBT were 45 ± 27 dpm in grade 0, 707 ±584 dpm in grade 1, 1558±584 dpm in grade 2, 1851±604 dpm in grade 3, and 2719 ± 892 dpm in grade 4. A significant correlation (r=0.848, p<0.01) was found between C-14 UBT and the grade of distribution of H. pylori infection on GBx with giemsa stain. We conclude that the C-14 UBT is a highly accurate, simple and noninvasive method for the diagnosis of ongoing H. pylori infection and reflects the degree of bacterial distribution

  9. Clinical trial: a randomized trial of early endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori testing and empirical therapy for the management of dyspepsia in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, A E; Elliott, C A; Miller, P; Hawkey, C J; Logan, R F A

    2009-01-01

    Early endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori eradication and empirical acid suppression are commonly used dyspepsia management strategies in primary care but have not been directly compared in a single trial. To compare endoscopy, H. pylori test and refer, H. pylori test and treat and empirical acid suppression for dyspepsia in primary care. Patients presenting to their general practitioner with dyspepsia were randomized to endoscopy, H. pylori'test and treat', H. pylori test and endoscope positives, or empirical therapy with symptoms, patient satisfaction, healthcare costs and cost effectiveness at 12 months being the outcomes. At 2 months, the proportion of patients reporting no or minimal dyspeptic symptoms ranged from 74% for those having early endoscopy to 55% for those on empirical therapy (P = 0.009), but at 1 year, there was little difference among the four strategies. Early endoscopy was associated with fewer subsequent consultations for dyspepsia (P = 0.003). 'Test and treat' resulted in fewer endoscopies overall and was most cost-effective over a range of cost assumptions. Empirical therapy resulted in the lowest initial costs, but the highest rate of subsequent endoscopy. Gastro-oesophageal cancers were found in four patients randomized to the H. pylori testing strategies. While early endoscopy offered some advantages 'Test and treat' was the most cost-effective strategy. In older patients, early endoscopy may be an appropriate strategy in view of the greater risk of malignant disease. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Comparison between the 13C-urea breath test and stool antigen test for the diagnosis of childhood Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Seiichi; Minoura, Takanori; Iinuma, Kazuie; Konno, Mutsuko; Tajiri, Hitoshi; Matsuhisa, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    As noninvasive tests for Helicobacter pylori infection, the 13 C-urea breath test (UBT) and stool antigen test have been widely used. In children, however, there are few studies reporting which test shows superior performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the 13 C-UBT and stool antigen test for their accuracy in diagnosing. H. pylori infection in children. A total of 123 Japanese children, ages 2 to 17 years (mean, 12 years) who underwent gastric biopsies for H. pylori infection were studied. The diagnoses included gastritis (n=55), gastric ulcer (n=5), duodenal ulcer (n=20), iron-deficiency anemia (n=7), and other conditions (n=36). The cutoff value of the 13 C-UBT was defined to be 3.5 per mille. The stool antigen test was performed using the H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Premier Platinum HpSA). In 16 patients who received eradication therapy, the 13 C-UBT and HpSA were repeated 2 months after treatment. Based on biopsy tests, 60 children were infected with H. pylori and 63 children were not. For the 13 C-UBT, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.1%-99.0%), 98.4% (95% CI, 91.5%-100%), and 96.4% (95% CI, 93.6%-99.9%), respectively. For the HpSA, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 983.% (95% CI, 90.8%-100%), 98.4% (95% CI, 91.2%-100%), and 98.3% (95% CI, 96.0%-100%), respectively. There were no significant differences between the performance of these two tests. In the assessment of H. pylori eradication, the results of 13 C-UBT and HpSA agreed with those of biopsy tests. The 13 C-UBT and the HpSA are equally accurate for the diagnosis of active H. pylori infection in Japanese children. (author)

  11. Multiple Genetic Analysis System-Based Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing in Helicobacter pylori and High Eradication Rate With Phenotypic Resistance-Guided Quadruple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fangyuan; Ji, Danian; Huang, Renxiang; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Yiqin; Xiang, Ping; Kong, Mimi; Nan, Li; Zeng, Xianping; Wu, Yong; Bao, Zhijun

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotics resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major factor for eradication failure. Molecular tests including fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and dual priming oligonucleotide-PCR (DPO-PCR) play critical roles in the detection of antibiotic susceptibility; however, limited knowledge is known about application of multiple genetic analysis system (MGAS) in the area of H. pylori identification and antibiotics resistance detection.The aim of this study is to determine the antibiotics resistance using different molecular tests and evaluate the treatment outcomes of E-test-based genotypic resistance.A total of 297 patients with dyspepsia complaint were recruited for gastroscopies. Ninety patients with H. pylori culture positive were randomly divided into 2 groups (test group and control group). E-test, general PCR, and MGAS assay were performed in test group. Patients in control group were treated with empirical therapy (rabeprazole + bismuth potassium citrate + amoxicillin [AMX] + clarithromycin [CLR]), whereas patients in test group received quadruple therapy based on E-test results twice daily for 14 consecutive days. The eradication effect of H. pylori was confirmed by C-urea breath test after at least 4 weeks when treatment was finished.Rapid urease test showed 46.5% (128/297) patients with H. pylori infection, whereas 30.3% (90/297) patients were H. pylori culture positive. E-test showed that H. pylori primary resistance rate to CLR, AMX, metronidazole, tetracycline, and levofloxacin (LVX) was 40.0% (18/45), 4.4% (2/45), 53.3% (24/45), 0% (0/45), and 55.6% (25/45), respectively. In addition, there are many multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, and the MDR strains have higher minimum inhibitory concentration than their single-drug resistant counterparts. Considering E-test as the reference test, the sensitivities of general PCR and MGAS in detecting CLR resistance were 83.3% (15/18) and 94.4% (17

  12. Immunohistochemical testing for Helicobacter Pylori existence in neoplasms of the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Nurgul

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a common pathogen, and its prevalence varies with socioeconomic conditions (10–80%. It has recently been recognized as a class I carcinogen in relation to gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in neoplasms of the colon by immunohistochemical methods. Methods The polypectomy materials of 51 patients (19 male and 32 female who had undergone colonoscopic polypectomy were retrieved for retrospective examination. The endoscopic size and colonic localization of the polyps were recorded. Hematoxylin and eosin stains were evaluated according to histological type and grade of dysplasia. Biopsy stains were immunohistochemically treated with Helicobacter pylori antibodies by the streptavidine-biotin immunoperoxidase technique. Helicobacter pylori staining in the gastric mucosa was used as the control for the immunohistochemical method. Specimens were classified according to the presence of Helicobacter pylori under an optical microscope, and Helicobacter pylori positive specimens were stratified according to the respective staining pattern. Results Mean age was 61.88 ± 10.62 (40–82 years. Polyp sizes were 1.45 ± 0.92 (1–4 cm; and 25.5% of polyps were localized in the right colon, 68.6% in the left colon and 5.9% in the transverse colon. Presence of Helicobacter pylori was not correlated with localization (p > 0.05 or size of the polyps (p > 0.05. Eleven (21.6% of all specimens included in the study were Helicobacter pylori positive by immunohistochemical methods. Of the Helicobacter pylori positive specimens, the staining pattern was diffuse: Equivocal in 90.9%, nonspecific with a finely granular type concentrated on the luminal surface in 90.9%, dot-like granular in 54.5%, and spiral in 9.1%. Of the tubular polyps, 17.9% were H. pylori positive, and the staining pattern was equivocal in 100%, luminal in 85.7%, and dot-like granular in 57.1%. Of the

  13. Helicobacter pylori from Peptic Ulcer Patients in Uganda Is Highly Resistant to Clarithromycin and Fluoroquinolones: Results of the GenoType HelicoDR Test Directly Applied on Stool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denish Calmax Angol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Around 70–90% of peptic ulcer disease (PUD is due to Helicobacter pylori and requires treatment with antimicrobials to which these bacteria are susceptible. Common H. pylori diagnostic tests do not provide drug susceptibility data. Using the GenoType HelicoDR PCR test designed for gastric biopsies for simultaneous detection of H. pylori and its resistance to clarithromycin (CLA/fluoroquinolones (FLQ, we present evidence for stool as an optional test specimen and also provide data on prevalence of H. pylori resistance to CLA and FLQ in Uganda. Methods. Stool from 142 symptomatic PUD patients at three hospitals in Kampala was screened for H. pylori using a rapid antigen test. The GenoType HelicoDR test was run on all H. pylori antigen positives to determine PCR positivity and resistance to CLA/FLQ. Results. Thirty-one samples (22% were H. pylori antigen positive, and 21 (68% of these were H. pylori PCR positive. Six of the 21 (29% were resistant to CLA and eight to FLQ (42%, while two gave invalid FLQ resistance results. Conclusion. Stool is a possible specimen for the GenoType HelicoDR test for rapid detection of H. pylori and drug resistance. In Uganda, Helicobacter pylori is highly resistant to CLA and FLQ.

  14. Evaluation of a new test, genotype HelicoDR, for molecular detection of antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambau, Emmanuelle; Allerheiligen, Vera; Coulon, Céline; Corbel, Céline; Lascols, Christine; Deforges, Lionel; Soussy, Claude-James; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Megraud, Francis

    2009-11-01

    The eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori by standard therapy is decreasing due to antibiotic resistance, mainly to clarithromycin. Our aim was to provide a new molecular test to guide the treatment of new and relapsed cases. We first studied 126 H. pylori strains for phenotypic (MIC) and genotypic resistance to clarithromycin (rrl mutation) and levofloxacin (gyrA mutation) and then developed a DNA strip genotyping test on the basis of the correlation results and literature data. Clinical strains (n = 92) and gastric biopsy specimens containing H. pylori (n = 105) were tested blindly with the new molecular test GenoType HelicoDR. The presence of mutations or the absence of hybridization with wild-type sequences was predictive, in rrl for clarithromycin resistance in 91 cases (mostly the A2147G mutation) and in gyrA for levofloxacin resistance in 58 cases (mutations at codon 87 or 91). Genotyping revealed a mix of genotypes in 33% of the cases, reflecting a coinfection or selection for resistant mutants. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting resistance were 94% and 99% for clarithromycin and 87% and 98.5% for levofloxacin, respectively. The concordance scores were 0.96 for clarithromycin and 0.94 for levofloxacin. With global resistance rates of 46% for clarithromycin and 25% for levofloxacin, which were observed for consecutive positive biopsy specimens from 2007 and 2008, the positive and negative predictive values for detecting resistance were 99% and 94% for clarithromycin and 96% and 96% for fluoroquinolone. GenoType HelicoDR is efficient at detecting mutations predictive of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori when applied to strains or directly to gastric biopsy specimens.

  15. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori in gastric cancer in a south-east Asian population by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, A.Y-F; Chow, P.K.H.; Yu, W-K.; Ho, J.M.S.; Chan, H-S.; Wong, W-K.; Soo, K-C.

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is believed to play an important role in the aetiology of gastric cancer. There is a great variability in seropositivity and histological frequency of H. pylori in gastric cancer. The present prospective study investigates the prevalence of H. pylori infection in gastric cancer patients using 14C-urea breath testing. Patients with endoscopic biopsy-proven gastric cancer were fasted for 6 h prior to ingesting 18.5 x 104 Bq of 14C-urea cocktail orally. Breath samples were collected after 20 min by AS/King them to blow into a hyamine solution and measurements were read in a scintillation counter. Fifty out of 51 patients (98%) with gastric cancer were positive on the 14C-urea breath test compared to 29 patients (61%) who were positive on histology. There was no association between sex, age or tumour site, stage, differentiation, Lauren type and H. pylori status. The test was negative in one patient with cardiac tumour in which histology of the resected specimen was also negative for the bacteria. Active H. pylori infection is highly prevalent in gastric cancer in a South-East Asian population. The 14C-urea breath test is a highly sensitive method for detecting the presence of H. pylori even in gastric adenocarcinoma irrespective of the stage

  16. Turnover of carbon in the {sup 13}C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Vladimir E.; Andreazzi, Mariana; Cury, Caio S.; Bassetto Junior, Carlos A.Z.; Rodrigues, Maria A.M.; Ducatti, Carlos, E-mail: vladimir@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: ducatti@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: mariana.andreazazi@gmail.com, E-mail: caiocury@hotmail.com, E-mail: juniorbassett@hotmail.com, E-mail: mariar@fmb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of {sup 13}C-urea breath test ({sup 13}C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of {sup 13}C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the {sup 13}C in the {sup 13}C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C in expired CO{sub 2} from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to {sup 13}C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  17. Sensitivity is not an intrinsic property of a diagnostic test: empirical evidence from histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrilho Carla

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to provide empirical evidence of how spectrum effects can affect the sensitivity of histological assessment of Helicobacter pylori infection, which may contribute to explain the heterogeneity in prevalence estimates across populations with expectedly similar prevalence. Methods Cross-sectional evaluation of dyspeptic subjects undergoing upper digestive endoscopy, including collection of biopsy specimens from the greater curvature of the antrum for assessment of H. pylori infection by histopathological study and polymerase chain reaction (PCR, from Portugal (n = 106 and Mozambique (n = 102 following the same standardized protocol. Results In the Portuguese sample the prevalence of infection was 95.3% by histological assessment and 98.1% by PCR. In the Mozambican sample the prevalence was 63.7% and 93.1%, respectively. Among those classified as infected by PCR, the sensitivity of histological assessment was 96.2% among the Portuguese and 66.3% among the Mozambican. Among those testing positive by both methods, 5.0% of the Portuguese and 20.6% of the Mozambican had mild density of colonization. Conclusions This study shows a lower sensitivity of histological assessment of H. pylori infection in Mozambican dyspeptic patients compared to the Portuguese, which may be explained by differences in the density of colonization, and may contribute to explain the heterogeneity in prevalence estimates across African settings.

  18. 13C-urea breath test analyzed with infrared isotope spectrometry for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, M.; Schoensby, H.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have evaluated a 13 C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The 13 C-test was analyzed with isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry and compared with a 14 C-urea breath test and the urease test in gastric mucosal biopsies. 46 patients were analyzed with breath tests, 23 patients were negative and 22 patients were positive with both methods. One patients was positive with 14 C-method and negative with the 13 C-urea breath test. 61 patients were analyzed with the 13 C-urea breath test and the urease test. 30 patients were negative and 30 patients were positive with both methods, whereas one patient with a negative urease test had a positive breath test. 13 C-urea breath test analyzed with isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry is a fast, simple, non-radioactive, non-invasive, convenient and reliable method for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Negative Effect of Proton-pump Inhibitors (PPIs) on Helicobacter pylori Growth, Morphology, and Urease Test and Recovery after PPI Removal--An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saniee, Parastoo; Shahreza, Somayeh; Siavoshi, Farideh

    2016-04-01

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) consumption does lead to false-negative results of Helicobacter pylori diagnostic tests such as biopsy culture and rapid urease test (RUT). Helicobacter pylori isolates from 112 dyspeptic patients with (56.5%) or without (43.5%) PPI consumption were recruited for examining the negative effects of omeprazole (OMP), lansoprazole (LPZ), and pantoprazole (PAN) on H. pylori viability, morphology, and urease, in vitro. The effect of a sublethal concentration of OMP on bacterial features and their recovery after removal of OMP was also assessed. Of 112 culture-positive gastric biopsies, 87.5% were RUT positive and 12.5% RUT negative. There was a significant correlation between negative RUT results and PPI consumption (p urease of 90.3% of isolates between 0 and 40 minutes and 54.4% between 20 and 40 minutes, respectively. PAN did not inhibit H. pylori growth and urease. Three 3-day (9 days) consecutive subcultures of H. pylori on brucella blood agar (BBA) supplemented with OMP resulted in reduced bacterial viability (1+), compared with control (4+), change of spiral morphology to coccoid, and reduction in pink color intensity in urea agar. Bacterial growth (1+), morphology, and urease test did not improve after the first 3-day and second 3-day (6 days) subcultures on BBA. However, relative recovery occurred after the third 3-day (9 days) subculture and complete recovery was observed after the fourth 3-day (12 days) subculture, as confluent growth (4+), 100% spiral cells, and strong urease test. Proton-pump Inhibitors exert transient negative effects on H. pylori viability, morphology, and urease test. Accordingly, cessation of PPI consumption at least 12 days before endoscopy could help avoiding false-negative results of H. pylori diagnostic tests. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Accuracy of non-invasive 13C-urea breath test compared to invasive tests for helicobacter pylori detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, R.; Khaar, B.; Omar, M.; Qureshi, T.Z.; Ahmed, T.; Latif, Z.; Jaffery, I.; Omar, M.

    2007-01-01

    To compare the sensitivity, specificity and Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of histology, Campylobacter-Like Organism (CLO) test, culture and 13C-Urea Breath Test (UBT) for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. District Headquarter Hospital, Rawalpindi, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi and Pakistan Institute of Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Nilore, Islamabad from June 2002 to 2003. Three mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained during endoscopy of 90 symptomatic patients. Histology, CLO test and culture were performed on these specimens. Breath samples for 13C-UBT were collected and sent to RIAD, PINSTECH on the same day for isotope ratio mass spectrometry. For analysis purpose, each of the tests was fixed as the gold standard in turn and the others were then compared against it. In addition, any two as well as any three positive tests were then set as the gold standard and the other tests compared against them to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and PPV of other tests. Urea breath test had the highest sensitivity, ranging from 95 to 100%, against all the gold standards with specificity ranging from 55 to 100%, whereas the sensitivity of histological examination was around 98% but it had comparatively lower specificity (49-89%). The CLO test had a sensitivity range of 86-100% and specificity of 67-100%. Culture had the minimum sensitivity (59-70%) but had highest specificity (96-100%) against all the gold standards. Age and gender had no effect on p-value of each test or in combination. The urea breath test has shown the highest ability to detect the organism with 95-100% sensitivity in symptomatic individuals and specificity, which is comparable to other tests. (author)

  1. The sup 14 C-urea breath-test for the detection of gastric Campylobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surveyor, I; Goodwin, C S; Mullan, B P; Geelhoed, E; Warren, J R; Murray, R N; Waters, T E; Sanderson, C R [Royal Perth Hospital (Australia)

    1989-10-16

    Sixty-three patients who were undergoing endoscopy were studied. The radioactivity in exhaled breath which was sampled within five minutes of {sup 14}C -urea administration was attributed to the presence of urease enzyme in mouth organisms and was discounted. The time-radioactivity curves for breath samples from five to 30 minutes after the administration of {sup 14}C-urea gave an excellent separation between subjects with negative results of the examination of gastric-biopsy samples and patients with microbiological and histological evidence of infection with Campylobacter (C.) pylori. The area under the time-radioactivity curve at between five and 30 minutes after the administration of {sup 14}C-urea in 24 patients with negative microbiological results was 6.9{plus minus}4.4 area units; in 35 of 39 patients with positive microbiological results, this area was greater than 40 area units. Measured against the results of the microbiological examination of gastricbiopsy samples, the sensitivity of breath-testing was 90% and the specificity was 100%. Measured against the results of histological examination for the presence of C. pylori infection, breath-testing had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 93%. A positive breath-test result also correlated well (P=0.0001) with the serological antibody test-result. The role of non-invasive tests - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and {sup 14}C-urea breath-testing - in the management of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease is discussed. We consider that the {sup 14}C-urea breath-test has an important role in the noninvasive confirmation of gastric infection with C. pylori and in the follow-up of patients after treatment. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Pipe rupture test results; 4 inch pipe whip tests under BWR operational condition-clearance parameter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Syuzo; Isozaki, Toshikuni; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Kato, Rokuro; Saito, Kazuo; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of pipe rupture studies in JAERI is to perform the model tests on pipe whip, restraint behavior, jet impingement and jet thrust force, and to establish the computational method for analyzing these phenomena. This report describes the experimental results of pipe whip on the pipe specimens of 4 inch in diameter under BWR condition on which the pressure is 6.77 MPa and the temperature is 285 0 C. The pipe specimens were 114.3 mm (4 inch) in diameter and 8.6 mm in thickness and 4500 mm in length. Four pipe whip restraints used in the tests were the U-bar type of 8 mm in diameter and fabricated from type 304 stainless steel. The experimental parameter was the clearance (30, 50 and 100 mm). The dynamic strain behavior of the pipe specimen and the restraints was investigated by strain gages and their residual deformation was obtained by measuring marking points provided on their surface. The Pressure-time history in the pipe specimens was also obtained by pressure gages. The maximum pipe strain is caused near the restraints and increases with increase of the clearance. The experimental results of pipe whip tests indicate the effectiveness of pipe whip restraints. The ratio of absorbed strain energy of the pipe specimen to that of the restraints is nearly constant for different clearances at the overhang length of 400 mm. (author)

  3. A methodological aspect of the {sup 14}C-urea breath test used in Helicobacter pylori diagnosis; Wybrany aspekt metodologiczny testu oddechowego z mocznikiem znakowanym stosowanego w diagnostyce zakazenia Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J.; Witkowska, B. [Szpital Wojskowy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    The main purpose of those investigations was optimisation of the performing time of the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea which reveals Helicobacter pylori infection. It was analysed 117 species, preselected according to endoscopy and histopathology results, 56 of them have suffered from chronic gastritis and 61 from gastric ulcer disease. Using microbiology diagnosis (culture + IFP test) it was found that 86 species were H. pylori infected. This group of patients were next subject to investigations with the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea. Measurements of radioactivity of breathe air have been carried out for 30 minutes. The obtained results allow us to maintain that the optimal time of duration of the test described above is 30 minutes. (author) 38 refs, 2 tabs, 1 fig

  4. Effect of cigarette smoking on nasal mucociliary clearance: A comparative analysis using saccharin test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Kurian Baby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nasal mucociliary clearance (NMC system transports the mucus layer covering the nasal epithelium towards nasopharynx by ciliary beating at a frequency of 7-16 Hz. NMC is altered by septal deviations, upper respiratory infections, and drugs. Few studies have revealed significant depression of ciliary activity in smokers. We conducted this study to compare NMC and influence duration of smoking on NMC in adult smokers and nonsmokers using saccharin test. Materials and Methods: Our study included 30 nonsmokers and 30 smokers (21-40 years who were not on any medications and had no history of any systemic illness. Time elapsing until the first experience of sweet taste at posterior nasopharynx, following placement of saccharin particle approximately 1 cm behind the anterior end of inferior turbinate was recorded as NMC time in minutes using standard method described by Anderson. Mean NMC of both groups were compared using Student′s t -test and influence of duration was analyzed by one-way Analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: NMC was significantly prolonged in smokers (481.2 ± 29.83; P 5 years = 637.5 ± 28.49 s; F statistic = 20.8968, P = 0.0000. Conclusions: NMC measurement is a simple and useful index for the assessment of effect of smoking on the ciliary activity of respiratory mucosa. Prolonged clearance observed in smokers of our study may be due to slowed ciliary beat frequency or reduction in number of cilia and changes in viscoelastic properties of mucus.

  5. Multicentric randomised study of Helicobacter pylori eradication and pepsinogen testing for prevention of gastric cancer mortality: the GISTAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Marcis; Park, Jin Young; Murillo, Raul; Liepniece-Karele, Inta; Isajevs, Sergejs; Kikuste, Ilze; Rudzite, Dace; Krike, Petra; Parshutin, Sergei; Polaka, Inese; Kirsners, Arnis; Santare, Daiga; Folkmanis, Valdis; Daugule, Ilva; Plummer, Martyn; Herrero, Rolando

    2017-08-11

    Population-based eradication of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to be cost-effective and is recommended by international guidelines. However, the potential adverse effects of widespread antibiotic use that this would entail have not been sufficiently studied. An alternative way to decrease gastric cancer mortality is by non-invasive search for precancerous lesions, in particular gastric atrophy; pepsinogen tests are the best currently available alternative. The primary objective of GISTAR is to determine whether H pylori eradication combined with pepsinogen testing reduces mortality from gastric cancer among 40-64-year-old individuals. The secondary objectives include evaluation of H pylori eradication effectiveness in gastric cancer prevention in patients with precancerous lesions and evaluation of the potential adverse events, including effects on microbiome. Individuals are recruited from general population (50% men) in areas with high gastric cancer risk in Europe and undergo detailed lifestyle and medical history questionnaire before being randomly allocated to intervention or control groups. The intervention group undergoes H pylori testing and is offered eradication therapy if positive; in addition, pepsinogen levels are detected in plasma and those with decreased levels are referred for upper endoscopy. All participants are offered faecal occult blood testing as an incentive for study participation. Effectiveness of eradication and the spectrum of adverse events are evaluated in study subpopulations. A 35% difference in gastric cancer mortality between the groups is expected to be detectable at 90% power after 15 years if 30 000 individuals are recruited. Biological materials are biobanked for the main and ancillary studies. The study procedure and assumptions will be tested during the pilot phase. The study was approved by the respective ethics committees. An independent Data Safety and Monitoring Board has been established. The findings will be

  6. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  7. A comparative study of stool antigen Immunocard STAT HpSA test with biopsy in diagnosis of H Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munish Rastogi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted on 78 cases in the Department of Medicine at G.S.V.M Medical College, Kanpur who reported with various gastrointestinal symptoms such as dyspepsia, heartburns, nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite. They all were advised for biopsy by the physician. Patients treated with antibiotics, bismuth or proton pump inhibitors within 4 weeks preceding the study were excluded. Invasive tests using mucosal biopsies including histology and rapid urease test (RUT were used to establish the gold standard in order to evaluate the accuracy of Immunocard STAT HpSA. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value and Negative Predictive Value of Immunocard STAT HpSA as compared to gold standard were 95.5%, 81.8%, 96.9% and 75.0% respectively. It is thus concluded that the Immunocard STAT HpSA test has a diagnostic value comparable to the gold standard in detecting H Pylori. The sensitivity and specificity of the test is fair enough to be used as a test for screening purpose and also for diagnosis and treatment of H.Pylori infection in clinical practice

  8. Validation of a simplified carbon-14-urea breath test for routine use for detecting Helicobacter pylori noninvasively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henze, E.; Malfertheiner, P.; Clausen, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Adam, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    A carbon-14 ( 14 C) urea breath test for detecting Helicobacter pylori with multiple breath sampling was developed. Carbon-14-urea (110 kBq) administered orally to 18 normal subjects and to 82 patients with Helicobacter infection. The exhaled 14 C-labeled CO 2 was trapped at 10-min intervals for 90 min. The total 14 C activity exhaled over 90 min was integrated and expressed in %activity of the total dose given. In normals, a mean of 0.59% +/- 0.24% was measured, resulting in an upper limit of normal of 1.07%. In 82 patients, a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 83.8%, and a positive predictive value of 90.2% was found. The single probes at intervals of 40-60 min correlated best with the integrated result, with r ranging from 0.986 to 0.990. The test's diagnostic accuracy did not change at all when reevaluated with the 40-, 50-, or 60-min sample data alone. Thus, the 14 C-urea breath test can be applied routinely as a noninvasive, low-cost and one-sample test with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting Helicobacter pylori colonization

  9. The 13carbon urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in subjects with atrophic gastritis: evaluation in a primary care setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, A.; van Eeden, S.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; Sabbe, L. J. M.; den Hartog, G.; Biemond, I.; Lamers, C. B. H. W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (13)Carbon urea breath testing is reliable to detect current infection with Helicobacter pylori but has been reported to be of limited value in selected patients with atrophic body gastritis or acid-lowering medication. AIM: To evaluate the accuracy of (13)carbon urea breath testing for

  10. GenoType HelicoDR test in the determination of antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Nayoung; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2014-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori is most important factor in eradication success. GenoType HelicoDR test has been developed for rapid detection of antimicrobial resistance. The present study evaluated the clinical usefulness of GenoType HelicoDR test in Korea. To detect 23S rRNA for clarithromycin resistance and gyrA mutations for fluoroquinolone resistance, both DNA sequencing after minimal inhibitory test (MIC) and GenoType HelicoDR test were performed in H. pylori isolates from the gastric mucosa of 101 patients. The eradication results of clarithromycin and moxifloxacin-containing triple therapy were evaluated by the 23S rRNA and gyrA mutations. For 42 isolates with A2143G mutation by GenoType HelicoDR, 83.3% (35/42) of concordance rate was estimated with DNA sequencing method and 85.7% (36/42) for MIC test. For 43 isolates with N87K mutation by GenoType HelicoDR, 71.1% (31/43) of concordance rate was estimated with DNA sequencing and 88.4% (38/43) for MIC test. The sensitivity and specificity of GenoType HelicoDR test in determination of 23S rRNA mutation were 94.9% and 87.1%, and those of gyrA 98.2% and 80.0%. The sensitivity and specificity of GenoType HelicoDR test in determination of clarithromycin resistance based on MIC test were 55.0% and 80.0%, for fluoroquinolone 74.4% and 70.0%. GenoType HelicoDR test is useful to determine mutations responsible for clarithromycin or fluoroquinolone-containing eradication failure but has a limitation for the clinical applicability in determination of resistance.

  11. The fate of ingested [sup 14]C-urea in the urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munster, D J; Chapman, B A; Burt, M J; Dobbs, B R; Allardyce, R A; Bagshaw, P F; Troughton, W D; Cook, H B [Christchurch Hospital (New Zealand)

    1993-08-01

    The metabolic fate of the radioactive carbon in the [sup 14]C-urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori was investigated in 18 subjects. After ingestion of labelled urea, breath was sampled for 24 h, and urine was collected for 3 days. Subjects were designated high or low expirers on the basis of their breath counts, and this agreed well with H. pylori serologic analyses. When given 185 or 37 kBq of [sup 14]C-urea, 51% of the label was recovered from the breath of high expirers, and 7% from the breath of low expirers. The mean combined urinary and breath recovery for high expirers was 86%, and for low expirers it was 97%. It is concluded that the long-term retention of [sup 14]C from ingested [sup 14]C-urea is low. The results enable a more accurate estimation to be made of radiation exposure resulting from the [sup 14]C-urea breath test. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. {sup 14}C urea breath test kit- an evaluation of a compact, cost-effective kit for the detection of H. pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellon, M.S. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia). Dept of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa causes active chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. Carbon-14 urea breath testing has been well documented in its ability to detect the presence of H. pylori. The aims of this study were to evaluate and refine the test to substantially reduce costs and improve its simplicity, availability and accuracy. We reviewed the results of 138 patients who underwent {sup 14}C urea breath testing for the detection of H. pylori utilising a kit developed at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Modifications to the standard technique that were assessed included the relevance of buccal cleansing, single sample v multiple sampling, use of alternative CO{sub 2} absorbers and sampling techniques. In those patients with positive biopsy results, a test sensitivity of 100% was achieved. No buccal cleansing is necessary (45% oral contamination without brushing teeth v 41% with). A single breath sample only at 15 min resulted in 100% sensitivity. Alternative (cheaper and safer) CO{sub 2} absorbers such as KOH can be used. Based on these results, modifications to this well documented test have enabled us to substantially reduce costs, improve simplicity and safety and increase accuracy and availability of the test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori.

  13. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  14. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your child aspirin, aspirin-containing medicines, ibuprofen, or anti-inflammatory drugs because these may irritate the stomach or cause stomach bleeding. With prolonged antibiotic therapy, H. pylori gastritis and peptic ulcer disease ( ...

  15. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P.

    1991-01-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration

  16. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Louvain Medical School, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  17. Detection of H. Pylori infection on dyspepsia patients with IgA H. Pylori antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesnihari, R.

    2018-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has a big role in the relapse and pathogenesis of the upper gastrointestinal disease. Dyspepsia is characterized by uncomfortable feeling at the upper gastrointestinal area. IgA H. pylori antibody was in two-thirds of H. pylori infected patients, but about 7.2% of IgA H. Pylori antibody became the only positive result of the test between the two serology test (IgG and IgA). A cross-sectional study was conducted in 38 patients with dyspepsia. The IgA antibody test for H. pylori in the serum of dyspepsia patient conducted through the ELISA test. The hemoglobin levels, leukocytes, platelets number, and H. pylori infection via IgA antibody test on ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia patient had no significant difference. There was a relation between the number of platelets in the infected H. pylori patients compared to the non-infected patients. H. pylori infection in the ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia patient with serology method was 18%. H. pylori infection number on ulcer dyspepsia was not higher than the non-ulcer dyspepsia, all ulcer dyspepsia patients who were with H. pylori found with a lesion on the antrum.

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of universal noninvasive testing for post-treatment confirmation of Helicobacter pylori eradication and the impact of patient adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boklage, Susan H; Mangel, Allen W; Ramamohan, Varun; Mladsi, Deirdre; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The treatment failure rate for Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is ~20% due to poor patient compliance and increased antibiotic resistance. This analysis assessed the cost-effectiveness of universal post-treatment testing to confirm eradication of H. pylori infection in adults. Decision-analytic models evaluated the cost-effectiveness of universal post-treatment testing (urea breath test [UBT] or monoclonal fecal antigen test [mFAT]) vs no testing (Model 1), and UBT vs mFAT after adjusting for patient adherence to testing (Model 2) in adults who previously received first-line antimicrobial therapy. Patients testing positive received second-line quadruple therapy; no further action was taken for those testing negative or with no testing (Model 1) or for those nonadherent to testing (Model 2). In addition to testing costs, excess lifetime costs and reduced quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) due to continuing H. pylori infection were considered in the model. Expected total costs per patient were higher for post-treatment testing (UBT: US$325.76; mFAT: US$242.12) vs no testing (US$182.41) in Model 1 and for UBT (US$336.75) vs mFAT (US$326.24) in Model 2. Expected QALYs gained per patient were 0.71 and 0.72 for UBT and mFAT, respectively, vs no testing (Model 1), and the same was 0.37 for UBT vs mFAT (Model 2). The estimated incremental costs per QALY gained for post-treatment testing vs no testing were US$82.90-US$202.45 and, after adjusting for adherence, US$28.13 for UBT vs mFAT. Universal post-treatment testing was found to be cost-effective for confirming eradication of H. pylori infection following first-line therapy. Better adherence to UBT relative to mFAT was the key to its cost-effectiveness.

  19. Comparison of three stool antigen assays with the 13C- urea breath test for the primary diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and monitoring treatment outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooton, Carmel

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The urea breath test (UBT) is the gold-standard non-invasive test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, however, the lack of availability of the UBT due to the high cost of the test, and in particular the need for expensive analytical instrumentation, limits the usefulness of this method. Stool antigen assays may offer an alternative non-invasive method for the diagnosis of infection. OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of three stool antigen assays (HpSA, IDEIA HpStAR, and ImmunoCard STAT) against the UBT for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for monitoring treatment outcome. METHODS: A total of 102 patients attending two gastroenterology day-case clinics for the investigation of dyspepsia were included. Each patient provided breath and stool samples for analysis. Patients who tested positive for H. pylori by the validated UBT were prescribed triple therapy and invited to return for repeat breath and stool sample analysis 6 weeks post-treatment. RESULTS: Of the 102 patients tested, 48 were diagnosed with H. pylori infection by the UBT. The HpSA assay interpreted 38 of these as positive (79% sensitive). Of the 54 UBT-negative patients the HpSA assay interpreted all 54 as negative (100% specific). The IDEIA HpStAR assay correctly identified 44 patients as positive (92% sensitive) and 50 as negative (92.5% specific). The ImmunoCard STAT assay interpreted 38 patients as positive (79% sensitive) and 52 as negative (96.3% specific). CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that the IDEIA HpStAR stool antigen kit is the most accurate assay of the three assays evaluated, and possibly represents a viable alternative to the UBT for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for monitoring treatment outcome.

  20. Gastric clearance of alpha-1-antitrypsin under cimetidine perfusion. New test to detect protein-losing gastropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florent, C.; Vidon, N.; Flourie, B.; Carmantrand, A.; Zerbani, A.; Maurel, M.; Bernier, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Gastric losses of plasma are usually measured with radiolabeled macromolecules. This method is expensive and cumbersome. Direct measurement of exudated plasma proteins are ineffective since proteins are denaturated by acidic gastric juice and pepsin. It was recently shown that albumin measurement after immediate neutralization allowed detection of gastric protein losses, but this method is quite complex and time consuming. We studied alpha 1-antitrypsin and 51Cr-labeled protein clearance in gastric juice during normal saline and cimetidine (1.5 mg/kg/hr) infusion in six healthy volunteers and six patients with exudative gastropathy. alpha 1-Antitrypsin was measurable in all samples during cimetidine infusion: alpha 1-AT and 51Cr losses were significantly correlated (P less than 0.001). The upper limit of gastric alpha 1-AT clearance in controls was 0.86 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD). Using this value, there was no overlapping between patients and controls. The upper limit of 51Cr test was 1.87 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD) in controls but gastric clearance of 51Cr was below this value in one patient. This suggests that the measurement of alpha 1-AT gastric clearance during cimetidine perfusion is a good test to detect an exudative gastropathy. This test is inexpensive and lasts only 3 hr

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Raymond, Josette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in children differs from that in adults, from the point of view of epidemiology, host response, clinical features, related diseases, and diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. The prevalence of H. pylori infection, in both children and adults, is decreasing in the Western World as well as in some developing countries, which contrasts with the increase in childhood asthma and allergic diseases. Recurrent abdominal pain is not specific during H. pylori infection in children. The role of H. pylori infection and failure to thrive, children's growth, type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease remains controversial. The main initial diagnosis is based on upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy-based methods. Nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. The infection eradication control is based on validated noninvasive tests. The main cause of treatment failure of H. pylori infection is its clarithromycin resistance. We recommend standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of H. pylori in pediatric patients prior to the initiation of eradication therapy. H. pylori treatment in children should be based on an evaluation of the rate of eradication in the local population, a systematic use of a treatment adapted to the susceptibility profile and a treatment compliance greater than 90%. The last meta-analysis in children did not show an advantage for sequential therapy when compared to a 14-day triple therapy. Finally, the high rate of antibiotic resistance responsible for therapy failure in recent years justifies the necessity of a novel vaccine to prevent H. pylori infection in children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. 133 xenon muscle clearance as a test parameter in the diagnosis of peripheral diabetic angiopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlmann, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    In 100 patients with manifest diabetes mellitus the irrigation in both legs at rest and in radioactive hyperemia after ischemic muscle work was measured by means of the 133-xenon muscle clearance. The clearance values measured ranged between 0.8 and 3.5 ml/100 g/60 s at rest and between 3.3 and 40.0 ml/100 gl/60 s during radioactive hyperemia. In 96 pc of the probands the irrigation of the legs was impaired. For the relation between glucose level and irrigation at rest a significant negative correlation was found. The difference between the clearance values for the right and left lower extremity was significant. For the relation between glucose level and reactive hyperemia, too, a significant negative correlation was found. The difference between the clearance values for the right and left lower extremities was significant. The measurement of the irrigation at rest showed no significant correlation between the period of manifestation of the diabetes and the clearance values. By contrast, the irrigation values during reactive hyperemia were shown to be in significantly negative correlation to the duration of the diabetes. No connection was found between the frequency of diabetic gangrene and impaired irrigation at rest. By contrast, there was a relation between decreasing hyperemia values and increased frequency of gangrene. A collection of case histories shows how the measuring results of the xenon clearance fit into the overall clinical picture. A comparison of xenon clearance with other methods of irrigation measurement confirmed obvious advantages of xenon clearance for the detection of diabetic microangiopathies. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Demonstration of a dynamic clearance seal in a rotating test facility.

    OpenAIRE

    Messenger, Andrew; Williams, Richard; Ingram, Grant; Hogg, Simon; Tibos, Stacie; Seaton, Jon; Charnley, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    The successful demonstration of the “Aerostatic Seal” in a half scale rotating facility is described in this paper. The Aerostatic seal is a novel dynamic clearance seal specifically designed for steam turbine secondary gas path applications. The seal responds to radial rotor excursions, so a reduced clearance can be maintained compared to conventional labyrinth seal without damage to the seal. This enables increased turbine performance through reduced leakage and increased tolerance of turbi...

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of helicobacter pylori in Turkey: a nationally-representative, cross-sectional, screening with the 13C-Urea breath test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is an important global pathogen infecting approximately 50% of the world’s population. This study was undertaken in order to estimate the prevalence rate of Helicobacter pylori infections among adults living in Turkey and to investigate the associated risk factors. Method This study was a nationally representative cross sectional survey, using weighted multistage stratified cluster sampling. All individuals aged ≥18 years in the selected households were invited to participate in the survey. Ninety two percent (n = 2382) of the households in 55 cities participated; 4622 individuals from these households were tested with the 13C-Urea breath test. Helicobacter pylori prevalence and associated factors were analysed by the t test, chi square and multiple logistic regression with SPSS11.0. Results The weighted overall prevalence was 82.5% (95% CI: 81.0-84.2) and was higher in men. It was lowest in the South which has the major fruit growing areas of the country. The factors included in the final model were sex, age, education, marital status, type of insurance (social security), residential region, alcohol use, smoking, drinking water source. While education was the only significant factor for women, residential region, housing tenure, smoking and alcohol use were significant for men in models by sex. Conclusion In Turkey, Helicobacter pylori prevalence was found to be very high. Individuals who were women, elderly adults, single, had a high educational level, were living in the fruit growing region, had social security from Emekli Sandigi, were drinking bottled water, non smokers and regular alcohol consumers, were under less risk of Helicobacter pylori infection than others. PMID:24359515

  5. Helicobacter Pylori – A Moving Target | Lambiotte | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pylori) continues to grow. Testing is also now advised for patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura, unexplained vitamin B12 or iron deficiency anemia. Despite the indications for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection widening, definitive ...

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007715.htm Helicobacter pylori infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ) is a type of bacteria that ...

  7. Comparison of fecal occult blood tests for colorectal cancer screening in an Alaska Native population with high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Asay, Elvin; Roberts, Diana; Haverkamp, Donald; Perdue, David; Bruce, Michael G; Sacco, Frank; Espey, David

    2014-04-10

    Alaska Native colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. CRC screening using guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests (gFOBT) are not recommended for Alaska Native people because of false-positive results associated with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated hemorrhagic gastritis. This study evaluated whether the newer immunochemical FOBT (iFOBT) resulted in a lower false-positive rate and higher specificity for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasia than gFOBT in a population with elevated prevalence of H. pylori infection. We used a population-based sample of 304 asymptomatic Alaska Native adults aged 40 years or older undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy (April 2008-January 2012). Specificity differed significantly (P < .001) between gFOBT (76%; 95% CI, 71%-81%) and iFOBT (92%; 95% CI, 89%-96%). Among H. pylori-positive participants (54%), specificity of iFOBT was even higher (93% vs 69%). Overall, sensitivity did not differ significantly (P = .73) between gFOBT (29%) and iFOBT (36%). Positive predictive value was 11% for gFOBT and 32% for iFOBT. The iFOBT had a significantly higher specificity than gFOBT, especially in participants with current H. pylori infection. The iFOBT represents a potential strategy for expanding CRC screening among Alaska Native and other populations with elevated prevalence of H. pylori, especially where access to screening endoscopy is limited.

  8. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...

  9. Application of 13C-urea breath test in patients diagnosed as H. pylori-negative by gastroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Long; Liu Changjiang; Gao Jianqing; Xu Sumei; Chen Linna; Zhou Jianming

    2006-01-01

    13 C-urea breath test( 13 C-UBT)was used to evaluate infection rate of H. pylori(HP) and effect of HP eradication in patients diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test. Patiens without gastrointestinal disorders were set as control group. Within 640 patients diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test, there were 389 patients showed HP-positive by 13 C-UBT. The positive rate of HP was 60.8%. 389 patients diagnosed as HP- positive by 13 C-UBT were treated with PPI-based triple therapy, PPI-based double therapy and single PPI therapy, respectively. After treatment, the negative rate of 13 C-UBT was 83.8%, 18.4% and 3.3%, respectively. The results showed significant difference between three kinds of therapy (P 13 C-UBT could improve the diagnostic rate of HP to patients who diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test. (authors)

  10. Relation between Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adianez Sugrañes-Montalván

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: In the present study, the relationship between chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori infection was demonstrated. Apparently, the eradicating treatment for Helicobacter pylori was effective as the patients had no symptoms after treatment. Specific immunoglobulin G and Urease Test together constitute a suitable diagnostic module for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori conditions.

  11. Testing of a Microwave Blade Tip Clearance Sensor at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woike, Mark R.; Roeder, James W.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new active tip clearance control and structural health monitoring schemes in turbine engines and other types of rotating machinery requires sensors that are highly accurate and can operate in a high-temperature environment. The use of a microwave sensor to acquire blade tip clearance and tip timing measurements is being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microwave blade tip clearance sensor works on principles that are very similar to a short-range radar system. The sensor sends a continuous microwave signal towards a target and measures the reflected signal. The phase difference of the reflected signal is directly proportional to the distance between the sensor and the target being measured. This type of sensor is beneficial in that it has the ability to operate at extremely high temperatures and is unaffected by contaminants that may be present in turbine engines. The use of microwave sensors for this application is a new concept. Techniques on calibrating the sensors along with installation effects are not well quantified as they are for other sensor technologies. Developing calibration techniques and evaluating installation effects are essential in using these sensors to make tip clearance and tip timing measurements. As a means of better understanding these issues, the microwave sensors were used on a benchtop calibration rig, a large axial vane fan, and a turbofan. Background on the microwave tip clearance sensor, an overview of their calibration, and the results from their use on the axial vane fan and the turbofan will be presented in this paper.

  12. Performances of Four Helicobacter pylori Serological Detection Kits Using Stool Antigen Test as Gold Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranjia-Hurdoyal, Susheela D; Seetulsingh-Goorah, Sharmila P

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to determine the performances of four Helicobacter pylori serological detection kits in different target groups, using Amplified IDEIA™ Hp StAR™ as gold standard. Kits studied were Rapid Immunochromatoghraphic Hexagon, Helicoblot 2.1, an EIA IgG kit and EIA IgA kit. Stool and blood samples were collected from 162 apparently healthy participants (control) and 60 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. The performances of the four serological detection kits were found to be affected by gender, age, health status and ethnicity of the participants. In the control group, the Helicoblot 2.1 kit had the best performance (AUC = 0.85; ppoor performances. In the T2DM subgroup, the kits H2.1 and EIA IgG had best performances, with accuracies of 96.5% and 93.1% respectively. The performance of EIA IgG improved with adjustment of its cut-off value. The performances of the detection kits were affected by various factors which should be taken into consideration.

  13. Performances of Four Helicobacter pylori Serological Detection Kits Using Stool Antigen Test as Gold Standard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheela D Biranjia-Hurdoyal

    Full Text Available The aim was to determine the performances of four Helicobacter pylori serological detection kits in different target groups, using Amplified IDEIA™ Hp StAR™ as gold standard. Kits studied were Rapid Immunochromatoghraphic Hexagon, Helicoblot 2.1, an EIA IgG kit and EIA IgA kit.Stool and blood samples were collected from 162 apparently healthy participants (control and 60 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients.The performances of the four serological detection kits were found to be affected by gender, age, health status and ethnicity of the participants. In the control group, the Helicoblot 2.1 kit had the best performance (AUC = 0.85; p<0.05, accuracy = 86.4%, followed by EIA IgG (AUC = 0.75; p<0.05, accuracy = 75.2%. The Rapid Hexagon and EIA IgA kits had relatively poor performances. In the T2DM subgroup, the kits H2.1 and EIA IgG had best performances, with accuracies of 96.5% and 93.1% respectively. The performance of EIA IgG improved with adjustment of its cut-off value.The performances of the detection kits were affected by various factors which should be taken into consideration.

  14. Microdose 14C urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori: a survey in Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Dowlatabadi Bazaz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon -14 urea breath test (UBTis a non-invasive and simple method for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Attempts have been made to use lower doses of 14C-urea in the UBT in order to reduce the radiation risk of the test. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a microdose (1 µCi [37 KBq] 14C-UBT in Iranian population for validation of its diagnostic accuracy against gold standard methods. Eighty and two patients were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as well as 14C-UBT in one week. Rapid urease test and histological examinations were used as gold standard. Breath samples were collected 10, 20 and 30 minute after ingestion of 1 µCi of 14C- urea solution and their activities were measured using a scintillation counter and expressed as counts per minute (cpm and disintegration per minute (dpm. Good agreement was observed between the 14C-UBT and gold standard for samples which were collected 20 minutes after 14C-urea administration. The 14CUBT showed 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 95.45% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value and 97.50% accuracy. The results of this study showed good concordance between the 14C-UBT and invasive methods.

  15. Reduced effectiveness of escitalopram in the forced swimming test is associated with increased serotonin clearance rate in food restricted rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, CP; Li, J-X; Owens, WA; Koek, W; Toney, GM; Daws, LC

    2012-01-01

    Efficacy of antidepressant drugs is often limited. One of the limiting factors may be diet. This study shows that the effect of escitalopram in the forced swimming test is diminished in rats by food restriction that decreased body weight by 8%. The primary target for escitalopram is the serotonin (5-HT) transporter. Using high-speed chronoamperometry to measure 5-HT clearance in vivo in rats fed the same food restricted diet, the rate of 5-HT clearance from extracellular fluid in brain was dramatically increased. Increased 5-HT transporter function under conditions of dietary restriction might contribute to the decreased effect of escitalopram. These results suggest that diet plays an integral role in determining efficacy of antidepressant drugs, and might well generalize to other psychoactive drugs that impinge upon the 5-HT transporter. PMID:19419596

  16. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Laszewicz, Wiktor; Lamarque, Dominique; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2006-10-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcers, in particular duodenal ulcers, is decreasing following decreasing prevalence of H. pylori infection, while the frequency of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)-induced and H. pylori-negative idiopathic ulcers is increasing. The incidence of bleeding ulcers has been stable during the last decades. Several putative H. pylori virulence genes, i.e., cag, vacA, babA, or dupA, as well as host-related genetic factors like IL-1beta and TNFalpha-gene polymorphism, have been proposed as risk factors for duodenal ulcer. H. pylori eradication may prevent NSAID complications, in particular, when it is performed before introduction of NSAIDs. There is a complex association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and the impact of H. pylori eradication on the appearance of GERD symptoms depends on various host- and bacteria-related factors. Eradication of H. pylori in GERD is recommended in patients before instauration of a long-term PPI treatment to prevent the development of gastric atrophy. A small proportion (10%) of non-ulcer dyspepsia cases may be attributed to H. pylori and may benefit from eradication treatment. A test-and-treat strategy is more cost-effective than prompt endoscopy in the initial management of dyspepsia.

  17. "VALIDATION OF 13C-UREA BREATH TEST WITH NON DISPERSIVE ISOTOPE SELECTIVE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION: A SURVEY IN IRANIAN POPULATION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Davood Beiki

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The urea breath test (UBT which is carried out with 13C or 14C labeled urea is one of the most important non invasive methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection. Application of 13C-UBT is becoming increasingly popular because of its non radioactive nature which makes it suitable for diagnostic purposes in children and women of child bearing ages. While isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS is generally used to detect 13C in expired breath, this instrument is expensive and recently non dispersive isotope selective infrared (NDIR spectroscopy which is a lower cost technique has been employed as a reliable counterpart for IRMS in small clinics. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of NDIR spectroscopy technique in Iranian population in comparison with histological examination, rapid urease test and 14C-urea breath test as gold standard. Seventy six patients with dyspepsia were underwent 13CUBT for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Good agreements were found between the 13C-UBT and gold standard methods. The 13C-UBT showed 100% sensitivity, 97.3% specificity, 97.56% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value and 98.65% accuracy. On the basis of these results it could be concluded that 13C-UBT performed with NDIR spectroscopy is a reliable, accurate and non invasive diagnostic tool for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the Iranian population.

  18. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding ulcer disease: rapid urease test and histology Diagnóstico mediante endoscopia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori en pacientes con úlcera gastroduodenal y hemorragia digestiva: test rápido de ureasa e histología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castro-Fernández

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the endoscopic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer is limited by a decreased sensitivity in standard invasive tests, rapid urease test and histology. There is controversy about the convenience of using one, neither, or both diagnostic tests. Aims: to evaluate the results of simultaneously performed rapid urease test and histology in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection (H. pylori in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer. Patients and methods: we included 173 patients, 98 male and 75 female, with an average age of 62 years (18-88, with upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to duodenal ulcer (115 or gastric ulcer (58, diagnosed within 24 hours after hospital admission. None of the patients had received treatment for H. pylori, proton pump inhibitors or antibiotics in the two weeks prior to the upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode. H. pylori infection was investigated in all patients by two antral biopsy samples for histological study (hematoxilin-eosin and one or two antral biopsies for rapid urease test (Jatrox®-H.p.-test. In cases with a negative urease test and histology, a 13C urea breath test was performed. Infection was considered present when at least one invasive test or the breath test was positive, whereas both invasive tests and the breath test had to be negative to establish an absent infection. Results: 152 patients (88% showed H. pylori infection, 104 patients (90% with duodenal ulcer and 48 patients (83% with gastric ulcer. In all 119 cases (78% were diagnosed by the urease test and 112 cases (74% by histology. Both methods were used to diagnose 134 of 152 cases (88% (p Introducción: el diagnóstico de la infección por Helicobacter pylori, mediante endoscopia, en pacientes con úlcera gastroduodenal y hemorragia digestiva está limitado por la disminución de la sensibilidad de los métodos invasivos habituales, test de la ureasa e histología. Existen

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of universal noninvasive testing for post-treatment confirmation of Helicobacter pylori eradication and the impact of patient adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boklage SH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan H Boklage,1 Allen W Mangel,2 Varun Ramamohan,2 Deirdre Mladsi,2 Tao Wang1 1Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc, Princeton, NJ, 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: The treatment failure rate for Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is ~20% due to poor patient compliance and increased antibiotic resistance. This analysis assessed the cost-effectiveness of universal post-treatment testing to confirm eradication of H. pylori infection in adults.Methods: Decision-analytic models evaluated the cost-effectiveness of universal post-treatment testing (urea breath test [UBT] or monoclonal fecal antigen test [mFAT] vs no testing (Model 1, and UBT vs mFAT after adjusting for patient adherence to testing (Model 2 in adults who previously received first-line antimicrobial therapy. Patients testing positive received second-line quadruple therapy; no further action was taken for those testing negative or with no testing (Model 1 or for those nonadherent to testing (Model 2. In addition to testing costs, excess lifetime costs and reduced quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs due to continuing H. pylori infection were considered in the model.Results: Expected total costs per patient were higher for post-treatment testing (UBT: US$325.76; mFAT: US$242.12 vs no testing (US$182.41 in Model 1 and for UBT (US$336.75 vs mFAT (US$326.24 in Model 2. Expected QALYs gained per patient were 0.71 and 0.72 for UBT and mFAT, respectively, vs no testing (Model 1, and the same was 0.37 for UBT vs mFAT (Model 2. The estimated incremental costs per QALY gained for post-treatment testing vs no testing were US$82.90–US$202.45 and, after adjusting for adherence, US$28.13 for UBT vs mFAT.Conclusion: Universal post-treatment testing was found to be cost-effective for confirming eradication of H. pylori infection following first-line therapy. Better adherence to UBT relative to mFAT was the key to its cost-effectiveness. Keywords: health

  20. Comparison of IL-6, IL-8 Concentrations in H. pylori- and non-H. pylori-associated Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontar Alamsyah Siregar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is a non-invasive microorganism causing intense gastric mucosal inflammatory and immune reaction. The gastric mucosal levels of the proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin 6 (IL-6 and IL-8 have been reported to be increased in H. pylori infection, but the serum levels in H. pylori infection is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in H. pylori infection. METHODS: A cross sectional study was done on eighty consecutive gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and Permata Bunda Hospital, Medan, Indonesia from May-October 2014. Histopathology was performed for the diagnosis of gastritis. Rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Serum samples were obtained to determine circulating IL-6 and IL-8. Univariate and bivariate analysis (independent t test were done. RESULTS: There were 41.25% patients infected with H. pylori. Circulatory IL-6 levels were significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori negative, but there were no differences between serum levels of IL-8 in H. pylori positive and negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected in an increased level of serum IL-6. Serum levels of IL-8 were not significantly different between H. pylori positive and negative. KEYWORDS: Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, IL-6, IL-8, cytokine.

  1. [Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal lesions in 547 symptomatic young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudelli, A; Vialette, G; Brazier, F; Seurat, P L; Capron, D; Dupas, J L

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is involved in the pathogenesis of gastric inflammatory disorders. Both antral chronic gastritis and H. pylori infection prevalence increase with age. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of H. pylori infection in young adults and to study the relationship between endoscopical and histological features and H. pylori infection. The study concerned 547 young patients (age: 18-25 years), undergoing endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The severity and the activity of chronic gastritis was graded by histological examination of antral biopsies. The diagnosis of H. pylori infection was based on histology and culture or urease test. Fifty-three percent of the patients had a normal endoscopy; 44 ulcers were found: 34 duodenal ulcers and 10 gastric ulcers. H. pylori infection was detected in 34% of cases. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 29.8% in non-ulcer patients, 50% in gastric ulcers and 91% in duodenal ulcers (P < 0.01). Duodenal ulcer, aspect of antral mosaic mucosa and nodular gastritis, were closely related to the presence of H. pylori. There was a significant relationship between H. pylori infection and both the severity (P < 0.01) and the activity (P < 0.01) of the antral chronic gastritis. The prevalence of follicular gastritis was 22% : it was present in 60% of H. pylori positive patients and 2.4% of H. pylori negative patients. H. pylori infection was more frequent in patients from Africa than in Europeans (P < 0.01). There was no significant association between H. pylori infection and different types of diets, settlements (rural vs urban) or symptoms. These results show that in the young population studied, duodenal ulcer, nodular gastritis, antral mosaic mucosa, active chronic gastric and follicular gastritis are closely related to H. pylori infection. They suggest that in the subgroup of non ulcer symptomatic patients, H. pylori prevalence is higher than in the general population.

  2. Sensitivity analysis on the interfacial drag in SPACE code to simulate UPTF separate effect test about loop seal clearance phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukho; Lim, Sanggyu; You, Gukjong; Park, Youngsheop [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear thermal hydraulic system code known as SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis CodE) was developed and its V and V (Verification and Validation) have been conducted using well-known SETs (Separate Effect Tests) and IETs (Integral Effect Tests). At the same time, the SBLOCA (Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident) methodology in accordance with Appendix K of 10CFR50 for the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400) was developed and applied to regulatory body for licensing in 2013. Especially, the SBLOCA methodology developed using SPACE v2.14 code adopts inherent test matrix independent of V and V test to show its conservatism for important phenomena. In this paper, the predictability of SPACE code for UPTF (Upper Plenum Test Facility) test simulating loop seal clearance of SBLOCA important phenomena and the related sensitivity analysis are introduced.

  3. Helicobacter pylori: From Infection to Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 380 abstracts, presentations and posters of recent advances were highlighted at the European and International Helicobacter pylori meeting held July 7 to 9, 1995 in Edinburgh, Scotland. New advances abound, with major interest focusing on the simple, safe, inexpensive new `gold standard’ for H pylori eradication therapy: a single week of tid omeprazole 20 mg, metronidazole 400 mg and clarithromycin 250 mg, or omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg and clarithromycin 500 mg. To avoid false negative results, two biopsies must be taken from the antrum and two from the gastric body at least four weeks after completion of eradication therapy, and ideally should be supplemented with at least one further H pylori test such as a biopsy for urease activity or culture, or a urea breath test. While most patients with a gastric or duodenal ulcer (DU who do not consume nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are infected with H pylori, the association is much less apparent in those with a DU who present with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. H pylori eradication for nonulcer dyspepsia is not widely recommended, and the patient with a DU given effective H pylori eradication who presents with dyspepsia likely has erosive esophagitis rather than recurrent DU or H pylori. Gastroenterologists are at increased risk of H pylori infection, particularly older gastroenterologists who are very busy endoscopists.

  4. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases...

  5. SU-F-T-496: An Investigation of Two Novel Devices for Testing Linac Clearance During CT Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, A; Massingill, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work’s objective is to determine the efficacy of two newly patented devices termed the Mor-O rings, Mark1 and Mark2, developed to predict collisions between the patient and a linac at the time of CT simulation. Methods: Mark1: A ring with an inner radius equal to the distance between the isocenter and the nearest portion of a linac head(diso) was made. This is mounted to a stand that allows vertical repositioning. The ring is placed around the patient on the CT table and aligned with isocenter. The patient is moved through the ring. If the ring touches the patient, a collision is predicted. To test this device, predicted collisions were marked on a phantom. The phantom was then repositioned on the linac table where the collisions were verified. Mark2: An arc with the radius diso was created with a re-locatable half-linac head wire-frame. The Mark2 is positioned in the same way as the Mark1 but can additionally mimic couch and gantry angulations. The Mark2 was tested with a volunteer using multiple couch, gantry and isocenter positions. The volunteer was then repositioned on the linac table to verify the angles of collisions. Results: Mark1: One isocenter out of ten showed negative clearance (0.9mm) on the linac table. All other collisions were predicted with 1 to 36mm of additional clearance. Mark2: All collisions were prevented with an additional 1.3 to 14.8 degrees of clearance. Conclusion: The Mark1 prototype is able to predict all collisions when no couch angulation is used. This device takes less than a minute to setup and is simple to use. The Mark2, when testing beam geometries used for noncoplanar SBRT, was able to prevent all collisions with 1.3 to 14.8 degrees additional clearance. Improvements in construction for both devices could increase accuracy and usability. Andrew Morrow owns Morrow Physics, LLC and Brian Massingill owns Spur Physics, LLC. We are both listed on the patent for the devices investigated in this work (patent 9220922

  6. CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with decreased risk of Barrett's esophagus in a population with high H. pylori infection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortego Javier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim The role that H. pylori infection plays in the development of and Barrett's esophagus (BE is uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that infection with cagA+ Helicobacter pylori strains protects against the development of BE. Methods We studied 104 consecutive patients, residents in an area with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, with BE and 213 sex- and age-matched controls. H. pylori infection and CagA antibody status were determined by western blot serology. Results H. pylori prevalence was higher in patients with BE than in controls (87.5% vs. 74.6%; OR. 2.3; 95% CI: 1.23–4.59. Increasing age was associated with a higher prevalence of H. pylori (p Conclusion Neither H. pylori infection nor H. pylori infection by CagA+ strains reduce the risk of BE in a population with high prevalence of H. pylori infection.

  7. Economic evaluation of test-and-treat and empirical treatment strategies in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection; A Markov model in an Iranian adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazdaki, Alireza; Ghiasvand, Hesam; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Naghdi, Seyran; Aryankhesal, Aidin

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause many gastrointestinal problems in developing countries such as Iran. We aimed to analyze the cost- effectiveness and cost- utility of the test-and-treat and empirical treatment strategies in managing Helicobacter pylori infection. This was a Markov based economic evaluation. Effectiveness was defined as the symptoms free numbers and QALYs in 100,000 hypothetical adults. The sensitivity analysis was based on Monte Carlo approach. In the test- and- treat strategy, if the serology is the first diagnostic test vs. histology, the cost per symptoms free number would be 291,736.1 Rials while the cost per QALYs would be 339,226.1 Rials. The cost per symptoms free number and cost per QALYs when the 13 C-UBT was used as the first diagnostic test vs. serology was 1,283,200 and 1,492,103 Rials, respectively. In the empirical strategy, if histology is used as the first diagnostic test vs. 13 CUBT, the cost per symptoms free numbers and cost per QALYs would be 793,234 and 955,698 Rials, respectively. If serology were used as the first diagnostic test vs. histology, the cost per symptoms free and QALYs would be 793,234 and 368941 Rials, respectively. There was no significant and considerable dominancy between the alternatives and the diagnostic tests.

  8. Mucociliary clearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Mathias; Mortensen, Jann

    2014-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance has long been known to be a significant innate defence mechanism against inhaled microbes and irritants. Important knowledge has been gathered regarding the anatomy and physiology of this system, and in recent years, extensive studies of the pathophysiology related to lung...... pharmacological interventions on clearance rate, to study the importance of defective mucus clearance in different lung diseases or as a diagnostic tool in the work-up of patients with recurrent airway diseases. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology...

  9. A screening program to test and treat for Helicobacter pylori infection: Cost-utility analysis by age, sex and ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Teng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization recommends all countries consider screening for H. pylori to prevent gastric cancer. We therefore aimed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a H. pylori serology-based screening program in New Zealand, a country that includes population groups with relatively high gastric cancer rates. Methods A Markov model was developed using life-tables and morbidity data from a national burden of disease study. The modelled screening program reduced the incidence of non-cardia gastric cancer attributable to H. pylori, if infection was identified by serology screening, and for the population expected to be reached by the screening program. A health system perspective was taken and detailed individual-level costing data was used. Results For adults aged 25–69 years old, nation-wide screening for H. pylori was found to have an incremental cost of US$196 million (95% uncertainty interval [95% UI]: $182–$211 million with health gains of 14,200 QALYs (95% UI: 5,100–26,300. Cost per QALY gained was US$16,500 ($7,600–$38,400 in the total population and 17% (6%-29% of future gastric cancer cases could be averted with lifetime follow-up. A targeted screening program for Māori only (indigenous population, was more cost-effective at US$8,000 ($3,800–$18,500 per QALY. Conclusions This modeling study found that H. pylori screening was likely to be cost-effective in this high-income country, particularly for the indigenous population. While further research is needed to help clarify the precise benefits, costs and adverse effects of such screening programs, there seems a reasonable case for policy-makers to give pilot programs consideration, particularly for any population groups with relatively elevated rates of gastric cancer.

  10. MIN 14C UBT: A combination of gastric basal transit and 14C-urea breath test for the detection of helicobacter pylori infection in human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubillaga, M.; Oliveri, P.; Calcagno, M.L.; Goldman, C.; Caro, R.; Mitta, A.; Degrossi, O.; Boccio, J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that the 14 C-urea breath test (UBT) performed at different times combined with the study of the gastric basal transit, which evaluates the intragastric displacement of a labeled solution under fasting conditions, has the advantage of being representative of the whole stomach surface and constitutes a non-aggressive test for the detection of H. pylori. This test, which has been called MIN 14 C UBT, is a modification of the conventional 14 C UBT in which low volumes of a solution of 14 C-urea together with 99m Tc-sulfur colloid are administered. The 99m Tc-sulfur colloid is not absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and has the great advantage of allowing the 'visualization' of the transit of the 14 C-urea within the gastrointestinal tract. This modification allows the simultaneous determination of the production of the 14 CO 2 and the place where this process occurs. The results show that there is a good correlation between the images obtained and the breath samples collected. We found that this test has a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 96% for H. pylori detection

  11. Utility of a stool antigen test to detect the incidence of helicobacter pylori infection and familial and community enviromental risk factors for this infection in pediatric age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbi, T; Dall'Oglio, L; De Angelis, P; Torroni, E; Colistro, F; Azzolina, M; Santoni, A; Di Ciommo, V; Benedetto, M

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is mainly acquired during childhood; it is recognised as a cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer and it has been classified as a group A carcinogen by World Health Organization. The exact mode of transmission is as yet, not known. Aim of our study has been to identify risk factors associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in a preschool and school population and to confirm if Hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening in epidemiological studies. We interviewed, with questionnaire, 400 children (203 male; age range 3-10 years; mean age 6 years) of 3 different schools and stool samples were collected of all children too. 35 of 400 (8%) children underwent to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of a suspect of upper gastrointestinal disease. stool were collected from 400 school children and 35 of them shown positivity of Hp antigen test. A questionnaire about presence of nausea, vomit, recurrent abdominal pain, family size, parent's occupations and education, use of antibiotics, country of birth of child and parents, personal hygiene, breast feeding, presence of the animals was completed. 35 children with positive Hp stool antigen test and a suspicious of upper gastrointestinal disease (recurrent abdominal pain, diurnal or nocturnal abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, iron deficiency) underwent to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS) that demonstrated antral gastritis and positive histology and urease rapid test. the results of this study suggest that risk factors for Hp infection are low socioeconomics factors, hygiene and living conditions and that Hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening test.

  12. Ten years experience of isotopic breath test with special reference to Helicobacter pylori detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhas, M.; Tricht, L.Van; Verschaeren, A.; Delmotte, E.; Martin, P

    1997-12-31

    The use of the carbon 14 urea breath test by comparison with culture for campylobacter of gastric endoscopic biopsies is studied in 91 patients. They were divided into 2 groups. The first group consisted of 53 patients examined by gastric endoscopy and carbon 14 urea breath test. In this population, gastric biopsies were taken at different regions of the stomach and duodenum. The breath test was performed within 3 hours after endoscopy. The second group consisted of 38 asymptomatic patients whom 23 were parent of children with campylobacter positive gastritis. For the whole population, neither antibiotic therapy nor bismuth medication was administrated within the 15 days before the realization of the test. Results were expressed in % of injected dose/mmole of CO{sub 2} after correction of endogenous production of CO{sub 2}. In conclusion, carbon 14 urea breath test is a reliable noninvasive test for detection and follow-up of gastritis caused by a widespread microorganism. Also, the precision of both tests, {sup 14} C-UBT and {sup 13} C-UBT, are compared simultaneously in 84 adults patients. The results were expressed as % of administered dose expired in 30 minutes. A better precision is observed with the {sup 13} C-UBT

  13. Detection of Helicobacter pylori urease antigen in saliva in patients with different gastric H. pylori status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khadir, Mounia; Alaoui Boukhris, Samia; Benajah, Dafr-Allah; El Rhazi, Karima; Ibrahimi, Sidi Adil; El Abkari, Mohamed; Harmouch, Taoufiq; Nejjari, Chakib; Mahmoud, Mustapha; Benlemlih, Mohamed; Bennani, Bahia

    2016-07-01

    Finding a simple, accurate, and noninvasive diagnosis method is a substantial challenge for the detection of Helicobacter pylori. The aim of the present study was to compare the presence of H. pylori urease antigen in saliva with the presence of this bacterium in gastric mucosa. Saliva samples and gastric biopsies were taken from 153 consenting Moroccan patients. Saliva samples were analyzed using an immunochromatographic test for urease antigen H. pylori detection. Thereafter, the gastric biopsies were analyzed by histology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect this bacterium. From a total of 153 recruited Moroccan patients, H. pylori was detected in 28 (18.30%), 87 (57.24%), and 69 (45.10%) cases by saliva test, histology, and PCR, respectively. A significant association was observed between the presence of H. pylori antigen in saliva and age. However, no association was found with sex, H. pylori virulence factors, gastric disease outcome, and density of the bacterium on the gastric mucosa. Considering that only 90 patients presented concordant results on H. pylori diagnosis (positive or negative) by both histology and PCR, the immunochromatographic test showed very low sensitivity (29.79%) and high specificity (90.70%). Of these two tests, the positive and negative predictive values were 77.78% and 54.17%, respectively. The accuracy of the test for salivary detection of urease antigen H. pylori was 58.89%. This study demonstrated a low detection rate of H. pylori antigens in saliva compared with the presence of this bacterium in gastric mucosa, suggesting that saliva cannot be used as a suitable sample for the diagnosis of H. pylori in our study population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among medical workers in Moscow and Kazan according to ¹³С-urease breath test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Bordin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: The relevance of the problem is related to the lack of data on Helicobacter pylori (HP prevalence in Russia, which is associated with the risk of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, and also, on the other hand, to the non-adherence of the doctors to the existing expert guidelines on diagnosis of this infection and HP eradication therapy.Aim: To assess the prevalence of HP among medical workers and their willingness to undergo eradication therapy.Materials and methods: A total of 315 medical workers (61 men and 254 women aged 18 to 76 years were examined, among them 221 in Moscow and 94 in Kazan. To assess the HP contamination rate, all participants performed a ¹³С-urease breath test with the “HELICARB” test kit according to the “four-point” technique. All participants were asked to complete the questionnaires to access the impact of social and occupational factors on the prevalence of HP.Results: HP was identified in 54.9% of the examined subjects, including 45.9% of men and 57.1% of women. The prevalence of HP in Moscow was substantially lower (49.8% than in Kazan (67%. The proportion of HP-positive subjects increased with age from 41.8% in those below 25 years of age to 76.9% in those above their 60s. 60.2% of married participants and 49% of the singles were HP-positive. Among doctors, HP prevalence rate was the largest in the endoscopy specialists (61.5% and internists (60.9%. Only 61.4% of HP-positive medical workers expressed their willingness to undergo eradication therapy.Conclusion: The study showed a high prevalence of HР in medical workers increasing with age. It is presumably related to hygiene habits and conditions during childhood of each generation; however, one cannot exclude their potential contamination during their occupational activities.

  15. [The relationship of halitosis and Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Tao, Dan-ying; Li, Qing; Feng, Xi-ping

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach. Fifty subjects without periodontal diseases and systematic disease (exclude gastrointestinal diseases) were included. Infection of H.pylori was diagnosed by biopsy and (14)C-urea breath test. SPSS11.5 software package was used to analyze the data. All the subjects were periodontal healthy according to the periodontal index. The prevalence of H.pylori infection in halitosis subjects was significantly higher than that in the normal subjects (57.1% VS 18.2%, Pperiodontal healthy subjects.

  16. Helicobacter pylori impairs murine dendritic cell responses to infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric malignancies, is generally viewed as an extracellular microorganism. Here, we show that H. pylori replicates in murine bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (BMDCs within autophagosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A 10-fold increase of CFU is found between 2 h and 6 h p.i. in H. pylori-infected BMDCs. Autophagy is induced around the bacterium and participates at late time points of infection for the clearance of intracellular H. pylori. As a consequence of infection, LC3, LAMP1 and MHC class II molecules are retained within the H. pylori-containing vacuoles and export of MHC class II molecules to cell surface is blocked. However, formalin-fixed H. pylori still maintain this inhibitory activity in BMDC derived from wild type mice, but not in from either TLR4 or TLR2-deficient mice, suggesting the involvement of H. pylori-LPS in this process. TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 expression was also modulated upon infection showing a TLR2-specific dependent IL-10 secretion. No IL-12 was detected favoring the hypothesis of a down modulation of DC functions during H. pylori infection. Furthermore, antigen-specific T cells proliferation was also impaired upon infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori can infect and replicate in BMDCs and thereby affects DC-mediated immune responses. The implication of this new finding is discussed for the biological life cycle of H. pylori in the host.

  17. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and risk of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a risk factor for distal stomach cancer, and a few small studies have suggested that H. pylori may be a potential risk factor for lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study of 350 lung adenocarcinoma cases, 350 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 700 controls nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC cohort of male Finnish smokers. Controls were one-to-one matched by age and date of baseline serum draw. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori whole-cell and cytotoxin-associated gene (CagA antigens, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for associations between H. pylori seropositivity and lung cancer risk using conditional logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was detected in 79.7% of cases and 78.5% of controls. After adjusting for pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with either adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.75-1.6 or squamous cell carcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.77-1.7. Results were similar for CagA-negative and CagA-positive H. pylori seropositivity. Despite earlier small studies suggesting that H. pylori may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, H. pylori seropositivity does not appear to be associated with lung cancer.

  18. Salivary IgG assay to detect Helicobacter pylori infection in an Indian adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Thirumala Krishnaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: EIAgen H. pylori IgG assay is a noninvasive, moderately accurate, and sensitive method for the detection of H. pylori infection in saliva. Salivary anti H. pylori IgG test prior to endoscopy is a useful screening test for seroepidemiological studies.

  19. Chronic Gastritis and its Association with H. Pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatema, J; Khan, A H; Uddin, M J; Rahman, M H; Saha, M; Safwath, S A; Alam, M J; Mamun, M A

    2015-10-01

    This cross sectional study was designed to see association of chronic gastritis including its type with H. pylori infection. Consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic examination having histopathological evidence of chronic gastritis were enrolled in the study and was done in Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College from July 2011 to June 2012. Biopsies were taken from antrum, body and fundus in all patients. Histopathological examinations were done using H-E stain and for detection of H. pylori, rapid urease test, anti-H.pylori antibody test and histopathological test with modified Giemsa stain were done. Patients having results positive in at least two methods were considered infected by H. pylori. Total 80 dyspeptic patients having chronic gastritis were evaluated. Out of them 67(83.8%) had H. pylori infection and 13(16.2%) were H. pylori negative. Among all patients 57(71.2%) had pangastritis and 23(28.8%) had antral gastritis with female and male predominance respectively. H. pylori infection was present in 49(86.0%) cases of pangastritis and 18(78.3%) cases of antral gastritis. H. pylori infection was a little higher among males (34, 50.7%) females (33, 49.3%). H. pylori infection is the predominant cause of chronic gastritis and pangastritis is the major type.

  20. Effect of sucralfate on antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Koichiro; Murakami, Kazunari; Sato, Ryugo; Kashimura, Koji; Miura, Masahiro; Ootsu, Satoshi; Miyajima, Hajime; Nasu, Masaru; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio

    2004-12-01

    It has been documented that sucralfate, a basic aluminum salt, enhances the efficacies of antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori, resulting in eradication rates comparable to those associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate sucralfate's ability to complement antibiotic treatment of H. pylori infection in vivo. Four weeks following induced H. pylori infection, clarithromycin (CAM) and amoxicillin (AMPC) were administered orally to C57BL/6 mice for 5 days, both with and without sucralfate or lansoprazole. When sucralfate was concurrently given with CAM and AMPC at the maximum noninhibitory doses for the treatment of H. pylori infection, the bacterial clearance rates were comparable to those achieved by treatment with lansoprazole plus those antibiotics. The results of pharmacokinetic studies showed that lansoprazole delayed gastric clearance and accelerated the absorption of CAM, whereas sucralfate suppressed both gastric clearance and absorption. AMPC was undetectable in all samples. Scanning electron microscopy with a microscope to which a energy dispersive spectrometer was attached revealed that aluminum-containing aggregated substances coated the mucosa surrounding H. pylori in mice receiving sucralfate plus antibiotics, whereas the gastric surface and pits where H. pylori had attached were clearly visible in mice receiving lansoprazole plus antibiotics. The addition of sucralfate to the antibiotic suspension resulted in a more viscous mixture that bound to the H. pylori-infected mucosa and that inhibited the loss of CAM bioavailability in the acidic environment. Sucralfate delays gastric clearance of CAM and physically captures H. pylori through the creation of an adherent mucus, which leads to bacterial clearance.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients undergoing appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, T E; Atmatzidis, K S; Papaziogas, B T; Souparis, A; Koutelidakis, I M; Papaziogas, T B

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been found in the upper gastrointestinal tract; it is incriminated as aetiological factor in various pathological conditions. This prospective study assesses the presence of this microorganism in the appendix flora and the possible role of its infection in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis. H. pylori was investigated in 46 consecutive patients undergoing emergent appendectomy for presumed acute appendicitis. Blood sample for serological test of H. pylori infection was drawn before operation. The removed appendix specimen was stained for H. pylori; confirmation was made by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis. The intensity of inflammation was determined pathologically grading from no inflammation to gangrenous appendicitis. Statistical analysis was made using the chi-square test. Seropositivity for H. pylori infection was found in 18 patients (39%), but the microbe was detected in just two appendix specimens (4%). In all seropositive patients acute appendicitis was confirmed by the pathology study; serous (33%) and purulent or gangrenous (67%). The latter incidence in the seronegative patients was 50%. There were found eight specimens (17%) negative for inflammation dealing all with seronegative patients. It seems that H. pylori colonizes the appendix in small proportion and is unlikely to be associated in direct correlation with acute appendicitis. However, seropositive patients with acute inflammation are likely to suffer from purulent or gangrenous form.

  2. Utility of a stool antigen test to detect the incidence of helicobacter pylori infection and familial and community enviromental risk factors for this infection in pediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sabbi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: helicobacter pylori (hp infection is mainly acquired during childhood; it is recognised as a cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer and it has been classified as a group A carcinogen by World health organization. the exact mode of transmission is as yet, not known. Aim of our study has been to identify risk factors associated with helicobacter pylori infection in a preschool and school population and to confirm if hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening in epidemiological studies. Methods: We interviewed, with questionnaire, 400 children (203 male; age range 3-10 years; mean age 6 years of 3 different schools and stool samples were collected of all children too. 35 of 400 (8% children underwent to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of a suspect of upper gastrointestinal disease. Results: stool were collected from 400 school children and 35 of them shown positivity of hp antigen test. A questionnaire about presence of nausea, vomit, recurrent abdominal pain, family size, parent’s occupations and education, use of antibiotics, country of birth of child and parents, personal hygiene, breast feeding, presence of the animals was completed. 35 children with positive hp stool antigen test and a suspicious of upper gastrointestinal disease (recurrent abdominal pain, diurnal or nocturnal abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, iron deficiency underwent to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (egdS that demonstrated antral gastritis and positive histology and urease rapid test. Conclusions: the results of this study suggest that risk factors for hp infection are low socioeconomics factors, hygiene and living conditions and that hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening test.

  3. Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, B.A.; Fishman, E.K.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Jones, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the CT scans of patients with Helicobacter pylori (formerly Campylobacter pylori) infection and histologic gastritis reviewed to determine if the inflammatory changes can mimic the CT appearance of gastric neoplasm. Records were obtained of 288 consecutive cases of biopsy-confirmed. Helicobacter pylori gastritis, spanning a 21-month period from July 1988 to March 1990. Abdominal CT scans had been performed in 70 of these cases and were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Seven of the 70 cases of confirmed Helicobacter pylori gastritis were suggestive of malignancy on CT

  4. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Patients and methods Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. Results A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, pgastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status. PMID:28860835

  5. Human lactoferrin increases Helicobacter pylori internalisation into AGS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coray, Dorien S; Heinemann, Jack A; Tyrer, Peter C; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2012-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori has high global infection rates and can cause other undesirable clinical manifestations such as duodenal ulcer (DU) and gastric cancer (GC). Frequencies of re-infection after therapeutic clearance and rates of DU versus GC vary geographically and differ markedly between developed and developing countries, which suggests additional factors may be involved. The possibility that, in vivo, lactoferrin (Lf) may play a subtle role in modulating micronutrient availability or bacterial internalisation with implications for disease etiology is considered. Lf is an iron binding protein produced in mammals that has antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties. Some bacteria that regularly colonise mammalian hosts have adapted to living in high Lf environments and we investigated if this included the gastric pathogen H. pylori. We found that H. pylori was able to use iron from fully iron-saturated human Lf (hLf) whereas partially iron-saturated hLf (apo) did not increase H. pylori growth. Instead, apo-hLf increased adherence to and internalisation of bacteria into cultured epithelial cells. By increasing internalisation, we speculate that apo-human lactoferrin may contribute to H. pylori's ability to persistence in the human stomach, an observation that potentially has implications for the risk of H. pylori-associated disease.

  6. The internalization of Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the failure of H. pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You-Hua; Lv, Zhi-Fa; Zhong, Yao; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Shu-Ping; Xie, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) internalization involves invasion of cells by the bacterium. Several studies have shown that H. pylori can invade human gastric epithelial cells, immune cells, and Candida yeast in vivo and in vitro. Whether bacterial invasion plays a role in eradication failure is unclear. To investigate the relationship between H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells and H. pylori eradication failure. Forty-two clinical strains isolated from H. pylori-positive patients with different outcomes after treatment with furazolidone-based therapy were examined (17 failures and 25 successes). The H. pylori strains were shown to be susceptible to amoxicillin and furazolidone, and the patients also exhibited good compliance. Genotyping was performed for cagA and vacA (s and m). The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains to amoxicillin, furazolidone, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was determined by E-tests. The levels of H. pylori invasion of GES-1 cells were detected by gentamicin colony-forming unit assays. The internalization level in the eradication success group was 5.40±5.78 × 10 -3  cfu/cell, and the median was 6.194 × 10 -3  cfu/cell; the internalization level in the eradication failure group was 8.98±5.40 × 10 -3  cfu/cell, and the median was 10.28 × 10 -3  cfu/cell. The eradication failure group showed a greater invasion level than the eradication success group (Pinternalization levels were compared (P>.05). The results showed that H. pylori invasion of the gastric epithelia might play a role in eradication failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Helicobacter pylori prevalence in dyspeptic patients in the Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence in dyspeptic patients in the Eastern Cape province – race and disease status. ... Fisher's exact test was used to assess the univariate association between H. pylori infection and the possible risk factors. ... Gender, antibiotic treatment and alcohol consumption may be risk factors for infection.

  8. (Nutmeg) on Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis in albino rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activities of dichloromethane and methanol extracts of Myristica fragrans Houtt. seed (nutmeg) was studied to authenticate ... Analysis of variance (ANOVA) tested the effect of the groups on the treatment days and revealed a significant difference between the treatments at p< 0.05.

  9. changing patterns of the prevalence of helicobacter pylori among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study described the prevalence of H. pylori among large numbers of ... the gastric antrum for Rapid Urease Test (RUT) in identifying H. Pylori. Data on patient characteristics, clinical diagnosis and findings upon endoscopy were analyzed by simple ..... factors to be taken into account when planning treatment include compli-.

  10. Prevalence Of Helicobacter pylori In Gastric Biopsies Of Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection as seen at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) Benin City Nigeria was 16% which was significant using the students T-test (P<0.05). Eighty one gastric biopsy specimens received in the microbiology laboratory were cultured on chocolate agar. Of the H. pylori ...

  11. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Thein; Shiota, Seiji; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ni, New; Aye, Than Than; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tran, Trang Thi Huyen; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To survey the detailed analyses for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric mucosal status in Myanmar. METHODS: A total of 252 volunteers with dyspeptic symptoms (155 female and 97 male; mean age of 43.6 ± 14.2 years) was participated in Yangon and Mandalay. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on 5 different tests including rapid urease test, culture, histology, immunohistochemistry and serology. Histological scores were evaluated according to the update Sydney system and the Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment system. Pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 48.0%. There was no relationship between age and infection rate. Even in young group (less than 29 years old), the H. pylori infection rate was relatively high (41.9%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in Yangon than that of Mandalay. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the presence of gastric mucosal atrophy. All 7 subjects with peptic ulcer were infected with H. pylori. Although H. pylori-positive subjects showed stronger gastritis than H. pylori-negative subjects, most cases had mild gastritis. CONCLUSION: We revealed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar. The H. pylori infection was a risk factor for peptic ulcer and stronger gastritis. PMID:25605987

  12. Validación de método simplificado de la prueba en aliento con urea-13C para diagnóstico de infección por Helicobacter pylori Validation of a simplified method of the 13C urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. X. Ortiz-Olvera Nayeli

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: validar un método simplificado de la prueba en aliento con urea-13C (PAU-13Cs para el diagnóstico de infección por Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, con administración simultánea de 50 mg de urea-13C y 2 g de ácido cítrico. Material y métodos: se estudiaron 88 pacientes (49 mujeres y 39 hombres; con promedio de edad 45 ± 15 años, referidos para endoscopia gastrointestinal y toma de biopsias. La PAU-13Cs se realizó en ayuno. Se recolectaron las muestras de aire espirado en tubos de cristal de 10 ml, antes y 30 minutos después de administrar simultáneamente 50 mg de urea-13C y 2 g de ácido cítrico disueltos en 200 ml de agua. Las muestras se analizaron por espectrometría de masas. El diagnóstico de infección se consideró cuando el cultivo y/o la biopsia y serología fueron positivas para H. pylori. Resultados: cincuenta y un pacientes (57,95% fueron positivos, 30 (34,10% negativos para H. pylori y 7 (7,95% casos se consideraron indeterminados. La sensibilidad, especificidad, valor predictivo positivo y negativo de PAU-13Cs fue de 90,2, 93,3, 95,8 y 84,8%, respectivamente. Con exactitud de 91,4%. Conclusión: la administración simultánea de 50 mg de urea-13C y 2 g de ácido cítrico, representa una alternativa para el diagnóstico no invasivo de infección por H. pylori, debido a que conserva la certeza diagnóstica de la PAU-13C.Objective: to validate a simplified 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT method for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Material and methods: patients referred for gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy were included, and a 13C-UBT was performed after a 6-hour fast. Breath samples were collected in 10 ml glass tubes before and 30 min after the simultaneous administration of 50 mg of 13C-urea and 2 g of citric acid in 200 ml of water. All breath samples were analyzed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The diagnosis of H. pylori infection was established with a positive culture and/or positive

  13. Indications for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: a systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J; Sherman, P M

    1994-01-15

    were dramatically reduced after H. pylori eradication. All of the studies involving nonulcer dyspepsia assessed clearance rather than eradication of H. pylori. No study used validated outcome measures. A consistent decrease in symptom severity was no more prevalent in patients in whom the organism had been cleared than in those taking a placebo. Of the studies concerning gastric cancer none investigated the effect of eradication of H. pylori on subsequent risk of gastric cancer. There is sufficient evidence to support the use of anti-H. pylori therapy in patients with duodenal ulcers who have H. pylori infection, triple therapy achieving the best results. There is no current evidence to support such therapy for nonulcer dyspepsia in patients with H. pylori infection. Much more attention must be paid to the design of nonulcer dyspepsia studies. Also, studies are needed to determine whether H. pylori eradication in patients with gastritis will prevent gastric cancer.

  14. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  15. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and its relation with body mass index in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengfu; Yan, Ming; Sun, Yan; Joo, Jungsoo; Wan, Xingyong; Yu, Chaohui; Wang, Qunyan; Shen, Chao; Chen, Peng; Li, Youming; Coleman, William G

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide. The association between obesity and H. pylori infection is controversial in the literature. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its relation with body mass index (BMI) in a Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was performed among adults who underwent health checkups at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University in 2013. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was examined by (13)C urea breath tests, and the association between prevalence of H. pylori infection and BMI was analyzed. Of the 8820 participants enrolled, 3859 (43.8%) were positive for H. pylori infection. H. pylori-positive participants had a more unfavorable metabolic profile than H. pylori-negative participants. Overweight/obese participants showed a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection than that of lean participants, and a positive linear correlation between BMI and prevalence of H. pylori infection was observed. Both unadjusted and adjusted analysis revealed that BMI was significantly associated with risk factors of H. pylori infection. Our results showed that BMI was significantly and positively associated with H. pylori infection, and a high BMI was associated with an increased risk of the infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2010-12-05

    Helicobacter pylori, discovered 27 years ago, has remained the most prevalent infectious agent in the world. In the author's hypothesis, the increase of peptic ulcer prevalence in the 19-20th century could be attributable to the extended worldwide use of gastric tubes for secretory testing which led to the iatrogenic transmission of pathogenic strains. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane proteins (OMP), and duodenal ulcer promoting (dupA) proteins were identified as novel virulence factors, leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which could be future targets of therapy. There is no ideal first-line eradication of the infection and according to expert's opinion, the efficiency of these regimens has fallen gradually in recent years to unacceptably low levels; however, in the author's opinion this is a multifactorial phenomenon which can not be generalized. As alternative drugs, the efficiency of levofloxacin, furazolidone and rifabutin has been proven by meta-analyses. Sequential and bismuth-free quadruple therapies, although highly efficient, are not yet used on a large scale. The recurrence of the infection is 2.27%/year in developed and of 13.0%/year in developing countries. Spontaneous eradication occurred in 8-20% of the children and 5-11% of adults. The prevalence of clarithromycin resistance is increasing worldwide. In Hungary, it has reached 10.9% in county cities, according to a national survey. In a district of Budapest called Ferencváros, the prevalence between 2005 and 2009 was 16-22%, with no increasing trend. The development of enzymatic inhibitors (urease, carbonic anhydrase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase), modified antibiotics and efflux pump inhibitors seem promising ways because these compounds do not lead to resistance; however, none have yet been used in humans.

  17. Possible association between Helicobacter pylori infection and vocal fold leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chen, Jian; Yang, Yue; Cheng, Lei; Wu, Hai-Tao

    2018-03-06

    Several studies have indicated the larynx as possible Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) reservoirs. This study explored the association between H. pylori and vocal fold leukoplakia. The case-control study involved 51 patients with vocal fold leukoplakia and 35 control patients with vocal polyps. Helicobacter pylori was detected in tissues by the rapid urease test, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and single-step PCR. The H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin antibodies were detected in plasma by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Helicobacter pylori-positive rate of vocal fold leukoplakia and vocal polyps was 23.5% versus 11.4% (P = .157), 37.2% versus 14.3% (P = .020), 27.5% versus 8.6% (P = .031), and 70.6% versus 68.6% (P = .841) detected by rapid urease test, nested PCR, single-step PCR, and ELISA, respectively. Regression analysis indicated that H. pylori infection (P = .044) was the independent risk factor for vocal fold leukoplakia. Helicobacter pylori infection exists in the larynx and may be associated with vocal fold leukoplakia. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Oral and gastric Helicobacter pylori: effects and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Nélio; Pereira, Carlos; Resende, Carlos; Amaral, Odete; Ferreira, Manuela; Nelas, Paula; Chaves, Claudia; Duarte, João; Cirnes, Luis; Machado, José Carlos; Ferreira, Paula; Correia, Ilídio J

    2015-01-01

    This study consisted in the comparison of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) present in the stomach and in saliva of a sample of Portuguese adolescents and the assessment of the association between H. pylori infection with socio-demographic variables and prevalence of dental caries. A cross-sectional study was designed including a sample of 447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years old, attending a public school in Sátão, Portugal. A questionnaire about socio-demographic variables and oral health behaviors was applied. Gastric H. pylori infection was determined using the urease breath test (UBT). Saliva collection was obtained and DNA was extracted by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in order to detect the presence of oral H. pylori. The prevalence of gastric H. pylori detected by UBT was 35.9%. Within the adolescents with a gastric UBT positive, only 1.9% were positive for oral H. pylori. The presence of gastric H. pylori was found to be associated with age (>15years, Odds ratio (OR)=1.64, 95%CI=1.08-2.52), residence area (urban, OR=1.48, 95%CI=1.03-2.29) and parents´ professional situation (unemployed, OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.02-1.23). Among those with detected dental caries during the intra-oral observation, 37.4% were positive for gastric H. pylori and 40.2% negative for the same bacterial strain (p=0.3). The oral cavity cannot be considered a reservoir for infection of H. pylori. Gastric H. pylori infection was found to be associated with socio-demographic variables such as age, residence area and socioeconomic status.

  19. Oral and gastric Helicobacter pylori: effects and associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Veiga

    Full Text Available This study consisted in the comparison of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori present in the stomach and in saliva of a sample of Portuguese adolescents and the assessment of the association between H. pylori infection with socio-demographic variables and prevalence of dental caries.A cross-sectional study was designed including a sample of 447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years old, attending a public school in Sátão, Portugal. A questionnaire about socio-demographic variables and oral health behaviors was applied. Gastric H. pylori infection was determined using the urease breath test (UBT. Saliva collection was obtained and DNA was extracted by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR in order to detect the presence of oral H. pylori.The prevalence of gastric H. pylori detected by UBT was 35.9%. Within the adolescents with a gastric UBT positive, only 1.9% were positive for oral H. pylori. The presence of gastric H. pylori was found to be associated with age (>15years, Odds ratio (OR=1.64, 95%CI=1.08-2.52, residence area (urban, OR=1.48, 95%CI=1.03-2.29 and parents´ professional situation (unemployed, OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.02-1.23. Among those with detected dental caries during the intra-oral observation, 37.4% were positive for gastric H. pylori and 40.2% negative for the same bacterial strain (p=0.3.The oral cavity cannot be considered a reservoir for infection of H. pylori. Gastric H. pylori infection was found to be associated with socio-demographic variables such as age, residence area and socioeconomic status.

  20. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection; Culture, microscopy of biopsy smears, and the rapid urease test compared with the sup 14 C-urea breath test. Diagnostikk av Helicobacter pylori-infeksjon; Urease hurtigtest, mikroskopi av utstryk, og dyrking av ventrikkelbiopsi sammenlignet med sup 14 C-urea-pusteproeven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nysaeter, G; Berstad, K; Weberg, R; Berstad, A; Hardardottir, H [Haukeland Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    1992-08-01

    By employing the {sup 14}C-urea breath test as the reference methods the authors determined the specificity and sensitivity of three bioptic methods for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in 103 subjects. All biopsy specimens were obtained from the gastric antrum. For culture the specificity was 100%. Its applicability was reduced, however, by a low sensitivity (73.8%) and a delay of several days before the final result was available. Microscopy of Loeffler-stained biopsy smears yielded a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 92.9%, but the method was regarded time-consuming. The rapid urease test yielded a specificity of 98.4% and a sensitivity of 85.7%. Being quick, simple and inexpensive, the rapid urease test is well suited for routine use in gastroscopy. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Helicobacter pylori Diagnostic Methods in Patients with Atrophic Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Omata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are several diagnostic methods for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection. A cost-effective analysis is needed to decide on the optimal diagnostic method. The aim of this study was to determine a cost-effective diagnostic method in patients with atrophic gastritis (AG. Methods. A decision-analysis model including seven diagnostic methods was constructed for patients with AG diagnosed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Expected values of cost and effectiveness were calculated for each test. Results. If the prevalence of H. pylori in the patients with AG is 85% and CAM-resistant H. pylori is 30%, histology, stool H. pylori antigen (SHPAg, bacterial culture (BC, and urine H. pylori antibody (UHPAb were dominated by serum H. pylori IgG antibody (SHPAb, rapid urease test (RUT, and urea breath test (UBT. Among three undominated methods, the incremental cost-effective ratios (ICER of RUT versus SHPAb and UBT versus RUT were $214 and $1914, respectively. If the prevalence of CAM-sensitive H. pylori was less than 55%, BC was not dominated, but its H. pylori eradication success rate was 0.86. Conclusions. RUT was the most cost-effective at the current prevalence of CAM-resistant H. pylori. BC could not be selected due to its poor effectiveness even if CAM-resistant H. pylori was more than 45%.

  2. Biofilm formation enhances Helicobacter pylori survivability in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chow Goon; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Ho, Bow

    2017-04-01

    To date, the exact route and mode of transmission of Helicobacter pylori remains elusive. The detection of H. pylori in food using molecular approaches has led us to postulate that the gastric pathogen may survive in the extragastric environment for an extended period. In this study, we show that H. pylori prolongs its survival by forming biofilm and micro-colonies on vegetables. The biofilm forming capability of H. pylori is both strain and vegetable dependent. H. pylori strains were classified into high and low biofilm formers based on their highest relative biofilm units (BU). High biofilm formers survived longer on vegetables compared to low biofilm formers. The bacteria survived better on cabbage compared to other vegetables tested. In addition, images captured on scanning electron and confocal laser scanning microscopes revealed that the bacteria were able to form biofilm and reside as micro-colonies on vegetable surfaces, strengthening the notion of possible survival of H. pylori on vegetables for an extended period of time. Taken together, the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm on vegetables (a common food source for human) potentially plays an important role in its survival, serving as a mode of transmission of H. pylori in the extragastric environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Helicobacter pylori : Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients, its relationship with gastric pathologies, and associated antibiotic susceptibility profiles, and compared two media to find the appropriate medium that enhances growth and expedites culture and isolation. Methods. Rapid urease and histological tests were used to screen for H. pylori. Culture was performed to test ...

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection and extragastric disorders in children: A critical update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, Lucia; Osborn, John F; Tromba, Valeria; Romaggioli, Sara; Bascetta, Stefano; Chiesa, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a highly prevalent, serious and chronic infection that has been associated causally with a diverse spectrum of extragastric disorders including iron deficiency anemia, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, growth retardation, and diabetes mellitus. The inverse relation of H. pylori prevalence and the increase in allergies, as reported from epidemiological studies, has stimulated research for elucidating potential underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Although H. pylori is most frequently acquired during childhood in both developed and developing countries, clinicians are less familiar with the pediatric literature in the field. A better understanding of the H. pylori disease spectrum in childhood should lead to clearer recommendations about testing for and treating H. pylori infection in children who are more likely to develop clinical sequelae. A further clinical challenge is whether the progressive decrease of H. pylori in the last decades, abetted by modern clinical practices, may have other health consequences. PMID:24587617

  5. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stomach. It is the main cause of peptic ulcers, and it can also cause gastritis and stomach ... inflammation. This can lead to gastritis or a peptic ulcer. Researchers aren't sure how H. pylori spreads. ...

  6. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    with age. The route of infection is unknown but faecal-oral infection is probable. Correlation between the presence of HP and the occurrence of symptoms is poor in the individual patient. The bacteria can be demonstrated histologically, cytologically, by culture, by the urease test, by the urease...

  7. The changing and its interaction of determining serum gastrin levels and helicobacter pylori test during chronic atrophic gastritis into gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Weijuan; Yang Yongqing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the changing and its interaction of determining serum gastrin levels and Helicobacter pylori test during chronic atrophic gastritis into gastric cancer. Methods: RIA and 13 C-urea breath test ( 13 C-UBT) determined the Gs levels and Hp infection rate in 63 rate cases (first visit) patients, 48 cases (after one year return visit) patients, 35 cases (after three year return visit) patients and 30 cases (after five years return visit) patients with CAG 90 cases patients with gastric cancer (and different position) and 61 cases normal controls. They all were done study compared. Results: Serum Gs levels in 63 cases (first visit) patients, 48 cases (after one year return visit) patients, 35 cases (after three year return visit) patients and 30 cases (after five years return visit) patient with CAG were significantly higher (t=4.716, 5.218, 5.624, 6.179, 6.5772, all P 0.05). Serum Gs levels in 90 cases with gastric cancer (and different position) was significantly higher (t=4.221, P<0.05; t=4.436, P<0.01) than 61 cases normal controls and the highest serum Gs level was found in cancer of cardia and fundus. And Hp infection rate was 88.8%. Conclusion: The early diagnosis on gastric cancer was very important by determining serum Gs and Hp infection rate. (authors)

  8. Infezioni da H.pylori. Diagnosi: il ruolo del gastroenterologo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Guatti Zuliani

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of H. pylori infection: the role of gastroenterologist Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection can be diagnosed by invasive techniques requiring endoscopy and biopsy (histological examination, rapid urease test, culture and by non invasive techniques (serology, urea breath test, detection of H. pylori antigen stool specimen.At present, no single test can be absolutely relied upon to detect colonization by H. pylori and a combination of two tests is recommended if feasible.Nevertheless, in routine dayto- day clinical practice H. pylori diagnosis is often by a single test and consequently the choice of the more suitable test is even more important. Choosing among them is not easy, and several issues need to be considered, such as the clinical situation, (i.e. present symptoms and past medical history, age of patients, if it is first diagnosis or follow-up after treatment.., sensitivity and specificity of the test, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy, the availability of the test, the local expertise . Since the “Ideal test” is not relied, the gastroenterologist or clinician as well, has the important role of deciding which test to employ. A good knowledge of advantages and vantages of each test is so necessary to make the best choose as possible.

  9. Serum TNF-α levels and Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, G. A.; Halim, S.; Sitepu, R. R.; Darmadi

    2018-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with higher virulence. TNF-α has an important role in host defense against H. pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between TNF-α serum levels with cagA and vacA genes in H. pylori infection. This was a cross-sectional study involving 80 patients that consecutively admitted to endoscopy unit. Diagnosis of H. pylori infection was based on rapid urease test. Serum samples werecollected to determine circulating TNF-α level. Polymerase chain reaction was done to examine H. pylori vacA and cagA genes. Data analysis was carriedout using SPSS version 22 with 95%CI and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. About 45 (56.3%) patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. There were 33 (73.3%) patients with H. pylori cagA positive. Serum TNF-α levels in patients with the H. pylori positive were significantly higher compared to H. pylori negative. Serum level of TNF-α was significantly higher in cagA positive than negative. Subjects with H. pylori cagA gene positive were more likely to have ahigher level of serum TNF-α than H. pylori cagA gene negative.

  10. Rosacea is associated with Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A-H R; Egeberg, A; Gideonsson, R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common skin disease characterized by facial erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules. Helicobacter pylori infection has been suggested to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of rosacea. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review and meta-analyse the relationship between...... rosacea and infection with Helicobacter pylori. METHODS: A literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Data extraction and analyses were performed on descriptive data. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Random-effects models with Der...... in the quantitative meta-analysis, comprising a total of 928 rosacea patients and 1527 controls. The overall association between Helicobacter pylori infection and rosacea was non-significant (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.00-2.84, P = 0.052), but analysis restricted to C-urea breath test showed a significant association (OR 3...

  11. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie SW; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes. PMID:26523098

  12. The role of helicobacter pylori infection in the pathogenesis of chronic urticaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazzawi, I.M.; Obidat, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria (ICU) and to see if eradication of the bacterium affects the course of the urticaria. Patients and Methods: One hundred patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria and 43 healthy subjects (matched for age and sex) underwent serological testing for H. pylori infection. All patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria were examined for Helicobacter pylori infection with the /sup 13/C-urea test as well as the serological testing. Gastric biopsy was obtained from 36 patients. Patients with proven Helicobacter pylori infection were given treatment for 2 weeks. Six weeks afterwards they were tested again for Helicobacter pylori infection, and their urticaria was clinically assessed. Results: There was no significant difference in the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection between : idiopathic chronic urticaria patients and healthy subjects. Helicobacter pylori was detected in 76% of patients and 69.8% of controls. Out of the 76 patients treated, only 24 showed complete remission of their urticaria after successfully eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection, the others only having some improvement in their symptoms. Conclusion: Patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria have similar high rates of H. pylori infection as healthy subjects. Bacterium eradication is associated with improvement of urticaria symptoms, suggesting a possible role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of this skin disorder. (author)

  13. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  14. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soussan Irani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 biopsies diagnosed as oral ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and oral primary lymphoma were selected from the archives of the Pathology Department. Thirty-two samples that were diagnosed as being without any pathological changes were selected as the control group. All the paraffin blocks were cut for hematoxylin and eosin staining to confirm the diagnoses and then the samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry staining. Data were collected and analyzed. Results. Chi-squared test showed significant differences between the frequency of H. pylori positivity in normal tissue and the lesions were examined (P=0.000. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference between the lesions examined (P=0.042. Chi-squared test showed significant differences between H. pylori positivity and different tissue types except inside the muscle layer as follows: in epithelium and in lamina propria (P=0.000, inside the blood vessels (P=0.003, inside the salivary gland duct (P=0.036, and muscle layer (P=0.122. Conclusion. There might be a relation between the presence of H. pylori and oral lesions. Therefore, early detection and eradication of H. pylori in high-risk patients are suggested.

  15. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  16. In vitro antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus casei against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shymaa Enany

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic infections in humans. Curing H. pylori infection is difficult because of the habitat of the organism below the mucus adherent layer of gastric mucosa. Lactobacilli are known as acid-resistant bacteria and can remain in stomach for a long time than any other organism, we aimed in this study to examine the efficacy of Lactobacillus casei as a probiotic against H. pylori in humans. Particularly, L. casei was opted as it is considered to be one of the widely used probiotics in dairy products. One hundred and seven strains of H. pylori were isolated from dyspeptic patients and were tested for their antibiotic susceptibility to metronidazole (MTZ, clarithromycin (CLR, tetracycline (TET, and amoxicillin (AMX by the disc diffusion method. The strains were examined for their susceptibility toward L. casei - present in fermented milk products - by well diffusion method. It was found that 74.7% strains were resistant to MTZ; 1.8% to MTZ, TET, and CLR; 3.7% to MTZ and CLR; 4.6% to MTZ and TET; and 0.9% were resistant to MTZ, TET, and AMX. The antibacterial activity of L. casei against H. pylori was determined on all the tested H. pylori isolates including antibiotic resistant strains with different patterns. Our study proposed the use of probiotics for the treatment of H. pylori infection as an effective approach.

  17. Human immune responses to H. pylori HLA Class II epitopes identified by immunoinformatic methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhua Zhang

    Full Text Available H. pylori persists in the human stomach over decades and promotes several adverse clinical sequelae including gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer that are linked to the induction and subsequent evasion of chronic gastric inflammation. Emerging evidence indicates that H. pylori infection may also protect against asthma and some other immune-mediated conditions through regulatory T cell effects outside the stomach. To characterize the complexity of the CD4+ T cell response generated during H. pylori infection, computational methods were previously used to generate a panel of 90 predicted epitopes conserved among H. pylori genomes that broadly cover HLA Class II diversity for maximum population coverage. Here, these sequences were tested individually for their ability to induce in vitro responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by interferon-γ ELISpot assay. The average number of spot-forming cells/million PBMCs was significantly elevated in H. pylori-infected subjects over uninfected persons. Ten of the 90 peptides stimulated IFN-γ secretion in the H. pylori-infected group only, whereas two out of the 90 peptides elicited a detectable IFN-γ response in the H. pylori-uninfected subjects but no response in the H. pylori-infected group. Cytokine ELISA measurements performed using in vitro PBMC culture supernatants demonstrated significantly higher levels of TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β1 in the H. pylori-infected subjects, whereas IL-17A expression was not related to the subjects H. pylori-infection status. Our results indicate that the human T cell responses to these 90 peptides are generally increased in actively H. pylori-infected, compared with H. pylori-naïve, subjects. This information will improve understanding of the complex immune response to H. pylori, aiding rational epitope-driven vaccine design as well as helping identify other H. pylori epitopes with potentially immunoregulatory effects.

  18. A Helicobacter pylori Homolog of Eukaryotic Flotillin Is Involved in Cholesterol Accumulation, Epithelial Cell Responses and Host Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L. Hutton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori acquires cholesterol from membrane raft domains in eukaryotic cells, commonly known as “lipid rafts.” Incorporation of this cholesterol into the H. pylori cell membrane allows the bacterium to avoid clearance by the host immune system and to resist the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. The presence of cholesterol in H. pylori bacteria suggested that this pathogen may have cholesterol-enriched domains within its membrane. Consistent with this suggestion, we identified a hypothetical H. pylori protein (HP0248 with homology to the flotillin proteins normally found in the cholesterol-enriched domains of eukaryotic cells. As shown for eukaryotic flotillin proteins, HP0248 was detected in detergent-resistant membrane fractions of H. pylori. Importantly, H. pylori HP0248 mutants contained lower levels of cholesterol than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.01. HP0248 mutant bacteria also exhibited defects in type IV secretion functions, as indicated by reduced IL-8 responses and CagA translocation in epithelial cells (P < 0.05, and were less able to establish a chronic infection in mice than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.05. Thus, we have identified an H. pylori flotillin protein and shown its importance for bacterial virulence. Taken together, the data demonstrate important roles for H. pylori flotillin in host-pathogen interactions. We propose that H. pylori flotillin may be required for the organization of virulence proteins into membrane raft-like structures in this pathogen.

  19. Accuracy of a rapid 10-minute carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiahung, Kao [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Shyhjen, Wang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Chungyuan, Hsu [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Wanyu, Lin [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Chihkua, Huang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Gastroenterology; Granhum, Chen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Gastroenterology

    1993-08-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP), an organism which is associated with peptic ulcer disease. To detect gastric urease, we examined 184 patients (144 males, 40 females; mean age: 49.8[+-]15.6 years) with suspected peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given orally 5 [mu]Ci of carbon-14 labelled urea. For each patient only one breath sample was collected in hyamine at 10 min. The amount of [sup 14]C collected at 10 min was expressed as follows: (DPM/mmol CO[sub 2] collected)/(DPM administered)x100xbody weight (kg). The presence of HP colonization was determined by examination of multiple endoscopic prepyloric antral biopsy specimens subjected to culture or a rapid urease test. For the purpose of this study, HP-positive patients were defined as those with characteristic bacteria as indicated by a positive result of either the culture or the rapid urease test; HP-negative patients were defined as those with negative findings on both the culture and the rapid urease test. Of the 184 cases, 99 (53.8%) were positive for HP infection, and 85 (46.2%), negative. The sensitivity and specificity of the rapid 10 min [sup 14]C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of HP-associated peptic ulcer disease were evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with a variable cut-off value from 1.5 to 4.5. When a cut-off value of 1.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity, 83.5%; when a cut-off value of 4.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 54.5% and the specificity, 97.6%. (orig.)

  20. Accuracy of a rapid 10-minute carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao Chiahung; Wang Shyhjen; Hsu Chungyuan; Lin Wanyu; Huang Chihkua; Chen Granhum

    1993-01-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP), an organism which is associated with peptic ulcer disease. To detect gastric urease, we examined 184 patients (144 males, 40 females; mean age: 49.8±15.6 years) with suspected peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given orally 5 μCi of carbon-14 labelled urea. For each patient only one breath sample was collected in hyamine at 10 min. The amount of 14 C collected at 10 min was expressed as follows: [(DPM/mmol CO 2 collected)/(DPM administered)]x100xbody weight (kg). The presence of HP colonization was determined by examination of multiple endoscopic prepyloric antral biopsy specimens subjected to culture or a rapid urease test. For the purpose of this study, HP-positive patients were defined as those with characteristic bacteria as indicated by a positive result of either the culture or the rapid urease test; HP-negative patients were defined as those with negative findings on both the culture and the rapid urease test. Of the 184 cases, 99 (53.8%) were positive for HP infection, and 85 (46.2%), negative. The sensitivity and specificity of the rapid 10 min 14 C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of HP-associated peptic ulcer disease were evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with a variable cut-off value from 1.5 to 4.5. When a cut-off value of 1.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity, 83.5%; when a cut-off value of 4.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 54.5% and the specificity, 97.6%. (orig.)

  1. Helicobacter pylori eradication in complicated peptic ulcer: Beneficial in most?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subair Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy has a role in minimizing the complications of peptic ulcer disease, namely, bleeding, perforation, and obstruction. However, the precise role of H. pylori eradication therapy in the complicated ulcers remains inconclusive, especially in perforation and gastric outlet obstruction. The prevalence of H. pylori in peptic ulcer bleeding patients has been widely underestimated owing to the differences in diagnostic tests and patient characteristics, and hence, it is recommended that an initial negative test should be followed up by a delayed repeat testing to rule out false negativity. It is well established now that eradication of H. pylori in patients with bleeding ulcers reduces rebleeding and ulcer recurrence. Multiple studies have attributed high recurrence rates of duodenal ulcer following simple closure to a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. Eradication therapy decreases the recurrence rate of perforated ulcers, thus justifying the role of H. pylori eradication therapy following the primary surgical management of perforated ulcers. The role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer with gastric outlet obstruction is yet to be evaluated clearly. There are some reports of resolution of gastric outlet obstruction following therapy for H. pylori, obviating the need for surgery. Clarithromycin-containing regimens are recommended as first-line in areas of low resistance, whereas bismuth-containing quadruple therapy is the first-line empirical treatment in areas of high clarithromycin resistance. Treatment of H. pylori is beneficial in most of the patients with complicated peptic ulcer disease, especially in reducing recurrence of ulcer with or without complications.

  2. Software testing and source code for the calculation of clearance values. Final report; Erprobung von Software und Quellcode zur Berechnung von Freigabewerten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, Andreas; Meyering, Henrich

    2016-11-15

    The GRS research project was aimed to the test the appropriateness of the software package ''residual radioactivity'' (RESRAD) for the calculation of clearance values according to German and European regulations. Comparative evaluations were performed with RESRAD-OFFSITE and the code SiWa-PRO DSS used by GRS and the GRS program code ARTM. It is recommended to use RESRAD-OFFSITE for comparative calculations. The dose relevant air-path dispersion of radionuclides should not be modeled using RESRAD-OFFSITE, the use of ARTM is recommended. The sensitivity analysis integrated into RESRAD-OFFSITE allows a fast identification of crucial parameters.

  3. Assessment of effectiveness of Anderson-Hynes operation in patients with unilateral hydronephrosis according to the data of radionuclide renography and clearance-tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khripta, F.P.; Kogut, Yu.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    The function of injured and contralateral kidneys is studied according to the data of radionuclide renography, effective kidney plasma flow and glomerular filtration in 35 patients with unilateral hydronephrosis after the Andersen-Heinz operation. The comparative estimate of the data obtained before and after operation (in different periods) is carried out. The improvement of functions of the hydronephrotic kidney is found both 1-5 years and 0.5 year after the operation. It is shown that radionuclide clearance tests are objective methods of studying remote results of surgical treatment of hydronephrosis. 8 refs

  4. High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Malaysian Parkinson's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisah WY

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available WY Nafisah,1 A Hamdi Najman,1 R Hamizah,1 S Azmin,1 R Rabani,1 SA Shah,2 MI Norlinah11Department of Medicine, 2Department of Community Health, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaBackground: Studies have reported a higher prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in Parkinson's disease.Objectives: To determine the frequency of H. pylori in patients with Parkinson's disease compared to controls and its effect on symptom severity and quality of life.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study involving 29 Parkinson's disease patients and 23 controls. The 13C-urea breath test was used to diagnose H. pylori. Symptom severity and quality of life were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS and 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39, respectively.Results: The frequency of H. pylori infection was 48.3% in the Parkinson's disease group and 21.7% in controls (P=0.048. This became more significant (P=0.012 when we excluded relatives of H. pylori-positive patients from the control group. There was no association between Hoehn and Yahr stages, UPDRS and PDQ-39 scores, and H. pylori.Conclusion: H. pylori infection is more prevalent in the Malaysian Parkinson's disease population compared to controls (48.3% versus 21.7%. However, symptom severity and quality of life was not related to H. pylori infection.Keywords: Parkinson's disease, Helicobacter pylori, prevalence, 13C-urea breath test

  5. Tuberculosis screening of new hospital employees: compliance, clearance to work time, and cost using tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Chang, Sarah A; Manning, Mary L; Chandler, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Selection of the most suitable test(s) for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection should be based on purpose, setting, effectiveness, and cost. Two tests are available to screen for latent TB: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the more recent interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs). Based on the administrative, logistic, and technical ease of use, an IGRA trial was initiated by the occupational health department at an urban Veteran's Administration health care facility for TB screening of new employees. As a result, new employees completing the pre-placement process within the organization's designated 14 days increased from 77% to 97%, new employee clearance to work time decreased from 13.18 to 5.91 days, and new employee TB screening costs were reduced by 40%. The IGRA is an acceptable alternative to the TST and has significant potential to improve the process of pre-placement TB screening. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  7. Peptide Extracts from Cultures of Certain Lactobacilli Inhibit Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, Luc; Vincent, Pascal; Makras, Eleftherios; Leroy, Frédéric; Pot, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori inhibition by probiotic lactobacilli has been observed in vitro and in vivo. Carefully selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains could therefore play an important role in the treatment of H. pylori infection and eradication. However, the underlying mechanism for this inhibition is not clear. The aim of this study was to examine if peptide extracts, containing bacteriocins or other antibacterial peptides, from six Lactobacillus cultures (Lactobacillus acidophilus La1, Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, Lactobacillus casei YIT 9029, Lactobacillus gasseri K7, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) contribute to the inhibition of H. pylori. Peptide extracts from cultures of Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were most active, reducing the viability of H. pylori ATCC 43504 with more than 2 log units within 4 h of incubation (P < 0.001). The four other extracts were less or not active. When six clinical isolates of H. pylori were tested for their susceptibility towards five inhibitory peptide extracts, similar observations were made. Again, the peptide extracts from Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were the most inhibitory, while the three other extracts resulted in a much lower inhibition of H. pylori. Protease-treated extracts were inactive towards H. pylori, confirming the proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory substance.

  8. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Triana, M.H.; Cabrera, A.; Sanchez, M. A.; Herrera, X.; Pawong, M.; Moreno, R.; Reyes, D.; Serrano, G.; Diaz, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer, chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94 % in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer, stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values

  9. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  10. Severe gastritis decreases success rate of Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Ismail Hakki; Sapmaz, Ferdane; Güliter, Sefa; Atasoy, Pınar

    2016-05-01

    In several studies, different risk factors other than antibiotic resistance have been documented with Helicobacter pylori eradication failure. We aimed in this study to investigate the relationship of gastric density of H. pylori, the occurrence/degree of gastric atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia (IM) with success rate of H. pylori eradication. Two hundred consecutive treatment naive patients who received bismuth containing standart quadruple treatment due to H. pylori infection documented by histopathological examination of two antral or two corpal biopsies entered this retrospective study. The updated Sydney system was used to grade the activity of gastritis, density of H. pylori colonization, atrophy, and IM. Stages III and IV of operative link for gastritis assessment (OLGA) or the operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) stages was considered as severe gastritis. H. pylori eradication was determined via stool H. pylori antigen test performed 4 weeks after the end of therapy. The presence of gastric atrophy and IM was significantly higher in patients with eradication failure (p = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Severe gastritis (OLGA III-IV and OLGIM III-IV) rates were higher in eradication failure group. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that OLGA and OLGIM stages were to be independent risk factors for eradication failure (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Our results suggested that histopathologically severe gastritis may cause H. pylori eradication failure. In addition, we found that H. pylori density was not a risk factor for treatment failure in patients who receive quadruple treatment.

  11. The fate of Helicobacter pylori phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerization chain reaction tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori able to express green fluorescent protein, as well as an ATCC strain, and a clinical isolate of this pathogen were evaluated for their ability to survive predation by Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Ingestion was evaluated by microscopic observation of the GFP-H. pyl...

  12. B-Cell and T-Cell Immune Responses to Experimental Helicobacter pylori Infection in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurgalieva, Zhannat Z.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Zheng, Carl Q.; Elliott, Susan N.; Ernst, Peter B.; Osato, Michael; Estes, Mary K.; Graham, David Y.

    2005-01-01

    The acute antibody and T-cell immune response to Helicobacter pylori infection in humans has not been studied systematically. Serum from H. pylori-naive volunteers challenged with H. pylori and cured after 4 or 12 weeks was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for anti-H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgA established using bacterial lysates from homologous (the infecting strain) and heterologous H. pylori. Proteins recognized by IgM antibody were identified by mass spectrometry of immunoreactive bands separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Mucosal T-cell subsets (CD4, CD8, CD3, and CD30 cells) were assessed by immunohistochemistry. All 18 infected volunteers developed H. pylori-specific IgM responses to both homologous or heterologous H. pylori antigens. H. pylori antigens reacted with IgM antibody at 4 weeks postinfection. IgM Western blotting showed immunoreactivity of postinfection serum samples to multiple H. pylori proteins with molecular weights ranging between 9,000 (9K) to 150K with homologous strains but only a 70K band using heterologous antigens. Two-dimensional electrophoresis demonstrated that production of H. pylori-specific IgM antibodies was elicited by H. pylori flagellins A and B, urease B, ABC transporter binding protein, heat shock protein 70 (DnaK), and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase. Mucosal CD3, CD4, and CD8 T-cell numbers increased following infection. IgM antibody responses were detected to a range of homologous H. pylori antigens 2 to 4 weeks postchallenge. The majority of H. pylori proteins were those involved in motility and colonization and may represent targets for vaccine development. PMID:15845507

  13. Optimal initiation of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Lee, Dong Ho; Jang, Eun Sun; Kim, Jaihwan; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hayng; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-02-28

    To evaluate when Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy (ET) should be started in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). Clinical data concerning adults hospitalized with PUB were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Age, sex, type and stage of peptic ulcer, whether endoscopic therapy was performed or not, methods of H. pylori detection, duration of hospitalization, and specialty of the attending physician were investigated. Factors influencing the confirmation of H. pylori infection prior to discharge were determined using multiple logistic regression analysis. The H. pylori eradication rates of patients who received ET during hospitalization and those who commenced ET as outpatients were compared. A total of 232 patients with PUB were evaluated for H. pylori infection by histology and/or rapid urease testing. Of these patients, 53.7% (127/232) had confirmed results of H. pylori infection prior to discharge. In multivariate analysis, duration of hospitalization and ulcer stage were factors independently influencing whether H. pylori infection was confirmed before or after discharge. Among the patients discharged before confirmation of H. pylori infection, 13.3% (14/105) were lost to follow-up. Among the patients found to be H. pylori-positive after discharge, 41.4% (12/29) did not receive ET. There was no significant difference in the H. pylori eradication rate between patients who received ET during hospitalization and those who commenced ET as outpatients [intention-to-treat: 68.8% (53/77) vs 60% (12/20), P=0.594; per-protocol: 82.8% (53/64) vs 80% (12/15), P=0.723]. Because many patients with PUB who were discharged before H. pylori infection status was confirmed lost an opportunity to receive ET, we should confirm H. pylori infection and start ET prior to discharge.

  14. EXTRAGASTRIC AND ORODENTAL MANIFESTATIONS IN PEDIATRIC INFECTION WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI. A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Smaranda DIACONESCU; Raluca STANCA; Maria BOLAT

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a worlwide spread infection mostly manifested in childhood. Many - both invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests - are now available,. The colonisation effect of gastric mucosa and its consequences are well known and studied. H. pylori can also induce extra-gastric manifestations, like iron-deficiency anemia. The role of oral cavity colonisation is not clearly defined, several studies stating that the oral cavity represents a reservoir for H. pyloris. The presence of ...

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Bukurije Zhubi; Zana Baruti-Gafurri; Ymer Mekaj; Mimoza Zhubi; Idriz Merovci; Iliriane Bunjaku; Valdete Topciu; Emine Devoli-Disha

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzym...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. ... or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can do on their own. Share ...

  17. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear the thick, sticky mucus ... Offer their tips for fitting ACTs into daily life Airway Clearance Techniques | Webcast ... Facebook Twitter ...

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today. ANNUAL FUND Become a Corporate Supporter Cause Marketing Make a Charitable Gift Our Corporate Supporters Workplace ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... D Structure Consortium CFTR Folding Consortium Epithelial Stem Cell Consortium Mucociliary Clearance Consortium SUCCESS WITH THERAPIES RESEARCH ... clapping) or vibration to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to ...

  20. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Active Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy ... clearance. Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency Chest Wall ...

  1. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... a range of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage ... LEGACY GIFT Sponsor a Participant CF Climb CF Cycle for Life Great Strides Xtreme Hike Participate In ...

  2. EXTRAGASTRIC AND ORODENTAL MANIFESTATIONS IN PEDIATRIC INFECTION WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI. A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda DIACONESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a worlwide spread infection mostly manifested in childhood. Many - both invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests - are now available,. The colonisation effect of gastric mucosa and its consequences are well known and studied. H. pylori can also induce extra-gastric manifestations, like iron-deficiency anemia. The role of oral cavity colonisation is not clearly defined, several studies stating that the oral cavity represents a reservoir for H. pyloris. The presence of this rod in the dental plaque may lead to periodontitis, dental caries, dental calculus and tooth loos. Dental treatment associated with eradication therapy decreases the prevalence of oral H. pylori and improves the eradication rate of gastric H. pylori. Dental treatment in H. pylori infection management should be taken into consideration, especially in children and teens.

  3. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with nodular antritis and follicular gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević Ratko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is known to be the must common cause of chronic gastritis having some endoscopic and pathologic characteristies as determinated by the Sydney System for Gastritis Classification. The aim of our case report was to point out the relationship between an endoscopic finding of nodular antritis and the presence of H. pylori infection and active chronic gastritis. Case report. Our patient underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for dyspeptic complaints and was diagnosed as having nodular antritis, but also underwent urease test and hystopathologic examination of antral mucosa, to determine the presence and density of H. pylori infection and the presence and severity of gastritis. After a course of anti H. pylori treatment, dyspepsia improved and new biopsy specimens obtained two months and six months afterwards revealed no pathological findings. Conclusion. The case report supported the association of H. pylori infection of lymphoid follicles with nodular gastric mucosis.

  4. Utilidad del test rápido de ureasa para la identificación de Helicobacter pylori en pacientes con hemorragia digestiva de origen péptico. Clínica Ortega de Huancayo 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Trujillo Cunyas, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Antecedentes: Helicobacter pylori juega un rol importante en la fisiopatología del desarrollo de la enfermedad ulcero péptica y sus complicaciones graves como la hemorragia digestiva siendo un factor de riesgo independiente que ocasiona el sangrado; la identificación de la bacteria en esta condición clínica se ve limitada por la disminución de la sensibilidad de la histología y test rápido de ureasa métodos utilizados para su diagnóstico. Objetivo: Identificar y valorar los resultados del tes...

  5. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the 13C-urea-breast-test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, A.; Hernandez-Triana, M.; Sanchez, M.; Herrera, X.; Pawong, M.; Moreno, R.; Reyes, D.; Serrano, G.; Diaz, M.E.; Valencia, M.

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94% in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the 13 C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values. This research contract proposes the study of contamination with Hp in Cuban children older than 2 years of age affected by chronic diarrhoea using the 13 C-Urea Breath Test and serological tests for detection of anti-Hp IgG antibodies. Their nutritional

  6. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the {sup 13}C-urea-breast-test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, A; Hernandez-Triana, M; Sanchez, M; Herrera, X; Pawong, M; Moreno, R; Reyes, D; Serrano, G; Diaz, M E [Institute of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Department of Biochemistry and Physiology, Havana (Cuba); Valencia, M [Centro de Investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, Department of Human Nutrition, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94% in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the {sup 13}C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values. This research contract proposes the study of contamination with Hp in Cuban children older than 2 years of age affected by chronic diarrhoea using the {sup 13}C-Urea Breath Test and serological tests for detection of anti-Hp IgG antibodies. Their

  7. Risks and Benefits of Helicobacter pylori Eradication: Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Hunt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with diseases known to be associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, such as peptic ulcer, treatment of the underlying infection is the standard of care. However, in most major consensus management guidelines, including those published in Canada, widespread testing for H pylori infection is not recommended. This practice is not encouraged because of insufficient evidence of cost-benefit in gastric cancer prevention, the potential for increases in antibiotic resistance and the controversial hypothesis of potential negative effects of eradication in certain clinical entities. For example, there is insufficient evidence to recommend against eradicating H pylori discovered in a patient with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The management guidelines designed specifically in Canada should, therefore, continue to be applied, with H pylori diagnosed and treated in appropriately selected patients.

  8. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  9. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Infection on Symptoms of Gastroenteritis Due to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Alicia Hsin-Ming; Haggerty, Thomas Dean; de Martel, Catherine; Leung, Cynthia Wai-Mun; Parsonnet, Julie

    Helicobacter pylori can cause hypochlorhydria in some hosts and predispose to diarrheal infections. We tested the hypothesis that chronic H. pylori infection increases the risk of diarrheal illness due to an acid-sensitive organism: enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). After testing healthy

  10. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nysaeter, G.; Berstad, K.; Weberg, R.; Berstad, A.; Hardardottir, H.

    1992-01-01

    By employing the 14 C-urea breath test as the reference methods the authors determined the specificity and sensitivity of three bioptic methods for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in 103 subjects. All biopsy specimens were obtained from the gastric antrum. For culture the specificity was 100%. Its applicability was reduced, however, by a low sensitivity (73.8%) and a delay of several days before the final result was available. Microscopy of Loeffler-stained biopsy smears yielded a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 92.9%, but the method was regarded time-consuming. The rapid urease test yielded a specificity of 98.4% and a sensitivity of 85.7%. Being quick, simple and inexpensive, the rapid urease test is well suited for routine use in gastroscopy. 17 refs., 4 tabs

  11. Lanthanum Deposition in the Stomach in the Absence of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Tanaka, Takehiro; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2018-03-15

    In this case report, we describe two patients who showed a diffusely whitish mucosa in the posterior wall and the lesser curvature of the gastric body. The patients were serologically- and histopathologically-negative for Helicobacter pylori. Random biopsy specimens from the stomach revealed no regenerative changes, intestinal metaplasia, and/or foveolar hyperplasia in either of the patients. Although lanthanum deposition in the gastric mucosa has been reported to occur in close association with H. pylori-associated gastritis, our patients tested negative for H. pylori. These cases suggest that lanthanum deposition presents as whitish lesions in the gastric body in H. pylori-negative patients.

  12. Using Nuclear Techniques to Detect Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is present in all countries the world over. More than 50% of the world’s population harbour H. pylori in their upper gastrointestinal tract. It can negatively influence nutrition by affecting the uptake of iron and zinc and by increasing susceptibility to diarrhoeal disease. Beyond that, H. pylori is also a major cause of stomach diseases like chronic gastritis, and elevates the risk of developing stomach cancer. The carbon-13 urea breath test is a quick and non-invasive diagnostic test to detect the presence of H. pylori. The patient drinks urea labelled with stable carbon isotopes ( 13 C) that is dissolved in orange juice or citric acid to make sure it coats the entire surface of the stomach, thereby improving the test’s accuracy. If H. pylori is present, it metabolizes the urea and, after 30 minutes, produces carbon dioxide labelled with the stable carbon isotope ( 13 CO 2 ), which can be detected in the breath analysis

  13. Frequency of helicobacter pylori antibodies in porto-systemic encephalopathy,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethar, G.H.; Ahmed, R.; Afsar, S.; Zuberi, B.F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of Helicobacter pylori antibodies in patients presenting with porto-systemic encephalopathy due to liver disease. Patients and Methods: During the study period, seventy-six patients of porto-systemic encephalopathy due to liver diseases was selected. These subjects were evaluated for hepatic encephalopathy grade, modified Child-Pugh classification and were managed according to the standard practices. These patients were evaluated for Helicobacter (H. pylori) antibody status by ELlSA (Abbott Laboratories) method. Results: Out of 76 patients studied and tested for H. pylori antibodies, 48(63.2%) were males and 28(36.8%) were females with age ranging between 17 and 85 years. Out of 76 patients who presented with porto-systemic encephalopathy, 59(77.6%) had a positive H. pylori antibody test. Thirty-five of these were males and 24 were females. A significant number of patients who presented with higher grade of encephalopathy were H. pylori antibody positive (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, frequency of H. pylori antibodies was significantly high in patients of porto-systematic encephalopathy. (author)

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections among patients referred for endoscopy at Hospital Sultan Abdul Halim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranita Kirubakaran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection according to age, gender, ethnicity, and endoscopic finding and to study the association between smoking and alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection. Methods: A retrospective observational study on 582 consecutive patients referred for endoscopy with H. pylori tested was conducted in Hospital Sultan Abdul Halim from 1st of January 2013 till 31st of December 2013. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi-square, Fisher’s exact test and binary logistic regression with SPSS version 16. Results: Out of the 582 patients, 74 (12.7% were positive for H. pylori infection. Among those with H. pylori infection, 42 (56.8% were female. Infection was highest in the age group of 51 to 60 years old, 25 (33.8% with the mean (SD age of 52.9 (14.9 years. From the endoscopic finding, erosions, 38 (51.4% had the highest H. pylori positive cases. H. pylori infection was commonly found among Indians (36.3%; 41/113 followed by Chinese (17.6%, 18/102 and Malays (4.1%; 15/367 (P 0.05. Conclusions: The increased risk of H. pylori infection in Indians might be due to the unusual socio-cultural practices and difference in diet which may be responsible for the transmission of the infection. Therefore, further studies are warranted.

  15. Lung mucociliary clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, J.; Lange, P.; Nyboe, J.; Groth, S.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish reference values for mucociliary clearance and mucociliary clearance reserve capacity as determined by β 2 -adrenergic agonist-induced increase in mucociliary clearance. We studied 62 healthy females (n=33) and males (n=29). Their ages ranged evenly between 18 and 84 years. Fifty-three of the subjects were life-long non-smokers, while nine were ex-smokers. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that mucociliary clearance was significantly faster when the radioaerosol was deposited in the central airways than when it was deposited in the peripheral airways, and faster in life-long non-smokers than in ex-smokers. There was no influence of age, and no convincing association with sex. The variation was less within than between subjects. Mean mucociliary clearance reserve capacity was 21.3% (SD: 10.0%, P 2 agonist-induced increase in lung mucociliary clearance was significantly larger (P<0.05) than the stimulation which has previously been reported in patients with asthma, bronchiectasis or cystic fibrosis. The signal-to-noise ratio of the mucociliary clearance reserve capacity in relation to measurement of baseline mucociliary clearance indicates that measurement of mucociliary clearance reserve capacity may be a more efficient means of distinguishing between ''normal'' and ''abnormal'' mucociliary clearance than single measurement of baseline mucociliary clearance. (orig.)

  16. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with protection against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Perry

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a lifelong and typically asymptomatic infection of the stomach, profoundly alters gastric immune responses, and may benefit the host in protection against other pathogens. We explored the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.We first examined M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma and H. pylori antibody responses in 339 healthy Northern Californians undergoing routine tuberculin skin testing. Of 97 subjects (29% meeting criteria for latent tuberculosis (TB infection (LTBI, 45 (46% were H. pylori seropositive. Subjects with LTBI who were H. pylori-seropositive had 1.5-fold higher TB antigen-induced IFN-gamma responses (p = 0.04, ANOVA, and a more Th-1 like cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to those who were H. pylori seronegative. To explore an association between H. pylori infection and clinical outcome of TB exposure, we evaluated H. pylori seroprevalence in baseline samples from two high risk TB case-contact cohorts, and from cynomolgus macaques experimentally challenged with M. tuberculosis. Compared to 513 household contacts who did not progress to active disease during a median 24 months follow-up, 120 prevalent TB cases were significantly less likely to be H. pylori infected (AOR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.0.36-0.83, p = 0.005, though seroprevalence was not significantly different from non-progressors in 37 incident TB cases (AOR: 1.35 [95% CI 0.63-2.9] p = 0.44. Cynomolgus macaques with natural H. pylori infection were significantly less likely to progress to TB 6 to 8 months after M. tuberculosis challenge (RR: 0.31 [95% CI 0.12-0.80], p = 0.04.H. pylori infection may induce bystander effects that modify the risk of active TB in humans and non-human primates. That immunity to TB may be enhanced by exposure to other microbial agents may have important implications for vaccine development and disease control.

  17. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and adult height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moayyedi, Paul; Forman, David; Duffett, Sara; Mason, Su; Brown, Julia; Crocombe, Will; Feltbower, Richard; Axon, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: A cross-sectional survey was performed to evaluate the association between H. pylori and adult height. Methods: H. pylori infection was assessed using a 13 C-urea breath test and height measured by a research nurse using a stadiometer in participants between the ages of 40-49 years. Results: Height was measured in 2932/3682 participants that attended and were evaluable. H. pylori infected women were 1.4 cm shorter than uninfected women (95% confidence interval, CI=0.7-2.1 cm) and this statistically significant difference persisted after adjusting for age, ethnicity, childhood and present socio-economic status (H. pylori positives 0.79 cm shorter; 95%CI: 0.05-1.52 cm). H. pylori positive men were 0.7 cm shorter than uninfected men but this did not reach statistical significance (95% CI: -0.1-1.5 cm). Conclusion: Although H. pylori infection is associated with reduced adult height in women, this maybe due to residual confounding

  18. Evaluation of Salivary Antibodies to Detect Infection with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B Loeb

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and chronic gastritis. Infection with this bacterium stimulates the production of immunoglobulin (Ig G antibody. Salivary IgG antibody tests to detect H pylori infection offer a convenient and noninvasive method of diagnosis. To evaluate an IgG salivary antibody kit, saliva was collected from 157 out-patients with dyspepsia referred for endoscopy to a tertiary centre. A salivary IgG ELISA antibody assay was performed using the Helisal Helicobacter pylori (IgG assay kit, and at least four gastric biopsies were obtained. H pylori infection was confirmed by demonstration of the organism on Warthin-Starry silver stain (sensitivity 85%, specificity 55%. The prevalence of infection with H pylori was 30%. When the analysis was redone, excluding those treated with eradication therapy, the results were similar (sensitivity 86%, specificity 58%. The positive predictive value of the assay was 45% and the negative predictive value was 90%. Despite the ease of sampling, the assay used has limited diagnostic utility, lacking the predictive value to indicate which patients referred with dyspeptic symptoms to a tertiary care setting are infected with H pylori.

  19. Helicobacter pylori management in ASEAN: The Bangkok consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rojborwonwitaya, Jarin; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chotivitayatarakorn, Peranart; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Pisespongsa, Pises; Mairiang, Pisaln; Rani, Aziz; Leow, Alex; Mya, Swe Mon; Lee, Yi-Chia; Vannarath, Sengdao; Rasachak, Bouachanh; Chakravuth, Oung; Aung, Moe Myint; Ang, Tiing-Leong; Sollano, Jose D; Trong Quach, Duc; Sansak, Inchaya; Wiwattanachang, Olarn; Harnsomburana, Piyathida; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Fock, Kwong-Ming; Goh, Khean-Lee; Sugano, Kentaro; Graham, David

    2018-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection remains to be the major cause of important upper gastrointestinal diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori management in ASEAN: the Bangkok consensus report gathered key opinion leaders for the region to review and evaluate clinical aspects of H. pylori infection and to develop consensus statements, rationales, and grades of recommendation for the management of H. pylori infection in clinical practice in ASEAN countries. This ASEAN Consensus consisted of 34 international experts from 10 ASEAN countries, Japan, Taiwan, and the United States. The meeting mainly focused on four issues: (i) epidemiology and disease association; (ii) diagnostic tests; (iii) management; and (iv) follow-up after eradication. The final results of each workshop were presented for consensus voting by all participants. Statements, rationale, and recommendations were developed from the available current evidence to help clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori and its clinical diseases. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Relationship Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Seif-Rabiei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There is some evidence indicating the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal diseases including skin, vascular, and autoimmune disorders, as well as some respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between H. pylori and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In a case-control study, 90 patients with COPD and 90 age- and sex- matched control subjects were included. Serum samples were tested for anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA IgG by ELISA. A physician completed a questionnaire including demographic characteristics, habitual history, and spirometric findings for each patient. Of 90 patients with COPD 66 (51% had mild, 31 (34.4% moderate, and 13 (14.4% sever disease. There was no significant association between H. pylori IgG seropositivity and COPD. Serum levels of anti-CagA IgG were significantly higher in patients with COPD than in the control subjects (P < 0.001. No association was observed between H. pylori infection and severity of COPD. The results suggest that there is an association between CagA-positive H. pylori infections and COPD. Further studies should be planned to investigate the potential pathogenic mechanisms that might underlie these associations.

  1. Metabolic Interaction of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Jong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a barrier, gut commensal microbiota can protect against potential pathogenic microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Crosstalk between gut microbes and immune cells promotes human intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been implicated in the development of many human metabolic disorders like obesity, hepatic steatohepatitis, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Certain microbes, such as butyrate-producing bacteria, are lower in T2D patients. The transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but the exact pathogenesis remains unclear. H. pylori in the human stomach cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancers. H. pylori infection also induces insulin resistance and has been defined as a predisposing factor to T2D development. Gastric and fecal microbiota may have been changed in H. pylori-infected persons and mice to promote gastric inflammation and specific diseases. However, the interaction of H. pylori and gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism also remains unknown. Further studies aim to identify the H. pylori-microbiota-host metabolism axis and to test if H. pylori eradication or modification of gut microbiota can improve the control of human metabolic disorders.

  2. Relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection with diarrhea and nutritional status among nutritionally-at-risk children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini, M.A.; Husaini, Y.K.; Suwardi, S.; Salimar; Widodo, Y.; Kurpad, A.; Miranda-Da-Cruz, B.

    2005-01-01

    A crossectional study of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was carried out in 275 children (Age range = 6-36 months) belonging to the low socio-economic strata (SES) in the rural and suburban areas of Bogor (West Java Indonesia). H. Pylori infection was diagnosed by using C-13 urea breath test and nutritional status was analyzed by z- 2 scores. The study revealed a strong (χ 2 = 30.9; df=4; p 2 =7.2; df=3; p<0.05) association was observed between the educational status of mothers and prevalence of H. pylori infection. Although there was a trend, the results did not yield any significant association between diarrhoea and H. pylori infection. A similar trend was also seen between anemia status and H. pylori infection. Of particular interest was the higher rate of H.pylori infection in children who were on breast-feeding as compared to those who had already been weaned (p<0.05). Stunting, a deficit of length-for-age was the only parameter among the three indicators of malnutrition (underweight, wasting, stunting), which was observed to be significantly (P<0.05) associated with H. pylori infection in our study. Although the other two parameters, underweight and wasting, were also manifested, the associations were not statistically significant. The results of this study have demonstrated that H. Pylori infection has an effect on malabsorption leading to a negative impact on the ability of children to thrive. (author)

  3. Association between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Chronic Urticaria: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyuan Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some studies have shown the possible involvement of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in chronic urticaria, but the relationship remains controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively assess the association between H. pylori infection and chronic urticaria. Methods. Observational studies comparing the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with chronic urticaria and control subjects were identified through a systematic search in MEDLINE and EMBASE up to July 2014. H. pylori infection was confirmed by serological or nonserological tests. For subgroup analyses, studies were separated by region, publication year, and H. pylori detection method to screen the potential factors resulting in heterogeneity. Results. 16 studies involving 965 CU cases and 1235 controls were included. Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in urticarial patients than in controls (OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.12–2.45; P=0.01. This result persisted in subanalysis of nine high-quality studies (OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.03–1.80; P=0.03. Subgroup analysis showed that detection method of H. pylori is also a potential influential factor for the overall results. Conclusions. Our present meta-analysis suggests that H. pylori infection is significantly, though weakly, associated with an increased risk of chronic urticaria.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection is an independent risk factor of early and advanced colorectal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Jun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Baek, Sun-Young; Kim, Kyunga; Hong, Sung Noh

    2017-06-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the development of colorectal neoplasm remains controversial. We examined the association between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasm in a large sample of healthy participants who underwent screening colonoscopy. A cross-sectional study of 8916 men, who participated in a regular health-screening examination that included an H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G antibody test and colonoscopy, was conducted to evaluate the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasm. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, regular exercise, regular aspirin use, and family history of colorectal cancer showed that the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for any adenoma and advanced neoplasm was 1.32 (1.07-1.61) and 1.90 (1.05-3.56) in participants with H. pylori infection and without H. pylori infection, respectively. The association persisted after further adjustment for inflammatory markers or metabolic variables including fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Regarding the location, a positive association was confined to cases with proximal adenomas and was observed similarly in all the evaluated subgroups. In a large-scale study, carefully controlled for confounding factors, involving asymptomatic participants without a history of colonoscopy, H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the risk of any colorectal adenoma and advanced colorectal neoplasm. Prospective studies are necessary to determine whether H. pylori eradication can reduce this risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with failure to thrive: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nan-Chang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chi, Hsin; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Ting, Wei-Hsin; Chan, Wai-Tao; Jiang, Chuen-Bin; Li, Sung-Tse; Lin, Chao-Hsu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2017-01-01

    The long-term impact of Helicobacter pylori infection is complex, and concerns about the need for eradication exist. We conducted this case control study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and failure to thrive (FTT). From January 2009 to December 2011, 53 children with FTT group and matched children with the same sex and age and similar socioeconomic status without FTT (control group) were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered to the parents/guardian, and a 13 C-urea breath test was performed to detect H. pylori infection. We found that the total prevalence of H. pylori infection was 29.2% and that there was no association between FTT and H. pylori infection (FTT group: 32%; control group: 26.4%; P =0.67). Short stature was more common in the FTT group and abdominal pain in the control group (FTT group: 37.7%; control group: 11.3%; P =0.003). In a comparison between the H. pylori -positive and -negative groups, abdominal pain (87.1% vs 64%; P =0.032) and the frequency of endoscopy (74.2% vs 32%; P <0.001) were significantly more common in the H. pylori -positive group. We found that children with H. pylori infection are at an increased risk for abdominal pain and that FTT is not associated with H. pylori infection. The decision for eradication should be evaluated carefully and individualized.

  6. Is raised helicobacter pylori antibody titre enough to decide retreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Ahmed, W.; Arif, A.; Alam, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection causes a rise in its antibodies which take almost a year to come to baseline following successful eradication treatment. Checking these values in between a year may give falsely high values and many patients may thus be over treated. Aims: To serially determine Helicobacter pylori antibody titres in patients after giving them triple therapy for H. pylori eradication and see how these values drop over time. Study type, Settings and duration: Longitudinal study conducted in Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pakistan Medical Research Council, Research Centre, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from May 2006 to April 2010. Subjects and Methods: Over the period of four years, 186 patients who were found positive for campylobacter like organism test during endoscopy were further tested for anti H. pylori IgG titre before being treated for H. pylori. Patients were given triple therapy comprising of Omeprazole (20 mg twice daily), Amoxicillin (1 gm twice daily) and Clarythromycin (500 mg twice daily) for a week and were followed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months to check symptomatic relief and they were tested again for H.Pylori antibody titres. Data was collected on pre-designed proforma which included patient's demography, symptoms and diagnosis. Results: Out of 186 patients who had a positive campylobacter like organism test, 173 patients consented to participate in the study. Serology for H.Pylori was positive in 119(68%) cases. A decline in mean antibody titres was observed as 11%, 21.5%, 54.7% and 59.2% at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. Conclusions: Sensitivity of serology for diagnosing H. pylori infection is good but using these as a tool for monitoring response to treatment is doubtful. A slow drop in H.pylori antibodies was seen over 12 months and therefore, physicians are cautioned not to retreat the already treated cases till about one year post treatment. Policy message: H. pylori antibodies should

  7. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  8. Reduced infectivity of waterborne viable but nonculturable Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Fontaine, Clinton; Brewster, Rebecca; Wu, Jianfeng; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne VBNCH. pylori could cause gastric infection. We performed five mouse experiments to assess the infectivity of VBNCH. pylori in various exposure scenarios. VBNC viability was examined using Live/Dead staining and Biolog phenotype metabolism arrays. High doses of VBNCH. pylori in water were chosen to test the "worst-case" scenario for different periods of time. One experiment also investigated the infectious capabilities of VBNC SS1 using gavage. Further, immunocompromised mice were exposed to examine infectivity among potentially vulnerable groups. After exposure, mice were euthanized and their stomachs were examined for H. pylori infection using culture and PCR methodology. VBNC cells were membrane intact and retained metabolic activity. Mice exposed to VBNCH. pylori via drinking water and gavage were not infected, despite the various exposure scenarios (immunocompromised, high doses) that might have permitted infection with VBNCH. pylori. The positive controls exposed to viable, culturable H. pylori did become infected. While other studies that have used viable, culturable SS1 via gavage or drinking water exposures to successfully infect mice, in our study, waterborne VBNC SS1 failed to colonize mice under all test conditions. Future studies could examine different H. pylori strains in similar exposure scenarios to compare the relative infectivity of the VBNC vs the viable, culturable state, which would help inform future risk assessments of H. pylori in water. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Cell Consortium Mucociliary Clearance Consortium SUCCESS WITH THERAPIES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM Therapeutics Development Network TDN Coordinating Center Study Services Working With the TDN Tools and Resources ...

  10. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... 3-D Structure Consortium CFTR Folding Consortium Epithelial Stem Cell Consortium Mucociliary Clearance Consortium SUCCESS WITH THERAPIES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM Therapeutics Development Network TDN Coordinating Center ...

  11. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Research Consortia CF Biomarker Consortium CFTR 3-D Structure Consortium CFTR Folding Consortium Epithelial Stem Cell Consortium Mucociliary Clearance Consortium SUCCESS WITH THERAPIES RESEARCH ...

  12. Security Clearance Tracking System

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    National Archives and Records Administration — SCTS supports the adjudication process of private background investigations and clearances for potential employees, contractors, interns and student workers.

  13. Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    90%, the sequential therapy seems to have a potential of becoming the standard first-line treatment for H pylori infection in the interim, while search is being made for the ideal antimicrobial monotherapy. . Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, Dyspepsia, Gastric cancer, Gastric Ulcer, Duodenal ulcer. INTRODUCTION. 1. Since the ...

  14. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000

  15. Gentamicin-intercalated smectite as a new therapeutic option for Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Jung, Da Hyun; Lee, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Soon Young; Song, Yungoo; Kang, Il-Mo; Song, Young Goo

    2018-02-12

    Novel antibacterial strategies against Helicobacter pylori are needed because H. pylori strains are acquiring resistance to antibiotics. We evaluated the efficacy of gentamicin-intercalated smectite hybrid (S-GEN)-based treatment regimens in a murine model of H. pylori infection. Two groups of 10 rats were administered either smectite or S-GEN to measure coverage of the gastric mucosa. To evaluate anti-H. pylori efficacy, mice were divided into eight groups of 10 mice each given different treatments, and H. pylori eradication was assessed by a Campylobacter-like organism (CLO) test and H. pylori PCR of the gastric mucosa, and H. pylori antigen and H. pylori PCR analysis of mouse faeces. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines were examined. S-GEN was retained in the gastric mucosal layer with a >60% distribution ratio for up to 1 h, and the S-GEN-based triple regimen decreased bacterial burden in vivo compared with that of untreated mice or mice treated with other regimens. The cure rates in the CLO test and H. pylori PCR from gastric mucosa were 70%, 60%, 80%, 50%, 60% and 60% in Groups III-VIII, respectively. Those for H. pylori PCR in the faeces of mice were 90% and 100% in Group III with standard therapy and Group V with triple therapy including S-GEN, respectively. S-GEN triple therapy also reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that S-GEN is a promising and effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in advanced gastric carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irami Araújo-Filho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUD: There is substantial evidence that infection with Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the development of gastric cancer and that it is rarely found in gastric biopsy of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. On advanced gastric tumors, the bacteria can be lost from the stomach. AIMS: To analyze the hypothesis that the prevalence of H.pylori in operated advanced gastric carcinomas and adjacent non-tumor tissues is high, comparing intestinal and diffuse tumors according to Lauren's classification METHODS: A prospective controlled study enrolled 56 patients from "Hospital Universitário", Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil, with advanced gastric cancer, treated from February 2000 to March 2003. Immediately after partial gastrectomy, the resected stomach was opened and several mucosal biopsy samples were taken from the gastric tumor and from the adjacent mucosa within 4 cm distance from the tumor margin. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Lauren's classification for gastric cancer was used, to analyse the prevalence of H. pylori in intestinal or diffuse carcinomas assessed by the urease rapid test, IgG by ELISA and Giemsa staining. H. pylori infected patients were treated with omeprazole, clarithromycin and amoxicillin for 7 days. Follow-up endoscopy and serology were performed 6 months after treatment to determine successful eradication of H. pylori in non-tumor tissue. Thereafter, follow-up endoscopies were scheduled annually. Chi-square and MacNemar tests with 0.05 significance were used. RESULTS: Thirty-four tumors (60.7% were intestinal-type and 22 (39.3% diffuse type carcinomas. In adjacent non-tumor gastric mucosa, chronic gastritis were found in 53 cases (94.6% and atrophic mucosa in 36 patients (64.3%. All the patients with atrophic mucosa were H. pylori positive. When examined by Giemsa and urease test, H. pylori positive rate in tumor tissue of intestinal type carcinomas was

  17. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  18. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia may differ according to age and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunsung; Park, Jae Jun; Park, Yoo Mi; Baik, Su Jung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jung, Da Hyun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin

    2018-03-29

    The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) remains controversial. This study aimed to clarify the association between H. pylori infection and ACN according to age groups. We retrospectively analyzed the association between H. pylori infection and ACN in patients aged Helicobacter pylori positivity was determined by the results of serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G or rapid urease test, if the anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G was in the borderline range. Among the 19 337 patients who were included, 56.2% and 3.4% were positive for H. pylori and ACN, respectively. Helicobacter pylori infection independently increased the risk of ACN in patients aged pylori infection and ACN was affected by smoking history. When stratified by age and smoking history, H. pylori infection conferred an increased risk of ACN in patients aged pylori infection and a history of smoking than in those without (69.3% vs 54.4%, respectively; P = .031). Helicobacter pylori infection confers an increased risk of ACN, but the association may differ according to age and smoking history. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Studies into laboratory animals for clearance rate of 32P-labelled Brucellae, using antigen elimination test after biotechnological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusky, K.; Hoffmann, A.; Bache, K.; Mueller, M.; Zwies, G.

    1988-01-01

    Studies were performed for the purpose of assessment of the immune status of mice, with regard to literature data and taking into consideration the large-scale use of veterinary pharmaceuticals for biotechnological control of reproduction. The antigen elimination test with Brucellae was applied to ICR mice but no influence on the immune status of 6 consecutive generations could be demonstrated. (author)

  20. Preparation of epigallocatechin gallate-loaded nanoparticles and characterization of their inhibitory effects on Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Hao-Yun; Feng, Chun-Lung; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Jui-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been proposed for overcoming the unpleasant side effects associated with antibiotics treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections. Research has shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major ingredient in green tea, has antibacterial activity for antiurease activity against H. pylori. Oral EGCG is not good because of its digestive instability and the fact that it often cannot reach the targeted site of antibacterial activity. To localize EGCG to H. pylori infection site, this study developed a fucose–chitosan/gelatin nanoparticle to encapsulate EGCG at the target and make direct contact with the region of microorganisms on the gastric epithelium. Analysis of a simulated gastrointestinal medium indicated that the proposed in vitro nanocarrier system effectively controls the release of EGCG, which interacts directly with the intercellular space at the site of H. pylori infection. Meanwhile, results of in vivo clearance assays indicated that our prepared fucose–chitosan/gelatin/EGCG nanoparticles had a significantly greater H. pylori clearance effect and more effectively reduced H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation in the gastric-infected mouse model than the EGCG solution alone. (paper)

  1. Helicobacter pylori Infection Rates in Patients Undergoing Endoscopy in the Interior of Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Feng Yih; Chong, Hock Chin; Tan, Yew Eng; Heng, Sophia Si Ling; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Ridwan, Hashim

    2016-04-01

    Very limited data are available on the Helicobacter pylori infection among the population of interior Borneo. We aimed to investigate the H. pylori infection rate among an endoscoped interior Borneo population and to report the differences between the infected and noninfected patients. We retrospectively analyzed the data of the rapid urease test (RUT) records in Endoscopy Unit Hospital Keningau from January 2009 to May 2014. Student's t-test, chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were used accordingly. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for H. pylori infection. Birth cohort was analyzed against H. pylori infection rate with chi-square test. Overall, there were 215 of 774 (27.8%) positive RUTs. Patients with H. pylori infection were younger (47.66 ± 14.93 vs 50.50 ± 15.02 years, p = .019), more likely to be female (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.12-2.13, p = .008) and originated from the Pensiangan district (OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.01-2.64, p = .047). Chinese patients were less likely infected with H. pylori (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.16-0.80, p = .013). Birth cohort was significantly associated with H. pylori infection rate (χ(2) (7) = 14.71, p = .040) with an increasing trend of H. pylori infection rate in patients born later (χ(2) (1) = 5.26, p = .022). The overall H. pylori infection rate in this population was unexpectedly low. Accordingly, it may be a recent arrival in this community. Gender, age, dietary practice, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity were among the factors associated with H. pylori infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mechanism of H. pylori intracellular entry: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eLiu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of H. pylori reside on gastric epithelial cell surfaces and in the overlying mucus, but a small fraction of H. pylori enter host epithelial and immune cells. To explore the role of the nudA invasin in host cell entry, a ΔnudA deletion derivative of strain J99 was constructed and transformants were verified by PCR and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. AGS cells were inoculated with either wild type (WT strain J99 or its ΔnudA mutant to determine the fraction of bacteria that were bound to the cells and inside these cells using the gentamicin protection assay. We observed no significant difference between either the density of H. pylori bound to AGS cell membranes or the density of intracellular H. pylori. To further explore this finding, separate chambers of each culture were fixed in glutaraldehyde for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and immunogold TEM. This addition to the classical gentamicin assay demonstrated that there were significantly more intracellular, and fewer membrane-bound, H. pylori in WT-infected AGS cells than in ΔnudA allele infected cells. Thus, the sum of intracellular and membrane-bound H. pylori was similar in the two groups. Since no other similar TEM study has been performed, it is at present unknown whether our observations can be reproduced by others Taken together however, our observations suggest that the classical gentamicin protection assay is not sufficiently sensitive to analyze H. pylori cell entry and that the addition of TEM to the test demonstrate that nudA plays a role in H. pylori entry into AGS cells in vitro. In addition, deletion of the invasin gene appears to limit H. pylori to the AGS cell surface, where it may be partly protected against gentamicin. In contrast, this specific environment may render H. pylori more vulnerable to host defense and therapeutic intervention, and less prone to trigger normal immune, carcinogenic, and other developmental response pathways.

  3. Relationship of Halitosis with Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz HajiFattahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori may be one of the main causes of halitosis. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship of Heli- cobacter pylori infection with halitosis.Materials and Methods: This case control study was performed on 44 dyspeptic patients with a mean age of 34.29±13.71 years (range 17 to 76 years. The case group included 22 patients with halitosis and no signs of diabetes mellitus, renal or liver failure, upper respiratory tract infection, malignancies, deep carious teeth, severe  periodontitis,  coated  tongue,  dry  mouth  or poor  oral  hygiene.  Control group included 22 patients without halitosis and the same age, sex, systemic and oral conditions as the case group. Halitosis was evaluated using organoleptic test (OLT and Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by Rapid Urease Test (RUT during endoscopy. The data were statistically analyzed using chi square, Mann Whitney and t-tests.Results: Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 20 (91% out of 22 halitosis patients, and 7 control subjects (32% (P<0.001.Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori gastric infection can be a cause of bad breath. Dentists should pay more attention to this infection and refer these patients to in- ternists to prevent further gastrointestinal (GI complications and probable malig- nancies.

  4. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Team Your cystic fibrosis care team includes a group of CF health care professionals who partner with ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... and Their Families When There's More Than One Person With CF in the Same School Daily Life ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  6. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori Adenotonsillar Colonization and Frequency of Adenotonsillitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuz Güçlü

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are insufficient data in the literature on the presence of Helicobacter pylori in tonsil and adenoid tissue of patients with only airway obstruction. This study examined the presence of H. pylori in surgical cases with airway obstruction or recurrent infection. Aims: To investigate the relationship between H. pylori adenotonsillar colonisation and the frequency of adenotonsillitis and to compare paediatric and adult patients according to H. pylori tonsillar colonisation. Study Design: Prospective clinical trial. Methods: Patients scheduled for adenoidectomy or tonsillectomy were classified into three groups based on indications: paediatric infection (n=29, paediatric obstruction (n=29 and adult infection (n=12. Tissue samples obtained from patients were examined for the presence of H. pylori by culture, rapid urease test and polymerase chain reaction. Results: Forty-nine tonsil tissues were examined. Positive results were found in two specimens with the rapid urease test (4.1% and three with polymerase chain reaction examination (6.1%. Only three positive polymerase chain reaction results (5.8% were identified in 52 adenoid tissue samples. There were no statistically significant differences in the presence of H. pylori between paediatric infection and obstruction groups or between paediatric infection and adult infection groups. Conclusion: In our study, there was a low incidence of H. pylori colonisation in tonsil and adenoid tissues. Regarding H. pylori colonisation, there was no significant difference between paediatric infection and obstruction groups. Also, no significant difference was found between adult and paediatric cases.

  7. Glutathione peroxidase level in patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tala, Z. Z.; Siregar, G. A.; Siregar, G. P.

    2018-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with leads to oxidative stress in the gastric mucosa. GPX is one of human antioxidative defense system allows the elimination of excess ROS. A cross-sectional study was in 80 consecutive gastritis patients who came to the endoscopic unit of Adam Malik General Hospital and PermataBunda Hospital in Medan, Indonesia, from May–September 2017, to determine the difference of GPX serum level between positive and negative infected H. pylori. the diagnosis of gastritis used Histopathology. Rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Serum samples were obtained to determined circulating GPX. It used Univariate and bivariate analysis (Mann Whitney U test). There were 50 patients (62.5%) infected with H. pylori. GPX levels in patients with positive H. pylori gastritis were lower than those of negative H. pylori but did not differ significantly. In conclusion, there were no significant differences in GPX level between positive and negative infected H. pylori patients.

  8. The association of pagophagia with Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, Suheyl; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan; Serin, Ender

    2009-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between pagophagia (compulsive ice eating) and H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. We identified H. pylori infection using the (13)C-urea breath test in 45 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (group 1) and 55 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia (group 2). Subgroups for testing oral intestinal iron absorption were randomly assigned from both groups. These subgroups consisted of (a) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, (b) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia, (c) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, pagophagia, and H. pylori infection before the eradication of H. pylori and (d) subgroup c after eradication therapy. There was no difference in the rate of H. pylori infection in the iron-deficiency anemia groups, with or without pagophagia. Furthermore, oral intestinal iron absorption was not influenced by pagophagia and/or H. pylori infection. Pagophagia did not increase the risk of H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Pagophagia and H. pylori infection do not synergistically affect the development of intestinal iron absorption abnormalities.

  9. Testing and Performance Validation of a Shielded Waste Segregation and Clearance Monitor Designed for the Measurement of Low Level Waste-13043

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, John A.; Burke, Kevin J.; Towner, Antony C.N.; Beaven, Graham; Spence, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development, testing and validation of a shielded waste segregation and clearance monitor designed for the measurement of low-density low-level waste (LLW). The monitor is made of a measurement chamber surrounded by detectors and a shielded outer frame. The shielded chamber consists of a steel frame, which contains typically 1.5 inches (3.81 cm) of lead and 0.5 inches (1.27 cm) of steel shielding. Inside the shielding are plastic scintillator panels, which serve as gross gamma ray detectors. The detector panels, with embedded photomultipliers, completely surround the internal measurement chamber on all 6 sides. Care has been taken to distribute the plastic scintillator detectors in order to optimise both the efficiency for gamma ray detection and at the same time achieve a volumetric sensitivity, which is as uniform as possible. A common high voltage power supply provides the bias voltage for each of the six photomultipliers. The voltage signals arising from the detectors and photomultipliers are amplified by six sensitive amplifiers. Each amplifier incorporates a single channel analyser with both upper and lower thresholds and the digitised counts from each detector are recorded on six scalars. Operation of the device is by means of a microprocessor from which the scalars are controlled. An internal load cell linked to the microprocessor determines the weight of the waste object, and this information is used to calculate the specific activity of the waste. The monitor makes background measurements when the shielded door is closed and a sample, usually a bag of low-density waste, is not present in the measurement chamber. Measurements of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of an earlier large volume prototype instrument are reported as part of the development of the Waste Segregation and Clearance Monitor (WSCM) described in the paper. For the optimised WSCM a detection efficiency of greater than 32% was measured using a small Cs-137

  10. A neglected cause for chronic spontaneous urticaria in children: Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akelma, A Z; Cizmeci, M N; Mete, E; Tufan, N; Bozkurt, B

    2015-01-01

    The aetiology of chronic urticaria is usually considered idiopathic. There is a paucity of research both on the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the aetiology of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CU) in children and also on which patients H. pylori should be investigated. All paediatric and adult patients who presented to the allergy outpatient clinic due to CU between January 2011 and July 2012 were included in this prospective, randomised study. Stool samples from all patients were examined for the H. pylori antigen. Paediatric and adult patients who had a positive stool test for the H. pylori antigen were reassessed following eradication therapy. Thirty-two children with CU and 35 adults with CU were enrolled in the study. Ten of the 32 (31.2%) children and 18 of the 35 (51.4%) adults were H. pylori positive (p=0.09). All children with positive-H. pylori were older than eight years of age. There was a significant positive correlation between age and the frequency of H. pylori infection (p0.05). Following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms recovered in 15 of the adults (83.3%) and 10 of the paediatric (100%) patients (p=0.172). In the current study we found that H. pylori is common among children with CU, particularly after eight years of age. We suggest that CU patients with an unknown aetiology should be routinely screened for H. pylori even if they do not present with GI symptoms and that those with H. pylori-positive results may receive treatment. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. The short-term effects of Helicobacter pylori eradication on symptoms of functional dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Tezer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection is major etiologic factor of chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Functional dyspepsia (FD is defined as “persistent or recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen in patient who has no definite structural or biochemical explanation of their symptoms. It is uncertain whether treatment of H.pylori infection relieves symptoms in patients with FD. We searched short term effects of H.pylori eradication for symptoms in patients with FD.Material and method: We enrolled patients with dyspeptic symptoms which were diagnosed FD and satisfied en-rollment criteria of trial. Endoscopic biopsy was taken from each patient during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. H.pylori infected patients were assigned to seven days of treatment with 30 mgr of lansoprozole twice daily, 1000 mg of amoksisilin twice daily, and 500 mg levofloxacin once daily. Patients were assessed whether treatment was suc-cessful or not by 14C urea breathe test after 6-8 week. Also pretreatment and post treatment symptom scores were questioned.Results: There were 99 female and 68 male patients. After treatment 114 patients (68% was negative for H. pylori, 53 patients (32% remained positive. Mean of age and proportion of sex was similar in H.pylori (+ and (- groups. While 111 (97.4% of H.pylori (- patients’ symptom scores decreased, 38 (71.7% of H.pylori (+ patients’ scores de-creased. There was significant differences between two groups (p=0.001.Conclusion: Eradication of H.pylori relieves the symptoms of functional dyspepsia. New trials for long term effect of H.pylori eradication on symptoms must be conducted in future.

  12. Review article: Associations between Helicobacter pylori and obesity--an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lender, N; Talley, N J; Enck, P; Haag, S; Zipfel, S; Morrison, M; Holtmann, G J

    2014-07-01

    There is emerging debate over the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on body mass index (BMI). A recent study demonstrated that individuals who underwent H. pylori eradication developed significant weight gain as compared to subjects with untreated H. pylori colonisation. To elucidate the association between H. pylori colonisation and the prevalence of overweight and obesity in developed countries. The literature was searched for publications reporting data on H. pylori prevalence rates and obesity prevalence rates. Studies selected reported H. pylori prevalence in random population samples with sample sizes of more than 100 subjects in developed countries (GDP >25,000 US$/person/year). Corresponding BMI distributions for corresponding countries and regions were identified. Nonparametric tests were used to compare the association between H. pylori and overweight and obesity rates. Forty-nine studies with data from 10 European countries, Japan, the US and Australia were identified. The mean H. pylori rate was 44.1% (range 17-75%), the mean rates for obesity and overweight were 46.6 (± 16)% and 14.2 (± 8.9)%. The rate of obesity and overweight were inversely and significantly (r = 0.29, P < 0.001) correlated with the prevalence of H. pylori infection. There is an inverse correlation between H. pylori prevalence and rate of overweight/obesity in countries of the developed world. Thus, the gradual decrease of the H. pylori colonisation that has been observed in recent decades (or factors associated with decrease of) could be causally related to the obesity endemic observed in the Western world. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Peptic Ulcer Disease and Helicobacter pylori Infection in Different Siberian Ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Vladislav V; Kasparov, Edward V; Tonkikh, Julia L; Shtygasheva, Olga V; Butorin, Nikolay N; Amelchugova, Olga S; Vasyutin, Alexander V; Bronnikova, Elena P; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    The high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in eastern Siberia is consistently established. In the same geographic area, however, fragmentary information is available on the epidemiology of the peptic ulcer disease (PUD). To assess the prevalence of H. pylori infection (including CagA status) and PUD in different eastern Siberian ethnicities. An endoscopy population of 3149 eastern Siberian dyspeptic patients was considered [1727 Europoids and 1422 Mongoloids (Evenks = 792; Khakases = 630)]. H. pylori status was assessed by urease test and/or serum anti-H. pylori IgG and/or histology. CagA status was serologically assessed (anti-CagA antibodies). All the Siberian ethnicities featured high rates of H. pylori infection (Europoids = 87.1%, Evenks = 88.6%, Khakases = 85.4%). Among the 1504 H. pylori-positive Europoids, the prevalence of CagA-positive status (68.7%) was significantly higher than that featured by the 1240 H. pylori-positive Mongoloid ethnicities (46.9%; p Peptic ulcer disease significantly prevailed among Europoids (prevalence among Europoid Evenks and Khakases: 8.9% and 8.3%, respectively; prevalence among Mongoloid Evenks and Khakases = 1.0% and 4.4%, respectively). eastern Siberian populations feature consistent high rates of H. pylori infection, but different prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. In particular, Europoids featured a prevalence of both CagA-positive status and peptic ulcer disease significantly higher than that of the Mongoloid ethnicities. These results suggest that both environmental factors (coexisting with the H. pylori infection) and host-related variables modulate the clinicopathological expression of the H. pylori -associated gastric diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by the probiotic strains Lactobacillus johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius ssp. salicinius AP-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pei-Shan; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Teh, Su-Fen; Ou, Chung-Mou; King, V An-Erl

    2012-12-01

    The current therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection includes antimicrobial agents and proton pump inhibitors. We have examined the ability of Lactobacillus spp. to inhibit H. pylori infection. Probiotic strains isolated from samples of adult feces, infant feces, breast milk, and vaginal swab collected from healthy volunteers in Taiwan and commercially available strains were screened for antagonism toward H. pylori. Inhibition liquid culture assay was used to screen potential anti-H. pylori activity. Then, we performed agar plate inhibition assay, and assays to determine the capacity of probiotics for adhesion, and inhibition and killing of H. pylori, and measured the levels of IL-8 and IL-10. Using animal models, we studied regulation of gastric acid and histopathological changes accompanying anti-H. pylori activity. We found that six of the tested strains suppressed urease activity of H. pylori: Lactobacillus acidophilus TYCA08, L. acidophilus TYCA15, L. johnsonii MH-68, and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 were more effective than the others. In vivo, L. johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 alone or in combination, reduced the H. pylori load in the gastric mucosa, and also reduced inflammatory chemokine expression and lymphocyte infiltration. Lactobacillus johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 effectively suppress H. pylori viability, and when used as probiotics, they may help decrease the occurrence of gastritis, and even reduce the risk of H. pylori infection. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Typical and atypical symptoms of gastro esophageal reflux disease: Does Helicobacter pylori infection matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Laurino; Ciccaglione, Antonio Francesco; Marzio, Leonardo

    2015-11-06

    To analyze whether the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could affect the quality of symptoms in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. one hundred and forty-four consecutive patients referred to our Unit for suspected GERD were recruited for the study. All patients underwent esophageal pH-metric recording. For those with a positive test, C13 urea breath test was then performed to assess the H. pylori status. GERD patients were stratified according to the quality of their symptoms and classified as typical, if affected by heartburn and regurgitation, and atypical if complaining of chest pain, respiratory and ears, nose, and throat features. H. pylori-negative patients were also asked whether they had a previous diagnosis of H. pylori infection. If a positive response was given, on the basis of the time period after successful eradication, patients were considered as "eradicated" (E) if H. pylori eradication occurred more than six months earlier or "recently eradicated" if the therapy had been administered within the last six months. Patients without history of infection were identified as "negative" (N). χ (2) test was performed by combining the clinical aspects with the H. pylori status. one hundred and twenty-nine of the 144 patients, including 44 H. pylori-positive and 85 H. pylori-negative (41 negative, 21 recently eradicated, 23 eradicated more than 6 mo before), were eligible for the analysis. No difference has been found between H. pylori status and either the number of reflux episodes (138 ± 23 vs 146 ± 36, respectively, P = 0.2, not significant) or the percentage of time with pH values < 4 (6.8 ± 1.2 vs 7.4 ± 2.1, respectively, P = 0.3, not significant). The distribution of symptoms was as follows: 13 typical (30%) and 31 atypical (70%) among the 44 H. pylori-positive cases; 44 typical (52%) and 41 atypical (48%) among the 85 H. pylori-negative cases, (P = 0.017 vs H. pylori+; OR = 2.55, 95%CI: 1.17-5.55). Furthermore

  16. C-Peptide, Baseline and Postprandial Insulin Resistance after a Carbohydrate-Rich Test Meal - Evidence for an Increased Insulin Clearance in PCOS Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassek, J; Erdmann, J; Ohnolz, F; Berg, F D; Kiechle, M; Seifert-Klauss, V

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Known characteristics of patients with PCOS include infertility, menstrual disorders, hirsutism and also often insulin resistance. These symptoms increase with increasing body weight. In the LIPCOS study ( L ifestyle I ntervention for Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome [ PCOS ]) long-term changes of the PCOS in dependence on pregnancy and parenthood were systematically assessed. In the framework of the LIPCOS study, PCOS patients were given a standardised carbohydrate-rich test meal in order to examine glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. The results were compared with those of a eumenorrhoeic control group who all had corresponding BMI values and corresponding ages. Methods and Patients 41 PCOS patients (without diabetes) and 68 controls received a standardised carbohydrate-rich test meal (260 kcal, 62 % carbohydrates, 32 % fat, 6 % proteins) in order to generate a submaximal insulin and glucose stimulation. The values were determined at baseline and postprandial after 60, 120 and 180 minutes. In addition, the corresponding C-peptide levels were recorded. Results In the PCOS patients (n = 41), the insulin secretion test after a standardised test meal showed almost identical baseline and postprandial insulin levels when compared with those of the age- and BMI-matched eumenorrhoeic controls (n = 68). In the PCOS patients, the baseline and postprandial glucose levels were significantly elevated (92.88 ± 10.28 [PCOS] vs. 85.07 ± 9.42 mg/dL [controls]; p PCOS patients formally exhibit a higher fasting insulin resistance than controls. In spite of the higher stimulated C-peptide levels, the insulin levels did not increase more strongly with increasing glucose levels than in controls which may be indicative of a higher insulin clearance in PCOS patients.

  17. Multiple Acid Sensors Control Helicobacter pylori Colonization of the Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Julie Y; Goers Sweeney, Emily; Guillemin, Karen; Amieva, Manuel R

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori's ability to respond to environmental cues in the stomach is integral to its survival. By directly visualizing H. pylori swimming behavior when encountering a microscopic gradient consisting of the repellent acid and attractant urea, we found that H. pylori is able to simultaneously detect both signals, and its response depends on the magnitudes of the individual signals. By testing for the bacteria's response to a pure acid gradient, we discovered that the chemoreceptors TlpA and TlpD are each independent acid sensors. They enable H. pylori to respond to and escape from increases in hydrogen ion concentration near 100 nanomolar. TlpD also mediates attraction to basic pH, a response dampened by another chemoreceptor TlpB. H. pylori mutants lacking both TlpA and TlpD (ΔtlpAD) are unable to sense acid and are defective in establishing colonization in the murine stomach. However, blocking acid production in the stomach with omeprazole rescues ΔtlpAD's colonization defect. We used 3D confocal microscopy to determine how acid blockade affects the distribution of H. pylori in the stomach. We found that stomach acid controls not only the overall bacterial density, but also the microscopic distribution of bacteria that colonize the epithelium deep in the gastric glands. In omeprazole treated animals, bacterial abundance is increased in the antral glands, and gland colonization range is extended to the corpus. Our findings indicate that H. pylori has evolved at least two independent receptors capable of detecting acid gradients, allowing not only survival in the stomach, but also controlling the interaction of the bacteria with the epithelium.

  18. Overview of the phytomedicine approaches against Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) successfully colonizes the human stomach of the majority of the human population. This infection always causes chronic gastritis, but may evolve to serious outcomes, such as peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori first line therapy recommended by the Maastricht-4 Consensus Report comprises the use of two antibiotics and a proton-pomp inhibitor, but in some regions failure associated with this treatment is already undesirable high. Indeed, treatment failure is one of the major problems associated with H. pylori infection and is mainly associated with bacterial antibiotic resistance. In order to counteract this situation, some effort has been allocated during the last years in the investigation of therapeutic alternatives beyond antibiotics. These include vaccines, probiotics, photodynamic inactivation and phage therapy, which are briefly revisited in this review. A particular focus on phytomedicine, also described as herbal therapy and botanical therapy, which consists in the use of plant extracts for medicinal purposes, is specifically addressed, namely considering its history, category of performed studies, tested compounds, active principle and mode of action. The herbs already experienced are highly diverse and usually selected from products with a long history of employment against diseases associated with H. pylori infection from each country own folk medicine. The studies demonstrated that many phytomedicine products have an anti-H. pylori activity and gastroprotective action. Although the mechanism of action is far from being completely understood, current knowledge correlates the beneficial action of herbs with inhibition of essential H. pylori enzymes, modulation of the host immune system and with attenuation of inflammation. PMID:24914319

  19. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification as a Fast Noninvasive Method of Helicobacter pylori Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Farideh; Abiri, Ramin; Aryan, Ehsan; Ahmadi Jouybari, Touraj; Navabi, Jafar; Alvandi, Amirhooshang

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is etiologically associated with some important health problems such as gastric cancer. Because of the high clinical importance of H. pylori infection, development of a noninvasive test for the detection of H. pylori is desirable. In this study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) targeted ureC of H. pylori was evaluated on 100 stool specimens and compared with a stool antigen test. Culture and rapid urease test were considered as gold standards. The overall detection rate of the fecal antigen test and LAMP was 58% and 82%, respectively. The analytical sensitivity of the fecal antigen test and LAMP was 500 and 10 H. pylori cells/g and 10 fg DNA/reaction, which is equal to six H. pylori genome. LAMP technique has been characterized by high sensitivity and low detection limit for the detection of H. pylori in stool specimen. Clinical diagnostic performance of LAMP was better than the stool antigen test. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effect of dihydroergocristin-methansulfonate on human cerebral blood flow in an acute test. Studies with the intracarotidial /sup 133/xenon clearance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlmeyer, K; Blessing, J [Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Neuroradiologie

    1978-01-01

    In 20 patients suffering from acute cerebrovascular diseases, cerebral trauma, cerebral atrophy and an apallic syndrome due to heart arrest, studies of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed by means of the intracaroticial /sup 133/xenon clearance method using 35 scintillation detectors to test the effect of dihydroegocristin-methansulfonate (DHEC) on the cerebral circulation. 0.6 mg and 0.9 mg, resp., DHEC dissolved in 200 mg levulose 5% were administered by a slow i.v. infusion during 20 min. Taking into consideration both the administered dosage of DHEC and the clinical diagnoses of the material, the results are the following: 0.6 mg DHEC lead to a significant increase of mean hemispheric flow in the average of 10 patients. On the other hand, 0.9 mg DHEC does not effect a significant change of mean hemispheric flow in the average of 10 patients. The highest increase of mean hemispheric flow was observed in the group of cases with cerebrovascular diseases receiving 0.6 mg DHEC.

  1. Treatment of helicobacter pylori infection; a controlled randomized comparative clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Usmanghani, K.; Mohiuddin, E.; Akram, M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces chronic inflammation of the underlying gastric mucosa and is strongly linked to the development of duodenal and gastric carcinoma. A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Pylorex, a herbal formulation, for treatment of H. pylori infection as compared to triple allopathic therapy (Omeprazole, Amoxicillin, Metronidazole). The therapeutic evaluations of these medicines were conducted on 97 clinically and immunologically diagnosed cases of H. pylori infection. H. pylori was eradicated in 16 (32.6%) out of 49 patients by the use of triple allopathic therapy (Control drugs), and in 9 (18.7%) out of 48 patients by the use of Pylorex (Test drug). Pylorex possesses a therapeutic value for the treatment of H. pylori associated symptoms but the eradication rate is superior in triple allopathic therapy. (author)

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Helicobacter pylori from patients with and without peptic ulcer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A M; Fussing, V; Colding, H

    2000-01-01

    ) profile of H. pylori strains were recorded; randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and urease gene typing were performed and correlated with diagnostic groups. RESULTS: Electron micrographs showed that H. pylori strains from patients with gastric ulcers adhered more frequently through filamentous...... ulcers were more prone to autoagglutinate than were strains from the other diagnostic groups (P = 0.03). H. pylori strains from gastric ulcer patients were found to be more homogeneous, as determined by RAPD and urease gene typing, than strains from the other diagnostic groups (P ..., a positive correlation was found between a patient's age and the adhesion to AGS cells of the patient's H. pylori strain (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: A combination of an H. pylori autoagglutination test, RAPD, and urease gene typing may be useful in separating gastric ulcer-related strains from duodenal ulcer...

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency in teenage females in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Alan G; Scragg, Robert; Schaaf, David; Metcalf, Patricia; Grant, Cameron C

    2010-04-30

    Iron deficiency is an important problem in New Zealand children and young adults. Iron deficiency and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection are each more common in Māori and Pacific Island ethnic groups. This study seeks to determine if H. pylori infection is associated with iron deficiency. 792 female students from 7 Auckland high schools (median age 16 years) had H. pylori serology and tests for iron deficiency assessed by a combination of serum ferritin, iron saturation and mean cell volume. The prevalence of positive H. pylori serology was highest for Pacific Island students (49.0%; CI 38.0-60.0), intermediate for Māori (26.7%; CI 16.9-36.4) and Asian (24.7%; CI 12.6-36.7) and lowest for European (13.7%; 6.0-21.4) piron saturation (p=0.013), but not of ferritin (p=0.068), haemoglobin (p=0.08) or mean cell volume (p=0.16), compared to those with negative serology. Positive H. pylori serology was associated with increased risk of iron deficiency (RR 1.20; CI 1.08-1.34), but not anaemia (RR 1.01; CI 0.87-1.18), after adjusting for age, ethnicity and school SES decile. This study indicates that H. pylori infection is associated with iron deficiency in adolescent females. There are significant differences in H. pylori serology amongst different ethnic groups in New Zealand.

  4. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors in patients with benign peptic ulcer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depender Kumar Timshina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess and compare the risk factors in patients with benign gastric and duodenal ulcers and to correlate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in benign peptic ulcer disease. Methods: A total of 30 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer disease were included in this study after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Their clinical profile and endoscopic findings were noted. Antral biopsies were subjected to histopathological examination and urease test for detection of H. pylori. Results were correlated. The study was cleared by the Institute Research Council and the Ethics committee. Results: The male: female ratio was 11:4. Overall, H. pylori infection was prevalent in 93.3% of the patients. Patients who took spicy food had a significantly higher rate of H. pylori positivity (P=0.04. Smoking, alcohol intake and NSAIDs did not affect H. pylori status in patients. There was no significant association between the site of the ulcer and H. pylori infection. Conclusions: Based on our observations we conclude that prevalence of H. pylori infection is similar in duodenal and gastric ulcers and intake of spicy food is a significant risk factor.

  5. Low prevalence of H. pylori Infection in HIV-Positive Patients in the Northeast of Brazil

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    Silva Cícero IS

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study conducted in Northeastern Brazil, evaluated the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the presence of gastritis in HIV-infected patients. Methods There were included 113 HIV-positive and 141 age-matched HIV-negative patients, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms. H. pylori status was evaluated by urease test and histology. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly lower (p H. pylori status and gender, age, HIV viral load, antiretroviral therapy and the use of antibiotics. A lower prevalence of H. pylori was observed among patients with T CD4 cell count below 200/mm3; however, it was not significant. Chronic active antral gastritis was observed in 87.6% of the HIV-infected patients and in 780.4% of the control group (p = 0.11. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with chronic active gastritis in the antrum in both groups, but it was not associated with corpus chronic active gastritis in the HIV-infected patients. Conclusion We demonstrated that the prevalence of H. pylori was significantly lower in HIV-positive patients compared with HIV-negative ones. However, corpus gastritis was frequently observed in the HIV-positive patients, pointing to different mechanisms than H. pylori infection in the genesis of the lesion.

  6. Prevalence and risk factors of Helicobacter pylori infection in Chinese maritime workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dongmei; Shao, Jing; Wang, Ligang; Zheng, Huichun; Xu, Yan; Song, Guirong; Liu, Qigui

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very common worldwide. To evaluate the prevalence and identify the risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection in Chinese maritime workers. Between March 2010 and October 2010, 3995 subjects were selected in the Hospital of Dalian Port. The presence of Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed using laboratory tests (serum IgG anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies) and background information, family history, lifestyle and eating habits were collected using questionnaires. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was 44.9% in these Chinese maritime workers. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was associated with family income, living space, family history of gastrointestinal diseases, smoking, drinking tea, raw vegetables consumption, spicy food, pickle food, dining outside, no regular meal and dish sharing. Further analysis with multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that raw vegetables consumption, pickle food consumption, family income and family history of gastrointestinal diseases were independent predictors for Helicobacter pylori infection. No association was found between infection and gender, marital status, education, alcohol consumption and tap water consumption. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with raw vegetables consumption, pickle food consumption, family income and family history of gastrointestinal disease among Chinese maritime workers.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection amongst Arab Israeli women with hyperemesis gravidarum--a prospective, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltin, Doron; Perets, Tsachi Tsadok; Elheiga, Sami Abu; Sharony, Asher; Niv, Yaron; Shamaly, Hussein; Dickman, Ram

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been associated with hyperemesis gravidarum in some geographical regions. The prevalence of H. pylori in Arab Israeli women in the Upper Galilee and its association with hyperemesis gravidarum has not been studied previously. We aimed to examine if hyperemesis gravidarum is associated with H. pylori in this population. Subjects with hyperemesis gravidarum carrying a singleton fetus were recruited prospectively. Women with an uncomplicated pregnancy served as controls. All patients underwent (13)C-urea breath testing to assess for H. pylori infection. A total of 72 subjects, including 24 patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and 48 controls, aged 28.8±5.3 years, were included. H. pylori infection was identified in 75.0% (18/24) of cases and 60.4% (29/48) of controls (p=not significant). H. pylori infection did not correlate with age, fetal sex, or the number of previous pregnancies (p=not significant). H. pylori does not seem to increase the likelihood of hyperemesis gravidarum in Arab Israeli women. However, given the high background prevalence of H. pylori in this population, a larger study is required to corroborate these findings. (MOH20110066). Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance of a Multiplex Serological Helicobacter pylori Assay on a Novel Microfluidic Assay Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Filomena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori occurs in 50% of the world population, and is associated with the development of ulcer and gastric cancer. Serological diagnostic tests indicate an H. pylori infection by detecting antibodies directed against H. pylori proteins. In addition to line blots, multiplex assay platforms provide smart solutions for the simultaneous analysis of antibody responses towards several H. pylori proteins. We used seven H. pylori proteins (FliD, gGT, GroEL, HpaA, CagA, VacA, and HP0231 and an H. pylori lysate for the development of a multiplex serological assay on a novel microfluidic platform. The reaction limited binding regime in the microfluidic channels allows for a short incubation time of 35 min. The developed assay showed very high sensitivity (99% and specificity (100%. Besides sensitivity and specificity, the technical validation (intra-assay CV = 3.7 ± 1.2% and inter-assay CV = 5.5 ± 1.2% demonstrates that our assay is also a robust tool for the analysis of the H. pylori-specific antibody response. The integration of the virulence factors CagA and VacA allow for the assessment of the risk for gastric cancer development. The short assay time and the performance of the platform shows the potential for implementation of such assays in a clinical setting.

  9. Assessment of Helicobacter pylori eradication by virgin olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Manuel; Romero, Concepción; de Castro, Antonio; Vargas, Julio; Medina, Eduardo; Millán, Raquel; Brenes, Manuel

    2012-08-01

     A recent study conducted by Medina et al. disclosed that virgin olive oil has a bactericidal effect in vitro against Helicobacter pylori because of its contents of certain phenolic compounds with dialdehydic structures. We carried out two clinical trials to evaluate the effect of virgin olive oil on H. pylori-infected individuals.  Two different pilot studies were performed with 60 H. pylori-infected adults. In the first study, thirty subjects who tested positive for H. pylori received 30 g of washed virgin olive oil for 14 days, and after 1 month, the patients took 30 g of unwashed virgin olive oil for another 14 days. In a second study, a group of 30 subjects received 30 g of a different virgin olive oil for 14 days. Helicobacter pylori-infection status was checked by the urea breath test.  Helicobacter pylori was eradicated in 8 of 30 individuals when microorganism status was checked after 4-6 weeks from the first clinical intervention although 12 of 30 individuals did not show H. pylori infection at 24-72 hour of the last oil dose. Eradication rates were 27 and 40% by intention to treat and per protocol, respectively. Moreover, only 3 of 30 individuals were H. pylori negative after 4-6 weeks from the second clinical intervention but 5 of 30 were negative at 24-72 hour of the last oil dose. Eradication rates were 10 and 11% by intention to treat and per protocol, respectively. It must also be noted that 13 subjects withdrew from the studies because of taste and nausea drawbacks.  The administration of virgin olive oil showed moderate effectiveness in eradicating H. pylori. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, especially with longer periods, different administration conditions, and several types of olive oils. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Indications, diagnostic tests and Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: Recommendations by the 2nd Spanish Consensus Conference Indicaciones, métodos diagnósticos y tratamiento erradicador de Helicobacter pylori: Recomendaciones de la II Conferencia Española de Consenso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Monés

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of the 2nd Spanish Consensus Conference for appropriate practice regarding indications for eradication, diagnostic tests, and therapy regimens for Helicobacter pylori infection are summarized. The Conference was based on literature searches in Medline, abstracts from three international meetings, and abstracts from national meetings. Results were agreed upon and approved by the whole group. Results are supplemented by evidence grades and recommendation levels according to the classification used in the Clinical Practice Guidelines issued by Cochrane Collaboration. Convincing indications (peptic ulcer, duodenal erosions with no history of ASA or NSAIDs, MALT lymphoma, and not so convincing indications (functional dyspepsia, patients receiving low-dose ASA for platelet aggregation, gastrectomy stump in patients operated on for gastric cancer, first-degree relatives of patients with gastric cancer, lymphocytic gastritis, and Ménétrier's disease for H. pylori eradication are discussed. Diagnostic recommendations for various clinical conditions (peptic ulcer, digestive hemorrhage secondary to ulcer, eradication control, patients currently or recently receiving antibiotic or antisecretory therapy, as well as diagnostic tests requiring biopsy collection (histology, urease fast test, and culture when endoscopy is needed for clinical diagnosis, and non-invasive tests requiring no biopsy collection (13C-urea breath test, serologic tests, and fecal antigen tests when endoscopy is not needed are also discussed. As regards treatment, first-choice therapies (triple therapy using a PPI and two antibiotics, therapy length, quadruple therapy, and a number of novel antibiotic options as "rescue" therapy are prioritized, the fact that prolonging PPI therapy following effective eradication is unnecessary for patients with duodenal ulcer but not for all gastric ulcers is documented, the fact that cultures and antibiograms are not needed for all

  11. Is there a link between seropositivity to Helicobacter pylori and hepatitis A virus? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BinSaeed, Abdulaziz A

    2010-07-01

    Since hepatitis A virus (HAV) is acquired primarily through the fecal-oral pathway, several investigators have used HAV seropositivity as a proxy for exposure to this pathway. This paper is a critical review of the evidence relevant to the association between seropositivity to HAV and Helicobacter pylori, and considers the validity of comparisons for testing the hypothesis that H. pylori spreads by the fecal-oral route. A Medline search identified reports of all types published in the English language literature that were linked to the keywords 'Campylobacter pylori', 'hepatitis A', or 'Helicobacter pylori', cross-referenced with 'seroepidemiology', 'seroprevalence', or 'seropositivity'. Studies identified by the search were included in the review if they used specific IgG antibodies to classify the serostatus of subjects for both HAV and H. pylori infection and provided an estimate of the magnitude of the association between HAV and H. pylori or information that permitted calculation of an odds ratio (OR). Out of the 21 studies identified, 15 met the inclusion criteria. The studies showed ORs for an association of HAV and H. pylori that ranged from 0.81 to 8.4. After adjustment for potential confounders, ORs shifted toward the null. They also showed that HAV seroprevalence is lower than H. pylori seroprevalence in early life and then becomes higher in later life. Thus in most populations, the trends cross over at some point. The observed associations between the two infections are generally overestimated by the confounding effects of age and socio-economic status-related factors, and when these factors are controlled, the association becomes weak. Moreover, HAV infection elicits a long-term antibody response, while H. pylori infection does not. Consequently, serostatus comparison does not constitute a convincing test of the fecal-oral transmission hypothesis for H. pylori. Copyright 2009 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Association of Helicobacter Pylori Infection with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Iranian Adolescents: the CASPIAN III Study

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    Enayat Kalantar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: At least half the world’s population is colonized the stomach by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori which are a key constituent of the human microbiome. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of cardiometabolic risk factors with H. pylori infection in Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: The current study was conducted along with the third survey of a national school-based surveillance system in Iran, entitled "Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and Prevention of Adult Non-communicable Disease" (CASPIAN study. Detailed questionnaires on demographic, socioeconomic, dietary, and health-related information of the participants were filled by one of the parents under supervision of trained health-care workers. Trained healthcare professionals measured anthropometric indices, blood pressures according to standard protocols. Fasting venous blood was examined for fasting blood sugar and lipid profile. Results: Overall 882 serum samples were suitable for testing. H. pylori antibody was found in 643 serum samples (72.9%. Among cardiometabolic risk factors, only the mean weight of participants was different between two groups (44.6±11.8 in H. pylori positive and 42.8±11.3 in H. pylori negative group; p=0.04. Overall, 5.1% of adolescents with positive H. pylori tests were overweight or obese, while 1.7% of negative ones were so (p=0.02. In the multivariate regression model, H. pyloriseropositivity increased the risk of overweight (OR, 3.3; 95%CI, 1.2-9.3; p= 0.03. In the multivariate model, association of other cardiometabolic risk factors with H. pylori infection was not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: Results of present study showed that H. pylori infection was associated with excess weight in adolescents. H. pylori eradication may be decrease the risk of obesity.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Protein 18 (Hp1125 Is Involved in Persistent Colonization by Evading Interferon-γ Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqun Shan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane proteins (OMPs can induce an immune response. Omp18 (HP1125 of H. pylori is a powerful antigen that can induce significant interferon-γ (IFN-γ levels. Previous studies have suggested that IFN-γ plays an important role in H. pylori clearance. However, H. pylori has multiple mechanisms to avoid host immune surveillance for persistent colonization. We generated an omp18 mutant (H. pylori 26695 and H. pylori SS1 strain to examine whether Omp18 interacts with IFN-γ and is involved in H. pylori colonization. qRT-PCR revealed that IFN-γ induced Omp18 expression. qRT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed reduced expressions of virulence factors CagA and NapA in H. pylori 26695 with IFN-γ treatment, but they were induced in the Δomp18 strain. In C57BL/6 mice infected with H. pylori SS1 and the Δomp18 strain, the Δomp18 strain conferred defective colonization and activated a stronger inflammatory response. Signal transducer phosphorylation and transcription 1 (STAT1 activator was downregulated by the wild-type strain but not the Δomp18 strain in IFN-γ-treated macrophages. Furthermore, Δomp18 strain survival rates were poor in macrophages compared to the wild-type strain. We concluded that H. pylori Omp18 has an important function influencing IFN-γ-mediated immune response to participate in persistent colonization.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection in apparently healthy South Indian children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurpad, A.V.; Caszo, B.; Raj, T.; Vaz, M.

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been established as a major cause of chronic gastritis in adults, and it has been implicated in the genesis of gastric carcinomas and the development of gastric and duodenal ulcers. It is now postulated that neatly 90% of the adult population in developing countries may be affected with the infection since childhood. Earlier studies on Indians using serology and endoscopic biopsy have shown a high incidence of H. pylori infection in small numbers of patients. The 13 C-urea breath test, which is simple, specific and non-invasive, is also increasingly being used to determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Preliminary data from India has shown a high prevalence in the urban Indian environment, and there is an urgent need to quantify the prevalence of H. pylori infections on an epidemiological basis in both urban and rural settings. It is also important to study the possible impact of this infection on growth in children, particularly in environments with low sanitation and high crowding. In this paper, we outline a proposal to study the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections in children from the following different environments: urban middle socio-economic class, urban slum, rural middle socio-economic class and rural village. (author)

  15. Application of methylation in improving plasmid transformation into Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huilin; Xu, Linlin; Rong, Qianyu; Xu, Zheng; Ding, Yunfei; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Yulong; Li, Boqing; Ji, Xiaofei

    2018-05-23

    Helicobacter pylori is an important gastrointestinal pathogen. Its strains possess different levels of powerful restriction modification systems, which are significant barriers to genetic tools used for studying the role of functional genes in its pathogenesis. Methylating vectors in vitro was reported as an alternative to overcome this barrier in several bacteria. In this study we used two H. pylori-E. coli shuttle plasmids and several single/double-crossover homologous recombination gene-targeting plasmids, to test the role of methylation in H. pylori transformation. According to our results, transformants could be obtained only after shuttle plasmids were methylated before transformation. It is helpful in gene complementation and over-expression although at a low frequency. The frequency of gene-targeting transformation was also increased after methylation, especially for the single-crossover recombination plasmids, the transformants of which could only be obtained after methylation. For the double-crossover recombination targeting plasmids, the initial yield of transformants was 0.3-0.8 × 10 2 CFUs per microgram plasmid DNA. With the help of methylation, the yield was increased to 0.4-1.3 × 10 2 CFUs per microgram plasmid DNA. These results suggest that in vitro methylation can improve H. pylori transformation by different plasmids, which will benefit the pathogenic mechanism research. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Helicobacter pylori in dyspepsia: Phenotypic and genotypic methods of diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Shetty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori affects almost half of the world's population and therefore is one of the most frequent and persistent bacterial infections worldwide. H. pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, ulcer disease (gastric and duodenal, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Several diagnostic methods exist to detect infection and the option of one method or another depends on various genes, such as availability, advantages and disadvantages of each method, monetary value, and the age of patients. Materials and Methods: Patients with complaints of abdominal pain, discomfort, acidity, and loss of appetite were chosen for endoscopy, detailed history was contained, and a physical examination was conducted before endoscopy. Biopsies (antrum + body were received from each patient and subjected to rapid urease test (RUT, histopathological examination (HPE, polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and culture. Results: Of the total 223 biopsy specimens obtained from dyspeptic patients, 122 (54.7% were positive for H. pylori for HPE, 109 (48.9% by RUT, 65 (29.1% by culture, and 117 (52.5% by PCR. The specificity and sensitivity were as follows: RUT (99% and 88.5%, phosphoglucosamine mutase PCR assay (100% and 95.9%, and culture (100% and 53.3%, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, we compared the various diagnostic methods used to identify H. pylori infection indicating that, in comparison with histology as gold standard for detection of H. pylori infection, culture and PCR showed 100% specificity whereas RUT and PCR showed 99% and 100% sensitivity, respectively.

  17. Correlation between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Intra Ocular Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatamizadeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of blindness. It is estimated that more than 60 million people suffer from this disease of all over the world. In other hand helicobacter pylori is a gram negative bacillus that is reported in some extra-gastrointestinal system diseases recently. This study is designed to determine the association between helicobacter pylori infection and intra-ocular pressure. Methods: This was an analytical cross-sectional study that was conducted on 74 persons who were randomly selected after referring to endoscopy ward of Shohadaye Kargar hospital of Yazd in 2009. Data was analyzed by Mann-Whitney U and fisher exact tests using SPSS software (ver16. Results: Mean of intra-ocular pressure in positive helicobacter pylori group was more than negative helicobacter pylori group but there was no significant relationship (P value > 0.05, also there was no significant relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes, hypertension, hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism (P value > 0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, more detailed studies with larger sample size are required for more reliable decisions also considering the confounder variables can help us to determine the common risk factors of these two outcomes.

  18. Agreement Between Serology and Histology for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, S.; Fatima, S.; Raheem, A.; Khan, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the percentage agreement between serology and histology for detection of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology and Microbiology, The Aga Khan University and Hospital, Karachi, from January to December 2009. Methodology: Fifty subjects were selected by non-probability purposive sampling from laboratory data who had serological testing of H. pylori IgG antibody, prior to histological evaluation of endoscopic gastric or/and duodenal biopsies. Serological Quantification of H. pylori IgG was carried out with HpG screen ELISA kit (Genesis Diagnostics, UK), using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for detection of IgG antibodies against H. pylori. Manufacturer's recommended cutoff value was used and results were considered positive when greater than 7 U/ml. For histological diagnosis, an expert histopathologist characterized the presence of spiral bacteria in the mucosal layer or the surface of epithelial cells on microscopic examination, as a positive test. Results: An agreement of 0.72 was found by Kappa statistics between serology and histopathology results and a good diagnostic accuracy (86%) of serological testing was observed for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Conclusion: A substantial agreement was found between serology and histopathology results to detect the H. pylori infection. Laboratory-based serologic testing using ELISA technology to detect IgG antibodies is inexpensive, noninvasive and convenient method to detect the H. pylori infection in primary care setting. (author)

  19. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.

  20. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... specialized CF care and a range of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway ... on their own. Share Facebook Twitter Email More options Print Share Facebook Twitter Email Print Permalink All ...

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    Full Text Available ... a Family Parenting as an Adult With CF Treatments and Therapies People with cystic fibrosis are living ... to specialized CF care and a range of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique ...

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    Full Text Available ... a Family Parenting as an Adult With CF Treatments and Therapies People with cystic fibrosis are living longer and ... to specialized CF care and a range of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique ...

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Care Guidelines Liver Disease Clinical Care Guidelines Respiratory Care Guidelines CF Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care ... attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist or another member of your CF care ...

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    Full Text Available ... decisions about your health care. CF Genetics: The Basics CF Mutations Video Series Find Out More About ... of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy Coughing and ...

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    Full Text Available ... people with cystic fibrosis so that they make smart decisions about CF-related research, treatment, and access ... Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance ...

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    Full Text Available ... ACTs involve coughing or huffing . Many of them use percussion (clapping) or vibration to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear the thick, sticky mucus ...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... many challenges, including medical, social, and financial. By learning more about how you can manage your disease every day, you can ultimately help find a ... Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic ...

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  20. Prevalence of helicobacter pylori among Nigerian patients with dyspepsia in Ibadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adegboyega Akere

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Determination of the true prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is difficult in a hyper-endemic area like Nigeria with use of serological tests because of their low discriminatory power between previous and current infections. The use of biopsy based methods will go a long way to mitigate this problem. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori in dyspeptic patients and its relationship with gastroduodenal pathologies using gastric biopsy histology and rapid urease test. METHODS: Eighty-six consecutive adult patients with dyspepsia underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy using forward-viewing endoscopes. Antral biopsy specimens were collected for histology and rapid urease test. Diagnosis of H. pylori infection was made if both or either of the tests was positive. RESULTS: Of the 86 subjects, there were 39 (45.3% males and 47(54.7% females. The age range was 23 to 85 years with a mean of 49.19 plus or minus 13.75 years. Diagnosis of H. pylori was made in 55(64% patients. Gastritis was the commonest endoscopic finding (60.5%, serious gastroduodenal pathology (gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer were documented in only 12 (14% patients. Thirty three (63.5% of the 55 patients with gastritis had H. pylori infection while 7(58.3% of the 12 patients with serious gastroduodenal lesions had the infection. Thirteen (72.2% of the 18 patients that had normal endoscopic findings were H. pylori positive. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H. pylori among dyspeptics using biopsy based methods is high in the South-Western part of Nigeria. It is therefore important to test and treat H. pylori among Nigerians with dyspepsia.

  1. First case of Helicobacter pylori infection resistant to seven antibiotics in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Talebi Bezmin Abadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection with common antibiotics is typically recommended for several digestive conditions, including peptic ulcers. However, reports of resistant H. pylori isolates are increasing, and unfortunately, these do not respond to currently available therapeutic regimens. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with two peptic ulcers in the duodenal antrum. An H. pylori strain was isolated, and tested for antibiotic resistance using agar dilution and disk diffusion. The isolated strain was found to be resistant to all seven antibiotics that were tested. Therefore, constant monitoring for antibiotic resistance should be performed prior to initiating antibiotic therapy.

  2. Oxyntic gastric atrophy in Helicobacter pylori gastritis is distinct from autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Varbanova, Mariya; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Reinhold, Dirk; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Jechorek, Doerthe; Weigt, Jochen; Link, Alexander; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To assess characteristics of oxyntic gastric atrophy (OGA) in autoimmune gastritis (AIG) compared with OGA as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients undergoing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy from July 2011 to October 2014 were prospectively included (N=452). Gastric biopsies were obtained for histology and H. pylori testing. Serum gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII and antibodies against H. pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A protein were determined in all patients. Antibodies against parietal cells and intrinsic factor were determined in patients with advanced (moderate to severe) OGA. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were calculated for serum biomarkers and compared with histology. Overall, 34 patients (8.9%) had advanced OGA by histology (22 women, age 61±15 years). Current or past H. pylori infection and AIG were present in 14/34 and 22/34 patients, respectively. H. pylori-negative AIG patients (N=18) were more likely to have another autoimmune disease (OR 6.3; 95% CI 1.3 to 29.8), severe corpus atrophy (OR 10.1; 95% CI 1.9 to 54.1) and corpus intestinal metaplasia (OR 26.9; 95% CI 5.3 to 136.5) compared with H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA. Antrum atrophy was present in 39% of H. pylori-negative AIG patients. The diagnostic performance of G17, PG I and PGI/II was excellent for AIG patients (AUC=0.83, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively), but limited for H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA (AUC=0.62, 0.75 and 0.67, respectively). H. pylori-negative AIG has a distinct clinical, morphological and serological phenotype compared with advanced OGA in H. pylori gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Evidence of helicobacter pylori infection in dental plaque and gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, M.; Haseeb-ur-Rehman; Mahmood, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque of individuals suffering from H. pylori associated gastric disease. Patients and Methods: Patients presenting with symptoms/signs of chronic gastritis were included in the study. Specimens of dental plaque and gastric biopsy were collected from all the patients. The dental plaque specimen was processed for helicourease test and the gastric biopsy specimens were processed both for the helicourease test and histopathology. Results: Out of all patients studied (n=52), 32 (61.53%) were positive for helicourease test with gastric biopsy while 48 (92.30%) were positive with dental plaque. The histopathology of gastric biopsy showed H. pylori associated chronic active gastritis in 42 (80.76%) patients. Eight (15.38%) patients showed chronic active gastritis which was not associated with H. pylori while in 2 (3.84%) patients the gastric biopsy specimen was unremarkable. Conclusion: Majority of the patients have possible H. pylori colonization in dental plaque while about two-thirds have H. pylori associated chronic active gastritis. Oral cavity may be the first place for colonization and then the infection involves the gastric mucosa. (author)

  4. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is significantly high in rural and suburban population of Ernakulam district, Kerala. Early detection and prompt treatment are essential for prevention of serious complications. Keywords: Gastrointestinal complications, Helicobacter pylori infection, Histopathological ...

  5. HELICOBACTER PYLORI: THE CAUSATIVE AGENT OF PEPTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Helicobacter pylori by treatment with antibiotics in peptic ulcer patients resulted in the healing of the ulcer. ... and gastric cancers. .... H. pyloris cause chronic active gastritis in humans and ... of the night when the stomach is empty and is.

  6. Detection of Helicobacter pylori CagA gene and Its Association with Endoscopic Appearance in Balinese Dyspepsia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Mariadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection causes various abnormalities in the stomach. Only particular strain can cause severe problems in the stomach. CagA is a microbial virulent factor which is associated with more severe stomach problems, such as: peptic ulcer and stomach cancer. We would like to know the prevalence of CagA in Balinese population, and the association of H. Pylori CagA status with the severity of endoscopic appearance in dyspepsia patients. Method: Study design being used was analytic cross sectional study, involving 71 dyspepsia patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination in Surya Husada Hospital and Balimed Hospital in June-December 2013. Sample was chosen in consecutive manner. Later, polymerase chain reaction (PCR examinations of the stomach mucous biopsy tissue to determine H. pylori infection status and CagA status were performed. Further, Chi square test was used to identify the difference in proportion of H. pylori and CagA between mild and severe endoscopic appearance. Results: In this study, we found that the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 22.5% using PCR examination. Prevalence of CagA positive in H. pylori positive was 62.5%. There was significant association between status of H. Pylori infection and severity of endoscopic appearance (p = 0.038; OR= 2.67; 95% CI = 1.18-6.05. Status of CagA in H. pylori infected patients was not associated with the severity of endoscopic appearance. Additionally, there was significant association between patients’ age and severity of endoscopic appearance. Conclusion: The prevalence of CagA in H. pylori positive was 62.5%. H. pylori infection was associated with severity of endoscopic appearance and CagA status in H. pylori infected patients was not associated with severity of endoscopic appearance.

  7. Linezolid susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori, including strains with multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Evstatiev, Ivailo; Gergova, Galina; Yaneva, Penka; Mitov, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Only a few studies have evaluated Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to linezolid. The aim of the present study was to assess linezolid susceptibility in H. pylori, including strains with double/multidrug resistance. The susceptibility of 53 H. pylori strains was evaluated by Etest and a breakpoint susceptibility testing method. Helicobacter pylori resistance rates were as follows: amoxicillin, 1.9%; metronidazole, 37.7%; clarithromycin, 17.0%; tetracycline, 1.9%; levofloxacin, 24.5%; and linezolid (>4 mg/L), 39.6%. The linezolid MIC50 value was 31.2-fold higher than that of clarithromycin and 10.5-fold higher than that of levofloxacin; however, 4 of 11 strains with double/multidrug resistance were linezolid-susceptible. The MIC range of the oxazolidinone agent was larger (0.125-64 mg/L) compared with those in the previous two reports. The linezolid resistance rate was 2.2-fold higher in metronidazole-resistant strains and in strains resistant to at least one antibiotic compared with the remaining strains. Briefly, linezolid was less active against H. pylori compared with clarithromycin and levofloxacin, and linezolid resistance was linked to resistance to metronidazole as well as to resistance to at least one antibiotic. However, linezolid activity against some strains with double/multidrug resistance may render the agent appropriate to treat some associated H. pylori infections following in vitro susceptibility testing of the strains. Clinical trials are required to confirm this suggestion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. What Do We Do about Helicobacter pylori?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ Hawkey

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs cause ulcers by different mechanisms. Under some circumstances, patients infected with H pylori may be less prone to NSAID-associated ulcers than those who are H pylori-negative. Eradication trials have yielded differing results. However, those who have studied patients who have a past history of ulcer disease and are already established on NSAIDs have shown no benefit from H pylori eradication.

  9. Helicobacter pylori colonization and diarrhoeal illness: Results of a population-based cross-sectional study in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, Guenter; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Brenner, Hermann

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that Helicobacter pylori colonization may protect against diarrhoeagenic gastrointestinal infections. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and the frequency of diarrhoeal episodes among adults. Helicobacter pylori infection status was determined by 13 C-urea breath test. Overall, 784 adults (mean age: 48.7 ± 17.7; range 18-85 years) who participated in two epidemiological studies were included in the analysis. Overall H. pylori prevalence was 25.5%. Episodes of diarrhoea within prior 3 months were less often reported for H. pylori infected subjects compared with H. pylori negative subjects (40.2 vs. 51.6%, p = 0.016). Compared to H. pylori negative subjects the odds ratio (OR) for the occurrence of diarrhoea within the prior 3 months was 0.63 (95% CI: 0.45-0.87) for H. pylori infected subjects. After adjustment for covariates the OR was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.47-0.95). These results support the hypothesis that colonization with H. pylori may protect from gastrointestinal infections that cause diarrhoea

  10. Effect of pretreatment with Ethanol or Ammonium Hydroxide on Helicobacter Pylori colonization in the stomach of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimi F

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Animal models for H.pylori infection have been developed to clarify the pathogenesis, testing new therapies and developing vaccines against human H.pylori infection. Although rats have been used extensively for gastric ulceration and acid secretion studies, the animal is not normally infected with H.pylori.Several chemicals such as ethanol and ammonium hydroxide can induce gastric erosion and interact with gastric mucosal defense mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment with the gastroinvasive agents on colonization of H. pylori with the gastroinvasive agents on colonization of H. pylori in not germ-free rats in order to overcome the resistance against H. pylori in rats. After 24 h fasting, the rats were divided into three major groups. Animals in the first group were not pretreated with any chemicals. The two other groups were pretreated with ethanol (60% or ammonium hydroxide (1% before inoculation of 1 mL H. pylori suspension (3×108 cfu/ml. The results showed that H. pylori could not colonize in rats, even with ethanol or ammonium hydroxide pretreatment. An understanding of the mechanism of this resistance can help researchers to develop new therapeutic or preventive drugs against H. pylori and it is recommended to perform more investigation to clarify the reason of this resistance

  11. ( Asteraceae ) methanol extracts against Helicobacter pylori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol vehicle did not affect H. pylori growth. Conclusion: The observed antibacterial effect of G. glutinosum extracts may be of benefit as an adjuvant treatment of diseases caused by H. pylori. Key words: Gymnosperma glutinosum, Helicobacter pylori, methanol extract, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC).

  12. From Bench to Bedside to Bug: An Update of Clinically Relevant Advances in the Care of Persons with Helicobacter pylori Associated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In-depth meetings of the XIth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and Helicobacter pylori led to the presentation and discussion of extensive new data on H pylori and its diseases. The mode of transmission of H pylori remains unclear, and it remains unknown why only a small proportion of infected individuals develop duodenal or gastric ulcer disease and even fewer develop gastric cancer. The role of H pylori eradication in persons with uninvestigated dyspepsia remains controversial. New clinical trials of H pylori treatment show symptom relief and improvement in the quality of life of persons with functional dyspepsia, especially in those with ulcer-like or reflux-like dyspepsia. Clearly the move is toward symptom-based management of persons with dyspepsia, with fewer endoscopies being needed in the otherwise healthy young dyspeptic patients. It remains controversial whether eradicating H pylori in duodenal ulcer or functional dyspepsia increases the risk of subsequent development of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The one-week proton pump inhibitor-based triple regimens remain the gold standard of H pylori therapy, but some of the ranitidine bismuth citrate plus two antibiotic regimens also achieve an 80% H pylori eradication rate on an intention-to-treat basis. While the urea breath test remains the noninvasive test of choice, interesting new data are available on the use of stool antigen testing to diagnose H pylori infection. The number of H pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases grows to include possible liver, vascular, immune and skin conditions.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection: approach of primary care physicians in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shah Hasnain

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and practices of primary care physicians in diagnosis and management of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in developing country. Methods This convenient sample based, cross sectional study was conducted in primary care physicians of Karachi, Pakistan from March 2008 to August 2008 through a pretested self-designed questionnaire, which contained 11 items pertaining to H. pylori route of transmission, diagnosis, indication for testing, treatment options, follow up and source of information. Results Out of 509 primary care physicians, 451 consented to participate with the response rate of 88.6%. Responses of 426 primary care physicians were analyzed after excluding 19 physicians. 78% of the physicians thought that contaminated water was the source of spread of infection, dyspepsia was the most frequent indication for investigating H. pylori infection (67% of the physicians, while 43% physicians were of the view that serology was the most appropriate test to diagnose active H. pylori infection. 77% of physicians thought that gastric ulcer was the most compelling indication for treatment, 61% physicians preferred Clarithromycin based triple therapy for 7–14 days. 57% of the physicians would confirm H. pylori eradication after treatment in selected patients and 47% physicians preferred serological testing for follow-up. In case of treatment failure, only 36% of the physicians were in favor of gastroenterologist referral. Conclusion The primary care physicians in this study lacked in knowledge regarding management of H. pylori infection. Internationally published guidelines and World gastroenterology organization (WGO practice guideline on H. pylori for developing countries have little impact on current practices of primary care physicians. We recommend more teaching programs, continuous medical education activities regarding H. pylori infection.

  14. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in newly diagnosed children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roka, Kleoniki; Roubani, Aikaterini; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Panayotou, Ioanna; Roma, Eleftheria; Chouliaras, Giorgos

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are less likely to be infected with Helicobacter pylori compared with non-IBD patients. We aimed to study the prevalence of H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative gastritis in newly diagnosed children with IBD in comparison to those with non-IBD in Greece. All children who underwent first esophagogastroduodenal endoscopy between 2002 and 2011 were retrospectively included. Four groups were studied: patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), IBD unclassified (IBDU), and non-IBD individuals (non-IBD). Helicobacter pylori infection was defined by positive culture or by positive histology and CLO test. Those children with negative or not available culture and only one positive test (histology or CLO) were further evaluated by urea breath test, and the positives were also included in the infected group. We studied 159 patients with IBD (66 CD, 34 UC, and 59 IBDU) and 1209 patients in non-IBD individuals. Helicobacter pylori gastritis was less frequent in the IBD group (3.8% vs 13.2% in the control group, p gastritis were 3.3 times more likely to belong in the IBD group compared with H. pylori-positive patients (p = .006). Occurrence of H. pylori gastritis is less frequent in children with IBD compared with controls. Our study confirms an inverse association between H. pylori and IBD. Future studies are needed to distinguish between a true protective role of H. pylori and a confounding effect due to previous antibiotic use in children with IBD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Helicobacter pylori eradication: A randomised comparative trial of 7 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compliance and side-effects were assessed 2 weeks after the start of therapy and H. pylori eradication was assessed by stool antigen tests 4 weeks after treatment. Results. Both the intention-to-treat (ITT; N=120) and per protocol (PP; N=97) analyses showed no significant differences between the eradication rates of EAC 7 ...

  16. Prevalence of H. Pylori Seropositivity among Adult Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The Rapid Diagnostic Test for H. pylori which was applied in this study is simple, cheap and does not require expertise. The strips should be made readily available in Primary Health Centers and GOPDs for the screening of dyspeptic patients before empirical treatment with triple regimen and referral to tertiary ...

  17. Generic clearance values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossio, M.C.; Muniz, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Generic Clearance Values established for natural and artificial radionuclides with the objective of evaluating their degree of conservatism in views of adopting them into the regulatory body. Generic clearance values for natural radionuclides have been chosen by experts judgments as the optimum boundary between, on one hand, the ubiquitous unmodified soil concentrations and, on the other hand, activity concentrations in ores, mineral sands, industrial residues and wastes. For artificial radionuclides the clearance levels have been derived from the scenarios postulated in the document 'Safety Reports Series Nr 44' of the IAEA considering quantitative exemption criteria. A set of 8 scenarios were postulated covering external, ingestion and inhalation exposure pathways. For each radionuclide, the generic clearance level was derived as the more restrictive value obtained from the scenarios, that is the lowest ratio between the applicable individual dose and the dose per unit activity concentration (Bq/g). The individual dose was calculated by a formula depending on each scenario and pathway, with different parameters, such as exposure time, dosimetric factors, dilution factor, density of the material, geometric factors, etc. It was concluded that the basis and parameters used for the derivation of the generic clearance levels are quite conservative and therefore its the adoption in Argentina has been recommended. It is expected that their implementation will contribute to optimize the regulatory management system. (author)

  18. Generic Clearance Values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossio, M.C.; Muniz, C.C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Generic Clearance Values established for natural and artificial radionuclides with the objective of evaluating their degree of conservatism in views of adopting them into the regulatory body. Generic clearance values for natural radionuclides have been chosen by experts judgments as the optimum boundary between, on the one hand, the ubiquitous unmodified soil concentrations and, on the other hand, activity concentrations in ores, mineral sands, industrial residues and wastes. For artificial radionuclides the clearance levels have been derived from the scenarios postulated in the document Safety Reports Series 44 of the IAEA considering quantitative exemption criteria. A set of 8 scenarios were postulated covering external, ingestion and inhalation exposure pathways. For each radionuclide, the generic clearance level was derived as the more restrictive value obtained from the scenarios, that is the lowest ratio between the applicable individual dose and the dose per unit activity concentration (Bq/g). The individual dose was calculated by a formula depending on each scenario and pathway, with different parameters, such as exposure time, dosimetric factors, dilution factor, density of the material, geometric factors, etc. It was concluded that the basis and parameters used for the derivation of the generic clearance levels are quite conservative and therefore its the adoption in Argentina has been recommended. It is expected that their implementation will contribute to optimize the regulatory management system. (authors) [es

  19. Study on clearance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yuko; Miura, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    The clearance system is a legal system to release 'the radioactive waste not requiring treatment as radioactive waste' from the regulatory control. JNES supports NISA on approval and confirmation of clearance measurement and judgment developed by the operator. The objective of this study is to establish technical base of the validation method of the clearance measurement for various objects. In reactor facilities, the bulk measurement technique or the statistical sampling measurement technique may be applied to large scale objects or concrete walls. In this study, the criteria of those techniques were examined. In uranium processing facilities, it is important to confirm surface state of the object in case of detecting alpha rays. The result of the examination about the influence of the surface rust in the uranium clearance measurement by the alpha ray measurement showed that the pollution was distributed in rust layer uniformly. This result will be reflected to the revision of the Ministerial Ordinance on Clearance in 2011FY. To develop a manual for unexpected incidents, the response procedure for an unexpected incident was prepared, including a response system. (author)

  20. Bromsulphalein (BSP) clearance in ageing rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, C.F.; Leeuw-Israel, F.R. de; Arp-Neefjes, J.M.

    1968-01-01

    Liver function in ageing rats was studied, using the bromsulphalein (BSP) clearance test. The test was done on ultramicro scale. This made it possible to repeat the test several times in the same animal and to start a longitudinal study. In 3-month-old rats the BSP retentions, measured 15, 30 and 45

  1. Evolution of Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to antibiotics during a 10-year period in Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupcinskas, Limas; Rasmussen, Lone; Jonaitis, Laimas

    2013-01-01

    .5 times, the total macrolide consumption remains one of the lowest in Europe. We have not observed any significant changes in the susceptibility of H. pylori to the most widely used antibiotics during the recent 10-year period. The low resistance rate to clarithromycin might be related to the policy......The study evaluated the changes in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori strains with primary resistance to antibiotics during the last 10 years in Lithuania. H. pylori susceptibilities to antibiotics were tested in 89 patients in 1998, in 81 patients in 2001 and in 90 patients in 2007...

  2. Effect on cell surface hydrophobicity and susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annuk, H; Hirmo, S; Türi, E; Mikelsaar, M; Arak, E; Wadström, T

    1999-03-01

    Effects on aqueous extracts of medicinal plants on ten Helicobacter pylori strains were studied by the salt aggregation test to determine the possibility to modulate their cell surface hydrophobicity and by an agar diffusion assay for detection of antimicrobial activity. It was established that aqueous extracts of bearberry and cowberry leaves enhance cell aggregation of all H. pylori strains tested by the salt aggregation test, and the extract of bearberry possessed a remarkable bacteriostatic activity. Pure tannic acid showed a result similar to that of bearberry and cowberry extracts which contained a large amount of tannins. In contrast, extracts of wild camomile and pineapple-weed, which blocked aggregation of H. pylori, contained small amounts of tannins and did not reveal any antimicrobial activity. Tannic acid seems to be the component of bearberry and cowberry aqueous extracts with the highest activity to decrease cell surface hydrophobicity as well as in antibacterial activity against H. pylori.

  3. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António M. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  4. Helicobacter pylori in First Nations and Recent Immigrant Populations in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L Jones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diminishing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among most segments of the Canadian population has led to changes in the etiologies and patterns of associated upper gastrointestinal diseases, including fewer peptic ulcers and their complications. Canadian Aboriginals and recent immigrants are among populations in which the prevalence of H pylori infection remains high and, therefore, the health risks imposed by H pylori remain a significant concern. Population-based strategies for H pylori eradication in groups with a low prevalence of infection are unlikely to be cost effective, but such measures are attractive in groups in which the prevalence rates of infection remain substantial. In addition to a lower prevalence of peptic ulcers and dyspepsia, the public health value of eradication may be particularly important if this leads to a reduction in the prevalence of gastric cancer in high prevalence groups. Therefore The Canadian Helicobacter Study Group held a conference that brought together experts in the field to address these issues, the results of which are reviewed in the present article. Canadians with the highest prevalence of H pylori infection are an appropriate focus for considering the health advantages of eradicating persistent infection. In Canadian communities with a high prevalence of both H pylori and gastric cancer, there remains an opportunity to test the hypothesis that H pylori infection is a treatable risk factor for malignancy.

  5. Prevalence of helicobacter pylori infection in school going children of Bhara Kahu area, Islamabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, T.; Bilal, R.; Khanum, A.

    2009-07-01

    Most Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected individuals remain asymptomatic, but the presence of H. pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. Despite the fact of high prevalence of H. pylori infection around the world, data about its prevalence in children in Pakistan is scanty. Our study was the first epidemiologic study in Pakistan designed to assess H. pylori prevalence in a school based population of children without gastrointestinal symptoms. The children were enrolled from three schools in the suburbs of Islamabad and their anthropometric data were noted. The non-invasive urea breath test was applied to find the prevalence of H. pylori infection. Overall, 72.3% of apparently healthy children were harboring the H. pylori bacterium and the prevalence was 69% in 3-6 years, 71% in 7-8 years, 79% in 9-10 years, 76% in 11-12 years and 55% in 13-16 years of age. The prevalence decreased in the higher age group significantly, while gender was not a risk factor for acquiring this infection as the prevalence of infection was not significantly different in males and females (74.0% vs. 70.3%, p=0.41). The lower prevalence in higher age group might be explained by change in degree of contact, Increasing antibody production with increasing age or improvement in sanitary habits of children as compared to younger children. (author)

  6. Geographic distribution of methyltransferases of Helicobacter pylori: evidence of human host population isolation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Jorge MB

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. This ubiquitous association between H. pylori and humans is thought to be present since the origin of modern humans. The H. pylori genome encodes for an exceptional number of restriction and modifications (R-M systems. To evaluate if R-M systems are an adequate tool to determine the geographic distribution of H. pylori strains, we typed 221 strains from Africa, America, Asia, and Europe, and evaluated the expression of different 29 methyltransferases. Results Independence tests and logistic regression models revealed that ten R-M systems correlate with geographical localization. The distribution pattern of these methyltransferases may have been originated by co-divergence of regional H. pylori after its human host migrated out of Africa. The expression of specific methyltransferases in the H. pylori population may also reflect the genetic and cultural background of its human host. Methyltransferases common to all strains, M. HhaI and M. NaeI, are likely conserved in H. pylori, and may have been present in the bacteria genome since the human diaspora out of Africa. Conclusion This study indicates that some methyltransferases are useful geomarkers, which allow discrimination of bacterial populations, and that can be added to our tools to investigate human migrations.

  7. Helicobacter pylori colonization in infants and its relation to childhood morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizami, S.Q.; Bhutta, Z.A.; Weaver, L.

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is universally reported from all over the world including both developed and developing countries. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Pakistan is unknown. Although a few studies have been done in adults, there are no studies looking at the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori colonization especially in children. In addition, a number of symptoms such as nonspecific abdominal pain, diarrhea and malnutrition etc. are attributed to it though most cases of Helicobacter pylori colonization remain asymptomatic. The association between Helicobacter pylori and gastrointestinal symptoms however, remains controversial. Hence in order to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, its time of acquisition and to look at its correlation with diarrhea-associated morbidity, we proposed to do the present study. In this study we will look for the evidence of Helicobacter colonization in infants with the non-invasive techniques using 13 C urea breath test and stool ELISA for Helicobacter pylori every at three month interval in a cohort of infants from a periurban community in Karachi Pakistan. (author)

  8. Comparison of different methods of helicobacter pylori detection in symptomatic gastroduodenal patients of Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, M.; Zaidi, P.; Hameed, A.; Rasool, A.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a principal cause of chronic gastritis (CG), gastric and duodenal ulcers and a major risk factor for gastric cancer in humans. The objective of this study was to determine and compare the prevalence of H. pylori by different detection methods in symptomatic patients of Karachi. A total of 227 biopsy samples were collected from patients having complaints of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), chronic gastritis and/or abdominal discomfort (AD) from three different health providing institutions of Karachi during 2004- 2006 and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori. Comparative evaluation of three different conventional diagnostic techniques with that of a highly specific PCR amplification of ureC gene were carried out and found H. pylori in 62.5%, 64.7%. 68.7% and 59% by PCR, histology, rapid urease test and culture respectively. Out of 227 biopsy samples collected, 120 (52.8%) were H. pylori positive by all methods comprising 62 male patients and 58 female patients. A significant association between H. pylori infection and gastro duodenal diseases was observed. Among 120 H. pylori infected patients 56 were comprised of PUD, 37 with CG, 19 with AD and 8 with Gastric cancer (GCa). The epidemiology of H. p)1/ori infection is also discussed. (author)

  9. Will Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Childhood Alter the Risk of Developing Gastric Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Bourke

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen for gastric cancer. It is estimated that there is between a two- and sixfold increase in the risk of developing gastric cancer among infected patients. Among different populations, the risk of H pylori-infected individuals developing gastric cancer varies greatly. However, on a worldwide scale, gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, H pylori eradication could help prevent up to three to four million gastric cancer deaths per year. H pylori is usually acquired in childhood. Because infected children have not harboured the organism for long enough to have developed precancerous lesions, childhood is theoretically an attractive time for H pylori eradication and, thus, could help prevent gastric cancer later in life. However, as H pylori prevalence and the incidence of gastric cancer are falling rapidly in developed nations, widespread population screening programs aimed at the eradication of H pylori in these countries would be enormously expensive. Therefore, except in groups with a high risk for development of gastric cancer (eg, Japanese or those with a strong positive family history of gastric cancer, a population-based test-and-treat policy is not justified.

  10. Implications of Antibiotic Resistance in the Management of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Canadian Helicobacter Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RH Hunt

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eradication of Helicobacter pylori from the gastric and duodenal mucosa is an important clinical goal in the treatment of infected patients with peptic ulcer disease and other H pylori-associated conditions. Although several oral drug combination regimens are associated with eradication rates of approximately 85% in controlled trials, the success rate in patients infected with a resistant strain of H pylori is closer to 75%. Resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin, which are common components of combination treatment regimens, is of greatest concern. Reported rates of H pylori resistance to various antibiotics vary considerably. In Canada, the data documenting H pylori susceptibility are limited but suggest that resistance to these antibiotics varies geographically and within specific treatment groups. Although susceptibility testing is not a prerequisite for initial treatment of individual patients infected with H pylori, formal efforts to identify and monitor both the causes and prevalence of antibiotic resistance across Canada are a much needed step in the ongoing management of this important infection. Recommended treatment regimens may be useful, even for treating apparently resistant H pylori strains. However, it is important to understand the mechanisms of the development of resistant strains to manage patients with treatment failure better.

  11. Early Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Vietnamese Patients with Acute Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Trong Quach

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate H. pylori infection rate and evaluate a combined set of tests for H. pylori diagnosis in Vietnamese patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding (PUD. Methods. Consecutive patients with acute PUB were enrolled prospectively. Rapid urease test (RUT with 3 biopsies was carried out randomly. Patients without RUT or with negative RUT received urea breath test (UBT and serological and urinary H. pylori antibody tests. H. pylori was considered positive if RUT or any noninvasive test was positive. Patients were divided into group A (RUT plus noninvasive tests and group B (only noninvasive tests. Results. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 94.2% (161/171. Groups A and B had no differences in demographic characteristics, bleeding severity, endoscopic findings, and proton pump inhibitor use. H. pylori-positive rate in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (98.2% versus 86.7%, p=0.004. The positive rate of RUT was similar at each biopsy site but significantly increased if RUT results from 2 or 3 sites were combined (p<0.05. Conclusions. H. pylori infection rate in Vietnamese patients with acute PUB is high. RUT is an excellent test if at least 2 biopsies are taken.

  12. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  13. Reflux oesophagitis and Helicobacter pylori infection in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, R.; Pitt, M. A.; Banerjee, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric malignancies. Little attention has been paid to the possibility that it may also have a role in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis. This is especially true in elderly patients who have life-long infection and provide an ideal group to study the mucosal changes associated with the organism. The aim of this study was to determine if H pylori is associated with reflux oesophagitis in elderly patients. Consecutive gastroscopy patients were recruited. Multiple biopsies were taken from oesophagus, stomach, antrum and duodenum for histology and rapid urease tests. Patients also had IgG ELISA antibodies and 13C-urea breath tests performed. Patients with macroscopic or microscopic evidence of reflux oesophagitis were compared to patients with macroscopically normal upper gastrointestinal tracts and no microscopic evidence of reflux. A total of 114 patients were recruited, average age 78.9 years (+/- 5.4). There were 37 refluxers and 33 non-refluxers. We found no evidence for an association between the presence of H pylori and reflux oesophagitis in elderly patients. The high prevalence of H pylori in patients with reflux oesophagitis can be explained by the presence of incidental gastritis. PMID:8733530

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection in women with Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmuely, Haim; Shimon, Ilan; Gitter, Limor Azulay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An association between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection as environmental risk factors for Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has been reported. We investigated this hypothesis in women in which HT is more common. Serum immunoglobulin G antibodies against H pylori (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), CagA protein (Western blot assay), circulating antibodies to thyroid antigens, mainly thyroperoxidase (TPOAbs) and thyroglobulin (TgAbs), were tested in 101 females with HT and 111 non-HT control women without a history of autoimmune disease. Thyroid function, socioeconomic status at childhood, and family history of thyroid malfunction were also studied. Forty-seven HT women (46.5%) tested seropositive for H pylori versus 48 controls (43.2%; P = 0.63). The prevalence of anti-CagA antibodies was 21.3% in HT-infected patients and 31.2% in infected controls (P = 0.352). Women with HT were older than the controls at a significance level of 0.03, and higher prevalence of hypothyroidism (69% vs 13.5%, respectively) and family history of thyroid malfunction (59% vs 34%, respectively) (P thyroid malfunction was independently associated with an increased risk of HT (odds ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 1.86–6.18, P thyroid malfunction is a risk factor for HT. PMID:27442635

  15. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NACFC Carolyn and C Richard Mattingly Leadership in Mental Health Care Award Mary M. Kontos Award NACFC Reflections ... help your infant or child manage their lung health, watch parents of children with CF and a respiratory therapist talk about the different techniques they use for airway clearance. ... Instagram Email Find a Clinical Trial Help us blaze ...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how you can help your infant or child manage their lung health, watch parents of children with CF and a respiratory therapist talk about the different techniques they use for airway clearance. Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage ...

  17. Study on clearance system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The clearance system is a legal system to release 'the radioactive waste not requiring treatment as radioactive waste' from the regulatory control. JNES supports Nuclear Regulatory Agency on approval and confirmation of clearance measurement and judgment developed by the operator. The objective of this study is to establish technical base of the validation method of the clearance measurement for various objects. In uranium processing facilities, simulation sources emitting alpha-rays is used in a validity confirmation examination of the measuring equipment. In this study, these sources were examined by measuring alpha and beta spectra to evaluate the applicability and problem of these sources. In addition, the measuring method detecting gamma-rays was examined. This method can be applied to complicated objects. As a part to develop a manual for unexpected incidents in clearance system, a quick method for measurement of Strontium 90 was examined. In addition, the measuring methods for the judgment of the influence of fallout and for NR (Non-Radioactive) confirmation were examined. (author)

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cystic fibrosis. CF CARE CENTER finder We provide funding for and accredit more than 120 care centers ... Community in Health Care Reform Milestones in Health Care Reform How Tax Reform Could Impact People With CF The ... Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Offer their tips for fitting ACTs into daily life Airway Clearance Techniques | Webcast To learn more about how you can help your infant or child manage their lung health, watch parents of children with CF and a respiratory therapist ...

  20. Helicobacter pylori colonization ameliorates glucose homeostasis in mice through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Kronsteiner, Barbara; Carbo, Adria; Lu, Pinyi; Viladomiu, Monica; Pedragosa, Mireia; Zhang, Xiaoying; Sobral, Bruno W; Mane, Shrinivasrao P; Mohapatra, Saroj K; Horne, William T; Guri, Amir J; Groeschl, Michael; Lopez-Velasco, Gabriela; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    There is an inverse secular trend between the incidence of obesity and gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that can affect the secretion of gastric hormones that relate to energy homeostasis. H. pylori strains that carry the cag pathogenicity island (PAI) interact more intimately with gastric epithelial cells and trigger more extensive host responses than cag(-) strains. We hypothesized that gastric colonization with H. pylori strains differing in cag PAI status exert distinct effects on metabolic and inflammatory phenotypes. To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic and inflammatory markers in db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity experimentally infected with isogenic forms of H. pylori strain 26695: the cag PAI wild-type and its cag PAI mutant strain 99-305. H. pylori colonization decreased fasting blood glucose levels, increased levels of leptin, improved glucose tolerance, and suppressed weight gain. A response found in both wild-type and mutant H. pylori strain-infected mice included decreased white adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) and increased adipose tissue regulatory T cells (Treg) cells. Gene expression analyses demonstrated upregulation of gastric PPAR γ-responsive genes (i.e., CD36 and FABP4) in H. pylori-infected mice. The loss of PPAR γ in immune and epithelial cells in mice impaired the ability of H. pylori to favorably modulate glucose homeostasis and ATM infiltration during high fat feeding. Gastric infection with some commensal strains of H. pylori ameliorates glucose homeostasis in mice through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism and modulates macrophage and Treg cell infiltration into the abdominal white adipose tissue.

  1. Helicobacter pylori colonization ameliorates glucose homeostasis in mice through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Bassaganya-Riera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an inverse secular trend between the incidence of obesity and gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that can affect the secretion of gastric hormones that relate to energy homeostasis. H. pylori strains that carry the cag pathogenicity island (PAI interact more intimately with gastric epithelial cells and trigger more extensive host responses than cag(- strains. We hypothesized that gastric colonization with H. pylori strains differing in cag PAI status exert distinct effects on metabolic and inflammatory phenotypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic and inflammatory markers in db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity experimentally infected with isogenic forms of H. pylori strain 26695: the cag PAI wild-type and its cag PAI mutant strain 99-305. H. pylori colonization decreased fasting blood glucose levels, increased levels of leptin, improved glucose tolerance, and suppressed weight gain. A response found in both wild-type and mutant H. pylori strain-infected mice included decreased white adipose tissue macrophages (ATM and increased adipose tissue regulatory T cells (Treg cells. Gene expression analyses demonstrated upregulation of gastric PPAR γ-responsive genes (i.e., CD36 and FABP4 in H. pylori-infected mice. The loss of PPAR γ in immune and epithelial cells in mice impaired the ability of H. pylori to favorably modulate glucose homeostasis and ATM infiltration during high fat feeding. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Gastric infection with some commensal strains of H. pylori ameliorates glucose homeostasis in mice through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism and modulates macrophage and Treg cell infiltration into the abdominal white adipose tissue.

  2. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Korea: A multicenter, nationwide study conducted in 2015 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Baik, Gwang Ho; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Byung-Wook; Hong, Su Jin; Lim, Hyun; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Si Hyung; Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Choi, Cheol Woong; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Choi, Suck Chei; Cho, Jin Woong; Lee, Wan Sik; Na, Soo-Young; Sung, Jae Kyu; Song, Kyung Ho; Chung, Jun-Won; Yun, Sung-Cheol

    2018-04-01

    The Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research has studied Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) prevalence since 1998 and found a dynamic change in its prevalence in Korea. The aim of this study was to determine the recent H. pylori prevalence rate and compare it with that of previous studies according to socioeconomic variables. We planned to enroll 4920 asymptomatic Korean adults from 21 centers according to the population distribution of seven geographic areas (Seoul, Gyeonggi, Gangwon, Chungcheong, Kyungsang, Cholla, and Jeju). We centrally collected serum and tested H. pylori serum IgG using a chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. We analyzed 4917 samples (4917/4920 = 99.9%) from January 2015 to December 2016. After excluding equivocal serologic results, the H. pylori seropositivity rate was 51.0% (2414/4734). We verified a decrease in H. pylori seroprevalence compared with previous studies performed in 1998, 2005, and 2011 (P pylori seroprevalence rate differed by area: Cholla (59.5%), Chungcheong (59.2%), Kyungsang (55.1%), Jeju (54.4%), Gangwon (49.1%), Seoul (47.4%), and Gyeonggi (44.6%). The rate was higher in those older than 40 years (38.1% in those aged 30-39 years and 57.7% in those aged 40-49 years) and was lower in city residents than in noncity residents at all ages. Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in Korea is decreasing and may vary according to population characteristics. This trend should be considered to inform H. pylori-related policies. © 2018 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases in Vietnam: a cross-sectional, hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okimoto Tadayoshi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of H. pylori infection in Vietnam is reportedly high, but the spectrum of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases has not been systematically investigated. Moreover, despite the similarities of ethnicity and diet, the age-standardized incidence rate of gastric cancer in the northern city of Hanoi is higher than that in the southern city of Ho Chi Minh, but the reason for this phenomenon is unknown. The virulence of Vietnamese H. pylori has also not been investigated in detail. Methods Individuals undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy were randomly recruited. H. pylori infection status was determined based on the combined results of culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urine test and serum ELISA. Peptic ulcer (PU and gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed by endoscopy, and chronic gastritis was determined histologically. H. pylori virulence factors were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Results Among the examined patients, 65.6% were infected with H. pylori. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in those over 40 years of age than in those aged ≤40. Chronic gastritis was present in all H. pylori-infected individuals, 83.1% of whom had active gastritis, and 85.3% and 14.7% had atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. PU was present in 21% of infected patients, whereas its incidence was very low in non-infected individuals. The prevalence of PU was significantly higher in Hanoi than in Ho Chi Minh. The prevalence of vacA m1, which has been identified as an independent risk factor for PU in Vietnam, was significantly higher among H. pylori isolates from Hanoi than among those from Ho Chi Minh. Conclusions H. pylori infection is common in Vietnam and is strongly associated with PU, active gastritis, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. vacA m1 is associated with an increased risk for PU and might contribute to the difference in the prevalence of PU and gastric cancer between

  4. Treatment of children with Helicobacter pylori infection and malabsorption syndrome with probiotics: Comparison with conventional method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndiaye, M F; Mbengue, M; Mbaye, P S; Diouf, S [Societe Senegalaise de Gasto-enterologie et d' hepatologie, Dakar (Senegal); Ghoos, Y [Labo. Digestie Absorptie, Leuven (Belgium); Brunser, O [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infection (82 %) in Senegal where malnutrition is common in children (25 %). Our aims were to definite prevalence of H. pylori, to determine the relationship between Hp infection and undernourishment and to verify the efficiency of treatment with probiotic. In some studies a positive effect of Saccharomyces boulardii has been demonstrated against H. pylori. We have included healthy children 7 to 10 years of age. 108 out of 129 (84%) were H. pylori-positive by breath-test. Two groups were randomised. Group A was treated with ten days' standard triple therapy (Omeprazole 1 mg Kg/day in single day gift, Amoxycillin 50 mg/kg/two times per day and Clarithromycin 250 mg two times per day). Group B received probiotic (250 mg of Saccharomyces boulardii with 5g Inulin three times per day) for 3 months. Evaluation of treatment was done one month after the end of therapy. Seventy one children out of 110 (64.5%) had digestive symptoms in their medical history. The main signs were recurrent abdominal pain in 64 cases. BMI were less than 18.50 in all the children with H. pylori infection without other nutritional abnormaly. Eight children were eradicated after treatment seven in the group under conventional treatment (58%) and one in the group under probiotics (6%). We concluded that prevalence of H. pylori infection is very high in young children as of the 7 years' age in urban as in rural environments. Symptoms are not specific. No significant difference in the nutritional state is observed between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative children. Treatment by probiotics does not seem to give efficient results for eradication of H. pylori. (author)

  5. Screening of E. coli β-clamp Inhibitors Revealed that Few Inhibit Helicobacter pylori More Effectively: Structural and Functional Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Pandey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic of interaction with various enzymes and processivity-promoting nature during DNA replication makes β-clamp an important drug target. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori have several unique features in DNA replication machinery that makes it different from other microorganisms. To find out whether difference in DNA replication proteins behavior accounts for any difference in drug response when compared to E. coli, in the present study, we have tested E. coli β-clamp inhibitor molecules against H. pylori β-clamp. Various approaches were used to test the binding of inhibitors to H. pylori β-clamp including docking, surface competition assay, complex structure determination, as well as antimicrobial assay. Out of five shortlisted inhibitor molecules on the basis of docking score, three molecules, 5-chloroisatin, carprofen, and 3,4-difluorobenzamide were co-crystallized with H. pylori β-clamp and the structures show that they bind at the protein-protein interaction site as expected. In vivo studies showed only two molecules, 5-chloroisatin, and 3,4-difluorobenzamide inhibited the growth of the pylori with MIC values in micro molar range, which is better than the inhibitory effect of the same drugs on E. coli. Therefore, the evaluation of such drugs against H. pylori may explore the possibility to use to generate species-specific pharmacophore for development of new drugs against H. pylori.

  6. The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on macrophage migration inhibitory factor, C-reactive protein and fetuin-a levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Kebapcilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori eradication on blood levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, macrophage migration inhibitory factor and fetuin-A in patients with dyspepsia who are concurrently infected with H. pylori. METHODS: H.pylori infection was diagnosed based on the 14C urea breath test (UBT and histology. Lansoprazole 30 mg twice daily, amoxicillin 1 g twice daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily were given to all infected patients for 14 days; 14C UBT was then re-measured. In 30 subjects, migration inhibitory factor, fetuin-A and hs-CRP levels were examined before and after the eradication of H. pylori infection and compared to levels in 30 healthy subjects who tested negative for H. pylori infection. RESULTS: Age and sex distribution were comparable between patients and controls. Migration inhibitory factor and hs-CRP levels were higher, and fetuin-A levels were lower, in H. pylori-infected patients (p0.05. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that H. pylori eradication reduces the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as migration inhibitory factor and hs-CRP and also results in a significant increase in anti-inflammatory markers such as fetuin-A.

  7. Screening of E. coli β-clamp Inhibitors Revealed that Few Inhibit Helicobacter pylori More Effectively: Structural and Functional Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Preeti; Verma, Vijay; Dhar, Suman Kumar; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2018-01-11

    The characteristic of interaction with various enzymes and processivity-promoting nature during DNA replication makes β-clamp an important drug target. Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) have several unique features in DNA replication machinery that makes it different from other microorganisms. To find out whether difference in DNA replication proteins behavior accounts for any difference in drug response when compared to E. coli , in the present study, we have tested E. coli β-clamp inhibitor molecules against H. pylori β-clamp. Various approaches were used to test the binding of inhibitors to H. pylori β-clamp including docking, surface competition assay, complex structure determination, as well as antimicrobial assay. Out of five shortlisted inhibitor molecules on the basis of docking score, three molecules, 5-chloroisatin, carprofen, and 3,4-difluorobenzamide were co-crystallized with H. pylori β-clamp and the structures show that they bind at the protein-protein interaction site as expected. In vivo studies showed only two molecules, 5-chloroisatin, and 3,4-difluorobenzamide inhibited the growth of the pylori with MIC values in micro molar range, which is better than the inhibitory effect of the same drugs on E. coli . Therefore, the evaluation of such drugs against H. pylori may explore the possibility to use to generate species-specific pharmacophore for development of new drugs against H. pylori .

  8. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo study the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBC. MethodsA total of 235 patients with HBC who were admitted to our hospitals from October 2008 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. The infection rate of H. pylori in those patients was calculated. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices and 97 patients with portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG, the infection rate of H. pylori was compared between those with different degrees of esophagogastric varices or PHG. In the 32 patients whose blood ammonia was determined, the level of blood ammonia was compared between H. pylori-positive and -negative groups. Between-group comparison of continuous data was performed by t test and analysis of variance, and between-group comparison of categorical data was performed by χ2 test. ResultsThe infection rate of H. pylori in the 235 patients with HBC was 80.85% (190/235. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices, who had tortuous serpentine uplift or bead-like changes of esophageal varices and tumor-like changes (with or without gastric erosion of gastric varices visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild, moderate, and severe varices (50.55% (46/91 vs 43.59% (17/39 vs 76% (19/25, χ2=6.913, P<0.05. In the 97 patients with PHG, who had snake skin-like changes, cherry red spots, scarlet rash, and erosion bleeding of gastric mucosa visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild and severe PHG (43.33% (26/60 vs 67.57% (25/37, χ2=5.391, P<005.In patients whose blood ammonia was determined, patients in H. pylori-positive group had a significantly higher average concentration of blood ammonia than those in H. pylori-negative group (62.76±13.43 vs 47.20±12.51 μmol/L, t= 3.39, P<0

  9. Patients with established gastro-esophageal reflux disease might benefit from Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, John M; Kouklakis, George; Vradelis, Stergios; Zezos, Petros; Pitiakoudis, Michael; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios; Zavos, Christos; Kountouras, Jannis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) eradication in selected H. pylori -positive patients with a primary diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) by using the 3-h postprandial esophageal pH monitoring. We recruited patients with erosive esophagitis at endoscopy and H. pylori infection at histology, successfully cured following eradication therapy; the selected H. pylori -positive patients had weekly reflux symptoms for at least six months and endoscopically established Grade A or B esophagitis. Twenty-nine eligible patients were initially subjected to esophageal manometry and ambulatory 3-h postprandial esophageal pH monitoring. All patients received H. pylori triple eradication therapy accompanied by successful H. pylori eradication. After successful eradication of H. pylori (confirmed by 13 C urea breath test), a second manometry and 3-h postprandial esophageal pH monitoring were introduced to assess the results of eradication therapy, after a 3-month post-treatment period. All 29 selected H. pylori -positive patients became negative due to successful H. pylori eradication, evaluated by 13 C urea breath test after a 4-week post-treatment period. Post-eradication, 62.1% patients showed similar manometric pattern at baseline; 17.2% showed improvement; 17.2% normalization; and 3.4% deterioration of the manometric patterns. The DeMeester symptom scoring in the 3-h postprandial ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring was improved after eradication of H. pylori (median 47.47 vs. 22.00, Wilcoxon's singed rank; P=0.016). On comparing the pH monitoring studies for each patient at baseline and post-eradication period, 82.8% patients showed improvement and 17.2% deterioration of the DeMeester score. By using 3-h postprandial esophageal pH monitoring, this study showed, for the first time, that H. pylori eradication may positively influence GERD symptoms. Large-scale controlled relative studies are warranted to

  10. Review: Prevalence and dynamics of Helicobacter pylori infection during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala Torrres, Beatriz; Lucero, Yalda; Lagomarcino, Anne J; Orellana-Manzano, Andrea; George, Sergio; Torres, Juan P; O'Ryan, Miguel

    2017-10-01

    Long-term persistent Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with ulceropeptic disease and gastric cancer. Although H. pylori is predominantly acquired early in life, a clear understanding of infection dynamics during childhood has been obfuscated by the diversity of populations evaluated, study designs, and methods used. Update understanding of true prevalence of H. pylori infection during childhood, based on a critical analysis of the literature published in the past 5 years. Comprehensive review and meta-analysis of original studies published from 2011 to 2016. A MEDLINE ® /PubMed ® search on May 1, 2016, using the terms pylori and children, and subsequent exclusion, based on abstract review using predefined criteria, resulted in 261 citations. An Embase ® search with the same criteria added an additional 8 citations. In healthy children, meta-analysis estimated an overall seroprevalence rate of 33% (95% CI: 27%-38%). Seven healthy cohort studies using noninvasive direct detection methods showed infection prevalence estimates ranging from 20% to 50% in children ≤5 and 38% to 79% in children >5 years. The probability of infection persistence after a first positive sample ranged from 49% to 95%. Model estimates of cross-sectional direct detection studies in asymptomatic children indicated a prevalence of 37% (95% CI: 30%-44%). Seroprevalence, but not direct detection rates increased with age; both decreased with increasing income. The model estimate based on cross-sectional studies in symptomatic children was 39% (95% CI: 35%-43%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection varied widely in the studies included here; nevertheless, model estimates by detection type were similar, suggesting that overall, one-third of children worldwide are or have been infected. The few cohort and longitudinal studies available show variability, but most studies, show infection rates over 30%. Rather surprisingly, overall infection prevalence in symptomatic children

  11. Presence of Helicobacter pylori in betel chewers and non betel chewers with and without oral cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Neluka; Jayakumar, Gnanapragasam; Perera, Naomal; Amarasingha, Indranee; Meedin, Fahra; Holton, John

    2009-01-01

    Background Betel chewing has been shown to predispose to periodontal disease and oral cancer. Studies show that people with gum disease are more likely to test positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). It is not known if the lesions produced by betel quid and the resulting, chemical changes predispose to colonization by H. pylori. Further the role of this organism in oral cancer is not known. Our objective was to determine the presence of H. pylori in oral lesions of thirty oral cancer patients and to determine the presence of IgG antibodies to H. pylori in oral cancer patients who are betel chewers and non betel chewers, healthy betel chewers and healthy non-betel chewers and to compare the presence of H. pylori in these four groups. This case control study was conducted at the Cancer Institute Maharagama and the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura. Methods One hundred and seventy three subjects, of whom fifty three were patients presenting with oral cancer to the Cancer Institute Maharagama, sixty healthy betel chewers and sixty healthy non-betel chewers from the Religious and Welfare Service Centre Maharagama were tested for H. pylori by serology. Thirty oral biopsies from oral cancer patients were cultured under microaerophilic condition to isolate H. pylori. The statistic used was Chi-square test. Results Of the fifty-three oral cancer patients, forty-four were betel chewers. Among the 53 oral cancer patients examined, ten of forty-four (10/44 = 22.7%) patients who are betel chewers and four of nine (4/9 = 44.4%) patients who are non-betel chewers were detected positive for IgG antibody against H. pylori. In the healthy group (betel chewers and non betel chewers) ten (16.7%) of the healthy betel chewers tested positive for H. pylori by serology. None of the healthy non-betel chewers tested positive for H. pylori Fourteen [26.4%] of oral cancer patients tested positive for H. pylori by serology, of

  12. Management of Helicobacter Pylori in the United States: Results from a national survey of gastroenterology physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Traci T; Scranton, Rebecca A; Brown, Heidi E; Harris, Robin B; Chen, Zhao; Musuku, Sunitha; Oren, Eyal

    2017-07-01

    We sought to determine current knowledge and practices among gastroenterology physicians and assess adherence to current guidelines for H. pylori management. Online surveys were distributed in 2014 to practicing gastroenterology physicians for information related to the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection. A total of 582 completed surveys were reviewed. The H. pylori screening test used "almost always" was gastric biopsy obtained during endoscopy (histology) (59%) followed by stool antigen test (20%). Standard triple therapy for 14days was commonly prescribed by 53% of respondents. The stool antigen test was most frequently chosen to confirm H. pylori eradication (51%), although only 58% of physicians checked for eradication in patients who underwent treatment. Adherence to current American College of Gastroenterology guidelines is low. Although more physicians treat patients with a positive H. pylori test, only half ensure eradication after treatment. Improving knowledge of the resistance patterns of H. pylori may be critical to ensure successful eradication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Food constituents enhance urease activity in Healicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Mizote, Tomoko; Inatsu, Sakiko; Ehara, Keiko

    2005-01-01

    Urease activity of Helicobacter pylori recovered from the stomach of H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils was affected by the diet used after infection. The effect of dietary components on urease activity was investigated by growth of H. pylori in…

  14. Piperine treatment suppresses Helicobacter pylori toxin entry in to gastric epithelium and minimizes β-catenin mediated oncogenesis and IL-8 secretion in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer initiation has been studied widely. The objective of our present study was to evaluate the effect of a single compound piperine on H. pylori infection and its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects in vitro. Cytotoxicity was tested by Ez-cytox cell viability assay kit. Effects of piperine on H. pylori toxin gene expression and IL-8 expression in mammalian cells during infection were assessed by RT-PCR. Effects of piperine on toxin entry into host cells, E-cadherin cleavage by H. pylori, and the changes in H. pylori mediated β-catenin expression and IL-8 secretion were determined by immunoblotting. Piperine treatment restrained the entry of CagA and VacA into AGS cells. Piperine administration in H. pylori infection reduced E-cadherin cleavage in stomach epithelium. In addition, H. pylori induced β-catenin up-regulation was reduced. Piperine administration impaired IL-8 secretion in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. As we reported previously piperine restrained H. pylori motility. The possible reason behind the H. pylori inhibition mechanism of piperine could be the dwindled motility, which weakened H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. The reduced adhesion decreased the toxin entry thereby secreting less amount of IL-8. In addition, piperine treatment suppressed H. pylori protease led to reduction of E-cadherin cleavage and β-catenin expression resulting in diminished β-catenin translocation into the nucleus thus decreasing the risk of oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the preliminary report of piperine mediated H. pylori infection control on gastric epithelial cells in-vitro. PMID:27158376

  15. A win for the patient: Direct patient notification improves treatment rates of active Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaratnam, Sriharan; Yeoh, Joey; Hsiang, John; Patrick, Alasdair B

    2014-01-01

    Current international guidelines recommend the commencement of effective eradication therapy as soon as active Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is confirmed. At our institution, all positive Campylobacter-like Organism (CLO) test results were automatically communicated to general practitioners (GPs) via a standardised letter, which also advised the commencement of eradication therapy. Despite this endeavour, a clinical audit conducted in 2011 demonstrated that only 66 per cent of confirmed H. pylori-positive South Auckland patients received eradication treatment and only 83 per cent of these patients received treatment within one month. Improve the timely initiation of H. pylori eradication therapy through direct patient notification. A prospective clinical audit of 109 consecutive outpatients with a positive CLO test identified at gastroscopy. In addition to standard general practitioner notification, patients were also directly notified of their positive CLO test result via a standardised letter, which provided information about H. pylori and its disease associations as well as advising patients to seek consultation with their GP to commence eradication therapy. Dispensing data was examined using Test Safe electronic records to determine the total uptake and timing of treatment compared to data from a preliminary 2011 audit. Ninety-five per cent of H. pylori-positive patients received standard triple therapy; therefore, treatment of active H. pylori infection was significantly higher when patients were directly notified in addition to standard GP notification, when compared to GP notification alone (95 per cent vs 66 per cent, paudit in 2011 (100 per cent vs. 83 per cent, pstrategy that significantly improves the timely initiation of eradication therapy for active H. pylori infection. This has since been integrated into standard practice at our District Health Board (DHB).

  16. Positive Result by Serology Indicates Active Helicobacter pylori Infection in Patients with Atrophic Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkola, Arto; Rautelin, Hilpi; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Sipponen, Pentti; Färkkilä, Martti; Haapiainen, Reijo; Kosunen, Timo U.

    1998-01-01

    Patients with atrophic corpus gastritis and elevated Helicobacter pylori antibody titers but 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) and histology results negative for H. pylori were randomized into eradication therapy or follow-up only. Antibody levels decreased significantly in six out of seven patients in the eradication group, while in the follow-up group, the titers declined in only one out of eight patients. In patients with atrophic corpus gastritis, positive serology results may indicate an on...

  17. Isotope determinations of renal clearance equivalent with physiological clearance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junges, R.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of renal clearance in nuclear medicine describes the tubular secretion and glomerular filtration of a substance being removed from the blood plasma. The concept of clearance as used physiologically is rather wider and includes consideration of the outflow of the substances remained back in the kidneys. The present paper discusses clearance measurements as seen from a thermodynamic point of view, in which isotope clearances become equivalent with the physiological concept of clearance. In addition, it is possible to quantify each single step of the excretory function of each kidney separately. (orig.) [de

  18. CD44 plays a functional role in Helicobacter pylori-induced epithelial cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Bertaux-Skeirik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxin-associated gene (Cag pathogenicity island is a strain-specific constituent of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori that augments cancer risk. CagA translocates into the cytoplasm where it stimulates cell signaling through the interaction with tyrosine kinase c-Met receptor, leading cellular proliferation. Identified as a potential gastric stem cell marker, cluster-of-differentiation (CD CD44 also acts as a co-receptor for c-Met, but whether it plays a functional role in H. pylori-induced epithelial proliferation is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that CD44 plays a functional role in H. pylori-induced epithelial cell proliferation. To assay changes in gastric epithelial cell proliferation in relation to the direct interaction with H. pylori, human- and mouse-derived gastric organoids were infected with the G27 H. pylori strain or a mutant G27 strain bearing cagA deletion (∆CagA::cat. Epithelial proliferation was quantified by EdU immunostaining. Phosphorylation of c-Met was analyzed by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis for expression of CD44 and CagA. H. pylori infection of both mouse- and human-derived gastric organoids induced epithelial proliferation that correlated with c-Met phosphorylation. CagA and CD44 co-immunoprecipitated with phosphorylated c-Met. The formation of this complex did not occur in organoids infected with ∆CagA::cat. Epithelial proliferation in response to H. pylori infection was lost in infected organoids derived from CD44-deficient mouse stomachs. Human-derived fundic gastric organoids exhibited an induction in proliferation when infected with H. pylori that was not seen in organoids pre-treated with a peptide inhibitor specific to CD44. In the well-established Mongolian gerbil model of gastric cancer, animals treated with CD44 peptide inhibitor Pep1, resulted in the inhibition of H. pylori-induced proliferation and associated atrophic gastritis. The current study reports a unique

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and nonmalignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjomina, Olga; Heluwaert, Frederic; Moussata, Driffa; Leja, Marcis

    2017-09-01

    A substantial decrease in Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease has been observed during the last decades. Drug-related ulcers as well as idiopathic ulcers are becoming predominant and are more refractory to treatment; however, H. pylori infection still plays an important role in ulcer bleeding and recurrence after therapy. The effect of H. pylori eradication upon functional dyspepsia symptoms has been reviewed in this article and generally confirms the results of previous meta-analyses. Additional evidence suggests a lack of impact upon the quality of life, in spite of improvement in symptoms. The association of H. pylori with gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus remains controversial with a majority of published studies showing a negative association. Furthermore, a strong inverse relationship between the presence of H. pylori and the esophageal eosinophilia was also reported. Several studies and a review addressed the role of H. pylori in autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia. The association of the above still remains controversial. Finally, the necessity of routine endoscopy and H. pylori eradication before bariatric surgery is discussed. Several studies suggest the rationale of preoperative upper endoscopy and H. pylori eradication prior to surgery. However, the prevalence of H. pylori infection prior to surgery in these studies generally reflects the overall prevalence of the infection in the particular geographic area. In addition, results on the role of H. pylori in developing postoperative complications remain controversial. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mechanisms of disease: Helicobacter pylori virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays an essential role in the development of various gastroduodenal diseases; however, only a small proportion of people infected with H. pylori develop these diseases. Some populations that have a high prevalence of H. pylori infection also have a high incidence of gastric cancer (for example, in East Asia), whereas others do not (for example, in Africa and South Asia). Even within East Asia, the incidence of gastric cancer varies (decreasing in the south). H. pylori is a highly heterogeneous bacterium and its virulence varies geographically. Geographic differences in the incidence of gastric cancer can be explained, at least in part, by the presence of different types of H. pylori virulence factor, especially CagA, VacA and OipA. However, it is still unclear why the pathogenicity of H. pylori increased as it migrated from Africa to East Asia during the course of evolution. H. pylori infection is also thought to be involved in the development of duodenal ulcer, which is at the opposite end of the disease spectrum to gastric cancer. This discrepancy can be explained in part by the presence of H. pylori virulence factor DupA. Despite advances in our understanding of the development of H. pylori-related diseases, further work is required to clarify the roles of H. pylori virulence factors.

  1. Helicobacter pylori among preschool children and their parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G; Berg, Gabriele

    1999-01-01

    and July 1997. Their H. pylori infection status was determined by 13C-urea breath test. Of 1522 eligible children, 1221 (80.2%) participated in the study. Crude prevalence of H. pylori infection in children was 11.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.5-13.3) and 36.4% in their parents (95% CI, 33.......5-39.4). The crude odds ratio (OR) for H. pylori infection of children whose mothers were infected was 16.5 (95% CI, 8.9-30.8) and 7.9 after adjustment for potential confounders (95% CI, 4.0-15.7). The crude OR if the child's father was infected was 7.8 (95% CI, 2. 5-24.2) and 3.8 after adjustment for potential......This study assessed the role of parental infection status in the transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection in a large population-based sample of preschool-aged children. The subjects, who lived in Ulm, Germany, and in two nearby communities, were screened for school fitness between January...

  2. Effect of propolis in gastric disorders: inhibition studies on the growth of Helicobacter pylori and production of its urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltas, Nimet; Karaoglu, Sengul Alpay; Tarakci, Cemre; Kolayli, Sevgi

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in alternative approaches to inhibit Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and thus treat many stomach diseases. Propolis is a pharmaceutical mixture containing many natural bioactive substances. The aim of this study was to use propolis samples to treat H. pylori. The anti-H. pylori and anti-urease activities of 15 different ethanolic propolis extracts (EPEs) were tested. The total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents of the EPE were also measured. The agar-well diffusion assay was carried out on H. pylori strain J99 and the inhibition zones were measured and compared with standards. All propolis extracts showed high inhibition of H. pylori J99, with inhibition diameters ranging from 31.0 to 47.0 mm. Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitory activity was measured using the phenol-hypochlorite assay; all EPEs showed significant inhibition against the enzyme, with inhibition concentrations (IC 50 ; mg/mL) ranging from 0.260 to 1.525 mg/mL. The degree of inhibition was related to the phenolic content of the EPE. In conclusion, propolis extract was found to be a good inhibitor that can be used in H. pylori treatment to improve human health.

  3. Coexistence of Helicobacter pylori and Intestinal Parasitosis in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökşen, Bülent; Appak, Yeliz Çağan; Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Ecemiş, Talat; Kasırga, Erhun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of coinfection with Helicobacter pylori and intestinal parasitosis in children with chronic abdominal pain (CAP) and to investigate the common risk factors in the development of both infections. Ninety patients with CAP were enrolled in this study. Blood samples of each case were screened for human preformed IgG (HpIgG) antibodies, and stool samples were tested for HpSA and also examined for intestinal parasites by direct wet-mount, formalin-ethyl-acetate concentration, and Trichrome staining procedures. Cellophane tape test was used for Enterobius vermicularis. Children tested positive for HpIgG and/or HpSA were accepted as H. pylori positive. The risk factors were compared with a questionnaire. The incidence of Giardia intestinalis was 14.8% in the H. pylori-positive group and was found to be statistically higher than that in the H. pylori-negative group (1.6%). The positivity rates of H. pylori were found to be statistically higher in children attending school and using drinking water from taps. The incidences of parasitosis were significantly higher in children with a low maternal education level and with a history of parasitosis treatment in the family. The most common etiologies of CAP in children are H. pylori infection and intestinal parasitosis. İmprovement of hygienic conditions would be beneficial in preventing both infections.

  4. Eradication rate of Helicobacter Pylori infection is directly influenced by adherence to therapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotilea, Kallirroi; Mekhael, Joyce; Salame, Assaad; Mahler, Tania; Miendje-Deyi, Veronique Yvette; Cadranel, Samy; Bontems, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Current commonly accepted strategies to eradicate Helicobacter pylori in children are a 10-day sequential treatment or a triple therapy for 7-14 days. To avoid further expensive and possibly risky investigations as well as induction of secondary antimicrobial resistance, a success rate of elimination strategies over 90% in a per-protocol analysis is the target goal but rates observed in clinical trials are lower. Antimicrobial resistance is a well-recognized risk factor for treatment failure; therefore, only a treatment tailored to susceptibility testing should be recommended. Adherence to therapy is also a risk factor for treatment failure but that has been poorly studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of adherence to therapy on the elimination rates obtained with different treatment regimens. Cohort study analysis of children, aged 2-17 years, treated for Helicobacter pylori infection between October 2011 and December 2013. As a routine clinical practice, children infected with a strain susceptible to clarithromycin and to metronidazole received either a sequential regimen or a 10-day triple therapy while children infected with a strain resistant to clarithromycin or metronidazole received a 10-day triple regimen tailored to antimicrobial susceptibility. The eradication rate was assessed by a negative 13 C-urea breath test performed at least 8 weeks after the end of the treatment and adherence evaluated using a diary. One hundred forty-five children (67 girls/78 boys, median age 9.7 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 118 being infected with a strain susceptible to both clarithromycin and metronidazole, 10 with a clarithromycin resistant, and 17 with a metronidazole resistant strain. A sequential regimen was prescribed in 44, a triple therapy containing clarithromycin in 84 and containing metronidazole in 17. Follow-up data were available for 130/145 and clearance of the infection observed in 105 of them. A concordance of more than

  5. MGMT and MLH1 methylation in Helicobacter pylori-infected children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Marisa C; Santos, Juliana C; Maniezzo, Nathália; Ladeira, Marcelo S; da Silva, Artur L C; Scaletsky, Isabel C A; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2013-05-28

    To evaluate the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and MLH1 and MGMT methylation and its relationship with microsatellite instability (MSI). The methylation status of the MLH1 and MGMT promoter region was analysed by methylation specific methylation-polymerase chain reaction (MSP-PCR) in gastric biopsy samples from uninfected or H. pylori-infected children (n = 50), from adults with chronic gastritis (n = 97) and from adults with gastric cancer (n = 92). MLH1 and MGMT mRNA expression were measured by real-time PCR and normalised to a constitutive gene (β actin). MSI analysis was performed by screening MSI markers at 4 loci (Bat-25, Bat-26, D17S250 and D2S123) with PCR; PCR products were analysed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by silver staining. Statistical analyses were performed with either the χ(2) test with Yates continuity correction or Fisher's exact test, and statistical significance for expression analysis was assessed using an unpaired Student's t-test. Methylation was not detected in the promoter regions of MLH1 and MGMT in gastric biopsy samples from children, regardless of H. pylori infection status. The MGMT promoter was methylated in 51% of chronic gastritis adult patients and was associated with H. pylori infection (P MLH1 methylation frequencies among H. pylori-infected and non-infected chronic gastritis adult patients were 13% and 7%, respectively. We observed methylation of the MLH1 promoter (39%) and increased MSI levels (68%) in samples from gastric cancer patients in comparison to samples from H. pylori-infected adult chronic gastritis patients (P MLH1 and MGMT mRNA were significantly reduced in chronic gastritis samples that were also hypermethylated (P MLH1 methylation did not occur in earlier-stage H. pylori infections and thus might depend on the duration of infection.

  6. Helicobacter pylori HopE and HopV porins present scarce expression among clinical isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienlaf, Maritza; Morales, Juan Pablo; Díaz, María Inés; Díaz, Rodrigo; Bruce, Elsa; Siegel, Freddy; León, Gloria; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate how widely Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) HopE and HopV porins are expressed among Chilean isolates and how seroprevalent they are among infected patients in Chile. METHODS: H. pylori hopE and hopV genes derived from strain CHCTX-1 were cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli AD494 (DE3). Gel-purified porins were used to prepare polyclonal antibodies. The presence of both genes was tested by PCR in a collection of H. pylori clinical isolates and their expression was detected in lysates by immunoblotting. Immune responses against HopE, HopV and other H. pylori antigens in sera from infected and non-infected patients were tested by Western blotting using these sera as first antibody on recombinant H. pylori antigens. RESULTS: PCR and Western blotting assays revealed that 60 and 82 out of 130 Chilean isolates carried hopE and hopV genes, respectively, but only 16 and 9, respectively, expressed these porins. IgG serum immunoreactivity evaluation of 69 H. pylori-infected patients revealed that HopE and HopV were infrequently recognized (8.7% and 10.1% respectively) compared to H. pylori VacA (68.1%) and CagA (59.5%) antigens. Similar values were detected for IgA serum immunoreactivity against HopE (11.6%) and HopV (10.5%) although lower values for VacA (42%) and CagA (17.4%) were obtained when compared to the IgG response. CONCLUSION: A scarce expression of HopE and HopV among Chilean isolates was found, in agreement with the infrequent seroconversion against these antigens when tested in infected Chilean patients. PMID:20082477

  7. Smoking increases the likelihood of Helicobacter pylori treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itskoviz, David; Boltin, Doron; Leibovitzh, Haim; Tsadok Perets, Tsachi; Comaneshter, Doron; Cohen, Arnon; Niv, Yaron; Levi, Zohar

    2017-07-01

    Data regarding the impact of smoking on the success of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication are conflicting, partially due to the fact that sociodemographic status is associated with both smoking and H. pylori treatment success. We aimed to assess the effect of smoking on H. pylori eradication rates after controlling for sociodemographic confounders. Included were subjects aged 15 years or older, with a first time positive C 13 -urea breath test (C 13 -UBT) between 2007 to 2014, who underwent a second C 13 -UBT after receiving clarithromycin-based triple therapy. Data regarding age, gender, socioeconomic status (SES), smoking (current smokers or "never smoked"), and drug use were extracted from the Clalit health maintenance organization database. Out of 120,914 subjects with a positive first time C 13 -UBT, 50,836 (42.0%) underwent a second C 13 -UBT test. After excluding former smokers, 48,130 remained who were eligible for analysis. The mean age was 44.3±18.2years, 69.2% were females, 87.8% were Jewish and 12.2% Arabs, 25.5% were current smokers. The overall eradication failure rates were 33.3%: 34.8% in current smokers and 32.8% in subjects who never smoked. In a multivariate analysis, eradication failure was positively associated with current smoking (Odds Ratio {OR} 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, psmoking was found to significantly increase the likelihood of unsuccessful first-line treatment for H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burucoa, Christophe; Axon, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    The study of Helicobacter pylori genetic variability brought us interesting data on the history of mankind. Based on multilocus sequence typing and more recently on whole-genome sequencing, paleomicrobiology still attracts the attention of global researchers in relation to its ancestor roots and coexistence with humans. Three studies determining the prevalence of virulence factors illustrates the controversial results obtained since 30 years by studies trying to associate prevalence of different virulence markers and clinical outcomes of H. pylori infection. Three articles analyzed the prevalence and risk of multiple (genetically distinct isolates) and mixed (susceptible and resistant isolates) infections. A number of studies confirm that H. pylori prevalence is falling worldwide especially in the developed world and in children but that the level of infection is higher in certain ethnic minorities and in Migrants. There is little new in identifying the mode of H. pylori transmission though intrafamilial spread appears to be important. There have, however, been some interesting papers on the presence of the organism in food, water, and the oral cavity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection. A...

  10. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  11. Clearance of labelled creatinine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberstadt, P.; Liverant, J.

    1982-01-01

    Creatinine, extensively used in clinical work to evaluate glomerular filtration rate (G.F.R.) has caused controversy. Using simultaneously on dogs a gamma emitting agent measuring G.F.R., creatinine clearance proved to be higher. Aided by quantitative determinations and compartmental analysis fortunately the respective dilution spaces can be calculated. In the majority of these animals creatinine spaces are larger but in some equal to the ones of inulin

  12. Antibiotics resistance of Helicobacter pylori in children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in Hangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaoli; Yin, Guofeng; Liu, Mingnan; Peng, Kerong; Zhao, Hong; Jiang, Mizu

    2018-03-12

    The decreasing eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori is mainly because of the progressive increase in its resistance to antibiotics. Studies on antimicrobial susceptibility of H. pylori in children are limited. This study aimed to investigate the resistance rates and patterns of H. pylori strains isolated from children. Gastric mucosa biopsy samples obtained from children who had undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were cultured for H. pylori, and susceptibility to six antibiotics (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, gentamicin, furazolidone, metronidazole, and levofloxacin) was tested from 2012-2014. A total of 545 H. pylori strains were isolated from 1390 children recruited. The total resistance rates of H. pylori to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin were 20.6%, 68.8%, and 9.0%, respectively. No resistance to amoxicillin, gentamicin, and furazolidone was detected. 56.1% strains were single resistance, 19.6% were resistant to more than one antibiotic, 16.7% for double resistance, and 2.9% for triple resistance in 413 strains against any antibiotic. And the H. pylori resistance rate increased significantly from 2012-2014. There was no significant difference in the resistance rates to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin between different gender, age groups, and patients with peptic ulcer diseases or nonulcer diseases. Antibiotic resistance was indicated in H. pylori strains isolated from children in Hangzhou, and it increased significantly during the 3 years. Our data strongly support current guidelines, which recommend antibiotic susceptibility tests prior to eradication therapy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Role of adjuvant therapy in the treatment of helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasymenko O.N.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the effect of combined probiotic containing Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium infantis, Enterococcus faecium, on H.pylori eradication efficacy in the treatment of children with chronic H.pylori- associated gastroduodenitis in the scheme of "triple" therapy of H.pylori eradication. Determination of total serum Ig M , A, G protein to Ag SagA H. pylori, breathing "Helik" test, rapid urease "Helpil" test ; that of concentration of serum sCD14 was conducted. The study group included 20 children who received standard "triple" eradication therapy for 7 days and 1 caps. of probiotic 3 times a day for 4 weeks, control group (20 children – who received only standard eradication therapy. It is shown that combined use of probiotics in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection enhances effectiveness of eradication of H.pylori. In the basis of action of probiotic strains of the drug is an anti-inflammatory effect mediated by the impact on non-specific mechanisms of innate immunity, provided by molecular mechanism responsible for induction of sCD14 synthesis.

  14. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in a country with a high occurrence of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Kitapcioglu, Gul; Kasap, Elmas

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with additional symptoms, relationship with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) of this country-wide study. METHODS Data from 3214 adults were obtained with validated questionnaire. Eight hundred and forty-one subjects were randomized to be tested for H. pylori via the urea breath test. "Frequent symptoms" were defined heartburn and/or regurgitation occurring at least weekly. RESULTS The prevalence of GERD was 22.8%, frequent and occasional heartburn were 9.3%-12.7%, regurgitation were 16.6%-18.7%, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) ≤ 18.5 showed a prevalence of 15%, BMI > 30 was 28.5%. The GERD prevalence was higher in women (26.2%) than men (18.9%) (P < 0001). Overall prevalence of H. pylori was 75.7%. The prevalence was 77.1% in subjects without symptoms vs 71.4% in subjects with GERD (χ2 = 2.6, P = 0.27). Underprivileged with the lowest income people exhibit a higher risk. CONCLUSION GERD is common in Turkey which reflects both Western and Eastern lifestyles with high rate of H. pylori. The presence of H. pylori had no effect on either the prevalence or the symptom profile of GERD. Subjects showing classical symptoms occasionally exhibit more additional symptoms compared with those without classical symptoms. PMID:28210089

  15. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and their role in peptic ulcer diseases in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, I E; Hussein, N R; Bolek, B K; Arikan, S; Salih, B A

    2010-01-01

    The role of virulence factors present in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains and the characterization of such factors being predictive of specific disease is still not clear. In this study, the cagA, vacA alleles and the recently characterized vacA i-region and dupA and their association with the severity of the disease was determined. Antral biopsies from 91patients with peptic ulcer (PU) (n = 41), gastritis (n = 48) and gastric cancer (GC) (n = 2) were analyzed for the presence of H. pylori by the CLO-test and PCR. A 79/91 (86%) patients were positive for H. pylori by either PCR or by both PCR and CLO-test. PCR-based typing of H. pylori isolates was performed on DNA extracted directly from biopsy samples. The cagA+ strains were found more likely to be associated with vacA s1 than s2. The vacA i1 allele detected in 16/23 (70%) of samples had significant association with duodenal ulcers than those 16/37 (44%) of gastritis (P dupA and duodenal ulcer. This study provided more evidence that the vacA i1 allele is one of the virulence factors of H. pylori that had significant association with severe outcome.

  16. The relationship between recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and periodontal disease and Helicobacter Pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülseren, D; Karaduman, A; Kutsal, D; Nohutcu, R M

    2016-11-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disease with unknown etiology. This cross-sectional study aimed to test the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori and periodontal disease might play an etiological role in RAS. Dental plaque samples obtained from 38 patients with RAS and 43 healthy individuals via periodontal examinations were examined for H. pylori colonization. H. pylori was identified using the rapid urease test (RUT). The periodontal status of the patients and controls was based on the following periodontal parameters: periodontal pocket depth (PPD), the plaque index (PI), the gingival index (GI), and clinical attachment loss (CAL). RUT results were positive in 34 (89.5 %) of the 38 patients and 24 (55.8 %) of the 43 controls (P = 0.002). There were not any significant differences in mean PPD, PI, GI, or CAL between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). Mean PPD, PI, GI, and CAL were higher in the RUT-positive RAS patients than in the RUT-negative patients (P > 0.05, for all). The present findings show that H. pylori might have played an etiological role in RAS and might have caused periodontal disease, but RAS was not associated with any of the periodontal parameters examined in this study. The present study indicates that H. pylori plays a role in the development of RAS, but periodontal diseases have no effect on it. Eradicating H. pylori might be useful to prevent RAS.

  17. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Batool M

    2011-03-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a common condition, affecting 25%-40% of the population. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CagA+ H. pylori and endoscopically proven gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The study group included 60 hospital patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease between 2007 and 2009 as compared with 30 healthy patients from a control group that was age and sex matched. Helicobacter pylori CagA+ was identified by an immunological test (Immunochromatography test) (ACON, USA). Helicobacter pyloriCagA+ was present in 42/60 (70%) of the patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in 11/30 (36.6%) patients in the control group (p=0.002). The Odds ratio = 0.8004 with 95% Confidence Interval = from 0.3188 to 2.0094. The relative risk=1.35 that indicates an association between Helicobacter pylori and disease. The presence of Helicobacter pylori is significantly increased in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease as compared with the control group.

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferritin...... in 1987/1988. The examination included a detailed questionnaire on medical history and lifestyle factors, a 7-day food record, and blood samples. Infection with H. pylori was measured serologically by ELISA and Westernblot. RESULTS: In total, 39.2% of 1806 persons aged 18 to 89 yr included in the study...... were H. pylori positive, of whom 57.6% had an infection with a CagA-positive H. pylori strain. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean of ferritin was 54.5 microg/dl among H. pylori-infected compared with 63.8 microg/dl among uninfected persons. A multiple linear regression model with log...

  19. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18...... prevalence of H. pylori infection was 39.2%. There was a clear inverse dose-response-relation between reported alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection. The relation persisted after control for potential confounding factors. The adjusted prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) for H. pylori infection...... among persons who consumed up to 10, 10 to 20, and more than 20 gm of alcohol per day compared with non-drinkers were 0.93 (0.77-1.13), 0.82 (0.65-1.04), and 0.71 (0.55-0.92). The inverse relation between alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection was even stronger when individuals with an indication...

  20. Investigation on psychological status and its relationship with Helicobacter pylori infection in servicemen from a Chinese army unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-jun LI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To understand the mental health status of officers and soldiers (OSs in a Chinese army unit, and analyze its relationship with Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection. Methods  Cross sectional extraction of 1293 male soldiers from a certain unit of Chinese army in September 2015, aged 17-37 years old, average age 20.5±3.2. Using the symptom self rating scale (SCL-90 to conduct a psychological evaluation, comparison between the evaluation results and the Chinese military norm was conducted to understand the mental health status of OSs in the unit. 13C-urea breath test was used to detect H.pylori infection, and the relationship between the positivity rate of various factors, the SCL-90 score and H.pylori infection were analyzed. Ninety OSs who had desire to eradicate H.pylori serves as the experimental group, and 90 H.pylori-infected OSs as control group. The experimental group received quadruple-drug eradication therapy, control group received no drug treatment. SCL-90 scores before and after the treatment were compared, and SCL-90 scores after treatment in the experimental group and those in the control group were also compared for analyzing the relationship between the OSs psychological status and H.pylori infection. Results  The SCL-90 score of the OSs was lower than the norm of Chinese army, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. The psychological screening positive rate was higher in H.pylori-positive OSs than H.pylori-negative those and the positive rates of psychological screening factors somatization, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility and paranoid were higher in H.pylori-positive OSs than in H.Pylorinegative those, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. After the eradication of H.pylori in the experimental group these factor scores were lower than those before eradication. Compared with control group SCL-90 scores, soldiers somatization, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety

  1. Helicobacter pylori: a sexually transmitted bacterium?

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriadi, Dimitra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral sex (fellatio) is a very common sexual activity. H. pylori is mainly a gastric organism, but studies have reported that infected individuals may permanently or transiently carry H. pylori in their mouth and saliva. Material and methods A Pubmed search was conducted using the words infection, oral sex and urethritis. Results The existing studies support the hypothesis that H. pylori could be a causative agent of non?gonococcal urethritis. Conclusions It is possible that H. py...

  2. Tear clearance implications for ocular surface health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Cintia Sade; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2004-03-01

    Tear clearance/turnover provides a global assessment of the function of the lacrimal functional unit and of tear exchange on the ocular surface. It is an indirect measure of dry eye induced inflammation on the ocular surface. It shows better correlation with the severity of ocular irritation symptoms and corneal epithelial disease in dry eye than the Schirmer 1 test. Delayed tear clearance may prove to be the best measure for identifying patients with tear film disorders who may respond to anti-inflammatory therapy.

  3. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection using urease rapid test in patients with bleeding duodenal ulcer: influence of endoscopic signs and simultaneous corporal and antral biopsies Diagnóstico de la infección por Helicobacter pylori mediante el test rápido de la ureasa en pacientes con hemorragia por úlcera duodenal: influencia de los signos endoscópicos de sangrado y de la obtención simultánea de biopsias de cuerpo y antro gástrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castro Fernández

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the sensitivity of invasive diagnostic methods for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, particularly of urease rapid test, is decreased in cases of gastroduodenal ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Objectives: to assess the influence of blood in the stomach or recent bleeding endoscopic signs in the diagnostic sensitivity of urease rapid test among patients with bleeding duodenal ulcer, as well as the influence of simultaneously collected corporal and antral biopsy samples. Patients and methods: 120 patients, 85 male and 35 female, with an average age of 62 (18-88 years, who were admitted to our Hospital due to bleeding duodenal ulcer and who received an endoscopic diagnosis within 24 hours of admission were included. None of the patients had been under treatment with non-steroideal antiinflammatory drugs, proton-pump inhibitors or antimicrobial drugs in the two weeks prior to the bleeding event, and none had received eradicating therapy for H. pylori. In this group of selected patients an H. pylori infection rate nearing 100% was assumed. H. pylori infection was ruled out using antral biopsy (69 cases or both antral and fundic biopsies (51 cases for urease rapid testing (Jatrox®-H.p.-Test. Patients were classified in three groups according to their endoscopic bleeding signs: a presence of blood in the stomach or recent bleeding ulcer (21 cases; b ulcer showing non-recent bleeding signs (38 cases; and c ulcer without bleeding signs (61 cases. The sensitivity of the urease rapid test was compared between patient groups. Similarly, urease test results with an antral biopsy sample were compared in 100 patients with non-bleeding duodenal ulcer. Results: urease test was positive in 93% of patients with non-bleeding duodenal ulcer, and in 83% of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, which reached statistical significance (p = 0.019. This test was positive in 82.6% of patients with an antral biopsy, and in 82.3% of

  4. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  5. Helicobacter Pylori Seropostivity of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tugba Kos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Until now many researches have showed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be etiological factor of colorectal cancer. The aim of current study was to investigate the frequency of H.pylori infection seropositivity of colorectal cancer patients and compare the clinicopathological features of H.pylori positive patients with negative ones. Material and Method: Seventy four colorectal patients were included in study. Retrospectively, patients clinical features, surgery history and pathological characteristics were screened. Patients group serum samples were collected. H.pylori Ig G level were quantitatively measured with ELISA method and levels above 5 arbU/ml were accepted as seropositive. Results: Patients median age was 60.5 ( range 26-83 and 56.8% (n=42 were male. H.pylori Ig G was positive in 37.8% (n=28 and negative in 62.2% (n=46 of patient group. H.pylori serpositive and negative patients median age of diagnosis were 56 and 64 respectively (p=0.01. There were no significant difference between H.pylori seropositive group when compared with negative group according to age, level of CEA and Ca 19-9, stage, lymph node involvement, perineural and vascular invasion, presence of polyps, differantion, localisation of tumours. Discussion: H.pylori seropositive patients were diagnosed at younger age. Association of this finding with etiology was confusing. Further studies with healthy controls may provide detailed information about whether H.pylori seropositivity is associated with colorectal cancer etiology.

  6. Punctual mutations in 23S rRNA gene of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori in Colombian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Andrés Jenuer; Zambrano, Diana Carolina; Pazos, Alvaro Jairo

    2018-04-14

    To characterize punctual mutations in 23S rRNA gene of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) and determine their association with therapeutic failure. PCR products of 23S rRNA gene V domain of 74 H. pylori isolates; 34 resistant to clarithromycin (29 from a low-risk gastric cancer (GC) population: Tumaco-Colombia, and 5 from a high-risk population: Tuquerres-Colombia) and 40 from a susceptible population (28 from Tumaco and 12 from Túquerres) were sequenced using capillary electrophoresis. The concordance between mutations of V domain 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori and therapeutic failure was determined using the Kappa coefficient and McNemar's test was performed to determine the relationship between H. pylori mutations and clarithromycin resistance. 23S rRNA gene from H. pylori was amplified in 56/74 isolates, of which 25 were resistant to clarithromycin (20 from Tumaco and 5 from Túquerres, respectively). In 17 resistant isolates (13 from Tumaco and 4 from Túquerres) the following mutations were found: A1593T1, A1653G2, C1770T, C1954T1, and G1827C in isolates from Tumaco, and A2144G from Túquerres. The mutations T2183C, A2144G and C2196T in H. pylori isolates resistant to clarithromycin from Colombia are reported for the first time. No association between the H. pylori mutations and in vitro clarithromycin resistance was found. However, therapeutic failure of eradication treatment was associated with mutations of 23S rRNA gene in clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori ( κ = 0.71). The therapeutic failure of eradication treatment in the two populations from Colombia was associated with mutations of the 23S rRNA gene in clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori .

  7. Recurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Bolivian children and adults after a population-based "screen and treat" strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalasingam, Sumathi; Rajasingham, Anu; Macy, Jonathan T; Friedman, Cindy R; Hoekstra, Robert M; Ayers, Tracy; Gold, Benjamin; Quick, Robert E

    2014-10-01

    Strategies to prevent gastric cancer by decreasing Helicobacter pylori infections in high-prevalence, low-income countries could include a population-based "screen and treat" eradication program. We tested residents of two rural villages for H. pylori infection using urea breath test (UBT), treated infected persons using directly observed therapy (DOT), retested for cure, and retested after 1 year later for H. pylori infection. We tested 1,065 (92%) of 1153 residents from two villages in rural Bolivia. Baseline H. pylori prevalence was 80% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78-84). Age-specific cure rates were similar (≥92%) after DOT. Among those cured, 12% (95% CI: 8-15) had recurrent infection. Age-specific annual H. pylori recurrence rates for combined villages were 20% (95% CI: 10-29) in persons pylori recurrence rates following a population-based screen and treat program; this H. pylori eradication strategy may not be feasible in high-prevalence, low-income settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Lon protease affects the RdxA nitroreductase activity and metronidazole susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, I-Fan; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Yang, Feng-Ling; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    The lon gene of Helicobacter pylori strains is constitutively expressed during growth. However, virtually nothing is understood concerning the role of Lon in H. pylori. This study examined the function and physiological role of Lon in H. pylori (HpLon) using a trapping approach to identify putative Lon binding partners in the bacterium. Protease-deficient Lon was expressed and served as the bait in trapping approach to capture the interacting partners in H. pylori. The antibiotic susceptibility of wild-type and lon derivative mutants was determined by the E test trips and the disc diffusion assay. The effect of HpLon on RdxA activity was detected the change in NADPH oxidation and metronidazole reduction by spectrophotometer. Lon in Helicobacter pylori (HpLon) interacting partners are mostly associated with metronidazole activation. lon mutant presents more susceptible to metronidazole than that of the wild type, and this phenotype is recovered by complementation of the wild-type Lon. We found that the ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities (AAA(+) ) module of HpLon causes a decrease in both NADPH oxidase and Mtz reductase activity in RdxA, a major Mtz-activating enzyme in H. pylori. Metronidazole resistance of H. pylori causes the serious medical problem worldwide. In this study, HpLon is involved in metronidazole susceptibility among H. pylori strains. We provide the evidence that HpLon alters RdxA activity in vitro. The decrease in metronidazole activation caused by HpLon is possibly prior to accumulate mutation in rdxA gene before the metronidazole-resistant strains to be occurred. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of eating habits in dyspeptic patients with or without Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Mohsen; Karbasi, Ashraf; Khedmat, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection varies in different societies and geographical locations. This is attributed to socioeconomic status, life style, family density and other factors. There is also a possibility of an association between eating habits and the prevalence of H. pylori infection. In this study, we examine the association between H. pylori infection and particular eating habits such as sharing plates, glasses and spoons. This cross-sectional study was performed via a questionnaire-based evaluation of all patients with dyspepsia who underwent endoscopic assessment. Data including demographic information, endoscopic findings, H. pylori status and sharing of dishes within families were recorded. Individuals with a history of 3-day antibiotic treatment in the past month, or use of proton pump inhibitors in the past two weeks, or regular use of H2-blockers during the past week were excluded. The H. pylori status was determined using the rapid urease test. Of the 225 participants who had filled in the questionnaire, 204 were eligible; 92 were male (45.1%) and 112 female (54.9%) with 22% younger than 30 years of age, 49% between 30 and 50 years and 29% older than 50. In families where common dishes were used, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher. (77% vs. 53%, p = 0.001) Factors such as age, sex, and education proved to be irrelevant. The results suggest a strong link between H. pylori infection and eating habits, thereby raising the possibility that modification of these habits might limit H. pylori infection.

  10. Potential Association of IL1B Polymorphism With Iron Deficiency Risk in Childhood Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Ta; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2018-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection occurs predominantly in childhood. Host immune response gene polymorphism is reported to affect the susceptibility to H pylori infection and the outcome of H pylori-related gastric cancer. Not all H pylori-infected patients, however, exhibit iron deficiency (ID). The relationship between host genetic polymorphisms and ID mediated by H pylori infection is not well understood. Subjects (n = 644) from the general population of age 10 to 18 years were divided into 2 groups based on serology testing for anti-H pylori IgG: seropositive study group; and seronegative control group. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL1B (rs1143627 and rs16944), IL8 (rs4073), IL10 (rs1800896), and ABO (rs505922), were genotyped and the iron status of the 2 groups was compared. The seroprevalence rate for H pylori was 10.7% in this study. Infected subjects were significantly older and had lower serum iron levels than uninfected subjects (P = 0.0195 and 0.0059, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed a significantly higher frequency of the T allele of rs505922 (odds ratio [OR] = 6.128; P < 0.001) and lower frequency of the T allele of rs1143627 (OR = 0.846; P = 0.014) in seropositive subjects. Among 59 seropositive subjects, the T allele frequency of rs1143627 was significantly higher in those with ID (OR = 3.156; P = 0.043), compared with those without ID. ABO (rs505922) and IL1B (rs1143627) may affect H pylori infection susceptibility, and IL1B (rs1143627) may also influence ID risk in infected children.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection, serum pepsinogens, and pediatric abdominal pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Eias; Naamna, Medhat; Mawassy, Kadri; Beer-Davidson, Gany; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-08-01

    The significance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains poorly recognized. We examined associations of H. pylori infection and serum pepsinogens (PGs), as non-invasive markers of gastritis, with pediatric abdominal pain. A case-control study was conducted among 99 children aged 5-17 years admitted to one hospital for abdominal pain (cases) without an apparent organic reason. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, sera were tested and compared with 179 controls for anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and PGI and PGII levels. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounders. H. pylori IgG sero-positivity was 34.3 and 36.3% in cases and controls, respectively, P = 0.7. H. pylori-infected children had higher median PGI and PGII levels and a lower PGI/PGII ratio than uninfected children. Cases infected with H. pylori had a higher median PGII level (P < 0.001) and lower PGI/PGII ratio (P = 0.036) than controls infected with H. pylori. The percentage of cases with PGII ≥7.5 μg/L, as indication for antral inflammation, was higher than in controls: 58.6 versus 44.7%, P = 0.027. Children with PGII levels ≥7.5 μg/L had increased risk for abdominal pain: adjusted prevalence ratio 1.73 [95% confidence intervals 1.02, 2.93], P = 0.039. Children with increased serum PGII levels, as an indication of gastritis, are more likely to have abdominal pain. Serum PGs can be a useful non-invasive marker for gastritis, in evaluating children with severe abdominal pain with no apparent organic reason. What is Known: • The significance of Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains debated. • Serum pepsinogens (PGs), non-invasive markers of gastric inflammation, were rarely utilized in assessing the association between H. pylori in pediatric abdominal pain of unknown origin. What is New: • High serum PGII level, as an indication of gastritis, rather than H. pylori

  12. Effect of Helicobacter Pylori Treatment on the Number and Intensity of Migraine Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Bakhshipour

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a common headache with an unknown cause. Migraine is about three times more common in women (18.2% than in men (6.2%. The recent studies have posed the possible relationship between the Helicobacter pylori infection and migraine headache. This study tries to analyze the effect of treating H. pylori infection on number and severity of migraine attacks.Materials and Methods: In this clinical pilot study, a number of 60 patients with migraine were examined in terms of infecting with H. pylori. Patients with the infections were treated by H. pylori eradication treatment standard triple regimen and the frequency and severity of their migraine attacks were measured for three months and finally the average of frequency and severity of attacks before and after treatment were compared. Results: The average frequency of the migraine attacks in patients with the H.pylori infection who have been treated was 7.1 before treatment and 2.7 after treatment (p=0.001. Likewise, the severity rate of such attacks in such patients was 9 which decreased to 4.5 after treatment (p=0.002. Conclusion: According to our study, patients with migraine attacks are preferred to be examined tested in terms of infecting with H. pylori. Thus, and eradication of this infection can be effective in decreasing of the migraine attacks.

  13. Meta-analysis: Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with Parkinson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Yang, Huazhen; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Jiang, Hong

    2017-10-01

    The results from observational studies on the relationship between helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and Parkinson's disease remain controversial. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between helicobacter pylori infection and Parkinson's disease. A comprehensive literature search was performed on relevant studies published from January 1983 to January 2017 in PubMed, Web of Science and EMBASE databases. The fixed or random effects model was used to pool the odds ratio with 95% confidence interval from individual studies. Publication bias was estimated by Egger's test and the funnel plot. Eight eligible studies involving 33 125 participants were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with the no helicobacter pylori infected person, the pooled odds ratio of Parkinson's disease in helicobacter pylori infected person was 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.37-1.85). In subgroup analyzes, the combined odds ratios were 1.96 (1.23-3.12) in Asia, 1.55 (1.32-1.82) in Europe, 1.59 (1.35-1.88) in case-control studies, 1.56 (1.01-2.39) in cross-sectional studies, 1.56 (1.32-1.85) in studies with confounders adjusted, and 1.71 (1.21-2.43) in studies with no confounder adjusted, respectively. This meta-analysis indicated that H. pylori infection might be associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Resistance pattern of Helicobacter pylori strains to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Khademi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori resistance to antibiotics has become a global problem and is an important factor in determining the outcome of treatment of infected patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin in gastrointestinal disorders patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, a total of 260 gastric antrum biopsy specimens were collected from patients with gastrointestinal disorders who referred to Endoscopy Section of the Isfahan Hospitals. The E-test and Modified Disk Diffusion Method (MDDM were used to verify the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in 78 H. pylori isolates to the clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. Results: H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and amoxicillin were 15.3, 55.1, and 6.4%, respectively. In this studyΈ we had one multidrug resistance (MDR isolates from patient with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Conclusion: Information on antibiotic susceptibility profile plays an important role in empiric antibiotic treatment and management of refractive cases. According to the results obtained in this study, H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole was relatively high. MDR strains are emerging and will have an effect on the combination therapy.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum leptin, obestatin, and ghrelin levels in Mexican schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-González, Carolina; Mendoza, Eugenia; Mera, Robertino M; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Chico-Aldama, Patricia; Gomez-Diaz, Rita; Duque, Ximena

    2017-10-01

    BackgroundThere is little information about the possible role of Helicobacter pylori infection on appetite-regulating peptides in children. This study evaluated the association between H. pylori infection and serum levels of ghrelin, leptin, and obestatin in schoolchildren.MethodsOne hundred seventy-eight schoolchildren, students at boarding schools in Mexico City, participated. H. pylori infection status was determined every 6 months for 1 year by a breath test using 13 C-urea; schoolchildren with consistently positive or negative results were selected to participate. Age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) were recorded. Serum concentrations of total ghrelin, leptin, and obestatin via specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were determined.ResultsSchoolchildren with H. pylori infection had lower concentration of leptin, -0.54 pg/ml (95% CI: -0.98 to -0.09), compared to the schoolchildren without infection, after adjustment by age, gender, and BMI. And the children with the infection had a median of obestatin lower in 0.99 ng/ml (95% CI: -1.93 to -0.06) compared with the uninfected children after adjustment by BMI.ConclusionAssociation was found between H. pylori infection and decreased serum concentrations of leptin and obestatin. These results suggest that in schoolchildren, H. pylori infection affects the levels of hormones implicated in regulating appetite and energy homeostasis.

  16. Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment does not benefit patients with nonulcer dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, F; Gonvers, J J; Wietlisbach, V; Burnand, B; Hildebrand, P; Schneider, C; Saraga, E; Beglinger, C; Vader, J P

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the still controversial role of treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with nonulcer dyspepsia. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial comparing the efficacy of 7 days of eradication treatment (lansoprazole 15 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin I g b.i.d., and clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.) with a control treatment (lansoprazole 15 mg b.i.d. and placebo) in H. pylori-infected patients with nonulcer dyspepsia. 13C breath tests were performed at baseline and during follow-up. We assessed patient symptoms, health status (based on the SF-12 questionnaire), patient satisfaction, drug consumption, health care consultation behavior, and absenteeism related to dyspepsia over a 1-yr period. A total of 74 patients randomized to eradication treatment and 70 patients randomized to placebo were compared. The rate of eradication of H. pylori infection was 75% in the active treatment group and 4% in the placebo group (p absenteeism or satisfaction with management of NUD. Patients receiving active treatment were more likely not to have had to use any dyspepsia treatment over the 12 months (60.8% vs 44.3%; p = 0.047). This study did not demonstrate any substantial benefit of curing H. pylori infection in patients with nonulcer dyspepsia. The study adds further evidence that H. pylori is not the main pathogenetic or therapeutic target in these patients.

  17. Helicobacter pylori determination in non-municipal drinking water and epidemiological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumbiegel, Peter; Lehmann, Irina; Alfreider, Albin; Fritz, Gisela J; Boeckler, David; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Richter, Matthias; Jorks, Siegfried; Müller, Lutz; Richter, Mattias W; Herbarth, Olf

    2004-03-01

    Studies conducted in Europe as well as in North and South America have tried to link Helicobacter pylori colonization with the drinking water supply, especially since H. pylori is known to survive quite well in water. In 2000, a cohort of 1884 grade-two children from two rural counties surrounding the city of Leipzig, Germany (77.4% of the 1991/1992 birth cohort) were tested for H. pylori colonization using the [13C]urea breath test. A parent-completed questionnaire elicited details on living conditions and lifestyle habits including questions on the children's drinking water from sources other than public water supplies, swimming in natural waters, etc. In a second independent study, samples of well water, taken from 157 private wells still used in the two counties, were being tested for the presence of H. pylori, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to determine relevant target DNA fragments of H. pylori. In county I, 5.7% of the children and in county II 6.6% tested H. pylori-positive. Cluster analyses of the questionnaire data in both counties pointed to 'drinking water from other than municipal sources', as the closest H. pylori-associated cluster variable. The cluster estimations were supported by odds ratio (OR) calculations with an OR=16.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.1,...,88.5) for county I and OR=4.0 (95% CI 1.3,...,12.4) for county II. The PCR analyses showed H. pylori DNA fragments in 10.8% of the wells in county I and 9.2% in county II. The detection limit was set at 10 DNA copies corresponding to 125 bacteria/L, the average infestation of these wells was 931 bacteria/L. Despite the fact that the microbiological and epidemiological data do not correspond except that both studies were conducted in the same geographical areas, the independent findings of H. pylori in well water in the same general areas where children do seem to drink water other than from the public water supply suggests that water may be an important source of H. pylori

  18. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the Approach to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents – an Evidence-Based Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L Jones

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H pylori infection; H pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two

  19. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the approach to Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents--an evidence-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Billy; Ceponis, Peter; Chiba, Naoki; Czinn, Steve; Ferraro, Richard; Fischbach, Lori; Gold, Ben; Hyunh, Hien; Jacobson, Kevan; Jones, Nicola L; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lebel, Sylvie; Moayyedi, Paul; Ridell, Robert; Sherman, Philip; van Zanten, Sander; Beck, Ivan; Best, Linda; Boland, Margaret; Bursey, Ford; Chaun, Hugh; Cooper, Geraldine; Craig, Brian; Creuzenet, Carole; Critch, Jeffrey; Govender, Krishnasamy; Hassall, Eric; Kaplan, Alan; Keelan, Monica; Noad, Garth; Robertson, Marli; Smith, Lesley; Stein, Markus; Taylor, Diane; Walters, Thomas; Persaud, Robin; Whitaker, Scott; Woodland, Robert

    2005-07-01

    As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H. pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H. pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H. pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H. pylori infection; H. pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H. pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H. pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H. pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H. pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H. pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H. pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two antibiotics

  20. Correlation of CYP2C19 Genetic Polymorphisms With Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients With Cirrhosis and Peptic Ulcer

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    Chii-Shyan Lay

    2010-04-01

    Conclusion: The results of the genotyping test for CYP2C19 seem to predict cure of H. pylori infection and peptic ulcer in patients with cirrhosis who receive triple therapy with rabeprazole, amoxicillin, and clarithromycin.

  1. Immune response to H pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Giovanni; Reyes, Victor E; Beswick, Ellen J

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer, attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium. PMID:17007009

  2. Clinical characteristics of Helicobacter pylori-negative drug-negative peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo Chul; Jeon, Eun Jung; Kim, Dae Bum; Sung, Hea Jung; Kim, Yeon-Ji; Lim, Eun Sun; Kim, Min-Ah; Oh, Jung Hwan

    2015-07-28

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of idiopathic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-negative and drug-negative] peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). A consecutive series of patients who experienced PUB between 2006 and 2012 was retrospectively analyzed. A total of 232 patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into four groups according to the etiologies of PUB: idiopathic, H. pylori-associated, drug-induced and combined (H. pylori-associated and drug-induced) types. We compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes between the groups. When the silver stain or rapid urease tests were H. pylori-negative, we obtained an additional biopsy specimen by endoscopic re-examination and performed an H. pylori antibody test 6-8 wk after the initial endoscopic examination. For a diagnosis of idiopathic PUB, a negative result of an H. pylori antibody test was confirmed. In all cases, re-bleeding was confirmed by endoscopic examination. For the risk assessment, the Blatchford and the Rockall scores were calculated for all patients. For PUB, the frequency of H. pylori infection was 59.5% (138/232), whereas the frequency of idiopathic cases was 8.6% (20/232). When idiopathic PUB was compared to H. pylori-associated PUB, the idiopathic PUB group showed a higher rate of re-bleeding after initial hemostasis during the hospital stay (30% vs 7.4%, P = 0.02). When idiopathic PUB was compared to drug-induced PUB, the patients in the idiopathic PUB group showed a higher rate of re-bleeding after initial hemostasis upon admission (30% vs 2.7%, P ulcer (77% vs 49%, P < 0.01). However, the Blatchford and the Rockall scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Among the patients who experienced drug-induced PUB, no significant differences were found with respect to clinical characteristics, irrespective of H. pylori infection. Idiopathic PUB has unique clinical characteristics such as re-bleeding after initial hemostasis upon admission

  3. Sensitivity of Amoxicillin-Resistant Helicobacter pylori to Other Penicillins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Maria P.; Graham, David Y.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.; Realdi, Giuseppe; Osato, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivities to penicillins and to a penicillin and β-lactamase inhibitor combination agent were determined for Helicobacter pylori strains that were sensitive, moderately resistant, or highly resistant to amoxicillin. All strains were resistant to nafcillin and oxacillin. Moderately resistant strains showed an intermediate zone of inhibition to ticarcillin, mezlocillin, piperacillin, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. High-level resistance was associated with the smallest zone size for all penicillins tested. PMID:10390249

  4. Nationwide survey of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Gumnarai, Pornpen; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Mahachai, Varocha

    2013-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to survey the antibiotic-resistant pattern of Helicobacter pylori infection in different geographical locations in Thailand and to determine factors associated with antibiotic resistance. Dyspeptic patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy from the Northern, Northeastern, Central, and Southern regions of Thailand between January 2004 and December 2012 were enrolled in this study. Two antral gastric biopsies were obtained for culture; susceptibility tests were performed using E-test. A total of 3964 were enrolled, and 1350 patients (34.1%) were infected with H. pylori as identified by rapid urease test. Cultures were positive in 619 isolates. E-test for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and tetracycline were successful in 400 isolates and for levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in 208 isolates. Antibiotic resistance was present in 50.3% including amoxicillin 5.2%, tetracycline 1.7%, clarithromycin 3.7%, metronidazole 36%, ciprofloxacin 7.7%, levofloxacin 7.2%, and multi-drugs in 4.2%. Clarithromycin resistance was significantly more common in those older than 40 years (i.e., 100% versus 0%; P = 0.04). The prevalence of metronidazole resistant in Southern Thailand was significantly higher than in the Northeastern region (66.7% versus 33.3% P = 0.04). Metronidazole resistance remains the most common antibiotic resistant type of H. pylori in Thailand. The pattern of H. pylori antibiotic resistance over 9 years demonstrated a fall in clarithromycin resistance such that currently age >40 years is a predictor for clarithromycin resistance in Thailand. Quinolone resistance is a growing problem. © 2013.

  5. Evaluation of diagnostic methods for the detection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsy specimens of dyspeptic patients

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    Ivy Bastos Ramis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infects nearly 50% of the world's population. This microorganism is accepted as the most important agent of gastritis and as a risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. Currently many diagnostic methods exist for detecting H. pylori, however they all have limitations, thus it is recommend a combination of at least two methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate diagnostic methods, such as in-house urease test, culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, for the detection of the H. pylori in gastric biopsy specimens of 144 dyspeptic patients, using as gold standard the association between histology and rapid urease test. According to the gold standard used in this study, 48 (33.3% patients were infected with H. pylori, while 96 (66.7% were classified as not infected. The in-house urease test and the PCR were the most sensitive methods (100%, followed by culture (85.4%. However, the in-house urease test and the culture were the most specific (100%, followed by PCR (75%. In conclusion, this study showed that, in comparison with the combination of histology and rapid urease test, the in-house urease test and the PCR presented 100% of sensitivity in the diagnosis of gastric infection by H. pylori, while the in-house urease test and the culture reached 100% of specificity. These finding suggest that the combination of two or more methods may improve the accuracy of the H. pylori detection.

  6. CONVENTIONAL VIDEOENDOSCOPY CAN IDENTIFY HELICOBACTER PYLORI GASTRITIS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alexandre; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Prestes, Manoel Alberto; Costa, Maiza da Silva; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski; Ramos, Gabriela Piovezani

    2016-01-01

    Studies with latest technologies such as endoscopy with magnification and chromoendoscopy showed that various endoscopic aspects are clearly related to infection by Helicobacter pylori (HP). The description of different patterns of erythema in gastric body under magnification of images revived interest in identifying these patterns by standard endoscopy. To validate the morphologic features of gastric mucosa related to H. pylori infection gastritis allowing predictability of their diagnosis as well as proper targeting biopsies. Prospective study of 339 consecutive patients with the standard videoendoscope image analysis were obtained, recorded and stored in a program database. These images were studied with respect to the presence or absence of H. pylori, diagnosed by rapid urease test and/or by histological analysis. Were studied: a) normal mucosa appearance; b) mucosal nodularity; c) diffuse nonspecific erythema or redness (with or without edema of folds and exudate) of antrum and body; d) mosaic pattern with focal area of hyperemia; e) erythema in streaks or bands (red streak); f) elevated (raised) erosion; g) flat erosions; h) fundic gland polyps. The main exclusion criteria were the use of drugs, HP pre-treatment and other entities that could affect results. Applying the exclusion criteria, were included 170 of the 339 patients, of which 52 (30.58%) were positive for HP and 118 negative. On the positive findings, the most associated with infection were: nodularity in the antrum (26.92%); presence of raised erosion (15.38%) and mosaic mucosa in the body (21.15%). On the negative group the normal appearance of the mucosa was 66.94%; erythema in streaks or bands in 9.32%; flat erosions 11.86%; and fundic gland polyps 11.86%. Endoscopic findings are useful in the predictability of the result and in directing biopsies. The most representative form of HP related gastritis was the nodularity of the antral mucosa. The raised erosion and mucosa in mosaic in the body

  7. Magnitude of Helicobacter pylori among Dyspeptic patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection is predominantly acquired in childhood from family members. The infection can cause dypepepsia, chronic and acute gastritis and gastric cancer. Dyspepsia is the most common illness in the Ethiopian population visiting outpatient department of health facilities, and it has ...

  8. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was seen. Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is significantly high in rural and suburban population of Ernakulam district, Kerala. Early detection and prompt treatment are essential for prevention of serious complications. Keywords: Gastrointestinal complications, Helicobacter pylori infection, Histopathological ...

  9. Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection | Jemilohun | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review aims at outlining the various diagnostic and therapeutic options available to the clinician in the management of H. pylori infection with an appraisal of their strength and weaknesses. Relevant literatures on diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection in texts and journals were reviewed. Extensive internet ...

  10. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study assessed the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori antibodies among Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It also examines whether anti H. pylori seroprevalence was associated with the severity of the HIV infection or the antiretroviral treatment. Material and Methods: ...

  11. Helicobacter pylori and upper digestive diseases - diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients with various upper gastrointestinal problems was 84.7%. The use of medication that can reduce the H. pylori density was common among the infected patients, as history of antibiotics use, acid suppressant use and medications for eradication treatment were ...

  12. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces...

  13. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takahisa; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    It is well known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with many nonmalignant disorders such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric polyp, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin-induced gastric injury, and functional dyspepsia. In 2008, interesting articles on the association of H. pylori infection with these disorders were presented, some of which intended to reveal the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in response to H. pylori infection, and have demonstrated that genetic differences in host and bacterial factors as well as environmental factors account for these differences. A decline in the occurrence of peptic ulcer related to H. pylori was confirmed. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and GERD was also confirmed but the impact of gastric atrophy on the prevention of GERD remained debatable. For NSAID-induced gastric injury, eradication of H. pylori infection has been recommended. During this year, eradication of H. pylori infection was recommended for patients treated with antiplatelet therapy as well as aspirin and NSAID. It was also reported that for patients with functional dyspepsia, eradication of H. pylori offers a modest but significant benefit.

  14. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L. Cover

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI. Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed.

  15. Geographic pathology of Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yi; Ponsioen, Cyriel I. J.; Xiao, Shu-Dong; Tytgat, Guido N. J.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Background and aim. Helicobacter pylori is etiologically associated with gastritis and gastric cancer. There are significant geographical differences between the clinical manifestation of H. pylori infections. The aim of this study was to compare gastric mucosal histology in relation to age among H.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Clearance in Alzheimer Disease Measured with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Mony J; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tsui, Wai H; Saint-Louis, Les A; Glodzik, Lidia; Osorio, Ricardo S; Fortea, Juan; Butler, Tracy; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Fossati, Silvia; Kim, Hee-Jin; Carare, Roxana O; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-09-01

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribriform plate, human CSF clearance pathways are not well characterized. Dynamic PET with 18 F-THK5117, a tracer for tau pathology, was used to estimate the ventricular CSF time-activity as a biomarker for CSF clearance. We tested 3 hypotheses: extracranial CSF is detected at the superior turbinates; CSF clearance is reduced in AD; and CSF clearance is inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Methods: Fifteen subjects, 8 with AD and 7 normal control volunteers, were examined with 18 F-THK5117. Ten subjects additionally underwent 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B ( 11 C-PiB) PET scanning, and 8 were 11 C-PiB-positive. Ventricular time-activity curves of 18 F-THK5117 were used to identify highly correlated time-activity curves from extracranial voxels. Results: For all subjects, the greatest density of CSF-positive extracranial voxels was in the nasal turbinates. Tracer concentration analyses validated the superior nasal turbinate CSF signal intensity. AD patients showed ventricular tracer clearance reduced by 23% and 66% fewer superior turbinate CSF egress sites. Ventricular CSF clearance was inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Conclusion: The human nasal turbinate is part of the CSF clearance system. Lateral ventricle and superior nasal turbinate CSF clearance abnormalities are found in AD. Ventricular CSF clearance reductions are associated with increased brain amyloid depositions. These data suggest that PET-measured CSF clearance is a biomarker of potential interest in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  17. Primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains among adults and children in a tertiary referral centre in Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dargiene, Gintare; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Jonaitis, Laimas

    2018-01-01

    The study evaluated primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori within the period 2013-2015 and trends of antibiotic consumption over the last decade in Lithuania; 242 adults and 55 children were included in the study. E-tests were performed for amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin......, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. The presence of H. pylori and clarithromycin resistance was additionally tested by PCR. Helicobacter pylori culture was positive in 67 of 242 (28%) adult and in 12 of 55 (21.8%) children samples. Resistance rates among adults by E-tests were as follows: metronidazole......, while it has doubled from 1.10 to 2.22 DDD/1000/children/day in children within 2003-2015. There are no significant changes in the susceptibility of H. pylori to the most widely used antibiotics in adults over the last years in Lithuania; however, clarithromycin resistance among children exceeds 15...

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukurije Zhubi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay test for H. pylori IgG with Biomerieux HPY-VIDAS.Results: The frequency of IgG antibody for H. pylori among healthy blood donors is 56.9%, there is not found any difference between voluntary and non-voluntary blood donors (57.4% respectively 56.3%(OR=1.05; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.43; p=0.8. H pylori IgG antibodies positive are detected in 57.0 % ( 126 of 221 of women, compared with 56.9 % ( 256 of 450 of men(OR=0.99; 95% CI 0.72 to 1.38; p=0.96. Serpositive donors are older than seronegative ones (31.9 years, respectively 29.5 years, p=0.02. Mean value of IgG antibody of H. pylori is 3.61 with no significant difference between males and females (3.72 respectively 3.44; p=0.2. The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection is similar among blood groups: O (57.4%, A (56.2%, B (59.6%, AB (51.4%, RhD positive (56.7% and RhD negative (58.3%.Conclusions: The seropositivity of H. pylori is moderately higher in the non voluntary and familiar blood donors among the total Kosovo blood donors. There is not found a significant relationship between infection with H. pylori and ABO/Rhesus blood group among blood donors.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with failure to thrive: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu NC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nan-Chang Chiu,1,2,* Chien-Yu Lin,3,* Hsin Chi,1 Chun-Yan Yeung,1,2 Wei-Hsin Ting,1 Wai-Tao Chan,1 Chuen-Bin Jiang,1 Sung-Tse Li,3,4 Chao-Hsu Lin,3 Hung-Chang Lee1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, MacKay Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Medicine, MacKay Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Taipei, 3Department of Pediatrics, Hsinchu MacKay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu City, 4Department of Statistics and Information Science, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The long-term impact of Helicobacter pylori infection is complex, and concerns about the need for eradication exist. We conducted this case control study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and failure to thrive (FTT.Patients and methods: From January 2009 to December 2011, 53 children with FTT group and matched children with the same sex and age and similar socioeconomic status without FTT (control group were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered to the parents/guardian, and a 13C-urea breath test was performed to detect H. pylori infection.Results: We found that the total prevalence of H. pylori infection was 29.2% and that there was no association between FTT and H. pylori infection (FTT group: 32%; control group: 26.4%; P=0.67. Short stature was more common in the FTT group and abdominal pain in the control group (FTT group: 37.7%; control group: 11.3%; P=0.003. In a comparison between the H. pylori-positive and -negative groups, abdominal pain (87.1% vs 64%; P=0.032 and the frequency of endoscopy (74.2% vs 32%; P<0.001 were significantly more common in the H. pylori-positive group.Conclusion: We found that children with H. pylori infection are at an increased risk for abdominal pain and that FTT is not associated with H. pylori infection. The decision for eradication should be evaluated carefully and individualized. Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, 13C-urea breath test, failure

  20. Current knowledge on alleviating Helicobacter pylori infections through the use of some commonly known natural products: bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliga Raman Murali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium, has been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization and recognized as the causative agent for peptic ulcers, duodenal ulcer, gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas, and gastric cancer. Owing to their alarming rate of drug resistance, eradication of H. pylori remains a global challenge. Triple therapy consisting of a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and either amoxicillin or metronidazole, is generally the recommended standard for the treatment of H. pylori infection. Complementary and alternative medicines have a long history in the treatment of gastrointestinal ailments and various compounds has been tested for anti-H. pylori activity both in vitro and in vivo; however, their successful use in human clinical trials is sporadic. Hence, the aim of this review is to analyze the role of some well-known natural products that have been tested in clinical trials in preventing, altering, or treating H. pylori infections. Whereas some in vitro and in vivo studies in the literature have demonstrated the successful use of a few potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections, others indicate a need to consider natural products, with or without triple therapy, as a useful alternative in treating H. pylori-related infections. Thus, the reported mechanisms include killing of H. pylori urease inhibition, induction of bacterial cell damage, and immunomodulatory effect on the host immune system. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the successful use of some potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections. Nevertheless, the routine prescription of potential complementary and alternative medicines continues to be restrained, and evidence on the safety and efficacy of the active compounds remains a subject of ongoing debate.

  1. Helicobacter Pylori Associated Antral Gastritis in Peptic Ulcer Disease Patients and Normal Healthy Population of Kashmir, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, G. M.; Bhat, M. Youssuf; rather, Ab. Rashid; Basu, Javaid Ahmad; Qureshi, Khursheed Ahmad

    1998-01-01

    Aim: To study the association of Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic antral gastritis in peptic ulcer disease patients and healthy population of Kashmir. Methods: 50 peptic ulcer patients (duodenal ulcer = 46, gastric ulcer = 2 and combined duodenal and gastric ulcer = 2) and 30 asymptomatic healthy volunteers were included in this study. Peptic ulcer was diagnosed on endoscopic examination. 4–6 punch biopsies were taken from gastric antrum in all the individuals and in case of gastric ulcer an additional biopsy was taken from the edge of the ulcer to exclude its malignant nature. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) organism was diagnosed using three different test methods, viz. Histology (using Giemsa Stain), Microbiology (Gram Stain) and Biochemistry (using one minute Endoscopy Room Test). Histological diagnosis of H. pylori was taken as the “gold standard” for the presence of H. pylori organism. Histological diagnosis of gastritis was made using Hematoxylin and Eosin Stain and the gastritis was classified as active chronic gastritis and superficial chronic gastritis. Results: Out of 30 peptic ulcer disease patients with associated antral gastritis, 27 (90%) were positive for H. pylori on histological examination (13 superficial chronic gastritis and 14 active chronic gastritis) whereas out of 8 healthy volunteers with histological evidence of chronic antral gastritis, H. pylori was observed in 7 individuals (87.50%) (4 active chronic gastritis and 3 superficial chronic gastritis). Conclusion: A highly significant association between H. pylori infection with chronic antral gastritis both in peptic ulcer disease patients and healthy volunteers of Kashmir was found in this study. Association between H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis was 90% in peptic ulcer group and 87.50% in healthy population (P<0.005). PMID:18493464

  2. Immunoproteomics of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with atrophic body gastritis, a predisposing condition for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Bernardini, Giulia; Possenti, Silvia; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa; Annibale, Bruno

    2011-02-01

    Atrophic body gastritis is considered an outcome of H. pylori infection at high risk for gastric cancer. Immunoproteomics has been used to detect H. pylori antigens, which may act as potential markers for neoplastic disease and may be used in specific serological tests. We used immunoproteome technology to identify H. pylori antigens, recognized by sera from patients with atrophic body gastritis. Here, we performed 2DE protein maps of H. pylori strain 10K, probed against single sera from 3 groups of H. pylori-positive patients (atrophic body gastritis; intestinal-type gastric cancer; peptic ulcer) and negative controls. Immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 155 immunoreactive spots were detected corresponding to 14.1% of total spots detected in our reference map of H. pylori strain 10K. Sera from atrophic body gastritis (40.5±2%) and gastric cancer patients (25.9±1.8%) showed a significantly higher and stronger mean immunoreactivity versus H. pylori antigens compared to peptic ulcer patients (11.2±1.3%). The average intensity of immunoreactivity of sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients was significantly stronger compared to peptic ulcer patients. Sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients differentially recognized 17 H. pylori spots. Immunoproteome technology may discriminate between different H. pylori-related disease phenotypes showing a serological immunorecognition pattern common to patients with gastric cancer and atrophic body gastritis, its precursor condition. This tool may be promising for developing specific serological tests to identify patients with gastritis at high risk for gastric cancer, to be evaluated in prospective investigations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Normalization of pH level and gastric mucosa after eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunji; Matsukura, Norio; Matsuda, Noriko; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Naito, Zenya; Tajiri, Takashi

    2008-12-01

    The Updated Sydney System (USS) is used to evaluate chronic gastritis and chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) due to H. pylori infection. Here, we investigated USS scores and gastric juice pH levels in H. pylori infection-positive or -eradicated patients with remnant stomach after surgery. Gastric juice pH levels were measured using pH test-tape in 197 patients (112 H. pylori-positive and 85 H. pylori-negative after eradication) who had undergone distal gastrectomy and conventional H. pylori eradication therapy. In H. pylori infection-positive remnant stomach cases, gastric juice pH showed a reverse correlation with pepsinogen I/II ratio, and H. pylori infection-negative patients following eradication showed associations with the degree of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia at both the anastomosis and in the corpus. Further, pH levels in these patients were normalized time depending after the eradication in the remnant stomach. Eradication therapy for the remnant stomach contributes to the possible improvement of stomach conditions by controlling the pH level of gastric juice. This effect will be protective against the risk of secondary stomach carcinogenesis in the remnant stomach.

  4. H. pylori seroprevalence and risk of diabetes: An ancillary case-control study nested in the diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Saud; Nelson, Jason; Moss, Steven F; Paulus, Jessica K; Knowler, William C; Pittas, Anastassios G

    2017-10-01

    To determine the association between H. pylori infection and risk of incident diabetes in adults at high risk for diabetes who participated in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) study. In a nested case-control study conducted among 421 adults with newly diagnosed diabetes and 421 matched controls, we examined the association between serological status of H. pylori at baseline and risk of incident diabetes over a mean follow-up period of 2.6years. Using data from the baseline visit of the DPP, we also examined the cross-sectional association between presence of H. pylori antibodies and insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and the disposition index-like measure after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). At baseline, H. pylori antibodies were present in 40% of participants who developed diabetes and 39% of controls. After adjusting for matching factors, there was no association between exposure to H. pylori and incident diabetes (odds ratio [OR] of 1.04 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.40). In cross-sectional analyses, H. pylori status was not significantly associated with insulin sensitivity and disposition index-like measure from OGTT. In adults at high risk for diabetes, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with risk of developing diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Presentation of studies on the bacterium helicobacter pylori at Maribor teaching hospital between 1988 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Reberšek-Gorišek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discovery of the bacterium Helicobacter (H pylori in biopsy specimens from the gastric mucosa and the confirmation of its key role in the pathogenesis of duodenal and gastric ulcer disease, and gastritis, its significant role in mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma and in the occurrence of gastric cancer also offered the possibility of causal treatment of these diseases with antimicrobial agents. The aim of antimicrobial treatment is the eradication of H. pylori, the decrease of recurrences and lessening the risk of gastric cancer diseases. H. pylori infection is treated with a combination of several antimicrobials. The human stomach is a natural reservoir of H. pylori. In the prevalence of H. pylori infection, patient age, socio-economic status, living and sanitary conditions can play an important role. Determination of serum IgG and IgA antibodies against H. pylori and detection of the antigen in the feces of asymptomatic patients is important for epidemiologic studies.Patients and methods: The study included patients with chronic gastritis and with recurrence of duodenal and gastric ulcer disease referred routinely to Maribor Teaching Hospital (MTH while the study on the identification of serum antibodies against H. pylori and of antigen in feces included asymptomatic patients. For confirmation of H. pylori in biopsy specimens of the gastric mucosa we used the histologic method, culture, the urease test and the nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR method. The latter was also used for dental plaque smears. Antimicrobial treatment with the aim of eradicating H. pylori was carried out in three studies comparing two groups of patients: The first group always received ranitidine – 2 × 150 mg over 3 weeks in the first study and over 8 weeks in the two further studies, with an addition of antacids if needed. The second group received ranitidine 2 × 150 mg + erythromycin 4 × 500 mg for one week in the first

  6. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Eradication on Functional Dyspepsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Min Soo; Jo, Hyun Jin; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Sang Hyub; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims This study evaluated the effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on functional dyspepsia (FD), and the relationship between the changes of histological gastritis and FD symptom responses. Methods A total of 213 FD patients diagnosed by Rome III criteria were consecutively enrolled. H. pylori tests and gastritis grade by the Sydney system were performed before and 1 year after the proton pump based-eradication therapy for 7 days. Serum levels of pepsinogen, and genetic polymorphisms IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 were investigated. Results Total of 91 patients completed the 1 year follow-up. When the response rate of dyspepsia was compared at 1 year between the non-eradicated group (n = 24) and eradicated group (n = 67), each group showed complete response of 62.5% and 62.7%; satisfactory response (≥ 50%) of 0.0% and 19.4%; partial response (gastritis at 1 year, suggesting that inflammation mediates FD. PMID:23667755

  7. Rational customs clearance technology choice

    OpenAIRE

    Shramenko, N.; Andriets, V.

    2008-01-01

    Issues concerning cargo delivery efficiencyincrease by choice of rational customs clearance technology have been considered. Three possible variants of customs clearance andmethods which allow to define the most rational version of cargo delivery in international road communication based on main efficiency criteria for definite distance have been presented.

  8. Non-destructive clearance measuring in closed joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucelance, C.; Manaranche, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods for clearance measuring in closed joints are described. The first one is based on the mechanical impedance concept, while the other one requires a shock test on shaker. Both are illustrated with an example of application [fr

  9. Radio-iodine therapy and Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholamrezanezhad, A.; Mirpour, S.; Saghari, M.; Abdollahzadeh, J.; Pourmoslemi, A.; Yarmand, S.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most important cause of gastritis and related morbidities. Following consumption, radioactive iodine accumulates considerably in the stomach. On the basis of this observation, we decided to determine whether the high radiation induced by radio-iodine in the stomach is effective in the eradication of this infection. All consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, who were referred for radio-iodine therapy [dose 117.1±24.4 mCi (4.3±0.9 GBq), range 100-200 mCi (3.7-7.4 GBq)], were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urease breath test (UBT) was performed 1-2 h before radio-iodine consumption and the test was repeated 2 months later. Of 88 patients, 71 had pre-treatment positive UBT. Of these, 23 patients had negative post-treatment result, which means a significant reduction (26.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 16.8-35.5%) in the number of positive UBT results in our treated population (32.4% of UBT-positive cases became UBT-negative). Considering the high prevalence of reinfection in developing countries, the therapeutic benefit would have been more considerable if the second UBT had been done with a lag time of less than 2 months. Although radio-iodine therapy is not a logical method for the treatment of patients suffering from H. pylori, our finding provides indirect evidence about the radiosensitivity of bacteria, the future clinical applications of which need to be further evaluated. Also this finding can be useful for the food industry, where radiation is used widely to sterilize food. Regarding the possibility of H. pylori suppression, we recommend not using UBT for screening for the infection for at least within 2 months following radio-iodine therapy. (author)

  10. Five-day bismuth-free triple therapy for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and reduction of duodenal ulcer relapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, L.G.; Passos, M.C.; Chausson, Y.; Castro L de, P.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a significant reduction of the rate of duodenal ulcer (DU) relapse. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of a bismuth-free triple therapy on the eradication of H. pylori and reduction of DU relapse. After informed consent, 61 patients with endoscopically proven DU and H. pylori infection detected on 14C-urea breath test (BT) were included in the study. All patients received a combination of furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole, three times a day, for 5 days, in addition to eventual classical antiulcer agents prescribed by their attending physicians. BT was repeated after an interval of at least 60 days to evaluate H. pylori eradication. Endoscopy and another BT were performed again at 6.5 months after therapy to detect possible recurrences. Forty-eight patients completed the trial: 26 (54%) patients were negative for H. pylori at 6.5 months after the end of treatment, and 22 (46%) persisted H. pylori positive. Ninety-two percent of the patients in whom the bacteria were eradicated showed endoscopically healed ulcers and were asymptomatic, and two that were symptomatic presented only occasional pain not requiring therapy. Among the 22 patients who persisted H. pylori positive, six (27%) showed endoscopically active ulcers (p = 0.012) and eight (36%) patients continued to be symptomatic (p less than 0.01), and were still using antiulcer drugs (p = 0.002) 6.5 months after treatment. It is concluded that combined treatment with furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole for 5 days represents a well-tolerated, inexpensive, and effective therapeutic regime for the eradication of H. pylori and abolition of DU relapse in more than 50% of the patients during a follow-up period of 6.5 months

  11. Isocitrate dehydrogenase of Helicobacter pylori potentially induces humoral immune response in subjects with peptic ulcer disease and gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abid Hussain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: H. pylori causes gastritis and peptic ulcers and is a risk factor for the development of gastric carcinoma. Many of the proteins such as urease, porins, flagellins and toxins such as lipo-polysaccharides have been identified as potential virulence factors which induce proinflammatory reaction. We report immunogenic potentials of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD, an important house keeping protein of H. pylori. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Amino acid sequences of H. pylori ICD were subjected to in silico analysis for regions with predictably high antigenic indexes. Also, computational modelling of the H. pylori ICD as juxtaposed to the E. coli ICD was carried out to determine levels of structure similarity and the availability of surface exposed motifs, if any. The icd gene was cloned, expressed and purified to a very high homogeneity. Humoral response directed against H. pylori ICD was detected through an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in 82 human subjects comprising of 58 patients with H. pylori associated gastritis or ulcer disease and 24 asymptomatic healthy controls. The H. pylori ICD elicited potentially high humoral immune response and revealed high antibody titers in sera corresponding to endoscopically-confirmed gastritis and ulcer disease subjects. However, urea-breath-test negative healthy control samples and asymptomatic control samples did not reveal any detectable immune responses. The ELISA for proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 did not exhibit any significant proinflammatory activity of ICD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ICD of H. pylori is an immunogen which interacts with the host immune system subsequent to a possible autolytic-release and thereby significantly elicits humoral responses in individuals with invasive H. pylori infection. However, ICD could not significantly stimulate IL8 induction in a cultured macrophage cell line (THP1 and therefore, may not be a notable proinflammatory agent.

  12. Assessment of Risk and Sero-Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Colonization among Remote Orang Asli Tribes in Peninsula Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevakumar, Kavitha; Chandren, Josephine Rebecca; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio; Chua, Eng Guan; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey; Goh, Khean Lee; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen; Marshall, Barry J.; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai; Wong, Li Ping

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is related to human poverty with marked differences between developing and developed countries. Socioeconomic factors and living standards are the main determinants of the age-dependent acquisition rate of H. pylori, and consequently its prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the risk and sero-prevalence of H. pylori colonization among Orang Asli in Peninsula Malaysia. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Orang Asli subjects in seven isolated settlements spanning across all three major tribes (Negrito, Proto Malay and Senoi) in Malaysia. Socio-demographic characteristics of the subjects were obtained through interview. Subjects were tested for H. pylori colonization based on CagA and whole cell (WC) antigen serological assays. A total of 275 subjects participated in this study. Among these subjects, 115 (44.7%) were H. pylori sero-positive with highest sero-prevalence among Negrito (65.7%). Among subjects who were H. pylori sero-positive, CagA sero positivity was also significantly higher among Negrito. The highest proportion of respondents reported to be H. pylori sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (57.9%), males (56.2%), Negrito (48.6%) and live in bamboo house (92.3%). The highest proportion of respondents reported to be CagA sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (41.4%), males (35.6%) and Negrito (48.6%). The results of this study demonstrate that H. pylori colonization can be related to age, gender, tribes and house materials and CagA sero-positive stain closely associated with age, gender and tribes. PMID:27441568

  13. Helicobacter pylori Disrupts Host Cell Membranes, Initiating a Repair Response and Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Juan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the human stomach pathogen, lives on the inner surface of the stomach and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plasma membrane repair response is a matter of life and death for human cells against physical and biological damage. We here test the hypothesis that H. pylori also causes plasma membrane disruption injury, and that not only a membrane repair response but also a cell proliferation response are thereby activated. Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA have been considered to be major H. pylori virulence factors. Gastric cancer cells were infected with H. pylori wild type (vacA+/cagA+, single mutant (ΔvacA or ΔcagA or double mutant (ΔvacA/ΔcagA strains and plasma membrane disruption events and consequent activation of membrane repair components monitored. H. pylori disrupts the host cell plasma membrane, allowing localized dye and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ca2+-triggered members of the annexin family, A1 and A4, translocate, in response to injury, to the plasma membrane, and cell surface expression of an exocytotic maker of repair, LAMP-2, increases. Additional forms of plasma membrane disruption, unrelated to H. pylori exposure, also promote host cell proliferation. We propose that H. pylori activation of a plasma membrane repair is pro-proliferative. This study might therefore provide new insight into potential mechanisms of H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  14. First detected Helicobacter pylori infection in infancy modifies the association between diarrheal disease and childhood growth in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganath, Devan; Saito, Mayuko; Gilman, Robert H; Queiroz, Dulciene M M; Rocha, Gifone A; Cama, Vitaliano; Cabrera, Lilia; Kelleher, Dermot; Windle, Henry J; Crabtree, Jean E; Checkley, William

    2014-08-01

    In endemic settings, Helicobacter pylori infection can occur shortly after birth and may be associated with a reduction in childhood growth. This study investigated what factors promote earlier age of first H. pylori infection and evaluated the role of H. pylori infection in infancy (6-11 months) versus early childhood (12-23 months) on height. We included 183 children near birth from a peri-urban shanty town outside of Lima, Peru. Field-workers collected data on socioeconomic status (SES), daily diarrheal and breast-feeding history, antibiotic use, anthropometrics, and H. pylori status via carbon 13-labeled urea breath test up to 24 months after birth. We used a proportional hazards model to assess risk factors for earlier age at first detected infection and linear mixed-effects models to evaluate the association of first detected H. pylori infection during infancy on attained height. One hundred and forty (77%) were infected before 12 months of age. Lower SES was associated with earlier age at first detected H. pylori infection (low vs middle-to-high SES Hazard ratio (HR) 1.59, 95% CI 1.16, 2.19; p = .004), and greater exclusive breast-feeding was associated with reduced likelihood (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.40, 0.98, p = .04). H. pylori infection in infancy was not independently associated with growth deficits (p = .58). However, children who had their first detected H. pylori infection in infancy (6-11 months) versus early childhood (12-23 months) and who had an average number of diarrhea episodes per year (3.4) were significantly shorter at 24 months (-0.37 cm, 95% CI, -0.60, -0.15 cm; p = .001). Lower SES was associated with a higher risk of first detected H. pylori infection during infancy, which in turn augmented the adverse association of diarrheal disease on linear growth. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Prevalence of Chronic Gastritis or Helicobacter pylori Infection in Adolescent Sleeve Gastrectomy Patients Does Not Correlate with Symptoms or Surgical Outcomes.

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    Franklin, Ashanti L; Koeck, Emily S; Hamrick, Miller C; Qureshi, Faisal G; Nadler, Evan P

    2015-08-01

    In adults undergoing gastric bypass surgery, it is routine practice to perform pre-operative testing for Helicobacter pylori infection. Evidence suggests that infection impairs anastomotic healing and contributes to complications. There currently are no data for adolescents undergoing bariatric procedures. Despite few patients with pre-operative symptoms, we noted occasional patients with H. pylori detected after sleeve gastrectomy. We reviewed our experience with our adolescent sleeve gastrectomy cohort to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection, its predictive factors, and association with outcomes. We hypothesized that H. pylori infection would be associated with pre-operative symptoms, but not surgical outcomes. All patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy at our hospital were included. We conducted a chart review to determine pre- or post-operative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease GERD or gastritis, operative complications, and long-term anti-reflux therapy after surgery. Pathology reports were reviewed for evidence of gastritis and H. pylori infection. 78 adolescents had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy from January 2010 through July 2014. The prevalence of chronic gastritis was 44.9% (35/78) and 11.4% of those patients had H. pylori (4/35). Only one patient with H. pylori had pre-operative symptoms, and only 25.7% (9/35) of patients with pathology-proven gastritis had symptoms. One staple line leak occurred but this patient did not have H. pylori or gastritis. Mean patient follow-up was 10 (3-26) mos. There is a moderate prevalence of gastritis among adolescents undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, but only a small number of these patients had H. pylori infection. Neither the presence of chronic gastritis nor H. pylori infection correlated with symptoms or outcomes. Thus, in the absence of predictive symptomology or adverse outcome in those who are infected, we advocate for continued routine pathologic evaluation without the required need for pre

  16. Detection of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and interleukin-1 polymorphisms in patients with abdominal complaint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anarkhuu, B.; Munguntsetseg, B.; Khosbayar, T.; Enkh-Amar, A.; Bayasgalan, P.; Yadamjav, Ch.; Oyuntsetseg, K.; Bira, N.; Choi, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Gastric Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related death in Mongolia (National Cancer Center, report-2006). Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori affects approximately half the world and results in malignancy in a small subset of this population. There was sufficient evidence that the Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-1994) classified it as a class I carcinogen, the only bacterial agent on this list. The aim of the study is to detect and define the role of H.pylori virulence factors and host IL-1 polymorphisms to prevent further gastric cancer. In the future, this combined bacterial/host genotyping may provide an important opportunity to identify patients who are at high risk for the development of gastric carcinoma long before malignancy occurs. Patients and biopsy specimens. Two biopsy specimens and 5ml of blood samples were collected from each of 59 patients who had abdominal complaint, after informed consent was obtained. All patients lived in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, 100% were of Mongolian nationality. Their mean age was 40.33 years (range, 1575 years). One biopsy specimen was used to test urease, and another was stored for molecular testing. DNA isolation from blood and tissue sample was performed with ''Promega'' kit, according to the manufacturer's instruction. Tissue samples were homogenized treated with proteinase K prior to DNA extraction. H. pylori detection and genotyping. For H.pylori, detection was by UreC primer. For virulence gene typing of H.pylori cagA and vacA, gene specific primer were used. Genotyping of IL-1 polymorphisms. IL-1B polymorphisms were distinguished by 2 methods, 5-nuclease PCR assay and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP). Result. Strain characteristics of H. pylori were investigated in all 59 patients. 66,7% (40/59) and 76,3% (29/36) of the patients were infected with H. pylori by UreC PCR and by urea test, respectively. The vacAs1 genotype was

  17. Antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains to five antibiotics, including levofloxacin, in Northwestern Turkey

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    Reyhan Caliskan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic resistance is the main factor that affects the efficacy of current therapeutic regimens against Helicobacter pylori. This study aimed to determine the rates of resistance to efficacy clarithromycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, levofloxacin and metronidazole among H. pylori strains isolated from Turkish patients with dyspepsia. METHODS: H. pylori was cultured from corpus and antrum biopsies that were collected from patients with dyspeptic symptoms, and the antimicrobial susceptibility of H. pylori was determined using the E-test (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, metronidazole and levofloxacin according to the EUCAST breakpoints. Point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of clarithromycin-resistant strains were investigated using real-time PCR. RESULTS: A total of 98 H. pylori strains were isolated, all of which were susceptible to amoxicillin and tetracycline. Of these strains, 36.7% (36/98 were resistant to clarithromycin, 35.5% (34/98 were resistant to metronidazole, and 29.5% (29/98 were resistant to levofloxacin. Multiple resistance was detected in 19.3% of the isolates. The A2143G and A2144G point mutations in the 23S rRNA-encoding gene were found in all 36 (100% of the clarithromycin-resistant strains. Additionally, the levofloxacin MIC values increased to 32 mg/L in our H. pylori strains. Finally, among the clarithromycin-resistant strains, 27.2% were resistant to levofloxacin, and 45.4% were resistant to metronidazole. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that treatment failure after clarithromycin- or levofloxacin-based triple therapy is not surprising and that metronidazole is not a reliable agent for the eradication of H. pylori infection in Turkey.

  18. Floating-bioadhesive gastroretentive Caesalpinia pulcherrima-based beads of amoxicillin trihydrate for Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Nilima A; Gide, Paraag S

    2016-01-01

    An oral dosage form containing floating bioadhesive gastroretentive microspheres forms a stomach-specific drug delivery system for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori. To prepare and evaluate controlled release floating bioadhesive gastroretentive chitosan-coated amoxicillin trihydrate-loaded Caesalpinia pulcherrima galactomannan (CPG)-alginate beads (CCA-CPG-A), for H. pylori eradication. CCA-CPG-A beads were prepared by ionotropic gelation, using 2(3) factorial design with quantity of drug, combination of CPG with sodium alginate and concentration of calcium chloride as variables. Beads facilitated mucoadhesion to gastric mucosa with floating nature caused by chitosan coating for wide distribution throughout GIT. Developed beads were evaluated for characteristics like beads size-morphology, entrapment efficiency, DSC, XRD, FTIR, swelling ratio, in vitro mucoadhesion, in vitro drug release, in vitro floating and in vitro H. pylori growth inhibition studies. CCA-CPG-A beads were studied in Wistar rats for in vivo gastric mucoadhesion, in vivo H. pylori growth inhibition studies using PCR amplification of isolated DNA, rapid urease test. Developed beads possess drug release of 79-92%, entrapment efficiency of 65-89%, mucoadhesion of 61-89%. In vivo mucoadhesion study showed more than 85% mucoadhesion of beads even after 7th hour. In vitro-in vivo growth inhibition study showed complete eradication of H. pylori. CPG-alginate and chitosan in beads interacts with gastric mucosubstrate surface for prolonged gastric residence with floating bioadhesion mechanism for H. pylori eradication in rats. Floating bioadhesive CCA-CPG-A beads offer a promising drug delivery system for H. pylori eradication at lower dose, reduced adverse effect and enhance bioavailability.

  19. Nodular Gastritis and Pathologic Findings in Children and Young Adults with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hong; Noh, Tae-Woong; Baek, Seoung-Yon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the pathologic characteristics of nodular gastritis in children and young adults infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Materials and Methods A total of 328 patients were enrolled in this study, and the diagnosis of H. pylori infection was done with gastroduodenal endoscopy concomitant with a CLO™ test and pathologic analysis of the biopsy specimens. Diagnoses of normal, superficial gastritis, nodular gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease were made from the gastroduodenal endoscopic findings. The density of H. pylori organisms in the gastric mucosa was rated as normal, mild, moderate, or marked. The pathologic findings of nodular gastritis were based on the histopathologic findings of inflammation, immune activity, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Each of these findings was scored as either normal (0), mild (1), moderate (2), or marked (3) according to the updated Sydney system and using visual analog scales. The gastritis score was the sum of the four histopathologic scores. Results In this study, nodular gastritis (50.6%) was most common, and mild density (51.5%) H. pylori infection was also common upon microscopic examination. Intestinal metaplasia occurred in 9 patients (2.7%). Conclusion Logistic regression revealed a significant increase in the incidence of nodular gastritis with gastritis score (p = 0.008), but not an association with sex, age, or H. pylori density. Gastritis score was the only significant factor influencing the occurrence of nodular gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia, which was originally thought to be a pre-malignant lesion, occurred in 2.7% of the patients with H. pylori infection. PMID:17461522

  20. Infection of Helicobacter pylori and Atrophic Gastritis Influence Lactobacillus in Gut Microbiota in a Japanese Population

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    Chikara Iino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSuppression of gastric acid by proton pump inhibitors is associated with the increase of Lactobacillus in human gut microbiota. Gastric acid secretion is also suppressed by Helicobacter pylori infection and following atrophic gastritis. However, few studies have examined the association between H. pylori infection and Lactobacillus species in gut microbiota particularly in Japan.MethodsA total of 1,123 adult subjects who participated in a health survey in Hirosaki City were studied. Infection of H. pylori was defined by both serum antibody and stool antigen test. The presence and the severity of atrophic gastritis were defined by the serum level of serum pepsinogens. Using 16S ribosomal RNA amplification from fecal samples, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was calculated, and the composition ratio of each Lactobacillus species was surveyed.ResultsThe relative abundance of the Lactobacillus in H. pylori-infected subjects with severe atrophic gastritis was higher comparing with those in subjects with mild atrophic gastritis and without atrophic gastritis (0.591 vs 0.068% and 0.033%, respectively; p < 0.001 and also that of non-infected subjects (0.033%; p < 0.001. In H. pylori non-infected subjects, both gender and age were not associated with the relative abundance of Lactobacillus in fecal samples. The proportion of Lactobacillus salivarius was high in H. pylori-infected subjects while that of Lactobacillus acidophilus was high in non-infected subjects.ConclusionLactobacillus in human gut microbiota could be influenced by H. pylori infection and severity of atrophic gastritis in Japanese subjects.

  1. In vitro activity of Aloe vera inner gel against Helicobacter pylori strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, L; Di Bartolomeo, S; Di Campli, E; Genovese, S; Locatelli, M; Di Giulio, M

    2014-07-01

    Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) is a herbal remedy widely used for a variety of illnesses; A. vera leaf extracts have been promoted for detoxification, cure constipation, help flush out toxins and wastes from the body, promote digestion and are used in the treatment of peptic ulcer for cytoprotective action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of A. vera inner gel against both susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains isolated in Abruzzo region, Italy. The inner gel of leaves of a 5-year-old plant of A. vera was extracted, homogenized and tested from 800 to 1.56 mg ml(-1) against 14 clinical strains and one reference strain of H. pylori using the broth microdilution methodology. Furthermore, the sample of A. vera was investigated for the chemical fingerprint of anthraquinones. The inhibitory concentrations of A. vera inner gel were similar to the bactericidal ones, with values ranging from 6.25 to 800 mg ml(-1) . Fifty per cent of the detected strains, independently of their susceptibility profile, were inhibited in their growth at 100 mg ml(-1) . Aloe vera inner gel expresses antibacterial properties against H. pylori and, therefore, in combination with antibiotics, could represent a novel strategy for the treatment of the infection of H. pylori, especially in cases of multiresistance. The study demonstrates that the Aloe vera inner gel expresses antibacterial properties against both susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains. These findings may impact on the antimicrobial resistance phenomenon of H. pylori, proposing the A. vera inner gel as a novel effective natural agent for combination with antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori gastric infection. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Comparison of Salivary and Serum Enzyme Immunoassays for the Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    John M Embil

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori has been established as an important risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease, gastritis and gastric cancer. The diagnosis of H pylori infection can be established by invasive or noninvasive techniques. Two noninvasive enzyme immunoassays (EIAs for antibody detection – HeliSal and Pylori Stat – were compared with histology. Both assays detect immunoglobulin (Ig G directed against purified H pylori antigen. The test populations consisted of 104 consecutive patients scheduled for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Of these patients, 97 (93% had symptoms compatible with peptic ulcer disease. Saliva and serum were collected simultaneously at the time of endoscopy. Salivary EIA had a sensitivity of 66%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 67% and negative predictive value of 66% compared with the serum EIA, where the results were 98%, 48%, 64% and 96%, respectively. Although the salivary EIA is an appealing noninvasive test, it was not a sensitive and specific assay. The serum EIA also lacked specificity, but was highly sensitive with a good negative predictive value. Although a negative serum EIA rules out H pylori infection, a positive result must be interpreted in the clinical context and confirmed with a more specific measure.

  3. Dietary Factors in Relation to Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Seyyed Ali Mard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Helicobacter pylori (HP and diet are both risk factors for gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Helicobacter pylori infection and dietary habits common in Khuzestan province. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011–2013 on 374 patients. Participants were interviewed using a food frequency questionnaire and tissue sample of the antrum was sent for pathology lab. The histopathological major variables were graded on a scale of 3 (mild, moderate, and severe and data analyzed using nonparametric tests. Results. In this study, of 160 patients (43% that were determined, 8.1 percent had severe contamination. Among dietary patterns, relationship between energy intake and carbohydrate with H. pylori was significant. A direct association was found between mean daily intakes of sausage (P=0.001 and burgers (P<0.05 with HP infection. Low intake of fresh vegetables and fruits was the most significant risk factors (P<0.05. Conclusion. There is a possibility that some dietary factors such as consumption of fast foods and low intake of fresh vegetables may increase the chance of HP and severity of this infection.

  4. The investigation of Helicobacter pylori in the dental biofilm and saliva samples of children with dyspeptic complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksit Bıcak, Damla; Akyuz, Serap; Kıratlı, Binnur; Usta, Merve; Urganci, Nafiye; Alev, Burcin; Yarat, Aysen; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2017-03-21

    The oral cavity can be an extra-gastric reservoir for Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori). This can play a role in the pathogenesis of halitosis, glossitis, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and dental caries. The present study was conducted to detect the presence of H.pylori within the dental biofilm and in saliva samples collected from children suffering from dyspepsia and children without any gastrointestinal complaints. Associations with gastric infection, halitosis, and some oral parameters were also evaluated. Seventy children (aged between 5-16) with dyspepsia were selected for the study group and control group composed of 30 healthy children without dyspepsia were also included in the study. After detailed oral and clinical examinations for oral parameters, saliva, and supragingival dental biofilm samples were collected for 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA genes detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The presence of gastric H.pylori was evaluated in endoscopic biopsy specimens histopathologically. Halitosis was evaluated by benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamid (BANA) test. Salivary S.mutans and Lactobacilli sp. counts were also carried out by commercial kits. H.pylori was histopathologically detected amongst 83% of the children with the dyspeptic condition. The detection rate of this bacteria in dental biofilm and saliva samples and halitosis were found relatively higher in the dyspeptic children rather than the control group (p pylori (p > 0.05). In the gastric H.pylori positive group with dyspepsia, DMFT/S and dmft/s numbers and plaque indices were found higher than the control group (p pylori negative group with dyspepsia were found higher than the control group (p pylori positive and negative groups (p > 0.05). Comparing to those with negative for both genes, in children whose dental biofilm and saliva samples were positive for both 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA genes, significantly higher results for halitosis, and DMFS numbers and significantly

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection-induced H3Ser10 phosphorylation in stepwise gastric carcinogenesis and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao-Tao; Cao, Na; Zhang, Hai-Hui; Wei, Jian-Bo; Song, Xiao-Xia; Yi, Dong-Min; Chao, Shuai-Heng; Zhang, Li-Da; Kong, Ling-Fei; Han, Shuang-Yin; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Ding, Song-Ze

    2018-04-15

    Our previous works have demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection can alter histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation status in gastric epithelial cells. However, whether Helicobacter pylori-induced histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation participates in gastric carcinogenesis is unknown. We investigate the expression of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation in various stages of gastric disease and explore its clinical implication. Stomach biopsy samples from 129 patients were collected and stained with histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation, Ki67, and Helicobacter pylori by immunohistochemistry staining, expressed as labeling index. They were categorized into nonatrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and intestinal-type gastric cancer groups. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by either 13 C-urea breath test or immunohistochemistry staining. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients, labeling index of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation was gradually increased in nonatrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia groups, peaked at low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and declined in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and gastric cancer groups. In Helicobacter pylori-infected patients, labeling index of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation followed the similar pattern as above, with increased expression over the corresponding Helicobacter pylori-negative controls except in nonatrophic gastritis patient whose labeling index was decreased when compared with Helicobacter pylori-negative control. Labeling index of Ki67 in Helicobacter pylori-negative groups was higher in gastric cancer than chronic atrophic gastritis and low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia groups, and higher in intestinal metaplasia group compared with chronic atrophic gastritis group. In Helicobacter pylori-positive groups, Ki67 labeling index was increased

  6. Extremely low Helicobacter pylori prevalence in North Sulawesi, Indonesia and identification of a Maori-tribe type strain: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Tuda, Josef; Suzuki, Rumiko; Kido, Yasutoshi; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tantular, Indah S; Pusarawati, Suhintam; Nasronudin; Harijanto, Paul N; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Sulawesi in Indonesia has a unique geographical profile with assumed separation from Sundaland. Studies of Helicobacter pylori in this region are rare due to the region's rural location and lack of endoscopy equipment. Indirect methods are, therefore, the most appropriate for measuring H. pylori infection in these areas; with the disposable gastric brush test, we can obtain gastric juice as well as small gastric tissue samples for H. pylori culture. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori infection and evaluated human migration patterns in the remote areas of North Sulawesi. We recruited a total of 251 consecutive adult volunteers and 131 elementary school children. H. pylori infection was determined by urine antibody test. A gastric brush test was used to culture H. pylori. We used next-generation and polymerase chain reaction based sequencing to determine virulence factors and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The overall H. pylori prevalence was only 14.3% for adults and 3.8% for children, and 13.6% and 16.7% in Minahasanese and Mongondownese participants, respectively. We isolated a single H. pylori strain, termed -Manado-1. Manado-1 was East Asian type cagA (ABD type), vacA s1c-m1b, iceA1 positive/iceA2 negative, jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3) galT-negative, oipA "on", and dupA-negative. Phylogenetic analyses showed the strain to be hspMaori type, a major type observed in native Taiwanese and Maori tribes. Our data support that very low H. pylori infection prevalence in Indonesia. Identification of hspMaori type H. pylori in North Sulawesi may support the hypothesis that North Sulawesi people migrated from north.

  7. Prediction of Helicobacter pylori status by conventional endoscopy, narrow-band imaging magnifying endoscopy in stomach after endoscopic resection of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kazuyoshi; Saka, Akiko; Nozawa, Yujiro; Nakamura, Atsuo

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the incidence of metachronous gastric carcinoma after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy has been endorsed. It is not unusual for such patients to be H. pylori negative after eradication or for other reasons. If it were possible to predict H. pylori status using endoscopy alone, it would be very useful in clinical practice. To clarify the accuracy of endoscopic judgment of H. pylori status, we evaluated it in the stomach after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of gastric cancer. Fifty-six patients treated by ESD were enrolled. The diagnostic criteria for H. pylori status by conventional endoscopy and narrow-band imaging (NBI)-magnifying endoscopy were decided, and H. pylori status was judged by two endoscopists. Based on the H. pylori stool antigen test as a diagnostic gold standard, conventional endoscopy and NBI-magnifying endoscopy were compared for their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Interobserver agreement was assessed in terms of κ value. Interobserver agreement was moderate (0.56) for conventional endoscopy and substantial (0.77) for NBI-magnifying endoscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.79, 0.52, 0.70, and 0.63 for conventional endoscopy and 0.91, 0.83, 0.88, and 0.86 for NBI-magnifying endoscopy, respectively. Prediction of H. pylori status using NBI-magnifying endoscopy is practical, and interobserver agreement is substantial. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

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    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  9. Frequency of helicobacter pylori infection using /sup 13/C-UBT in asymptomatic individuals of Barakaho, Islamabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheed, F.; Ahmad, T.; Bilal, R.

    2011-01-01

    High frequency of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection has been reported in Pakistan mainly for dyspeptic patients, while the published data is inadequate regarding asymptomatic population. The non-invasive /sup 13/C urea breath test (UBT) was used to determine the frequency of H. pylori infection in 516 asymptomatic individuals and to find out its association with gender and age. Overall prevalence was 74.4% (384/516) while 63.5% (113/178) children were positive for 13C-UBT and the percentage increased with age in both the genders with significantly higher prevalence in adolescents (p=0.003) and adults (p < 0.001). Moreover, there was non-significant difference between the prevalence of H. pylori infection in males and females in all age categories. The reported high frequency of H. pylori infection warrants further studies to identify epidemiological and environmental risk factors. (author)

  10. The influence of duodeno-gastric reflux on frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection at patients with ulcer gastric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J.

    1996-01-01

    To estimate the correlation between frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and intensity of duodeno-gastric reflux it was analysed 61 species with ulcer gastric. Bacterial infection was diagnosed by the breath test with 14 C-labelled urea, whereas presence and intensity of the reflux was found with dynamic scintigraphy with 99 Tm MBrIDA support. The H. pylori infection was present at 42 (68.9%) patients. The presence of throwing back the duodenal liquid was found at 32 (52.5%) diagnosed patients. At 19 (31.2%) of them the reflux has intensity of 1%, at 11 (18%)-2 o and 2 (3.3%)-3 o .The investigations which were carried out, showed that at patients with ulcer gastric disease, duodeno-gastric reflux is an agent which slows down H. pylori infection, however it is easily seen not earlier than at 2 o of its intensity. (author)

  11. Evaluation of eight enzyme immunoassays for detection of immunoglobulin G against Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, JC; Kleibeuker, JH; vanZwet, AA; Berrelkamp, RJP; Meijer, B.C

    Eight commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to test sera taken from 102 patients in whom Helicobacter pylori infection status had been determined by means of biopsy culture, PCR, histology, and urease production and by C-13 urea breath test. By those means, 61 patients had

  12. Online monitoring of dynamic tip clearance of turbine blades in high temperature environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu; Zhong, Chong; Zhu, Xiaoliang; Zhe, Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Minimized tip clearance reduces the gas leakage over turbine blade tips and improves the thrust and efficiency of turbomachinery. An accurate tip clearance sensor, measuring the dynamic clearances between blade tips and the turbine case, is a critical component for tip clearance control. This paper presents a robust inductive tip clearance sensor capable of monitoring dynamic tip clearances of turbine machines in high-temperature environments and at high rotational speeds. The sensor can also self-sense the temperature at a blade tip in situ such that temperature effect on tip clearance measurement can be estimated and compensated. To evaluate the sensor’s performance, the sensor was tested for measuring the tip clearances of turbine blades under various working temperatures ranging from 700 K to 1300 K and at turbine rotational speeds ranging from 3000 to 10 000 rpm. The blade tip clearance was varied from 50 to 2000 µm. The experiment results proved that the sensor can accurately measure the blade tip clearances with a temporal resolution of 10 µm. The capability of accurately measuring the tip clearances at high temperatures (~1300 K) and high turbine rotation speeds (~30 000 rpm), along with its compact size, makes it promising for online monitoring and active control of blade tip clearances of high-temperature turbomachinery.

  13. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... diagnostic evaluation should include a newborn screening, a sweat chloride test, a genetic or carrier test, and ... vs. IRT-DNA States Newborn Screening for CF Sweat Test Life With CF X close Caring for ...

  14. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  15. Features of Immune Response to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children with Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Kalichevska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The course of bronchial asthma in children is often accompanied by gastrointestinal (GI diseases associated with H.pylori infection. The presence of H.pylori leads to the activation and maintenance of inflammatory process with release of cytokines and mediators of inflammation and subsequent systemic effects. Objective: to study the peculiarities of interferon gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-4, -5 and -13 production as markers of allergic inflammation severity in children with bronchial asthma infected with H.pylori. Materials and methods. There were examined 120 children with bronchial asthma aged 6 to 18 years. Identification of H.pylori was carried out with the help of brea­thing Helic-test (LLC AMA, Russia. Serum concentrations of IFN-γ and IL‑4, -5 and -13 were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay (Diaclone test-kits, France before and 7 days after the end of treatment for GI pathology. Statistical processing was performed using the methods of variation statistics implemented in the software package Statistica 6.1. Results. 78 children with bronchial asthma were diagnosed with GI disease, including 37 cases associated with H.pylori infection. To study the influence of H.pylori on the course of bronchial asthma, children were divided into 3 groups: I group — 37 children with bronchial asthma and GI pathology, infected with H.pylori, II — 41 H.pylori-negative children with bronchial asthma and GI pathology, III — 42 H.pylori-negative children with bronchial asthma without GI disorders. Duration of bronchial asthma in group I was 7.80 ± 0.17 years, in II — 5.90 ± 0.26 years, in group III — 3.90 ± 0.48 years (p < 0.05. The presence of H.pylori infection in children with bronchial asthma was accompanied by lower concentrations of IFN-γ compared to children of group II (8.47 ± 0.14 pg/ml and 9.69 ± 0.32 pg/ml, respectively, p < 0.05. The level of IL‑13 in the blood serum was

  16. HELICOBACTER PYLORI GROWTH INHIBITION BY SUBSTANCE PRODUCED PSEUDOMONAS BY AEROGINOSA: IN VTRO STUDY

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    A FAZELI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of H.pylori against metronidazole is increasingly appeared in reports of investigators of gastric infections. So that, seeking to find more effective anti-helicobacter drugs is a necessity. In this study, inhibitory effect of the P. aeroginosa-produced substance on H. pylori growth was determined using two methods, Cross-streak and Well-diffusion Only two out of 37 P. aeroginosa isalates were able to inhibit H. pylori growth which one of them was chosen for further investigation. Its antibacterial activity was tested on 31 isolates of H. pylori consisting 27 metrondazole-sensitive and 4 metronidazole-resistant isolates. The inhibitory substance was enable to kill both metrondazole-sensitive and resistant isolates of H. pylori. The substance could also inhibit the of several other bacteria including E.coli, Salmonella sp., Klebsiella sp., S. aureus and a gram positive bacilli. While the inhibitory effect of the substance had no change at 40c for 30 days, its effect substantially reduced by treating at 600c for 15 minutes. Treatment of substance at 600c (30 min. 80?c and 100?c (15 & 30min, and freezing (-20?c and melting (37?c inactivated its inhibitory effect completely. Treatment with trips in also could inactivate it. Thus P. aeroginosa-produced substance, probably is a protein and may be classified in bacteriocin group.

  17. Saccharomyces Boulardii in Helicobacter Pylori Eradication in Children: A Randomized Trial From Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkin, Kokab; Zardast, Mahmood; Basirinejad, Fatemeh

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects around 50% of the human population and is asymptomatic in 70% of the cases. H. pylori eradication in childhood will not only result in peptic symptoms relief, but will also prevent late-term complications such as cancer. Today, probiotics are being increasingly studied in the treatment of gastrointestinal infections as an alternative or complement to antibiotics. In this study we aimed to assess the effect of S. boulardii supplementation on H. pylori eradication among children in our region. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial 28 asymptomatic primary school children with a positive H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) exam were randomly allocated into the study group, receiving Saccharomyces boulardii, and the control group receiving placebo capsules matched by shape and size, for one month. The children were followed up weekly and were reinvestigated four to eight weeks after accomplished treatment by HpSA testing. The significance level was set at P Saccharomyces boulardii has a positive effect on reducing the colonization of H. pylori in the human gastrointestinal system but is not capable of its eradication when used as single therapy.

  18. HELICOBACTER PYLORI-ASSOCIATED INFLAMMATION IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

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    O. N. Pavlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim – assessment of the prevalence of seropositivity to Helicobacter pylori infection and laboratory comparative study of the peripheralblood in patients depending on the course of coronary heart disease (CHD.Materials and methods. Observation of 100 patients with coronary artery disease and 40 control patients is presented. Investigation indicatorsof clinical blood tests, biochemical blood analysis and determination of immunoglobulin antibody titer against Helicobacter pylori.Results. In patients with coronary artery disease signs of systemic inflammation associated with the development of acute coronary syndrome are marked with increased antibody titers to infection Helicobacter pylori.Conclusion. A history of coronary artery disease in patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastroduodenal pathology should be considered as a factor that increases the likelihood of unstable coronary desease course. Detected in patients with coronary artery disease signs of systemic inflammation with an increase in titer of antibodies to Helicobacter pylori infection associated with development of acute coronary syndrome.

  19. Histological and endoscopic features of the stomachs of patients with Chagas disease in the era of Helicobacter pylori

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    Fernanda Machado Fonseca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Most studies that have evaluated the stomachs of patients with Chagas disease were performed before the discovery of Helicobacter pylori and used no control groups. This study compared the gastric features of chagasic and non-chagasic patients and assessed whether gastritis could be associated with Chagas disease. Methods Gastric biopsy samples were taken from patients who underwent endoscopy for histological analysis according to the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori infection was assessed by histology, 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR, serology and the 13C-urea breath test. Patients were considered H. pylori-negative when all of these diagnostic tests were negative. Clinical and socio-demographic data were obtained by reviewing medical records and using a questionnaire. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection (70.3% versus 71.7% and chronic gastritis (92.2% versus 85% was similar in the chagasic and non-chagasic groups, respectively; such as peptic ulcer, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Gastritis was associated with H. pylori infection independent of Chagas disease in a log-binomial regression model. However, the chagasic H. pylori-negative patients showed a significantly higher grade of mononuclear (in the corpus and polymorphonuclear (PMN (in the antrum cell infiltration. Additionally, the patients with the digestive form of Chagas disease showed a significantly lower prevalence of corpus atrophy than those with other clinical forms. Conclusions The prevalence of H. pylori infection and of gastric histological and endoscopic features was similar among the chagasic and non-chagasic patients. Additionally, this is the first controlled study to demonstrate that H. pylori is the major cause of gastritis in patients with Chagas disease.

  20. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory activities of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains against antibiotic susceptible and resistant Helicobacter pylori strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, L; Gergova, G; Markovska, R; Yordanov, D; Mitov, I

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to detect anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (GLB) strains by four cell-free supernatant (CFS) types. Activity of non-neutralized and non-heat-treated (CFSs1), non-neutralized and heat-treated (CFSs2), pH neutralized, catalase-treated and non-heat-treated (CFSs3), or neutralized, catalase- and heat-treated (CFSs4) CFSs against 18 H. pylori strains (11 of which with antibiotic resistance) was evaluated. All GLB strains produced bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs), the neutralized CFSs of two GLB strains inhibited >81% of test strains and those of four GLB strains were active against >71% of antibiotic resistant strains. Two H. pylori strains were BLIS resistant. The heating did not reduce the CFS activity. Briefly, all GLB strains evaluated produced heat-stable BLISs, although GLB and H. pylori strain susceptibility patterns exhibited differences. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance activity can be an advantage for the probiotic choice for H. pylori infection control. In this study, anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of seven Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (GLB) strains was evaluated by four cell-free supernatant (CFS) types. The GLB strains produced heat-stable bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs) with a strong anti-H. pylori activity and some neutralized, catalase- and heat-treated CFSs inhibited >83% of the test strains. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance production of GLB strains can render them valuable probiotics in the control of H. pylori infection. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Comparison of different stains in imprint cytology with the conventional diagnostic tools in detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Shashikant Adlekha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is one of the most common causes of gastrointestinal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early diagnosis of infection is imperative for the cure of distressing symptoms and prevention of complications. Objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate imprint cytology of gastric biopsy specimens as a rapid and cost-effective diagnostic tool and its comparison with conventional diagnostic tests. Materials and Methods: Antral biopsies were collected from 130 patients and evaluated for H. pylori infection by imprint cytology and histopathological examination by different stains and rapid urease test (RUT. Histopathological features of gastric biopsy specimens were also assessed. Results: A total of 118 patients showed H. pylori infection by two or more methods. Giemsa histology showed highest sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and Youden′s Index (YI. Among imprint cytology stain methods, toluidine blue showed highest sensitivity and highest YI was obtained for PAP stain. Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastric mucosa changes like chronic active gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, ulceration and carcinoma. Imprint cytology has high sensitivity and comparable predictive values to conventional diagnostic tools-histopathological examination and RUT in the detection of H. pylori infection.

  2. Clearance of insoluble dust from the lower respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, P E; Gibb, F R; Johnson, L

    1964-01-01

    Clearance of tagged heavy metal aerosols (Fe, Hg, Mn, Ba, and U) in female beagles by in vivo counting was assessed. Fecal excretion paralleled lower respiratory tract clearance of Fe. No Fe was found in blood, indicating its biological insolubility. Ultrafiltration tests (an indication of biological solubility) ranked the heavy metals as: Hg, Mn, Fe, and U in order of decreasing solubility. The solubility ratios were remarkably similar to the ratios of inverse biological half-times.

  3. A significant increase in the pepsinogen I/II ratio is a reliable biomarker for successful Helicobacter pylori eradication.

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    Hiroki Osumi

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori eradication is usually assessed using the 13C-urea breath test (UBT, anti-H. pylori antibody and the H. pylori stool antigen test. However, a few reports have used pepsinogen (PG, in particular, the percentage change in the PG I/II ratio. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of the percentage changes in serum PG I/II ratios for determining the success of eradication therapy for H. pylori.In total, 650 patients received eradication therapy from October 2008 to March 2013 in our Cancer Institute Hospital. We evaluated the relationship between H. pylori eradication and percentage changes in serum PG I/II ratios before and 3 months after treatment with CLEIA® (FUJIREBIO Inc, Tokyo, Japan. The gold standard of H. pylori eradication was defined as negative by the UBT performed 3 months after completion of eradication treatment. Cut-off values for percentage changes in serum PG I/II ratios were set as +40, +25 and +10% when the serum PG I/II ratio before treatment was below 3.0, above 3.0 but below 5.0 and 5.0 or above, respectively.Serum PG I and PG II levels were measured in 562 patients with H. pylori infection before and after eradication therapy. Eradication of H. pylori was achieved in 433 patients studied (77.0%. The ratios of first, second, third-line and penicillin allergy eradication treatment were 73.8% (317/429, 88.3% (99/112, 75% (12/16 and 100% (5/5, respectively. An increasing percentage in the serum levels of the PG I/II ratios after treatment compared with the values before treatment clearly distinguished success from failure of eradication (108.2±57.2 vs. 6.8±30.7, p<0.05. Using the above cut-off values, the sensitivity, specificity and validity for determination of H. pylori were 93.1, 93.8 and 93.2%, respectively.In conclusion, the percentage changes in serum PG I/II ratios are useful as evaluation criteria for assessing the success of eradication therapy for H. pylori.

  4. PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN PATIENTS WITH DYSPEPSIA UNDERGOING UPPER GASTRO INTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY IN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Ajay Babu K

    2017-12-01

    diagnosis. Rapid urease test and Giemsa staining were conducted on endoscopy biopsy specimens and Helicobacter pylori positivity was based on either Rapid urease test and/or histopathological examination was positive. From the present study it is evident that, there was no specific symptom attributable to H. pylori infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is more common in males than females. Helicobacter pylori is consistently associated with peptic ulcer disease than non-ulcer dyspepsia, which is in broad agreement with the studies done earlier. Thus we conclude that, Helicobacter pylori infection may have a role in the aetiopathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. There appears to be no significant association between Helicobacter pylori infection and dyspeptic cases with normal endoscopy. This finding does not exclude the possibility that a small undefined subset of infected individuals will have symptoms induced by the infection, but only large randomized trials will be able to establish this. Hence, we recommend eradication of the bacteria only in patients positive for the bacterium, who have peptic ulceration. We believe in, Peter C Robin’s dictum: “If a person with peptic ulcer disease is shown to have Helicobacter pylori, then eradication is indicated”.

  5. Changing epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manami

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is known as the most important cause of gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, and socioeconomic status. In Japan, H. pylori infection has been highly correlated with the incidence rate of gastric cancer, and a reduction in H. pylori infection is therefore crucial for decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer, especially at the population level. Infection occurs during childhood, commonly before 5 years of age. In Japan, where gastric cancer has ranked as the most common cancer by incidence and mortality for the last several decades, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has dramatically declined by birth cohort effect, mainly due to improvements in the general hygiene environment in childhood. Older generations born before around 1950 show a high prevalence of around 80-90 %, decreasing with age to reach around 10 % or less in those born around the 1990s, and less than 2 % for children born after the year 2000. This change will have generational effects on gastric cancer prevention strategies, both primary and secondary. The risk-stratified approach to gastric cancer prevention should be considered in Japan and other countries which have similarly experienced rapid economic development.

  6. Lactoferrin Adsorbed onto Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals Controlling - In Vivo - the Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgione, Andrea; Nocerino, Nunzia; Iannaccone, Marco; Roperto, Sante; Capuano, Federico; Roveri, Norberto; Lelli, Marco; Crasto, Antonio; Calogero, Armando; Pilloni, Argenia Paola; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Background The resistance of Helicobacter pylori to the antibiotic therapy poses the problem to discover new therapeutic approaches. Recently it has been stated that antibacterial, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant properties of lactoferrin are increased when this protein is surface-linked to biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. Objective Based on these knowledge, the aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an alternative therapy against Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods Antibacterial and antinflammatory properties, humoral antibody induction, histopathological analysis and absence of side effects were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Results The tests carried out have been demonstrated better performance of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles combined with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei compared to both lactoferrin and probiotic alone or pooled. Conclusion These findings indicate the effectiveness and safety of our proposed therapy as alternative treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:27384186

  7. Potentiation of the action of metronidazole on Helicobacter pylori by omeprazole and bismuth subcitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L P; Colding, H; Kristiansen, J E

    2000-01-01

    test (Etest). With 0.5 MIC of either of the two drugs, the susceptibility of all H. pylori4 mg/l) reverted to being metronidazole sensitive. These results suggested that either bismuth salts or proton pump inhibitors may be effective in the treatment of some infections with metronidazole-resistant H...... to regimens that include proton pump inhibitors. In the present study, the synergistic effect of subinhibitory concentrations (0.25-0.5 MIC) of either bismuth subcitrate or omeprazole with metronidazole on the susceptibility of 42 H. pylori strains was investigated by agar dilution method and the Epsilometer......Treatment failures using triple therapy that include metronidazole, are common in patients infected with metronidazole-resistant Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa. Higher eradication rates in such patients have been described when treatment regimens include bismuth salts compared...

  8. No Helicobacter pylori, no Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    Virtually all duodenal ulcers (DUs) and the vast majority of gastric ulcers (GUs) are the consequence of Helicobacter pylori-associated inflammation. In DUs, the inflammation is maximal in the antrum and is associated with gastric metaplasia in the bulb. Gastrin homeostasis is disturbed by H. pylori

  9. Modified Augmented Renal Clearance Score Predicts Rapid Piperacillin and Tazobactam Clearance in Critically Ill Surgery and Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-24

    collision; VAP , ventilator-associated pneumonia. TABLE 2. PK Parameter Estimates for Free Piperacillin and Tazobactam in Patients Stratified by ARC Score...SOFA score are typically generated during routine care of the most severely ill patients . Positive screening test results (high ARC scores) can be...Modified Augmented Renal Clearance score predicts rapid piperacillin and tazobactam clearance in critically ill surgery and trauma patients Kevin S

  10. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis.

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    Sinem Oktem-Okullu

    Full Text Available The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1, IL-17 (Th17, and FOXP3 (Treg expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer-based models.

  11. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktem-Okullu, Sinem; Tiftikci, Arzu; Saruc, Murat; Cicek, Bahattin; Vardareli, Eser; Tozun, Nurdan; Kocagoz, Tanil; Sezerman, Ugur; Yavuz, Ahmet Sinan; Sayi-Yazgan, Ayca

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1), IL-17 (Th17), and FOXP3 (Treg) expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer-based models.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection and low dietary iron alter behavior, induce iron deficiency anemia, and modulate hippocampal gene expression in female C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Monika; Amaya, Aldo; Bodi, Caroline; Ge, Zhongming; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Ennis, Kathleen; Wang, Timothy C.; Georgieff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori), a bacterial pathogen, is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is a strong risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Environmental conditions, such as poor dietary iron resulting in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), enhance H.pylori virulence and increases risk for gastric cancer. IDA affects billions of people worldwide, and there is considerable overlap between regions of high IDA and high H.pylori prevalence. The primary aims of our study were to evaluate the effect of H.pylori infection on behavior, iron metabolism, red blood cell indices, and behavioral outcomes following comorbid H. pylori infection and dietary iron deficiency in a mouse model. C57BL/6 female mice (n = 40) were used; half were placed on a moderately iron deficient (ID) diet immediately post-weaning, and the other half were maintained on an iron replete (IR) diet. Half were dosed with H.pylori SS1 at 5 weeks of age, and the remaining mice were sham-dosed. There were 4 study groups: a control group (-Hp, IR diet) as well as 3 experimental groups (-Hp, ID diet; +Hp, IR diet; +Hp,ID diet). All mice were tested in an open field apparatus at 8 weeks postinfection. Independent of dietary iron status, H.pylori -infected mice performed fewer exploratory behaviors in the open field chamber than uninfected mice (pmice on an ID diet (both pmice compared to all other study groups. H.pylori infection caused IDA in mice maintained on a marginal iron diet. The mouse model developed in this study is a useful model to study the neurologic, behavioral, and hematologic impact of the common human co-morbidity of H. pylori infection and IDA. PMID:28355210

  13. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os pa