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Sample records for pygmy states observed

  1. Diversity among African pygmies.

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    Fernando V Ramírez Rozzi

    Full Text Available Although dissimilarities in cranial and post-cranial morphology among African pygmies groups have been recognized, comparative studies on skull morphology usually pull all pygmies together assuming that morphological characters are similar among them and different with respect to other populations. The main aim of this study is to compare cranial morphology between African pygmies and non-pygmies populations from Equatorial Africa derived from both the Eastern and the Western regions in order to test if the greatest morphological difference is obtained in the comparison between pygmies and non-pygmies. Thirty three-dimensional (3D landmarks registered with Microscribe in four cranial samples (Western and Eastern pygmies and non-pygmies were obtained. Multivariate analysis (generalized Procrustes analysis, Mahalanobis distances, multivariate regression and complementary dimensions of size were evaluated with ANOVA and post hoc LSD. Results suggest that important cranial shape differentiation does occur between pygmies and non-pygmies but also between Eastern and Western populations and that size changes and allometries do not affect similarly Eastern and Western pygmies. Therefore, our findings raise serious doubt about the fact to consider African pygmies as a homogenous group in studies on skull morphology. Differences in cranial morphology among pygmies would suggest differentiation after divergence. Although not directly related to skull differentiation, the diversity among pygmies would probably suggest that the process responsible for reduced stature occurred after the split of the ancestors of modern Eastern and Western pygmies.

  2. Sociocultural behavior, sex-biased admixture, and effective population sizes in Central African Pygmies and non-Pygmies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdu, Paul; Becker, Noémie S A; Froment, Alain; Georges, Myriam; Grugni, Viola; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Hombert, Jean-Marie; Van der Veen, Lolke; Le Bomin, Sylvie; Bahuchet, Serge; Heyer, Evelyne; Austerlitz, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Sociocultural phenomena, such as exogamy or phylopatry, can largely determine human sex-specific demography. In Central Africa, diverging patterns of sex-specific genetic variation have been observed between mobile hunter-gatherer Pygmies and sedentary agricultural non-Pygmies. However, their sex-specific demography remains largely unknown. Using population genetics and approximate Bayesian computation approaches, we inferred male and female effective population sizes, sex-specific migration, and admixture rates in 23 Central African Pygmy and non-Pygmy populations, genotyped for autosomal, X-linked, Y-linked, and mitochondrial markers. We found much larger effective population sizes and migration rates among non-Pygmy populations than among Pygmies, in agreement with the recent expansions and migrations of non-Pygmies and, conversely, the isolation and stationary demography of Pygmy groups. We found larger effective sizes and migration rates for males than for females for Pygmies, and vice versa for non-Pygmies. Thus, although most Pygmy populations have patrilocal customs, their sex-specific genetic patterns resemble those of matrilocal populations. In fact, our results are consistent with a lower prevalence of polygyny and patrilocality in Pygmies compared with non-Pygmies and a potential female transmission of reproductive success in Pygmies. Finally, Pygmy populations showed variable admixture levels with the non-Pygmies, with often much larger introgression from male than from female lineages. Social discrimination against Pygmies triggering complex movements of spouses in intermarriages can explain these male-biased admixture patterns in a patrilocal context. We show how gender-related sociocultural phenomena can determine highly variable sex-specific demography among populations, and how population genetic approaches contrasting chromosomal types allow inferring detailed human sex-specific demographic history.

  3. Isospin character of low-lying pygmy dipole states in 208Pb via inelastic scattering of 17O ions.

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    Crespi, F C L; Bracco, A; Nicolini, R; Mengoni, D; Pellegri, L; Lanza, E G; Leoni, S; Maj, A; Kmiecik, M; Avigo, R; Benzoni, G; Blasi, N; Boiano, C; Bottoni, S; Brambilla, S; Camera, F; Ceruti, S; Giaz, A; Million, B; Morales, A I; Vandone, V; Wieland, O; Bednarczyk, P; Ciemała, M; Grebosz, J; Krzysiek, M; Mazurek, K; Zieblinski, M; Bazzacco, D; Bellato, M; Birkenbach, B; Bortolato, D; Calore, E; Cederwall, B; Charles, L; de Angelis, G; Désesquelles, P; Eberth, J; Farnea, E; Gadea, A; Görgen, A; Gottardo, A; Isocrate, R; Jolie, J; Jungclaus, A; Karkour, N; Korten, W; Menegazzo, R; Michelagnoli, C; Molini, P; Napoli, D R; Pullia, A; Recchia, F; Reiter, P; Rosso, D; Sahin, E; Salsac, M D; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Simpson, J; Söderström, P-A; Stezowski, O; Theisen, Ch; Ur, C; Valiente-Dobón, J J

    2014-07-04

    The properties of pygmy dipole states in 208Pb were investigated using the 208Pb(17O, 17O'γ) reaction at 340 MeV and measuring the γ decay with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array. Cross sections and angular distributions of the emitted γ rays and of the scattered particles were measured. The results are compared with (γ, γ') and (p, p') data. The data analysis with the distorted wave Born approximation approach gives a good description of the elastic scattering and of the inelastic excitation of the 2+ and 3- states. For the dipole transitions a form factor obtained by folding a microscopically calculated transition density was used for the first time. This has allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states from 4 to 8 MeV.

  4. Gamma decay of pygmy states in 90,94Zr from inelastic scattering of light ions

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    Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Tamii, A.; Blasi, N.; Camera, F.; Wieland, O.; Aoi, N.; Balabanski, D.; Bassauer, S.; Brown, A. S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Ciemala, M.; Czeszumska, A.; Davies, P. J.; Donaldson, L.; Fang, Y.; Fujita, H.; Gey, G.; Hoang, T. H.; Ichige, N.; Ideguchi, E.; Inoue, A.; Isaak, J.; Iwamoto, C.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jin, O. H.; Klaus, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Koike, T.; Krzysiek, M.; Raju, M. Kumar; Liu, M.; Maj, A.; Montanari, D.; Morris, L.; Noji, S.; Pickstone, S. G.; Savran, D.; Spieker, M.; Steinhilber, G.; Sullivan, C.; Wasilewska, B.; Werner, V.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Zhou, X.; Zhu, S.

    2018-05-01

    We performed experiments to study the low-energy part of the E1 response (Pygmy Dipole Resonance) in 90,94Zr nuclei, by measuring the (p,p’γ) and (α,α’γ) inelastic scattering reactions at energies Ebeam,p = 80 MeV and Ebeam,α = 130 MeV respectively. The inelastically scattered particles were measured by employing the high-resolution spectrometer Grand Raiden. The gamma-rays emitted following the de-excitation of the Zr target nuclei were detected using both the clover type HPGe detectors of the CAGRA array and the large volume LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors from the HECTOR+ array. Some preliminary results are presented here.

  5. Decay properties of the Pygmy dipole resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaak, J.; Savran, D.; Silva, J. [EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS, Frankfurt (Germany); Aumann, T.; Loeher, B. [IKP, TU Darmstadt (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Beck, T.; Gayer, U.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Scheit, H.; Werner, V.; Zweidinger, M. [IKP, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Cooper, N. [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven (United States); Derya, V.; Zilges, A. [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Kelley, J. [Department of Physics, Duke University, TUNL (United States); Department of Physics, NCSU (United States); Scheck, M. [School of Engineering, UWS, Paisley (United Kingdom); SUPA, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Tornow, W.; Weller, H. [Department of Physics, Duke University, TUNL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The so-called Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) has been investigated in stable and in a few unstable nuclei in the past decades. So far, decay properties have been determined only in an indirect or model-dependent way. An excellent tool to extend the study of the decay pattern of the PDR is provided by the γ{sup 3}-setup at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS). The combination of the γ-γ-coincidence method and the quasi-monochromatic photon beam at HIγS allows to observe primary transitions directly with high sensitivity and to obtain information on the decay behavior of individual states as well as extracting averaged quantities in a model-independent way. Recent experimental results for nuclei in the Z=50 and N=82 mass region are presented.

  6. Pygmy resonances probed with electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Pygmy resonances in light nuclei excited in electron scattering are discussed. These collective modes will be explored in future electron-ion colliders such as ELISe/FAIR (spokesperson: Haik Simon - GSI). Response functions for direct breakup are explored with few-body and hydrodynamical models, including the dependence upon final state interactions

  7. Distribution and Numbers of Pygmies in Central African Forests.

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    Jesús Olivero

    Full Text Available Pygmy populations occupy a vast territory extending west-to-east along the central African belt from the Congo Basin to Lake Victoria. However, their numbers and actual distribution is not known precisely. Here, we undertake this task by using locational data and population sizes for an unprecedented number of known Pygmy camps and settlements (n = 654 in five of the nine countries where currently distributed. With these data we develop spatial distribution models based on the favourability function, which distinguish areas with favourable environmental conditions from those less suitable for Pygmy presence. Highly favourable areas were significantly explained by presence of tropical forests, and by lower human pressure variables. For documented Pygmy settlements, we use the relationship between observed population sizes and predicted favourability values to estimate the total Pygmy population throughout Central Africa. We estimate that around 920,000 Pygmies (over 60% in DRC is possible within favourable forest areas in Central Africa. We argue that fragmentation of the existing Pygmy populations, alongside pressure from extractive industries and sometimes conflict with conservation areas, endanger their future. There is an urgent need to inform policies that can mitigate against future external threats to these indigenous peoples' culture and lifestyles.

  8. The decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance of 140Ce

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    Löher, B.; Savran, D.; Aumann, T.; Beller, J.; Bhike, M.; Cooper, N.; Derya, V.; Duchêne, M.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Humby, P.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Knörzer, M.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Romig, C.; Scheck, M.; Scheit, H.; Silva, J.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wamers, F.; Weller, H.; Werner, V.; Zilges, A.

    2016-05-01

    The decay properties of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) have been investigated in the semi-magic N = 82 nucleus 140Ce using a novel combination of nuclear resonance fluorescence and γ-γ coincidence techniques. Branching ratios for transitions to low-lying excited states are determined in a direct and model-independent way both for individual excited states and for excitation energy intervals. Comparison of the experimental results to microscopic calculations in the quasi-particle phonon model exhibits an excellent agreement, supporting the observation that the Pygmy Dipole Resonance couples to the ground state as well as to low-lying excited states. A 10% mixing of the PDR and the [21+ × PDR ] is extracted.

  9. The decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance of 140Ce

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    B. Löher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The decay properties of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR have been investigated in the semi-magic N=82 nucleus 140Ce using a novel combination of nuclear resonance fluorescence and γ–γ coincidence techniques. Branching ratios for transitions to low-lying excited states are determined in a direct and model-independent way both for individual excited states and for excitation energy intervals. Comparison of the experimental results to microscopic calculations in the quasi-particle phonon model exhibits an excellent agreement, supporting the observation that the Pygmy Dipole Resonance couples to the ground state as well as to low-lying excited states. A 10% mixing of the PDR and the [21+×PDR] is extracted.

  10. Splitting of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, J.; Zilges, A.; Butler, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Scheck, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harissopulos, S.; Lagoyannis, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ring, P.; Litvinova, E.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Sonnabend, K.; Popescu, L.; Savran, D.; Stoica, V. I.; Woertche, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years investigations have been made to study the electric Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) systematically, mainly in semi-magic nuclei. For this purpose the well understood high resolution (γ,γ') photon scattering method is used. In complementary (α,α'γ) coincidence experiments at E α = 136 MeV a similar γ-energy resolution and a high selectivity to E1 transitions can be obtained at the Big-Bite Spectrometer (BBS) at KVI, Groningen. In comparison to the (γ,γ') method a structural splitting of the PDR is observed in the N = 82 nuclei 138 Ba and 140 Ce and in the Z = 50 nucleus 124 Sn. The low energy part is excited in (γ,γ') as well as in (α,α'γ) while the high energy part is observed in (γ,γ') only. The experimental results together with theoretical QPM and RQTBA calculations on 124 Sn which are able to reproduce the splitting of the PDR qualitatively are presented. The low-lying group of J π = 1 - states seem to represent the more isoscalar neutron-skin oscillation of the PDR while the energetically higher-lying states seemingly belong to the transitional region between the PDR and the isovector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR).

  11. Paranoids, pygmies, pariahs and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The spread of nuclear weapons has finally become a central item on the foreign policy agenda. But the fervor of most opponents of proliferation has been matched only by their reluctance to deal with the causes of the threat. The misplaced focus on ways to isolate weapons-related capabilities obscures the importance of the stickier but more salient problem of the incentives many nations have to get a bomb: fear or ambition. As long as antiproliferation strategy goes no further than schemes to keep the genie in a few bottles, we risk doing both more and less than necessary. Distressingly few arms-control enthusiasts have faced up to the full price of nonproliferation. The needed reorientation in thinking, which is really only a return to the ageless problem of balance of power, has been impeded by prevalent fallacies of emphasis about what causes the threat, who the candidates for proliferation are, and what strategies are applicable to which candidates. The author proceeds to discuss: (1) causes (the moralist fallacy, the economic fallacy, the diseconomic fallacy, and the technicist fallacy); (2) candidates (the pygmy states, the paranoid states, the pariah states, and five options of the U.S.); (3) cures (the fatalist fallacy, the multilateral fallacy, the embargo fallacy, the safeguards fallacy, the umbrella fallacy, the two-wrongs-don't-make-a-right fallacy, and the golden key fallacy); and (4) choices

  12. Physical comparison between Rampasasa Pygmy and Yogyakarta children of Indonesia

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    Neni Trilusiana Rahmawati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In growth studies, somatotyping allows one to characterize changes in physique during growth in order to monitor growth patterns and to better understand variations in adult physique. Information on the physique of children with short stature is limited In Indonesia the study of somatotype for Pygmy children had never been done. The aims of this study were to compare the physiques of Rampasasa Pygmy and Yogyakarta children and to evaluate factors that might lead to variability in physiques. The sample consisted of 61 Rampasasa Pygmy (32 boys and 29 girls and 319 Javanese children in Yogyakarta (173 boys and 146 girls aged 8–13 years. Height, weight, biepicondylar breadths of the humerus and femur, calf and upper arm circumferences, and skinfolds (at triceps, subscapula, calf, and supraspine were measured on each subject. We used somatotyped by the Heath-Carter method. The results showed that the Pygmy children were shorter, lighter, and less endomorphic than the Yogyakarta children. Our findings suggest that the observed differences between Rampasasa Pygmy and Yogyakarta children could be related mainly to environment background in the two areas.

  13. Spectral structure of the pygmy dipole resonance.

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    Tonchev, A P; Hammond, S L; Kelley, J H; Kwan, E; Lenske, H; Rusev, G; Tornow, W; Tsoneva, N

    2010-02-19

    High-sensitivity studies of E1 and M1 transitions observed in the reaction 138Ba(gamma,gamma{'}) at energies below the one-neutron separation energy have been performed using the nearly monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams of the HIgammaS facility. The electric dipole character of the so-called "pygmy" dipole resonance was experimentally verified for excitations from 4.0 to 8.6 MeV. The fine structure of the M1 "spin-flip" mode was observed for the first time in N=82 nuclei.

  14. Structure of the pygmy dipole resonance in Sn-124

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endres, J.; Savran, D.; Butler, P. A.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harissopulos, S.; Herzberg, R. -D.; Kruecken, R.; Lagoyannis, A.; Litvinova, E.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Popescu, L.; Ring, P.; Scheck, M.; Schlueter, F.; Sonnabend, K.; Stoica, V. I.; Zilges, A.; Wortche, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Background: In atomic nuclei, a concentration of electric dipole strength around the particle threshold, commonly denoted as pygmy dipole resonance, may have a significant impact on nuclear structure properties and astrophysical scenarios. A clear identification of these states and the structure of

  15. Isospin Character of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in Sn-124

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endres, J.; Litvinova, E.; Savran, D.; Butler, P. A.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harissopulos, S.; Herzberg, R. -D.; Kruecken, R.; Lagoyannis, A.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu; Popescu, L.; Ring, P.; Scheck, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Stoica, V. I.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2010-01-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance has been studied in the proton-magic nucleus Sn-124 with the (alpha, alpha'gamma) coincidence method at E-alpha = 136 MeV. The comparison with results of photon-scattering experiments reveals a splitting into two components with different structure: one group of states

  16. Mitochondrial, Y-chromosomal and autosomal variation in Mbenzele Pygmies from the Central African Republic.

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    Anagnostou, Paolo; Coia, Valentina; Spedini, Gabriella; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we carry out a combined analysis of autosomal (ten microsatellites and an Alu insertion), mitochondrial (HVR-1 sequence, 360 nucleotides) and Y-chromosomal (seven microsatellites) variation in the Mbenzele Pygmies from the Central African Republic. This study focuses on two important questions concerning the admixture and origin of African Pygmies. Ethnographic observations suggest a sex-biased gene flow between the Bantus and Pygmies, an issue which could be clarified through genetic analyses may shed light. A study of intrapopulational variation of mtDNA and Y-chromosome produces results in accordance with the hypothesized matrimonial behaviour. In fact, while shared mitochondrial haplotypes belonging to the L1c5 (or L1c1a1 clade) sub-haplogroup provides evidence of a Pygmy-to-Bantu female biased gene flow, a male biased gene flow from Bantu to Pygmies is supported by the distribution of the Y-chromosomes bearing M2 mutation. The second part of our study regards the question of the genetic relationships between Western and Eastern Pygmies. Our results favour the pre-Bantu hypothesis which suggests that the two Pygmy groups separated in ancient times (at least 18,000 years ago), whereas they do not support the recent divergence and differential admixture hypothesis which posits their separation as a consequence of the Bantu expansion (2,000-3,000 years ago).

  17. Evolution of pygmy angelfishes: Recent divergences, introgression, and the usefulness of color in taxonomy

    KAUST Repository

    Gaither, Michelle R.; Schultz, Jennifer K.; Bellwood, David R.; Pyle, Richard L.; DiBattista, Joseph; Rocha, Luiz A.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    The pygmy angelfishes (genus Centropyge, family Pomacanthidae) are brightly colored species that occupy reef habitats in every tropical ocean. Some species are rarely observed because they occur below conventional scuba depths. Their striking

  18. Differences between Pygmy and Non-Pygmy Hunting in Congo Basin Forests.

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    John E Fa

    Full Text Available We use data on game harvest from 60 Pygmy and non-Pygmy settlements in the Congo Basin forests to examine whether hunting patterns and prey profiles differ between the two hunter groups. For each group, we calculate hunted animal numbers and biomass available per inhabitant, P, per year (harvest rates and killed per hunter, H, per year (extraction rates. We assess the impact of hunting of both hunter groups from estimates of numbers and biomass of prey species killed per square kilometre, and by examining the proportion of hunted taxa of low, medium and high population growth rates as a measure of their vulnerability to overhunting. We then map harvested biomass (kg-1P-1Yr-1 of bushmeat by Pygmies and non-Pygmies throughout the Congo Basin. Hunting patterns differ between Pygmies and non-Pygmies; Pygmies take larger and different prey and non-Pygmies sell more for profit. We show that non-Pygmies have a potentially more severe impact on prey populations than Pygmies. This is because non-Pygmies hunt a wider range of species, and twice as many animals are taken per square kilometre. Moreover, in non-Pygmy settlements there was a larger proportion of game taken of low population growth rate. Our harvest map shows that the non-Pygmy population may be responsible for 27 times more animals harvested than the Pygmy population. Such differences indicate that the intense competition that may arise from the more widespread commercial hunting by non-Pygmies is a far more important constraint and source of conflict than are protected areas.

  19. Hierarchical spatial models for predicting pygmy rabbit distribution and relative abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T.L.; Odei, J.B.; Hooten, M.B.; Edwards, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    Conservationists routinely use species distribution models to plan conservation, restoration and development actions, while ecologists use them to infer process from pattern. These models tend to work well for common or easily observable species, but are of limited utility for rare and cryptic species. This may be because honest accounting of known observation bias and spatial autocorrelation are rarely included, thereby limiting statistical inference of resulting distribution maps. We specified and implemented a spatially explicit Bayesian hierarchical model for a cryptic mammal species (pygmy rabbit Brachylagus idahoensis). Our approach used two levels of indirect sign that are naturally hierarchical (burrows and faecal pellets) to build a model that allows for inference on regression coefficients as well as spatially explicit model parameters. We also produced maps of rabbit distribution (occupied burrows) and relative abundance (number of burrows expected to be occupied by pygmy rabbits). The model demonstrated statistically rigorous spatial prediction by including spatial autocorrelation and measurement uncertainty. We demonstrated flexibility of our modelling framework by depicting probabilistic distribution predictions using different assumptions of pygmy rabbit habitat requirements. Spatial representations of the variance of posterior predictive distributions were obtained to evaluate heterogeneity in model fit across the spatial domain. Leave-one-out cross-validation was conducted to evaluate the overall model fit. Synthesis and applications. Our method draws on the strengths of previous work, thereby bridging and extending two active areas of ecological research: species distribution models and multi-state occupancy modelling. Our framework can be extended to encompass both larger extents and other species for which direct estimation of abundance is difficult. ?? 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2010 British Ecological Society.

  20. The pygmy dipole resonance in neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Nguyen Quang; Kiet, Hoang Anh Tuan; Duc, Huynh Ngoc; Chuong, Nguyen Thi

    2016-01-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance (PDR), which has been observed via the enhancement of the electric dipole strength E 1 of atomic nuclei, is studied within a microscopic collective model. The latter employs the Hartree-Fock (HF) method with effective nucleon-nucleon interactions of the Skyrme types plus the random-phase approximation (RPA). The results of the calculations obtained for various even-even nuclei such as "1"6"-"2"8O, "4"0"-"5"8Ca, "1"0"0"-"1"2"0Sn, and "1"8"2"-"2"1"8Pb show that the PDR is significantly enhanced when the number of neutrons outside the stable core of the nucleus is increased, that is, in the neutron-rich nuclei. As the result, the relative ratio between the energy weighted sum of the strength of the PDR and that of the GDR (giant dipole resonance) does not exceed 4%. The collectivity of the PDR and GDR states will be also discussed. (paper)

  1. Ecology and conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; Deborah M. Finch

    2000-01-01

    This report is the result of a cooperative effort by the Rocky Mountain Research Station and the USDA Forest Service Region 3, with participation by the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the Bureau of Land Management. It assesses the state of knowledge related to the conservation status of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona. The population decline of this...

  2. Relationships between gas field development and the presence and abundance of pygmy rabbits in southwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, Stephen; Carter, Sarah; Ignizio, Drew A.; Freeman, Aaron T.

    2017-01-01

    More than 5957 km2 in southwestern Wyoming is currently covered by operational gas fields, and further development is projected through 2030. Gas fields fragment landscapes through conversion of native vegetation to roads, well pads, pipeline corridors, and other infrastructure elements. The sagebrush steppe landscape where most of this development is occurring harbors 24 sagebrush-associated species of greatest conservation need, but the effects of gas energy development on most of these species are unknown. Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis) are one such species. In 2011, we began collecting three years of survey data to examine the relationship between gas field development density and pygmy rabbit site occupancy patterns on four major Wyoming gas fields (Continental Divide–Creston–Blue Gap, Jonah, Moxa Arch, Pinedale Anticline Project Area). We surveyed 120 plots across four gas fields, with plots distributed across the density gradient of gas well pads on each field. In a 1 km radius around the center of each plot, we measured the area covered by each of 10 gas field infrastructure elements and by shrub cover using 2012 National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery. We then modeled the relationship between gas field elements, pygmy rabbit presence, and two indices of pygmy rabbit abundance. Gas field infrastructure elements—specifically buried utility corridors and a complex of gas well pads, adjacent disturbed areas, and well pad access roads—were negatively correlated with pygmy rabbit presence and abundance indices, with sharp declines apparent after approximately 2% of the area consisted of gas field infrastructure. We conclude that pygmy rabbits in southwestern Wyoming may be sensitive to gas field development at levels similar to those observed for greater sage-grouse, and may suffer local population declines at lower levels of development than are allowed in existing plans and policies designed to conserve greater sage-grouse by limiting

  3. Limited dispersal in mobile hunter–gatherer Baka Pygmies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdu, Paul; Leblois, Raphaël; Froment, Alain; Théry, Sylvain; Bahuchet, Serge; Rousset, François; Heyer, Evelyne; Vitalis, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    Hunter–gatherer Pygmies from Central Africa are described as being extremely mobile. Using neutral genetic markers and population genetics theory, we explored the dispersal behaviour of the Baka Pygmies from Cameroon, one of the largest Pygmy populations in Central Africa. We found a strong correlation between genetic and geographical distances: a pattern of isolation by distance arising from limited parent–offspring dispersal. Our study suggests that mobile hunter–gatherers do not necessarily disperse over wide geographical areas. PMID:20427330

  4. Filtering with Discrete State Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, F.; Elliott, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of estimating a finite state Markov chain observed via a process on the same state space is discussed. Optimal solutions are given for both the 'weak' and 'strong' formulations of the problem. The 'weak' formulation proceeds using a reference probability and a measure change for the Markov chain. The 'strong' formulation considers an observation process related to perturbations of the counting processes associated with the Markov chain. In this case the 'small noise' convergence is investigated

  5. Functional observer and state feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we show the relation between state space approach and transfer function approach for functional observer and state feedback design. Two approaches can be transformed into each other, based on this result. More importantly, we find that the state space approach introduces some severe, unnecessary restrictions in solving the problem. The restrictions are, however, reduced to be a trivial condition in transfer function approach. It is believed that the result presented in this paper will be useful in developing both approaches, and motivate some new results for solving the problem

  6. THE MANAGEMENT OF AN ORAL ANAPLASTIC SARCOMA IN A PYGMY HIPPOPOTAMUS (CHOEROPSIS LIBERIENSIS) USING INTRALESIONAL CHEMOTHERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklinos, Lydia H V; Masters, Nicholas; Feltrer, Yedra; Pocknell, Ann; Bolt, David M; Dakin, Stephanie; Berry, Karla; Molenaar, Fieke M

    2017-03-01

    An adult female captive pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) was diagnosed with an oral anaplastic sarcoma. The tumor was surgically debulked and intralesional chemotherapy with mitomycin C (0.4 mg/cm 3 of tumor) and cisplatin (1 mg/cm 3 of tumor) was administered. Chemotherapeutic treatment proved difficult due to the risks of repeated anesthetics and unknown drug efficacies. Marked proliferation of the mass was observed during estrus, and chemotherapy was repeated as an experimental treatment to slow tumor progression in order for the animal to remain in the species breeding program. Tumor proliferation was detected during the first trimester of pregnancy; however, in the lactation period, the mass became quiescent. No adverse reactions to chemotherapeutic drugs were observed and the animal continues to be monitored for tumor progression. This is the first report of an anaplastic sarcoma and of chemotherapy use in a pygmy hippopotamus and it highlights logistical considerations for treating neoplasia in this species.

  7. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence off 54Cr: The Onset of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, P. C.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Krishichayan; Gayer, U.; Isaak, J.; Löher, B.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Schilling, M.; Tornow, W.; Werner, V.; Zweidinger, M.

    2016-06-01

    Low-lying electric and magnetic dipole excitations (E1 and M1) below the neutron separation threshold, particularly the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR), have drawn considerable attention in the last years. So far, mostly moderately heavy nuclei in the mass regions around A = 90 and A = 140 were examined with respect to the PDR. In the present work, the systematics of the PDR have been extended by measuring excitation strengths and parity quantum numbers of J = 1 states in lighter nuclei near A = 50 in order to gather information on the onset of the PDR. The nuclei 50,52,54Cr and 48,50Ti were examined via bremsstrahlung produced at the DArmstadt Superconducting electron Linear Accelerator (S-DALINAC) with photon energies up to 9.7 MeV with the method of nuclear resonance fluorescence. Numerous excited states were observed, many of which for the first time. The parity quantum numbers of these states have been determined at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory in Durham, NC, USA. Informations to the methods and the experimental setups will be provided and the results on 54Cr achieved will be discussed with respect to the onset of the PDR.

  8. Study of the pygmy dipole resonance in {sup 94}Mo using the (α,α{sup ′}γ) coincidence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derya, V., E-mail: derya@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Endres, J.; Elvers, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Harakeh, M.N. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Pietralla, N.; Romig, C. [Institut für Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Savran, D. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, Ruth-Moufang-Straße 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Scheck, M.; Siebenhühner, F. [Institut für Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Stoica, V.I. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Sociology/ICS, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Grote Rozenstraat 31, 9712 TG Groningen (Netherlands); Wörtche, H.J. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); and others

    2013-05-15

    The (α,α{sup ′}γ) reaction at E{sub α}=136 MeV was used to study the electric dipole response in the open-shell vibrational nucleus {sup 94}Mo below the neutron-separation threshold. The coincidence experiment has been performed at the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut in Groningen, The Netherlands, exploiting the Big-Bite Spectrometer and an array of large volume High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. Due to the excellent energy resolution and high selectivity to transitions stemming from the pygmy dipole resonance, singles α-scattering cross sections could be determined for individual electric dipole excitations between 4 and 8 MeV. For three of the excited low-lying J{sup π}=1{sup −} states in {sup 94}Mo a γ-decay branch into the J{sup π}=2{sub 1}{sup +} state could be observed. The experiment extends the systematic studies of the pygmy dipole resonance by real-photon scattering (γ,γ{sup ′}) experiments and (α,α{sup ′}γ) experiments. Recently, a (γ,γ{sup ′}) experiment on {sup 94}Mo was performed at the Darmstadt High-Intensity Photon Setup at the S-DALINAC in Darmstadt, Germany, permitting the comparison of B(E1)↑ strength distribution and α-scattering cross sections.

  9. Fluralaner as a single dose oral treatment for Caparinia tripilis in a pygmy African hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Camilo; Sheinberg Waisburd, Galia; Pineda, Jocelyn; Heredia, Rafael; Yarto, Enrique; Cordero, Alberto M

    2017-12-01

    African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) are popular pets belonging to the Erinaceidae family of spined mammals. Amongst the most common skin diseases occurring in this species is infestation caused by the mite Caparinia spp. Due to their skin anatomy and spiny coat, detection of skin lesions in these hedgehogs can be difficult. This may result in delays in seeking medical care, which may lead to secondary bacterial infection and self-inflicted trauma. Multiple therapies have been used in the treatment of this skin condition including ivermectin, amitraz, fipronil and selamectin. A drug which could be administered as a single oral dose would be advantageous to these pets and their owners. To evaluate the effect of a single oral dose (15 mg/kg) of fluralaner on Caparinia tripilis infestation in the African pygmy hedgehog. A 10-month-old African pygmy hedgehog weighing 184 g. Response to treatment was monitored by dermatological examination and superficial skin scrapings repeated at 7, 14, 21, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days following fluralaner administration. On Day 7 after treatment, adult mites were observed exhibiting normal movement. On Day 14, only dead mites were observed. No life stages of the mites were found after Day 21. A single oral dose at 15 mg/kg of fluralaner was effective within 21 days after treatment for capariniasis in this case. Further studies are required to evaluate the drug's safety and toxicology in hedgehogs, and to confirm efficacy. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  10. Pygmy quadrupole resonance as a manifestation of the nuclear skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoneva, Nadia [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Lenske, Horst [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a new mode of nuclear excitation called pygmy quadrupole resonance (PQR) was theoretically predicted in the framework of energy-density functional (EDF) theory plus three-phonon quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) in Sn isotopic chain. It is closely connected with higher order multipole vibrations of nuclear skin induced by the action of the electromagnetic and hadronic external fields. The predictions initiated new experiments using ({sup 17}O,{sup 17}O{sup '}γ), (α,α{sup '}γ) and (γ,γ{sup '}) reactions which were carried out in {sup 124}Sn nucleus. The aim was to probe for the first time experimentally, the possibility of existence of PQR. The detailed analysis of the obtained experimental results in comparison with the EDF+QPM theory indicates clearly the presence of a multitude of discrete low-energy 2{sup +} excitations of neutron type which can be addressed to PQR mode. The independent measurements of B(E2) values with different probes and the theory allow to identify the dominant isoscalar character of these states. Furthermore, newly determined γ-decay branching ratios exclude a statistical origin of the PQR strength. The latter are important to discriminate between PQR and multiphonon excitations.

  11. The pygmy whitefish, Coregonus coulteri, in Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschmeyer, Paul H.; Bailey, Reeve M.

    1955-01-01

    Bottom trawling by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service motor vessel Cisco in Lake Superior in 1952–1953 revealed a large population of a tiny whitefish, Coregonus (Prosopium) coulteri, which has been reported previously only from northwestern North America. The hiatus in range, from Lake Superior to the Columbia River basin, is the greatest known for a North American freshwater fish. Although minor structural differences characterize the disjunct populations of the pygmy whitefish, these are not deemed worthy of nomenclatorial recognition. Comparisons with related species indicate that the pygmy whitefish is distinctive in the small size, large scales, few vertebrae, few pyloric caeca, and in other characters.

  12. Fish, fans and hydroids: host species of pygmy seahorses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Reijnen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the octocoral and hydrozoa host species of pygmy seahorses is provided, based on recently collected data for H. bargibanti, H. denise and H. pontohi and literature records. Seven new interspecific host-species associations are recognized, and an overview of the so far documented number of host species is given. Detailed re-examination of octocoral type material and a review of the taxonomic history are included, as a baseline for further studies. The host-specificity and colour morphs of pygmy seahorses are discussed, as well as the validity of (previous identifications and conservations issues.

  13. Fish, fans and hydroids: host species of pygmy seahorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnen, Bastian T; van der Meij, Sancia E T; van Ofwegen, Leen P

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the octocoral and hydrozoan host species of pygmy seahorses is provided based on literature records and recently collected field data for Hippocampus bargibanti, Hippocampus denise and Hippocampus pontohi. Seven new associations are recognized and an overview of the so far documented host species is given. A detailed re-examination of octocoral type material and a review of the taxonomic history of the alcyonacean genera Annella (Subergorgiidae) and Muricella (Acanthogorgiidae) are included as baseline for future revisions. The host specificity and colour morphs of pygmy seahorses are discussed, as well as the reliability of (previous) identifications and conservation issues.

  14. The pygmy quadrupole resonance and neutron-skin modes in 124Sn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Spieker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an extensive experimental study of the recently predicted pygmy quadrupole resonance (PQR in Sn isotopes, where complementary probes were used. In this study, (α,α′γ and (γ,γ′ experiments were performed on 124Sn. In both reactions, Jπ=2+ states below an excitation energy of 5 MeV were populated. The E2 strength integrated over the full transition densities could be extracted from the (γ,γ′ experiment, while the (α,α′γ experiment at the chosen kinematics strongly favors the excitation of surface modes because of the strong α-particle absorption in the nuclear interior. The excitation of such modes is in accordance with the quadrupole-type oscillation of the neutron skin predicted by a microscopic approach based on self-consistent density functional theory and the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM. The newly determined γ-decay branching ratios hint at a non-statistical character of the E2 strength, as it has also been recently pointed out for the case of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR. This allows us to distinguish between PQR-type and multiphonon excitations and, consequently, supports the recent first experimental indications of a PQR in 124Sn.

  15. Minimal covariant observables identifying all pure states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmeli, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.carmeli@gmail.com [D.I.M.E., Università di Genova, Via Cadorna 2, I-17100 Savona (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku (Finland); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-09-02

    It has been recently shown by Heinosaari, Mazzarella and Wolf (2013) [1] that an observable that identifies all pure states of a d-dimensional quantum system has minimally 4d−4 outcomes or slightly less (the exact number depending on d). However, no simple construction of this type of minimal observable is known. We investigate covariant observables that identify all pure states and have minimal number of outcomes. It is shown that the existence of this kind of observables depends on the dimension of the Hilbert space.

  16. Test of the Brink-Axel Hypothesis for the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Bassauer, S.; Bertulani, C. A.; Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Ito, T.; Krugmann, A.; Liu, B.; Maeda, Y.; Miki, K.; Neveling, R.; Pietralla, N.; Poltoratska, I.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Shima, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Zweidinger, M.

    2017-11-01

    The gamma strength function and level density of 1- states in 96Mo have been extracted from a high-resolution study of the (p → , p→ ' ) reaction at 295 MeV and extreme forward angles. By comparison with compound nucleus γ decay experiments, this allows a test of the generalized Brink-Axel hypothesis in the energy region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The Brink-Axel hypothesis is commonly assumed in astrophysical reaction network calculations and states that the gamma strength function in nuclei is independent of the structure of the initial and final state. The present results validate the Brink-Axel hypothesis for 96Mo and provide independent confirmation of the methods used to separate gamma strength function and level density in γ decay experiments.

  17. 'Pygmy' old-growth redwood characteristics on an edaphic ecotone in Mendocino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will Russell; Suzie. Woolhouse

    2012-01-01

    The 'pygmy forest' is a specialized community that is adapted to highly acidic, hydrophobic, nutrient deprived soils, and exists in pockets within the coast redwood forest in Mendocino County. While coast redwood is known as an exceptionally tall tree, stunted trees exhibit unusual growth-forms on pygmy soils. We used a stratified random sampling procedure to...

  18. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  19. Observation of a new Bs π state

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a narrow structure, X(5568), in the decay sequence X(5568) → Bs π±, Bs → J/ψ ϕ, J/ψ → μ+μ−, ϕ → K+K−. This is the first observation of a hadronic state with valence quarks of four different flavors. The mass and natural width of the new state are measured to be m = 5567.8 ± 2.9 (stat) +0.9−1.9 (syst) MeV and Γ = 21.9 ± 6.4 (stat) +5.0−2.5 (syst) MeV, and the significance including look-elsewhere effect and systematic uncertainties is 5.1σ. The observation is based on10.4 fb−1 of ppbar collision data at 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  20. Predicting occupancy for pygmy rabbits in Wyoming: an independent evaluation of two species distribution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, Stephen S.; Ignizio, Drew; Keinath, Doug; Copeland, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Species distribution models are an important component of natural-resource conservation planning efforts. Independent, external evaluation of their accuracy is important before they are used in management contexts. We evaluated the classification accuracy of two species distribution models designed to predict the distribution of pygmy rabbit Brachylagus idahoensis habitat in southwestern Wyoming, USA. The Nature Conservancy model was deductive and based on published information and expert opinion, whereas the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model was statistically derived using historical observation data. We randomly selected 187 evaluation survey points throughout southwestern Wyoming in areas predicted to be habitat and areas predicted to be nonhabitat for each model. The Nature Conservancy model correctly classified 39 of 77 (50.6%) unoccupied evaluation plots and 65 of 88 (73.9%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 63.3%. The Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model correctly classified 53 of 95 (55.8%) unoccupied plots and 59 of 88 (67.0%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 61.2%. Based on 95% asymptotic confidence intervals, classification success of the two models did not differ. The models jointly classified 10.8% of the area as habitat and 47.4% of the area as nonhabitat, but were discordant in classifying the remaining 41.9% of the area. To evaluate how anthropogenic development affected model predictive success, we surveyed 120 additional plots among three density levels of gas-field road networks. Classification success declined sharply for both models as road-density level increased beyond 5 km of roads per km-squared area. Both models were more effective at predicting habitat than nonhabitat in relatively undeveloped areas, and neither was effective at accounting for the effects of gas-energy-development road networks. Resource managers who wish to know the amount of pygmy rabbit habitat present in an

  1. Investigation of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in {sup 60}Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, Matthias; Pietralla, Norbert; Romig, Christopher; Savran, Deniz; Sonnabend, Kerstin [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet, Darmstadt (Germany); Rusev, Gencho; Tonchev, Anton P.; Tornow, Werner; Weller, Henry R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Zilges, Andreas [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    At the High Intensity Photon Setup (HIPS) at S-DALINAC in Darmstadt {sup 60}Ni was investigated with unpolarized bremsstrahlung with energies up to 8.0 MeV and 9.9 MeV, respectively. Determination of spin and parity quantum numbers and absolute transition strengths was possible, using HPGe detectors placed under different angles. To assign also parity quantum numbers, the polarized photon beam of the High Intensity Gamma Source (HI{gamma}S) at Duke University was used. With the combined results, evidence of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in {sup 60}Ni was found.

  2. Chaos synchronization based on intermittent state observer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-Hui; Zhou Shi-Ping; Xu De-Ming

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the method of synchronizing slave to the master trajectory using an intermittent state observer by constructing a synchronizer which drives the response system globally tracing the driving system asymptotically. It has been shown from the theory of synchronization error-analysis that a satisfactory result of chaos synchronization is expected under an appropriate intermittent period and state observer. Compared with continuous control method,the proposed intermittent method can target the desired orbit more efficiently. The application of the method is demonstrated on the hyperchaotic Rossler systems. Numerical simulations show that the length of the synchronization interval rs is of crucial importance for our scheme, and the method is robust with respect to parameter mismatch.

  3. State observers for monitoring gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, M.J.; Jones, R.P.; Pritchard, A.J.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes work performed on collaboration with the British Gas Corporation in relation to the development of algorithms for monitoring the condition of high-pressure gas pipelines. The practical problem considered is that of reconstructing the pressure profile along a single length of pipe from pressure measurements at the end points and a further measurement at an intermediate point along the pipe. The approach adopted is based on the implementation of a finite-dimensional asymptotic state observer derived from consideration of the distributed-parameter properties of the system. The paper includes the results of a computational study in which the observer was evaluated against experimental data corresponding to an 80 km section of pipe. These results indicate that the dynamic observer is capable of providing an accurate estimate of the pressure profile over a complete 24 h demand cycle. 5 refs. (authors).

  4. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation

  5. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  6. Music induces universal emotion-related psychophysiological responses: comparing Canadian listeners to Congolese Pygmies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egermann, Hauke; Fernando, Nathalie; Chuen, Lorraine; McAdams, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Subjective and psychophysiological emotional responses to music from two different cultures were compared within these two cultures. Two identical experiments were conducted: the first in the Congolese rainforest with an isolated population of Mebenzélé Pygmies without any exposure to Western music and culture, the second with a group of Western music listeners, with no experience with Congolese music. Forty Pygmies and 40 Canadians listened in pairs to 19 music excerpts of 29–99 s in duration in random order (eight from the Pygmy population and 11 Western instrumental excerpts). For both groups, emotion components were continuously measured: subjective feeling (using a two- dimensional valence and arousal rating interface), peripheral physiological activation, and facial expression. While Pygmy music was rated as positive and arousing by Pygmies, ratings of Western music by Westerners covered the range from arousing to calming and from positive to negative. Comparing psychophysiological responses to emotional qualities of Pygmy music across participant groups showed no similarities. However, Western stimuli, rated as high and low arousing by Canadians, created similar responses in both participant groups (with high arousal associated with increases in subjective and physiological activation). Several low-level acoustical features of the music presented (tempo, pitch, and timbre) were shown to affect subjective and physiological arousal similarly in both cultures. Results suggest that while the subjective dimension of emotional valence might be mediated by cultural learning, changes in arousal might involve a more basic, universal response to low-level acoustical characteristics of music. PMID:25620935

  7. Music Induces Universal Emotion-Related Psychophysiological Responses: Comparing Canadian Listeners To Congolese Pygmies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauke eEgermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjective and psychophysiological emotional responses to music from two different cultures were compared within these two cultures. Two identical experiments were conducted: the first in the Congolese rainforest with an isolated population of Mbenzélé Pygmies without any exposure to Western music and culture, the second with a group of Western music listeners, with no experience with Congolese music. Forty Pygmies and 40 Canadians listened in pairs to 19 music excerpts of 29 to 99 seconds in duration in random order (8 from the Pygmy population and 11 Western instrumental excerpts. For both groups, emotion components were continuously measured: subjective feeling (using a two- dimensional valence and arousal rating interface, peripheral physiological activation, and facial expression. While Pygmy music was rated as positive and arousing by Pygmies, ratings of Western music by Westerners covered the range from arousing to calming and from positive to negative. Comparing psychophysiological responses to emotional qualities of Pygmy music across participant groups showed no similarities. However, Western stimuli, rated as high and low arousing by Canadians, created similar responses in both participant groups (with high arousal associated with increases in subjective and physiological activation. Several low-level acoustical features of the music presented (tempo, pitch, and timbre were shown to affect subjective and physiological arousal similarly in both cultures. Results suggest that while the subjective dimension of emotional valence might be mediated by cultural learning, changes in arousal might involve a more basic, universal response to low-level acoustical characteristics of music.

  8. Genetic variation at the ApoB 3' HVR minisatellite locus in the Mbenzele Pygmies from the Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Belledi, Michele; Capelli, Cristian; Maviglia, Riccardo; Spedini, Gabriella

    2000-09-01

    This study analyzes the polymorphic minisatellite ApoB 3' HVR in the Mbenzele Pygmies from the Central African Republic. A total of 14 alleles was observed, with frequencies ranging from 0.020 (19, 21, 27, and 45 repeat unit alleles) to 0.210 (37 repeat unit allele). Departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not statistically significant. The estimated heterozygosity was 0.874 +/- 0.016. Taking data from the literature into consideration, the results support the hypothesis that the Africans are different from non-Africans due to greater ApoB 3' HVR genetic diversity and a unimodal profile of ApoB 3' HVR allele frequency distribution. Interpopulational relationships were also analyzed using an F(ST) based genetic distance. The results highlight the similarity between the Mbenzele Pygmies and Bantu-speaking groups (Ewondo and Zulu), and the divergence between the Mbenzele and San, the two groups which are often considered to be the most direct descendants of proto-Africans. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 12:588-592, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Diet-related buccal dental microwear patterns in Central African Pygmy foragers and Bantu-speaking farmer and pastoralist populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Romero

    Full Text Available Pygmy hunter-gatherers from Central Africa have shared a network of socioeconomic interactions with non-Pygmy Bantu speakers since agropastoral lifestyle spread across sub-Saharan Africa. Ethnographic studies have reported that their diets differ in consumption of both animal proteins and starch grains. Hunted meat and gathered plant foods, especially underground storage organs (USOs, are dietary staples for pygmies. However, scarce information exists about forager-farmer interaction and the agricultural products used by pygmies. Since the effects of dietary preferences on teeth in modern and past pygmies remain unknown, we explored dietary history through quantitative analysis of buccal microwear on cheek teeth in well-documented Baka pygmies. We then determined if microwear patterns differ among other Pygmy groups (Aka, Mbuti, and Babongo and between Bantu-speaking farmer and pastoralist populations from past centuries. The buccal dental microwear patterns of Pygmy hunter-gatherers and non-Pygmy Bantu pastoralists show lower scratch densities, indicative of diets more intensively based on nonabrasive foodstuffs, compared with Bantu farmers, who consume larger amounts of grit from stoneground foods. The Baka pygmies showed microwear patterns similar to those of ancient Aka and Mbuti, suggesting that the mechanical properties of their preferred diets have not significantly changed through time. In contrast, Babongo pygmies showed scratch densities and lengths similar to those of the farmers, consistent with sociocultural contacts and genetic factors. Our findings support that buccal microwear patterns predict dietary habits independent of ecological conditions and reflect the abrasive properties of preferred or fallback foods such as USOs, which may have contributed to the dietary specializations of ancient human populations.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Polyomavirus JC in the Biaka Pygmies and Bantu of Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvester C Chima

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus JC (JCV is ubiquitous in humans and causes a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system , progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy which is common in AIDS. JCV is excreted in urine of 30-70% of adults worldwide. Based on sequence analysis of JCV complete genomes or fragments thereof, JCV can be classified into geographically derived genotypes. Types 1 and 2 are of European and Asian origin respectively while Types 3 and 6 are African in origin. Type 4, a possible recombinant of European and African genotypes (1 and 3 is common in the USA. To delineate the JCV genotypes in an aboriginal African population, random urine samples were collected from the Biaka Pygmies and Bantu from the Central African Republic. There were 43 males and 25 females aged 4-55 years, with an average age of 26 years. After PCR amplification of JCV in urine, products were directly cycle sequenced. Five of 23 Pygmy adults (22% and four of 20 Bantu adults (20% were positive for JC viruria. DNA sequence analysis revealed JCV Type 3 (two, Type 6 (two and one Type 1 variant in Biaka Pygmies. All the Bantu strains were Type 6. Type 3 and 6 strains of JCV are the predominant strains in central Africa. The presence of multiple subtypes of JCV in Biaka Pygmies may be a result of extensive interactions of Pygmies with their African tribal neighbors during their itinerant movements in the equatorial forest.

  11. Pygmy dipole strength in {sup 86}Kr and systematics of N=50 isotones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwengner, R.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A.R.; Marta, M.; Schilling, K.D.; Wagner, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) (Germany); Massarczyk, R.; Hannaske, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany); Rusev, G.; Kelley, J.H.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Tonchev, A.; Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), Durham NC (United States); Tsoneva, N.; Lenske, H. [Universitaet Giessen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We present results of the first photon-scattering study of {sup 86}Kr. Experiments were carried out with bremsstrahlung at the ELBE accelerator of HZDR and with monoenergetic, polarized γ rays at the HIγS facility of TUNL. A high-pressure gas target was used. We identified about 40 states with J{sup π} = 1{sup -} up to the neutron-separation energy for the first time. For the determination of the absorption cross section, strength in the quasicontinuum was taken into account and a correction of the cross section for inelastic transitions was performed on the basis of simulations of statistical γ-ray cascades. The resulting absorption cross section shows enhanced strength considered as a pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) and is compared with predictions of the quasiparticle-phonon model. The behavior of PDR strength within the series of N=50 isotones is discussed. Enhanced photon strength may influence neutron-capture reaction rates relevant for transmutation studies.

  12. Addisonian Crisis due to Metastatic Adenocarcinoma in a Pygmy Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Nogradi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 15-year-old Pygmy doe was evaluated for acute onset of lethargy, anorexia, and weakness. Adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed based on physical exam findings, blood work abnormalities (hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, azotemia, and hypoglycemia, and lack of cortisol response to the ACTH stimulation test. Abdominal ultrasound exam revealed an intact urinary tract and multiple bilateral peri-renal masses. The doe was treated with intravenous fluid therapy aimed at correcting the electrolyte abnormalities and intravenous corticosteroids. She responded favorably to medical therapy in 24 hours, with dramatic improvement in attitude and appetite. Fluid therapy was discontinued, and the doe was discharged from the hospital on steroid supplementation. She deteriorated rapidly and died at home 36 hours after discharge. Necropsy results revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma originating from the uterus that infiltrated the urinary bladder, the region of the adrenal glands, the left and right renal lymph nodes, the left kidney, the caudal vena cava, the submandibular lymph nodes, the diaphragm, the lungs, and the omentum. Addison’s syndrome in ruminants should be considered as an uncommon sequel of intra-abdominal neoplastic processes.

  13. Collection and preservation of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragusty, J; Hildebrandt, T B; Bouts, T; Göritz, F; Hermes, R

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge about the reproduction of the endangered pygmy hippopotamus is almost non-existent. This study takes the first step toward changing this by devising a protocol for the collection, evaluation, and short-term preservation of semen of this endangered species. Semen was collected successfully from seven bulls by electroejaculation, using a specially designed rectal probe. Mean +/- SEM values of native sperm parameters from combined best fractions were: motility-80.0 +/- 4.1%, concentration-2421 +/- 1530 x 10(6) cells/mL, total collected cell number-759 +/- 261 x 10(6) cells, intact acrosome-87.8 +/- 1.2%, intact morphology-52.7 +/- 4.3%, and, for some, hypoosmotic swelling test-79.3 +/- 4.4% and seminal plasma osmolarity-297.5 +/- 3.3 mOsm. Seven different extenders were tested for sperm storage under chilling conditions: Berliner Cryomedium (BC), Biladyl, modification of Kenney modified Tyrode's medium (KMT), MES medium, Androhep((R)), boar M III() extender and Human Sperm Refrigeration Medium. While differences between males were apparent, the BC was consistently superior to all other extenders in sperm motility and facilitated storage for 7 d with up to 30% motility and some motility even after 3 weeks. With this knowledge in hand, the obvious two directions for future research are to conduct artificial insemination and to develop a technique for sperm cryopreservation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Forest biomass observation: current state and prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Schepaschenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With this article, we provide an overview of the methods, instruments and initiatives for forest biomass observation at global scale. We focus on the freely available information, provided by both remote and in-situ observations. The advantages and limitation of various space borne methods, including optical, radar (C, L and P band and LiDAR, as well as respective instruments available on the orbit (MODIS, Proba-V, Landsat, Sentinel-1, Sentinel-2 , ALOS PALSAR, Envisat ASAR or expecting (BIOMASS, GEDI, NISAR, SAOCOM-CS are discussed. We emphasize the role of in-situ methods in the development of a biomass models, providing calibration and validation of remote sensing data. We focus on freely available forest biomass maps, databases and empirical models. We describe the functionality of Biomass.Geo-Wiki.org portal, which provides access to a collection of global and regional biomass maps in full resolution with unified legend and units overplayed with high-resolution imagery. The Forest-Observation-System.net is announced as an international cooperation to establish a global in-situ forest biomass database to support earth observation and to encourage investment in relevant field-based observations and science. Prospects of unmanned aerial vehicles in the forest inventory are briefly discussed. The work was partly supported by ESA IFBN project (contract 4000114425/15/NL/FF/gp.

  15. Evolution of pygmy angelfishes: Recent divergences, introgression, and the usefulness of color in taxonomy

    KAUST Repository

    Gaither, Michelle R.

    2014-05-01

    The pygmy angelfishes (genus Centropyge, family Pomacanthidae) are brightly colored species that occupy reef habitats in every tropical ocean. Some species are rarely observed because they occur below conventional scuba depths. Their striking coloration can command thousands of U.S. dollars in the aquarium trade, and closely related species are often distinguished only by coloration. These factors have impeded phylogenetic resolution, and every phylogeographic survey to date has reported discordance between coloration, taxonomy, and genetic partitions. Here we report a phylogenetic survey of 29 of the 34 recognized species (N= 94 plus 23 outgroups), based on two mtDNA and three nuclear loci, totaling 2272. bp. The resulting ML and Baysian trees are highly concordant and indicate that the genus Centropyge is paraphyletic, consistent with a previous analysis of the family Pomacanthidae. Two recognized genera (Apolemichthys and Genicanthus) nest within Centropyge, and two subgenera (Xiphypops and Paracentropyge) comprise monophyletic lineages that should be elevated to genus level. Based on an age estimate of 38. Ma for the family Pomacanthidae, Centropyge diverged from the closest extant genus Pygoplites about 33. Ma, three deep lineages within Centropyge diverged about 18-28. Ma, and four species complexes diverged 3-12. Ma. However, in 11 of 13 cases, putative species in these complexes are indistinguishable based on morphology and genetics, being defined solely by coloration. These cases indicate either emerging species or excessive taxonomic splitting based on brightly colored variants. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Observability of Quantum State of Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    David, J R; Mandal, G; Wadia, S R; David, Justin R.; Dhar, Avinash; Mandal, Gautam; Wadia, Spenta R.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze terms subleading to Rutherford in the $S$-matrix between black hole and probes of successively high energies. We show that by an appropriate choice of the probe one can read off the quantum state of the black hole from the S-matrix, staying asymptotically far from the BH all the time. We interpret the scattering experiment as scattering off classical stringy backgrounds which explicitly depend on the internal quantum numbers of the black hole.

  17. Translocation and radio-telemetry monitoring of pygmy marmoset, Cebuella pygmaea (Spix, 1823, in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAR. Dias

    Full Text Available Two groups of pygmy marmoset (Cebuella pygmaea were rescued along the left bank of the Madeira River during the formation of Santo Antônio Hydroelectric Dam reservoir in the state of Rondônia, Northern Brazil. Reintroduction of both groups occurred in areas of open Tropical rainforest located within the project´s Permanent Preservation Area. A post-release monitoring was conducted for three months using radio-telemetry. Individuals of each group remained together and settled in stable home ranges near their respective release sites. The mortality rate of translocated animals was about 7%. This seems to be the first report documenting the complete group translocation of C. pygmaea and the first to successfully employ radio-telemetry techniques in monitoring this species. This study demonstrated the feasibility of translocation and the use of radio-telemetry in monitoring C. pygmaea.

  18. Distribution of standard deviation of an observable among superposed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chang-shui; Shao, Ting-ting; Li, Dong-mo

    2016-01-01

    The standard deviation (SD) quantifies the spread of the observed values on a measurement of an observable. In this paper, we study the distribution of SD among the different components of a superposition state. It is found that the SD of an observable on a superposition state can be well bounded by the SDs of the superposed states. We also show that the bounds also serve as good bounds on coherence of a superposition state. As a further generalization, we give an alternative definition of incompatibility of two observables subject to a given state and show how the incompatibility subject to a superposition state is distributed.

  19. Distribution of standard deviation of an observable among superposed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-shui; Shao, Ting-ting; Li, Dong-mo

    2016-10-01

    The standard deviation (SD) quantifies the spread of the observed values on a measurement of an observable. In this paper, we study the distribution of SD among the different components of a superposition state. It is found that the SD of an observable on a superposition state can be well bounded by the SDs of the superposed states. We also show that the bounds also serve as good bounds on coherence of a superposition state. As a further generalization, we give an alternative definition of incompatibility of two observables subject to a given state and show how the incompatibility subject to a superposition state is distributed.

  20. Ancestor–descendant relationships in evolution: origin of the extant pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2015-01-01

    Ancestor–descendant relationships (ADRs), involving descent with modification, are the fundamental concept in evolution, but are usually difficult to recognize. We examined the cladistic relationship between the only reported fossil pygmy right whale, †Miocaperea pulchra, and its sole living relative, the enigmatic pygmy right whale Caperea marginata, the latter represented by both adult and juvenile specimens. †Miocaperea is phylogenetically bracketed between juvenile and adult Caperea marginata in morphologically based analyses, thus suggesting a possible ADR—the first so far identified within baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti). The †Miocaperea–Caperea lineage may show long-term morphological stasis and, in turn, punctuated equilibrium. PMID:25589485

  1. Migratory movements of pygmy blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda between Australia and Indonesia as revealed by satellite telemetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Double

    Full Text Available In Australian waters during the austral summer, pygmy blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda occur predictably in two distinct feeding areas off western and southern Australia. As with other blue whale subspecies, outside the austral summer their distribution and movements are poorly understood. In order to describe the migratory movements of these whales, we present the satellite telemetry derived movements of eleven individuals tagged off western Australia over two years. Whales were tracked from between 8 and 308 days covering an average distance of 3,009±892 km (mean ± se; range: 832 km-14,101 km at a rate of 21.94±0.74 km per day (0.09 km-455.80 km/day. Whales were tagged during March and April and ultimately migrated northwards post tag deployment with the exception of a single animal which remained in the vicinity of the Perth Canyon/Naturaliste Plateau for its eight day tracking period. The tagged whales travelled relatively near to the Australian coastline (100.0±1.7 km until reaching a prominent peninsula in the north-west of the state of Western Australia (North West Cape after which they travelled offshore (238.0±13.9 km. Whales reached the northern terminus of their migration and potential breeding grounds in Indonesian waters by June. One satellite tag relayed intermittent information to describe aspects of the southern migration from Indonesia with the animal departing around September to arrive in the subtropical frontal zone, south of western Australia in December. Throughout their migratory range, these whales are exposed to impacts associated with industry, fishing and vessel traffic. These movements therefore provide a valuable tool to industry when assessing potential interactions with pygmy blue whales and should be considered by conservation managers and regulators when mitigating impacts of development. This is particularly relevant for this species as it continues to recover from past exploitation.

  2. Pygmy and core polarization dipole modes in 206Pb: Connecting nuclear structure to stellar nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Tsoneva, N.; Bhatia, C.; Arnold, C. W.; Goriely, S.; Hammond, S. L.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Lenske, H.; Piekarewicz, J.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Shizuma, T.; Tornow, W.

    2017-10-01

    A high-resolution study of the electromagnetic response of 206Pb below the neutron separation energy is performed using a (γ → ,γ‧) experiment at the HI γ → S facility. Nuclear resonance fluorescence with 100% linearly polarized photon beams is used to measure spins, parities, branching ratios, and decay widths of excited states in 206Pb from 4.9 to 8.1 MeV. The extracted ΣB (E 1) ↑ and ΣB (M 1) ↑ values for the total electric and magnetic dipole strength below the neutron separation energy are 0.9 ± 0.2 e2fm2 and 8.3 ± 2.0 μN2, respectively. These measurements are found to be in very good agreement with the predictions from an energy-density functional (EDF) plus quasiparticle phonon model (QPM). Such a detailed theoretical analysis allows to separate the pygmy dipole resonance from both the tail of the giant dipole resonance and multi-phonon excitations. Combined with earlier photonuclear experiments above the neutron separation energy, one extracts a value for the electric dipole polarizability of 206Pb of αD = 122 ± 10 mb /MeV. When compared to predictions from both the EDF+QPM and accurately calibrated relativistic EDFs, one deduces a range for the neutron-skin thickness of Rskin206 = 0.12- 0.19 fm and a corresponding range for the slope of the symmetry energy of L = 48- 60 MeV. This newly obtained information is also used to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged radiative cross section 205Pb (n , γ)206Pb at 30 keV to be σ = 130 ± 25 mb. The astrophysical impact of this measurement-on both the s-process in stellar nucleosynthesis and on the equation of state of neutron-rich matter-is discussed.

  3. Investigation of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in (alpha, alpha 'gamma) coincidence experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savran, D.; Babilon, M.; van den Berg, A. M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hasper, J.; Wortche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on first results from experiments using the (alpha, alpha'gamma) reaction at E alpha = 136 MeV to investigate bound electric dipole (El) excitations building the so-called Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) in the semi-magic nucleus Ce-140. The method of (alpha, alpha'gamma) allows the

  4. Scorpion envenomation in pygmies from Democratic Republic of Congo, the example of Pelenge Center, Lomela, DRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Biezakala Mudiandambu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a survey among the pygmies of central Democratic Republic of Congo, the incidence of scorpion stings seemed very high with a severity greater than expected. Species responsible were not identified. Specific studies are needed to clarify the risk emerging in the equatorial African forest.

  5. The role fo the Pygmy resonance in the synthesis of heavy elements with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1990-12-01

    It is suggested that the inclusion of the virtual excitation of the soft giant dipole (pygmy) resonance in the calculation of the cross-section for very neutron-rich radioactive beam-induced fusion reactions may enhance the formation probability of the heavy compound nucleus produced at low excitation energy. (author)

  6. Chapter 6: Research needs for the conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; W. Scott Richardson; Deborah M. Finch; David J. Krueper

    2000-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe research needs for the conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) in Arizona. Estimates of population size, structure, and dynamics, as well as demographic data, are needed for the recovery team to formulate sound population objectives. Habitat loss due to residential development...

  7. Distribution of Standard deviation of an observable among superposed states

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chang-shui; Shao, Ting-ting; Li, Dong-mo

    2016-01-01

    The standard deviation (SD) quantifies the spread of the observed values on a measurement of an observable. In this paper, we study the distribution of SD among the different components of a superposition state. It is found that the SD of an observable on a superposition state can be well bounded by the SDs of the superposed states. We also show that the bounds also serve as good bounds on coherence of a superposition state. As a further generalization, we give an alternative definition of in...

  8. How many Pygmy Marmoset (Cebuella Gray, 1870) species are there? A taxonomic re-appraisal based on new molecular evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Boubli, JP; da Silva, MNF; Rylands, AB; Nash, SD; Bertuol, F; Nunes, M; Mittermeier, RA; Byrne, H; da Silva, FE; Röhe, F; Sampaio, I; Schneider, H; Farias, IP; Hrbek, T

    2017-01-01

    The pygmy marmoset, Cebuella pygmaea, the smallest of the New World monkeys, has one of the largest geographical distributions of the Amazonian primates. Two forms have been recognized: Cebuella pygmaea pygmaea (Spix, 1823), and C. p. niveiventris Lönnberg, 1940. In this study, we investigated if the separation of pygmy marmosets into these two clades can be corroborated by molecular data. We also examine and compare coloration of the pelage in light of the new molecular results. We analyzed ...

  9. Taxonomic revision of the pygmy devils (Tetrigidae: Discotettiginae) with online social media as a new tool for discovering hidden diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Skejo, Josip

    2017-01-01

    Pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrigidae) are family of small grasshoppers inhabiting humid aras, where thy feed on detritus, algae and mosses, that sometimes grow on their body. Pygmy devils (Discotettiginae) are a group of genera characterized by widened subapical antennal segments. Taxonomy and biogeograpy of all the members are reviewed by examination of large series of museum material and additional photo material found in social networks (Flickr, Facebook). In total 887 specimens o...

  10. Observer dependence of quantum states in relativistic quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malin, S.

    1982-01-01

    Quantum states can be understood as either (i) describing quantum systems or (ii) representing observers' knowledge about quantum systems. These different meanings are shown to imply different transformation properties in relativistic field theories. The rules for the reduction of quantum states and the transformation properties of quantum states under Lorentz transformations are derived for case (ii). The results obtained are applied to a quantum system recently presented and analyzed by Aharonov and Albert. It is shown that the present results, combined with Aharonov and Albert's, amount to a proof of Bohr's view that quantum states represent observers' knowledge about quantum systems

  11. Chaotic Secure Communication Systems with an Adaptive State Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Der Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a new digital communication scheme based on using a unified chaotic system and an adaptive state observer. The proposed communication system basically consists of five important elements: signal modulation, chaotic encryption, adaptive state observer, chaotic decryption, and signal demodulation. A sequence of digital signals will be delivered from the transmitter to the receiver through a public channel. It is rather reasonable that if the number of signals delivered on the public channel is fewer, then the security of such communication system is more guaranteed. Therefore, in order to achieve this purpose, a state observer will be designed and its function is to estimate full system states only by using the system output signals. In this way, the signals delivered on the public channel can be reduced mostly. According to these estimated state signals, the original digital sequences are then retrieved completely. Finally, experiment results are provided to verify the applicability of the proposed communication system.

  12. Observation of Hyperfine Transitions in Trapped Ground-State Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Olin, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the first observation of stimulated magnetic resonance transitions between the hyperfine levels of trapped ground state atomic antihydrogen, confirming its presence in the ALPHA apparatus. Our observations show that these transitions are consistent with the values in hydrogen to within 4~parts~in~$10^3$. Simulations of the trapped antiatoms in a microwave field are consistent with our measurements.

  13. Operator symbols in the description of observable-state systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassner, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    For the observable-state system of finite degree of freedom N topological properties of the kernels and symbols belonging to the considered operators are investigated. For the operators of the observable algebra of rho + (delta) kernels and symbols are distributions and for density matrices p they are smooth functions

  14. Meteorological Observations Available for the State of Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-12

    The National Weather Service’s Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System (MADIS) contains a large number of station networks of surface and upper air meteorological observations for the state of Utah. In addition to MADIS, observations from individual station networks may also be available. It has been confirmed that LLNL has access to the data sources listed below.

  15. Observation of hyperfine transitions in trapped ground-state antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration: A. Olin for the ALPHA Collaboration

    2015-08-15

    This paper discusses the first observation of stimulated magnetic resonance transitions between the hyperfine levels of trapped ground state atomic antihydrogen, confirming its presence in the ALPHA apparatus. Our observations show that these transitions are consistent with the values in hydrogen to within 4 parts in 10{sup 3}. Simulations of the trapped antiatoms in a microwave field are consistent with our measurements.

  16. Ancestor-descendant relationships in evolution: origin of the extant pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2015-01-01

    Ancestor-descendant relationships (ADRs), involving descent with modification, are the fundamental concept in evolution, but are usually difficult to recognize. We examined the cladistic relationship between the only reported fossil pygmy right whale, †Miocaperea pulchra, and its sole living relative, the enigmatic pygmy right whale Caperea marginata, the latter represented by both adult and juvenile specimens. †Miocaperea is phylogenetically bracketed between juvenile and adult Caperea marginata in morphologically based analyses, thus suggesting a possible ADR-the first so far identified within baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti). The †Miocaperea-Caperea lineage may show long-term morphological stasis and, in turn, punctuated equilibrium. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Inferring the demographic history of African farmers and pygmy hunter-gatherers using a multilocus resequencing data set.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Patin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition from hunting and gathering to farming involved a major cultural innovation that has spread rapidly over most of the globe in the last ten millennia. In sub-Saharan Africa, hunter-gatherers have begun to shift toward an agriculture-based lifestyle over the last 5,000 years. Only a few populations still base their mode of subsistence on hunting and gathering. The Pygmies are considered to be the largest group of mobile hunter-gatherers of Africa. They dwell in equatorial rainforests and are characterized by their short mean stature. However, little is known about the chronology of the demographic events-size changes, population splits, and gene flow--ultimately giving rise to contemporary Pygmy (Western and Eastern groups and neighboring agricultural populations. We studied the branching history of Pygmy hunter-gatherers and agricultural populations from Africa and estimated separation times and gene flow between these populations. We resequenced 24 independent noncoding regions across the genome, corresponding to a total of approximately 33 kb per individual, in 236 samples from seven Pygmy and five agricultural populations dispersed over the African continent. We used simulation-based inference to identify the historical model best fitting our data. The model identified included the early divergence of the ancestors of Pygmy hunter-gatherers and farming populations approximately 60,000 years ago, followed by a split of the Pygmies' ancestors into the Western and Eastern Pygmy groups approximately 20,000 years ago. Our findings increase knowledge of the history of the peopling of the African continent in a region lacking archaeological data. An appreciation of the demographic and adaptive history of African populations with different modes of subsistence should improve our understanding of the influence of human lifestyles on genome diversity.

  18. Observation of elastic topological states in soft materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuaifeng; Zhao, Degang; Niu, Hao; Zhu, Xuefeng; Zang, Jianfeng

    2018-04-10

    Topological elastic metamaterials offer insight into classic motion law and open up opportunities in quantum and classic information processing. Theoretical modeling and numerical simulation of elastic topological states have been reported, whereas the experimental observation remains relatively unexplored. Here we present an experimental observation and numerical simulation of tunable topological states in soft elastic metamaterials. The on-demand reversible switch in topological phase has been achieved by changing filling ratio, tension, and/or compression of the elastic metamaterials. By combining two elastic metamaterials with distinct topological invariants, we further demonstrate the formation and dynamic tunability of topological interface states by mechanical deformation, and the manipulation of elastic wave propagation. Moreover, we provide a topological phase diagram of elastic metamaterials under deformation. Our approach to dynamically control interface states in soft materials paves the way to various phononic systems involving thermal management and soft robotics requiring better use of energy.

  19. An efficient algebraic approach to observability analysis in state estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruneda, R.E.; Solares, C.; Conejo, A.J. [University of Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Castillo, E. [University of Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain)

    2010-03-15

    An efficient and compact algebraic approach to state estimation observability is proposed. It is based on transferring rows to columns and vice versa in the Jacobian measurement matrix. The proposed methodology provides a unified approach to observability checking, critical measurement identification, determination of observable islands, and selection of pseudo-measurements to restore observability. Additionally, the observability information obtained from a given set of measurements can provide directly the observability obtained from any subset of measurements of the given set. Several examples are used to illustrate the capabilities of the proposed methodology, and results from a large case study are presented to demonstrate the appropriate computational behavior of the proposed algorithms. Finally, some conclusions are drawn. (author)

  20. History of surface weather observations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebrich, Christopher A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the history of surface weather observations in the United States is reviewed. Local weather observations were first documented in the 17th Century along the East Coast. For many years, the progression of a weather observation from an initial reading to dissemination remained a slow and laborious process. The number of observers remained small and unorganized until agencies including the Surgeon General, Army, and General Land Office began to request regular observations at satellite locations in the 1800s. The Smithsonian was responsible for first organizing a large "network" of volunteer weather observers across the nation. These observers became the foundation for today's Cooperative Observer network. As applications of weather data continued to grow and users required the data with an ever-decreasing latency, automated weather networks saw rapid growth in the later part of the 20th century. Today, the number of weather observations across the U.S. totals in the tens of thousands due largely to privately-owned weather networks and amateur weather observers who submit observations over the internet.

  1. Observations of spectroscopic binaries with a solid-state detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekel, F. Jr.; Lacy, C.H.; Tomkin, J.

    1980-01-01

    The recent installation of a solid-state 1024-element silicon photodiode array detector (Reticon) at the coude focus of the 2.7 m McDonald Observatory reflector has greatly extended its limits of observation for binary and multiple systems which have weak and/or broad-lined components. This detector can produce extremely high signal-to-noise ratio observations and has high quantum efficiency over the wavelength region 3000-11000 A. The observational programs of three users of this device are described. (Auth.)

  2. Microscopic observation of magnon bound states and their dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Takeshi; Schauß, Peter; Endres, Manuel; Hild, Sebastian; Cheneau, Marc; Bloch, Immanuel; Gross, Christian

    2013-10-03

    The existence of bound states of elementary spin waves (magnons) in one-dimensional quantum magnets was predicted almost 80 years ago. Identifying signatures of magnon bound states has so far remained the subject of intense theoretical research, and their detection has proved challenging for experiments. Ultracold atoms offer an ideal setting in which to find such bound states by tracking the spin dynamics with single-spin and single-site resolution following a local excitation. Here we use in situ correlation measurements to observe two-magnon bound states directly in a one-dimensional Heisenberg spin chain comprising ultracold bosonic atoms in an optical lattice. We observe the quantum dynamics of free and bound magnon states through time-resolved measurements of two spin impurities. The increased effective mass of the compound magnon state results in slower spin dynamics as compared to single-magnon excitations. We also determine the decay time of bound magnons, which is probably limited by scattering on thermal fluctuations in the system. Our results provide a new way of studying fundamental properties of quantum magnets and, more generally, properties of interacting impurities in quantum many-body systems.

  3. Observation of the 1P1 state of charmonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.A.; Bettoni, D.; Bharadwaj, V.; Biino, C.; Borreani, G.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Ceccucci, A.; Cester, R.; Church, M.; Dalpiaz, P.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Dibenedetto, R.; Dimitroyannis, D.; Fabbri, M.G.; Fast, J.; Gianoli, A.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Gollwitzer, K.; Hahn, A.; Hasan, M.; Hsueh, S.; Lewis, R.; Luppi, E.; Macri, M.; Majewska, A.M.; Mandelkern, M.; Marchetto, F.; Marinelli, M.; Marques, J.; Marsh, W.; Martini, M.; Masuzawa, M.; Menichetti, E.; Migliori, A.; Mussa, R.; Palestini, S.; Pallavicini, M.; Pastrone, N.; Patrignani, C.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pesando, L.; Petrucci, F.; Pia, M.G.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.; Ray, R.; Reid, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roccuzzo, B.; Rosen, J.; Santroni, A.; Sarmiento, M.; Savrie, M.; Scalisi, A.; Schultz, J.; Seth, K.K.; Smith, A.; Smith, G.A.; Sozzi, M.; Trokenheim, S.; Weber, M.F.; Werkema, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zioulas, G.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed a search for the 1 P 1 state of charmonium resonantly formed in bar pp annihilations, close to the center of gravity of the 3 P J states. We report results from the study of the J/ψ+π 0 and J/ψ+2π final states. We have observed a statistically significant enhancement in the bar p+p→J/ψ+π 0 cross section at √s congruent 3526.2 MeV. This enhancement has the characteristics of a narrow resonance of mass, total width, and production cross section consistent with what is expected for the 1 P 1 state. In our search we have found no candidates for the reactions bar p+p→J/ψ+π 0 +π 0 and bar p+p→J/ψ+π + +π -

  4. Can We Observe the Gravitational Quantum States of Positronium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Crivelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the feasibility of observing the gravitational quantum states of positronium. The proposed scheme employs the flow-throw technique used for the first observation of this effect with neutrons. Collimation and Stark deceleration of Rydberg positronium atoms allow selecting the required velocity class. If this experiment could be realized with positronium, it would lead to a determination of g for this matter-antimatter system at the few % level. As discussed in this contribution, most of the required techniques are currently available but important milestones have to be demonstrated experimentally before such an experiment could become reality. Those are the efficient focusing of a bunched positron beam, Stark deceleration of Rydberg positronium, and its subsequent excitation into states with large angular momentum. We provide an estimate of the efficiencies we expect for these steps and assuming those could be confirmed we calculate the signal rate.

  5. Observation of squeezed states with strong photon-number oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmet, Moritz; Vahlbruch, Henning; Lastzka, Nico; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2010-01-01

    Squeezed states of light constitute an important nonclassical resource in the field of high-precision measurements, for example, gravitational wave detection, as well as in the field of quantum information, for example, for teleportation, quantum cryptography, and distribution of entanglement in quantum computation networks. Strong squeezing in combination with high purity, high bandwidth, and high spatial mode quality is desirable in order to achieve significantly improved performances contrasting any classical protocols. Here we report on the observation of 11.5 dB of squeezing, together with relatively high state purity corresponding to a vacuum contribution of less than 5%, and a squeezing bandwidth of about 170 MHz. The analysis of our squeezed states reveals a significant production of higher-order pairs of quantum-correlated photons and the existence of strong photon-number oscillations.

  6. Decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 140Ce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, J.; Löher, B.; Savran, D.; Aumann, T.; Beller, J.; Cooper, N.; Derya, V.; Duchêne, M.; Endres, J.; Fiori, E.; Kelley, J. H.; Knörzer, M.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Romig, C.; Scheck, M.; Scheit, H.; Silva, J.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Werner, V.; Zilges, A.; Zweidinger, M.

    2015-05-01

    The decay behavior of low-lying dipole states in 140Ce was investigated exploiting the γ3-setup at the HIγS facility using quasi-monochromatic photon beams. Branching ratios of individual excited states as well as average branching ratios to low-lying states have been extracted using γ - γ coincidence measurements. The comparison of the average branching ratios to QPM calculations shows a remarkable agreement between experiment and theory in the energy range from 5.0 to 8.5 MeV.

  7. Decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 140Ce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaak J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The decay behavior of low-lying dipole states in 140Ce was investigated exploiting the γ3-setup at the HIγS facility using quasi-monochromatic photon beams. Branching ratios of individual excited states as well as average branching ratios to low-lying states have been extracted using γ – γ coincidence measurements. The comparison of the average branching ratios to QPM calculations shows a remarkable agreement between experiment and theory in the energy range from 5.0 to 8.5 MeV.

  8. First observation of bound-state β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, M.; Bosch, F.; Beckert, K.; Eickhoff, H.; Folger, H.; Franzke, B.; Kienle, P.; Klepper, O.; Koenig, W.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mann, R.; Moshammer, R.; Nolden, F.; Schaaf, U.; Soff, G.; Spaedtke, P.; Steck, M.; Stoehlker, T.; Suemmerer, K.

    1992-06-01

    Bound-state Β - decay was observed for the first time by storing bare 66 163 Dy 66+ ions in a heavy-ion storage ring. From the number of 67 163 Ho 66+ daughter ions, measured as a function of the storage time, a half-life of 47 4 +5 - d was derived. By comparing this result with reported half-lives for electron capture (EC) from the M 1 and M 2 shells of neutral 67 163 Ho, bounds for both the Q EC value of neutral 67 163 Ho and for the electron neutrino mass were set. (orig.)

  9. Observation of high spin states in 117Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.; Yuan, G.J.; Li, G.S.; Yang, C.X.; Luo, W.D.; Chen, Y.S.

    1995-01-01

    High spin states of 117 Xe have been investigated by means of in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using the reaction 92 Mo( 28 Si, 2pn) at beam energies of 100 to 120 MeV. The previously known νh 11/2 bands are confirmed and the νg 7/2 favored-signature band is extended up to 47/2 + , in which two band crossings are observed at hω=0.33 and 0.44 MeV, respectively. Two new positive-parity bands have been established, one of which is most likely the νg 7/2 unfavored-signature band. A new transition cascade with irregular level spacings is also observed. (orig.)

  10. Reduced predation risk for melanistic pygmy grasshoppers in post-fire environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpestam, Einat; Merilaita, Sami; Forsman, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The existence of melanistic (black) color forms in many species represents interesting model systems that have played important roles for our understanding of selective processes, evolution of adaptations, and the maintenance of variation. A recent study reported on rapid evolutionary shifts in frequencies of the melanistic forms in replicated populations of Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers; the incidence of the melanistic form was higher in recently burned areas with backgrounds blackened by fire than in nonburned areas, and it declined over time in postfire environments. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the frequency shifts of the black color variant were driven, at least in part, by changes in the selective regime imposed by visual predators. To study detectability of the melanistic form, we presented human “predators” with images of black grasshoppers and samples of the natural habitat on computer screens. We demonstrate that the protective value of black coloration differs between burnt and nonburnt environments and gradually increases in habitats that have been more blackened by fire. These findings support the notion that a black color pattern provides improved protection from visually oriented predators against blackened backgrounds and implicate camouflage and predation as important drivers of fire melanism in pygmy grasshoppers. PMID:23139879

  11. Patterns of ancestry, signatures of natural selection, and genetic association with stature in Western African pygmies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Jarvis

    Full Text Available African Pygmy groups show a distinctive pattern of phenotypic variation, including short stature, which is thought to reflect past adaptation to a tropical environment. Here, we analyze Illumina 1M SNP array data in three Western Pygmy populations from Cameroon and three neighboring Bantu-speaking agricultural populations with whom they have admixed. We infer genome-wide ancestry, scan for signals of positive selection, and perform targeted genetic association with measured height variation. We identify multiple regions throughout the genome that may have played a role in adaptive evolution, many of which contain loci with roles in growth hormone, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor signaling pathways, as well as immunity and neuroendocrine signaling involved in reproduction and metabolism. The most striking results are found on chromosome 3, which harbors a cluster of selection and association signals between approximately 45 and 60 Mb. This region also includes the positional candidate genes DOCK3, which is known to be associated with height variation in Europeans, and CISH, a negative regulator of cytokine signaling known to inhibit growth hormone-stimulated STAT5 signaling. Finally, pathway analysis for genes near the strongest signals of association with height indicates enrichment for loci involved in insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling.

  12. Nuclear Deformation and Neutron Excess as Competing Effects for Dipole Strength in the Pygmy Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Dönau, F.; Frauendorf, S.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Bhatia, C.; Birgersson, E.; Butterling, M.; Elekes, Z.; Ferrari, A.; Gooden, M. E.; Hannaske, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Kempe, M.; Kelley, J. H.; Kögler, T.; Matic, A.; Menzel, M. L.; Müller, S.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Röder, M.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Schmidt, K.; Schramm, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wagner, A.

    2014-02-01

    The electromagnetic dipole strength below the neutron-separation energy has been studied for the xenon isotopes with mass numbers A =124, 128, 132, and 134 in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using the γELBE bremsstrahlung facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the HIγS facility at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Durham. The systematic study gained new information about the influence of the neutron excess as well as of nuclear deformation on the strength in the region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The results are compared with those obtained for the chain of molybdenum isotopes and with predictions of a random-phase approximation in a deformed basis. It turned out that the effect of nuclear deformation plays a minor role compared with the one caused by neutron excess. A global parametrization of the strength in terms of neutron and proton numbers allowed us to derive a formula capable of predicting the summed E1 strengths in the pygmy region for a wide mass range of nuclides.

  13. Organochlorine Pesticides in the Ferruginous Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrona-Rivera, Alicia E; Enríquez, Paula L; García-Feria, Luis M; Orellana, Sergio Alvarado; von Osten, Jaime Rendón

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides were quantified in samples of feathers (n = 17) and blood (n = 15) of the ferruginous pygmy owl (Glaucidium brasilianum). The individuals were captured near the Protected Natural Area Cerro Sonsonate, Chiapas, Mexico, between February and June 2014. In both tissues, pesticides belonging to seven organochlorine chemical families were detected. However, the organochlorine pesticide concentrations differed between feathers and blood. The highest concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes were found in feathers (0.63 ± 0.89 μg/g), whereas the highest concentrations of ΣDrines were found in blood (0.31 ± 0.47 μg/mL). By using the summed concentrations for each of the seven families of pesticides found in feathers, we did not find any significant correlation between the pesticides and pectoral muscle or body weight (p > 0.15). The ΣDDT group was the only pesticide family that showed a positive correlation with owl body weight (r = 0.60, p = 0.05); the concentrations of these pesticides were also high in feather and blood tissues (r = 0.87, p = 0.02). Our results confirm that ferruginous pygmy owls in the study area are exposed to these pesticides.

  14. Nuclear deformation and neutron excess as competing effects for dipole strength in the pygmy region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, R; Schwengner, R; Dönau, F; Frauendorf, S; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Beyer, R; Bhatia, C; Birgersson, E; Butterling, M; Elekes, Z; Ferrari, A; Gooden, M E; Hannaske, R; Junghans, A R; Kempe, M; Kelley, J H; Kögler, T; Matic, A; Menzel, M L; Müller, S; Reinhardt, T P; Röder, M; Rusev, G; Schilling, K D; Schmidt, K; Schramm, G; Tonchev, A P; Tornow, W; Wagner, A

    2014-02-21

    The electromagnetic dipole strength below the neutron-separation energy has been studied for the xenon isotopes with mass numbers A=124, 128, 132, and 134 in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using the γELBE bremsstrahlung facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the HIγS facility at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Durham. The systematic study gained new information about the influence of the neutron excess as well as of nuclear deformation on the strength in the region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The results are compared with those obtained for the chain of molybdenum isotopes and with predictions of a random-phase approximation in a deformed basis. It turned out that the effect of nuclear deformation plays a minor role compared with the one caused by neutron excess. A global parametrization of the strength in terms of neutron and proton numbers allowed us to derive a formula capable of predicting the summed E1 strengths in the pygmy region for a wide mass range of nuclides.

  15. 75 FR 60515 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the Pygmy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... warranted at this time. However, we ask the public to submit to us any new information that becomes...; Larrison 1967, p. 64; Green and Flinders 1980a, p. 1; Janson 2002, p. 4). Ecology and Life History Pygmy... OMITTED] TP30SE10.008 Figure 1. Approximate historical and current range (based on data from 1877 to 2008...

  16. Chapter 2: A historical perspective on the population decline of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Roy Johnson; Jean-Luc E. Cartron; Lois T. Haight; Russell B. Duncan; Kenneth J. Kingsley

    2000-01-01

    The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) was discovered in the U.S. by Bendire in 1872 in the Tucson area (Coues 1872). During the next five decades, naturalists collected many specimens of this owl and typically described the subspecies as common or fairly common along some streams and rivers of central and southern Arizona...

  17. A novel adipokinetic peptide from the corpus cardiacum of the primitive caeliferan pygmy grasshopper Tetrix subulata (Caelifera, Tetrigidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Marco, H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 68, JUN 01 (2015), s. 43-49 ISSN 0196-9781 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18509S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : insects * pygmy grasshoppers * Tetrigidae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.535, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196978115000339

  18. Efficacy of a combination of 10% imidacloprid and 1% moxidectin against Caparinia tripilis in African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyu-Rim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy and safety of a combination formulation of 10% imidacloprid + 1.0% moxidectin spot-on (Advocate® for Cats, Bayer Animal Health GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany was tested in 40 African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris naturally infested with Caparinia tripilis. Methods The optimal dosage level of the combination for hedgehogs was determined by assigning 20 hedgehogs into three treatment groups (0.1, 0.4 and 1.6 ml/Kg b.w., and one untreated control group of 5 hedgehogs each. Twenty naturally infested hedgehogs were then randomly assigned to either treatment or control group with 10 animals each, and the number of live mites was counted from 13 body regions on day 0, 3, 9, 16, and 30 after single treatment at the dosage level of 0.1 ml/Kg. Results Before the chemotherapy, the highest density of mite was observed in external ear canals followed by the dorsal and the lowest in the ventral regions of the body surface. The dosage level of 0.1 ml/Kg, which corresponded to the recommended dosage level for cats, containing 10 mg imidacloprid and 1 mg moxidectin was also the optimal dosage level for hedgehogs. No hedgehogs in the treatment group showed live mites from day 3 post treatment. Side effects such as ataxia, depression, nausea, and weight fluctuation were not observed during the whole period of study. Conclusions This report suggests that a combination formulation of 0.1 ml/Kg of 10% imidacloprid + 1% moxidectin spot-on for cats is also useful for the control of Caparinia tripilis infestation in hedgehogs.

  19. Observation of the resonant character of the $Z(4430)^-$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Resonant structures in $B^0\\to\\psi'\\pi^-K^+$ decays are analyzed by performing a four-dimensional fit of the decay amplitude, using $pp$ collision data corresponding to $\\rm 3 fb^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb detector. The data cannot be described with $K^+\\pi^-$ resonances alone, which is confirmed with a model-independent approach. A highly significant $Z(4430)^-\\to\\psi'\\pi^-$ component is required, thus confirming the existence of this state. The observed evolution of the $Z(4430)^-$ amplitude with the $\\psi'\\pi^-$ mass establishes the resonant nature of this particle. The mass and width measurements are substantially improved. The spin-parity is determined unambiguously to be $1^+$.

  20. Observations of high spin states in {sup 179}Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Ahmad, I.; Blumenthal, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    As part of a current study on the properties of the {pi} i{sub 13/2} intruder state in the A = 175-190 region, we conducted an experiment at ATLAS to observe high spin states in {sup 179}Au utilizing the reaction {sup 144}Sm({sup 40}Ar,p4n) at beam energies of 207 MeV and 215 MeV. To aid in the identification of {sup 179}Au, and to filter out the large amount of events from fission by-products, the Fragment Mass Analyzer was utilized in conjunction with ten Compton-suppression germanium detectors. In total, 11 x 10{sup 6} {gamma}-{gamma} and 4 x 10{sup 5} {gamma}-recoil events were collected. By comparing {gamma}-rays in coincidence with an A = 179 recoil mass gate and {gamma}-rays in coincidence with Au K{alpha} and K{beta} X-rays, ten {gamma}-rays were identified as belonging to {sup 179}Au. Based on {gamma}-ray coincidence relationships and on comparisons with neighboring odd-A Au nuclei, we constructed a tentative level scheme and assigned a rotational-like sequence to the {pi} i{sub 13/2} proton configuration.

  1. Observation of the state of the nuclear reactor core by means of non-linear observation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel Palacio, F.E.; Espana, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    A combined, variable-adaptive structure, non-linear observer was designed in order to observe the state of the nuclear reactor core, based on the Absolute Stability Theory. The observer was proved under noise and modelling error conditions. Successful results were obtained in the observation of the states in both cases, showing clear improvement in the observation due to the application of adaptive and variable structure ideas. (Author) [es

  2. Observations of radiation fog chemistry in the Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, D.; Hutchings, J.; Herckes, P.

    2010-07-01

    The chemical composition of radiation fog in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States has been the focus of an ongoing field campaign based in Selinsgrove, PA. This field study was established to provide a long term record that can be used to identify the effects of meteorology and air mass source regions on fog composition and to shed light on the role that fog can play in the production of secondary inorganic and organic aerosol mass. In the United States, studies that focus on radiation fog have been relatively rare. For the most part, they have been limited geographically to the Central Valley of California, though individual studies have also been conducted in the Central United States and along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast. Sample collection for the current study began during the fall of 2007. Through 2009, samples from 25 radiation fog events have been obtained. A Caltech Heated Rod Cloudwater Collector (CHRCC) having a Dp50 of approximately 8 microns was used to collect one fog sample per event. Samples were typically collected between 2:00 AM and 7:00 AM under conditions of light winds, clear skies, and recent rainfall. Sample volumes ranged from 2.9 ml to 150 ml. Following collection, samples were analyzed for pH and then one of the following: major inorganic ions, dissolved total organic carbon, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), metals, or organic speciation. Through 2009, sample pH varied between 4.28 and 6.86 and averaged 5.03 based on H+ concentration. Ammonium and sulfate were found to be the most abundant ionic species in the fog samples. Sufficient ammonium was detected in nearly every sample to fully neutralize nitrate and sulfate. The concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium observed in this study were lower than values reported in the literature for most other cloud and fog studies conducted in the US. Due to significant ammonium input, pH in the current study was higher than most other studies. Concentrations of total organic carbon

  3. Characterization and analysis of a de novo transcriptome from the pygmy grasshopper Tetrix japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongying; Liu, Fei; Lu, Huimeng; Huang, Yuan

    2017-05-01

    The pygmy grasshopper Tetrix japonica is a common insect distributed throughout the world, and it has the potential for use in studies of body colour polymorphism, genomics and the biology of Tetrigoidea (Insecta: Orthoptera). However, limited biological information is available for this insect. Here, we conducted a de novo transcriptome study of adult and larval T. japonica to provide a better understanding of its gene expression and develop genomic resources for future work. We sequenced and explored the characteristics of the de novo transcriptome of T. japonica using Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 107 608 206 paired-end clean reads were assembled into 61 141 unigenes using the trinity software; the mean unigene size was 771 bp, and the N50 length was 1238 bp. A total of 29 225 unigenes were functionally annotated to the NCBI nonredundant protein sequences (Nr), NCBI nonredundant nucleotide sequences (Nt), a manually annotated and reviewed protein sequence database (Swiss-Prot), Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. A large number of putative genes that are potentially involved in pigment pathways, juvenile hormone (JH) metabolism and signalling pathways were identified in the T. japonica transcriptome. Additionally, 165 769 and 156 796 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms occurred in the adult and larvae transcriptomes, respectively, and a total of 3162 simple sequence repeats were detected in this assembly. This comprehensive transcriptomic data for T. japonica will provide a usable resource for gene predictions, signalling pathway investigations and molecular marker development for this species and other pygmy grasshoppers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Approximating local observables on projected entangled pair states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, M.; Buerschaper, O.; Eisert, J.

    2017-06-01

    Tensor network states are for good reasons believed to capture ground states of gapped local Hamiltonians arising in the condensed matter context, states which are in turn expected to satisfy an entanglement area law. However, the computational hardness of contracting projected entangled pair states in two- and higher-dimensional systems is often seen as a significant obstacle when devising higher-dimensional variants of the density-matrix renormalization group method. In this work, we show that for those projected entangled pair states that are expected to provide good approximations of such ground states of local Hamiltonians, one can compute local expectation values in quasipolynomial time. We therefore provide a complexity-theoretic justification of why state-of-the-art numerical tools work so well in practice. We finally turn to the computation of local expectation values on quantum computers, providing a meaningful application for a small-scale quantum computer.

  5. First observation of isomeric state in {sup 97}Rb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudigier, Matthias; Blazhev, Andrey; Regis, Jean-Marc; Warr, Nigel; Jolie, Jan; Fransen, Christoph; Hackstein, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Michael; Rother, Wolfram; Thomas, Tim [IKP, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Simpson, Gary; Ramdhane, Mourad [LPSC, Grenoble (France); Koester, Ulli; Materna, Thomas; Urban, Waldemar [ILL, Grenoble (France); Daugas, Jean-Michel [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2012-07-01

    Data on a new microsecond isomer in {sup 97}Rb are presented. The measurement was conducted at the LOHENGRIN mass separator at the ILL, Grenoble. We were able to deduce the level energy and lifetime of the state. The multipolarity of the transition to the ground state was determined using conversion electron spectroscopy. This information enabled us to assign a spin and parity to the state, based on quasi-particle-rotor model calculations. The nucleus {sup 97}Rb has neutron number 60, and is thus situated in the shape-phase transition line of the mass 100 nuclei. It is discussed how the new state fits into the region and the Rb-isotopic chain. Furthermore some new results on the decay of the 9/2{sup +} microsecond isomer of {sup 97}Sr are presented and discussed.

  6. Observation of nonadditive mixed-state phases with polarized neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, Jürgen; Sponar, Stephan; Filipp, Stefan; Lettner, Matthias; Badurek, Gerald; Hasegawa, Yuji

    2008-10-10

    In a neutron polarimetry experiment the mixed-state relative phases between spin eigenstates are determined from the maxima and minima of measured intensity oscillations. We consider evolutions leading to purely geometric, purely dynamical, and combined phases. It is experimentally demonstrated that the sum of the individually determined geometric and dynamical phases is not equal to the associated total phase which is obtained from a single measurement, unless the system is in a pure state.

  7. Design of state observer for modular multilevel converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2015-01-01

    observer is established to obtain the capacitor voltages. In this paper the observability of the MMC system is displayed and the calculation of the gain matrix is also described detailedly. No additional sensor is required by this technique and it can easily be implemented in a DSP or microcontroller...

  8. Observation of moving wave packets reveals their quantum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, U.; Raymer, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    We show how to infer the quantum state of a wave packet from position probability distributions measured during the packet close-quote s motion in an arbitrary potential. We assume a nonrelativistic one-dimensional or radial wave packet. Temporal Fourier transformation and spatial sampling with respect to a newly found set of functions project the density-matrix elements out of the probability distributions. The sampling functions are derivatives of products of regular and irregular wave functions. We note that the ability to infer quantum states in this way depends on the structure of the Schroedinger equation. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Observations on reproductive health programs in the Baltic States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Nadisauskiene, R J; Liljestrand, J

    2004-01-01

    Public attention in Sweden has been drawn to three neighboring states that recently joined the European Union: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. At this historic moment, it seems instructive to look at how the rapidly reformed health sectors of these ex-Soviet republics are responding to the vision...... of reproductive health articulated in Cairo 10 years ago. Reproductive health and rights have improved in these states in spite of recent reforms often acting to oppose improvement. Reforms such as the introduction of family medicine need continued adjustment, especially regarding antenatal care. One special...

  10. Iterative Observer-based Estimation Algorithms for Steady-State Elliptic Partial Differential Equation Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Majeed, Muhammad Usman

    2017-01-01

    the problems are formulated on higher dimensional space domains. However, in this dissertation, feedback based state estimation algorithms, known as state observers, are developed to solve such steady-state problems using one of the space variables as time

  11. Observations of bound and unbound states of Ce−

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C W; Li, Y-G; Matyas, D J; Alton, R M; Lou, S E; III, R L Field; Gibson, N D; Hanstorp, D

    2012-01-01

    The negative ion of cerium has been investigated with tunable infrared laser photodetachment spectroscopy over selected photon energy ranges between 0.56 − 0.70 eV. The spectrum reveals several sharp peaks due to negative ion resonances and possible bound-bound transitions in Ce − . The newly observed transitions, together with our previous measurements, provide insight into the rich near-threshold spectrum of this lanthanide negative ion.

  12. Comments on the recent changes in taxonomy of pygmy unicorns, with description of a new species of Metopomystrum from Brazil (Insecta, Tetrigidae, Cleostratini, Miriatrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Santos Martins Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The tribe Cleostratini Bolívar, 1887 sensu Storozhenko, 2016 does not represent a monophyletic taxon because it gathers various Tetrigidae genera with various types of horn and prolongation of frons or vertex. Prolongation of these structures is present in morphologically and biogeographically distant groups. We do not regard Miriatrini Cadena-Castañeda & Cardona, 2015 synonymous with Cleostratini because the genus Miriatra Bolívar, 1906 belongs to a group of genera distant from Cleostratus Stål, 1877. There is no adequate diagnosis for proposed groups of genera forming tribes Cleostratini or Miriatrini. Miriatrini stat. resurr. are monotypic and include only Miriatra, Cleostratini are monotypic as well. Apteromystrum Storozhenko, 2016 syn. n. is regarded synonymous with Metopomystrum, M. apterum comb. resurr., M. amazoniensis comb. resurr. and Miriatra brevifastigiata (Cadena-Castañeda & Cardona, 2015, comb. n. are not Metopomystrum member. Herein a new species of pygmy unicorn, Metopomystrum muriciense Silva & Skejo, sp. n., is described from Atlantic Forest remnants in northeast of Brazil, collected on the Estação Serra do Ouro (municipality of Murici, Alagoas state. Distribution data, morphological characterization, and an identification key to Metopomystrum species are also presented.

  13. Comments on the recent changes in taxonomy of pygmy unicorns, with description of a new species of Metopomystrum from Brazil (Insecta, Tetrigidae, Cleostratini, Miriatrini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Daniela Santos Martins; Skejo, Josip; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Domenico, Fernando Campos De; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2017-01-01

    The tribe Cleostratini Bolívar, 1887 sensu Storozhenko, 2016 does not represent a monophyletic taxon because it gathers various Tetrigidae genera with various types of horn and prolongation of frons or vertex. Prolongation of these structures is present in morphologically and biogeographically distant groups. We do not regard Miriatrini Cadena-Castañeda & Cardona, 2015 synonymous with Cleostratini because the genus Miriatra Bolívar, 1906 belongs to a group of genera distant from Cleostratus Stål, 1877. There is no adequate diagnosis for proposed groups of genera forming tribes Cleostratini or Miriatrini. Miriatrini stat. resurr. are monotypic and include only Miriatra , Cleostratini are monotypic as well. Apteromystrum Storozhenko, 2016 syn. n. is regarded synonymous with Metopomystrum , M. apterum comb. resurr. , M. amazoniensis comb. resurr. and Miriatra brevifastigiata (Cadena-Castañeda & Cardona, 2015), comb. n. are not Metopomystrum member. Herein a new species of pygmy unicorn, Metopomystrum muriciense Silva & Skejo, sp. n. , is described from Atlantic Forest remnants in northeast of Brazil, collected on the Estação Serra do Ouro (municipality of Murici, Alagoas state). Distribution data, morphological characterization, and an identification key to Metopomystrum species are also presented.

  14. Comments on the recent changes in taxonomy of pygmy unicorns, with description of a new species of Metopomystrum from Brazil (Insecta, Tetrigidae, Cleostratini, Miriatrini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Daniela Santos Martins; Skejo, Josip; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Domenico, Fernando Campos De; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The tribe Cleostratini Bolívar, 1887 sensu Storozhenko, 2016 does not represent a monophyletic taxon because it gathers various Tetrigidae genera with various types of horn and prolongation of frons or vertex. Prolongation of these structures is present in morphologically and biogeographically distant groups. We do not regard Miriatrini Cadena-Castañeda & Cardona, 2015 synonymous with Cleostratini because the genus Miriatra Bolívar, 1906 belongs to a group of genera distant from Cleostratus Stål, 1877. There is no adequate diagnosis for proposed groups of genera forming tribes Cleostratini or Miriatrini. Miriatrini stat. resurr. are monotypic and include only Miriatra, Cleostratini are monotypic as well. Apteromystrum Storozhenko, 2016 syn. n. is regarded synonymous with Metopomystrum, M. apterum comb. resurr., M. amazoniensis comb. resurr. and Miriatra brevifastigiata (Cadena-Castañeda & Cardona, 2015), comb. n. are not Metopomystrum member. Herein a new species of pygmy unicorn, Metopomystrum muriciense Silva & Skejo, sp. n., is described from Atlantic Forest remnants in northeast of Brazil, collected on the Estação Serra do Ouro (municipality of Murici, Alagoas state). Distribution data, morphological characterization, and an identification key to Metopomystrum species are also presented. PMID:29118597

  15. XY females do better than the XX in the African pygmy mouse, Mus minutoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Paul A; Perez, Julie; Rahmoun, Massilva; Ronce, Ophélie; Crochet, Pierre-André; Veyrunes, Frédéric

    2014-07-01

    All therian mammals have a similar XY/XX sex-determination system except for a dozen species. The African pygmy mouse, Mus minutoides, harbors an unconventional system in which all males are XY, and there are three types of females: the usual XX but also XX* and X*Y ones (the asterisk designates a sex-reversal mutation on the X chromosome). The long-term evolution of such a system is a paradox, because X*Y females are expected to face high reproductive costs (e.g., meiotic disruption and loss of unviable YY embryos), which should prevent invasion and maintenance of a sex-reversal mutation. Hence, mechanisms for compensating for the costs could have evolved in M. minutoides. Data gathered from our laboratory colony revealed that X*Y females do compensate and even show enhanced reproductive performance in comparison to the XX and XX*; they produce significantly more offspring due to (i) a higher probability of breeding, (ii) an earlier first litter, and (iii) a larger litter size, linked to (iv) a greater ovulation rate. These findings confirm that rare conditions are needed for an atypical sex-determination mechanism to evolve in mammals, and provide valuable insight into understanding modifications of systems with highly heteromorphic sex chromosomes. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Polygyny without wealth: popularity in gift games predicts polygyny in BaYaka Pygmies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Thompson, James; Dyble, Mark; Page, Abigail; Smith, Daniel; Mace, Ruth; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of polygynous marriage in hunter-gatherer societies, which do not accumulate wealth, remains largely unexplored since resource availability is dependent on male hunting capacity and limited by the lack of storage. Hunter-gatherer societies offer the greatest insight in to human evolution since they represent the majority of our species' evolutionary history. In order to elucidate the evolution of hunter-gatherer polygyny, we study marriage patterns of BaYaka Pygmies. We investigate (i) rates of polygyny among BaYaka hunter-gatherers; (ii) whether polygyny confers a fitness benefit to BaYaka men; (iii) in the absence of wealth inequalities, what are the alternative explanations for polygyny among the BaYaka. To understand the latter, we explore differences in phenotypic quality (height and strength), and social capital (popularity in gift games). We find polygynous men have increased reproductive fitness; and that social capital and popularity but not phenotypic quality might have been important mechanisms by which some male hunter-gatherers sustained polygynous marriages before the onset of agriculture and wealth accumulation.

  17. The cochlea of the enigmatic pygmy right whale Caperea marginata informs mysticete phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Travis; Marx, Felix G; Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Evans, Alistair R

    2017-06-01

    The pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata, is the least understood extant baleen whale (Cetacea, Mysticeti). Knowledge on its basic anatomy, ecology, and fossil record is limited, even though its singular position outside both balaenids (right whales) and balaenopteroids (rorquals + grey whales) gives Caperea a pivotal role in mysticete evolution. Recent investigations of the cetacean cochlea have provided new insights into sensory capabilities and phylogeny. Here, we extend this advance to Caperea by describing, for the first time, the inner ear of this enigmatic species. The cochlea is large and appears to be sensitive to low-frequency sounds, but its hearing limit is relatively high. The presence of a well-developed tympanal recess links Caperea with cetotheriids and balaenopteroids, rather than balaenids, contrary to the traditional morphological view of a close Caperea-balaenid relationship. Nevertheless, a broader sample of the cetotheriid Herpetocetus demonstrates that the presence of a tympanal recess can be variable at the specific and possibly even the intraspecific level. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Localization of Point Sources for Poisson Equation using State Observers

    KAUST Repository

    Majeed, Muhammad Usman

    2016-08-09

    A method based On iterative observer design is presented to solve point source localization problem for Poisson equation with riven boundary data. The procedure involves solution of multiple boundary estimation sub problems using the available Dirichlet and Neumann data from different parts of the boundary. A weighted sum of these solution profiles of sub-problems localizes point sources inside the domain. Method to compute these weights is also provided. Numerical results are presented using finite differences in a rectangular domain. (C) 2016, IFAC (International Federation of Automatic Control) Hosting by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Localization of Point Sources for Poisson Equation using State Observers

    KAUST Repository

    Majeed, Muhammad Usman; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2016-01-01

    A method based On iterative observer design is presented to solve point source localization problem for Poisson equation with riven boundary data. The procedure involves solution of multiple boundary estimation sub problems using the available Dirichlet and Neumann data from different parts of the boundary. A weighted sum of these solution profiles of sub-problems localizes point sources inside the domain. Method to compute these weights is also provided. Numerical results are presented using finite differences in a rectangular domain. (C) 2016, IFAC (International Federation of Automatic Control) Hosting by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Getting to know you: Identification of pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata and melon-headed whales (Peponocephala electra under challenging conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Siciliano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra and Pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata are very poorly known species and are often confused with each other. We examined in detail Figure 3 in MARIGO and GIFFONI (2010 who reported that two melon-headed whales were taken in a surface driftnet about 90 nm off Santos, Brazil. We concluded they were in fact pygmy killer whales and explain our reasoning. To aid in future identifications, we illustrate and describe some of the main differences between these two species of small cetaceans. The incident reported by MARIGO and GIFFONI (2010 might represent the 'tip of the iceberg' regarding the incidental catches of cetaceans by pelagic drift nets off Brazil. Offshore driftnetting operating along the south-southeastern coast of Brazil may threaten pygmy killer whales.

  1. United States Forest Disturbance Trends Observed Using Landsat Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.; Goward, Samuel N.; Kennedy, Robert E.; Cohen, Warren B.; Moisen, Gretchen G.; Schleeweis, Karen; Huang, Chengquan

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance events strongly affect the composition, structure, and function of forest ecosystems; however, existing U.S. land management inventories were not designed to monitor disturbance. To begin addressing this gap, the North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project has examined a geographic sample of 50 Landsat satellite image time series to assess trends in forest disturbance across the conterminous United States for 1985-2005. The geographic sample design used a probability-based scheme to encompass major forest types and maximize geographic dispersion. For each sample location disturbance was identified in the Landsat series using the Vegetation Change Tracker (VCT) algorithm. The NAFD analysis indicates that, on average, 2.77 Mha/yr of forests were disturbed annually, representing 1.09%/yr of US forestland. These satellite-based national disturbance rates estimates tend to be lower than those derived from land management inventories, reflecting both methodological and definitional differences. In particular the VCT approach used with a biennial time step has limited sensitivity to low-intensity disturbances. Unlike prior satellite studies, our biennial forest disturbance rates vary by nearly a factor of two between high and low years. High western US disturbance rates were associated with active fire years and insect activity, while variability in the east is more strongly related to harvest rates in managed forests. We note that generating a geographic sample based on representing forest type and variability may be problematic since the spatial pattern of disturbance does not necessarily correlate with forest type. We also find that the prevalence of diffuse, non-stand clearing disturbance in US forests makes the application of a biennial geographic sample problematic. Future satellite-based studies of disturbance at regional and national scales should focus on wall-to-wall analyses with annual time step for improved accuracy.

  2. Retrospective analysis of causes of death in mountain pygmy-possums (Burramys parvus) at Healesville Sanctuary, Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheelings, T F; Dobson, E C

    2015-11-01

    Identification and characterisation of deaths is important for the veterinary management of both wild and captive animals. It is especially important as a tool for monitoring health and disease within populations of endangered species for which little information on morbidity and mortality is known. Investigations into the causes of death and other important necropsy findings were made in a captive population of the critically endangered mountain pygmy-possum (Burramys parvus). Necropsy records from January 2000-December 2013 were reviewed for all possums that had lived and died at Healesville Sanctuary (n = 48). The average age of death of possums in this population was 4.7 years. The most common histological change in mountain pygmy-possums was varying degrees of chronic progressive kidney disease (n = 17). Of these cases, eight animals (47%) had histological changes suggesting the kidney disease was the likely cause of death. Other causes of death included neoplasia (n = 5), necrotising pancreatitis (n = 4), pneumonia (n = 2), reproductive disease (n = 2) and trauma (n = 2). No cause of death was able to be identified in 33.3% (n = 16) of cases. Hepatic lipidosis (n = 5), pneumonia (n = 2) and degenerative joint disease (n = 2) were the most common comorbidities found. Progressive renal disease, often with secondary metastatic mineralisation, appears to be a significant cause of mortality in captive mountain pygmy-possums and further investigation into its pathophysiology, antemortem diagnosis and treatment is warranted. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  3. Sensorless State-Space Control of Elastic Two-Inertia Drive System Using a Minimum State Order Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Comnac

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents sensorless state-space control of two-inertia drive system with resilient coupling. The control structure contains an I+PI controller for load speed regulation and a state feedback controller for effective vibration suppression of the elastic coupling. Mechanical state variable of two-inertia drive are obtained by using a linear minimum-order (Gopinath state observer. The design of the combined (I+PI and state feedback controller is achieved with the extended version of the modulus criterion [5]. The dynamic behavior of presented control structure has been examined, for different conditions, using MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation.

  4. A dynamic state observer for real-time reconstruction of the tokamak plasma profile state and disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felici, F.; De Baar, M.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic observer is presented which can reconstruct the internal state of a tokamak fusion plasma, consisting of the spatial distribution of current and temperature, from measurements. Today, the internal plasma state is usually reconstructed by solving an ill-conditioned inversion problem using a

  5. Columbia River wildlife mitigation habitat evaluation procedures report: Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County pygmy rabbit projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, P.R.; Ratassepp, J.; Berger, M.; Judd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites

  6. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  7. 78 FR 60766 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Species Status for Spring Pygmy Sunfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... threat assessment supported our decision to list this species, though they stated endangered status was... observations. The Service should not base listing decision on potential threats that are pure speculation. Peer... our threat discussion under the Summary of Factors Affecting the Species section and most notably...

  8. A Method for Determining Pseudo-measurement State Values for Topology Observability of State Estimation in Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Shoichi; Mori, Hiroyuki

    This paper proposes a new technique for determining of state values in power systems. Recently, it is useful for carrying out state estimation with data of PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit). The authors have developed a method for determining state values with artificial neural network (ANN) considering topology observability in power systems. ANN has advantage to approximate nonlinear functions with high precision. The method evaluates pseudo-measurement state values of the data which are lost in power systems. The method is successfully applied to the IEEE 14-bus system.

  9. An Energy-Based State Observer for Dynamical Subsystems with Inaccessible State Variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Sabanovic, Asif; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    This work presents an energy-based state estimation formalism for a class of dynamical systems with inaccessible/unknown outputs, and systems at which sensor utilization is impractical, or when measurements can not be taken. The power-conserving physical interconnections among most of the dynamical

  10. Observations of the role of science in the United States medical cannabis state policies: Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Jelica; Goddard, Perilou; Ryder, David

    2017-04-01

    Clinical trials have shown cannabis to be effective in the treatment of some medical conditions and there is mounting public and political pressure to enact laws enabling the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes. To date, 28 United States (U.S.) states and the District of Columbia have enacted medical cannabis laws. This study sought to identify the main issues pertaining to the development of medical cannabis laws in the U.S, including the role of scientific evidence. Data were collected from three groups of participants: government officials, lobbyists and medical professionals involved in the medical cannabis debate in five selected states in the U.S.; researchers from the same five states conducting funded research in the alcohol and other drugs field; and members of the International Society for the Study of Drug Policy. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Six major themes emerged in relation to the factors influencing policy: scientific evidence plays a limited role in the development of policy; the available research is limited and mixed; there is a need for clearer communication and active dissemination of evidence to policy makers; researchers need to consider what research is likely to impact on policy; scientific evidence is not a major factor in policy development; and there is a need to consider evidence within a political context. Researchers need to be aware of the political context in which medical cannabis laws are or are not enacted and consider ways in which research findings can achieve a higher profile within this context. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A comparative study of kalman filtering based observer and sliding mode observer for state of charge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Sassi, Hicham; Errahimi, Fatima; Es-Sbai, Najia; Alaoui, Chakib

    2018-05-01

    Nowadays, electric mobility is starting to define society and is becoming more and more irreplaceable and essential to daily activities. Safe and durable battery is of a great significance for this type of mobility, hence the increasing interest of research activity oriented to battery studies, in order to assure safe operating mode and to control the battery in case of any abnormal functioning conditions that could damage the battery if not properly managed. Lithium-ion technology is considered the most suitable existing technology for electrical storage, because of their interesting features such as their relatively long cycle life, lighter weight, their high energy density, However, there is a lot of work that is still needed to be done in order to assure safe operating lithium-ion batteries, starting with their internal status monitoring, cell balancing within a battery pack, and thermal management. Tasks that are accomplished by the battery management system (BMS) which uses the state of charge (SOC) as an indicator of the internal charge level of the battery, in order to avoid unpredicted system interruption. Since the state of charge is an inner state of a the battery which cannot be directly measured, a powerful estimation technique is inevitable, in this paper we investigate the performances of tow estimation strategies; kalman filtering based observers and sliding mode observers, both strategies are compared in terms of accuracy, design requirement, and overall performances.

  12. Two local observables are sufficient to characterize maximally entangled states of N qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fengli; Gao, Ting; Chitambar, Eric

    2011-02-01

    Maximally entangled states (MES) represent a valuable resource in quantum information processing. In N-qubit systems the MES are N-GHZ states [i.e., the collection of |GHZN>=(1)/(2)(|00…0>+|11…1>)] and its local unitary (LU) equivalences. While it is well known that such states are uniquely stabilized by N commuting observables, in this article we consider the minimum number of noncommuting observables needed to characterize an N-qubit MES as the unique common eigenstate. Here, we prove, rather surprisingly, that in this general case any N-GHZ state can be uniquely stabilized by only two observables. Thus, for the task of MES certification, only two correlated measurements are required with each party observing the spin of his or her system along one of two directions.

  13. An Approach for State Observation in Dynamical Systems Based on the Twisting Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel approach for state estimation in dynamical systems, with the special focus on hydraulic valve-cylinder drives. The proposed observer structure is based on the framework of the so-called twisting algorithm. This algorithm utilizes the sign of the state being the target...

  14. Observation of an intermediate state in psi (3684) radiative cascade decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanenbaum, W.; Whitaker, J.S.; Abrams, G.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Chinowsky, W.; Feldman, G.J.; Friedberg, C.E.; Fryberger, D.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jean-Marie, B.; Kadyk, J.A.; Larsen, R.R.; Litke, A.M.; Luke, D.; Lulu, B.A.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Pierre, F.M.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Sadoulet, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Trilling, G.H.; Vannucci, F.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    We present evidence for the existence of an intermediate state observed in the decay sequence psi(3684) → psi(3095)γγ. The mass of the state is either 3500+-10 or 3270+-10 MeV. The branching fraction of the sequence is (3.6+-0.7)%

  15. Observation of an Excited Meson State with the ATLAS Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.

    2014-01-01

    ±c→J/ψπ±. The state appears in the m(B±cπ+π−)−m(B±c)−2m(π±) mass difference distribution with a significance of 5.2 standard deviations. The mass of the observed state is 6842±4±5  MeV, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The mass and decay of this state are consistent with expectations...

  16. A novel adipokinetic peptide from the corpus cardiacum of the primitive caeliferan pygmy grasshopper Tetrix subulata (Caelifera, Tetrigidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2015-06-01

    The basal caeliferan family Tetrigidae is investigated to identify neuropeptides belonging to the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family. The pygmy grasshopper Tetrix subulata contains in its corpus cardiacum two octapeptides as revealed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The less abundant peptide is the well-known Schgr-AKH-II (pELNFSTGW amide) which is suggested to be the ancestral AKH of Caelifera and Ensifera. The second peptide, Tetsu-AKH (pEFNFTPGW amide), is novel and quite unusual with its third aromatic residue at position 2. It is thought to be autapomorphic for Caelifera. Tetsu-AKH has hyperlipemic activity in T. subulata and in Schistocerca gregaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Multifrequency observations of the Blazar PKS 0537-441 in a moderately active state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzi, E.G.; Chiappetti, L.; Barr, P.; Bouchet, P.; Cristiani, S.; EXOSAT Observatory, Darmstadt, West Germany; European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile)

    1986-01-01

    PKS 0537-441 was observed during an active state in February 1985 at infrared, optical, UV, and X-ray frequencies. Comparison with earlier measurements indicates that the source brightened by a factor of approximately 2 in all bands. This suggests that the same spatial region may be responsible for the emission in the whole spectral range observed. 19 references

  18. Multifrequency observations of the Blazar PKS 0537-441 in a moderately active state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzi, E.G.; Chiappetti, L.; Barr, P.; Bouchet, P.; Cristiani, S.

    1986-12-01

    PKS 0537-441 was observed during an active state in February 1985 at infrared, optical, UV, and X-ray frequencies. Comparison with earlier measurements indicates that the source brightened by a factor of approximately 2 in all bands. This suggests that the same spatial region may be responsible for the emission in the whole spectral range observed. 19 references.

  19. A Neural-Network-Based Nonlinear Adaptive State-Observer for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been some severe nuclear accidents such as Three Mile Island (USA, Chernobyl (Ukraine and Fukushima (Japan, nuclear fission energy is still a source of clean energy that can substitute for fossil fuels in a centralized way and in a great amount with commercial availability and economic competitiveness. Since the pressurized water reactor (PWR is the most widely used nuclear fission reactor, its safe, stable and efficient operation is meaningful to the current rebirth of the nuclear fission energy industry. Power-level regulation is an important technique which can deeply affect the operation stability and efficiency of PWRs. Compared with the classical power-level controllers, the advanced power-level regulators could strengthen both the closed-loop stability and control performance by feeding back the internal state-variables. However, not all of the internal state variables of a PWR can be obtained directly by measurements. To implement advanced PWR power-level control law, it is necessary to develop a state-observer to reconstruct the unmeasurable state-variables. Since a PWR is naturally a complex nonlinear system with parameters varying with power-level, fuel burnup, xenon isotope production, control rod worth and etc., it is meaningful to design a nonlinear observer for the PWR with adaptability to system uncertainties. Due to this and the strong learning capability of the multi-layer perceptron (MLP neural network, an MLP-based nonlinear adaptive observer is given for PWRs. Based upon Lyapunov stability theory, it is proved theoretically that this newly-built observer can provide bounded and convergent state-observation. This observer is then applied to the state-observation of a special PWR, i.e., the nuclear heating reactor (NHR, and numerical simulation results not only verify its feasibility but also give the relationship between the observation performance and observer parameters.

  20. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON NEUTRON STAR OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, A. W.; Hempel, M.; Fischer, T.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the currently available equations of state for core-collapse supernova simulations give large neutron star radii and do not provide large enough neutron star masses, both of which are inconsistent with some recent neutron star observations. In addition, one of the critical uncertainties in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the nuclear symmetry energy, is not fully explored by the currently available equations of state. In this article, we construct two new equations of state which match recent neutron star observations and provide more flexibility in studying the dependence on nuclear matter properties. The equations of state are also provided in tabular form, covering a wide range in density, temperature, and asymmetry, suitable for astrophysical simulations. These new equations of state are implemented into our spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model, which is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport. The results are compared with commonly used equations of state in supernova simulations of 11.2 and 40 M ☉ progenitors. We consider only equations of state which are fitted to nuclear binding energies and other experimental and observational constraints. We find that central densities at bounce are weakly correlated with L and that there is a moderate influence of the symmetry energy on the evolution of the electron fraction. The new models also obey the previously observed correlation between the time to black hole formation and the maximum mass of an s = 4 neutron star

  1. Experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a minimal globally coupled network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Joseph D. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Bansal, Kanika [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo, SUNY Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Murphy, Thomas E. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Roy, Rajarshi [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A “chimera state” is a dynamical pattern that occurs in a network of coupled identical oscillators when the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into synchronous and asynchronous parts. We report the experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a network of four globally coupled chaotic opto-electronic oscillators. This is the minimal network that can support chimera states, and our study provides new insight into the fundamental mechanisms underlying their formation. We use a unified approach to determine the stability of all the observed partially synchronous patterns, highlighting the close relationship between chimera and cluster states as belonging to the broader phenomenon of partial synchronization. Our approach is general in terms of network size and connectivity. We also find that chimera states often appear in regions of multistability between global, cluster, and desynchronized states.

  2. Seeing mental states: An experimental strategy for measuring the observability of other minds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchio, Cristina; Koul, Atesh; Ansuini, Caterina; Bertone, Cesare; Cavallo, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Is it possible to perceive others' mental states? Are mental states visible in others' behavior? In contrast to the traditional view that mental states are hidden and not directly accessible to perception, in recent years a phenomenologically-motivated account of social cognition has emerged: direct social perception. However, despite numerous published articles that both defend and critique direct perception, researchers have made little progress in articulating the conditions under which direct perception of others' mental states is possible. This paper proposes an empirically anchored approach to the observability of others' mentality - not just in the weak sense of discussing relevant empirical evidence for and against the phenomenon of interest, but also, and more specifically, in the stronger sense of identifying an experimental strategy for measuring the observability of mental states and articulating the conditions under which mental states are observable. We conclude this article by reframing the problem of direct perception in terms of establishing a definable and measurable relationship between movement features and perceived mental states.

  3. Synthesis of state observer and nonlinear output feedback controller design of AC machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tahir, Ali Abdul Razzaq

    2016-01-01

    The research work developed in this thesis has been mainly devoted to the observation and sensor-less control problems of electrical systems. Three major contributions have been carried out using the high - gain concept and output feedback adaptive nonlinear control for online UPS. In this thesis, we dealt with synthesis of sampled high - gain observers for nonlinear systems application to PMSMs and DFIGs. We particularly focus on two constraints: sampling effect and tracking unmeasured mechanical and magnetic state variables. The first contribution consists in a high gain observer design that performs a relatively accurate estimation of both mechanical and magnetic state variable using the available measurements on stator currents and voltages of PMSM. We propose a global exponential observer having state predictor for a class of nonlinear globally Lipschitz system. In second contribution, we proposed a novel non - standard HGO design for non-injective feedback relation application to variable speed DFIG based WPGS. Meanwhile, a reduced system model is analyzed, provided by observability test to check is it possible synthesis state observer for sensor-less control. In last contribution, an adaptive observer for states and parameters estimation are designed for a class of state - affine systems application to output feedback adaptive nonlinear control of three-phase AC/DC boost power converter for online UPS systems. Basically, the problem focused on cascade nonlinear adaptive controller that is developed making use Lyapunov theory. The parameters uncertainties are processed by the practical control laws under back-stepping design techniques with capacity of adaptation. (author)

  4. Optimal State Estimation for Discrete-Time Markov Jump Systems with Missing Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the optimal linear estimation for a class of direct-time Markov jump systems with missing observations. An observer-based approach of fault detection and isolation (FDI is investigated as a detection mechanic of fault case. For systems with known information, a conditional prediction of observations is applied and fault observations are replaced and isolated; then, an FDI linear minimum mean square error estimation (LMMSE can be developed by comprehensive utilizing of the correct information offered by systems. A recursive equation of filtering based on the geometric arguments can be obtained. Meanwhile, a stability of the state estimator will be guaranteed under appropriate assumption.

  5. Infinite-Dimensional Boundary Observer for Lithium-Ion Battery State Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasan, Agus; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents boundary observer design for state-of-charge (SOC) estimation of lithium-ion batteries. The lithium-ion battery dynamics are governed by thermal-electrochemical principles, which mathematically modeled by partial differential equations (PDEs). In general, the model is a reaction......-diffusion equation with time-dependent coefficients. A Luenberger observer is developed using infinite-dimensional backstepping method and uses only a single measurement at the boundary of the battery. The observer gains are computed by solving the observer kernel equation. A numerical example is performed to show...

  6. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  7. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B.

    2014-01-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  8. State Estimation for a Biological Phosphorus Removal Process using an Asymptotic Observer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larose, Claude Alain; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the use of an asymptotic observer for state estimation in a continuous biological phosphorus removal process. The estimated states are the concentration of heterotrophic, autotrophic, and phosphorus accumulating organisms, polyphosphate, glycogen and PHA. The reaction scheme...... if the convergence, driven by the dilution rate, was slow (from 15 to 60 days). The propagation of the measurement noise and a bias in the estimation of glycogen and PHA could be the result of the high condition number of one of the matrices used in the algorithm of the asymptotic observer for the aerated tanks....

  9. Observation of an eta'/sub c/ candidate state with mass 3592 +- 5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.; Partridge, R.; Peck, C.; Porter, F.C.; Antreasyan, D.; Gu, Y.F.; Kollmann, W.; Richardson, M.; Strauch, K.; Wacker, K.; Weinstein, A.; Aschman, D.; Burnett, T.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.; Newman, C.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Gelphman, D.; Hofstadter, R.; Horisberger, R.; Kirkbride, I.; Kolanoski, H.; Koenigsmann, K.; Lee, R.; Liberman, A.; O'Reilly, J.; Osterheld, A.; Pollock, B.; Tompkins, J.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Chestnut, R.; Gaiser, J.; Godfrey, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lockman, W.; Oreglia, M.; Scharre, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    An eta'/sub c/ candidate state is observed at a mass M = 3592 +- 5 MeV and with a natural linewidth GAMMA<8 MeV (95% confidence level), by using the ''crystal ball'' NaI(Tl) detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SPEAR). The evidence is found in the inclusive photon spectrum in decays of the psi'(3684), where a signal is observed corresponding to a radiative transition to this state with branching ratio between 0.2% and 1.3%

  10. Nonlinear Adaptive Descriptor Observer for the Joint States and Parameters Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    2016-08-29

    In this note, the joint state and parameters estimation problem for nonlinear multi-input multi-output descriptor systems is considered. Asymptotic convergence of the adaptive descriptor observer is established by a sufficient set of linear matrix inequalities for the noise-free systems. The noise corrupted systems are also considered and it is shown that the state and parameters estimation errors are bounded for bounded noises. In addition, if the noises are bounded and have zero mean, then the estimation errors asymptotically converge to zero in the mean. The performance of the proposed adaptive observer is illustrated by a numerical example.

  11. Nonlinear Adaptive Descriptor Observer for the Joint States and Parameters Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Unknown author

    2016-01-01

    In this note, the joint state and parameters estimation problem for nonlinear multi-input multi-output descriptor systems is considered. Asymptotic convergence of the adaptive descriptor observer is established by a sufficient set of linear matrix inequalities for the noise-free systems. The noise corrupted systems are also considered and it is shown that the state and parameters estimation errors are bounded for bounded noises. In addition, if the noises are bounded and have zero mean, then the estimation errors asymptotically converge to zero in the mean. The performance of the proposed adaptive observer is illustrated by a numerical example.

  12. Extended state observer-based motion synchronisation control for hybrid actuation system of large civil aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingjian; Shi, Cun; Wang, Shaoping

    2017-07-01

    Hybrid actuation system with dissimilar redundant actuators, which is composed of a hydraulic actuator (HA) and an electro-hydrostatic actuator (EHA), has been applied on modern civil aircraft to improve the reliability. However, the force fighting problem arises due to different dynamic performances between HA and EHA. This paper proposes an extended state observer (ESO)-based motion synchronisation control method. To cope with the problem of unavailability of the state signals, the well-designed ESO is utilised to observe the HA and EHA state variables which are unmeasured. In particular, the extended state of ESO can estimate the lumped effect of the unknown external disturbances acting on the control surface, the nonlinear dynamics, uncertainties, and the coupling term between HA and EHA. Based on the observed states of ESO, motion synchronisation controllers are presented to make HA and EHA to simultaneously track the desired motion trajectories, which are generated by a trajectory generator. Additionally, the unknown disturbances and the coupling terms can be compensated by using the extended state of the proposed ESO. Finally, comparative simulation results indicate that the proposed ESO-based motion synchronisation controller can achieve great force fighting reduction between HA and EHA.

  13. Observational constraints on variable equation of state parameters of dark matter and dark energy after Planck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study a cosmological model in general relativity within the framework of spatially flat Friedmann–Robertson–Walker space–time filled with ordinary matter (baryonic, radiation, dark matter and dark energy, where the latter two components are described by Chevallier–Polarski–Linder equation of state parameters. We utilize the observational data sets from SNLS3, BAO and Planck + WMAP9 + WiggleZ measurements of matter power spectrum to constrain the model parameters. We find that the current observational data offer tight constraints on the equation of state parameter of dark matter. We consider the perturbations and study the behavior of dark matter by observing its effects on CMB and matter power spectra. We find that the current observational data favor the cold dark matter scenario with the cosmological constant type dark energy at the present epoch.

  14. Observational constraints on variable equation of state parameters of dark matter and dark energy after Planck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Suresh; Xu, Lixin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study a cosmological model in general relativity within the framework of spatially flat Friedmann–Robertson–Walker space–time filled with ordinary matter (baryonic), radiation, dark matter and dark energy, where the latter two components are described by Chevallier–Polarski–Linder equation of state parameters. We utilize the observational data sets from SNLS3, BAO and Planck + WMAP9 + WiggleZ measurements of matter power spectrum to constrain the model parameters. We find that the current observational data offer tight constraints on the equation of state parameter of dark matter. We consider the perturbations and study the behavior of dark matter by observing its effects on CMB and matter power spectra. We find that the current observational data favor the cold dark matter scenario with the cosmological constant type dark energy at the present epoch

  15. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    CERN Document Server

    Deng Ying Chun; Qian Min Ping; Feng Jian Feng

    2003-01-01

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included.

  16. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Yingchun; Peng Shenglun; Qian Minping; Feng Jianfeng

    2003-01-01

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included

  17. Observation of a low-lying neutron-unbound state in 19C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoennessen, M.; Mosby, S.; Badger, N.S.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Bennett, M.; Brown, J.; Christian, G.; DeYoung, P.A.; Finck, J.E.; Gardner, M.; Hook, E.A.; Luther, B.; Meyer, D.A.; Mosby, M.; Rogers, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Proton removal reactions from a secondary 22 N beam were utilized to populate unbound states in neutron-rich carbon isotopes. Neutrons were measured with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) in coincidence with carbon fragments. A resonance with a decay energy of 76(14) keV was observed in the system 18 C+n corresponding to a state in 19 C at an excitation energy of 653(95) keV. This resonance could correspond to the first 5/2 + state which was recently speculated to be unbound in order to describe 1n and 2n removal cross section measurements from 20 C

  18. Electron-tunneling observation of localized excited states in superconducting manganese-doped lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, J.; Ginsberg, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    We have made electron-tunneling measurements on a dilute, superconducting lead-manganese alloy. A well-defined structure was observed in the ac-conductance--voltage curves, indicating excited states within the BCS energy gap. These states were partially accounted for by Shiba theory when spin-dependent s-, p-, and d-wave scattering were included. The phase shifts used in doing that were the results of band calculations. The experimental data also show the existence of a broad background density of states in the energy gap, which cannot be accounted for by the theory

  19. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Yingchun [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Peng Shenglun [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Qian Minping [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Feng Jianfeng [COGS, Sussex University, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-07

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included.

  20. Optimizing mesoscopic two-band superconductors for observation of fractional vortex states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piña, Juan C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitária, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Núcleo de Tecnologia, CAA, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 55002-970 Caruaru, PE (Brazil); Souza Silva, Clécio C. de, E-mail: clecio@df.ufpe [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitária, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Milošević, Milorad V. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Observation of fractional vortices in two-band superconductors of broad size range. • There is a minimal sample size for observing each particular fractional state. • Optimal value for stability of each fractional state is determined. • A suitable magnetic dot enhances stability even further. - Abstract: Using the two-component Ginzburg–Landau model, we investigate the effect of sample size and magnitude and homogeneity of external magnetic field on the stability of fractional vortex states in a mesoscopic two-band superconducting disk. We found that each fractional state has a preferable sample size, for which the range of applied field in which the state is stable is pronouncedly large. Vice versa, there exists an optimal magnitude of applied field for which a large range of possible sample radii will support the considered fractional state. Finally, we show that the stability of fractional states can be enhanced even further by magnetic nanostructuring of the sample, i.e. by suitably chosen geometrical parameters and magnetic moment of a ferromagnetic dot placed on top of the superconducting disk.

  1. Iterative Observer-based Estimation Algorithms for Steady-State Elliptic Partial Differential Equation Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Majeed, Muhammad Usman

    2017-07-19

    Steady-state elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) are frequently used to model a diverse range of physical phenomena. The source and boundary data estimation problems for such PDE systems are of prime interest in various engineering disciplines including biomedical engineering, mechanics of materials and earth sciences. Almost all existing solution strategies for such problems can be broadly classified as optimization-based techniques, which are computationally heavy especially when the problems are formulated on higher dimensional space domains. However, in this dissertation, feedback based state estimation algorithms, known as state observers, are developed to solve such steady-state problems using one of the space variables as time-like. In this regard, first, an iterative observer algorithm is developed that sweeps over regular-shaped domains and solves boundary estimation problems for steady-state Laplace equation. It is well-known that source and boundary estimation problems for the elliptic PDEs are highly sensitive to noise in the data. For this, an optimal iterative observer algorithm, which is a robust counterpart of the iterative observer, is presented to tackle the ill-posedness due to noise. The iterative observer algorithm and the optimal iterative algorithm are then used to solve source localization and estimation problems for Poisson equation for noise-free and noisy data cases respectively. Next, a divide and conquer approach is developed for three-dimensional domains with two congruent parallel surfaces to solve the boundary and the source data estimation problems for the steady-state Laplace and Poisson kind of systems respectively. Theoretical results are shown using a functional analysis framework, and consistent numerical simulation results are presented for several test cases using finite difference discretization schemes.

  2. Identification of weak autoionizing resonances observed through fluorescence from the satellite states of Ar{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, K.W.; Yenen, O.; Samson, J.A.R. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Photoionization accompanied by excitation of the residual ionic state violates an independent electron model since, according to QED, photons interact only with individual electrons. By allowing measurements at a threshold event with high resolution, the observation of the fluorescence from the decay of these excited states (satellite states) is a sensitive method in the study of electron-electron interactions, providing complementary information to photoelectron spectroscopy. In the measurements reported here, an atomic beam of argon has been photoionized with 34 to 39 eV synchrotron radiation at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source. This energy range encompasses the 3p{sup 4} [{sup 3}P] 4p {sup 4}P, {sup 2}P, and {sup 2}D as well as the [{sup 1}D]4p {sup 2}F satellite states of Ar{sup +}. By observing the fine-structure resolved fluorescence from these satellite states, new Rydberg series and extensions of previously known series have been resolved with an energy resolution of 3 meV. With the high photon flux available from the high resolution monochromator of beamline 9.0.1, even the weakly excited [{sup 3}P] 4p ({sup 2}S) ns,d autoionizing structure has been observed for the first time.

  3. Identification of weak autoionizing resonances observed through fluorescence from the satellite states of Ar+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, K.W.; Yenen, O.; Samson, J.A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Photoionization accompanied by excitation of the residual ionic state violates an independent electron model since, according to QED, photons interact only with individual electrons. By allowing measurements at a threshold event with high resolution, the observation of the fluorescence from the decay of these excited states (satellite states) is a sensitive method in the study of electron-electron interactions, providing complementary information to photoelectron spectroscopy. In the measurements reported here, an atomic beam of argon has been photoionized with 34 to 39 eV synchrotron radiation at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source. This energy range encompasses the 3p 4 [ 3 P] 4p 4 P, 2 P, and 2 D as well as the [ 1 D]4p 2 F satellite states of Ar + . By observing the fine-structure resolved fluorescence from these satellite states, new Rydberg series and extensions of previously known series have been resolved with an energy resolution of 3 meV. With the high photon flux available from the high resolution monochromator of beamline 9.0.1, even the weakly excited [ 3 P] 4p ( 2 S) ns,d autoionizing structure has been observed for the first time

  4. Observation of electric quadrupole transitions to Rydberg nd states of ultracold rubidium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tong, D.; Farooqi, S.M.; Kempen, van E.G.M.; Pavlovic, Z.; Stanojevic, J.; Coté, R.; Eyler, E.E.; Gould, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    We report the observation of dipole-forbidden, but quadrupole-allowed, one-photon transitions to high-Rydberg states in Rb. Using pulsed uv excitation of ultracold atoms in a magneto-optical trap, we excite 5s¿nd transitions over a range of principal quantum numbers n=27–59. Compared to

  5. White noise theory of robust nonlinear filtering with correlated state and observation noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Karandikar, Rajeeva

    1992-01-01

    In the direct white noise theory of nonlinear filtering, the state process is still modeled as a Markov process satisfying an Ito stochastic differential equation, while a finitely additive white noise is used to model the observation noise. In the present work, this asymmetry is removed by modeling

  6. White noise theory of robust nonlinear filtering with correlated state and observation noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Karandikar, Rajeeva

    1994-01-01

    In the existing `direct¿ white noise theory of nonlinear filtering, the state process is still modelled as a Markov process satisfying an Itô stochastic differential equation, while a `finitely additive¿ white noise is used to model the observation noise. We remove this asymmetry by modelling the

  7. Making United States Integrated Ocean Observing System (U.S. IOOS) inclusive of marine biological resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustahfid, H.; Potemra, J.; Goldstein, P.; Mendelssohn, R.; Desrochers, A.

    2011-01-01

    An important Data Management and Communication (DMAC) goal is to enable a multi-disciplinary view of the ocean environment by facilitating discovery and integration of data from various sources, projects and scientific domains. United States Integrated Ocean Observing System (U.S. IOOS) DMAC functional requirements are based upon guidelines for standardized data access services, data formats, metadata, controlled vocabularies, and other conventions. So far, the data integration effort has focused on geophysical U.S. IOOS core variables such as temperature, salinity, ocean currents, etc. The IOOS Biological Observations Project is addressing the DMAC requirements that pertain to biological observations standards and interoperability applicable to U.S. IOOS and to various observing systems. Biological observations are highly heterogeneous and the variety of formats, logical structures, and sampling methods create significant challenges. Here we describe an informatics framework for biological observing data (e.g. species presence/absence and abundance data) that will expand information content and reconcile standards for the representation and integration of these biological observations for users to maximize the value of these observing data. We further propose that the approach described can be applied to other datasets generated in scientific observing surveys and will provide a vehicle for wider dissemination of biological observing data. We propose to employ data definition conventions that are well understood in U.S. IOOS and to combine these with ratified terminologies, policies and guidelines. ?? 2011 MTS.

  8. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M

    2015-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process-a search state and a recognition state-facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state.

  9. Design and Experiment of Nonlinear Observer with Adaptive Gains for Battery State of Charge Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available State of charge (SOC is an important evaluation index for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs in electric vehicles (EVs. This paper proposes a nonlinear observer with a new adaptive gain structure for SOC estimation based on a second-order RC model. It is able to dynamically adjust the gains and obtain a better balance between convergence speed and estimation accuracy with less computational time. A sufficient condition is derived to guarantee the uniform asymptotic stability of the observer, and its robustness with respect to disturbances and uncertainties is analyzed with the help of input-to-state stability (ISS theory. A selection guide of the observer gains in practical application is presented. The estimation accuracy and convergence rate of the observer are evaluated and compared with those of extended Kalman filter (EKF based on multi-temperature datasets from two different types of LIB cells. The robustness against different disturbances and uncertainties that may appear in a real vehicle is validated and discussed in detail. The experimental results show that the proposed observer is capable of achieving better performance with less computational time in comparison to EKF for different types of LIB cells under various working conditions. The observer is also capable of estimating SOC accurately for real life conditions according to the validation results of datasets from a battery management system (BMS in an EV battery pack. Furthermore, the observer is simple enough, and is suitable for implementation on embedded hardware for LIB cells of EVs.

  10. Field observations of the developing legal recreational cannabis economy in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric L; Roussell, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    Washington State legalized the sale of recreational cannabis in 2012. This paper describes the unfolding of the market regulatory regime in an eastern portion of the state, including field descriptions to illustrate the setting. We made observations and conducted interviews of the local supply chain comprising a producer/processor, analytic facility, and retail establishments as well as querying the state director of the regulatory board. Interviews and observations of facilities suggest an overwhelming concern for black market diversion drives state regulatory efforts. The ongoing dialogue between market actors and the state has resulted in a more equitable distribution of profits at different stages in the process. State safety regulations have thus far been shifted to independent laboratories. Banks and insurance companies have slowly begun making inroads into the industry, despite federal prohibition. The law was conceived as a social justice remedy, but the bulk of the legal and regulatory activity surrounds cannabis marketplace management. This has been characterized by concerns for black market diversion, producer/processor profits, and a hands-off approach to safety regulation. Minor cannabis violations as a pathway to criminal justice system involvement have been reduced substantially but disproportionate enforcement upon racial/ethnic minorities continues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence of a new state in 11Be observed in the 11Li β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madurga, M.; Borge, M.J.G.; Alcorta, M.; Fraile, L.M.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Jonson, B.; Kirsebom, O.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Perea, A.; Poves, A.; Riisager, K.; Tengblad, O.; Tengborn, E.; Van der Walle, J.

    2009-01-01

    Coincidences between charged particles emitted in the β-decay of 11 Li were observed using highly segmented detectors. The breakup channels involving three particles were studied in full kinematics allowing for the reconstruction of the excitation energy of the 11 Be states participating in the decay. In particular, the contribution of a previously unobserved state at 16.3 MeV in 11 Be has been identified selecting the α+ 7 He→α+ 6 He+n channel. The angular correlations between the α particle and the center of mass of the 6 He + n system favors spin and parity assignment of 3/2 - for this state as well as for the previously known state at 18 MeV.

  12. World Health Organization Member States and Open Health Data: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J Greenberg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Open health data has implications for clinical care, research, public health, and health policy at regional, national, and global levels. No published attempts have been made to determine, collectively, whether WHO member states and governments have embraced the promise and effort required to officially share open health data. The observational study will provide evidence that World Health Organization (WHO member states individually and collectively have adopted open data recommended principles, providing access to open health data. Methods Using the WHO list of member states (n=194, the researchers identified the presence of open health data or initiatives. With each country, the following types of official government web pages were recorded: a Ministry of Health web page; a conspicuous link on a government web page to open health data; additional government health web sites; national government-sponsored open data repositories; unique attributes of national health data web sites; and adherence to the principles of open government data for health. A supplemental PDF file provides a representation of data used for analysis and observations. Our complete data is available at: https://goo.gl/Kwj7mb Observations and Discussion Open health data is easily discoverable in less than one-third of the WHO member states. 13 nations demonstrate the principle to provide comprehensive open data. Only 16 nations distribute primary, non-aggregated health data. 24 % of the WHO observed member states are providing some health data in a non-proprietary formats such as comma-separated values. The sixth, seventh, and eighth open government data principles for health, representing universal access, non-proprietary formats, and non-patent protection, are observed in about one-third of the WHO member states. While there are examples of organized national open health data, no more than a one-third minority of the world’s nations have portals set up to

  13. Detection experiments with humans implicate visual predation as a driver of colour polymorphism dynamics in pygmy grasshoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal colour patterns offer good model systems for studies of biodiversity and evolution of local adaptations. An increasingly popular approach to study the role of selection for camouflage for evolutionary trajectories of animal colour patterns is to present images of prey on paper or computer screens to human ‘predators’. Yet, few attempts have been made to confirm that rates of detection by humans can predict patterns of selection and evolutionary modifications of prey colour patterns in nature. In this study, we first analyzed encounters between human ‘predators’ and images of natural black, grey and striped colour morphs of the polymorphic Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers presented on background images of unburnt, intermediate or completely burnt natural habitats. Next, we compared detection rates with estimates of capture probabilities and survival of free-ranging grasshoppers, and with estimates of relative morph frequencies in natural populations. Results The proportion of grasshoppers that were detected and time to detection depended on both the colour pattern of the prey and on the type of visual background. Grasshoppers were detected more often and faster on unburnt backgrounds than on 50% and 100% burnt backgrounds. Striped prey were detected less often than grey or black prey on unburnt backgrounds; grey prey were detected more often than black or striped prey on 50% burnt backgrounds; and black prey were detected less often than grey prey on 100% burnt backgrounds. Rates of detection mirrored previously reported rates of capture by humans of free-ranging grasshoppers, as well as morph specific survival in the wild. Rates of detection were also correlated with frequencies of striped, black and grey morphs in samples of T. subulata from natural populations that occupied the three habitat types used for the detection experiment. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that crypsis is background-dependent, and implicate visual predation

  14. Stochastic simulations of conditional states of partially observed systems, quantum and classical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambetta, Jay; Wiseman, H M

    2005-01-01

    In a partially observed quantum or classical system the information that we cannot access results in our description of the system becoming mixed, even if we have perfect initial knowledge. That is, if the system is quantum the conditional state will be given by a state matrix ρ r (t), and if classical, the conditional state will be given by a probability distribution P r (x,t), where r is the result of the measurement. Thus to determine the evolution of this conditional state, under continuous-in-time monitoring, requires a numerically expensive calculation. In this paper we demonstrate a numerical technique based on linear measurement theory that allows us to determine the conditional state using only pure states. That is, our technique reduces the problem size by a factor of N, the number of basis states for the system. Furthermore we show that our method can be applied to joint classical and quantum systems such as arise in modelling realistic (finite bandwidth, noisy) measurement

  15. Interference effect as resonance killer of newly observed charmoniumlike states Y(4320) and Y(4390)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dian-Yong [Southeast University, School of Physics, Nanjing (China); Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Lanzhou (China); Matsuki, Takayuki [Tokyo Kasei University, Tokyo (Japan); Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Theoretical Research Division, Saitama (Japan)

    2018-02-15

    In this letter, we decode the newly observed charmoniumlike states, Y(4320) and Y(4390), by introducing interference effect between ψ(4160) and ψ(4415), which plays a role of resonance killer for Y(4320) and Y(4390). It means that two newly reported charmoniumlike states are not genuine resonances, according to which we can naturally explain why two well-established charmonia ψ(4160) and ψ(4415) are missing in the cross sections of e{sup +}e{sup -} → π{sup +}π{sup -}J/ψ and π{sup +}π{sup -}h{sub c} simultaneously. To well describe the detailed data of these cross sections around √(s) = 4.2 GeV, our study further illustrates that a charmoniumlike structure Y(4220) must be introduced. As a charmonium, Y(4220) should dominantly decay into its open-charm channel e{sup +}e{sup -} → D{sup 0}π{sup +}D{sup *-}, which provides an extra support to ψ(4S) assignment to Y(4220). In fact, this interference effect introduced to explain Y(4320) and Y(4390) gives a typical example of non-resonant explanations to the observed XYZ states, which should be paid more attention especially before identifying the observed XYZ states as genuine resonances. (orig.)

  16. Observed and Model-Derived Ozone Production Efficiency over Urban and Rural New York State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Ninneman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the model-derived and observed ozone production efficiency (OPE = ∆Ox/∆NOz in one rural location, Pinnacle State Park (PSP in Addison, New York (NY, and one urban location, Queens College (QC in Flushing, NY, in New York State (NYS during photo-chemically productive hours (11 a.m.–4 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST in summer 2016. Measurement data and model predictions from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NOAA NAQFC—Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model versions 4.6 (v4.6 and 5.0.2 (v5.0.2 were used to assess the OPE at both sites. CMAQ-predicted and observed OPEs were often in poor agreement at PSP and in reasonable agreement at QC, with model-predicted and observed OPEs, ranging from approximately 5–11 and 10–13, respectively, at PSP; and 4–7 and 6–8, respectively, at QC. The observed relationship between OPE and oxides of nitrogen (NOx was studied at PSP to examine where the OPE downturn may have occurred. Summer 2016 observations at PSP did not reveal a distinct OPE downturn, but they did indicate that the OPE at PSP remained high (10 or greater regardless of the [NOx] level. The observed OPEs at QC were found by using species-specific reactive odd nitrogen (NOy instruments and an estimated value for nitrogen dioxide (NO2, since observed OPEs determined using non-specific NOx and NOy instruments yielded observed OPE results that (1 varied from approximately 11–25, (2 sometimes had negative [NOz] concentrations, and (3 were inconsistent with CMAQ-predicted OPE. This difference in observed OPEs at QC depending on the suite of instruments used suggests that species-specific NOx and NOy instruments may be needed to obtain reliable urban OPEs.

  17. Distinctive orbital anisotropy observed in the nematic state of a FeSe thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Yi, M.; Stanford University, CA; Liu, Z.-K.

    2016-01-01

    Nematic state, where the system is translationally invariant but breaks the rotational symmetry, has drawn great attentions recently due to experimental observations of such a state in both cuprates and iron-based superconductors. The mechanism of nematicity that is likely tied to the pairing mechanism of high-T c , however, still remains controversial. Here, we studied the electronic structure of multilayer FeSe film by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We found that the FeSe film enters the nematic state around 125 K, while the electronic signature of long range magnetic order has not been observed down to 20K indicating the non-magnetic origin of the nematicity. The band reconstruction in the nematic state is characterized by the splitting of the d xz and d yz bands. More intriguingly, such energy splitting is strong momentum dependent with the largest band splitting of ~80 meV at the zone corner. The simple on-site ferro-orbital ordering is insufficient to reproduce the nontrivial momentum dependence of the band reconstruction. Instead, our results suggest that the nearest-neighbor hopping of d xz and d yz is highly anisotropic in the nematic state, the origin of which holds the key in understanding the nematicity in iron-based superconductors.

  18. Estimating the state of a geophysical system with sparse observations: time delay methods to achieve accurate initial states for prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhe; Rey, Daniel; Ye, Jingxin; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of forecasting the behavior of a complex dynamical system through analysis of observational time-series data becomes difficult when the system expresses chaotic behavior and the measurements are sparse, in both space and/or time. Despite the fact that this situation is quite typical across many fields, including numerical weather prediction, the issue of whether the available observations are "sufficient" for generating successful forecasts is still not well understood. An analysis by Whartenby et al. (2013) found that in the context of the nonlinear shallow water equations on a β plane, standard nudging techniques require observing approximately 70 % of the full set of state variables. Here we examine the same system using a method introduced by Rey et al. (2014a), which generalizes standard nudging methods to utilize time delayed measurements. We show that in certain circumstances, it provides a sizable reduction in the number of observations required to construct accurate estimates and high-quality predictions. In particular, we find that this estimate of 70 % can be reduced to about 33 % using time delays, and even further if Lagrangian drifter locations are also used as measurements.

  19. Model Predictive Flight Control System with Full State Observer using H∞ Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanwale, Jitu; Singh, Dhan Jeet

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the application of the model predictive approach to design a flight control system (FCS) for longitudinal dynamics of a fixed wing aircraft. Longitudinal dynamics is derived for a conventional aircraft. Open loop aircraft response analysis is carried out. Simulation studies are illustrated to prove the efficacy of the proposed model predictive controller using H ∞ state observer. The estimation criterion used in the {H}_{∞} observer design is to minimize the worst possible effects of the modelling errors and additive noise on the parameter estimation.

  20. Improved state observers for sensorless single phase BLDC-PM motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepure, Liviu L.; Boldea, Ion; Andreescu, Gheorghe Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Two methods of extracting the rotor position and speed for a sensorless single phase BLDC-PM motor drive by measuring only the phase current are presented here. Both methods are based on a generated orthogonal flux system. The first method extracts the position information by using the tan−1...... function and then an improved observer is created by adding a 4th order harmonic term in the estimated position, while the second method uses a phase locked loop structure. The proposed state observers are detailed using simulation results and then validated by experimental results....

  1. Observation of a relaxed plasma state in a quasi-infinite cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T; Brown, M R; Dandurand, D

    2013-02-22

    A helical relaxed plasma state is observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v ≥ 50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data are favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibit broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement with the minimum energy eigenstate of [Symbol: see text] × B = λB.

  2. Discrete-time state estimation for stochastic polynomial systems over polynomial observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, M.; Basin, M.; Stepanov, O.

    2018-07-01

    This paper presents a solution to the mean-square state estimation problem for stochastic nonlinear polynomial systems over polynomial observations confused with additive white Gaussian noises. The solution is given in two steps: (a) computing the time-update equations and (b) computing the measurement-update equations for the state estimate and error covariance matrix. A closed form of this filter is obtained by expressing conditional expectations of polynomial terms as functions of the state estimate and error covariance. As a particular case, the mean-square filtering equations are derived for a third-degree polynomial system with second-degree polynomial measurements. Numerical simulations show effectiveness of the proposed filter compared to the extended Kalman filter.

  3. Perpendicular State of an Electronically Excited Stilbene: Observation by Femtosecond-Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Martin; Dobryakov, Alexander L; Ioffe, Ilya N; Granovsky, Alex A; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2016-10-20

    In the photoisomerization path of stilbene, a perpendicular state P on the S 1 potential energy surface is expected just before internal conversion through a conical intersection S 1 /S 0 . For decades the observation of P was thwarted by a short lifetime τ P in combination with slow population flow over a barrier. But these limitations can be overcome by ethylenic substitution. Following optical excitation of trans-1,1'-dicyanostilbene, P is populated significantly (τ P = 27 ps in n-hexane) and monitored by an exited-state absorption band at 370 nm. Here we report stimulated Raman lines of P. The strongest, at 1558 cm -1 , is attributed to stretching vibrations of the phenyl rings. Transient electronic states, resonance conditions, and corresponding Raman signals are discussed.

  4. Observation of a Relaxed Plasma State in a Quasi-Infinite Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Dandurand, D.

    2013-02-01

    A helical relaxed plasma state is observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v≥50km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data are favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibit broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement with the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇×B=λB.

  5. Catchment-scale conservation units identified for the threatened Yarra pygmy perch (Nannoperca obscura) in highly modified river systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Chris J; Unmack, Peter J; Hammer, Michael P; Adams, Mark; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2013-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation caused by human activities alters metapopulation dynamics and decreases biological connectivity through reduced migration and gene flow, leading to lowered levels of population genetic diversity and to local extinctions. The threatened Yarra pygmy perch, Nannoperca obscura, is a poor disperser found in small, isolated populations in wetlands and streams of southeastern Australia. Modifications to natural flow regimes in anthropogenically-impacted river systems have recently reduced the amount of habitat for this species and likely further limited its opportunity to disperse. We employed highly resolving microsatellite DNA markers to assess genetic variation, population structure and the spatial scale that dispersal takes place across the distribution of this freshwater fish and used this information to identify conservation units for management. The levels of genetic variation found for N. obscura are amongst the lowest reported for a fish species (mean heterozygosity of 0.318 and mean allelic richness of 1.92). We identified very strong population genetic structure, nil to little evidence of recent migration among demes and a minimum of 11 units for conservation management, hierarchically nested within four major genetic lineages. A combination of spatial analytical methods revealed hierarchical genetic structure corresponding with catchment boundaries and also demonstrated significant isolation by riverine distance. Our findings have implications for the national recovery plan of this species by demonstrating that N. obscura populations should be managed at a catchment level and highlighting the need to restore habitat and avoid further alteration of the natural hydrology.

  6. Study of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 124Sn by means of the (α,α'γ) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, J.; Zilges, A.; Pietralla, N.; Savran, D.; Sonnabend, K.; Harakeh, M. N.; Stoica, V.; Woertche, H.; Butler, P.; Herzberg, R. D.; Scheck, M.; Kruecken, R.; Popescu, L.; Harissopulos, S.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years α-γ coincidence experiments at 136 MeV incident energy on 48 Ca, 140 Ce, 138 Ba and 124 Sn were performed at the KVI in Groningen to study the isospin character of electric dipole excitations below the particle threshold, frequently called Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR). An array of HPGe γ-detectors has been used in coincidence with the Big-Bite Spectrometer (BBS) and a resolution of about 10 keV in the γ-ray energy has been achieved. The results show that the excitation patterns of the PDR in the (α,α') reaction seem to differ significantly from results obtained in Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF)(γ,γ') measurements. The PDR, which until now has been assigned to one excitation mode, splits up into two parts: One that is excited in (α,α'γ) and (γ,γ') reactions (denoting a dominant isoscalar character), and one that is only excited in (γ,γ')(denoting a dominant isovector character). This indicates that two different excitation mechanisms produce these low-lying E1 excitations [1], The preliminary results of the latest measurements on the N = 82 nucleus 138 Ba and the Z = 50 nucleus 124 Sn show that this break up into two parts is a common feature of the PDR in semi-magic nuclei.

  7. Sensitive Constrained Optimal PMU Allocation with Complete Observability for State Estimation Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Manam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a sensitive constrained integer linear programming approach is formulated for the optimal allocation of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs in a power system network to obtain state estimation. In this approach, sensitive buses along with zero injection buses (ZIB are considered for optimal allocation of PMUs in the network to generate state estimation solutions. Sensitive buses are evolved from the mean of bus voltages subjected to increase of load consistently up to 50%. Sensitive buses are ranked in order to place PMUs. Sensitive constrained optimal PMU allocation in case of single line and no line contingency are considered in observability analysis to ensure protection and control of power system from abnormal conditions. Modeling of ZIB constraints is included to minimize the number of PMU network allocations. This paper presents optimal allocation of PMU at sensitive buses with zero injection modeling, considering cost criteria and redundancy to increase the accuracy of state estimation solution without losing observability of the whole system. Simulations are carried out on IEEE 14, 30 and 57 bus systems and results obtained are compared with traditional and other state estimation methods available in the literature, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Multi-hadron-state contamination in nucleon observables from chiral perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Oliver

    2018-03-01

    Multi-particle states with additional pions are expected to be a non-negligible source of the excited-state contamination in lattice simulations at the physical point. It is shown that baryon chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) can be employed to calculate the contamination due to two-particle nucleon-pion states in various nucleon observables. Results to leading order are presented for the nucleon axial, tensor and scalar charge and three Mellin moments of parton distribution functions: the average quark momentum fraction, the helicity and the transversity moment. Taking into account experimental and phenomenological results for the charges and moments the impact of the nucleon-pionstates on lattice estimates for these observables can be estimated. The nucleon-pion-state contribution leads to an overestimation of all charges and moments obtained with the plateau method. The overestimation is at the 5-10% level for source-sink separations of about 2 fm. Existing lattice data is not in conflict with the ChPT predictions, but the comparison suggests that significantly larger source-sink separations are needed to compute the charges and moments with few-percent precision. Talk given at the 35th International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory, 18 - 24 June 2017, Granada, Spain.

  9. State and actuator fault estimation observer design integrated in a riderless bicycle stabilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela Mendoza, Jorge Aurelio; Astorga Zaragoza, Carlos Manuel; Zavala Río, Arturo; Pattalochi, Leo; Canales Abarca, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with an observer design for Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) systems with high-order time-varying parameter dependency. The proposed design, considered as the main contribution of this paper, corresponds to an observer for the estimation of the actuator fault and the system state, considering measurement noise at the system outputs. The observer gains are computed by considering the extension of linear systems theory to polynomial LPV systems, in such a way that the observer reaches the characteristics of LPV systems. As a result, the actuator fault estimation is ready to be used in a Fault Tolerant Control scheme, where the estimated state with reduced noise should be used to generate the control law. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology has been tested using a riderless bicycle model with dependency on the translational velocity v, where the control objective corresponds to the system stabilization towards the upright position despite the variation of v along the closed-loop system trajectories. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences: reincarnation of a 50 year old State Observatory of Nainital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Ram

    2006-03-01

    The fifty year old State Observatory, well known as U.P. State Observatory till the formation of Uttaranchal in November 2000, was reincarnated on March 22, 2004 as Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences with acronym ARIES, an autonomous institute, under the Department of Science & Technology, Government of India. The growth of academic and technical activities and new mandate of the Institute are briefly described. In early 60's, the Institute was one of the 12 centres established by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, USA, all over the globe but the only centre in India for imaging artificial earth satellites. Commensurating with its observing capabilities, the Institute started a number of front-line research programmes during the last decade, e.g., optical follow up observations of GRB afterglows, radio and space borne astronomical resources, intra-night optical variability in active galactic nuclei as well as gravitational microlensing and milli-magnitude variations in the rapidly oscillating peculiar A type stars. As a part of atmospheric studies, characterisation of aerosol at an altitude of about 2 km is going on since 2002. ARIES has plans for establishing modern observing facilities equipped with latest backend instruments in the area of both astrophysics and atmospheric science. Formation of ARIES, therefore augurs well for the overall development of astrophysics and atmospheric science in India.

  11. State and force observers based on multibody models and the indirect Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjurjo, Emilio; Dopico, Daniel; Luaces, Alberto; Naya, Miguel Ángel

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this work is to present two new methods to provide state observers by combining multibody simulations with indirect extended Kalman filters. One of the methods presented provides also input force estimation. The observers have been applied to two mechanism with four different sensor configurations, and compared to other multibody-based observers found in the literature to evaluate their behavior, namely, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF), and the indirect extended Kalman filter with simplified Jacobians (errorEKF). The new methods have some more computational cost than the errorEKF, but still much less than the UKF. Regarding their accuracy, both are better than the errorEKF. The method with input force estimation outperforms also the UKF, while the method without force estimation achieves results almost identical to those of the UKF. All the methods have been implemented as a reusable MATLAB® toolkit which has been released as Open Source in https://github.com/MBDS/mbde-matlab.

  12. Ensemble Kalman Filtering with Residual Nudging: An Extension to State Estimation Problems with Nonlinear Observation Operators

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is an efficient algorithm for many data assimilation problems. In certain circumstances, however, divergence of the EnKF might be spotted. In previous studies, the authors proposed an observation-space-based strategy, called residual nudging, to improve the stability of the EnKF when dealing with linear observation operators. The main idea behind residual nudging is to monitor and, if necessary, adjust the distances (misfits) between the real observations and the simulated ones of the state estimates, in the hope that by doing so one may be able to obtain better estimation accuracy. In the present study, residual nudging is extended and modified in order to handle nonlinear observation operators. Such extension and modification result in an iterative filtering framework that, under suitable conditions, is able to achieve the objective of residual nudging for data assimilation problems with nonlinear observation operators. The 40-dimensional Lorenz-96 model is used to illustrate the performance of the iterative filter. Numerical results show that, while a normal EnKF may diverge with nonlinear observation operators, the proposed iterative filter remains stable and leads to reasonable estimation accuracy under various experimental settings.

  13. Measuring the neutron star equation of state with gravitational wave observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Jocelyn S.; Markakis, Charalampos; Creighton, Jolien D. E.; Friedman, John L.; Shibata, Masaru; Uryu, Koji

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of a first study that uses numerical simulations to estimate the accuracy with which one can use gravitational wave observations of double neutron-star inspiral to measure parameters of the neutron-star equation of state. The simulations use the evolution and initial-data codes of Shibata and Uryu to compute the last several orbits and the merger of neutron stars, with matter described by a parametrized equation of state. Previous work suggested the use of an effective cutoff frequency to place constraints on the equation of state. We find, however, that greater accuracy is obtained by measuring departures from the point-particle limit of the gravitational waveform produced during the late inspiral. As the stars approach their final plunge and merger, the gravitational wave phase accumulates more rapidly for smaller values of the neutron-star compactness (the ratio of the mass of the neutron-star to its radius). We estimate that realistic equations of state will lead to gravitational waveforms that are distinguishable from point-particle inspirals at an effective distance (the distance to an optimally oriented and located system that would produce an equivalent waveform amplitude) of 100 Mpc or less. As Lattimer and Prakash observed, neutron-star radius is closely tied to the pressure at density not far above nuclear. Our results suggest that broadband gravitational wave observations at frequencies between 500 and 1000 Hz will constrain this pressure, and we estimate the accuracy with which it can be measured. Related first estimates of radius measurability show that the radius can be determined to an accuracy of δR∼1 km at 100 Mpc.

  14. First observation of high spin states and isomeric decay in 210Fr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanjilal, D.; Saha, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Goswami, A.; Kshetri, R.; Raut, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Mukherjee, G.; Mukherjee, B.

    2011-01-01

    The first observation of the prompt and the delayed γ transitions involving the high spin states in 210 Fr is reported. The decay of the high spin states and the isomeric levels of 210 Fr, identified for the first time from the known sequence of low-lying transitions found earlier in the α decay of 214 Ac, were studied. High spin states of the doubly-odd 210 Fr, which were produced by the fusion evaporation reaction 197 Au ( 16 O, xn) 213-x Fr, were populated and the subsequent emitted γ rays were detected through the high-sensitivity germanium clover detector array INGA. The level scheme up to yrast levels of 5.3 MeV excitation energy and ∼20(ℎ/2π) angular momentum could be established for the first time through γγ, γγΔT coincidence, and DCO ratio measurements. A new low-lying isomeric transition at E γ = 203(2) keV was observed. The half-life was measured to be T 1/2 = 41(2) ns. The measured half-life was compared with the corresponding single-particle estimate, based on the level scheme obtained from the experiment.

  15. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Alex Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  16. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, Alex Jason

    2009-01-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4(prime)-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4(prime)-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles

  17. Dendritic morphology observed in the solid-state precipitation in binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, S.W.; Ahmed, M.S.; Qamar, I. [Dr. A.Q. Khan Research Labs., Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    1999-06-01

    The precipitation of {gamma}{sub 2} phase in Cu-Al {beta}-phase alloys has been observed to occur in the dendritic morphology. Such morphology is rarely observed in the solid-state transformations. Earlier it was reported that the {gamma} precipitates were formed in the dendritic shape when Cu-Zn {beta}-phase alloys were cooled from high temperature. The characteristics of these two alloy systems have been examined to find the factors promoting the dendritic morphology in the solid-state transformations. Rapid bulk diffusion and fast interfacial reaction kinetics would promote such morphology. The kinetics of atom attachment to the growing interface is expected to be fast when crystallographic similarities exist between the parent phase and the precipitate. The authors have predicted the dendritic morphology in the solid-state precipitation in many binary alloy systems simply based on such crystallographic similarities. These alloys include, in addition to Cu-Al and Cu-Zn, the {beta}-phase alloys in Ag-Li, Ag-Zn, Cu-Ga, Au-Zn, and Ni-Zn systems, {gamma}-phase alloys in Cu-Sn and Ag-Cd systems, and {delta}-phase alloys in Au-Cd system. Of these, the alloys in Ag-Zn, Ni-Zn, Ag-Cd, and Cu-Sn systems were prepared and it was indeed found that the precipitates formed in the dendritic shape.

  18. The state of renewable energies in Europe. Edition 2015 - 15. EurObserv'ER Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrutto, Vincent; ); Chabrillat, Remi; Seigneur, Vincent Jacques le; Decombe, Annabelle; David, Romain

    2016-01-01

    For sixteen years now, EurObserv'ER has been collecting data on European Union renewable energy sources to describe the state and thrust of the various sectors in its focus studies or barometers. The first part of this assessment is an updated and completed summary of the work published in 2015 in 'Systemes Solaires' ('Journal de l'Eolien' no. 16, 'Journal du Photovoltaique' no. 13 and 'Journal des Energies Renouvelables' no. 227, 228 and 229). This publication provides a complete overview of the twelve renewable sectors. Their performances are compared against the sta-ted goals set out by each country in its National Renewable Energy Action Plan (NREAP). Additionally, for the sixth year running, the EurObserv'ER consortium members have published their annual renewable energy share estimates of overall final energy consumption for each Member State of the European Union. These figures provide preliminary indication of how the various countries are faring along their renewable energy paths and whether their individual trends point to successful achievement of the targets set by European Directive 2009/28/EC

  19. Decision-making contexts involving Earth observations in federal and state government agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwayama, Y.; Thompson, A.

    2017-12-01

    National and international organizations are placing greater emphasis on the societal and economic benefits that can be derived from applications of Earth observations, yet improvements are needed to connect to the decision processes that produce actions with direct societal benefits. The Consortium for the Valuation of Applications Benefits Linked with Earth Science (VALUABLES), a cooperative agreement between Resources for the Future (RFF) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), has the goal of advancing methods for the valuation and communication of the applied benefits linked with Earth observations. One of the Consortium's activities is a set of Policy Briefs that document the use of Earth observations for decision making in federal and state government agencies. In developing these Policy Briefs, we pay special attention to documenting the entire information value chain associated with the use of Earth observations in government decision making, namely (a) the specific data product, modeling capability, or information system used by the agency, (b) the decision context that employs the Earth observation information and translates it into an agency action, (c) the outcomes that are realized as a result of the action, and (d) the beneficiaries associated with the outcomes of the decision. Two key examples include the use of satellite data for informing the US Drought Monitor (USDM), which is used to determine the eligibility of agricultural communities for drought disaster assistance programs housed at the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the use of satellite data by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to develop numeric nutrient water quality standards and monitoring methods for chlorophyll-a, which is codified in Florida state code (62-302.532).

  20. Observation of a new $B_s^0 \\pi^\\pm$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.P.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B.C.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.F.; Dominguez, A.; Drutskoy, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Faure, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J.A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grunendahl, S.; Grunewald, M.W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; La Cruz, I.Heredia-De; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.M.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, S.W.; Lee, W.M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.Z.; Lim, J.K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.L.; Maciel, A.K.A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.L.; Mansour, J.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.L.; Meijer, M.M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.A.; Negret, J.P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Petroff, P.; Pleier, M.A.; Podstavkov, V.M.; Popov, A.V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Sanders, M.P.; Santos, A.S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G.R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D.A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Tsai, Y.T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; W. van Leeuwen, M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.W.; Vasilyev, I.A.; Verkheev, A.Y.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H.D.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M.R.J.; Wilson, G.W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D.R.; Wyatt, T.R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y.A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S.W.; Yu, J.M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2016-07-07

    We report the observation of a narrow structure, $X(5568)$, in the decay sequence $X(5568) \\rightarrow B_s^0 \\pi^{\\pm}$, $B_s^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\phi$, $J/\\psi\\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, $\\phi \\rightarrow K^+K^-$. This is the first observation of a hadronic state with valence quarks of four different flavors. The mass and natural width of the new state are measured to be $m = 5567.8 \\pm 2.9 {\\rm \\thinspace (stat)} ^{+0.9}_{-1.9} {\\rm \\thinspace (syst)}$ MeV/$c^2$ and $\\Gamma = 21.9 \\pm 6.4 {\\rm \\thinspace (stat)} ^{+5.0}_{-2.5} {\\rm \\thinspace (syst)} $ MeV/$c^2$, and the significance including look-elsewhere effect and systematic uncertainties is 5.1$\\sigma$. The observation is based on$10.4~\\rm{fb^{-1}}$ of $p \\overline p $ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  1. Power system observability and dynamic state estimation for stability monitoring using synchrophasor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kai; Qi, Junjian; Kang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Growing penetration of intermittent resources such as renewable generations increases the risk of instability in a power grid. This paper introduces the concept of observability and its computational algorithms for a power grid monitored by the wide-area measurement system (WAMS) based on synchrophasors, e.g. phasor measurement units (PMUs). The goal is to estimate real-time states of generators, especially for potentially unstable trajectories, the information that is critical for the detection of rotor angle instability of the grid. The paper studies the number and siting of synchrophasors in a power grid so that the state of the system can be accurately estimated in the presence of instability. An unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is adopted as a tool to estimate the dynamic states that are not directly measured by synchrophasors. The theory and its computational algorithms are illustrated in detail by using a 9-bus 3-generator power system model and then tested on a 140-bus 48-generator Northeast Power Coordinating Council power grid model. Case studies on those two systems demonstrate the performance of the proposed approach using a limited number of synchrophasors for dynamic state estimation for stability assessment and its robustness against moderate inaccuracies in model parameters.

  2. The Probabilistic Structure of Quantum Theory as Originating from Optimal Observation in the Face of the Observer's Lack of Knowledge of his Own State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Sven

    2014-03-01

    One of the problems facing any attempt to understand quantum theory is that the theory does not seem to offer an explanation of the way the probabilities arise. Moreover, it is a commonly held view that no such explanation is compatible with the mathematical structure of quantum theory, i.e. that the theory is inherently indeterministic, simply because nature is like that. We propose an abstract formalisation of the observation of a system in which the interaction between the system and the observer deterministically produces one of n possible outcomes. If the observer consistently manages to realize the outcome which maximizes the likelihood ratio that the outcome was inferred from the state of the system under study (and not from his own state), he will be called optimal. The probability for a repeated measurement on an ensemble of identical system states, is then derived as a measure over observer states. If the state of the system is a statistical mixture, the optimal observer produces an unbiased estimate of the components of the mixture. In case the state space is a complex Hilbert space, the resulting probability is equal to the one given by the Born rule. The proposal offers a concise interpretation for the meaning of the occurrence of a specific outcome as the unique outcome that, relative to the state of the system, is least dependent on the state of the observer. We note that a similar paradigm is used in the literature of perception to explain optical illusions in human visual perception. We argue that the result strengthens Helmholtz's view that all observation, is in fact a form a inference.

  3. Optimal control of photovoltaic systems by a new battery state-of-charge observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giglioli, R; Zini, G; Conte, M; Raugi, M

    1988-06-01

    In photovoltaic power plants, the ability to accurately determine battery state-of-charge at any given time can reduce the risk of curtailed energy and allow more precise and less costly battery sizing. In this paper, a new state-of-charge observer, based on an original equivalent electric network of the lead-acid battery, is shown and used to develop an optimal control of the system. Hence, a management plan for a complete photovoltaic system is studied. Finally, a comparison between a simulation of the proposed plan and experimental data from a monitored photovoltaic plant, with very simple management requirements, is made and discussed. The present work was carried out within the framework of the Italian Finalized Energy Project-2.

  4. Observational constraints on cosmological models with Chaplygin gas and quadratic equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharov, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Observational manifestations of accelerated expansion of the universe, in particular, recent data for Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, for the Hubble parameter H ( z ) and cosmic microwave background constraints are described with different cosmological models. We compare the ΛCDM, the models with generalized and modified Chaplygin gas and the model with quadratic equation of state. For these models we estimate optimal model parameters and their permissible errors with different approaches to calculation of sound horizon scale r s ( z d ). Among the considered models the best value of χ 2 is achieved for the model with quadratic equation of state, but it has 2 additional parameters in comparison with the ΛCDM and therefore is not favored by the Akaike information criterion.

  5. The state of renewable energies in Europe. Edition 2012 - 12. EurObserv'ER Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillett, William; ); Chabrillat, Remi; Liebard, Alain

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides a complete overview of ten renewable sectors, supplemented by two notes on concentrated solar power and ocean energy. Additionally, for the third year running, the EurObserv'ER consortium members have published their annual renewable energy share estimates of overall final energy consumption for each Member State of the European Union. This issue also provides with the importance of the sectors in terms of employment and turnover. A focus on specific regions that were successful in developing RES sectors shows what are motivating factors for investors on the regional level

  6. Observation of Five New Narrow Ω_{c}^{0} States Decaying to Ξ_{c}^{+}K^{-}.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; 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Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2017-05-05

    The Ξ_{c}^{+}K^{-} mass spectrum is studied with a sample of pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.3  fb^{-1}, collected by the LHCb experiment. The Ξ_{c}^{+} is reconstructed in the decay mode pK^{-}π^{+}. Five new, narrow excited Ω_{c}^{0} states are observed: the Ω_{c}(3000)^{0}, Ω_{c}(3050)^{0}, Ω_{c}(3066)^{0}, Ω_{c}(3090)^{0}, and Ω_{c}(3119)^{0}. Measurements of their masses and widths are reported.

  7. Observation of five new narrow $\\Omega_c^0$ states decaying to $\\Xi^+_c K^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Chen; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gonzalo, David; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevens, Holger; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-05-02

    The $\\Xi^+_c K^-$ mass spectrum is studied with a sample of $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.3 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. The $\\Xi^+_c$ is reconstructed in the decay mode $pK^- \\pi^+$. Five new, narrow excited $\\Omega_c^0$ states are observed: the $\\Omega_c (3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c (3090)^0$, and $\\Omega_c (3119)^0$. Measurements of their masses and widths are reported.

  8. The state of renewable energies in Europe. Edition 2013 - 13. EurObserv'ER Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabrillat, Remi; Gillett, William; ); Liebard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    This publication provides a complete overview of ten renewable sectors, supplemented by two notes on concentrated solar power and ocean energy. Additionally, for the fourth year running, the EurObserv'ER consortium members have published their annual renewable energy share estimates of overall final energy consumption for each Member State of the European Union. This issue also provides with the importance of the sectors in terms of employment and turnover. Finally, for the first time, a chapter dedicated to investment in RES sectors in Europe shows how the sectors are making their way through the economic crisis

  9. First observation of vector boson pairs in a hadronic final state at the tevatron collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-08-28

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 + or - 239(stat) + or - 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section sigma(pp[over ]-->VV + X) of 18.0 + or - 2.8(stat) + or - 2.4(syst) + or -1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  10. Electron-tunneling observation of local excited states in manganese-doped indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, J.; Ginsberg, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    We have measured the electron-tunneling characteristics of a dilute indium-manganese alloy. Well-defined structure was observed, corresponding to a band of local excited states within the energy gap. The measurements were made on two samples, and were quantitatively compared with the theory of Shiba and of Rusinov. We obtained good agreement of the tunneling data with the theory by taking into account only s-wave scattering of conduction electrons from the magnetic-impurity atoms. Even better agreement was obtained by including p- and d-wave scattering. Only by including these higher partial waves could we account for the magnitude of the observed depression of the transition temperature. The phase shifts used are in good agreement with band-theory values calculated recently

  11. Russian State Time and Earth Rotation Service: Observations, Eop Series, Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M.; Pasynok, S.

    2010-01-01

    Russian State Time, Frequency and Earth Rotation Service provides the official EOP data and time for use in scientific, technical and metrological works in Russia. The observations of GLONASS and GPS on 30 stations in Russia, and also the Russian and worldwide observations data of VLBI (35 stations) and SLR (20 stations) are used now. To these three series of EOP the data calculated in two other Russian analysis centers are added: IAA (VLBI, GPS and SLR series) and MCC (SLR). Joint processing of these 7 series is carried out every day (the operational EOP data for the last day and the predicted values for 50 days). The EOP values are weekly refined and systematic errors of every individual series are corrected. The combined results become accessible on the VNIIFTRI server (ftp.imvp.ru) approximately at 6h UT daily.

  12. Observations of Co-variation in Cloud Properties and their Relationships with Atmospheric State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, K.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Fridlind, A. M.; Arnold, T. G.; Yorks, J. E.; Heymsfield, G. M.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Um, J.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative properties of upper tropospheric ice clouds are generally not well represented in global and cloud models. Cloud top height, cloud thermodynamic phase, cloud optical thickness, cloud water path, particle size and ice crystal shape all serve as observational targets for models to constrain cloud properties. Trends or biases in these cloud properties could have profound effects on the climate since they affect cloud radiative properties. Better understanding of co-variation between these cloud properties and linkages with atmospheric state variables can lead to better representation of clouds in models by reducing biases in their micro- and macro-physical properties as well as their radiative properties. This will also enhance our general understanding of cloud processes. In this analysis we look at remote sensing, in situ and reanalysis data from the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS), Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL), Cloud Radar System (CRS), GEOS-5 reanalysis data and GOES imagery obtained during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) airborne campaign. The MAS, CPL and CRS were mounted on the ER-2 high-altitude aircraft during this campaign. In situ observations of ice size and shape were made aboard the DC8 and WB57 aircrafts. We explore how thermodynamic phase, ice effective radius, particle shape and radar reflectivity vary with altitude and also investigate how these observed cloud properties vary with cloud type, cloud top temperature, relative humidity and wind profiles. Observed systematic relationships are supported by physical interpretations of cloud processes and any unexpected differences are examined.

  13. COPERNICUS - The European Union Earth Observation Programme - State of play and way ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Astrid-Christina

    2015-04-01

    Copernicus is the new name of the European Earth Observation Programme, GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security). Copernicus or rather its predecessor was established as an EU programme. It covers all the activities for ensuring an uninterrupted provision of accurate and reliable data and information on environmental issues and security matters to users in charge of policy making, implementation and monitoring, in the EU and its Member States. Copernicus aims at providing Europe with a continuous, independent and reliable access to observation data and information. The EU investment aims at filling the observation gaps, providing access to existing assets and developing operational services. The data policy of the Copernicus programme supports an open, full and free of charge data access that is in line with the data sharing principles of the Group for Earth Observation (GEO). Copernicus is structured in six Services: Marine, Atmosphere, Land and Climate change monitoring as well as support to Emergency and Security. Copernicus uses data from satellites and in-situ sensors such as buoys, balloons or air sensors to provide timely and reliable added-value information and forecasting to support for example, agriculture and fisheries, land use and urban planning, the fight against forest fires, disaster response, maritime transport or air pollution monitoring. The need for continuing such observations is becoming critical, considering the increasing political pressure on public authorities to take informed decisions in the field of environment, security and climate change and the need to respect international agreements. Copernicus also contributes to economic stability and growth by boosting commercial applications (the so-called downstream services) in many different sectors through a full and open access to Copernicus observation data and information products. KEY WORDS: Sentinels, big data, data access, Emergency, Marine, Atmosphere.

  14. State-of-the-art multi-wavelength observations of nearby brightest group/cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron-Marsolais, Marie-Lou; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Nearby galaxy groups and clusters are crucial to our understanding of the impact of nuclear outbursts on the intracluster medium as their proximity allows us to study in detail the processes of feedback from active galactic nuclei in these systems. In this talk, I will present state-of-the-art multi-wavelength observations signatures of this mechanism.I will first show results on multi-configuration 230-470 MHz observations of the Perseus cluster from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, probing the non-thermal emission from the old particle population of the AGN outflows. These observations reveal a multitude of new structures associated with the “mini-halo” and illustrate the high-quality images that can be obtained with the new JVLA at low radio-frequencies.Second, I will present new observations with the optical imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SITELLE (CFHT) of NGC 1275, the Perseus cluster's brightest galaxy. With its wide field of view, it is the only integral field unit spectroscopy instrument able to cover the large emission-line filamentary nebula in NGC 1275. I will present the first detailed velocity map of this nebula in its entirety and tackle the question of its origin (residual cooling flow or dragged gas).Finally, I will present deep Chandra observations of the nearby early-type massive elliptical galaxy NGC 4472, the most optically luminous galaxy in the local Universe, lying on the outskirts of the Virgo cluster. Enhanced X-ray rims around the radio lobes are detected and interpreted as gas uplifted from the core by the buoyant rise of the radio bubbles. We estimate the energy required to lift the gas to constitute a significant fraction of the total outburst energy.I will thus show how these high-fidelity observations of nearby brightest group/cluster galaxies are improving our understanding of the AGN feedback mechanism taking place in galaxy groups and clusters.

  15. Camouflage Effects of Various Colour-Marking Morphs against Different Microhabitat Backgrounds in a Polymorphic Pygmy Grasshopper Tetrix japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurui, Kaori; Honma, Atsushi; Nishida, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    Background Colour-marking polymorphism is widely distributed among cryptic species. To account for the adaptive significance of such polymorphisms, several hypotheses have been proposed to date. Although these hypotheses argue over the degree of camouflage effects of marking morphs (and the interactions between morphs and their microhabitat backgrounds), as far as we know, most empirical evidence has been provided under unnatural conditions (i.e., using artificial prey). Methodology/Principal Findings Tetrix japonica, a pygmy grasshopper, is highly polymorphic in colour-markings and occurs in both sand and grass microhabitats. Even within a microhabitat, T. japonica is highly polymorphic. Using humans as dummy predators and printed photographs in which various morphs of grasshoppers were placed against different backgrounds, we addressed three questions to test the neutral, background heterogeneity, and differential crypsis hypotheses in four marking-type morphs: 1) do the morphs differ in the degree of crypsis in each microhabitat, 2) are different morphs most cryptic in specific backgrounds of the microhabitats, and 3) does the morph frequency reflect the degree of crypsis? Conclusions/Significance The degree of camouflage differed among the four morphs; therefore, the neutral hypothesis was rejected. Furthermore, the order of camouflage advantage among morphs differed depending on the two types of backgrounds (sand and grass), although the grass background consistently provided greater camouflage effects. Thus, based on our results, we could not reject the background heterogeneity hypothesis. Under field conditions, the more cryptic morphs comprised a minority of the population. Overall, our results demonstrate that the different morphs were not equivalent in the degree of crypsis, but the degree of camouflage of the morphs was not consistent with the morph frequency. These findings suggest that trade-offs exist between the camouflage benefit of body colouration

  16. Camouflage effects of various colour-marking morphs against different microhabitat backgrounds in a polymorphic pygmy grasshopper Tetrix japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurui, Kaori; Honma, Atsushi; Nishida, Takayoshi

    2010-07-06

    Colour-marking polymorphism is widely distributed among cryptic species. To account for the adaptive significance of such polymorphisms, several hypotheses have been proposed to date. Although these hypotheses argue over the degree of camouflage effects of marking morphs (and the interactions between morphs and their microhabitat backgrounds), as far as we know, most empirical evidence has been provided under unnatural conditions (i.e., using artificial prey). Tetrix japonica, a pygmy grasshopper, is highly polymorphic in colour-markings and occurs in both sand and grass microhabitats. Even within a microhabitat, T. japonica is highly polymorphic. Using humans as dummy predators and printed photographs in which various morphs of grasshoppers were placed against different backgrounds, we addressed three questions to test the neutral, background heterogeneity, and differential crypsis hypotheses in four marking-type morphs: 1) do the morphs differ in the degree of crypsis in each microhabitat, 2) are different morphs most cryptic in specific backgrounds of the microhabitats, and 3) does the morph frequency reflect the degree of crypsis? The degree of camouflage differed among the four morphs; therefore, the neutral hypothesis was rejected. Furthermore, the order of camouflage advantage among morphs differed depending on the two types of backgrounds (sand and grass), although the grass background consistently provided greater camouflage effects. Thus, based on our results, we could not reject the background heterogeneity hypothesis. Under field conditions, the more cryptic morphs comprised a minority of the population. Overall, our results demonstrate that the different morphs were not equivalent in the degree of crypsis, but the degree of camouflage of the morphs was not consistent with the morph frequency. These findings suggest that trade-offs exist between the camouflage benefit of body colouration and other fitness components, providing a better understanding of

  17. Camouflage effects of various colour-marking morphs against different microhabitat backgrounds in a polymorphic pygmy grasshopper Tetrix japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Tsurui

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colour-marking polymorphism is widely distributed among cryptic species. To account for the adaptive significance of such polymorphisms, several hypotheses have been proposed to date. Although these hypotheses argue over the degree of camouflage effects of marking morphs (and the interactions between morphs and their microhabitat backgrounds, as far as we know, most empirical evidence has been provided under unnatural conditions (i.e., using artificial prey.Tetrix japonica, a pygmy grasshopper, is highly polymorphic in colour-markings and occurs in both sand and grass microhabitats. Even within a microhabitat, T. japonica is highly polymorphic. Using humans as dummy predators and printed photographs in which various morphs of grasshoppers were placed against different backgrounds, we addressed three questions to test the neutral, background heterogeneity, and differential crypsis hypotheses in four marking-type morphs: 1 do the morphs differ in the degree of crypsis in each microhabitat, 2 are different morphs most cryptic in specific backgrounds of the microhabitats, and 3 does the morph frequency reflect the degree of crypsis?The degree of camouflage differed among the four morphs; therefore, the neutral hypothesis was rejected. Furthermore, the order of camouflage advantage among morphs differed depending on the two types of backgrounds (sand and grass, although the grass background consistently provided greater camouflage effects. Thus, based on our results, we could not reject the background heterogeneity hypothesis. Under field conditions, the more cryptic morphs comprised a minority of the population. Overall, our results demonstrate that the different morphs were not equivalent in the degree of crypsis, but the degree of camouflage of the morphs was not consistent with the morph frequency. These findings suggest that trade-offs exist between the camouflage benefit of body colouration and other fitness components, providing a better

  18. Extended state observer based fuzzy model predictive control for ultra-supercritical boiler-turbine unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Xiao; Shen, Jiong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel ESOFMPC is proposed based on the combination of ESO and stable MPC. • The improved ESO can overcome unknown disturbances on any channel of MIMO system. • Nonlinearity and disturbance of boiler-turbine unit can be handled simultaneously. - Abstract: The regulation of ultra-supercritical (USC) boiler-turbine unit in large-scale power plants is vulnerable to various unknown disturbances, meanwhile, the internal nonlinearity makes it a challenging task for wide range load tracking. To overcome these two issues simultaneously, an extended state observer based fuzzy model predictive control is proposed for the USC boiler-turbine unit. Firstly, the fuzzy model of a 1000-MW coal-fired USC boiler-turbine unit is established through the nonlinearity analysis. Then a fuzzy stable model predictive controller is devised on the fuzzy model using output cost function for the purpose of wide range load tracking. An improved linear extended state observer, which can estimate plant behavior variations and unknown disturbances regardless of the direct feedthrough characteristic of the system, is synthesized with the predictive controller to enhance its disturbance rejection property. Closed-loop stability of the overall control system is guaranteed. Simulation results on a 1000-MW USC boiler-turbine unit model demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. Heterogeneous distribution of water in the mantle transition zone beneath United States inferred from seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Pavlis, G. L.; Li, M.

    2017-12-01

    The amount of water in the Earth's deep mantle is critical for the evolution of the solid Earth and the atmosphere. Mineral physics studies have revealed that Wadsleyite and Ringwoodite in the mantle transition zone could store several times the volume of water in the ocean. However, the water content and its distribution in the transition zone remain enigmatic due to lack of direct observations. Here we use seismic data from the full deployment of the Earthscope Transportable Array to produce 3D image of P to S scattering of the mantle transition zone beneath the United States. We compute the image volume from 141,080 pairs of high quality receiver functions defined by the Earthscope Automated Receiver Survey, reprocessed by the generalized iterative deconvolution method and imaged by the plane wave migration method. We find that the transition zone is filled with previously unrecognized small-scale heterogeneities that produce pervasive, negative polarity P to S conversions. Seismic synthetic modeling using a point source simulation method suggests two possible structures for these objects: 1) a set of randomly distributed blobs of slight difference in size, and 2) near vertical diapir structures from small scale convections. Combining with geodynamic simulations, we interpret the observation as compositional heterogeneity from small-scale, low-velocity bodies that are water enriched. Our results indicate there is a heterogeneous distribution of water through the entire mantle transition zone beneath the contiguous United States.

  20. Radiative observables for linearized gravity on asymptotically flat spacetimes and their boundary induced states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benini, Marco; Dappiaggi, Claudio; Murro, Simone

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the quantization of linearized gravity on globally hyperbolic, asymptotically flat, vacuum spacetimes, and the construction of distinguished states which are both of Hadamard form and invariant under the action of all bulk isometries. The procedure, we follow, consists of looking for a realization of the observables of the theory as a sub-algebra of an auxiliary, non-dynamical algebra constructed on future null infinity ℑ + . The applicability of this scheme is tantamount to proving that a solution of the equations of motion for linearized gravity can be extended smoothly to ℑ + . This has been claimed to be possible provided that a suitable gauge fixing condition, first written by Geroch and Xanthopoulos [“Asymptotic simplicity is stable,” J. Math. Phys. 19, 714 (1978)], is imposed. We review its definition critically, showing that there exists a previously unnoticed obstruction in its implementation leading us to introducing the concept of radiative observables. These constitute an algebra for which a Hadamard state induced from null infinity and invariant under the action of all spacetime isometries exists and it is explicitly constructed

  1. Coastal observing and forecasting system for the German Bight – estimates of hydrophysical states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Petersen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A coastal observing system for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA aims at construction of a long-term observatory for the German part of the North Sea, elements of which will be deployed as prototype modules in Arctic coastal waters. At present a coastal prediction system deployed in the area of the German Bight integrates near real-time measurements with numerical models in a pre-operational way and provides continuously state estimates and forecasts of coastal ocean state. The measurement suite contributing to the pre-operational set up includes in situ time series from stationary stations, a High-Frequency (HF radar system measuring surface currents, a FerryBox system and remote sensing data from satellites. The forecasting suite includes nested 3-D hydrodynamic models running in a data-assimilation mode, which are forced with up-to-date meteorological forecast data. This paper reviews the present status of the system and its recent upgrades focusing on developments in the field of coastal data assimilation. Model supported data analysis and state estimates are illustrated using HF radar and FerryBox observations as examples. A new method combining radial surface current measurements from a single HF radar with a priori information from a hydrodynamic model is presented, which optimally relates tidal ellipses parameters of the 2-D current field and the M2 phase and magnitude of the radials. The method presents a robust and helpful first step towards the implementation of a more sophisticated assimilation system and demonstrates that even using only radials from one station can substantially benefit state estimates for surface currents. Assimilation of FerryBox data based on an optimal interpolation approach using a Kalman filter with a stationary background covariance matrix derived from a preliminary model run which was validated against remote sensing and in situ data demonstrated the capabilities of the pre-operational system. Data

  2. High magnetic field observation of the resonance donor states of S in InSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porowski, S.; Konczewicz, L.; Kowalski, J.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical transport measurements in InSb heavily doped with sulfur (n approximately 5x10 18 cm -3 ) are performed. At T = 4.2 K the Hall coefficient and transverse magnetoresistivity are measured as a function of pressure up to 2100 MPa and magnetic field up to 18 T. At the highest pressure, a decrease of the frequency and a decrease of the damping of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are observed. These effects are explained as a result of the transfer of electrons from the conduction band to the resonance states of sulfur. At atmospheric pressure these states are 0.55 eV above the bottom of conduction band. In the lower pressure range, the experimental dependence of the effective Dingle temperature T*sub(D) = Tsub(D) + Tsub(i) can be explained by the model in which the scattering by ionized impurities and short-range potentials are taken into account. At the highest pressures a change of inhomogeneity of carrier concentration due to the transfer of electrons to the resonance states has to be considered. (author)

  3. Auditory Hallucinations and the Brain’s Resting-State Networks: Findings and Methodological Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson-Day, Ben; Diederen, Kelly; Fernyhough, Charles; Ford, Judith M.; Horga, Guillermo; Margulies, Daniel S.; McCarthy-Jones, Simon; Northoff, Georg; Shine, James M.; Turner, Jessica; van de Ven, Vincent; van Lutterveld, Remko; Waters, Flavie; Jardri, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the potential for alterations to the brain’s resting-state networks (RSNs) to explain various kinds of psychopathology. RSNs provide an intriguing new explanatory framework for hallucinations, which can occur in different modalities and population groups, but which remain poorly understood. This collaboration from the International Consortium on Hallucination Research (ICHR) reports on the evidence linking resting-state alterations to auditory hallucinations (AH) and provides a critical appraisal of the methodological approaches used in this area. In the report, we describe findings from resting connectivity fMRI in AH (in schizophrenia and nonclinical individuals) and compare them with findings from neurophysiological research, structural MRI, and research on visual hallucinations (VH). In AH, various studies show resting connectivity differences in left-hemisphere auditory and language regions, as well as atypical interaction of the default mode network and RSNs linked to cognitive control and salience. As the latter are also evident in studies of VH, this points to a domain-general mechanism for hallucinations alongside modality-specific changes to RSNs in different sensory regions. However, we also observed high methodological heterogeneity in the current literature, affecting the ability to make clear comparisons between studies. To address this, we provide some methodological recommendations and options for future research on the resting state and hallucinations. PMID:27280452

  4. CONSIDERATIONS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF OBSERVING HUMAN RIGHTS WITHIN EUROPEAN STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela, STANCEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The detailed analysis of the institution of human rights and fundamental freedoms is necessary to know its role. The promotion of the human condition in the world leads to the innovative interpretation of this institution. The existence of so many international legal instruments aims towards a better protection of the human rights in contemporary society. The issue of human rights has occupied an important role within the states, human rights violations being a common concern, especially in the former communist states. The issue of human rights in Romania has emerged and developed very early. The changes made in Romania by the revolution of 22 December 1989 caused an intense process of amending the legislation in order to be correlated with the international standards. Within European states human rights observance has acquired great importance, a matter which will be emphasised in the future as well. The European Court of Human Rights ensures the guarantee of respecting human rights in Europe, having as legal instrument the European Convention on Human Rights.

  5. From Neutron Star Observables to the Equation of State. II. Bayesian Inference of Equation of State Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Carolyn A.; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2017-08-01

    One of the key goals of observing neutron stars is to infer the equation of state (EoS) of the cold, ultradense matter in their interiors. Here, we present a Bayesian statistical method of inferring the pressures at five fixed densities, from a sample of mock neutron star masses and radii. We show that while five polytropic segments are needed for maximum flexibility in the absence of any prior knowledge of the EoS, regularizers are also necessary to ensure that simple underlying EoS are not over-parameterized. For ideal data with small measurement uncertainties, we show that the pressure at roughly twice the nuclear saturation density, {ρ }{sat}, can be inferred to within 0.3 dex for many realizations of potential sources of uncertainties. The pressures of more complicated EoS with significant phase transitions can also be inferred to within ˜30%. We also find that marginalizing the multi-dimensional parameter space of pressure to infer a mass-radius relation can lead to biases of nearly 1 km in radius, toward larger radii. Using the full, five-dimensional posterior likelihoods avoids this bias.

  6. Confronting Weather and Climate Models with Observational Data from Soil Moisture Networks over the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Wu, Jiexia; Norton, Holly E.; Dorigo, Wouter A.; Quiring, Steven M.; Ford, Trenton W.; Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Ek, Michael B.; Koster, Randal Dean; hide

    2016-01-01

    Four land surface models in uncoupled and coupled configurations are compared to observations of daily soil moisture from 19 networks in the conterminous United States to determine the viability of such comparisons and explore the characteristics of model and observational data. First, observations are analyzed for error characteristics and representation of spatial and temporal variability. Some networks have multiple stations within an area comparable to model grid boxes; for those we find that aggregation of stations before calculation of statistics has little effect on estimates of variance, but soil moisture memory is sensitive to aggregation. Statistics for some networks stand out as unlike those of their neighbors, likely due to differences in instrumentation, calibration and maintenance. Buried sensors appear to have less random error than near-field remote sensing techniques, and heat dissipation sensors show less temporal variability than other types. Model soil moistures are evaluated using three metrics: standard deviation in time, temporal correlation (memory) and spatial correlation (length scale). Models do relatively well in capturing large-scale variability of metrics across climate regimes, but poorly reproduce observed patterns at scales of hundreds of kilometers and smaller. Uncoupled land models do no better than coupled model configurations, nor do reanalyses out perform free-running models. Spatial decorrelation scales are found to be difficult to diagnose. Using data for model validation, calibration or data assimilation from multiple soil moisture networks with different types of sensors and measurement techniques requires great caution. Data from models and observations should be put on the same spatial and temporal scales before comparison.

  7. Constraints on the Equation-of-State of neutron stars from nearby neutron star observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhäuser, R; Hambaryan, V V; Hohle, M M; Eisenbeiss, T

    2012-01-01

    We try to constrain the Equation-of-State (EoS) of supra-nuclear-density matter in neutron stars (NSs) by observations of nearby NSs. There are seven thermally emitting NSs known from X-ray and optical observations, the so-called Magnificent Seven (M7), which are young (up to few Myrs), nearby (within a few hundred pc), and radio-quiet with blackbody-like X-ray spectra, so that we can observe their surfaces. As bright X-ray sources, we can determine their rotational (pulse) period and their period derivative from X-ray timing. From XMM and/or Chandra X-ray spectra, we can determine their temperature. With precise astrometric observations using the Hubble Space Telescope, we can determine their parallax (i.e. distance) and optical flux. From flux, distance, and temperature, one can derive the emitting area - with assumptions about the atmosphere and/or temperature distribution on the surface. This was recently done by us for the two brightest M7 NSs RXJ1856 and RXJ0720. Then, from identifying absorption lines in X-ray spectra, one can also try to determine gravitational redshift. Also, from rotational phase-resolved spectroscopy, we have for the first time determined the compactness (mass/radius) of the M7 NS RBS1223. If also applied to RXJ1856, radius (from luminosity and temperature) and compactness (from X-ray data) will yield the mass and radius - for the first time for an isolated single neutron star. We will present our observations and recent results.

  8. The influence of visual perspective on the somatosensory steady-state response during pain observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Linsey Canizales

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The observation and evaluation of other's pain activate part of the neuronal network involved in the actual experience of pain, including those regions subserving the sensori-discriminative dimension of pain. This was largely interpreted as evidence showing that part of the painful experience can be shared vicariously. Here, we investigated the effect of the visual perspective from which other people’s pain is seen on the cortical response to continuous 25 Hz non-painful somatosensory stimulation (somatosensory steady-state response: SSSR. Based on the shared representation framework, we expected first-person visual perspective (1PP to yield more changes in cortical activity than third-person visual perspective (3PP during pain observation. Twenty healthy adults were instructed to rate a series of pseudo-dynamic pictures depicting hands in either painful or non-painful scenarios, presented either in 1PP (0°-45° angle or 3PP (180° angle, while changes in brain activity was measured with a 128-electode EEG system. The ratings demonstrated that the same scenarios were rated on average as more painful when observed from the 1PP than from the 3PP. As expected from previous works, the SSSR response was decreased after stimulus onset over the left caudal part of the parieto-central cortex, contralateral to the stimulation side. Moreover, the difference between the SSSR was of greater amplitude when the painful situations were presented from the 1PP compared to the 3PP. Together, these results suggest that a visuospatial congruence between the viewer and the observed scenarios is associated with both a higher subjective evaluation of pain and an increased modulation in the somatosensory representation of observed pain. These findings are discussed with regards to the potential role of visual perspective in pain communication and empathy.

  9. OBSERVE-5: Comparison of Etanercept-Treated Psoriasis Patients From Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Kim A; Bourcier, Marc; Poulin, Yves; Lynde, Charles W; Gilbert, Martin; Poulin-Costello, Melanie; Billen, Lieven; Isaila, Maya

    2018-02-01

    OBSERVE-5 surveillance registry results evaluating etanercept safety and effectiveness in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis from Canada and the United States have been reported from data collected between May 2006 and December 2012. Although both countries have an identical indicated starting dose, the maintenance dose can differ and thus affect management strategies and outcomes. To compare the long-term safety and effectiveness outcomes of etanercept in the Canadian and US cohorts. Primary end points included exposure-adjusted event incidence rates of serious adverse events and serious infectious events. Secondary end points included exposure-adjusted event incidence rates of events of medical interest and efficacy outcomes. Over 5 years, Canadian patients received a higher maintenance dose of etanercept (50 mg twice/week) more frequently than those from the United States. Safety outcome comparisons revealed that Canadian patients had a significantly lower occurrence of serious adverse events than patients from the United States, with an overall exposure-adjusted event incidence rate per 100 patient-years of 4.46 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05-6.29) vs 7.76 (95% CI 7.04-8.54), respectively. Serious infectious event rates were not significantly different between the 2 countries. Secondary outcomes of events of medical interest and effectiveness also did not reveal significant differences between the 2 cohorts. After 5 years of etanercept use, safety and effectiveness outcomes were similar between patients from Canada and the United States, with the exception of a significantly lower rate of serious adverse events in the Canadian population.

  10. Observation of chi(cJ) decaying into the p(p)over-barK(+)K(-) final state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-01-01

    First measurements of the decays of the three chi(cJ) states to p (p) over barK(+)K(-) final states are presented. Intermediate phi -> K+K- and Lambda(1520) -> pK(-) resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for chi(cJ) -> (p) over barK(+) Lambda(1520), Lambda(1520)(Lambda) over bar

  11. Observation of the Stark effect in υ+ = 0 Rydberg states of NO: a comparison between predissociating and bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, N J A; Minns, R S; Patel, R; Fielding, H H

    2008-01-01

    The Stark spectra of Rydberg states of NO below the υ + = 0 ionization limit, with principal quantum numbers n = 25-30, have been investigated in the presence of dc electric fields in the range 0-150 V cm -1 . The Stark states were accessed by two-colour, double-resonance excitation via the υ' = 0, N' = 0 rovibrational state of the A 2 Σ + state. The N( 2 D) atoms produced by predissociation were measured by (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization, and compared with pulsed-field ionization spectra of the bound Rydberg state population (Patel et al 2007 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 40 1369)

  12. The state of renewable energies in Europe. 8. EurObserv'ER report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    For over ten years, EurObserv'Er has been collecting data on European Union renewable energy sources in order to describe, in thematic barometers, the state and dynamism of the different renewable sectors. The present annual assessment is a synthesis of the work published in 2008, after having been first updated and completed. It provides a complete survey of the 8 renewable sectors. Their performances are compared with the objectives of the european commission white paper and its biomass action plan. Finally two synthesis notes on two constantly evolving sectors, solar thermal electricity and ocean energy, complete this study. A chapter is devoted to socio-economic indicators associated with their development. Seven countries were monitored sector by sector to describe the local or national effects of renewable energy growth and their involvement and implication in the economy of each country. (A.L.B.)

  13. Computational rationalization for the observed ground-state multiplicities of fluorinated acylnitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Matthew P; Jenks, William S

    2014-10-03

    Computational methods are used to investigate the mechanism by which fluorination of acetylnitrene reduces the stabilization of the singlet configuration. ΔEST is made more positive (favoring the triplet state) by 1.9, 1.3, and 0.7 kcal/mol by the addition of the first, second, and third fluorine, respectively, at the CR-CC(2,3)/6-311(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Smaller effects observed with substitution of β-fluorines in propanoylnitrene derivatives and examination of molecular geometries and orbitals demonstrate that the effect is due to inductive electron withdrawal by the fluorines, rather than hyperconjugation.

  14. Generalized projective synchronization via the state observer and its application in secure communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Di; Li Juan-Juan

    2010-01-01

    Based on the improved state observer and the pole placement technique, by adding a constant which extends the scope of use of the original system, a new design method of generalized projective synchronization is proposed. With this method, by changing the projective synchronization scale factor, one can achieve not only complete synchronization, but also anti-synchronization, as well as arbitrary percentage of projective synchronization, so that the system may attain arbitrary synchronization in a relatively short period of time, which makes this study more meaningful. By numerical simulation, and choosing appropriate scale factor, the results of repeated experiments verify that this method is highly effective and satisfactory. Finally, based on this method and the relevant feedback concept, a novel secure communication project is designed. Numerical simulation verifies that this secure communication project is very valid, and moreover, the experimental result has been greatly improved in decryption time. (general)

  15. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time. PMID:27703140

  16. Chaos control for a class of chaotic systems using PI-type state observer approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Guoping; Zheng Weixing

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, by using the PI-type state observer design approach and the characteristic of ergodicity of chaos, a new method is presented for controlling chaos, including the stabilization of unstable equilibrium points and set-point tracking, for a class of chaotic systems. Based on the theory of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, a simple criterion is derived for designing the controller gains for stabilization and tracking, in which control parameters can be selected via the pole placement technique of linear control theory. More importantly, this control method has a simple controller structure, high robustness against system parametric variations, and strong rejection of external constant disturbances. The method is applied to the chaotic Lorenz system for demonstration

  17. Direct observations of the charge states of low energy solar particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.; Hovestadt, D.

    1974-01-01

    The charge states of carbon and oxygen of solar origin have been measured directly in interplanetary space. At 100 keV per nucleon the C(+5)/C(+6) and O(+7)/O(+8) ratios are 1.8 and 1.6, respectively. Abundance ratios of low energy heavy nuclei to He are found which are significantly larger than the corresponding photospheric values. The enhancement of O/He is 35, and both Si/He and Fe/He are overabundant by a factor of 100. To explain these observations a mechanism is proposed which first preferentially accelerates heavy ions and is followed by either storage of these ions in the coronal regions or strong adiabatic deceleration.

  18. The state of renewable energies in Europe. Edition 2014 - 14. EurObserv'ER Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrutto, Vincent; ); Chabrillat, Remi; Seigneur, Vincent Jacques le; Augereau, Laurence; David, Romain

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides a complete overview of ten renewable energy sectors, supplemented by two notes on concentrated solar power and ocean energy. Additionally, for the fifth year running, the EurObserv'ER consortium members have published their annual renewable energy share estimates of overall final energy consumption for each Member State of the European Union. This issue also provides with the importance of the sectors in terms of employment and turnover. For the second time, a chapter dedicated to investment in RES sectors in Europe shows how the sectors are making their way through the economic crisis. And finally, selected case studies show what new business models are emerging for the financing of RES projects

  19. Empirical observations offer improved estimates of forest floor carbon content across in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C. H.; Domke, G. M.; Walters, B. F.; Smith, J. E.; Woodall, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the United States Forest Service reports official estimates of national forest floor carbon (FFC) stocks and stock change to national and international parties, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), respectively. These estimates of national FFC stocks are derived from plot-level predictions of FFC density. We suspect the models used to predict plot-level FFC density are less than ideal for several reasons: (a) they are based upon local studies that may not reflect FFC dynamics at the national scale, (b) they are relatively insensitive to climate change, and (c) they reduce the natural variability of the data leading to misplaced confidence in the estimates. However, FIA has measured forest floor attributes since 2001 on a systematic 1/16th subset of a nation-wide array of inventory plots (7 800 of 125 000 plots). Here we address the efficacy of replacing plot-level model predictions with empirical observations of FFC density while assessing the impact of imputing FFC density values to the full plot network on national stock estimates. First, using an equivalence testing framework, we found model predictions of FFC density to differ significantly from the observations in all regions and forest types; the mean difference across all plots was 21 percent (1.81 Mg·ha-1). Furthermore, the model predictions were biased towards the lower end of extant FFC density observations, underestimating it while greatly truncating the range relative to the observations. Second, the optimal imputation approach (k-Nearest Neighbor, k-NN) resulted in values that were equivalent to observations of FFC density across a range of simulated missingness and maintained the high variability seen in the observations. We used the k-NN approach to impute FFC density values to the 94 percent of FIA inventory plots without soil measurements. Third, using the imputed

  20. State observer-based sliding mode control for semi-active hydro-pneumatic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sizhong; Zhao, Yuzhuang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an improved virtual reference model for semi-active suspension to coordinate the vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. The reference model combines the virtues of sky-hook with ground-hook control logic, and the hybrid coefficient is tuned according to the longitudinal and lateral acceleration so as to improve the vehicle stability especially in high-speed condition. Suspension state observer based on unscented Kalman filter is designed. A sliding mode controller (SMC) is developed to track the states of the reference model. The stability of the SMC strategy is proven by means of Lyapunov function taking into account the nonlinear damper characteristics and sprung mass variation of the vehicle. Finally, the performance of the controller is demonstrated under three typical working conditions: the random road excitation, speed bump road and sharp acceleration and braking. The simulation results indicated that, compared with the traditional passive suspension, the proposed control algorithm can offer a better coordination between vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active suspension control systems for commercial vehicles.

  1. Observation of Exclusive {ital B} Decays to Final States Containing a Charmed Baryon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Richichi, S.J.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.; Wang, P.N. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gibbons, L.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Schaffner, S.F.; Wang, R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Coan, T.E.; Dominick, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 (United States); Artuso, M.; Efimov, A.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Xing, X. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Marka, S. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Freyberger, A.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Schrenk, S. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Cinabro, D. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; OGrady, C.; Schmidtler, M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; and others

    1997-10-01

    Using data collected in the region of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the CLEO-II detector, we report on the first observation of exclusive decays of the B meson to final states with a charmed baryon. We have measured the branching fractions B(B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{ovr p}{pi}{sup {minus}})=( 0.62{sup +0.23}{sub {minus}0.20}{plus_minus}0.11{plus_minus}0.10) {times}10{sup {minus}3} and B({ovr B}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{ovr p}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}})=(1.33{sup +0.46}{sub {minus}0.42}{plus_minus}0.31{plus_minus}0.21){times}10{sup {minus}3} , where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is due to uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c} branching fractions. In addition, we report upper limits for final states of the form {ovr B}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{ovr p} (n{pi}) and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{ovr p}(n{pi}) {pi}{sup 0} , where (n{pi}) denotes up to four charged pions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Learning of state-space models with highly informative observations: A tempered sequential Monte Carlo solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Andreas; Schön, Thomas B.; Lindsten, Fredrik

    2018-05-01

    Probabilistic (or Bayesian) modeling and learning offers interesting possibilities for systematic representation of uncertainty using probability theory. However, probabilistic learning often leads to computationally challenging problems. Some problems of this type that were previously intractable can now be solved on standard personal computers thanks to recent advances in Monte Carlo methods. In particular, for learning of unknown parameters in nonlinear state-space models, methods based on the particle filter (a Monte Carlo method) have proven very useful. A notoriously challenging problem, however, still occurs when the observations in the state-space model are highly informative, i.e. when there is very little or no measurement noise present, relative to the amount of process noise. The particle filter will then struggle in estimating one of the basic components for probabilistic learning, namely the likelihood p (data | parameters). To this end we suggest an algorithm which initially assumes that there is substantial amount of artificial measurement noise present. The variance of this noise is sequentially decreased in an adaptive fashion such that we, in the end, recover the original problem or possibly a very close approximation of it. The main component in our algorithm is a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler, which gives our proposed method a clear resemblance to the SMC2 method. Another natural link is also made to the ideas underlying the approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). We illustrate it with numerical examples, and in particular show promising results for a challenging Wiener-Hammerstein benchmark problem.

  3. The state of renewable energies in Europe. 11. EurObserv'ER report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillett, William; Schwarz, Virginie; Liebard, Alain; Civel, Yves-Bruno; Augereau, Laurence; Marandet, Laure; Szita Toth, Klara; Roncz, Judit; Decombe, Annabelle; Baratte, Lucie

    2011-12-01

    For over ten years now, EurObserv'ER has been collecting data on European Union renewable energy sources to describe the state and thrust of the various sectors in its focus studies or barometers. The first part of this assessment is an updated and completed summary of the work published in 2011 in 'Systemes Solaires' (Journal des energies Renouvelables No. 203, 204, 205 and 206), 'Journal de l'eolien' no. 8 and 'Journal du Photovoltaique' no.5). It provides a complete overview of the ten renewable sectors, supplemented by two summary notes on concentrated solar power and ocean energy. Their performances are compared against the stated goals set out by each country in its National Renewable Energy Action Plan (NREAP). Additionally, for the second year running, the EurObserv'ER consortium members have published their annual renewable energy share estimates of overall final energy consumption for each Member State of the European Union. These figures provide preliminary indication of how the various countries are faring along their renewable energy paths and whether their individual trends point to successful achievement of the targets set by European Directive 2009/28/EC. 2010 was momentous for the evolution of the renewable energy market in Europe; were adopted by Member States to implement the Renewable Energy Directive and the first results can now be seen, despite the difficult economic climate. As revealed in this report, renewable energy production in the EU grew by +11.3% between 2009 and 2010. Even though factors such as a cold winter and a high level of rainfall have surely helped, this figure highlights the positive impacts of support policies and additional investments by market players. As the renewable energy sector shows promising signs of growth, we acknowledge the growing accuracy of EurObserv'ER's estimates. According to the official data published in November 2011 by Eurostat, the share of renewable energies in the EU in 2009 was 11.7%; EurObserv

  4. On applied state estimation and observation theory to simulation modelling of Prespa-Ohrid Lakes system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolemishevska-Gugulovska, Tanja; Dimirovski, Georgi; Gough, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    In the south-west of the Republic of Macedonia, on the cross boundary area with Republic of Albania and Republic of Greece, Prespa-Ohrid hydrologic region is located. To this region belong Prespa and Ohrid valleys, on the bottom of which the lakes of Prespa and Ohrid reside. Due to the fact that there is no surface hydrologic link and that they are separated by high mountain Galichica, both valleys and lakes constitute almost mutually autonomous hydrologic entities. This paper presents a study on the hydrologic cycle of Prespa Lake basin for the purpose of developing and identifying a simulation model for the long term dynamics of the water level. The actual simulation modelling technique makes use of available apriori knowledge and available recorder or observed data on phenomena involving the whole cycle from precipitation to evaporation and evapotranspiration in Prespa basin. Also, a modelling account for the functional impact due to strong interaction with Ohrid basin, is included. The resulting simulation model is a set of discrete-time state equation, derived on the grounds of the conceptual model of interconnected multiple tanks and of discrete-time observation (output) equation. The dynamic structure of Kalman filter for both linear and non-linear modelling case is derived and a discussion on applicability and further research is given. (author)

  5. STEADY STATE DUST DISTRIBUTIONS IN DISK VORTICES: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS AND APPLICATIONS TO TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyra, Wladimir; Lin, Min-Kai

    2013-01-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array has returned images of transitional disks in which large asymmetries are seen in the distribution of millimeter sized dust in the outer disk. The explanation in vogue borrows from the vortex literature and suggests that these asymmetries are the result of dust trapping in giant vortices, excited via Rossby wave instabilities at planetary gap edges. Due to the drag force, dust trapped in vortices will accumulate in the center and diffusion is needed to maintain a steady state over the lifetime of the disk. While previous work derived semi-analytical models of the process, in this paper we provide analytical steady-steady solutions. Exact solutions exist for certain vortex models. The solution is determined by the vortex rotation profile, the gas scale height, the vortex aspect ratio, and the ratio of dust diffusion to gas-dust friction. In principle, all of these quantities can be derived from observations, which would validate the model and also provide constrains on the strength of the turbulence inside the vortex core. Based on our solution, we derive quantities such as the gas-dust contrast, the trapped dust mass, and the dust contrast at the same orbital location. We apply our model to the recently imaged Oph IRS 48 system, finding values within the range of the observational uncertainties

  6. Resonance scattering by auroral N2+: steady state theory and observations from Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jokiaho

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of auroral energy input at high latitudes often depend on observations of emissions from the first negative band of ionised nitrogen. However, these emissions are affected by solar resonance scattering, which makes photometric and spectrographic measurements difficult to interpret. This work is a statistical study from Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway, during the solar minimum between January and March 2007, providing a good coverage in shadow height position and precipitation conditions. The High Throughput Imaging Echelle Spectrograph (HiTIES measured three bands of N2+ 1N (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3, and one N2 2P band (0,3 in the magnetic zenith. The brightness ratios of the N2+ bands are compared with a theoretical treatment with excellent results. Balance equations for all important vibrational levels of the three lowest electronic states of the N2+ molecule are solved for steady-state, and the results combined with ion chemistry modelling. Brightnesses of the (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3 bands of N2+ 1N are calculated for a range of auroral electron energies, and different values of shadow heights. It is shown that in sunlit aurora, the brightness of the (0,1 band is enhanced, with the scattered contribution increasing with decreasing energy of precipitation (10-fold enhancements for energies of 100 eV. The higher vibrational bands are enhanced even more significantly. In sunlit aurora the observed 1N (1,2/(0,1 and (2,3/(0,1 ratios increase as a function of decreasing precipitation energy, as predicted by theory. In non-sunlit aurora the N2+ species have a constant proportionality to neutral N2. The ratio of 2P(0,3/1N(0,1 in the morning hours shows a pronounced decrease, indicating enhancement of N2+ 1N emission. Finally we study the relationship of all emissions and their ratios to rotational temperatures. A clear effect is observed on rotational development of the bands. It is possible that greatly enhanced rotational temperatures may be a

  7. The state of renewable energies in Europe. 10. EurObserv'ER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This EurObserv'ER publication, which is supported by the Intelligent Energy Europe (IEE) programme, provides a concise overview of the latest renewable energy market statistics even before official data are available. These have proven to be broadly consistent with the Eurostat figures. It also gives valuable insights into each of the main renewable energy markets, showing how well each sector is progressing, and reviewing relevant legislation, policy frameworks, and market structures. Currently, the EurObserv'ER methodology is being adapted to reflect the requirements of the 2009 Renewable Energy Directive. This will permit future EurObserv'ER barometers to be used to track the trajectory of each Member State towards its binding 2020 target, and the corresponding progress of each technology. The IEE programme supports public and private organisations across the European Union which are working together to accelerate the growth of renewable energy markets, and to remove market barriers. 2010 was a milestone in the success story of modern renewable energies. The energy revolution began, new binding targets came into force, and European Union Member States submitted their first National Renewable Energy Action Plans (NREAPs). Each NREAP defines a trajectory towards its binding national target and presents its planned policy measures. As we go into 2011, the European Commission is assessing these NREAPs, and in the coming years will work with the Member States to deliver their targets. Despite continuing progress, the renewable energy share of European Union gross inland energy consumption is only 9.4%; therefore the 12% targeted by the White Paper will not be achieved. The main reason for this failure is that the efforts to reduce consumption have not matched the efforts to develop renewable energies. Thus, while major investments have indeed been made, they amount to a smaller-than-anticipated share of energy consumption, given the later continued growth. We must

  8. Allozyme variation of bishop pine associated with pygmy forest soils in northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance I. Millar

    1989-01-01

    Two races of bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don) meet in a narrow contact zone near sea level along the Sonoma County coast, northern California. The races previously were identified by foliar ("blue" in north, "green" in south), monoterpene, and allozyme differences. Disjunct stands of blue bishop pine were observed at higher elevations along a...

  9. Policy Document on Earth Observation for Urban Planning and Management: State of the Art and Recommendations for Application of Earth Observation in Urban Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Janet; King, Bruce; Xiaoli, Ding; Dowman, Ian; Quattrochi, Dale; Ehlers, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    A policy document on earth observation for urban planning and management resulting from a workshop held in Hong Kong in November 2006 is presented. The aim of the workshop was to provide a forum for researchers and scientists specializing in earth observation to interact with practitioners working in different aspects of city planning, in a complex and dynamic city, Hong Kong. A summary of the current state of the art, limitations, and recommendations for the use of earth observation in urban areas is presented here as a policy document.

  10. Transcriptome markers of viral persistence in naturally-infected andes virus (bunyaviridae seropositive long-tailed pygmy rice rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey L Campbell

    Full Text Available Long-tailed pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus are principal reservoir hosts of Andes virus (ANDV (Bunyaviridae, which causes most hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome cases in the Americas. To develop tools for the study of the ANDV-host interactions, we used RNA-Seq to generate a de novo transcriptome assembly. Splenic RNA from five rice rats captured in Chile, three of which were ANDV-infected, was used to generate an assembly of 66,173 annotated transcripts, including noncoding RNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of selected predicted proteins showed similarities to those of the North American deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus, the principal reservoir of Sin Nombre virus (SNV. One of the infected rice rats had about 50-fold more viral burden than the others, suggesting acute infection, whereas the remaining two had levels consistent with persistence. Differential expression analysis revealed distinct signatures among the infected rodents. The differences could be due to 1 variations in viral load, 2 dimorphic or reproductive differences in splenic homing of immune cells, or 3 factors of unknown etiology. In the two persistently infected rice rats, suppression of the JAK-STAT pathway at Stat5b and Ccnot1, elevation of Casp1, RIG-I pathway factors Ppp1cc and Mff, and increased FC receptor-like transcripts occurred. Caspase-1 and Stat5b activation pathways have been shown to stimulate T helper follicular cell (TFH development in other species. These data are also consistent with reports suggestive of TFH stimulation in deer mice experimentally infected with hantaviruses. In the remaining acutely infected rice rat, the apoptotic pathway marker Cox6a1 was elevated, and putative anti-viral factors Abcb1a, Fam46c, Spp1, Rxra, Rxrb, Trmp2 and Trim58 were modulated. Transcripts for preproenkephalin (Prenk were reduced, which may be predictive of an increased T cell activation threshold. Taken together, this transcriptome dataset will permit rigorous

  11. The state of renewable energies in Europe. Edition 2016. 16. EurObserv'ER Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigneur, Vincent Jacques le; Bongrain, Timothee; David, Romain; Moreau, Sabrina; Bruder, Odile; Tennenhaus, Shula; Baratte, Lucie; Guichard, Marie Agnes; Guillier, Alice

    2017-04-01

    EurObserv'ER has been gathering data on the European Union's renewable energy sources for seventeen years for its theme-based barometer reports on the state of the sectors and their momentum. The first part of this work is a summary of the barometers published in 2016 for the wind energy, solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, heat pump, bio-fuel and solid biomass sectors. The data drawn from these barometers has been updated and supplemented by data on the sectors for which no individual barometers were published - small hydropower, biogas, geothermal energy, concentrated solar power, household refuse incineration and renewable marine energy sources. Hence this publication offers a comprehensive energy dimension review of the twelve renewable sectors that are now developed in the European Union on an industrial scale. It also gives for the first time a view of the share of RES heating and cooling in the building stock. The 2016 edition of this report has additional sections broaden understanding of how renewable energies are developing in the European energy, economic and environmental context. The state of renewable energies report has been expanded to include the following new subjects in addition to the traditional sections devoted to energy indicators, socioeconomic aspects and investments made in the European Union's renewable sectors: - an appraisal of the penetration rates of renewable energy equipment for heating and cooling and urban infrastructures; - an overview of the main renewable sector costs and their levels of competitiveness in comparison with the fossil fuel sectors; - an assessment of the impact of the development of renewables on reducing fossil energy consumption within the European Union and the expenses thereby averted; - a full section on innovation and competitiveness indicators arising from R and D efforts in renewable technologies. This covers public-sector R and D investments, the result in terms of filed patents and a comparison of the

  12. Simultaneous Estimation of Model State Variables and Observation and Forecast Biases Using a Two-Stage Hybrid Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, V. R. N.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a two-stage hybrid Kalman filter to estimate both observation and forecast bias in hydrologic models, in addition to state variables. The biases are estimated using the discrete Kalman filter, and the state variables using the ensemble Kalman filter. A key issue in this multi-component assimilation scheme is the exact partitioning of the difference between observation and forecasts into state, forecast bias and observation bias updates. Here, the error covariances of the forecast bias and the unbiased states are calculated as constant fractions of the biased state error covariance, and the observation bias error covariance is a function of the observation prediction error covariance. In a series of synthetic experiments, focusing on the assimilation of discharge into a rainfall-runoff model, it is shown that both static and dynamic observation and forecast biases can be successfully estimated. The results indicate a strong improvement in the estimation of the state variables and resulting discharge as opposed to the use of a bias-unaware ensemble Kalman filter. Furthermore, minimal code modification in existing data assimilation software is needed to implement the method. The results suggest that a better performance of data assimilation methods should be possible if both forecast and observation biases are taken into account.

  13. Simultaneous estimation of model state variables and observation and forecast biases using a two-stage hybrid Kalman filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. N. Pauwels

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a two-stage hybrid Kalman filter to estimate both observation and forecast bias in hydrologic models, in addition to state variables. The biases are estimated using the discrete Kalman filter, and the state variables using the ensemble Kalman filter. A key issue in this multi-component assimilation scheme is the exact partitioning of the difference between observation and forecasts into state, forecast bias and observation bias updates. Here, the error covariances of the forecast bias and the unbiased states are calculated as constant fractions of the biased state error covariance, and the observation bias error covariance is a function of the observation prediction error covariance. In a series of synthetic experiments, focusing on the assimilation of discharge into a rainfall-runoff model, it is shown that both static and dynamic observation and forecast biases can be successfully estimated. The results indicate a strong improvement in the estimation of the state variables and resulting discharge as opposed to the use of a bias-unaware ensemble Kalman filter. Furthermore, minimal code modification in existing data assimilation software is needed to implement the method. The results suggest that a better performance of data assimilation methods should be possible if both forecast and observation biases are taken into account.

  14. Interpretation of the Haestholmen in situ state of stress based on core damage observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakala, M.

    2000-01-01

    At the Haestholmen investigation site, direct in situ stress measurements, overcoring and hydraulic fracturing have been unsuccessful because of ring disking and horizontal hydraulic fracturing. Prior to this study, a detailed study on both core disking and ring disking was made, and based on those results an in situ state of stress interpretation method was developed. In this work this method is applied to the Haestholmen site. The interpretation is based on disk fracture type, spacing and shape. Also, the Hoek-Brown strength envelope and Poisson's ratio of intact rock are needed. The interpretation result is most reliable if both core disking and ring disking information at the same depth levels is available. A detailed core logging showed that ring disking is systematic below the -365 m level in the vertical overcoring stress measurement hole, HH-KR6. On the other hand, no representative core disking exists except for two points in two differently oriented subvertical boreholes HH-KR2 and HHKR7. Because the interpretation has to be based on ring disking only, upper and lower estimates for the vertical stress were set. These were gravitational and 67% of gravitational. Furthermore, the in situ stress state was assumed to be in horizontal and vertical planes, because the disking in vertical borehole HH-KR6 was not inclined. The interpretation resulted in a good estimate for the major horizontal stress but none of the horizontal stress rations ( 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ) or vertical stress assumptions studied are clearly more probable the others. At the 500 m level the resulting maximum horizontal stress is 41 MPa. If a linear fit through the zero depth and zero stress point is applied, the maximum horizontal stress gradient is 0.0818 z MPa/m with a standard deviation between 5 and 12 per cent. The orientation of the major horizontal stress is 108 with standard deviation of 21 degrees. The interpreted major horizontal stress state also indicated that systematic

  15. First observation of bound excited states in the A/Z = 3 nucleus 15B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobradi, Zs.; Sohler, D.; Azaiez, F.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Structure of strongly neutron rich nuclei, especially of those lying close to the neutron drip line came into the focus of interest. Among others, the structure of neutron rich Boron isotopes also attracted attention in the last decade. The nuclei 15 B, 17 B and 19 B are particle stable, while the isotopes with even mass number are unstable against neutron emission. Even the neutron rich Boron isotopes with odd mass number have a low neutron binding energy, which is a sign of their weakly bound nature. As a common effect of the weak binding and of the large neutron excess, neutron skin or halo can also develop already in the isotope 15 B with A/Z = 3. Structure of the nucleus 15 B has been investigated by in-beam γ-spectroscopic study of the 9 Be + 36 S fragmentation reaction at GANIL, France. The emerging fragments were identified by use of a standard ΔE-time-of-fight technique with help of the SPEG spectrograph. γ-ray energies, intensities and γγ coincidences have been measured in coincidence with the projectile like fragments by 74 BaF 2 detectors of the Chateau de crystal. On the basis of the γ-spectroscopic information the level scheme presented in Figure 1 was constructed. The level scheme is shown together with the results of di rent model calculations. The common in predictions of these models is that all of them suggest a ground state band with the spin sequence 3/2 - , 5/2 - and 7/2 - , as well as a 1/2 - state, which involves a proton single particle excitation. The shell model calculations (SM) predict similar moments of inertia, strongly different from that of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics calculations (AMD). The experimentally observed states can be assigned to the members of the rotational band on the basis of their decay properties. The experimental results confirm the predictions of the shell model. (author)

  16. Model Data Interoperability for the United States Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signell, Richard P.

    2010-05-01

    Model data interoperability for the United States Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) was initiated with a focused one year project. The problem was that there were many regional and national providers of oceanographic model data; each had unique file conventions, distribution techniques and analysis tools that made it difficult to compare model results and observational data. To solve this problem, a distributed system was built utilizing a customized middleware layer and a common data model. This allowed each model data provider to keep their existing model and data files unchanged, yet deliver model data via web services in a common form. With standards-based applications that used these web services, end users then had a common way to access data from any of the models. These applications included: (1) a 2D mapping and animation using a web browser application, (2) an advanced 3D visualization and animation using a desktop application, and (3) a toolkit for a common scientific analysis environment. Due to the flexibility and low impact of the approach on providers, rapid progress was made. The system was implemented in all eleven US IOOS regions and at the NOAA National Coastal Data Development Center, allowing common delivery of regional and national oceanographic model forecast and archived results that cover all US waters. The system, based heavily on software technology from the NSF-sponsored Unidata Program Center, is applicable to any structured gridded data, not just oceanographic model data. There is a clear pathway to expand the system to include unstructured grid (e.g. triangular grid) data.

  17. Reconstruction of the Dark Energy Equation of State from the Latest Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ji-Ping; Yang, Yang; Xia, Jun-Qing

    2018-04-01

    Since the discovery of the accelerating expansion of our universe in 1998, studying the features of dark energy has remained a hot topic in modern cosmology. In the literature, dark energy is usually described by w ≡ P/ρ, where P and ρ denote its pressure and energy density. Therefore, exploring the evolution of w is the key approach to understanding dark energy. In this work, we adopt three different methods, polynomial expansion, principal component analysis, and the correlated prior method, to reconstruct w with a collection of the latest observations, including the type-Ia supernova, cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure, Hubble measurements, and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), and find that the concordance cosmological constant model (w = ‑1) is still safely consistent with these observational data at the 68% confidence level. However, when we add the high-redshift BAO measurement from the Lyα forest (Lyα FB) of BOSS DR11 quasars into the calculation, there is a significant impact on the reconstruction result. In the standard ΛCDM model, since the Lyα FB data slightly prefer a negative dark energy density, in order to avoid this problem, a dark energy model with a w significantly smaller than ‑1 is needed to explain this Lyα FB data. In this work, we find the consistent conclusion that there is a strong preference for the time-evolving behavior of dark energy w at high redshifts, when including the Lyα FB data. Therefore, we think that this Lyα FB data needs to be watched carefully attention when studying the evolution of the dark energy equation of state.

  18. Assessment of Observational Uncertainty in Extreme Precipitation Events over the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinskey, E. A.; Loikith, P. C.; Waliser, D. E.; Goodman, A.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme precipitation events are associated with numerous societal and environmental impacts. Furthermore, anthropogenic climate change is projected to alter precipitation intensity across portions of the Continental United States (CONUS). Therefore, a spatial understanding and intuitive means of monitoring extreme precipitation over time is critical. Towards this end, we apply an event-based indicator, developed as a part of NASA's support of the ongoing efforts of the US National Climate Assessment, which assigns categories to extreme precipitation events based on 3-day storm totals as a basis for dataset intercomparison. To assess observational uncertainty across a wide range of historical precipitation measurement approaches, we intercompare in situ station data from the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN), satellite-derived precipitation data from NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), gridded in situ station data from the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM), global reanalysis from NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis version 2 (MERRA 2), and regional reanalysis with gauge data assimilation from NCEP's North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). Results suggest considerable variability across the five-dataset suite in the frequency, spatial extent, and magnitude of extreme precipitation events. Consistent with expectations, higher resolution datasets were found to resemble station data best and capture a greater frequency of high-end extreme events relative to lower spatial resolution datasets. The degree of dataset agreement varies regionally, however all datasets successfully capture the seasonal cycle of precipitation extremes across the CONUS. These intercomparison results provide additional insight about observational uncertainty and the ability of a range of precipitation measurement and analysis products to capture extreme precipitation event climatology. While the event category threshold is fixed

  19. 30-year lidar observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer state over Tomsk (Western Siberia, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Vladimir V.; Burlakov, Vladimir D.; Nevzorov, Aleksei V.; Pravdin, Vladimir L.; Savelieva, Ekaterina S.; Gerasimov, Vladislav V.

    2017-02-01

    There are only four lidar stations in the world which have almost continuously performed observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer (SAL) state over the last 30 years. The longest time series of the SAL lidar measurements have been accumulated at the Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii) since 1973, the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia) since 1974, and Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany) since 1976. The fourth lidar station we present started to perform routine observations of the SAL parameters in Tomsk (56.48° N, 85.05° E, Western Siberia, Russia) in 1986. In this paper, we mainly focus on and discuss the stratospheric background period from 2000 to 2005 and the causes of the SAL perturbations over Tomsk in the 2006-2015 period. During the last decade, volcanic aerosol plumes from tropical Mt. Manam, Soufrière Hills, Rabaul, Merapi, Nabro, and Kelut and extratropical (northern) Mt. Okmok, Kasatochi, Redoubt, Sarychev Peak, Eyjafjallajökull, and Grímsvötn were detected in the stratosphere over Tomsk. When it was possible, we used the NOAA HYSPLIT trajectory model to assign aerosol layers observed over Tomsk to the corresponding volcanic eruptions. The trajectory analysis highlighted some surprising results. For example, in the cases of the Okmok, Kasatochi, and Eyjafjallajökull eruptions, the HYSPLIT air mass backward trajectories, started from altitudes of aerosol layers detected over Tomsk with a lidar, passed over these volcanoes on their eruption days at altitudes higher than the maximum plume altitudes given by the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program. An explanation of these facts is suggested. The role of both tropical and northern volcanic eruptions in volcanogenic aerosol loading of the midlatitude stratosphere is also discussed. In addition to volcanoes, we considered other possible causes of the SAL perturbations over Tomsk, i.e., the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) events and smoke plumes from strong forest fires. At least

  20. Solid state de-wetting observed for vapor deposited copper films on carbon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrank, C.; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C.; Neubauer, E.; Bangert, H.; Bergauer, A.

    2004-01-01

    Copper-Carbon composites are a good example for novel materials consisting of components with extremely different physical and chemical properties. They have a high potential for an application as heat sinks for electronic components, but the joining of the two materials is a difficult task. To obtain reasonable mechanical and thermal contact between copper and carbon the following route was chosen. First glassy-carbon substrates were subjected to an RF-Nitrogen plasma treatment. Then 300 nm thick copper coatings were sputter-deposited on the plasma treated surface within the same vacuum chamber. Finally, the samples were removed from the deposition chamber and either investigated immediately or thermally annealed at 850 deg. C under high vacuum conditions (10 -4 Pa). While non-annealed copper-coatings were continuous and showed excellent adhesion values of approximately 700 N/cm 2 , the heat treated samples lose their continuity by a de-wetting process. At the beginning holes are formed, then a labyrinth-like morphology develops and finally the coating consists of isolated droplets. All these processes occur well below the melting temperature of copper and were observed by AFM and SEM. The mechanism of this solid-state de-wetting process is investigated in relation to the recent literature on de-wetting and its consequences on the manufacturing of copper-carbon composites are discussed

  1. Physical Properties and Evolutionary States of EA-type Eclipsing Binaries Observed by LAMOST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhang, J.; He, J.-J.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E.-G.; Shi, X.-D.; Zhou, X.; Han, Z.-T.

    2018-03-01

    About 3196 EA-type binaries (EAs) were observed by LAMOST by 2017 June 16 and their spectral types were derived. Meanwhile, the stellar atmospheric parameters of 2020 EAs were determined. In this paper, those EAs are cataloged and their physical properties and evolutionary states are investigated. The period distribution of EAs suggests that the period limit of tidal locking for the close binaries is about 6 days. It is found that the metallicity of EAs is higher than that of EW-type binaries (EWs), indicating that EAs are generally younger than EWs and they are the progenitors of EWs. The metallicities of long-period EWs (0.4values of Log (g) are usually smaller than those of EAs. These support the evolutionary process that EAs evolve into long-period EWs through the combination of angular momentum loss (AML) via magnetic braking and case A mass transfer. For short-period EWs, their metallicities are lower than those of EAs, while their gravitational accelerations are higher. These reveal that they may be formed from cool short-period EAs through AML via magnetic braking with little mass transfer. For some EWs with high metallicities, they may be contaminated by material from the evolution of unseen neutron stars and black holes or they have third bodies that may help them to form rapidly through a short timescale of pre-contact evolution. The present investigation suggests that the modern EW populations may have formed through a combination of these mechanisms.

  2. Complete sets of commuting observables of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, M.Q.; Zeng, J.Y.

    2004-01-01

    Complete sets of commuting observables (CSCOs) of the form Σ N =Π i=1 N σ iα i (α i =x,y,z) for an N-qubit system are extracted by a simple graphic approach. One can construct 2x3 N sets of operators, each set consisting of K N commuting Σ N , K N =2 N-1 +1 for even N, and 2 N-1 for odd N. Any N functional-independent operators among the K N operators may be adopted as a CSCO, whose simultaneous eigenstates (SEs) span an orthonormal basis of N-qubit space. These SEs have reduced density matrix of rank 2 and can be reduced to the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state form of Eq. (2) in suitable representations. The all-versus-nothing demolition of the elements of reality holds for each basis of the form of Eq. (2) for N-qubit (N≥3) systems. Σ N may be considered as the infinitesimal operator of rotational operator R(α 1 ,α 2 ,...α N )=Π i=1 N exp[-iπσ iα i /2] , whose eigenvalue (signature) r=e -iπα , or signature exponent α, may be equivalently used for characterizing each basis.

  3. The state of renewable energies in Europe - Edition 2017. 17. EurObserv'ER Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigneur, Vincent Jacques le; Bongrain, Timothee; David, Romain; L'escale, Charlotte de; Bruder, Odile; Tennenhaus, Shula; Baratte, Lucie; Guichard, Marie Agnes; Guillier, Alice

    2018-01-01

    EurObserv'ER has been gathering data on the European Union's renewable energy sources for eighteen years for its theme-based barometer reports on the state of the sectors and their momentum. The first part of this work is a summary of the barometers published in 2017 for the wind energy, solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, biofuel, biogas and solid biomass sectors. The energy indicators drawn from these barometers have been updated with SHARES data from 26 January and supplemented by data on the sectors for which no individual barometers were published - small hydropower, heat pumps, geothermal energy, concentrated solar power, household refuse incineration and renewable marine energy sources. The following chapters supply socioeconomic indicators on employment and turnover, investments, avoided CO 2 emissions and resulting avoided expenses thanks to the development of the RES sectors. Another part gives an overview of how the EU performs in terms of R et D as compared to its main trading partners. A final chapter shows that there still is quite enough flexibility in the electricity grid to allow for the integration of more RES-E

  4. Simultaneous Observation of Hybrid States for Cyber-Physical Systems: A Case Study of Electric Vehicle Powertrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chen; Liu, Yahui; Hu, Xiaosong; Guo, Hongyan; Cao, Dongpu; Wang, Fei-Yue

    2017-08-22

    As a typical cyber-physical system (CPS), electrified vehicle becomes a hot research topic due to its high efficiency and low emissions. In order to develop advanced electric powertrains, accurate estimations of the unmeasurable hybrid states, including discrete backlash nonlinearity and continuous half-shaft torque, are of great importance. In this paper, a novel estimation algorithm for simultaneously identifying the backlash position and half-shaft torque of an electric powertrain is proposed using a hybrid system approach. System models, including the electric powertrain and vehicle dynamics models, are established considering the drivetrain backlash and flexibility, and also calibrated and validated using vehicle road testing data. Based on the developed system models, the powertrain behavior is represented using hybrid automata according to the piecewise affine property of the backlash dynamics. A hybrid-state observer, which is comprised of a discrete-state observer and a continuous-state observer, is designed for the simultaneous estimation of the backlash position and half-shaft torque. In order to guarantee the stability and reachability, the convergence property of the proposed observer is investigated. The proposed observer are validated under highly dynamical transitions of vehicle states. The validation results demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed hybrid-state observer.

  5. Generalised linear models for correlated pseudo-observations, with applications to multi-state models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Klein, John P.; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    Generalised estimating equation; Generalised linear model; Jackknife pseudo-value; Logistic regression; Markov Model; Multi-state model......Generalised estimating equation; Generalised linear model; Jackknife pseudo-value; Logistic regression; Markov Model; Multi-state model...

  6. Theoretical observation of two state lasing from InAs/InP quantum-dash lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2011-09-01

    The effect of cavity length on the lasing wavelength of InAs/InP quantum dash (Qdash) laser is examined using the carrier-photon rate equation model including the carrier relaxation process from the Qdash ground state and excited state. Both, homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening has been incorporated in the model. We show that ground state lasing occurs with longer cavity lasers and excited state lasing occurs from relatively short cavity lasers. © 2011 IEEE.

  7. Observation of Dirac state in half-Heusler material YPtBi

    OpenAIRE

    Hosen, M. Mofazzel; Dhakal, Gyanendra; Dimitri, Klauss; Choi, Hongchul; Kabir, Firoza; Sims, Christopher; Pavlosiuk, Orest; Wisniewski, Piotr; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Kaczorowski, Dariusz; Neupane, Madhab

    2018-01-01

    The prediction of non-trivial topological electronic states hosted by half-Heusler compounds makes them prime candidates for discovering new physics and devices as they harbor a variety of electronic ground states including superconductivity, magnetism, and heavy fermion behavior. Here we report normal state electronic properties of a superconducting half-Heusler compound YPtBi using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Our data reveal the presence of a Dirac state at the zone c...

  8. State funding for local public health: observations from six case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Margaret A; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe state funding of local public health within the context of state public health system types. These types are based on administrative relationships, legal structures, and relative proportion of state funding in local public health budgets. We selected six states representing various types and geographic regions. A case study for each state summarized available information and was validated by state public health officials. An analysis of the case studies reveals that the variability of state public health systems--even within a given type--is matched by variability in approaches to funding local public health. Nevertheless, some meaningful associations appear. For example, higher proportions of state funding occur along with higher levels of state oversight and the existence of local service mandates in state law. These associations suggest topics for future research on public health financing in relation to local accountability, local input to state priority-setting, mandated local services, and the absence of state funds for public health services in some local jurisdictions.

  9. The Soft State of Cygnus X-1 Observed With NuSTAR: A Variable Corona and a Stable Inner Disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Tomsick, J. A.; Madsen, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-epoch hard X-ray analysis of Cygnus X-1 in its soft state based on four observations with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Despite the basic similarity of the observed spectra, there is clear spectral variability between epochs. To investigate this variabilit...

  10. NuSTAR and INTEGRAL observations of a low/hard state of 1E1740.7-2942

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natalucci, Lorenzo; Tomsick, John A.; Bazzano, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The microquasar 1E1740.7-2942, also known as the "Great Annihilator", was observed by NuSTAR in the Summer of 2012. We have analyzed in detail two observations taken ~2 weeks apart, for which we measure hard and smooth spectra typical of the low/hard state. A few weeks later the source flux decli...

  11. AstroSat /LAXPC Observation of Cygnus X-1 in the Hard State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Ranjeev; Pahari, Mayukh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411007 (India); Yadav, J S; Chauhan, Jai Verdhan; Antia, H M; Chitnis, V R; Dedhia, Dhiraj; Katoch, Tilak; Madhwani, P.; Shah, Parag [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai (India); Agrawal, P C [UM-DAE Center of Excellence for Basic Sciences, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Mumbai-400098 (India); Manchanda, R K [University of Mumbai, Kalina, Mumbai-400098 (India); Paul, B, E-mail: rmisra@iucaa.in [Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Raman Research Institute, Bengaluru-560080 (India)

    2017-02-01

    We report the first analysis of data from AstroSat /LAXPC observations of Cygnus X-1 in 2016 January. LAXPC spectra reveals that the source was in the canonical hard state, represented by a prominent thermal Comptonization component having a photon index of ∼1.8 and high temperature of kT{sub e} > 60 keV along with weak reflection and possible disk emission. The power spectrum can be characterized by two broad lorentzian functions centered at ∼0.4 and ∼3 Hz. The rms of the low-frequency component decreases from ∼15% at around 4 keV to ∼10% at around 50 keV, while that of the high-frequency one varies less rapidly from ∼13.5% to ∼11.5% in the same energy range. The time lag between the hard (20–40 keV) and soft (5–10 keV) bands varies in a step-like manner being nearly constant at ∼50 milliseconds from 0.3 to 0.9 Hz, decreasing to ∼8 milliseconds from 2 to 5 Hz and finally dropping to ∼2 milliseconds for higher frequencies. The time lags increase with energy for both the low and high-frequency components. The event mode LAXPC data allows for flux resolved spectral analysis on a timescale of 1 s, which clearly shows that the photon index increased from ∼1.72 to ∼1.80 as the flux increased by nearly a factor of two. We discuss the results in the framework of the fluctuation propagation model.

  12. TIMING OBSERVATIONS OF PSR J1023+0038 DURING A LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaodand, Amruta; Archibald, Anne M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bogdanov, Slavko [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); D’Angelo, Caroline R.; Patruno, Alessandro [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-10-20

    Transitional millisecond pulsars (tMSPs) switch, on roughly multi-year timescales, between rotation-powered radio millisecond pulsar (RMSP) and accretion-powered low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. The tMSPs have raised several questions related to the nature of accretion flow in their LMXB state and the mechanism that causes the state switch. The discovery of coherent X-ray pulsations from PSR J1023+0038 (while in the LMXB state) provides us with the first opportunity to perform timing observations and to compare the neutron star’s spin variation during this state to the measured spin-down in the RMSP state. Whereas the X-ray pulsations in the LMXB state likely indicate that some material is accreting onto the neutron star’s magnetic polar caps, radio continuum observations indicate the presence of an outflow. The fraction of the inflowing material being ejected is not clear, but it may be much larger than that reaching the neutron star’s surface. Timing observations can measure the total torque on the neutron star. We have phase-connected nine XMM-Newton observations of PSR J1023+0038 over the last 2.5 years of the LMXB state to establish a precise measurement of spin evolution. We find that the average spin-down rate as an LMXB is 26.8 ± 0.4% faster than the rate (−2.39 × 10{sup −15} Hz s{sup −1}) determined during the RMSP state. This shows that negative angular momentum contributions (dipolar magnetic braking, and outflow) exceed positive ones (accreted material), and suggests that the pulsar wind continues to operate at a largely unmodified level. We discuss implications of this tight observational constraint in the context of possible accretion models.

  13. SEM study of Anisakis brevispiculata Dollfus, 1966 and Pseudoterranova ceticola (Deardoff and Overstreet, 1981 (Nematoda: Anisakidae, parasites of the pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Abollo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was used to study different topo-morphological characteristics of the architecture (cuticle, excretory pore, lips and adjacent structures, number and distribution patterns of caudal papillae and papillae-like structures of the anisakid nematodes Anisakis brevispiculata and Pseudoterranova ceticola, parasites in the stomach of the pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps. SEM micrographs herein help to accurately define the above surface topographical features by adding a more adequate 3-D picture to the original descriptions of both parasitic species. In A. brevispiculata the entire body cuticle structure, well-differentiated paracloacal papillae and the wrinkle cuticle of the papillae are clear examples that enhance the above differentiation of structures as seen by LM or SEM. Similarly, in P. ceticola the cuticle striations, bulky cloacal lips, rectangular distribution pattern of distal papillae and the absence of a groove separating paracloacal papillae which are obliquely arranged are all different to those features previously described.

  14. The influence of air-filled structures on wave propagation and beam formation of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) in horizontal and vertical planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhongchang; Zhang, Yu; Thornton, Steven W; Li, Songhai; Dong, Jianchen

    2017-10-01

    The wave propagation, sound field, and transmission beam pattern of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) were investigated in both the horizontal and vertical planes. Results suggested that the signals obtained at both planes were similarly characterized with a high peak frequency and a relatively narrow bandwidth, close to the ones recorded from live animals. The sound beam measured outside the head in the vertical plane was narrower than that of the horizontal one. Cases with different combinations of air-filled structures in both planes were used to study the respective roles in controlling wave propagation and beam formation. The wave propagations and beam patterns in the horizontal and vertical planes elucidated the important reflection effect of the spermaceti and vocal chambers on sound waves, which was highly significant in forming intensive forward sound beams. The air-filled structures, the forehead soft tissues and skull structures formed wave guides in these two planes for emitted sounds to propagate forward.

  15. Aspects of the biology of the pygmy ribbontail catshark Eridacnis radcliffei (Proscylliidae: Carcharhiniformes) from the south-west coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhilesh, K V; Bineesh, K K; White, W T; Pillai, N G K

    2012-08-01

    Biological data are presented for the pygmy ribbontail catshark Eridacnis radcliffei based on specimens collected from the by-catch of the commercial deep-sea shrimp trawl fishery operating in the Arabian Sea off the south-west coast of India. A total of 549 individuals, from 101 to 257 mm total length (L(T)) and 2·2 to 56 g, were collected. The L(T) at first maturity (L(T50)) of females and males was estimated at 183 and 170 mm, respectively, and analysis of stomach contents revealed that E. radcliffei feeds primarily on crustaceans. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  16. Top-down influences on ambiguous perception: the role of stable and transient states of the observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scocchia, Lisa; Valsecchi, Matteo; Triesch, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The world as it appears to the viewer is the result of a complex process of inference performed by the brain. The validity of this apparently counter-intuitive assertion becomes evident whenever we face noisy, feeble or ambiguous visual stimulation: in these conditions, the state of the observer may play a decisive role in determining what is currently perceived. On this background, ambiguous perception and its amenability to top-down influences can be employed as an empirical paradigm to explore the principles of perception. Here we offer an overview of both classical and recent contributions on how stable and transient states of the observer can impact ambiguous perception. As to the influence of the stable states of the observer, we show that what is currently perceived can be influenced (1) by cognitive and affective aspects, such as meaning, prior knowledge, motivation, and emotional content and (2) by individual differences, such as gender, handedness, genetic inheritance, clinical conditions, and personality traits and by (3) learning and conditioning. As to the impact of transient states of the observer, we outline the effects of (4) attention and (5) voluntary control, which have attracted much empirical work along the history of ambiguous perception. In the huge literature on the topic we trace a difference between the observer's ability to control dominance (i.e., the maintenance of a specific percept in visual awareness) and reversal rate (i.e., the switching between two alternative percepts). Other transient states of the observer that have more recently drawn researchers' attention regard (6) the effects of imagery and visual working memory. (7) Furthermore, we describe the transient effects of prior history of perceptual dominance. (8) Finally, we address the currently available computational models of ambiguous perception and how they can take into account the crucial share played by the state of the observer in perceiving ambiguous displays. PMID

  17. The Habitability of Proxima Centauri b: Environmental States and Observational Discriminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Victoria S; Arney, Giada N; Schwieterman, Edward W; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Lincowski, Andrew P; Robinson, Tyler; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D; Deitrick, Russell; Barnes, Rory K; Fleming, David P; Luger, Rodrigo; Driscoll, Peter E; Quinn, Thomas R; Crisp, David

    2018-02-01

    Proxima Centauri b provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand the evolution and nature of terrestrial planets orbiting M dwarfs. Although Proxima Cen b orbits within its star's habitable zone, multiple plausible evolutionary paths could have generated different environments that may or may not be habitable. Here, we use 1-D coupled climate-photochemical models to generate self-consistent atmospheres for several evolutionary scenarios, including high-O 2 , high-CO 2 , and more Earth-like atmospheres, with both oxic and anoxic compositions. We show that these modeled environments can be habitable or uninhabitable at Proxima Cen b's position in the habitable zone. We use radiative transfer models to generate synthetic spectra and thermal phase curves for these simulated environments, and use instrument models to explore our ability to discriminate between possible planetary states. These results are applicable not only to Proxima Cen b but to other terrestrial planets orbiting M dwarfs. Thermal phase curves may provide the first constraint on the existence of an atmosphere. We find that James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) observations longward of 10 μm could characterize atmospheric heat transport and molecular composition. Detection of ocean glint is unlikely with JWST but may be within the reach of larger-aperture telescopes. Direct imaging spectra may detect O 4 absorption, which is diagnostic of massive water loss and O 2 retention, rather than a photosynthetic biosphere. Similarly, strong CO 2 and CO bands at wavelengths shortward of 2.5 μm would indicate a CO 2 -dominated atmosphere. If the planet is habitable and volatile-rich, direct imaging will be the best means of detecting habitability. Earth-like planets with microbial biospheres may be identified by the presence of CH 4 -which has a longer atmospheric lifetime under Proxima Centauri's incident UV-and either photosynthetically produced O 2 or a hydrocarbon haze layer. Key Words: Planetary

  18. Hydroxyl radical observations during the wintertime in Beijing and comparison with steady state model calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, E.; Whalley, L.; Woodward-Massey, R.; Ye, C.; Crilley, L.; Kramer, L. J.; Vu, T.; Bloss, W.; Squires, F. A.; Dunmore, R.; Lee, J. D.; Heard, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    In Beijing poor urban air quality has a demonstrable effect on human health. During the wintertime, anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel combustion can lead to high aerosol loadings and haze events. A high oxidation capacity on hazy days has previously been inferred from the significant contribution secondary organic aerosol (SOA) make to total PM2.5 (Huang et al., 2014). The hydroxyl radical (OH) mediates virtually all of the oxidative chemistry in the atmosphere, being responsible for the transformation of primary emissions into secondary pollutants such as NO2, O3 and SOA. Understanding the sources and sinks of OH in the atmosphere is essential in improving predictions of the lifetimes and chemical processing of pollutants and their transport within urban areas. We will present OH and HO2 measurements made in central Beijing during the recent `An Integrated Study of AIR Pollution PROcesses in Beijing (AIRPRO)' project which took place in November and December 2016. OH measurements were made using the FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique, with the use of an inlet pre injector (IPI) which provides an alternative method to determine the background by injecting a scavenger (propane) to remove ambient OH. The OH measurements were made over a range of meteorological conditions including a number of haze days, with the average maximum OH concentration measured for the campaign being 2.5 x 106 cm-3 and for haze days the OH concentration reached levels of 3.5 x 106 cm-3 which is comparable to OH levels in non-haze days. We will compare the OH observations to steady state calculations constrained to the total OH reactivity and key OH precursors that were measured alongside OH. Through this comparison we will identify the major OH sources which sustain the wintertime oxidation capacity. The current understanding is that gas-phase oxidation via the OH radical becomes less important in haze events due to lower light and ozone levels, making photochemistry

  19. The dynamic relationship between emotional and physical states: an observational study of personal health records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee YS

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ye-Seul Lee,1 Won-Mo Jung,1 Hyunchul Jang,2 Sanghyun Kim,2 Sun-Yong Chung,3 Younbyoung Chae1 1Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, 2Mibyeong Research Center, Korean Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Objectives: Recently, there has been increasing interest in preventing and managing diseases both inside and outside medical institutions, and these concerns have supported the development of the individual Personal Health Record (PHR. Thus, the current study created a mobile platform called “Mind Mirror” to evaluate psychological and physical conditions and investigated whether PHRs would be a useful tool for assessment of the dynamic relationship between the emotional and physical conditions of an individual.Methods: Mind Mirror was used to collect 30 days of observational data about emotional valence and the physical states of pain and fatigue from 20 healthy participants, and these data were used to analyze the dynamic relationship between emotional and physical conditions. Additionally, based on the cross-correlations between these three parameters, a multilevel multivariate regression model (mixed linear model [MLM] was implemented.Results: The strongest cross-correlation between emotional and physical conditions was at lag 0, which implies that emotion and body condition changed concurrently. In the MLM, emotional valence was negatively associated with fatigue (β =-0.233, P<0.001, fatigue was positively associated with pain (β =0.250, P<0.001, and pain was positively associated with fatigue (β =0.398, P<0.001.Conclusion: Our study showed that emotional valence and one’s physical condition negatively influenced one another, while fatigue and pain positively affected each other. These findings suggest that the mind and body interact instantaneously, in

  20. The Habitability of Proxima Centauri b: Environmental States and Observational Discriminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, Giada N.; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Lincowski, Andrew P.; Robinson, Tyler; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Deitrick, Russell; Barnes, Rory K.; Fleming, David P.; Luger, Rodrigo; Driscoll, Peter E.; Quinn, Thomas R.; Crisp, David

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Proxima Centauri b provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand the evolution and nature of terrestrial planets orbiting M dwarfs. Although Proxima Cen b orbits within its star's habitable zone, multiple plausible evolutionary paths could have generated different environments that may or may not be habitable. Here, we use 1-D coupled climate-photochemical models to generate self-consistent atmospheres for several evolutionary scenarios, including high-O2, high-CO2, and more Earth-like atmospheres, with both oxic and anoxic compositions. We show that these modeled environments can be habitable or uninhabitable at Proxima Cen b's position in the habitable zone. We use radiative transfer models to generate synthetic spectra and thermal phase curves for these simulated environments, and use instrument models to explore our ability to discriminate between possible planetary states. These results are applicable not only to Proxima Cen b but to other terrestrial planets orbiting M dwarfs. Thermal phase curves may provide the first constraint on the existence of an atmosphere. We find that James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) observations longward of 10 μm could characterize atmospheric heat transport and molecular composition. Detection of ocean glint is unlikely with JWST but may be within the reach of larger-aperture telescopes. Direct imaging spectra may detect O4 absorption, which is diagnostic of massive water loss and O2 retention, rather than a photosynthetic biosphere. Similarly, strong CO2 and CO bands at wavelengths shortward of 2.5 μm would indicate a CO2-dominated atmosphere. If the planet is habitable and volatile-rich, direct imaging will be the best means of detecting habitability. Earth-like planets with microbial biospheres may be identified by the presence of CH4—which has a longer atmospheric lifetime under Proxima Centauri's incident UV—and either photosynthetically produced O2 or a hydrocarbon haze layer. Key Words: Planetary

  1. Implementation of state - federal agreements: observations and suggestions from New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canepa, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    State - federal agreements have been authorized by Congress under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (the Act). The process for reaching such agreements as well as their content have been modeled after the State of New Mexico's experience with its lawsuit and resulting Agreement for Consultation and Cooperation with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) over the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). New Mexico has been through the entire process, beginning with litigation and ending with a formal, written agreement with the federal government which addresses all aspects of a major nuclear waste repository within its borders. The process for reaching and implementing such agreements is not unlike the process for negotiating a treaty between countries. States entering into negotiations for such agreements should be aware of several important considerations which New Mexico learned the hard way. Avoiding the pitfalls inherent in this process is the key to producing a meaningful, working and enforceable document that protects the state's interests and affords a state continuing control over a long-term nuclear waste project within the state

  2. Observation of interface carrier states in no-common-atom heterostructures ZnSe/BeTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, A. S.; Kochereshko, V. P.; Bleuse, J.; Mariette, H.; Waag, A.; Akimoto, R.

    2011-09-01

    The existence of intrinsic carrier interface states in heterostructures with no common atom at the interface (such as ZnSe/BeTe) is shown experimentally by ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy. These states are located on interfaces and lie inside the effective bandgap of the structure; they are characterized by a high density and a long lifetime. A tight binding model confirms theoretically the existence of these states in ZnSe/BeTe heterostructures for a ZnTe-type interface, in contrast to the case of the BeSe-type interface for which they do not exist.

  3. Observation of interface carrier states in no-common-atom heterostructures ZnSe/BeTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, A S; Kochereshko, V P [A F Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Bleuse, J; Mariette, H [CEA-CNRS Group ' Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs' , CEA, INAC/SP2M, and Institut Neel, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Waag, A [Braunschweig Technical University, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Akimoto, R, E-mail: vladimir.kochereshko@mail.ioffe.ru [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 2-1, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2011-09-07

    The existence of intrinsic carrier interface states in heterostructures with no common atom at the interface (such as ZnSe/BeTe) is shown experimentally by ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy. These states are located on interfaces and lie inside the effective bandgap of the structure; they are characterized by a high density and a long lifetime. A tight binding model confirms theoretically the existence of these states in ZnSe/BeTe heterostructures for a ZnTe-type interface, in contrast to the case of the BeSe-type interface for which they do not exist.

  4. Polarized photon scattering of 52Cr: Determining the parity of dipole states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishichayan, Fnu; Bhike, M.; Tornow, W.

    2014-03-01

    Observation of dipole states in nuclei are important because they provide information on various collective and single-particle nuclear excitation modes, e.g., pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) and spin-flip M1 resonance. The PDR has been extensively studied in the higher and medium mass region, whereas not much information is available around the low mass (A ~ 50) region where, apparently,the PDR starts to form. The present photoresponse of 52Cr has been investigated to test the evolution of the PDR in a nucleus with a small number of excess neutrons as well as to look for spin-flip M1 resonance excitation mode. Spin-1 states in 52Cr between 5.0 to 9.5 MeV excitation energy were excited by exploiting fully polarized photons using the (γ ,γ') nuclear resonance fluorescence technique, a completely model-independent electromagnetic method. The de-excitation γ-rays were detected using a HPGe array. The experiment was carried out using the HIGS facility at TUNL. Results of unambiguous parity determinations of dipole states in 52Cr will be presented.

  5. State-observer with low sensitivity and its application to Maglev vehicle suspension control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breinl, W; Mueller, P C

    1982-12-01

    A linear time-invariant multi-input/multi-output dynamical system with uncertain parameters is considered. In general the separate design of the regulator and of the observer is not possible because the separation principle does not hold for parameter variations. However, in certain cases the observer matrices may be chosen in a special manner that an observer with low sensitivity can be designed. Then the separation principle is also valid for parameter variations. The existence and the design of such insensitive observers are discussed. The theoretical results are illustrated by an application to the suspension control of a Maglev vehicle.

  6. Observation of excited states and isomeric decays in doubly-odd 208Fr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanjilal, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Goswami, A.; Kshetri, R.; Raut, R.; Saha, S.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Gehlot, J.; Jnaneswari, G.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Mukherjee, B.; Mukherjee, G.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclei near the doubly magic 208 Pb are predicted to exhibit various interesting structural phenomena, one of which is a wealth of isomerism. However, a detailed study of high spin states of 211, 212, 213 Fr has already been done. Structure of such trans-Lead nuclei can be interpreted in terms of the shell model states, and the high spin states of these nuclei are interpreted. One of the major interests in the spectroscopic investigation of these nuclei is the role played by the i 13/2 state in creating isomeric levels which decay through transitions of higher muiltipolarity, or are hindered by the close proximity of the levels below. A systematic study of these nuclei will possibly reveal many other interesting structural features

  7. Observation of topological edge states of acoustic metamaterials at subwavelength scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongqing; Jiao, Junrui; Xia, Baizhan; Liu, Tingting; Zheng, Shengjie; Yu, Dejie

    2018-05-01

    Topological states are of key importance for acoustic wave systems owing to their unique transport properties. In this study, we develop a hexagonal array of hexagonal columns with Helmholtz resonators to obtain subwavelength Dirac cones. Rotation operations are performed to open the Dirac cones and obtain acoustic valley vortex states. In addition, we calculate the angular-dependent frequencies for the band edges at the K-point. Through a topological phase transition, the topological phase of pattern A can change into that of pattern B. The calculations for the bulk dispersion curves show that the acoustic metamaterials exhibit BA-type and AB-type topological edge states. Experimental results demonstrate that a sound wave can transmit well along the topological path. This study could reveal a simple approach to create acoustic topological edge states at the subwavelength scale.

  8. Crystalline state photoreactions direct observation of reaction processes and metastable intermediates

    CERN Document Server

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Offering some 300 references, this book focuses on chemical reactions in the crystalline state. The reactions span many fields in inorganic and organic chemistry, making this a useful resource for inorganic, organic and physical chemists and graduate students.

  9. 76 FR 14375 - United States Integrated Ocean Observing System Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration United States Integrated... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Establishment of and Membership... support a variety of societal benefits. These benefits include supporting national defense; marine...

  10. Σ hypernuclear bound state observed in stopped K- reaction on 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayano, R.S.; Ishikawa, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Outa, H.; Takada, E.; Tamura, H.; Sakaguchi, A.; Aoki, M.; Yamazaki, T.

    1988-12-01

    Results are presented of inclusive measurements of π ± momentum spectra from K - absorption at rest in liquid helium. We found a peak in the π - spectrum. The (K - , π + ) spectrum does not exhibit a clear peak in the Σ - bound region. Comparison of these two spectra suggests that the peak in the π - spectrum is due to the formation of the S = 0, I = 1/2 ground state of Σ-nucleus bound state. (J.P.N.)

  11. Observation of an excited Bc+/- meson state with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 21 (2014), "2120041"-"212004-5" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : error * statistical * p p * scattering * B/c+ * ATLAS * meson * mass difference * CERN LHC Coll * excited state * ground state * J/psi(3100) * pi+ pi- Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.512, year: 2014

  12. Direct Power Control for Three-Phase Two-Level Voltage-Source Rectifiers Based on Extended-State Observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhanfeng; Tian, Yanjun; Yan, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a direct power control strategy for three-phase two-level voltage-source rectifiers based on extended-state observation. Active and reactive powers are directly regulated in the stationary reference frame. Similar to the family of predictive controllers whose inherent characte......This paper proposed a direct power control strategy for three-phase two-level voltage-source rectifiers based on extended-state observation. Active and reactive powers are directly regulated in the stationary reference frame. Similar to the family of predictive controllers whose inherent...

  13. How well can gravitational wave observations of coalescing binaries involving neutron stars constrain the neutron star equation of state?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, Sukanta

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO detectors began observation runs a few weeks ago. This has afforded relativists and astronomers the opportunity to use gravitational waves to improve our understanding of a variety of astronomical objects and phenomena. In this talk I will examine how well gravitational wave observations of coalescing binaries involving neutron stars might constrain the neutron star (NS) equation of state. These astrophysical constraints can improve our understanding of nuclear interactions in ways that complement the knowledge acquired from terrestrial labs. I will study the effects of different NS equations of states in both NS-NS and NS-Black Hole systems, with and without spin, on these constraint. (author)

  14. Ensemble Kalman Filtering with Residual Nudging: An Extension to State Estimation Problems with Nonlinear Observation Operators

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaodong; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    -space-based strategy, called residual nudging, to improve the stability of the EnKF when dealing with linear observation operators. The main idea behind residual nudging is to monitor and, if necessary, adjust the distances (misfits) between the real observations

  15. Exotic baryon pπ+π+ states observation in the π+p → pπ+π+π- reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlichenko, V.I.; Drutskoj, A.G.; Morgunov, V.L.; Nikitin, S.Ya.; Kiselevich, I.L.; Shidlovskij, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Production of exotic baryon states in the π + p→pπ + π + π s - - reaction, the π + meson momentum being 4.23 GeV/c, was observed (where π s - -π - -meson with p * <0). Masses and widths of resonances observed in baryon exchange reactions are 1387±15(8±10), 1581±15(73±15), 1759±13(76±12) and 2074±19(147±41), respectively

  16. Accounting for correlated observations in an age-based state-space stock assessment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Casper Willestofte; Nielsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Fish stock assessment models often relyon size- or age-specific observations that are assumed to be statistically independent of each other. In reality, these observations are not raw observations, but rather they are estimates from a catch-standardization model or similar summary statistics base...... the independence assumption is rejected. Less fluctuating estimates of the fishing mortality is obtained due to a reduced process error. The improved model does not suffer from correlated residuals unlike the independent model, and the variance of forecasts is decreased....

  17. State trajectories used to observe and control dc-to-dc converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, W. W., III; Wilson, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    State-plane analysis techniques are employed to study the voltage stepup energy-storage dc-to-dc converter. Within this framework, an example converter operating under the influence of a constant on-time and a constant frequency controller is examined. Qualitative insight gained through this approach is used to develop a conceptual free-running control law for the voltage stepup converter which can achieve steady-state operation in one on/off cycle of control. Digital computer simulation data are presented to illustrate and verify the theoretical discussions presented.

  18. Motion Sensorless Control of BLDC PM Motor with Offline FEM Info Assisted State Observer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stirban, Alin; Boldea, Ion; Andreescu, Gheorghe-Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a new offline FEM assisted position and speed observer, for brushless dc (BLDC) PM motor drive sensorless control, based on the line-to-line PM flux linkage estimation. The zero-crossing of the line-to-line PM flux linkage occurs right in the middle of two commutation points...... identification. Digital simulations and experimental results are shown, demonstrating the reliability of the FEM assisted position and speed observer for BLDC PM motor sensorless control operation....

  19. Observing the state of balance with a single upper-body sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paiman (student), Charlotte; Lemus Perez, D.S.; Short Sotero, D.M.; Vallery, H.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of falls is an urgent challenge in our aging society. For wearable devices that actively prevent falls or mitigate their consequences, a critical prerequisite is knowledge on the user’s current state of balance. To keep such wearable systems practical and to achieve high acceptance,

  20. Observation of Zero-Dimensional States in a One-Dimensional Electron Interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, B.J. van; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Williamson, J.G.; Timmering, C.E.; Broekaart, M.E.I.; Foxon, C.T.; Harris, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the electron transport in a one-dimensional electron interferometer. It consists of a disk-shaped two-dimensional electron gas, to which quantum point contacts are attached. Discrete zero-dimensional states are formed due to constructive interference of electron waves traveling along

  1. Linear Extended State Observer-Based Motion Synchronization Control for Hybrid Actuation System of More Electric Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Moving towards the more electric aircraft (MEA, a hybrid actuator configuration provides an opportunity to introduce electromechanical actuator (EMA into primary flight control. In the hybrid actuation system (HAS, an electro-hydraulic servo actuator (EHSA and an EMA operate on the same control surface. In order to solve force fighting problem in HAS, this paper proposes a novel linear extended state observer (LESO-based motion synchronization control method. To cope with the problem of unavailability of the state signals required by the motion synchronization controller, LESO is designed for EHSA and EMA to observe the state variables. Based on the observed states of LESO, motion synchronization controllers could enable EHSA and EMA to simultaneously track the desired motion trajectories. Additionally, nonlinearities, uncertainties and unknown disturbances as well as the coupling term between EHSA and EMA can be estimated and compensated by using the extended state of the proposed LESO. Finally, comparative simulation results indicate that the proposed LESO-based motion synchronization controller could reduce significant force fighting between EHSA and EMA.

  2. Linear Extended State Observer-Based Motion Synchronization Control for Hybrid Actuation System of More Electric Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Rui; Shi, Cun; Wang, Shaoping

    2017-01-01

    Moving towards the more electric aircraft (MEA), a hybrid actuator configuration provides an opportunity to introduce electromechanical actuator (EMA) into primary flight control. In the hybrid actuation system (HAS), an electro-hydraulic servo actuator (EHSA) and an EMA operate on the same control surface. In order to solve force fighting problem in HAS, this paper proposes a novel linear extended state observer (LESO)-based motion synchronization control method. To cope with the problem of unavailability of the state signals required by the motion synchronization controller, LESO is designed for EHSA and EMA to observe the state variables. Based on the observed states of LESO, motion synchronization controllers could enable EHSA and EMA to simultaneously track the desired motion trajectories. Additionally, nonlinearities, uncertainties and unknown disturbances as well as the coupling term between EHSA and EMA can be estimated and compensated by using the extended state of the proposed LESO. Finally, comparative simulation results indicate that the proposed LESO-based motion synchronization controller could reduce significant force fighting between EHSA and EMA. PMID:29068392

  3. 49 CFR 1103.11 - Standards of ethical conduct in courts of the United States to be observed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards of ethical conduct in courts of the... PRACTITIONERS Canons of Ethics The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Toward the Board § 1103.11 Standards of ethical conduct in courts of the United States to be observed. These canons further the purpose...

  4. Integration of the state observer RAPTOR in the real-time MARTe framework at RFX-mod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piron, C.; Manduchi, G.; Bettini, P.; Felici, F.; Finotti, C.; Franz, P.; Kudlacek, O.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Moret, J.M.; Piovesan, P.; Sauter, O.; Taliercio, C.

    2017-01-01

    The RAPTOR - RApid Plasma Transport simulatOR code is a model-based control-oriented code that predicts Tokamak plasma profile evolution in real-time. One of its key applications is in a state observer, where the real-time predictions are combined with the measurements of the available diagnostics,

  5. Elicitation of State and Local User Needs for Future Moderate Resolution Earth Observations: The AmericaView Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, N. H. F.; Lawrence, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    AmericaView is a nationwide partnership of remote sensing scientists who support the use of Landsat and other public domain remotely sensed data through applied remote sensing research, K-12 and higher STEM education, workforce development, and technology transfer. The national AmericaView program currently has active university-lead members in 39 states, each of which has a "stateview" consortium consisting of some combination of university, agency, non-profit, and other members. This "consortium of consortia" has resulted in a strong and unique nationwide network of remote sensing practitioners. AmericaView has used this network to contribute to the USGS Requirements Capabilities & Analysis for Earth Observations. Participating states have conducted interviews of key remote sensing end users across the country to provide key input at the state and local level for the design and implementation of future U.S. moderate resolution Earth observations.

  6. Study on Application of T-S Fuzzy Observer in Speed Switching Control of AUVs Driven by States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the inherent strongly nonlinear and coupling performance of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs, the speed switching control method for AUV driven by states is presented. By using T-S fuzzy observer to estimate the states of AUV, the speed control strategies in lever plane, vertical plane, and speed kept are established, respectively. Then the adaptive switching law is introduced to switch the speed control strategies designed in real time. In the simulation, acoustic Doppler current profile/side scan sonar (ADCP/SSS observation case is employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the efficiency of AUV was improved, the trajectory tracking error was reduced, and the steady-state ability was enhanced.

  7. First direct observation of bound-state beta-decay: Measurements of branching and lifetime of 207Tl81+ fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutin, D.

    2005-08-01

    The first experimental observation of bound-state beta-decay showed, that due solely to the electron stripping, a stable nuclide, e.g. 163 Dy, became unstable. Also a drastic modification of the half-life of bare 187 Re, from 4.12(2) x 10 10 years down to 32.9(20) years, could be observed. It was mainly due to the possibility for the mother nuclide to decay into a previously inaccessible nuclear level of the daughter nuclide. It was proposed to study a nuclide where this decay mode was competing with continuum-state beta-decay, in order to measure their respective branchings. The ratio β b /β c could also be evaluated for the first time. 207 Tl was chosen due to its high atomic number, and Q-value of about 1.4 MeV, small enough to enhance the β b probability and large enough to allow the use of time-resolved Schottky Mass Spectrometry (SMS) to study the evolution of mother and bound-state beta-decay daughter ions. The decay properties of the ground state and isomeric state of 207 Tl 81+ have been investigated at the GSI accelerator facility in two separate experiments. For the first time β-decay where the electron could go either to a bound state (atomic orbitals) and lead to 207 Pb 81+ as a daughter nuclide, or to a continuum state and lead to 207 Pb 82+ , has been observed. The respective branchings of these two processes could be measured as well. The deduced total nuclear half-life of 255(17) s for 207 Tl 81+ , was slightly modified with respect to the half-life of the neutral atom of 286(2) s. It was nevertheless in very good agreement with calculations based on the assumption that the beta-decay was following an allowed type of transition. The branching β b /β c =0.192(20), was also in very good agreement with the same calculations. The application of stochastic precooling allowed to observe in addition the 1348 keV short-lived isomeric state of 207 Tl. The half-life of this isomeric state was measured as 1.47(32) s, which shows a small deviation

  8. The Observed State of the Water Cycle in the Early Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Olson, W. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Houser, P. R.; Adler, R.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Clayson, C. A.; Chambers, D.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This study quantifies mean annual and monthly fluxes of Earth's water cycle over continents and ocean basins during the first decade of the millennium. To the extent possible, the flux estimates are based on satellite measurements first and data-integrating models second. A careful accounting of uncertainty in the estimates is included. It is applied within a routine that enforces multiple water and energy budget constraints simultaneously in a variational framework in order to produce objectively determined optimized flux estimates. In the majority of cases, the observed annual surface and atmospheric water budgets over the continents and oceans close with much less than 10% residual. Observed residuals and optimized uncertainty estimates are considerably larger for monthly surface and atmospheric water budget closure, often nearing or exceeding 20% in North America, Eurasia, Australia and neighboring islands, and the Arctic and South Atlantic Oceans. The residuals in South America and Africa tend to be smaller, possibly because cold land processes are negligible. Fluxes were poorly observed over the Arctic Ocean, certain seas, Antarctica, and the Australasian and Indonesian islands, leading to reliance on atmospheric analysis estimates. Many of the satellite systems that contributed data have been or will soon be lost or replaced. Models that integrate ground-based and remote observations will be critical for ameliorating gaps and discontinuities in the data records caused by these transitions. Continued development of such models is essential for maximizing the value of the observations. Next-generation observing systems are the best hope for significantly improving global water budget accounting.

  9. Changes in visual and sensory-motor resting-state functional connectivity support motor learning by observing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Heather R; Gribble, Paul L

    2015-07-01

    Motor learning occurs not only through direct first-hand experience but also through observation (Mattar AA, Gribble PL. Neuron 46: 153-160, 2005). When observing the actions of others, we activate many of the same brain regions involved in performing those actions ourselves (Malfait N, Valyear KF, Culham JC, Anton JL, Brown LE, Gribble PL. J Cogn Neurosci 22: 1493-1503, 2010). Links between neural systems for vision and action have been reported in neurophysiological (Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuroreport 11: 2289-2292, 2000; Watkins KE, Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuropsychologia 41: 989-994, 2003), brain imaging (Buccino G, Binkofski F, Fink GR, Fadiga L, Fogassi L, Gallese V, Seitz RJ, Zilles K, Rizzolatti G, Freund HJ. Eur J Neurosci 13: 400-404, 2001; Iacoboni M, Woods RP, Brass M, Bekkering H, Mazziotta JC, Rizzolatti G. Science 286: 2526-2528, 1999), and eye tracking (Flanagan JR, Johansson RS. Nature 424: 769-771, 2003) studies. Here we used a force field learning paradigm coupled with resting-state fMRI to investigate the brain areas involved in motor learning by observing. We examined changes in resting-state functional connectivity (FC) after an observational learning task and found a network consisting of V5/MT, cerebellum, and primary motor and somatosensory cortices in which changes in FC were correlated with the amount of motor learning achieved through observation, as assessed behaviorally after resting-state fMRI scans. The observed FC changes in this network are not due to visual attention to motion or observation of movement errors but rather are specifically linked to motor learning. These results support the idea that brain networks linking action observation and motor control also facilitate motor learning. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Changes in visual and sensory-motor resting-state functional connectivity support motor learning by observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Heather R.

    2015-01-01

    Motor learning occurs not only through direct first-hand experience but also through observation (Mattar AA, Gribble PL. Neuron 46: 153–160, 2005). When observing the actions of others, we activate many of the same brain regions involved in performing those actions ourselves (Malfait N, Valyear KF, Culham JC, Anton JL, Brown LE, Gribble PL. J Cogn Neurosci 22: 1493–1503, 2010). Links between neural systems for vision and action have been reported in neurophysiological (Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuroreport 11: 2289–2292, 2000; Watkins KE, Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuropsychologia 41: 989–994, 2003), brain imaging (Buccino G, Binkofski F, Fink GR, Fadiga L, Fogassi L, Gallese V, Seitz RJ, Zilles K, Rizzolatti G, Freund HJ. Eur J Neurosci 13: 400–404, 2001; Iacoboni M, Woods RP, Brass M, Bekkering H, Mazziotta JC, Rizzolatti G. Science 286: 2526–2528, 1999), and eye tracking (Flanagan JR, Johansson RS. Nature 424: 769–771, 2003) studies. Here we used a force field learning paradigm coupled with resting-state fMRI to investigate the brain areas involved in motor learning by observing. We examined changes in resting-state functional connectivity (FC) after an observational learning task and found a network consisting of V5/MT, cerebellum, and primary motor and somatosensory cortices in which changes in FC were correlated with the amount of motor learning achieved through observation, as assessed behaviorally after resting-state fMRI scans. The observed FC changes in this network are not due to visual attention to motion or observation of movement errors but rather are specifically linked to motor learning. These results support the idea that brain networks linking action observation and motor control also facilitate motor learning. PMID:25995349

  11. Final State Interactions and Polarization Observables in the Reaction pp → pKΛ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röder Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of high quality hyperon beams, final state interactions in hyperon production reactions are a compelling tool to study hyperon-nucleon interactions. The COSY-TOF experiment has recently been upgraded in order to reconstruct the pK+Λ final state with sufficient precision to determine the spin triplet pΛ scattering length with a polarized proton beam. We find an unexpected behavior of the K+ analyzing power which prevents the extraction method to be used with the available statistics. A theoretical explanation is pending. Furthermore, the polarized beam together with the self analyzing decay of the Λ allows us to determine the Λ depolarization. This is especially sensitive to K+ and π exchange in the production mechanism. Our finding verifies, to a large extent, the result from DISTO [2] that has so far been the only measurement close to the production threshold.

  12. Observation of a γ-decaying millisecond isomeric state in 128Cd80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jungclaus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A new high-spin isomer in the neutron-rich nucleus 128Cd was populated in the projectile fission of a 238U beam at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN. A half-life of T1/2=6.3(8 ms was measured for the new state which was tentatively assigned a spin/parity of (15−. The experimental results are compared to shell model calculations performed using state-of-the-art realistic effective interactions and to the neighbouring nucleus 129Cd. In the present experiment no evidence was found for the decay of a 18+ E6 spin-trap isomer, based on the complete alignment of the two-neutron and two-proton holes in the 0h11/2 and the 0g9/2 orbit, respectively, which is predicted to exist by the shell model.

  13. Observational constraints on scalar field models of dark energy with barotropic equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergijenko, Olga; Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Durrer, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    We constrain the parameters of dynamical dark energy in the form of a classical or tachyonic scalar field with barotropic equation of state jointly with other cosmological parameters using the following datasets: the CMB power spectra from WMAP7, the baryon acoustic oscillations in the space distribution of galaxies from SDSS DR7, the power spectrum of luminous red galaxies from SDSS DR7 and the light curves of SN Ia from 2 different compilations: Union2 (SALT2 light curve fitting) and SDSS (SALT2 and MLCS2k2 light curve fittings). It has been found that the initial value of dark energy equation of state parameter is constrained very weakly by most of the data while the other cosmological parameters are well constrained: their likelihoods and posteriors are similar, their forms are close to Gaussian (or half-Gaussian) and the confidence ranges are narrow. The most reliable determinations of the best-fit value and 1σ confidence range for the initial value of the dark energy equation of state parameter are obtained from the combined datasets including SN Ia data from the full SDSS compilation with MLCS2k2 light curve fitting. In all such cases the best-fit value of this parameter is lower than the value of corresponding parameter for current epoch. Such dark energy loses its repulsive properties and in future the expansion of the Universe changes into contraction. We also perform a forecast for the Planck mock data and show that they narrow significantly the confidence ranges of cosmological parameters values, moreover, their combination with SN SDSS compilation with MLCS2k2 light curve fitting may exclude the fields with initial equation of state parameter > −0.1 at 2σ confidence level

  14. 76 FR 18042 - Uniform Criteria for State Observational Surveys of Seat Belt Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... Transportation (MO DOT), Nevada Department of Public Safety (prepared by University of Nevada--Las Vegas) (NV DPS... member of the public stated that conducting such surveys is a waste of taxpayer's money. (Jean Public at...; WY HSP at 1; LA HSC at 1; NJIT at 3; CO DOT at 1; GHSA at 1; ODU at 1- 2; MO DOT at 1; CA OTS at 1...

  15. A Systematic Controller Design for a Grid-Connected Inverter with LCL Filter Using a Discrete-Time Integral State Feedback Control and State Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Jin Yoon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Inductive-capacitive-inductive (LCL-type filters are currently preferred as a replacement for L-type filters in distributed generation (DG power systems, due to their superior harmonic attenuation capability. However, the third-order dynamics introduced by LCL filters pose a challenge to design a satisfactory controller for such a system. Conventionally, an LCL-filtered grid-connected inverter can be effectively controlled by using a full-state feedback control. However, this control approach requires the measurement of all system state variables, which brings about more complexity for the inverter system. To address this issue, this paper presents a systematic procedure to design an observer-based integral state feedback control for a LCL-filtered grid-connected inverter in the discrete-time domain. The proposed control scheme consists of an integral state feedback controller and a full-state observer which uses the control input, grid-side currents, and grid voltages to predict all the system state variables. Therefore, only the grid-side current sensors and grid voltage sensors are required to implement the proposed control scheme. Due to the discrete-time integrator incorporated in the state feedback controller, the proposed control scheme ensures both the reference tracking and disturbance rejection performance of the inverter system in a practical and simple way. As a result, superior control performance can be achieved by using the reduced number of sensors, which significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the LCL-filtered grid-connected inverter system in DG applications. To verify the practical usefulness of the proposed control scheme, a 2 kW three-phase prototype grid-connected inverter has been constructed, and the proposed control system has been implemented based on 32-bit floating-point digital signal processor (DSP TMS320F28335. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is demonstrated through the comprehensive simulation

  16. Gaussian anamorphosis in the analysis step of the EnKF: a joint state-variable/observation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Amezcua

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis step of the (ensemble Kalman filter is optimal when (1 the distribution of the background is Gaussian, (2 state variables and observations are related via a linear operator, and (3 the observational error is of additive nature and has Gaussian distribution. When these conditions are largely violated, a pre-processing step known as Gaussian anamorphosis (GA can be applied. The objective of this procedure is to obtain state variables and observations that better fulfil the Gaussianity conditions in some sense. In this work we analyse GA from a joint perspective, paying attention to the effects of transformations in the joint state-variable/observation space. First, we study transformations for state variables and observations that are independent from each other. Then, we introduce a targeted joint transformation with the objective to obtain joint Gaussianity in the transformed space. We focus primarily in the univariate case, and briefly comment on the multivariate one. A key point of this paper is that, when (1–(3 are violated, using the analysis step of the EnKF will not recover the exact posterior density in spite of any transformations one may perform. These transformations, however, provide approximations of different quality to the Bayesian solution of the problem. Using an example in which the Bayesian posterior can be analytically computed, we assess the quality of the analysis distributions generated after applying the EnKF analysis step in conjunction with different GA options. The value of the targeted joint transformation is particularly clear for the case when the prior is Gaussian, the marginal density for the observations is close to Gaussian, and the likelihood is a Gaussian mixture.

  17. Disturbance observer-based control of a dual output LLC converter for solid state lighting applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, M.G.L.; Duarte, J.L.; Hendrix, M.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Feedback sensor isolation is often an expensive necessity in power converters, for reasons of safety and electromagnetic compatibility. A disturbance observer-based control strategy for a dual-output resonant converter is proposed to overcome this problem. Current control of two LED loads is

  18. Toward a national animal telemetry network for aquatic observations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Barbara A.; Holbrook, Christopher; Simmons, Samantha E; Holland, Kim N; Ault, Jerald S.; Costa, Daniel P.; Mate, Bruce R; Seitz, Andrew C.; Arendt, Michael D.; Payne, John; Mahmoudi, Behzad; Moore, Peter L.; Price, James; J. J. Levenson,; Wilson, Doug; Kochevar, Randall E

    2016-01-01

    Animal telemetry is the science of elucidating the movements and behavior of animals in relation to their environment or habitat. Here, we focus on telemetry of aquatic species (marine mammals, sharks, fish, sea birds and turtles) and so are concerned with animal movements and behavior as they move through and above the world’s oceans, coastal rivers, estuaries and great lakes. Animal telemetry devices (“tags”) yield detailed data regarding animal responses to the coupled ocean–atmosphere and physical environment through which they are moving. Animal telemetry has matured and we describe a developing US Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) observing system that monitors aquatic life on a range of temporal and spatial scales that will yield both short- and long-term benefits, fill oceanographic observing and knowledge gaps and advance many of the U.S. National Ocean Policy Priority Objectives. ATN has the potential to create a huge impact for the ocean observing activities undertaken by the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) and become a model for establishing additional national-level telemetry networks worldwide.

  19. Observation of a Central Mode in an Exchange-Coupled Singlet-Ground State System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Kjems, Jørgen; Buyers, W. J. L.

    1977-01-01

    A central mode in the ferromagnetic phase transition of Pr3Tl is observed by inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering. The integrated intensity has a Lorentzian wavevector dependence with a correlation range that is much larger than in ordinary ferromagnets. The softening of the exciton mode...... is considerably smaller than predicted by mean field theory....

  20. Adaptive extended-state observer-based fault tolerant attitude control for spacecraft with reaction wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Dechao; Chen, Xiaoqian; de Ruiter, Anton; Xiao, Bing

    2018-04-01

    This study presents an adaptive second-order sliding control scheme to solve the attitude fault tolerant control problem of spacecraft subject to system uncertainties, external disturbances and reaction wheel faults. A novel fast terminal sliding mode is preliminarily designed to guarantee that finite-time convergence of the attitude errors can be achieved globally. Based on this novel sliding mode, an adaptive second-order observer is then designed to reconstruct the system uncertainties and the actuator faults. One feature of the proposed observer is that the design of the observer does not necessitate any priori information of the upper bounds of the system uncertainties and the actuator faults. In view of the reconstructed information supplied by the designed observer, a second-order sliding mode controller is developed to accomplish attitude maneuvers with great robustness and precise tracking accuracy. Theoretical stability analysis proves that the designed fault tolerant control scheme can achieve finite-time stability of the closed-loop system, even in the presence of reaction wheel faults and system uncertainties. Numerical simulations are also presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed control scheme over existing methodologies.

  1. New low-spin states of 122Xe observed via high-statistics β-decay of 122Cs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jigmeddorj, B.; Garrett, P. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Bruhn, T.; Cross, D. S.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hadinia, B.; Moukaddam, M.; Park, J.; Pore, J. L.; Radich, A. J.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rand, E. T.; Rizwan, U.; Svensson, C. E.; Voss, P.; Wang, Z. M.; Wood, J. L.; Yates, S. W.

    2018-05-01

    Excited states of 122Xe were studied via the β+/EC decay of 122Cs with the 8π γ-ray spectrometer at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility. Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors were used for measurements of γ-ray intensities, γγ coincidences, and γ-γ angular correlations. Two sets of data were collected to optimize the decays of the ground (21.2 s) and isomeric (3.7 min) states of 122Cs. The data collected have enabled the observation of about 505 new transitions and about 250 new levels, including 51 new low-spin states. Spin assignments have been made for 58 low-spin states based on the deduced β-decay feeding and γ-γ angular correlation analyses.

  2. Some new effects of the deuteron D state observed in (p,d) and (d,p) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Hajime

    1980-01-01

    Two previously unexplored experiments have revealed the importance of the deuteron D-state effects on (p,d) and (d,p) reactions at moderate energies. Firstly, a clear indication of the deuteron D-state effects on the polarization of the residual nuclear state has been observed in the 58 Ni(p,dγ) angular correlation measurement at E sub(p) = 30 MeV. Secondly, a comparison of the vector analyzing power and vector polarization measured at E sub(d) = 22 MeV for an l = 0 (d,p) transition has shown that the D state has significant effects even on the first-rank polarization quantities. The experimental data and the results of exact-finite-range DWBA calculations with Reid soft-core potential are presented. (author)

  3. Excited State Chemistry in the Free Stream of the NASA IHF Arc Jet Facility Observed by Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael W.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of non-equilibrium emission were made in the free stream of the 60 megawatts Interaction Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. In the visible near infrared wavelength region, the most prominent emission was from molecular N2, and in the ultra violet region, the spectra were dominated by emission from molecular NO. The only atomic lines observed were those of copper (an erosion product of the electrodes). The bands of the 1st Positive system of N2 (if B is true then A is true) differed significantly from spectra computed spectra assuming only thermal excitation, suggesting overpopulation of the high vibrational states of the B state of N2. Populations of these high vibrational levels (peaking at v (sub upper) equals 13) of the N2 B state were determined by scaling simulated spectra; calculations were performed for each upper vibrational state separately. The experimental-theoretical procedure was repeated for several radial positions away from the nozzle axis to obtain spatial distributions of the upper state populations; rotational symmetry of the flow was assumed in simulations. The overpopulation of the high vibrational levels has been interpreted as the effect of inverse pre-dissociation of neutral atoms in the N2 A state, which populates the N2 B state through a level crossing process at v (sub upper) is greater than 10.

  4. Monitoring the State of the Magmatic Structures of Elbrus Volcano Based on Observation of Lithosphere Strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milyukov, Vadim; Myasnikov, Andrey; Mironov, Alexey

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of crustal strain recorded by the Baksan laser interferometer revealed a shallow magma chamber in the structure of Elbrus Volcano (The Northern Caucasus, Russia). The analysis is based on estimation of parameters of magmatic structures resonant modes excited by teleseismic signals. The resonance parameters we have found were interpreted in the framework of contemporary models of magma resonators. The depth and dimension of the magma chamber, as well as the properties of the magma fluid were estimated. It was suggested the changing the magma state due to rising the intrachamber pressure

  5. Observed Trends in Indices of Daily Precipitation and Temperature Extremes in Rio de Janeiro State (brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, W. L.; Dereczynski, C. P.; Cavalcanti, I. F.

    2013-05-01

    One of the main concerns of contemporary society regarding prevailing climate change is related to possible changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme events. Strong heat and cold waves, droughts, severe floods, and other climatic extremes have been of great interest to researchers because of its huge impact on the environment and population, causing high monetary damages and, in some cases, loss of life. The frequency and intensity of extreme events associated with precipitation and air temperature have been increased in several regions of the planet in recent years. These changes produce serious impacts on human activities such as agriculture, health, urban planning and development and management of water resources. In this paper, we analyze the trends in indices of climatic extremes related to daily precipitation and maximum and minimum temperatures at 22 meteorological stations of the National Institute of Meteorology (INMET) in Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil) in the last 50 years. The present trends are evaluated using the software RClimdex (Canadian Meteorological Service) and are also subjected to statistical tests. Preliminary results indicate that periods of drought are getting longer in Rio de Janeiro State, except in the North/Northwest area. In "Vale do Paraíba", "Região Serrana" and "Região dos Lagos" the increase of consecutive dry days is statistically significant. However, we also detected an increase in the total annual rainfall all over the State (taxes varying from +2 to +8 mm/year), which are statistically significant at "Região Serrana". Moreover, the intensity of heavy rainfall is also growing in most of Rio de Janeiro, except in "Costa Verde". The trends of heavy rainfall indices show significant increase in the "Metropolitan Region" and in "Região Serrana", factor that increases the vulnerability to natural disasters in these areas. With respect to temperature, it is found that the frequency of hot (cold) days and nights is

  6. The NASA Earth Observing System Higher-Education Alliance Curriculum Development Project at Middle Tennessee State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolins, M. J.; Wylie, M.

    2008-12-01

    During the last three years, geodata-rich undergraduate curricula were developed at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) with major support from the NASA Earth Observing System Higher-Education Alliance ("GeoBrain") and additional support from Tennessee Space Grant and the NSF StepMT program. These curricula fall into three broad categories: (1) GIS-based curricula, (2) the free on-line textbook "Physical Regions and Features of the United States," and (3) presentation graphics (primarily satellite images) for faculty involved in teaching and research outside the United States. All three incorporate Earth Observing System data as well as data from other public sources. Most data was obtained through the GeoBrain data download website, the USGS Seamless Data Distribution System, or the National Atlas of the United States website. The three categories of curricula exemplify the diverse educational applications of satellite images and other map data. The GIS-based curricula (1) are built around ESRI GIS software and include an asteroid impact activity and a volcano activity. The free on-line textbook (2) provides a broad overview of the physical features of the United States and is intended as a supplement for undergraduate geoscience courses. Presentation graphics (3) have been created for faculty investigating Scottish archeology and historical/cultural issues in Portugal and Morocco. The three categories represent three distinctly different ways to use remotely-sensed data to improve undergraduate instruction.

  7. A novel method for state of charge estimation of lithium-ion batteries using a nonlinear observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bizhong; Chen, Chaoren; Tian, Yong; Sun, Wei; Xu, Zhihui; Zheng, Weiwei

    2014-12-01

    The state of charge (SOC) is important for the safety and reliability of battery operation since it indicates the remaining capacity of a battery. However, as the internal state of each cell cannot be directly measured, the value of the SOC has to be estimated. In this paper, a novel method for SOC estimation in electric vehicles (EVs) using a nonlinear observer (NLO) is presented. One advantage of this method is that it does not need complicated matrix operations, so the computation cost can be reduced. As a key step in design of the nonlinear observer, the state-space equations based on the equivalent circuit model are derived. The Lyapunov stability theory is employed to prove the convergence of the nonlinear observer. Four experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the presented method. The results show that the SOC estimation error converges to 3% within 130 s while the initial SOC error reaches 20%, and does not exceed 4.5% while the measurement suffers both 2.5% voltage noise and 5% current noise. Besides, the presented method has advantages over the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and sliding mode observer (SMO) algorithms in terms of computation cost, estimation accuracy and convergence rate.

  8. The Use of the State Observer in the Simulation of the Process of the Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenesis therapy is one of the modern and progressive methods for treatment of cancerous disease in which the growth of new vessels is suppressed. In the paper a model of cancerous tumour evolution in the framework of anti-angiogenesis therapy is analyzed. Earlier a treatment for this model was developed which was determined by a distribution of medicament dose along the treatment. To reach the required result of the tumour volume reduction upto the given level the treatment requires 120 days. This result is refined using the differential-geometric methods and the new scheme requires only 60 days. The proposed treatment schemes are based on the full state vector of the system but this can be hardly provided by measurements. Hence, the problem of observer design arises which obtains a state vector estimate from the measured tumour volume. In this note the normal form of the system is refined and an observer with high gain is designed. An estimate of the full state vector of the system obtained by the observer is used in the output feedback which stabilizes the system. An identification algorithm for parameters of the nonlinear system is also presented which is based on lower sample of the output measurement. The identification algorithm is based on using the observer. The theoretical results obtained in this work are verified by numerical simulation.

  9. Surgical Procedures of the Elbow: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Observational Study in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kinaci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Elbow surgery is shared by several subspecialties. We were curious about the most common elbow surgeries and their corresponding diagnoses in the United States.   Methods:  We used the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS and the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery (NSAS data gathered in 2006-databases that together provide an estimate of all inpatient and ambulatory surgical care in the US.  Results:  An estimated 150,000 elbow surgeries were performed in the US in 2006, 75% in an outpatient setting. The most frequent diagnosis treated operative was enthesopathy (e.g. lateral epicondylitis and it was treated with several different procedures. More than three quarters of all elbow surgeries treated enthesopathy, cubital tunnel syndrome, or fracture (radial head in particular. Arthroscopy and arthroplasty accounted for less than 10% of all elbow surgeries.  Conclusions:  Elbow surgery in the United States primarily addresses enthesopathies such as tennis elbow, cubital tunnel syndrome, and trauma. It is notable that some of the most common elbow surgeries (those that address enthesopathy and radial head fracture are some of the most variably utilized and debated.

  10. Observation of a γ -decaying millisecond isomeric state in 128 Cd 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungclaus, A.; Grawe, H.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P. -A.; Sumikama, T.; Taprogge, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gey, G.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jung, H. S.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y. -K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Li, Z.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Vajta, Zs.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.; Benzoni, G.; Bönig, S.; Chae, K. Y.; Coraggio, L.; Daugas, J. -M.; Drouet, F.; Gadea, A.; Gargano, A.; Ilieva, S.; Itaco, N.; Kondev, F. G.; Kröll, T.; Lane, G. J.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Mücher, D.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Wendt, A.

    2017-09-01

    A new high-spin isomer in the neutron-rich nucleus 128Cd was populated in the projectile fission of a 238U beam at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN. A half-life of T1/2 = 6.3(8) ms was measured for the new state which was tentatively assigned a spin/parity of (15-). The experimental results are compared to shell model calculations performed using state-of-the-art realistic effective interactions and to the neighbouring nucleus 129Cd. In the present experiment no evidence was found for the decay of a 18+ E6 spin-trap isomer, based on the complete alignment of the two-neutron and two-proton holes in the 0h11/2 and the 0g9/2 orbit, respectively, which is predicted to exist by the shell model.

  11. Experimental Observations of Natural Circulation Flow in the NSTF at Steady-State Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, Darius D.; Farmer, Mitch T.

    2014-01-01

    A ½ scale test facility has been constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study the heat removal performance and natural circulation flow patterns in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). Our test facility, the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF), supports the broader goal of developing an inherently safe and fully passive ex-vessel decay heat removal for advanced reactor designs. The project, initiated in 2010 to support the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Small Modular Reactor (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) programs, has been conducting experimental operations since early 2014. The following paper provides a summary of some primary design features of the 26-m tall test facility along with a description of the data acquisition suite that guides our experimental practices. Specifics of the distributed fiber optic temperature measurements will be discussed, which introduces an unparalleled level of data density that has never before been implemented in a large scale natural circulation test facility. Results from our first test series will then be presented, which provide insight into the thermal hydraulic behavior at steady-state conditions for varying heat flux levels and exhaust chimney configuration states. (author)

  12. The discriminatory value of cardiorespiratory interactions in distinguishing awake from anaesthetised states: a randomised observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenwright, D A; Bernjak, A; Draegni, T; Dzeroski, S; Entwistle, M; Horvat, M; Kvandal, P; Landsverk, S A; McClintock, P V E; Musizza, B; Petrovčič, J; Raeder, J; Sheppard, L W; Smith, A F; Stankovski, T; Stefanovska, A

    2015-12-01

    Depth of anaesthesia monitors usually analyse cerebral function with or without other physiological signals; non-invasive monitoring of the measured cardiorespiratory signals alone would offer a simple, practical alternative. We aimed to investigate whether such signals, analysed with novel, non-linear dynamic methods, would distinguish between the awake and anaesthetised states. We recorded ECG, respiration, skin temperature, pulse and skin conductivity before and during general anaesthesia in 27 subjects in good cardiovascular health, randomly allocated to receive propofol or sevoflurane. Mean values, variability and dynamic interactions were determined. Respiratory rate (p = 0.0002), skin conductivity (p = 0.03) and skin temperature (p = 0.00006) changed with sevoflurane, and skin temperature (p = 0.0005) with propofol. Pulse transit time increased by 17% with sevoflurane (p = 0.02) and 11% with propofol (p = 0.007). Sevoflurane reduced the wavelet energy of heart (p = 0.0004) and respiratory (p = 0.02) rate variability at all frequencies, whereas propofol decreased only the heart rate variability below 0.021 Hz (p cardiorespiratory synchronisation time was increased (p < 0.05). A classification analysis based on an optimal set of discriminatory parameters distinguished with 95% success between the awake and anaesthetised states. We suggest that these results can contribute to the design of new monitors of anaesthetic depth based on cardiovascular signals alone. © 2015 The Authors. Anaesthesia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. The observability principle and beyond. Reply to comments on "Seeing mental states: An experimental strategy for measuring the observability of other minds" by Cristina Becchio et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchio, Cristina; Koul, Atesh; Ansuini, Caterina; Bertone, Cesare; Cavallo, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Is it possible to directly perceive others' mental states? Mediating the debate between Direct Perception and Inferentialism proponents would require knowing "what counts as an inference and how to tell the difference between inferential and non-inferential processing" [1]. However, few theorists have even attempted to answer the question of what counts as inference. The consequence, as noted by Spaulding [1], is that "given that neither Inferentialists nor DSP [Direct Social Perception, Ed.] proponents specify what they mean by inference, it is hard to tell what exactly each side is affirming and denying. Thus, the debate between Inferentialism and DSP is at an impasse". Similar considerations apply to distinguishing between what is 'observable' versus 'unobservable' [2].

  14. Spectroscopy of 9Be and observation of neutron halo structure in the states of positive parity rotational band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanova A.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The differential cross sections of the 9Be + α inelastic scattering at 30 MeV were measured at the tandem of Tsukuba University. All the known states of 9Be up to energies ~ 12 MeV were observed and decomposed into three rotational bands, each of them having a cluster structure consisting of a 8Be core plus a valence neutron in one of the sub-shells: p3/2−, s1/2+ and p1/2−. Existence of a neutron halo in the positive parity states was confirmed.

  15. Direct Observation of Cr3+ 3d States in Ruby: Toward Experimental Mechanistic Evidence of Metal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunault, Myrtille O J Y; Harada, Yoshihisa; Miyawaki, Jun; Wang, Jian; Meijerink, Andries; de Groot, Frank M F; van Schooneveld, Matti M

    2018-04-26

    The role of transition metals in chemical reactions is often derived from probing the metal 3d states. However, the relation between metal site geometry and 3d electronic states, arising from multielectronic effects, makes the spectral data interpretation and modeling of these optical excited states a challenge. Here we show, using the well-known case of red ruby, that unique insights into the density of transition metal 3d excited states can be gained with 2p3d resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). We compare the experimental determination of the 3d excited states of Cr 3+ impurities in Al 2 O 3 with 190 meV resolution 2p3d RIXS to optical absorption spectroscopy and to simulations. Using the crystal field multiplet theory, we calculate jointly for the first time the Cr 3+ multielectronic states, RIXS, and optical spectra based on a unique set of parameters. We demonstrate that (i) anisotropic 3d multielectronic interactions causes different scaling of Slater integrals, and (ii) a previously not observed doublet excited state exists around 3.35 eV. These results allow to discuss the influence of interferences in the RIXS intermediate state, of core-hole lifetime broadenings, and of selection rules on the RIXS intensities. Finally, our results demonstrate that using an intermediate excitation energy between L 3 and L 2 edges allows measurement of the density of 3d excited states as a fingerprint of the metal local structure. This opens up a new direction to pump-before-destroy investigations of transition metal complex structures and reaction mechanisms.

  16. Decentralized State-Observer-Based Traffic Density Estimation of Large-Scale Urban Freeway Network by Dynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqi Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate traffic densities in a large-scale urban freeway network in an accurate and timely fashion when traffic sensors do not cover the freeway network completely and thus only local measurement data can be utilized, this paper proposes a decentralized state observer approach based on a macroscopic traffic flow model. Firstly, by using the well-known cell transmission model (CTM, the urban freeway network is modeled in the way of distributed systems. Secondly, based on the model, a decentralized observer is designed. With the help of the Lyapunov function and S-procedure theory, the observer gains are computed by using linear matrix inequality (LMI technique. So, the traffic densities of the whole road network can be estimated by the designed observer. Finally, this method is applied to the outer ring of the Beijing’s second ring road and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed approach.

  17. The State of the Thermosphere in 2017 as Observed by SABER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, L. A.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Marshall, B. T.; Russell, J. M., III

    2017-12-01

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 μm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 μm) has been observed for nearly 16 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on timescales ranging from days to the nominal 11-year solar cycle, providing important information about the radiation budget in the upper atmosphere. The effects of Solar Cycle 24 are clearly evident in the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere as observed by SABER. The peak NO cooling in SC24 is about one-third less than the maximum seen in SC23 since the beginning of the SABER record in January 2002, while the SC24 CO2 peak is nearly 95% of that in SC23. SC24 has been weakening throughout all of 2017 as measured by the F10.7 index and the sunspot number. Despite this, the radiative cooling by NO and CO2 has not yet reached the low levels of the prior minimum in 2008-2009. This is due to continuing elevated levels of geomagnetic activity as clearly shown by the Ap index. During the years preceding the prior solar minimum, harmonics of the solar rotation period were evident in time series of the NO and CO2 power, and were associated with high speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes roughly evenly spaced in solar longitude. Despite a number of large, Earth-facing coronal holes in 2017, periodic features have not yet been observed in spectral/Fourier analysis of the SABER radiative cooling time series. Additional comparisons between solar cycles and with other solar and geomagnetic indicators will also be shown.

  18. DETECTION OF CHANGES OF THE SYSTEM TECHNICAL STATE USING STOCHASTIC SUBSPACE OBSERVATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Puchalski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available System diagnostics based on vibroacoustics signals, carried out by means of stochastic subspace methods was undertaken in the hereby paper. Subspace methods are the ones based on numerical linear algebra tools. The considered solutions belong to diagnostic methods according to data, leading to the generation of residuals allowing failure recognition of elements and assemblies in machines and devices. The algorithm of diagnostics according to the subspace observation method was applied – in the paper – for the estimation of the valve system of the spark ignition engine.

  19. State of Art in space weather observational activities and data management in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislawska, Iwona

    One of the primary scientific and technical goals of space weather is to produce data in order to investigate the Sun impact on the Earth and its environment. Studies based on data mining philosophy yield increase the knowledge of space weather physical properties, modelling capabilities and gain applications of various procedures in space weather monitoring and forecasting. Exchanging tailored individually and/or jointly data between different entities, storing of the databases and making data accessible for the users is the most important task undertaken by investigators. National activities spread over Europe is currently consolidated pursuant to the terms of effectiveness and individual contributions embedded in joint integrated efforts. The role of COST 724 Action in animation of such a movement is essential. The paper focuses on the analysis of the European availability in the Internet near-real time and historical collections of the European ground based and satellite observations, operational indices and parameters. A detailed description of data delivered is included. The structure of the content is supplied according to the following selection: (1) observations, raw and/or corrected, updated data, (2) resolution, availability of real-time and historical data, (3) products, as the results of models and theory including (a) maps, forecasts and alerts, (b) resolution, availability of real-time and historical data, (4) platforms to deliver data. Characterization of the networking of stations, observatories and space related monitoring systems of data collections is integrated part of the paper. According to these provisions operational systems developed for these purposes is presented and analysed. It concerns measurements, observations and parameters from the theory and models referred to local, regional collections, European and worldwide networks. Techniques used by these organizations to generate the digital content are identified. As the reference pan

  20. Observation of roton density of states in two-dimensional Landau-level excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinczuk, A.; Valladares, J.P.; Heiman, D.; Gossard, A.C.; English, J.H.; Tu, C.W.; Pfeiffer, L.; West, K.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic light scattering by inter-Landau-level excitations of the 2D electron gas in high-mobility GaAs structures in a perpendicular magnetic field was observed at the energies of the critical points in the mode dispersions. For Landau-level filling factors /nu//ge/, structure in the spectra indicates the excitonic binding and roton behavior predicted by the Hartree-Fock approximation. The large critical-point wave vectors, qapprox. >((h/2/pi/)c/eB)/sup -1/2/approx. >10/sup 6/ cm/sup -1/, are probably accessible in resonant light scattering through the residual disorder that broadens the Landau levels

  1. Direct observation of the lowest indirect exciton state in the bulk of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, R.; Habenicht, C.; Ahmad, M.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.

    2018-01-01

    We combine electron energy-loss spectroscopy and first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory (DFT) to identify the lowest indirect exciton state in the in-plane charge response of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) single crystals. This remarkably sharp mode forms a narrow pocket with a dispersion bandwidth of ˜100 meV and, as we argue based on a comparison to our DFT calculations, is predominantly polarized along the Γ K direction of the hexagonal Brillouin zone. Our data support the recent report by Cassabois et al. [Nat. Photonics 10, 262 (2016), 10.1038/nphoton.2015.277] who indirectly inferred the existence of this mode from the photoluminescence signal, thereby establishing h-BN as an indirect semiconductor.

  2. Observation of the Distribution of Molecular Spin States by Resonant Quantum Tunneling of the Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Ohm, T.; Sangregorio, C.; Sessoli, R.; Mailly, D.; Paulsen, C.

    1999-05-01

    Below 360 mK, Fe8 magnetic molecular clusters are in the pure quantum relaxation regime and we show that the predicted ``square-root time'' relaxation is obeyed, allowing us to develop a new method for watching the evolution of the distribution of molecular spin states in the sample. We measure as a function of applied field H the statistical distribution P\\(ξH\\) of magnetic energy bias ξH acting on the molecules. Tunneling initially causes rapid transitions of molecules, thereby ``digging a hole'' in P\\(ξH\\) (around the resonant condition ξH = 0). For small initial magnetization values, the hole width shows an intrinsic broadening which may be due to nuclear spins.

  3. Complex state variable- and disturbance observer-based current controllers for AC drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal, Mehmet; Teodorescu, Remus; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    In vector-controlled AC drives, the design of current controller is usually based on a machine model defined in synchronous frame coordinate, where the drive performance may be degraded by both the variation of the machine parameters and the cross-coupling between the d- and q-axes components...... of the stator current. In order to improve the current control performance an alternative current control strategy was proposed previously aiming to avoid the undesired cross-coupling and non-linearities between the state variables. These effects are assumed as disturbances arisen in the closed-loop path...... of the parameter and the cross-coupling effect. Moreover, it provides a better performance, smooth and low noisy operation with respect to the complex variable controller....

  4. Laboratory Observation of a Plasma-Flow-State Transition from Diverging to Stretching a Magnetic Nozzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2017-06-02

    An axial magnetic field induced by a plasma flow in a divergent magnetic nozzle is measured when injecting the plasma flow from a radio frequency (rf) plasma source located upstream of the nozzle. The source is operated with a pulsed rf power of 5 kW, and the high density plasma flow is sustained only for the initial ∼100  μsec of the discharge. The measurement shows a decrease in the axial magnetic field near the source exit, whereas an increase in the field is detected at the downstream side of the magnetic nozzle. These results demonstrate a spatial transition of the plasma-flow state from diverging to stretching the magnetic nozzle, where the importance of both the Alfvén and ion Mach numbers is shown.

  5. Columbus State University Global Observation and Outreach for the 2012 Transit of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Matthew; McCarty, C.; Bartow, M.; Hood, J. C.; Lodder, K.; Johnson, M.; Cruzen, S. T.; Williams, R. N.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty, staff and students from Columbus State University’s (CSU’s) Coca-Cola Space Science Center presented a webcast of the 2012 Transit of Venus from three continents to a global audience of 1.4 million unique viewers. Team members imaged the transit with telescopes using white-light, hydrogen-alpha, and calcium filters, from Alice Springs, Australia; the Gobi Desert, Mongolia; Bryce Canyon, UT; and Columbus, GA. Images were webcast live during the transit in partnership with NASA’s Sun-Earth Day program, and Science Center staff members were featured on NASA TV. Local members of the public were brought in for a series of outreach initiatives, in both Georgia and Australia, before and during the transit. The data recorded from the various locations have been archived for use in demonstrating principles such as the historical measurement of the astronomical unit.

  6. Recent changes in flood damage in the United States from observations and ACME model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, G.; Leung, L. R.

    2017-12-01

    Despite efforts to mitigate flood hazards in flood-prone areas, survey- and report-based flood databases show that flood damage has increased and emerged as one of the most costly disaster in the United States since the 1990s. Understanding the mechanism driving the changes in flood damage is therefore critical for reducing flood risk. In this study, we first conduct a comprehensive analysis of the changing characteristics of flood damage at local, state and country level. Results show a significant increasing trend in the number of flood hazards, causing economic losses of up to $7 billion per year. The ratio of flood events that caused tangible economical cost to the total flood events has exhibited a non-significant increasing trend before 2007 followed by a significant decrease, indicating a changing vulnerability to floods. Analysis also reveals distinct spatial and temporal patterns in the threshold intensity of flood hazards with tangible economical cost. To understand the mechanism behind the increasing flood damage, we develop a flood damage economic model coupled with the integrated hydrological modeling system of ACME that features a river routing model with an inundation parameterization and a water use and regulation model. The model is evaluated over the country against historical records. Several numerical experiments are then designed to explore the mechanisms behind the recent changes in flood damage from the perspective of flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability, which constitute flood damage. The role of human activities such as reservoir operations and water use in modifying regional floods are also explored using the new tool, with the goal of improving understanding and modeling of vulnerability to flood hazards.

  7. Static states and dynamic behaviour of charges: observation and control by scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews charges that locally functionalize materials. Microscopic analyses and operation of charges using various scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have revealed static, quasi-static/quasi-dynamic and dynamic charge behaviours. Charge-sensitive SPM has allowed for the visualization of the distribution of functionalized charges in electronic devices. When used as bit data in a memory system, the charges can be operated by SPM. The behaviour of quasi-static/quasi-dynamic charges is discussed here. In the data-writing process, spatially dispersive charges rather than a fast injection rate are introduced, but the technical problems can be solved by using nanostructures. Careful charge operations using SPM should realize a memory with a larger density than Tbit/inch 2 . Dynamic charges have been introduced in physical analyses and chemical processes. Although the observable timescale is limited by the SPM system response time of the order of several seconds, dynamics such as photon-induced charge redistributions and probe-assisted chemical reactions are observed. (topical review)

  8. Static states and dynamic behaviour of charges: observation and control by scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Masashi, E-mail: ISHII.Masashi@nims.go.j [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-05-05

    This paper reviews charges that locally functionalize materials. Microscopic analyses and operation of charges using various scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have revealed static, quasi-static/quasi-dynamic and dynamic charge behaviours. Charge-sensitive SPM has allowed for the visualization of the distribution of functionalized charges in electronic devices. When used as bit data in a memory system, the charges can be operated by SPM. The behaviour of quasi-static/quasi-dynamic charges is discussed here. In the data-writing process, spatially dispersive charges rather than a fast injection rate are introduced, but the technical problems can be solved by using nanostructures. Careful charge operations using SPM should realize a memory with a larger density than Tbit/inch{sup 2}. Dynamic charges have been introduced in physical analyses and chemical processes. Although the observable timescale is limited by the SPM system response time of the order of several seconds, dynamics such as photon-induced charge redistributions and probe-assisted chemical reactions are observed. (topical review)

  9. On-line iron loss resistance identification by a state observer for rotor-flux-oriented control of induction motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, Pablo M. de la; Bossio, Guillermo R.; Solsona, Jorge A.; Garcia, Guillermo O.

    2008-01-01

    A rotor flux state observer considering iron loss, for an Induction Motor (IM), is proposed. The aim of this proposal is to avoid detuning caused by the IM iron loss on a field-oriented control (FOC). An adaptive scheme for the K Fe , a parameter that represents the IM iron loss, is also proposed. The main objective of this scheme is to improve the dynamic response of control by compensating the variations of iron losses due to possible variations in the stator core characteristics. Simulation results demonstrated that the observer and the adaptive scheme showed a good performance fulfilling then the objectives

  10. The state of renewable energies in Europe. 10. EurObserv'ER; Etat des energies renouvelables en Europe 2010. 10. bilan EurObserv'ER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This EurObserv'ER publication, which is supported by the Intelligent Energy Europe (IEE) programme, provides a concise overview of the latest renewable energy market statistics even before official data are available. These have proven to be broadly consistent with the Eurostat figures. It also gives valuable insights into each of the main renewable energy markets, showing how well each sector is progressing, and reviewing relevant legislation, policy frameworks, and market structures. Currently, the EurObserv'ER methodology is being adapted to reflect the requirements of the 2009 Renewable Energy Directive. This will permit future EurObserv'ER barometers to be used to track the trajectory of each Member State towards its binding 2020 target, and the corresponding progress of each technology. The IEE programme supports public and private organisations across the European Union which are working together to accelerate the growth of renewable energy markets, and to remove market barriers. 2010 was a milestone in the success story of modern renewable energies. The energy revolution began, new binding targets came into force, and European Union Member States submitted their first National Renewable Energy Action Plans (NREAPs). Each NREAP defines a trajectory towards its binding national target and presents its planned policy measures. As we go into 2011, the European Commission is assessing these NREAPs, and in the coming years will work with the Member States to deliver their targets. Despite continuing progress, the renewable energy share of European Union gross inland energy consumption is only 9.4%; therefore the 12% targeted by the White Paper will not be achieved. The main reason for this failure is that the efforts to reduce consumption have not matched the efforts to develop renewable energies. Thus, while major investments have indeed been made, they amount to a smaller-than-anticipated share of energy consumption, given the later continued

  11. Design of polynomial fuzzy observer-controller for nonlinear systems with state delay: sum of squares approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassara, H.; El Hajjaji, A.; Chaabane, M.

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of observer-based control for two classes of polynomial fuzzy systems with time-varying delay. The first class concerns a special case where the polynomial matrices do not depend on the estimated state variables. The second one is the general case where the polynomial matrices could depend on unmeasurable system states that will be estimated. For the last case, two design procedures are proposed. The first one gives the polynomial fuzzy controller and observer gains in two steps. In the second procedure, the designed gains are obtained using a single-step approach to overcome the drawback of a two-step procedure. The obtained conditions are presented in terms of sum of squares (SOS) which can be solved via the SOSTOOLS and a semi-definite program solver. Illustrative examples show the validity and applicability of the proposed results.

  12. United States Naval Academy Polar Science Program's Visual Arctic Observing Buoys; The IceGoat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. E.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Nghiem, S. V.; Rigor, I.; Valentic, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Naval Academy Oceanography Department currently has a curriculum based Polar Science Program (USNA PSP). Within the PSP there is an Arctic Buoy Program (ABP) student research component that will include the design, build, testing and deployment of Arctic Buoys. Establishing an active, field-research program in Polar Science will greatly enhance Midshipman education and research, as well as introduce future Naval Officers to the Arctic environment. The Oceanography Department has engaged the USNA Ocean Engineering, Systems Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, and Computer Science Departments and developed a USNA Visual Arctic Observing Buoy, IceGoat1, which was designed, built, and deployed by midshipmen. The experience gained through Polar field studies and data derived from these buoys will be used to enhance course materials and laboratories and will also be used directly in Midshipman independent research projects. The USNA PSP successfully deployed IceGoat1 during the BROMEX 2012 field campaign out of Barrow, AK in March 2012. This buoy reports near real-time observation of Air Temperature, Sea Temperature, Atmospheric Pressure, Position and Images from 2 mounted webcams. The importance of this unique type of buoy being inserted into the U.S. Interagency Arctic Buoy Program and the International Arctic Buoy Programme (USIABP/IABP) array is cross validating satellite observations of sea ice cover in the Arctic with the buoys webcams. We also propose to develop multiple sensor packages for the IceGoat to include a more robust weather suite, and a passive acoustic hydrophone. Remote cameras on buoys have provided crucial qualitative information that complements the quantitative measurements of geophysical parameters. For example, the mechanical anemometers on the IABP Polar Arctic Weather Station at the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) have at times reported zero winds speeds, and inspection of the images from the NPEO cameras have showed

  13. Characteristic 7- and 5- states observed in the (p,t) reactions on even-even rare earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Y.; Kubono, S.; Iwasaki, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The (p,t) reactions have been studied for the even-even rare earth nuclei with 40 MeV proton beam from the INS SF cyclotron. A pair of 7 - and 5 - states was observed with large cross sections in each of the nuclei with the neutron number (N) ranging from 86 to 100. For sup(140,142)Nd of N = 80 and 82 the data were obtained at KVI in Groningen, and the data for 152 Sm of N = 90 at MSU. Q value systematics of (p,t) reactions to these states seem to suggest that these are excited by the two neutron pick-up from the neutron core of N = 82. The (p,t) cross sections leading to these states of N from 82 to 96 are nearly constant. (author)

  14. Mutual Recognition of Financial Penalties between the EU Member States. Critical Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Ioana Rusu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the special Romanian law, one of the forms of judicial assistance in criminal matters recognized in the relations between the EU member states is, among others, the one referringto the cooperation in applying the principle of mutual recognition of financial penalties. The European normative act that establishes the general cooperation norms in this matter is the Council’sDecision Frame 2005/214/JAI on February 24, 2005 on the application of the principle of mutual recognition of financial penalties. This European normative act has been transposed in the internallegislation through Law no.302/2004, according to the international judicial cooperation in criminal matters, with the subsequent amendments and completions, the latter being represented by Lawno.222/2008. The amendments and completions instituted by the abovementioned normative act establish the procedure of transmitting the decision, the procedures for recognition and execution ofsuch a decision by the competent Romanian judicial authorities, the grounds of non recognition and non execution, the definition of used terms, as well as other aspects referring to the recognition andexecution of such decisions. Commenting refers to a number of provisions in the law under both European and domestic in the special law, comments aimed in particular the replacement of terms ofrecognition or non-performance reasons, the procedure of identification of persons convicted when they are evade the enforcement of financial obligations and failure to transpose into national law of subsequent changes to European law.

  15. Development of a United States-Mexico Emissions Inventory for the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Hampden; Knipping, Eladio M; Vukovich, Jeffrey M

    2005-05-01

    The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study was commissioned to investigate the sources of haze at Big Bend National Park in southwest Texas. The modeling domain of the BRAVO Study includes most of the continental United States and Mexico. The BRAVO emissions inventory was constructed from the 1999 National Emission Inventory for the United States, modified to include finer-resolution data for Texas and 13 U.S. states in close proximity. The first regional-scale Mexican emissions inventory designed for air-quality modeling applications was developed for 10 northern Mexican states, the Tula Industrial Park in the state of Hidalgo, and the Popocatépetl volcano in the state of Puebla. Emissions data were compiled from numerous sources, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (now Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), the Eastern Research Group, the Minerals Management Service, the Instituto Nacional de Ecología, and the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografía y Informática. The inventory includes emissions for CO, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, particulate matter (PM) < 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter, and PM < 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter. Wind-blown dust and biomass burning were not included in the inventory, although high concentrations of dust and organic PM attributed to biomass burning have been observed at Big Bend National Park. The SMOKE modeling system was used to generate gridded emissions fields for use with the Regional Modeling System for Aerosols and Deposition (REMSAD) and the Community Multiscale Air Quality model modified with the Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution (CMAQ-MADRID). The compilation of the inventory, supporting model input data, and issues encountered during the development of the inventory are documented. A comparison of the BRAVO emissions

  16. The state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere using global observations through 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Oksana; Koide, Hiroshi; Dlugokencky, Ed; Montzka, Stephen A.; Keeling, Ralph; Tanhua, Toste; Lorenzoni, Laura

    2015-04-01

    We present results from the tenth annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ ghg/GHGbulletin.html) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The results are based on research and observations performed by laboratories contributing to the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme (www.wmo.int/gaw). The Bulletin presents results of global analyses of observational data collected according to GAW recommended practices and submitted to the World Data Center for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG), and for the first time, it includes a summary of ocean acidification. Bulletins are prepared by the WMO/GAW Scientific Advisory Group for Greenhouse Gases (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ScientificAdvisoryGroups.html) in collaboration with WDCGG. The summary of ocean acidification and trends in ocean pCO2 was jointly produced by the International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP) of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC-UNESCO), the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), and the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre (OA-ICC) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The tenth Bulletin included a special edition published prior to the United Nations Climate Summit in September 2014. The scope of this edition was to demonstrate the level of emission reduction necessary to stabilize radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases. It shows in particular that a reduction in radiative forcing from its current level (2.92 W m-2 in 2013) requires significant reductions in anthropogenic emissions of all major greenhouse gases. Observations used for global analysis are collected at more than 100 marine and terrestrial sites worldwide for CO2 and CH4 and at a smaller number of sites for other greenhouse gases. Globally averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide derived from this network reached new highs in 2013, with CO2 at 396.0 ± 0.1 ppm, CH4 at

  17. Current state of the construction of SPARC test facility for observing hydrogen′s behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Young Su; Hong, Seong-Ho; Park, Ki Han; Hong, Seong-Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen combustion can make a dynamic load, which can cause severe damage to a structure or facility. Many studies on hydrogen behavior, such as distribution, combustion and mitigation, have been conducted since the TMI accident, and they were recently summarized in. A large-scaled experimental facility is required for simulating the complex severe accident phenomena in a closed containment building. We are preparing the test facility, called the SPARC (Spray, Aerosol, Recombiner, Combustion), to resolve the international open issues regarding hydrogen risk as well as the validation of the Korean PAR (Passive Auto-catalytic Recombiner). This paper summarized the previous study submitted to the NUTHOS-11, which introduced the SPARC test facility. KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is preparing a test facility, called the SPARC for an assessment of the containment integrity under a severe accident. In the SPARC test facility, the hydrogen behavior such as mixing with steam and air, distribution, and combustion will be observed under various thermal-hydraulic conditions. We will carry out the performance tests of the safety systems such as the spray, cooling fan, PAR, and igniter. The SPARC test facility consists of a pressure vessel with a 9.5 m height and 3.4 m diameter, and an operating system to control and measure the thermal hydraulic conditions. In a commissioning test, we verified the controllable thermal conditions. It took about 8,400 seconds to increase up to 5 bar. The increment rate of the atmosphere temperature is about 34° C/h from room temperature to 100° C.

  18. Investigating Marine Boundary Layer Parameterizations by Combining Observations with Models via State Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Monahce, Luca [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Clifton, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hacker, Joshua [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Kosovic, Branko [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Lee, Jared [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Vanderberghe, Francois [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Wu, Yonghui [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Hawkins, Sam [Vattenfall, Solna Municipality (Sweden); Nissen, Jesper [Vattenfall, Solna Municipality (Sweden)

    2015-06-30

    In this project we have improved numerical weather prediction analyses and forecasts of low level winds in the marine boundary layer. This has been accomplished with the following tools; The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Weather and Research Forecasting model, WRF, both in his single column (SCM) and three-dimensional (3D) versions; The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Watch III (WWIII); SE algorithms from the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART, Anderson et al. 2009); and Observations of key quantities of the lower MBL, including temperature and winds at multiple levels above the sea surface. The experiments with the WRF SCM / DART system have lead to large improvements with respect to a standard WRF configuration, which is currently commonly used by the wind energy industry. The single column model appears to be a tool particularly suitable for off-shore wind energy applications given its accuracy, the ability to quantify uncertainty, and the minimal computational resource requirements. In situations where the impact of an upwind wind park may be of interest in a downwind location, a 3D approach may be more suitable. We have demonstrated that with the WRF 3D / DART system the accuracy of wind predictions (and other meteorological parameters) can be improved over a 3D computational domain, and not only at specific locations. All the scripting systems developed in this project (i.e., to run WRF SCM / DART, WRF 3D / DART, and the coupling between WRF and WWIII) and the several modifications and upgrades made to the WRF SCM model will be shared with the broader community.

  19. The cases of observance and violation of politeness maxims by communicants in the ego-state of natural Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Гульнара Фанзиловна Гизатова

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the study of human communication is of great importance in linguistics and psychology. In order to achieve smooth and conflict-free interaction it is necessary not only to respect the rules of politeness, but also to take into account the position of the speaker and the addressee. This explains the need to study many psychological factors in communication. This paper studies the ego-state of Natural Child in speech communication. Investigating the behavior of communicants in the ego-state of Natural Child, we rely on the theory of transactional analysis (E. Bern 1961 . According to this theory, the behavior of the speaker and the addressee in the ego-states of Natural Child varies from curious, inspiring, dreamy, and natural to the selfish, spiteful, shameless and impatient. The material for investigation is the dialogs from British and American fiction of XIX-XXI centuries. The dialogs contain the speaker and addressee’s replicas, meeting the essential requirements of the Principle of Politeness (G. Leech 1983 and the theory of transactional analysis. In our work we have applied hypothetical-deductive method, and methods of definitional and contextual analysis. The anylisis of our material demonstrates that communicants in the ego-state of Natural Child observe the maxims of generosity, tact and agreement, and violate the maxims of approbation, modesty and tact. Thus, the implementation of politeness maxims by communicants in ego-state of Natural Child depends entirely on their behavior.

  20. Observation of high-spin mixed oxidation state of cobalt in ceramic Co3TeO6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harishchandra; Ghosh, Haranath; Chandrasekhar Rao, T. V.; Sinha, A. K.; Rajput, Parasmani

    2014-12-01

    We report coexistence of high spin Co3+ and Co2+ in ceramic Co3TeO6 using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), DC magnetization, and first principles ab-initio calculations. The main absorption line of cobalt Co K-edge XANES spectra, along with a linear combination fit, led us to estimate relative concentration of Co2+ and Co3+as 60:40. The pre edge feature of XANES spectrum shows crystal field splitting of ˜1.26 eV between eg and t2g states, suggesting a mixture of high spin states of both Co2+ and Co3+. Temperature dependent high field DC magnetization measurements reveal dominant antiferromagnetic order with two Neel temperatures (TN1 ˜ 29 K and TN2 ˜ 18 K), consistent with single crystal study. A larger effective magnetic moment is observed in comparison to that reported for single crystal (which contains only Co2+), supports our inference that Co3+ exists in high spin state. Furthermore, we show that both Co2+ and Co3+ being in high spin states constitute a favorable ground state through first principles ab-initio calculations, where Rietveld refined synchrotron X-ray diffraction data are used as input.

  1. A hidden Markov model approach to analyze longitudinal ternary outcomes when some observed states are possibly misclassified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Julia S; Chan, Wenyaw; Luo, Sheng; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Doody, Rachelle

    2016-04-30

    Understanding the dynamic disease process is vital in early detection, diagnosis, and measuring progression. Continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) methods have been used to estimate state-change intensities but challenges arise when stages are potentially misclassified. We present an analytical likelihood approach where the hidden state is modeled as a three-state CTMC model allowing for some observed states to be possibly misclassified. Covariate effects of the hidden process and misclassification probabilities of the hidden state are estimated without information from a 'gold standard' as comparison. Parameter estimates are obtained using a modified expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, and identifiability of CTMC estimation is addressed. Simulation studies and an application studying Alzheimer's disease caregiver stress-levels are presented. The method was highly sensitive to detecting true misclassification and did not falsely identify error in the absence of misclassification. In conclusion, we have developed a robust longitudinal method for analyzing categorical outcome data when classification of disease severity stage is uncertain and the purpose is to study the process' transition behavior without a gold standard. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Effect of Extended State Observer and Automatic Voltage Regulator on Synchronous Machine Connected to Infinite Bus Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angu, Rittu; Mehta, R. K.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a robust controller known as Extended State Observer (ESO) in order to improve the stability and voltage regulation of a synchronous machine connected to an infinite bus power system through a transmission line. The ESO-based control scheme is implemented with an automatic voltage regulator in conjunction with an excitation system to enhance the damping of low frequency power system oscillations, as the Power System Stabilizer (PSS) does. The implementation of PSS excitation control techniques however requires reliable information about the entire states, though they are not always directly measureable. To address this issue, the proposed ESO provides the estimate of system states as well as disturbance state together in order to improve not only the damping but also compensates system efficiently in presence of parameter uncertainties and external disturbances. The Closed-Loop Poles (CLPs) of the system have been assigned by the symmetric root locus technique, with the desired level of system damping provided by the dominant CLPs. The performance of the system is analyzed through simulating at different operating conditions. The control method is not only capable of providing zero estimation error in steady-state, but also shows robustness in tracking the reference command under parametric variations and external disturbances. Illustrative examples have been provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed methodology.

  3. Observation of double-well potential of NaH C 1Σ+ state: Deriving the dissociation energy of its ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Huang, Hsien-Yu; Whang, Thou-Jen; Tsai, Chin-Chun

    2018-03-21

    Vibrational levels (v = 6-42) of the NaH C 1 Σ + state including the inner and outer wells and the near-dissociation region were observed by pulsed optical-optical double resonance fluorescence depletion spectroscopy. The absolute vibrational quantum number is identified by comparing the vibrational energy difference of this experiment with the ab initio calculations. The outer well with v up to 34 is analyzed using the Dunham expansion and a Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) potential energy curve is constructed. A hybrid double-well potential combined with the RKR potential, the ab initio calculation, and a long-range potential is able to describe the whole NaH C 1 Σ + state including the higher vibrational levels (v = 35-42). The dissociation energy of the NaH C 1 Σ + state is determined to be D e (C) = 6595.10 ± 5 cm -1 and then the dissociation energy of the NaH ground state D e (X) = 15 807.87 ± 5 cm -1 can be derived.

  4. NuSTAR AND SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE HARD STATE IN CYGNUS X-1: LOCATING THE INNER ACCRETION DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, M. L.; Lohfink, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Alston, W. N.; Kara, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Miller, J. M.; Yamaoka, K.; Nowak, M.; Grinberg, V.; Christensen, F. E.; Fürst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; King, A. L.; Stern, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broadband spectra in unprecedented detail. We confirm that the iron line cannot be fit with a combination of narrow lines and absorption features, instead requiring a relativistically blurred profile in combination with a narrow line and absorption from the companion wind. We use the reflection models of García et al. to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low source height and rule out truncation to greater than three gravitational radii at the 3σ confidence level. In addition, we find that the line profile has not changed greatly in the switch from soft to hard states, and that the differences are consistent with changes in the underlying reflection spectrum rather than the relativistic blurring. We find that the blurring parameters are consistent when fitting either just the iron line or the entire broadband spectrum, which is well modeled with a Comptonized continuum plus reflection model

  5. Constraining the Dense Matter Equation of State with ATHENA-WFI observations of Neutron Stars in Quiescent LMXBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Oezel, F.

    2015-09-01

    The study of neutron star quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) will address one of the main science goals of the Athena x-ray observatory. The study of the soft X-ray thermal emission from the neutron star surface in qLMXBs is a crucial tool to place constrains on the dense matter equation of state. I will briefly review this method, its strength and current weaknesses and limitations, as well as the current constraints on the equation of state from qLMXBs. The superior sensitivity of Athena will permit the acquisition of unprecedentedly high signal-to-noise spectra from these sources. It has been demonstrated that a single qLMXB, even with high S/N, will not place useful constraints on the EoS. However, a combination of qLMXBs spectra has shown promises of obtaining tight constraints on the equation of state. I will discuss the expected prospects for observations of qLMXBs inside globular clusters -- those that Athena will be able to resolve. I will also present the constraints on the equation of state that Athena will be able to obtain from these qLMXBs and from a population of qLMXBs in the field of the Galaxy, with distance measurements provided by Gaia.

  6. Triplet-State Dissolved Organic Matter Quantum Yields and Lifetimes from Direct Observation of Aromatic Amine Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Markus; Erickson, Paul R; McNeill, Kristopher

    2017-11-21

    Excited triplet state chromophoric dissolved organic matter ( 3 CDOM*) is a short-lived mixture of excited-state species that plays important roles in aquatic photochemical processes. Unlike the study of the triplet states of well-defined molecules, which are amenable to transient absorbance spectroscopy, the study of 3 CDOM* is hampered by it being a complex mixture and its low average intersystem crossing quantum yield (Φ ISC ). This study is an alternative approach to investigating 3 CDOM* using transient absorption laser spectroscopy. The radical cation of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), formed through oxidation by 3 CDOM*, was directly observable by transient absorption spectroscopy and was used to probe basic photophysical properties of 3 CDOM*. Quenching and control experiments verified that TMPD •+ was formed from 3 CDOM* under anoxic conditions. Model triplet sensitizers with a wide range of excited triplet state reduction potentials and CDOM oxidized TMPD at near diffusion-controlled rates. This gives support to the idea that a large cross-section of 3 CDOM* moieties are able to oxidize TMPD and that the complex mixture of 3 CDOM* can be simplified to a single signal. Using the TMPD •+ transient, the natural triplet lifetime and Φ ISC for different DOM isolates and natural waters were quantified; values ranged from 12 to 26 μs and 4.1-7.8%, respectively.

  7. Observer-based adaptive control of chaos in nonlinear discrete-time systems using time-delayed state feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goharrizi, Amin Yazdanpanah; Khaki-Sedigh, Ali; Sepehri, Nariman

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to adaptive control of chaos in a class of nonlinear discrete-time-varying systems, using a delayed state feedback scheme, is presented. It is discussed that such systems can show chaotic behavior as their parameters change. A strategy is employed for on-line calculation of the Lyapunov exponents that will be used within an adaptive scheme that decides on the control effort to suppress the chaotic behavior once detected. The scheme is further augmented with a nonlinear observer for estimation of the states that are required by the controller but are hard to measure. Simulation results for chaotic control problem of Jin map are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  8. Extended State Observer Based Adaptive Back-Stepping Sliding Mode Control of Electronic Throttle in Transportation Cyber-Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfu Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high accuracy requirement of information exchange via vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V communications, an extended state observer (ESO is designed to estimate the opening angle change of an electronic throttle (ET, wherein the emphasis is placed on the nonlinear uncertainties of stick-slip friction and spring in the system as well as the existence of external disturbance. In addition, a back-stepping sliding mode controller incorporating an adaptive control law is presented, and the stability and robustness of the system are analyzed using Lyapunov technique. Finally, numerical experiments are conducted using simulation. The results show that, compared with back-stepping control (BSC, the proposed controller achieves superior performance in terms of the steady-state error and rising time.

  9. Measurement of CP observables in B ± → DK *± decays using two- and four-body D final states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Atzeni, M.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørn, M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Chapman, M. G.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S.-G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Declara, P.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianí, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T. H.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Hasse, C.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Hecker, M.; Heinicke, K.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Hu, W.; Huard, Z. C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ibis, P.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kazeev, N.; Kecke, M.; Keizer, F.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Kress, F.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, P.-R.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Lisovskyi, V.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Loi, A.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Mackowiak, P.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malecki, B.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Mombächer, T.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pisani, F.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepulveda, E. S.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stepanova, M.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, J.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Usachov, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Weisser, C.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, M.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-11-01

    Measurements of CP observables in B ± → DK *± decays are presented, where D denotes a superposition of D 0 and {\\overline{D}}^0 meson states. Decays of the D meson to K - π +, K - K +, π - π +, K - π + π - π + and π - π + π - π + are used and the K *± meson is reconstructed in the K S 0 π ± final state. This analysis uses a data sample of pp collisions collected with the LHCb experiment, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1 fb-1, 2 fb-1 and 1.8 fb-1 at centre-of-mass energies √{s}=7 TeV, 8 TeV and 13 TeV, respectively. The sensitivity of the results to the CKM angle γ is discussed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Communication: Photodissociation of CH3CHO at 308 nm: Observation of H-roaming, CH3-roaming, and transition state pathways together along the ground state surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hou-Kuan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hung, Kai-Chan; Kasai, Toshio; Lin, King-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Following photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) at 308 nm, the CO(v = 1-4) fragment is acquired using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The CO(v = 1) rotational distribution shows a bimodal feature; the low- and high-J components result from H-roaming around CH3CO core and CH3-roaming around CHO radical, respectively, in consistency with a recent assignment by Kable and co-workers (Lee et al., Chem. Sci. 5, 4633 (2014)). The H-roaming pathway disappears at the CO(v ≥ 2) states, because of insufficient available energy following bond-breaking of H + CH3CO. By analyzing the CH4 emission spectrum, we obtained a bimodal vibrational distribution; the low-energy component is ascribed to the transition state (TS) pathway, consistent with prediction by quasiclassical trajectory calculations, while the high-energy component results from H- and CH3-roamings. A branching fraction of H-roaming/CH3-roaming/TS contribution is evaluated to be (8% ± 3%)/(68% ± 10%)/(25% ± 5%), in which the TS pathway was observed for the first time. The three pathways proceed concomitantly along the electronic ground state surface.

  11. Observation of high-spin states in the N=84 nucleus 152Er and comparison with shell-model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnert, A.; Alber, D.; Grawe, H.; Kluge, H.; Maier, K.H.; Reviol, W.; Sun, X.; Beck, E.M.; Byrne, A.P.; Huebel, H.; Bacelar, J.C.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M.; Stephens, F.S.

    1992-01-01

    High-spin states in 152 Er have been populated through the 116 Sn( 40 Ar,4n) 152 Er reaction. Prompt and delayed γ-γ-γ-t and γ-e-t coincidences have been measured. Levels and transitions are assigned up to an excitation energy of 15 MeV and spin and parities up to 28 + at 9.7 MeV. A new isomer [t 1/2 =11(1) ns] has been observed at 13.4 MeV. The results are discussed in comparison with neighboring nuclei and with shell-model calculations

  12. Design of Nonlinear Robust Rotor Current Controller for DFIG Based on Terminal Sliding Mode Control and Extended State Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As to strong nonlinearity of doubly fed induction generators (DFIG and uncertainty of its model, a novel rotor current controller with nonlinearity and robustness is proposed to enhance fault ride-though (FRT capacities of grid-connected DFIG. Firstly, the model error, external disturbances, and the uncertain factors were estimated by constructing extended state observer (ESO so as to achieve linearization model, which is compensated dynamically from nonlinear model. And then rotor current controller of DFIG is designed by using terminal sliding mode variable structure control theory (TSMC. The controller has superior dynamic performance and strong robustness. The simulation results show that the proposed control approach is effective.

  13. A State-of-the-Art Review of the Sensor Location, Flow Observability, Estimation, and Prediction Problems in Traffic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Castillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A state-of-the-art review of flow observability, estimation, and prediction problems in traffic networks is performed. Since mathematical optimization provides a general framework for all of them, an integrated approach is used to perform the analysis of these problems and consider them as different optimization problems whose data, variables, constraints, and objective functions are the main elements that characterize the problems proposed by different authors. For example, counted, scanned or “a priori” data are the most common data sources; conservation laws, flow nonnegativity, link capacity, flow definition, observation, flow propagation, and specific model requirements form the most common constraints; and least squares, likelihood, possible relative error, mean absolute relative error, and so forth constitute the bases for the objective functions or metrics. The high number of possible combinations of these elements justifies the existence of a wide collection of methods for analyzing static and dynamic situations.

  14. Observed Correlation between Aerosol and Cloud Base Height for Low Clouds at Baltimore and New York, United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sium Gebremariam

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between aerosol particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μ m (PM2.5 and cloud base height (CBH of low clouds (CBH lower than 1.5 km a.g.l. at Baltimore and New York, United States, for an 8 year period (2007–2014 was investigated using information from the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS observations and collocated U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA observations. The lifting condensation level (LCL heights were calculated and compared with the CBH. The monthly average observations show that PM2.5 decreases from 2007 to 2014 while there is no significant trend found for CBH and LCL. The variability of the LCL height agrees well with CBH but LCL height is systematically lower than CBH (~180 m lower. There was a significant negative correlation found between CBH–LCL and PM2.5. All of the cloud cases were separated into polluted and clean conditions based on the distribution of PM2.5 values. The distributions of CBH–LCL in the two groups show more cloud cases with smaller CBH–LCL in polluted conditions than in clean conditions.

  15. Defect states in hexagonal boron nitride: Assignments of observed properties and prediction of properties relevant to quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, A.; Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Ford, Michael J.

    2018-02-01

    Key properties of nine possible defect sites in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), VN,VN -1,CN,VNO2 B,VNNB,VNCB,VBCN,VBCNS iN , and VNCBS iB , are predicted using density-functional theory and are corrected by applying results from high-level ab initio calculations. Observed h-BN electron-paramagnetic resonance signals at 22.4, 20.83, and 352.70 MHz are assigned to VN,CN, and VNO2 B , respectively, while the observed photoemission at 1.95 eV is assigned to VNCB . Detailed consideration of the available excited states, allowed spin-orbit couplings, zero-field splitting, and optical transitions is made for the two related defects VNCB and VBCN . VNCB is proposed for realizing long-lived quantum memory in h-BN. VBCN is predicted to have a triplet ground state, implying that spin initialization by optical means is feasible and suitable optical excitations are identified, making this defect of interest for possible quantum-qubit operations.

  16. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the ‘explosion of complexity’ of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  17. NuSTAR and integral observations of a low/hard state of 1E1740.7-2942

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natalucci, Lorenzo; Bazzano, Angela; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Ubertini, Pietro [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Krivonos, Roman [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Smith, David M. [Physics Department and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kuulkers, Erik [European Space Astronomy Centre (ESA/ESAC), Science Operations Department, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Madrid) (Spain); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Pottschmidt, Katja [CRESST and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: lorenzo.natalucci@iaps.inaf.it [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    The microquasar 1E1740.7-2942, also known as the 'Great Annihilator,' was observed by NuSTAR in the summer of 2012. We have analyzed in detail two observations taken ∼2 weeks apart, for which we measure hard and smooth spectra typical of the low/hard state. A few weeks later the source flux declined significantly. Nearly simultaneous coverage by INTEGRAL is available from its Galactic Center monitoring campaign lasting ∼2.5 months. These data probe the hard state spectrum from 1E1740.7-2942 before the flux decline. We find good agreement between the spectra taken with IBIS/ISGRI and NuSTAR, with the measurements being compatible with a change in flux with no spectral variability. We present a detailed analysis of the NuSTAR spectral and timing data and upper limits for reflection of the high energy emission. We show that the high energy spectrum of this X-ray binary is well described by thermal Comptonization.

  18. Robust back-stepping output feedback trajectory tracking for quadrotors via extended state observer and sigmoid tracking differentiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xingling; Liu, Jun; Wang, Honglun

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a robust back-stepping output feedback trajectory tracking controller is proposed for quadrotors subject to parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. Based on the hierarchical control principle, the quadrotor dynamics is decomposed into translational and rotational subsystems to facilitate the back-stepping control design. With given model information incorporated into observer design, a high-order extended state observer (ESO) that relies only on position measurements is developed to estimate the remaining unmeasurable states and the lumped disturbances in rotational subsystem simultaneously. To overcome the problem of "explosion of complexity" in the back-stepping design, the sigmoid tracking differentiator (STD) is introduced to compute the derivative of virtual control laws. The advantage is that the proposed controller via output-feedback scheme not only can ensure good tracking performance using very limited information of quadrotors, but also has the ability of handling the undesired uncertainties. The stability analysis is established using the Lyapunov theory. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme in achieving a guaranteed tracking performance with respect to an 8-shaped reference trajectory.

  19. Thermoelectric properties of 3D topological insulator: Direct observation of topological surface and its gap opened states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Stephane Yu; Huynh, Khuong Kim; Yoshino, Harukazu; Tu, Ngoc Han; Tanabe, Yoichi; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2017-10-01

    We report thermoelectric (TE) properties of topological surface Dirac states (TSDS) in three-dimensional topological insulators (3D-TIs) purely isolated from the bulk by employing single-crystal B i2 -xS bxT e3 -yS ey films epitaxially grown in the ultrathin limit. Two intrinsic nontrivial topological surface states, a metallic TSDS (m-TSDS) and a gap-opened semiconducting topological state (g-TSDS), are successfully observed by electrical transport, and important TE parameters [electrical conductivity (σ), thermal conductivity (κ), and thermopower (S )] are accurately determined. Pure m-TSDS gives S =-44 μ V K-1 , which is an order of magnitude higher than those of the conventional metals and the value is enhanced to -212 μ V K-1 for g-TSDS. It is clearly shown that the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equation (SBTE) in the framework of constant relaxation time (τ) most frequently used for conventional analysis cannot be valid in 3D-TIs and strong energy dependent relaxation time τ(E ) beyond the Born approximation is essential for making intrinsic interpretations. Although σ is protected on the m-TSDS, κ is greatly influenced by the disorder on the topological surface, giving a dissimilar effect between topologically protected electronic conduction and phonon transport.

  20. Observation of glassy state relaxation during annealing of frozen sugar solutions by X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kyuya; Tamiya, Shinri; Do, Gabsoo; Kono, Shinji; Ochiai, Takaaki

    2018-06-01

    Glassy phase formation in a frozen product determines various properties of the freeze-dried products. When an aqueous solution is subjected to freezing, a glassy phase forms as a consequence of freeze-concentration. During post-freezing annealing, the relaxation of the glassy phase and the ripening of ice crystals (i.e. Ostwald ripening) spontaneously occur, where the kinetics are controlled by the annealing and glass transition temperatures. This study was motivated to observe the progress of glassy state relaxation separate from ice coarsening during annealing. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe a frozen and post-freezing annealed solutions by using monochromatized X-ray from the synchrotron radiation. CT images were successfully obtained, and the frozen matrix were analyzed based on the gray level values that were equivalent to the linear X-ray attenuation coefficients of the observed matters. The CT images obtained from rapidly frozen sucrose and dextrin solutions with different concentrations gave clear linear relationships between the linear X-ray attenuation coefficients values and the solute concentrations. It was confirmed that the glassy state relaxation progressed as increasing annealing time, and this trend was larger in the order of the glass transition temperature of the maximally freeze-concentrated phase. The sucrose-water system required nearly 20 h of annealing time at -5 °C for the completion of the glassy phase relaxation, whereas dextrin-water systems required much longer periods because of their higher glass transition temperatures. The trends of ice coarsening, however, did not perfectly correspond to the trends of the relaxation, suggesting that the glassy phase relaxation and Ostwald ripening would jointly control the ice crystal growth/ripening kinetics, and the dominant mechanism differed by the annealing stage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Kalman filters for assimilating near-surface observations in the Richards equation - Part 2: A dual filter approach for simultaneous retrieval of states and parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, H.; Romano, N.; Chirico, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    We present a dual Kalman Filter (KF) approach for retrieving states and parameters controlling soil water dynamics in a homogenous soil column by using near-surface state observations. The dual Kalman filter couples a standard KF algorithm for retrieving the states and an unscented KF algorithm for retrieving the parameters. We examine the performance of the dual Kalman Filter applied to two alternative state-space formulations of the Richards equation, respectively differentiated by the type of variable employed for representing the states: either the soil water content (θ) or the soil matric pressure head (h). We use a synthetic time-series series of true states and noise corrupted observations and a synthetic time-series of meteorological forcing. The performance analyses account for the effect of the input parameters, the observation depth and the assimilation frequency as well as the relationship between the retrieved states and the assimilated variables. We show that the identifiability of the parameters is strongly conditioned by several factors, such as the initial guess of the unknown parameters, the wet or dry range of the retrieved states, the boundary conditions, as well as the form (h-based or θ-based) of the state-space formulation. State identifiability is instead efficient even with a relatively coarse time-resolution of the assimilated observation. The accuracy of the retrieved states exhibits limited sensitivity to the observation depth and the assimilation frequency.

  2. Estimation of State of Charge of a Lithium-Ion Battery Pack for Electric Vehicles Using an Adaptive Luenberger Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zou

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to safely and efficiently use the power as well as to extend the lifetime of the traction battery pack, accurate estimation of State of Charge (SoC is very important and necessary. This paper presents an adaptive observer-based technique for estimating SoC of a lithium-ion battery pack used in an electric vehicle (EV. The RC equivalent circuit model in ADVISOR is applied to simulate the lithium-ion battery pack. The parameters of the battery model as a function of SoC, are identified and optimized using the numerically nonlinear least squares algorithm, based on an experimental data set. By means of the optimized model, an adaptive Luenberger observer is built to estimate online the SoC of the lithium-ion battery pack. The observer gain is adaptively adjusted using a stochastic gradient approach so as to reduce the error between the estimated battery output voltage and the filtered battery terminal voltage measurement. Validation results show that the proposed technique can accurately estimate SoC of the lithium-ion battery pack without a heavy computational load.

  3. CORONA, JET, AND RELATIVISTIC LINE MODELS FOR SUZAKU/RXTE/CHANDRA-HETG OBSERVATIONS OF THE CYGNUS X-1 HARD STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Trowbridge, Sarah N.; Davis, John E.; Hanke, Manfred; Wilms, Joern; Markoff, Sera B.; Maitra, Dipankar; Tramper, Frank; Pottschmidt, Katja; Coppi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Using Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have conducted a series of four simultaneous observations of the galactic black hole candidate Cyg X-1 in what were historically faint and spectrally hard 'low states'. Additionally, all of these observations occurred near superior conjunction with our line of sight to the X-ray source passing through the dense phases of the 'focused wind' from the mass donating secondary. One of our observations was also simultaneous with observations by the Chandra-High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). These latter spectra are crucial for revealing the ionized absorption due to the secondary's focused wind. Such absorption is present and must be accounted for in all four spectra. These simultaneous data give an unprecedented view of the 0.8-300 keV spectrum of Cyg X-1, and hence bear upon both corona and X-ray emitting jet models of black hole hard states. Three models fit the spectra well: coronae with thermal or mixed thermal/non-thermal electron populations and jets. All three models require a soft component that we fit with a low temperature disk spectrum with an inner radius of only a few tens of GM/c 2 . All three models also agree that the known spectral break at 10 keV is not solely due to the presence of reflection, but each gives a different underlying explanation for the augmentation of this break. Thus, whereas all three models require that there is a relativistically broadened Fe line, the strength and inner radius of such a line is dependent upon the specific model, thus making premature line-based estimates of the black hole spin in the Cyg X-1 system. We look at the relativistic line in detail, accounting for the narrow Fe emission and ionized absorption detected by HETG. Although the specific relativistic parameters of the line are continuum dependent, none of the broad line fits allow for an inner disk radius that is >40 GM/c 2 .

  4. An Adaptive Gain Nonlinear Observer for State of Charge Estimation of Lithium-Ion Batteries in Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The state of charge (SOC is important for the safety and reliability of battery operation since it indicates the remaining capacity of a battery. However, it is difficult to get an accurate value of SOC, because the SOC cannot be directly measured by a sensor. In this paper, an adaptive gain nonlinear observer (AGNO for SOC estimation of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs in electric vehicles (EVs is proposed. The second-order resistor–capacitor (2RC equivalent circuit model is used to simulate the dynamic behaviors of a LIB, based on which the state equations are derived to design the AGNO for SOC estimation. The model parameters are identified using the exponential-function fitting method. The sixth-order polynomial function is used to describe the highly nonlinear relationship between the open circuit voltage (OCV and the SOC. The convergence of the proposed AGNO is proved using the Lyapunov stability theory. Two typical driving cycles, including the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC and Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS are adopted to evaluate the performance of the AGNO by comparing with the unscented Kalman filter (UKF algorithm. The experimental results show that the AGNO has better performance than the UKF algorithm in terms of reducing the computation cost, improving the estimation accuracy and enhancing the convergence ability.

  5. Observation of valleylike edge states of sound at a momentum away from the high-symmetry points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bai-Zhan; Zheng, Sheng-Jie; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiao, Jun-Rui; Chen, Ning; Dai, Hong-Qing; Yu, De-Jie; Liu, Jian

    2018-04-01

    In condensed matter physics, topologically protected edge transportation has drawn extensive attention over recent years. Thus far, the topological valley edge states have been produced near the Dirac cones fixed at the high-symmetry points of the Brillouin zone. In this paper, we demonstrate a unique valleylike phononic crystal (PnC) with the position-varying Dirac cones at the high-symmetry lines of the Brillouin zone boundary. The emergence of such Dirac cones, characterized by the vortex structure in a momentum space, is attributed to the unavoidable band crossing protected by the mirror symmetry. The Dirac cones can be unbuckled and a complete band gap can be induced through breaking the mirror symmetry. Interestingly, by simply rotating the square columns, we realize the valleylike vortex states and the band inversion effect which leads to the valley Hall phase transition. Along the valleylike PnC interfaces separating two distinct acoustic valley Hall phases, the valleylike protected edge transport of sound in domain walls is observed in both the simulations and the experiments. These results are promising for the exploration of alternative topological phenomena in the valleylike PnCs beyond the graphenelike lattice.

  6. Lidar observation campaign of sugar cane fires and industrial emissions in the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, E.; Jorge, Maria Paulete M. P.; Held, Gerhard; Guardani, Roberto; Steffens, Juliana; dos Anjos F. Pinto, Sergio; Andre, Iara R.; Garcia, Gilberto; Lopes, F. J. S.; Mariano, Glauber L.; da Costa, Renata F.; Rodrigues, Patricia F.

    2010-10-01

    Brazil has an important role in the biomass burning, with the detection of approximately 100,000 burning spots in a single year (2007). Most of these spots occur in the southern part of the Amazon basin during the dry season (from August to november) and these emissions reach the southeast of the country, a highly populated region and with serious urban air pollution problems. With the growing demand on biofuels, sugarcane is considerably expanding in the state of Sao Paulo, being a strong contributor to the bad air quality in this region. In the state of Sao Paulo, the main land use are pasture and sugarcane crop, that covers around 50% and 10% of the total area, respectively. Despite the aerosol from sugarcane burning having reduced atmospheric residence time, from a few days to some weeks, they might get together with those aerosol which spread over long distances (hundreds to thousands of kilometers). In the period of June through February 2010 a LIDAR observation campaign was carried in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, in order to observe and characterize optically the aerosols from two distinct sources, namely, sugar cane biomass burning and industrial emissions. For this purpose 2 LIDAR systems were available, one mobile and the other placed in a laboratory, both working in the visible (532 nm) and additionally the mobile system had a Raman channel available (607 nm). Also this campaign counted with a SODAR, a meteorological RADAR specially set up to detect aerosol "echoes" and gas-particle analyzers. To guarantee a good regional coverage 4 distinct sites were available to deploy the instruments, 2 in the near field of biomass burning activities (Rio Claro and Bauru), one for industrial emissions (Cubatao) and others from urban sources (Sao Paulo). The whole campaign provide the equivalent of 30 days of measurements which allowed us to get aerosol optical properties such as backscattering/extinction coefficients, scatter and LIDAR ratios, those were used to

  7. Enhanced online model identification and state of charge estimation for lithium-ion battery with a FBCRLS based observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhongbao; Meng, Shujuan; Xiong, Binyu; Ji, Dongxu; Tseng, King Jet

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated online model identification and SOC estimate is explored. • Noise variances are online estimated in a data-driven way. • Identification bias caused by noise corruption is attenuated. • SOC is online estimated with high accuracy and fast convergence. • Algorithm comparison shows the superiority of proposed method. - Abstract: State of charge (SOC) estimators with online identified battery model have proven to have high accuracy and better robustness due to the timely adaption of time varying model parameters. In this paper, we show that the common methods for model identification are intrinsically biased if both the current and voltage sensors are corrupted with noises. The uncertainties in battery model further degrade the accuracy and robustness of SOC estimate. To address this problem, this paper proposes a novel technique which integrates the Frisch scheme based bias compensating recursive least squares (FBCRLS) with a SOC observer for enhanced model identification and SOC estimate. The proposed method online estimates the noise statistics and compensates the noise effect so that the model parameters can be extracted without bias. The SOC is further estimated in real time with the online updated and unbiased battery model. Simulation and experimental studies show that the proposed FBCRLS based observer effectively attenuates the bias on model identification caused by noise contamination and as a consequence provides more reliable estimate on SOC. The proposed method is also compared with other existing methods to highlight its superiority in terms of accuracy and convergence speed.

  8. Stress state and its anomaly observations in the vicinity of a fault in NanTroSEIZE Expedition 322

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hung-Yu; Saito, Saneatsu; Kinoshita, Masataka

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the stress state and geological properties within the shallow Shikoku Basin, southwest of Japan, two sites, C0011A and C0011B, were drilled in open-ocean sediments using Logging While Drilling (LWD) and coring, respectively. Resistivity image logging was performed at C0011A from sea floor to 950 m below sea floor (mbsf). At C0011B, the serial coring was obtained in order to determine physical properties from 340 to 880 mbsf. For the LWD images, a notable breakout anomaly was observed at a depth of 615 m. Using resistivity images and a stress polygon, the potential horizontal principal stress azimuth and its magnitude within the 500-750 mbsf section of the C0011A borehole were constrained. Borehole breakout azimuths were observed for the variation by the existence of a fault zone at a depth of 615 mbsf. Out of this fracture zone, the breakout azimuth was located at approximately 109° ± 12°, subparallel to the Nankai Trough convergence vector (300-315°). Our calculations describe a stress drop was determined based on the fracture geometry. A close 90° (73° ± 12°) rotation implied a 100% stress drop, defined as a maximum shear stress drop equal to 1 MPa. The magnitude of the horizontal principal stresses near the fracture stress anomaly ranged between 49 and 52 MPa, and the bearing to the vertical stress (Sv = 52 MPa) was found to be within the normal-faulting stress regime. Low rock strength and a low stress level are necessary to satisfy the observations.

  9. Recent changes in county-level corn yield variability in the United States from observations and crop models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, Guoyong

    2017-12-01

    The United States is responsible for 35% and 60% of global corn supply and exports. Enhanced supply stability through a reduction in the year-to-year variability of US corn yield would greatly benefit global food security. Important in this regard is to understand how corn yield variability has evolved geographically in the history and how it relates to climatic and non-climatic factors. Results showed that year-to-year variation of US corn yield has decreased significantly during 1980-2010, mainly in Midwest Corn Belt, Nebraska and western arid regions. Despite the country-scale decreasing variability, corn yield variability exhibited an increasing trend in South Dakota, Texas and Southeast growing regions, indicating the importance of considering spatial scales in estimating yield variability. The observed pattern is partly reproduced by process-based crop models, simulating larger areas experiencing increasing variability and underestimating the magnitude of decreasing variability. And 3 out of 11 models even produced a differing sign of change from observations. Hence, statistical model which produces closer agreement with observations is used to explore the contribution of climatic and non-climatic factors to the changes in yield variability. It is found that climate variability dominate the change trends of corn yield variability in the Midwest Corn Belt, while the ability of climate variability in controlling yield variability is low in southeastern and western arid regions. Irrigation has largely reduced the corn yield variability in regions (e.g. Nebraska) where separate estimates of irrigated and rain-fed corn yield exist, demonstrating the importance of non-climatic factors in governing the changes in corn yield variability. The results highlight the distinct spatial patterns of corn yield variability change as well as its influencing factors at the county scale. I also caution the use of process-based crop models, which have substantially underestimated

  10. State Emergency Response and Field Observation Activities in California (USA) during the March 11, 2011, Tohoku Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. M.; Wilson, R. I.; Goltz, J.; Fenton, J.; Long, K.; Dengler, L.; Rosinski, A.; California Tsunami Program

    2011-12-01

    This poster will present an overview of successes and challenges observed by the authors during this major tsunami response event. The Tohoku, Japan tsunami was the most costly to affect California since the 1964 Alaskan earthquake and ensuing tsunami. The Tohoku tsunami caused at least $50 million in damage to public facilities in harbors and marinas along the coast of California, and resulted in one fatality. It was generated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake which occurred at 9:46PM PST on Thursday, March 10, 2011 in the sea off northern Japan. The tsunami was recorded at tide gages monitored by the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC), which projected tsunami surges would reach California in approximately 10 hours. At 12:51AM on March 11, 2011, based on forecasted tsunami amplitudes, the WCATWC placed the California coast north of Point Conception (Santa Barbara County) in a Tsunami Warning, and the coast south of Point Conception to the Mexican border in a Tsunami Advisory. The California Emergency Management Agency (CalEMA) activated two Regional Emergency Operation Centers (REOCs) and the State Operation Center (SOC). The California Geological Survey (CGS) deployed a field team which collected data before, during and after the event through an information clearinghouse. Conference calls were conducted hourly between the WCATWC and State Warning Center, as well as with emergency managers in the 20 coastal counties. Coordination focused on local response measures, public information messaging, assistance needs, evacuations, emergency shelters, damage, and recovery issues. In the early morning hours, some communities in low lying areas recommended evacuation for their citizens, and the fishing fleet at Crescent City evacuated to sea. The greatest damage occurred in the harbors of Crescent City and Santa Cruz. As with any emergency, there were lessons learned and important successes in managing this event. Forecasts by the WCATWC were highly accurate

  11. The low energy photon tagger NEPTUN: Toward a detailed study of the Pygmy dipole resonance with real photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Diego; Aumann, T.; Bauer, C.; Baumann, M.; Beckstein, M.; Beller, J.; Blecher, A.; Cvejin, N.; Duchene, M.; Hug, F.; Kahlbow, J.; Knoerzer, M.; Kreis, K.; Kremer, C.; Ries, P.; Romig, C.; Scheit, H.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Symochko, D.; Walz, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Lefol, R. [University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Loeher, B. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, Frankfurt (Germany); Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The low energy photon tagger NEPTUN at the S-DALINAC delivers a quasi-monoenergetic photon beam between about 4 MeV and 20 MeV with a resolution of approximately 25 keV. Tagged photons provide the possibility to measure the dipole strength of nuclei in the energy range below and above the neutron threshold. The highly efficient LaBr{sub 3} based spectrometer GALATEA will be used to detect not only the direct decays to the ground state, but also cascading decays can be measured with suitable efficiency. We will measure (γ,n)- and (γ,nγ)-reactions with neutron detectors based on plastic scintillators. This talk provides an overview about setup and goals of the NEPTUN experiment as well as the current state of the commissioning phase. Planned optimizations of the setup, based on the results of a test beam time in June 2013, are also presented.

  12. The Observation of Frog Species at State University of Malang as a Preliminary Effort on Frog Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Ratri Wulandari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Frog is an amphibian which is widely spread around the world. Indonesia houses 450 species which represent 11% of frog species in the world. In Java Island alone, there live 42 species of frogs and toads. Frogs can be used as an environment indicator in that the presence of frog in a particular place indicates that the place stays natural and unpolluted. The 1st Campus of State University of Malang, which is located in the heart of Malang District, has been developing rapidly currently. Thus, it requires the construction of new various facilities to support its huge activities. Extensive construction can be destructive even damaging to the habitat of frog, which potentially threats the frog’s life, if it does not take the environmental impact into careful consideration. This study is aimed to identify the species of frog which survives at State University of Malang with, particularly the frog species found in 1995. Species identification was conducted by observing the morphological character. This study found that there were four species with three species remained survived in 1995; those were Duttaphrynus melanostictus, Polypedates leucomystax, and Kaloula baleta; and one new species called Rana chalconota. This study also revealed that there were four species which were extinct; those were Fejervarya cancrivora, Fejervarya limnocharis, Ingerophrynus biporcatus, and Occidoziga lima. This situation shows the decreasing amount of species from 7 to 4 within the last 17 years. This result indicates that there is a serious environmental degradation which causes the losing of frog habitats. Further research is needed to study the ecological condition changing in order to save the frog species.

  13. Operando Solid-State NMR Observation of Solvent-Mediated Adsorption-Reaction of Carbohydrates in Zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Long; Alamillo, Ricardo; Elliott, William A.; Andersen, Amity; Hoyt, David W.; Walter, Eric D.; Han, Kee Sung; Washton, Nancy M.; Rioux, Robert M.; Dumesic, James A.; Scott, Susannah L.

    2017-04-18

    Liquid-phase processing of molecules using heterogeneous catalysts – an important strategy for obtaining renewable chemicals sustainably from biomass – involves reactions that occur at solid-liquid interfaces. In glucose isomerization catalyzed by basic faujasite zeolites, the catalytic activity depends strongly on the solvent composition: initially, it declines precipitously when water is mixed with a small amount of the organic co-solvent γ-valerolactone (GVL), then recovers as the GVL content increases. Using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, we observed glucose isomers located inside the zeolite pores directly, and followed their transformations into fructose and mannose in real time. At low GVL concentrations, glucose is depleted in the zeolite pores relative to the liquid phase, while higher GVL concentrations in solution drive glucose inside the pores, resulting in up to a 32 enhancement in the local glucose concentration. Although their populations exchange rapidly, molecules present at the reactive interface experience a significantly different environment from the bulk solution.

  14. Frequency Inertia Response Control of SCESS-DFIG under Fluctuating Wind Speeds Based on Extended State Observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyang Sun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient frequency regulation capability and system inertia reduction are common problems encountered in a power grid with high wind power penetration, mainly due to the reason that the rotor energy in doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs is isolated by the grid side converters (GSCs, and also due to the randomness and intermittence of wind power which are not as stable as traditional thermal power sources. In this paper, the frequency inertia response control of a DFIG system under variable wind speeds was investigated. First, a DFIG system topology with rotor-side supercapacitor energy storage system (SCESS-DFIG was introduced. Then a control strategy for frequency inertia response of SCESS-DFIG power grid under fluctuating wind speed was designed, with two extended state observers (ESOs which estimate the mechanical power captured by the DFIG and the required inertia response power at the grid frequency drops, respectively. Based on one inconstant wind speed model and the SCESS-DFIG system model adopting the control strategy established, one power grid system consisting of three SCESS-DFIGs with different wind speed trends and a synchronous generator was simulated. The simulation results verified the effectiveness of the SCESS-DFIG system structure and the control strategy proposed.

  15. Direct observation of an isomeric state in {sup 98}Rb and nuclear properties of exotic rubidium isotopes measured by laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, T.J.; Garnsworthy, A.B.; Levy, C.D.P.; Pearson, M.R. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Behr, J.A.; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Billowes, J. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J.E.; Leary, A.; Shelbaya, O.; Al Tamimi, W. [McGill University, Physics Department, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cheal, B. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mane, E. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ministry of External Relations, Rio Bianco Institute, Brasilia (Brazil); Stolz, M. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Voss, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2015-02-01

    Fast-beam collinear laser spectroscopy experiments on rubidium have been performed at the ISAC radioactive ion beam facility at TRIUMF. Most recently, the neutron-rich {sup 98}Rb isotope has been studied for the investigation of shape coexistence. Two long-lived nuclear states in {sup 98}Rb have been clearly observed for the first time: a low-spin state, assigned a spin of I = 0, and a high-spin state. The high-spin state is tentatively assigned a spin of I = 3 based on this analysis in combination with gamma decay results. The measured nuclear properties of the two states are presented, alongside unpublished values of the neutron-deficient isotopes investigated previously. The mean-square charge radii of both states in {sup 98}Rb are observed to continue along the isodeformation line present after the N = 60 onset of deformation. (orig.)

  16. Invariant Observer-Based State Estimation for Micro-Aerial Vehicles in GPS-Denied Indoor Environments Using an RGB-D Camera and MEMS Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dachuan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a non-linear state observer-based integrated navigation scheme for estimating the attitude, position and velocity of micro aerial vehicles (MAV operating in GPS-denied indoor environments, using the measurements from low-cost MEMS (micro electro-mechanical systems inertial sensors and an RGB-D camera. A robust RGB-D visual odometry (VO approach was developed to estimate the MAV’s relative motion by extracting and matching features captured by the RGB-D camera from the environment. The state observer of the RGB-D visual-aided inertial navigation was then designed based on the invariant observer theory for systems possessing symmetries. The motion estimates from the RGB-D VO were fused with inertial and magnetic measurements from the onboard MEMS sensors via the state observer, providing the MAV with accurate estimates of its full six degree-of-freedom states. Implementations on a quadrotor MAV and indoor flight test results demonstrate that the resulting state observer is effective in estimating the MAV’s states without relying on external navigation aids such as GPS. The properties of computational efficiency and simplicity in gain tuning make the proposed invariant observer-based navigation scheme appealing for actual MAV applications in indoor environments.

  17. A model to investigate intention understanding in autism?. Comment on "Seeing mental states: An experimental strategy for measuring the observability of other minds" by Cristina Becchio et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Paul A. G.; Hamilton, Antonia F. de C.

    2018-03-01

    Becchio et al. [2] specify the conditions under which mental states are observable in the kinematics of other agents. Given that autistic people display differences in their understanding of other's mental states [1] and show an insensitivity to the kinematics of co-actors' movements [5,10], what are the implications of Becchio et al.'s strategy for the study of autism?

  18. The first observation of EO transitions from negative parity states in even-even nucleus 160Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    In even-even deformed nuclei up to now EO-transitions were found only between the states of the same spin belonging to Κ π = O + rotational bands. There is no forbidenness for EO-transitions between states belonging to bands with any other quantum number Κ provided both initial and final states have the same J π Κ values. EO-transitions may depopulate odd-parity states. In odd nuclei β-vibrational states are identified by transition with EO-components. Here transitions also proceed between states with the same J π K numbers. Even-even nuclide 160 Dy is the first nucleus where the EO-transitions between odd-parity states have been found

  19. Causation, constitution and context. Comment on "Seeing mental states: An experimental strategy for measuring the observability of other minds" by Cristina Becchio et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahavi, Dan

    2018-03-01

    In their new article [1], Becchio and her colleagues argue that recent claims concerning the possibility of directly perceiving other people's mental states will remain speculative as long as one has failed to demonstrate the availability of mentalistic information in observable behavior [p. 4]. The ambitious goal of the authors is then to outline an experimental setup that will permit one to determine whether and to what extent a mental state is observable. Drawing on Becchio's previous work on how regularities in the kinematic patterns specify the mental states of the agent, the authors suggest that a similar approach can be adopted to probe the observability of any mental state instantiated in behavioral patterns [p. 19].

  20. Observation of Excited Charmed Baryon States Decaying to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub {ital c}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; O`Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Wappler, F.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmier, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Payne, D.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Gibbons, L.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick, J.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Zadorozhny, P.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Zhu, G.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Athanas, M.; Brower, W.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Ryd, A.; Sperka, D.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Procario, M.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Gaidarev, P.; (CLEO Collabora...

    1995-04-24

    Using data collected by the CLEO II detector, we have observed two states decaying to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub {ital c}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}. Relative to the {Lambda}{sup +}{sub {ital c}}, their mass splittings are measured to be +307.5{plus_minus}0.4{plus_minus}1.0 and +342.2{plus_minus}0.2{plus_minus}0.5MeV/{ital c}{sup 2}, respectively; this represents the first measurement of the less massive state. These two states are consistent with being orbitally excited, isospin zero {Lambda}{sup +}{sub {ital c}} states.

  1. The state of renewable energies in Europe. 11th EurObserv'ER report; Etat des energies renouvelables en Europe. 11e bilan EurObserv'ER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civel, Y B [ed.

    2012-02-15

    For over ten years now, eurobserv'eR has been collecting data on european Union renewable energy sources to describe the state and thrust of the various sectors in its thematic barometers. The first part of this assessment is an updated and completed summary of the work published in 2011. It provides a complete overview of the ten renewable sectors, supplemented by two summary notes on concentrated solar power and ocean energies. Their performances are compared against the european Commission White Paper and Biomass Action plan targets. The eurobserv'eR consortium members will publish their end-of-year estimates of the renewable energy share of overall final energy consumption for each European Union country from this edition onwards. These figures will thus provide preliminary indication of how the various countries are faring along their renewable energy paths and will ascertain whether their individual trends point to success in achieving their objectives [Dutch] Depuis plus de dix ans, eurobserv'er collecte des donnees sur les sources d'energies renouvelables de l'union europeenne afin de decrire, dans des barometres thematiques, l'etat et la dynamique des filieres. La premiere partie de cet ouvrage constitue une synthese des travaux publies en 2011, actualisee et completee. Elle offre un tour d'horizon complet des dix filieres renouvelables, completee par deux notes de synthese sur l'heliothermodynamique et l'energie marine. Ces filieres sont analysees a l'aide de differents indicateurs de types energetiques. leurs performances sont comparees aux objectifs du livre blanc de la Commission europeenne et de son plan d'action biomasse. a partir de cette edition, les membres du consortium eurobserv'er publieront chaque fin d'annee leurs estimations de la part des energies renouvelables dans la consommation brute d'energie finale pour chaque pays de l'union europeenne. Ces estimations permettront de donner une premiere indication sur la trajectoire energie

  2. State-dependent errors in a land surface model across biomes inferred from eddy covariance observations on multiple timescales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, T.; Brender, P.; Ciais, P.; Piao, S.; Mahecha, M.D.; Chevallier, F.; Reichstein, M.; Ottle, C.; Maignan, F.; Arain, A.; Bohrer, G.; Cescatti, A.; Kiely, G.; Law, B.E.; Lutz, M.; Montagnani, L.; Moors, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of state-dependent model biases in land surface models can highlight model deficiencies, and provide new insights into model development. In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used to estimate the state-dependent biases of a land surface model (ORCHIDEE: ORganising

  3. Observation of the narrow state X (3872) → J/ψπ+π- in p-barp collisions at √s = 1.96 Tev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, D.; CDF Collaboration

    2004-01-01

    The authors report the observation of a narrow state decaying into J/ψπ + π - and produced in 220 pb -1 of (bar p)p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF II experiment. They observe 730 ± 90 decays. The mass is measured to be 3871.3 ± 0.7(stat) ± 0.4(syst) MeV/c 2 , with an observed width consistent with the detector resolution. This is in agreement with the recent observation by the Belle Collaboration of the X(3872) meson

  4. High-energy observations of the state transition of the X-ray nova and black hole candidate XTE J1720-318

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bel, M.C.; Rodriguez, J.; Sizun, P.

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of extensive high-energy observations of the X-ray transient and black hole candidate XTE J1720-318 performed with INTEGRAL, XMM-Newton and RXTE. The source, which underwent an X-ray outburst in 2003 January, was observed in February in a spectral state dominated by a soft......, typical of a black-hole binary in the so-called High/Soft State. We then followed the evolution of the source outburst over several months using the INTEGRAL Galactic Centre survey observations. The source became active again at the end of March: it showed a clear transition towards a much harder state...... of the black hole X-ray novae class which populate our galactic bulge and we discuss its properties in the frame of the spectral models used for transient black hole binaries....

  5. Method of observation of low density interface states by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under bias and passivation by cyanide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Sakurai, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Kubota, T.; Maida, O.; Takahashi, M.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements under bias can observe low density interface states for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) diodes with low densities. This method can give energy distribution of interface states for ultrathin insulating layers for which electrical measurements cannot be performed due to a high density leakage current. During the XPS measurements, a bias voltage is applied to the rear semiconductor surface with respect to the ∼3 nm-thick front platinum layer connected to the ground, and the bias voltage changes the occupation of interface states. Charges accumulated in the interface states shift semiconductor core levels at the interface, and thus the analysis of the bias-induced shifts of the semiconductor core levels measured as a function of the bias voltage gives energy distribution of interface states. In the case of Si-based MOS diodes, the energy distribution and density of interface states strongly depend on the atomic density of silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) layers and the interfacial roughness, respectively. All the observed interface state spectra possess peaked-structures, indicating that they are due to defect states. An interface state peak near the Si midgap is attributable to isolated Si dangling bonds at the interface, while those above and below the midgap to Si dangling bonds interacting weakly with Si or oxygen atoms in the SiO 2 layers. A method of the elimination of interface states and defect states in Si using cyanide solutions has been developed. The cyanide method simply involves the immersion of Si in KCN solutions. Due to the high Si-CN bond energy of ∼4.5 eV, the bonds are not ruptured at 800 deg. C and upon irradiation. The cyanide treatment results in the improvement of the electrical characteristics of MOS diodes and solar cells

  6. Structural observations of heterometallic uranyl copper(II) carboxylates and their solid-state topotactic transformation upon dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchowka, Jakub; Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry

    2013-02-04

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and metallic copper with aromatic polycarboxylic acids gave rise to the formation of five heterometallic UO(2)(2+)-Cu(2+) coordination polymers: (UO(2))Cu(H(2)O)(2)(1,2-bdc)(2) (1; 1,2-bdc = phthalate), (UO(2))Cu(H(2)O)(2)(btec)⋅4 H(2)O (2) and (UO(2))Cu(btec) (2'; btec = pyromellitate), (UO(2))(2)Cu(H(2)O)(4)(mel) (3; mel = mellitate), and (UO(2))(2)O(OH)(2)Cu(H(2)O)(2)(1,3-bdc)⋅H(2)O (4; 1,3-bdc = isophthlalate). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of compound 1 revealed 2D layers of chains of UO(8) and CuO(4)(H(2)O)(2) units that were connected through the phthalate ligands. In compound 2, these sheets were connected to each other through the two additional carboxylate arms of the pyromellitate, thus resulting in a 3D open-framework with 1D channels that trapped water molecules. Upon heating, free and bonded water species (from Cu-OH(2)) were evacuated from the structure. This thermal transition was followed by in situ XRD and IR spectroscopy. Heating induced a solid-state topotactic transformation with the formation of a new set of Cu-O interactions in the crystalline anhydrous structure (2'), in order to keep the square-planar environment around the copper centers. The structure of compound 3 was built up from trinuclear motifs, in which one copper center, CuO(4)(OH(2))(2), was linked to two uranium units, UO(5)(H(2)O)(2). The assembly of this trimer, "U(2)Cu", with the mellitate generated a 3D network. Complex 4 contained a tetranuclear uranyl core of UO(5)(OH)(2) and UO(6)(OH) units that were linked to two copper centers, CuO(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(2), which were then connected to each other through isophthalate ligands and U=O-Cu interactions to create a 3D structure. The common structural feature of these different compounds is a bridging oxo group of U=O-Cu type, which is reflected by apical Cu-O distances in the range 2.350(3)-2.745(5) Å. In the case of a shorter Cu-O distance, a slight lengthening

  7. Structural observations of heterometallic uranyl copper(II) carboxylates and their solid-state topotactic transformation upon dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olchowka, Jakub; Falaise, Clement; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and metallic copper with aromatic polycarboxylic acids gave rise to the formation of five heterometallic UO 2 2+ -Cu 2+ coordination polymers: (UO 2 )Cu(H 2 O) 2 (1,2-bdc) 2 (1; 1,2-bdc=phthalate), (UO 2 )Cu(H 2 O) 2 (btec).4 H 2 O (2) and (UO 2 )Cu(btec) (2'; btec=pyromellitate), (UO 2 ) 2 Cu(H 2 O) 4 (mel) (3; mel=mellitate), and (UO 2 ) 2 O(OH) 2 Cu(H 2 O) 2 (1,3-bdc).H 2 O (4; 1,3-bdc=isophthlalate). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of compound 1 revealed 2D layers of chains of UO 8 and CuO 4 (H 2 O) 2 units that were connected through the phthalate ligands. In compound 2, these sheets were connected to each other through the two additional carboxylate arms of the pyromellitate, thus resulting in a 3D open-framework with 1D channels that trapped water molecules. Upon heating, free and bonded water species (from Cu-OH 2 ) were evacuated from the structure. This thermal transition was followed by in situ XRD and IR spectroscopy. Heating induced a solid-state topotactic transformation with the formation of a new set of Cu-O interactions in the crystalline anhydrous structure (2'), in order to keep the square-planar environment around the copper centers. The structure of compound 3 was built up from trinuclear motifs, in which one copper center, CuO 4 (OH 2 ) 2 , was linked to two uranium units, UO 5 (H 2 O) 2 . The assembly of this trimer, ''U 2 Cu'', with the mellitate generated a 3D network. Complex 4 contained a tetranuclear uranyl core of UO 5 (OH) 2 and UO 6 (OH) units that were linked to two copper centers, CuO(OH) 2 (H 2 O) 2 , which were then connected to each other through isophthalate ligands and U=O-Cu interactions to create a 3D structure. The common structural feature of these different compounds is a bridging oxo group of U=O-Cu type, which is reflected by apical Cu-O distances in the range 2.350(3)-2.745(5) Aa. In the case of a shorter Cu-O distance, a slight

  8. Pain severity and the economic burden of neuropathic pain in the United States: BEAT Neuropathic Pain Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Schaefer,1 Alesia Sadosky,2 Rachael Mann,3 Shoshana Daniel,4 Bruce Parsons,2 Michael Tuchman,5 Alan Anschel,6 Brett R Stacey,7 Srinivas Nalamachu,8 Edward Nieshoff9 1Covance Market Access Services Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, 2Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY, 3Covance Market Access Services Inc., San Diego, CA, 4Covance Market Access Services Inc., Conshohocken, PA, 5Palm Beach Neurological Center, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, 6Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 7Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, 8International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, 9Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan/Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USABackground: As with many chronic conditions, patients with neuropathic pain (NeP are high consumers of health care resources. However, limited literature exists on the economic burden of NeP, including its impact on productivity. The aim of this study was to characterize health care resource utilization, productivity, and costs associated with NeP by pain severity level in US adults.Methods: Subjects (n=624 with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus-related peripheral NeP, post-trauma/post-surgical NeP, spinal cord injury with NeP, chronic low back pain with NeP, and small fiber neuropathy were recruited during routine office visits to US community-based general practitioners and specialists. Clinicians captured clinical characteristics, NeP-related medications, and health care resource utilization based on 6-month retrospective medical chart review. Subjects completed questionnaires on demographics, pain/symptoms, costs, and productivity. Brief Pain Inventory pain severity scores were used to classify subjects by mild, moderate, or severe pain. Annualized NeP-related costs (adjusted for covariates were estimated, and differences across pain severity groups were evaluated.Results: In total, 624 subjects were recruited (mean age 55.5±13.7 years; 55.4% male

  9. Structural observations of heterometallic uranyl copper(II) carboxylates and their solid-state topotactic transformation upon dehydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olchowka, Jakub; Falaise, Clement; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry [Unite de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide (UCCS), UMR CNRS 8181, Universite de Lille Nord de France, USTL-ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2013-02-04

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and metallic copper with aromatic polycarboxylic acids gave rise to the formation of five heterometallic UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination polymers: (UO{sub 2})Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(1,2-bdc){sub 2} (1; 1,2-bdc=phthalate), (UO{sub 2})Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(btec).4 H{sub 2}O (2) and (UO{sub 2})Cu(btec) (2'; btec=pyromellitate), (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(mel) (3; mel=mellitate), and (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}O(OH){sub 2}Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(1,3-bdc).H{sub 2}O (4; 1,3-bdc=isophthlalate). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of compound 1 revealed 2D layers of chains of UO{sub 8} and CuO{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} units that were connected through the phthalate ligands. In compound 2, these sheets were connected to each other through the two additional carboxylate arms of the pyromellitate, thus resulting in a 3D open-framework with 1D channels that trapped water molecules. Upon heating, free and bonded water species (from Cu-OH{sub 2}) were evacuated from the structure. This thermal transition was followed by in situ XRD and IR spectroscopy. Heating induced a solid-state topotactic transformation with the formation of a new set of Cu-O interactions in the crystalline anhydrous structure (2'), in order to keep the square-planar environment around the copper centers. The structure of compound 3 was built up from trinuclear motifs, in which one copper center, CuO{sub 4}(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}, was linked to two uranium units, UO{sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. The assembly of this trimer, ''U{sub 2}Cu'', with the mellitate generated a 3D network. Complex 4 contained a tetranuclear uranyl core of UO{sub 5}(OH){sub 2} and UO{sub 6}(OH) units that were linked to two copper centers, CuO(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, which were then connected to each other through isophthalate ligands and U=O-Cu interactions to create a 3D structure. The common structural feature of these different compounds is

  10. Impact of satellite-based lake surface observations on the initial state of HIRLAM. Part II: Analysis of lake surface temperature and ice cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Kheyrollah Pour

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from a study on the impact of remote-sensing Lake Surface Water Temperature (LSWT observations in the analysis of lake surface state of a numerical weather prediction (NWP model. Data assimilation experiments were performed with the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM, a three-dimensional operational NWP model. Selected thermal remote-sensing LSWT observations provided by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR sensors onboard the Terra/Aqua and ENVISAT satellites, respectively, were included into the assimilation. The domain of our experiments, which focussed on two winters (2010–2011 and 2011–2012, covered northern Europe. Validation of the resulting objective analyses against independent observations demonstrated that the description of the lake surface state can be improved by the introduction of space-borne LSWT observations, compared to the result of pure prognostic parameterisations or assimilation of the available limited number of in-situ lake temperature observations. Further development of the data assimilation methods and solving of several practical issues are necessary in order to fully benefit from the space-borne observations of lake surface state for the improvement of the operational weather forecast. This paper is the second part of a series of two papers aimed at improving the objective analysis of lake temperature and ice conditions in HIRLAM.

  11. Observation of two distinct magnetic states in ZrZn2 via the dHvA effect under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, N.; Endo, M.; Isshiki, T.; Ochiai, A.; Aoki, H.; Terashima, T.; Uji, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Lonzarich, G.G.

    2005-01-01

    We have found an anomaly in magnetic field dependence of the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) frequency of ZrZn 2 . Pressure dependence of this anomaly suggests an existence of two distinct ferromagnetic states and then a 'nested' phase diagram similar to that of UGe 2 . The Stoner exchange parameter and the exchange splitting energy are 400 and 66meV, respectively, which are derived from comparing the field dependence of the dHvA frequency difference with the magnetization. The two parameters do not change in both the low and slightly higher average moment states, suggesting that the phase transition between these states is ascribed to the change in the difference of majority and minority spin carrier densities

  12. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar - low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from June and October 2013, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10-12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearance...... and current multi-wavelength observations and show the hard X-ray power law extending to 79 keV without a spectral break. Sharp edged, flat bottomed `dips' are observed with widths between 30-1000 s and ingress and egress time-scales of 30-60 s. No change in hardness ratio was observed during the dips...

  13. Time Series Analysis of Non-Gaussian Observations Based on State Space Models from Both Classical and Bayesian Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durbin, J.; Koopman, S.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The analysis of non-Gaussian time series using state space models is considered from both classical and Bayesian perspectives. The treatment in both cases is based on simulation using importance sampling and antithetic variables; Monte Carlo Markov chain methods are not employed. Non-Gaussian

  14. LT-STM/STS observation of definite superconducting gap states on the multistage crystal surface of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Hironaru; Aoki, Ryozo

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature STM/STS observations have been carried out on cleaved BSCCO crystal surfaces. The authors have succeeded in detection of a special layer, probably a CuO 2 or Ca layer exposed on the surface. The STS spectrum which was reproducibly observed on this special site shows a considerably anisotropic but distinct superconducting gap structure with a definite and flat gap bottom region. This gap structure shows significantly different characteristic from another gap structure observed on the BiO layer, which shows a rounded shape at the gap bottom region without any indication of a finite gap state

  15. Comment on 'Direct observation of the 2D3/2-2D5/2 ground-state splitting in Xe9+''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.

    2007-01-01

    We have found that xenon in different charge states, namely, Xe 9+ and Xe 31+ , can contribute to the radiation in the 598 nm spectral range. Our observation resolves the discrepancy of line identification given by Takacs et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 052505 (2006)] and Crespo et al. [Can. J. Phys. 80, 1687 (2002)

  16. VLBI OBSERVATION OF MICROQUASAR CYG X-3 DURING AN X-RAY STATE TRANSITION FROM SOFT TO HARD IN THE 2007 MAY-JUNE FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Sang Joon [School of Space Science, Kyunghee University, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon-Wook [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kurayama, Tomoharu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Honma, Mareki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sasao, Tetsuo, E-mail: evony@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: skim@kasi.re.kr [Yaeyama Star Club, Ookawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa 904-0022 (Japan)

    2013-07-20

    We present a radio observation of microquasar Cyg X-3 during an X-ray state transition from ultrasoft to hard state in the 2007 May-June flare using the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry at 22 GHz. During the transition, a short-lived mini-flare of {approx}< 3 hr was detected prior to the major flare. In such a transition, a jet ejection is believed to occur, but there have been no direct observations to support it. An analysis of Gaussian fits to the observed visibility amplitudes shows a time variation of the source axis, or a structural change, during the mini-flare. Our model fits, together with other multiwavelength observations in the radio, soft, and hard X-rays, and the shock-in-jet models for other flaring activities at GHz wavebands, suggest a high possibility of synchrotron flares during the mini-flare, indicative of a predominant contribution from jet activity. Therefore, the mini-flare with an associated structural change is indicative of a jet ejection event in the state transition from ultrasoft to hard state.

  17. Water-Protein Hydrogen Exchange in the Micro-Crystalline Protein Crh as Observed by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeckmann, Anja; Juy, Michel; Bettler, Emmanuel; Emsley, Lyndon; Galinier, Anne; Penin, Francois; Lesage, Anne

    2005-01-01

    We report site-resolved observation of hydrogen exchange in the micro-crystalline protein Crh. Our approach is based on the use of proton T 2 ' -selective 1 H- 13 C- 13 C correlation spectra for site-specific assignments of carbons nearby labile protein protons. We compare the proton T 2 ' selective scheme to frequency selective water observation in deuterated proteins, and discuss the impacts of deuteration on 13 C linewidths in Crh. We observe that in micro-crystalline proteins, solvent accessible hydroxyl and amino protons show comparable exchange rates with water protons as for proteins in solution, and that structural constraints, such as hydrogen bonding or solvent accessibility, more significantly reduce exchange rates

  18. Direct observation of electronic and nuclear ground state splitting in external magnetic field by inelastic neutron scattering on oxidized ferrocene and ferrocene containing polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard; Elbert, Johannes; Gallei, Markus; Stühn, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The quantum mechanical splitting of states by interaction of a magnetic moment with an external magnetic field is well known, e.g., as Zeeman effect in optical transitions, and is also often seen in magnetic neutron scattering. We report excitations observed in inelastic neutron spectroscopy on the redox-responsive polymer poly(vinylferrocene). They are interpreted as splitting of the electronic ground state in the organometallic ferrocene units attached to the polymer chain where a magnetic moment is created by oxidation. In a second experiment using high resolution neutron backscattering spectroscopy we observe the hyperfine splitting, i.e., interaction of nuclear magnetic moments with external magnetic fields leading to sub-μeV excitations observable in incoherent neutron spin-flip scattering on hydrogen and vanadium nuclei.

  19. Kalman filters for assimilating near-surface observations into the Richards equation - Part 2: A dual filter approach for simultaneous retrieval of states and parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, H.; Romano, N.; Chirico, G. B.

    2014-07-01

    This study presents a dual Kalman filter (DSUKF - dual standard-unscented Kalman filter) for retrieving states and parameters controlling the soil water dynamics in a homogeneous soil column, by assimilating near-surface state observations. The DSUKF couples a standard Kalman filter for retrieving the states of a linear solver of the Richards equation, and an unscented Kalman filter for retrieving the parameters of the soil hydraulic functions, which are defined according to the van Genuchten-Mualem closed-form model. The accuracy and the computational expense of the DSUKF are compared with those of the dual ensemble Kalman filter (DEnKF) implemented with a nonlinear solver of the Richards equation. Both the DSUKF and the DEnKF are applied with two alternative state-space formulations of the Richards equation, respectively differentiated by the type of variable employed for representing the states: either the soil water content (θ) or the soil water matric pressure head (h). The comparison analyses are conducted with reference to synthetic time series of the true states, noise corrupted observations, and synthetic time series of the meteorological forcing. The performance of the retrieval algorithms are examined accounting for the effects exerted on the output by the input parameters, the observation depth and assimilation frequency, as well as by the relationship between retrieved states and assimilated variables. The uncertainty of the states retrieved with DSUKF is considerably reduced, for any initial wrong parameterization, with similar accuracy but less computational effort than the DEnKF, when this is implemented with ensembles of 25 members. For ensemble sizes of the same order of those involved in the DSUKF, the DEnKF fails to provide reliable posterior estimates of states and parameters. The retrieval performance of the soil hydraulic parameters is strongly affected by several factors, such as the initial guess of the unknown parameters, the wet or dry

  20. Disturbance observer-based control of a dual-output LLC converter for solid-state lighting applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, M.G.L.; Duarte, J.L.; Hendrix, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Feedback sensor isolation is often an expensive necessity in power converters, for reasons of safety and electromagnetic compatibility. A disturbance observer-based control strategy for a dual-output resonant converter is proposed to overcome this problem. Current control of two LED loads is

  1. Observation of D-0 meson decays to pi(+) pi(-) mu(+) mu(-) and K+ K- mu(+) mu(-) final states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufour, L.; Mulder, M; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.; van Veghel, M.

    2017-01-01

    The first observation of the D-0 -> pi(+) pi(-) mu(+) mu(-) and D-0 -> K+ K- mu(+) mu(-) decays is reported using a sample of proton-proton collisions collected by LHCb at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to 2 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity. The corresponding branching fractions

  2. Offshore observations of eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis in the Mid-Atlantic United States using multiple survey methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaylyn K Hatch

    Full Text Available Little is known about the migration and movements of migratory tree-roosting bat species in North America, though anecdotal observations of migrating bats over the Atlantic Ocean have been reported since at least the 1890s. Aerial surveys and boat-based surveys of wildlife off the Atlantic Seaboard detected a possible diurnal migration event of eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis in September 2012. One bat was sighted approximately 44 km east of Rehoboth Beach, Delaware during a boat-based survey. Eleven additional bats were observed between 16.9 and 41.8 km east of New Jersey, Delaware, and Virginia in high definition video footage collected during digital aerial surveys. Observations were collected incidentally as part of a large baseline study of seabird, marine mammal, and sea turtle distributions and movements in the offshore environment. Digital survey methods also allowed for altitude estimation for several of these bats at >100 m above sea level. These observations provide new evidence of bat movements offshore, and offer insight into their flight heights above sea level and the times of day at which such migrations may occur.

  3. Speeding up Online POMDP planning - unification of observation branches by belief-state compression via expected feature values

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rens, G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel algorithm to speed up online planning in partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) is introduced. I propose a method for compressing nodes in belief-decision-trees while planning occurs. Whereas belief-decision-trees branch...

  4. State-to-state time-of-flight measurements of NO scattering from Au(111): direct observation of translation-to-vibration coupling in electronically nonadiabatic energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Altschäffel, Jan; Rahinov, Igor; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Bartels, Christof

    2013-09-12

    Translational motion is believed to be a spectator degree of freedom in electronically nonadiabatic vibrational energy transfer between molecules and metal surfaces, but the experimental evidence available to support this view is limited. In this work, we have experimentally determined the translational inelasticity in collisions of NO molecules with a single-crystal Au(111) surface-a system with strong electronic nonadiabaticity. State-to-state molecular beam surface scattering was combined with an IR-UV double resonance scheme to obtain high-resolution time-of-flight data. The measurements include vibrationally elastic collisions (v = 3→3, 2→2) as well as collisions where one or two quanta of molecular vibration are excited (2→3, 2→4) or de-excited (2→1, 3→2, 3→1). In addition, we have carried out comprehensive measurements of the effects of rotational excitation on the translational energy of the scattered molecules. We find that under all conditions of this work, the NO molecules lose a large fraction (∼0.45) of their incidence translational energy to the surface. Those molecules that undergo vibrational excitation (relaxation) during the collision recoil slightly slower (faster) than vibrationally elastically scattered molecules. The amount of translational energy change depends on the surface temperature. The translation-to-rotation coupling, which is well-known for v = 0→0 collisions, is found to be significantly weaker for vibrationally inelastic than elastic channels. Our results clearly show that the spectator view of the translational motion in electronically nonadiabatic vibrational energy transfer between NO and Au(111) is only approximately correct.

  5. Observation of the Hadronic Final State Charge Asymmetry in High Q^2 Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A first measurement is presented of the charge asymmetry in the hadronic final state from the hard interaction in deep-inelastic ep neutral current scattering at HERA. The measurement is performed in the range of negative squared four momentum transfer 100

  6. Extreme UV observation of 3-3 transitions of niobium in near neon-like charge states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchet-Poulizac, M.C. E-mail: marie-claude.buchet-poulizac@lasim.univ-lyon1.fr; Cassimi, A.; Cremer, G.; Grandin, J.-P.; Hennecart, D.; Husson, X.; Jacquet, E.; Wyart, J.-F

    2003-05-01

    The emission spectra of highly ionised niobium ions generated by beam-foil excitation in the range 7-21 nm show most 3-3 transitions belonging to the neon-like ions and neighbouring Na-, Mg- and F- sequences. Wavelengths have been determined in reference to {delta}n=1 transitions between Rydberg states. Line identification have been made by comparison to extra- or interpolation of wavenumbers along isoelectronic sequences when data were available and to ab initio atomic structure calculations, using either a Cowan code or a fully relativistic parametric code for Ne- and F-sequences.

  7. Observation of the hadronic final state charge asymmetry in high Q2 deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.

    2009-06-01

    A first measurement is presented of the charge asymmetry in the hadronic final state from the hard interaction in deep-inelastic ep neutral current scattering at HERA. The measurement is performed in the range of negative squared four momentum transfer 100 2 2 . The difference between the event normalised distributions of the scaled momentum, x p , for positively and negatively charged particles, measured in the current region of the Breit frame, is studied together with its evolution as a function of Q. The results are compared to Monte Carlo models at the hadron and parton level. (orig.)

  8. Observation of topological surface states and strong electron/hole imbalance in extreme magnetoresistance compound LaBi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Schröter, N. B. M.; Wu, S.-C.; Kumar, N.; Shekhar, C.; Peng, H.; Xu, X.; Chen, C.; Yang, H. F.; Hwang, C.-C.; Mo, S.-K.; Felser, C.; Yan, B. H.; Liu, Z. K.; Yang, L. X.; Chen, Y. L.

    2018-02-01

    The recent discovery of the extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) in the nonmagnetic rare-earth monopnictides La X (X = P, As, Sb, Bi,), a recently proposed new topological semimetal family, has inspired intensive research effort in the exploration of the correlation between the XMR and their electronic structures. In this work, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to investigate the three-dimensional band structure of LaBi, we unraveled its topologically nontrivial nature with the observation of multiple topological surface Dirac fermions, as supported by our ab initio calculations. Furthermore, we observed substantial imbalance between the volume of electron and hole pockets, which rules out the electron-hole compensation as the primary cause of the XMR in LaBi.

  9. Observation of multiphase magnetic state of hematite crystal during Morin transition by the method of section topography of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchetinkin, S.A.; Kvardakov, V.V.; Viler, Eh.; Barushel', Zh.; Shlenker, M.

    2005-01-01

    The boundaries between weak ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases in hematite crystals during Morin transition are detected by the section topography method by synchrotron radiation. It is shown that these boundaries are parallel to (111) surface hence magnetic phases during Morin transition separate the crystal by layers. Change of layer depth in dependence on temperature and magnetic field, and interaction interphase boundaries with crystal defects are observed [ru

  10. Do state-of-the-art CMIP5 ESMs accurately represent observed vegetation-rainfall feedbacks? Focus on the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaro, M.; Wang, F.; Yu, Y.; Mao, J.; Shi, X.; Wei, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The semi-arid Sahel ecoregion is an established hotspot of land-atmosphere coupling. Ocean-land-atmosphere interactions received considerable attention by modeling studies in response to the devastating 1970s-90s Sahel drought, which models suggest was driven by sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies and amplified by local vegetation-atmosphere feedbacks. Vegetation affects the atmosphere through biophysical feedbacks by altering the albedo, roughness, and transpiration and thereby modifying exchanges of energy, momentum, and moisture with the atmosphere. The current understanding of these potentially competing processes is primarily based on modeling studies, with biophysical feedbacks serving as a key uncertainty source in regional climate change projections among Earth System Models (ESMs). In order to reduce this uncertainty, it is critical to rigorously evaluate the representation of vegetation feedbacks in ESMs against an observational benchmark in order to diagnose systematic biases and their sources. However, it is challenging to successfully isolate vegetation's feedbacks on the atmosphere, since the atmospheric control on vegetation growth dominates the atmospheric feedback response to vegetation anomalies and the atmosphere is simultaneously influenced by oceanic and terrestrial anomalies. In response to this challenge, a model-validated multivariate statistical method, Stepwise Generalized Equilibrium Feedback Assessment (SGEFA), is developed, which extracts the forcing of a slowly-evolving environmental variable [e.g. SST or leaf area index (LAI)] on the rapidly-evolving atmosphere. By applying SGEFA to observational and remotely-sensed data, an observational benchmark is established for Sahel vegetation feedbacks. In this work, the simulated responses in key atmospheric variables, including evapotranspiration, albedo, wind speed, vertical motion, temperature, stability, and rainfall, to Sahel LAI anomalies are statistically assessed in Coupled Model

  11. An observational study of road safety around selected primary schools in Ibadan municipality, Oyo State, Southwestern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangowawa, Adesola O; Adebiyi, Akindele O; Faseru, Babalola; Popoola, Olusola J

    2012-01-01

    Child pedestrians have been identified as vulnerable road users. Although walking as a means of transport has health and other benefits, it exposes children to the risk of road traffic injuries. This study was conducted to assess the availability of road safety features around government-owned primary schools in Ibadan municipality. A multistage sampling technique was used to select 46 of the 74 schools in the study area. Some (11) of the selected schools were sited within the same premises and shared a common entrance; thus a total of 35 school premises were eventually observed. Trained research assistants observed the school environment around the selected schools for road safety features such as location of schools, presence of "school", "child crossing" and "speed limit" road signs, and presence of traffic calming devices (road bumps or zebra crossing). Five (14%) of the schools were located on major roads and eight (23%) had road signs indicating that a school was nearby. Seven (20%) had road bumps close to the school, 15 (43%) had a warden who assisted children to cross, and none had a zebra crossing. Five (14%) schools had pedestrian sidewalks. The study revealed that the environment around a number of the observed schools in the municipality compromised the pupils' road safety. The local government, school authorities, parents, and road safety professionals need to institute definite measures to enhance the road safety environment around schools in the municipality.

  12. Using NASA Satellite Observations to Map Wildfire Risk in the United States for Allocation of Fire Management Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, A.; Reager, J. T., II; Behrangi, A.; Stavros, E. N.; Randerson, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Fires are a key disturbance globally acting as a catalyst for terrestrial ecosystem change and contributing significantly to both carbon emissions and changes in surface albedo. The socioeconomic impacts of wildfire activities are also significant with wildfire activity results in billions of dollars of losses every year. Fire size, area burned and frequency are increasing, thus the likelihood of fire danger, defined by United States National Interagency Fire Center (NFIC) as the demand of fire management resources as a function of how flammable fuels (a function of ignitability, consumability and availability) are from normal, is an important step toward reducing costs associated with wildfires. Numerous studies have aimed to predict the likelihood of fire danger, but few studies use remote sensing data to map fire danger at scales commensurate with regional management decisions (e.g., deployment of resources nationally throughout fire season with seasonal and monthly prediction). Here, we use NASA Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) assimilated surface soil moisture, NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) vapor pressure deficit, NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) enhanced vegetation index products and landcover products, along with US Forest Service historical fire activity data to generate probabilistic monthly fire potential maps in the United States. These maps can be useful in not only government operational allocation of fire management resources, but also improving understanding of the Earth System and how it is changing in order to refine predictions of fire extremes.

  13. Reframing the issue of direct social perception. Comment on "Seeing mental states: An experimental strategy for measuring the observability of other minds" by Cristina Becchio et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Søren

    2018-03-01

    Becchio and colleagues make significant progress both in terms of clarifying what is at issue in the current debate about "direct social perception" (henceforth: DSP) and in terms of making the issue amenable to empirical investigation. Advances in these directions are much needed, since there is currently confusion about what the thesis of DSP states, and a near total lack of evidence pertaining to the truth or falsity of that thesis [1]. Thus, as Becchio et al. note, "The claim that mental states are 'observable' thus far remains just as speculative as the claim that they are 'unobservable' " [2, section 1.2].

  14. Measurement of Polarization Observables in the Electro-Excitation of the Proton to its First Excited State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Rikki [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2003-08-01

    This thesis reports results from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Hall A experiment E91-011, which measured double-polarization observables in the pion electroproduction reaction from the proton. Specifically, the experiment measured the recoil proton polarization, polarized response functions, and cross section for the p($\\vec{e}$, e' $\\vec{p}$) π° reaction at a center-of-mass energy centered at W = 1232 MeV--the peak of the Δ(1232) resonance--and at a four-momentum transfer squared of Q2 = 1.0 GeV2/c2. Both the recoil proton polarization and polarized response function results will be presented in this thesis. Data were collected at Jefferson Lab, located in Newport News, Virginia during the summer of 2000. A 4.53 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off of a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton polarization was measured in the Focal Plane Polarimeter (FPP), located in one of the two High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) in Hall A. A maximum likelihood method was used to determine the polarized response functions directly from the measured polarizations and cross sections. A simultaneous fit of the cross sections, the recoil proton polarizations, and angular distributions of the polarized response functions will provide a determination of individual multipole amplitudes. Some of these multipole amplitudes are related to the concept of proton deformation. Both the recoil proton polarizations and polarized response functions were compared to two phenomenological models: MAID and SAID, which have all free parameters fixed, based on fits to previous world data. The measured helicity dependent observables, which are dominated by imaginary parts of Δ(1232)-resonance excitation multipole amplitudes, agree very well with the two models. The measured helicity independent observables, which are dominated by real parts of background multipole amplitudes, do not agree completely with

  15. Observation of superheavy primary cosmic ray nuclei with solid state track detectors and x-ray films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doke, Tadayoshi; Hayashi, Takayoshi; Ito, Kensai; Yanagimachi, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Shigeru.

    1977-01-01

    The measurements of energy spectra and the nuclear charge distribution of superheavy nuclei heavier than iron in primary cosmic ray can provide information on the origin, propagation and life time of the cosmic ray. Since incident particles are in the region of relativistic velocity (the low energy cosmic ray below the cutoff energy is forbidden from entering), the charges of cosmic ray nuclei can be determined without knowing the energy of particles. The balloon-borne solid state track detector and plastic and X-ray films were employed for the detection of superheavy cosmic ray, and the five events were detected with the cellulose nitrate film. The flux of superheavy nuclei is predicted from the present analysis. (Yoshimori, M.)

  16. Observation of the helicity-selection-rule suppressed decay of the χc 2 charmonium state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The decays of χc 2→K+K-π0, KSK±π∓, and π+π-π0 are studied with the ψ (3686 ) data samples collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII). For the first time, the branching fractions of χc 2→K*K ¯, χc 2→a2±(1320 )π∓/a20(1320 )π0 , and χc 2→ρ (770 )±π∓ are measured. Here, K*K ¯ denotes both K*±K∓ and its isospin-conjugated process K*0K¯ 0+c .c . , and K* denotes the resonances K*(892 ), K2*(1430 ), and K3*(1780 ). The observations indicate a strong violation of the helicity selection rule in χc 2 decays into vector and pseudoscalar meson pairs. The measured branching fractions of χc 2→K*(892 )K ¯ are more than ten times larger than the upper limit of χc 2→ρ (770 )±π∓, which is so far the first direct observation of a significant U -spin symmetry breaking effect in charmonium decays.

  17. Distinct site- and state-selective dissociation of methyl-trifluoroacetate observed in core-electron excitation at the oxygen K-edge region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, T.; Tabayashi, K.; Maruyama, T.; Harada, C.; Yoshida, H.

    2009-11-01

    Distinct site- and state-selective dissociation following the O1s core-excitation has been found in the gaseous molecules of methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA). The site- and state-selective dissociation was examined by measuring the branching ratios of dominant CH3+ and CHO+ fragments. The branching ratios from MTFA showed that site-selective dissociation takes place via the excitation from the different atomic sites to the same π*CO resonance state, (O1sCO-1π*CO) and (O1sOMe-1π*CO). A pronounced O1sOMe site-selectivity was identified by a significant increment of CHO+ formation at the (O1sOMe→π*CO) band. The site-selectivity was also justified by an equivalent core approximation using the density functional theory calculation. State-selective dissociation was identified among the (O1sOMe-1π*CO), (O1sOMe-1σ*O-Me) and (O1sOMe-1σ*C-OMe) transitions originated from the same OMe core. State-selective production of CH3+ could be found at the (O1sOMe→σ*O-Me) band, whereas state-selective formation of CHO+ was observed at the (O1sOMe→π*CO) and (O1sOMe→σ*C-OMe) bands.

  18. Satellite Observations of Declining Aerosol Burden in The Twenty-First Century in the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, N.; Tosca, M.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Campbell, J. R.; Garay, M. J.; Seidel, F. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Southeast US (SEUS) has long been recognized as a region where the climatic effect of atmospheric aerosols can cool the Earth and have thus reduced the effect of greenhouse warming. However, previous studies have assessed that abundant carbonaceous aerosols over SEUS from a combination of anthropogenic and natural sources are systematically underestimated by most atmospheric models, especially during summer when the average carbon concentration in SEUS is the highest in the country. In this study, we utilize an ensemble of surface (AERONET) and satellite (MISR, CALIPSO) observations over the SEUS from 2001 to 2015 to better understand the spatially and vertically-resolved decadal trend of SEUS aerosol burden. Results from CALIOP show significant aerosol loading extending from the surface to 5km year-round. Additionally, these data show aerosol extinction coefficients as large as 0.01 km-1 extending well above 8km during the summertime. CALIOP measurements corroborate seasonal observations from MISR and indicate that much of the aerosol burden in the SEUS is comprised of smoke, polluted continental and polluted dust species. Using boundary layer heights from the ERA Interim dataset, CALIOP data show that while summertime aerosol burden above the boundary layer (elevated) is equal to about half of the AOD in the surface layer (0.17 vs. 0.08), during wintertime, the vast majority of aerosols are below the boundary layer (0.12 vs. 0.03). Despite strong seasonality in overall aerosol burden, decadal trends in AOD did not exhibit similarly large seasonal differences; data show AOD decreasing between 2001 and 2015 during both summer and winter and in both the MISR and CALIOP datasets. Between 2001 and 2015, the average summertime aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MISR fell from 0.23 to 0.15, and the trend was -0.05 decade-1 (23% decade-1). The fit was statistically significant, with an r2=0.53. Measurement campaigns such as SEAC4RC will be extensively leveraged, which

  19. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...

  20. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...

  1. The soft spectral state of the black hole candidate IGR J17091-3624 observed by INTEGRAL and Swift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Santo, M.; Kuulkers, E.; Bozzo, E.

    2011-01-01

    The currently on-going outburst of the black hole candidate (BHC) IGR J17091-3624 (ATel #3144, #3159, #3167) has been recently observed simultaneously with INTEGRAL and Swift. The source was in the IBIS FOV on 2011 Feb. 28 from 17:45 to 21:23 (UTC; exposure time 7.7 ks) during the Galactic Bulge......, a better description of the spectrum (confirmed by the F-test) can be obtained adding a disk black-body component (red. chi^2=1.1 (302 d.o.f.)). The fit of the joint XRT+IBIS/ISGRI broad-band spectrum (0.8-200 keV) gives an absorption column density of N_H=1.00+/-0.06, a disc black-body temperature of 1...

  2. Measurement of Polarization Observables in the Electro-Excitation of the Proton to its First Excited State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rikki Roche

    2003-01-01

    This thesis reports results from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Hall A experiment E91-011, which measured double-polarization observables in the pion electroproduction reaction from the proton. Specifically, the experiment measured the recoil proton polarization, polarized response functions, and cross section for the p(rvec e), e(prime) (rvec p) π o reaction at a center-of-mass energy centered at W = 1232 MeV--the peak of the Δ(1232) resonance--and at a four-momentum transfer squared of Q 2 = 1.0 GeV 2 /c 2 . Both the recoil proton polarization and polarized response function results will be presented in this thesis

  3. A measuring stick for other minds. Comment on 'Seeing mental states: An experimental strategy for measuring the observability of other minds' by Cristina Becchio et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillekens, Imme Christina; Schilbach, Leonhard

    2018-03-01

    In their compelling article 'Seeing mental states: An experimental strategy for measuring the observability of other minds' Becchio et al. [1] tackle a long-standing and controversial issue, namely the perennial question of whether we can access or even quite literally see other minds. Much of the relevant interdisciplinary literature is built on the premise that one's access to others' minds is indirect and inferential in nature [e.g. [4,5

  4. First observation of a new zonal-flow cycle state in the H-mode transport barrier of the experimental advanced superconducting Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    A new turbulence-flow cycle state has been discovered after the formation of a transport barrier in the H-mode plasma edge during a quiescent phase on the EAST superconducting tokamak. Zonal-flow modulation of high-frequency-broadband (0.05-1MHz) turbulence was observed in the steep-gradient region...... leading to intermittent transport events across the edge transport barrier. Good confinement (H-98y,H-2 similar to 1) has been achieved in this state, even with input heating power near the L-H transition threshold. A novel model based on predator-prey interaction between turbulence and zonal flows...... reproduced this state well. © 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4769852]...

  5. No Observed Effect of Landscape Fragmentation on Pathogen Infection Prevalence in Blacklegged Ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the Northeastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine P Zolnik

    Full Text Available Pathogen prevalence within blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis Say, 1821 tends to vary across sites and geographic regions, but the underlying causes of this variation are not well understood. Efforts to understand the ecology of Lyme disease have led to the proposition that sites with higher host diversity will result in lower disease risk due to an increase in the abundance of inefficient reservoir species relative to the abundance of species that are highly competent reservoirs. Although the Lyme disease transmission cycle is often cited as a model for this "dilution effect hypothesis", little empirical evidence exists to support that claim. Here we tested the dilution effect hypothesis for two pathogens transmitted by the blacklegged tick along an urban-to-rural gradient in the northeastern United States using landscape fragmentation as a proxy for host biodiversity. Percent impervious surface and habitat fragment size around each site were determined to assess the effect of landscape fragmentation on nymphal blacklegged tick infection with Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Our results do not support the dilution effect hypothesis for either pathogen and are in agreement with the few studies to date that have tested this idea using either a landscape proxy or direct measures of host biodiversity.

  6. Emissions of CH4 from natural gas production in the United States using aircraft-based observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Karion, A.; Peischl, J.; Petron, G.; Schnell, R. C.; Tsai, T.; Crosson, E.; Rella, C.; Trainer, M.; Frost, G. J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Montzka, S. A.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Tans, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    New extraction technologies are making natural gas from shale and tight sand gas reservoirs in the United States (US) more accessible. As a result, the US has become the largest producer of natural gas in the world. This growth in natural gas production may result in increased leakage of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, offsetting the climate benefits of natural gas relative to other fossil fuels. Methane emissions from natural gas production are not well quantified because of the large variety of potential sources, the variability in production and operating practices, the uneven distribution of emitters, and a lack of verification of emission inventories with direct atmospheric measurements. Researchers at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) have used simple mass balance approaches to estimate emissions of CH4 from several natural gas and oil plays across the US. We will summarize the results of the available aircraft and ground-based atmospheric emissions estimates to better understand the spatial and temporal distribution of these emissions in the US.

  7. Emissions of CH4 from natural gas production in the United States using aircraft-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Petron, Gabrielle; Ryerson, Thomas; Peischl, Jeff; Trainer, Michael; Rella, Chris; Hardesty, Michael; Crosson, Eric; Montzka, Stephen; Tans, Pieter; Shepson, Paul; Kort, Eric

    2014-05-01

    New extraction technologies are making natural gas from shale and tight sand gas reservoirs in the United States (US) more accessible. As a result, the US has become the largest producer of natural gas in the world. This growth in natural gas production may result in increased leakage of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, offsetting the climate benefits of natural gas relative to other fossil fuels. Methane emissions from natural gas production are not well quantified because of the large variety of potential sources, the variability in production and operating practices, the uneven distribution of emitters, and a lack of verification of emission inventories with direct atmospheric measurements. Researchers at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) have used simple mass balance approaches in combination with isotopes and light alkanes to estimate emissions of CH4 from several natural gas and oil plays across the US. We will summarize the results of the available aircraft and ground-based atmospheric emissions estimates to better understand the spatial and temporal distribution of these emissions in the US.

  8. Singlet ground-state fluctuations in praseodymium observed by muon spin relaxation in PrP and PrP0.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, D R; Waeppling, R; Kalvius, G M; Jr, M F White; Stronach, C E

    2005-01-01

    Muon spin relaxation (μSR) in the singlet ground-state compounds PrP and PrP 0.9 reveals the unusual situation of a Lorentzian local field distribution with fast-fluctuation-limit strong-collision dynamics, a case that does not show motional narrowing. Contrary to publications by others, where PrP 0.9 was asserted to have vacancy-induced spin-glass freezing, no spin-glass freezing is seen in PrP 0.9 or PrP down to ≤100mK. This was confirmed by magnetization measurements on these same samples. In both compounds, the muon spin relaxation rate does increase as temperature decreases, demonstrating increasing strength of the paramagnetic response. A Monte Carlo model of fluctuations of Pr ions out of their crystalline-electric-field singlet ground states into their magnetic excited states (and back down again) produces the strong-collision-dynamic Lorentzian relaxation functions observed at each individual temperature but not the observed temperature dependence. This model contains no exchange interaction, and so predicts decreasing paramagnetic response as the temperature decreases, contrary to the temperature dependence observed. Comparison of the simulations to the data suggests that the exchange interaction is causing the system to approach magnetic freezing (by mode softening), but fails to complete the process

  9. INTEGRAL SPI Observations of Cygnus X-1 in the Soft State: What about the Jet Contribution in Hard X-Rays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.; Chauvin, M.

    2014-07-01

    During the first 7 yr of the INTEGRAL mission (2003-2009), Cyg X-1 has essentially been detected in its hard state (HS), with some incursions in intermediate HSs. This long, spectrally stable period allowed in particular the measurement of the polarization of the high-energy component that has long been observed above 200 keV in this peculiar object. This result strongly suggests that here we see the contribution of the jet, known to emit a strong synchrotron radio emission. In 2010 June, Cyg X-1 underwent a completed transition toward a soft state (SS). It gave us the unique opportunity to study in detail the corona emission in this spectral state, and to investigate in particular the behavior of the jet contribution. Indeed, during the SS, the hard X-ray emission decreases drastically, with its maximum energy shifted toward lower energy and its flux divided by a factor of ~5-10. Interestingly, the radio emission follows a similar drop, supporting the correlation between the jet emission and the hard component, even though the flux is too low to quantify the polarization characteristics. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland), the Czech Republic and Poland with the participation of Russia and USA.

  10. SDP_wlanger_3: State of the Diffuse ISM: Galactic Observations of the Terahertz CII Line (GOT CPlus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W.

    2011-09-01

    Star formation activity throughout the Galactic disk depends on the thermal and dynamical state of the interstellar gas, which in turn depends on heating and cooling rates, modulated by the gravitational potential and shock and turbulent pressures. Molecular cloud formation, and thus the star formation, may be regulated by pressures in the interstellar medium (ISM). To understand these processes we need information about the properties of the diffuse atomic and diffuse molecular gas clouds, and Photon Dominated Regions (PDR). An important tracer of these regions is the CII line at 158 microns (1900.5 GHz). We propose a "pencil-beam" survey of CII with HIFI band 7b, based on deep integrations and systematic sparse sampling of the Galactic disk plus selected targets, totaling over 900 lines of sight. We will detect both emission and, against the bright inner Galaxy and selected continuum sources, absorption lines. These spectra will provide the astronomical community with a large rich statistical database of the diffuse cloud properties throughout the Galaxy for understanding the Milky Way ISM and, by extension, other galaxies. It will be extremely valuable for determining the properties of the atomic gas, the role of barometric pressure and turbulence in cloud evolution, and the properties of the interface between the atomic and molecular clouds. The CII line is one of the major ISM cooling lines and is present throughout the Galactic plane. It is the strongest far-IR emission line in the Galaxy, with a total luminosity about a 1000 times that of the CO J=1-0 line. Combined with other data, it can be used to determine density, pressure, and radiation environment in gas clouds, and PDRs, and their dynamics via velocity fields. HSO is the best opportunity over the next several years to probe the ISM in this tracer and will provide a template for large-scale surveys with dedicated small telescopes and future surveys of other important ISM tracers.

  11. KPOT_wlanger_1: State of the Diffuse ISM: Galactic Observations of the Terahertz CII Line (GOT CPlus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W.

    2007-10-01

    Star formation activity throughout the Galactic disk depends on the thermal and dynamical state of the interstellar gas, which in turn depends on heating and cooling rates, modulated by the gravitational potential and shock and turbulent pressures. Molecular cloud formation, and thus the star formation, may be regulated by pressures in the interstellar medium (ISM). To understand these processes we need information about the properties of the diffuse atomic and diffuse molecular gas clouds, and Photon Dominated Regions (PDR). An important tracer of these regions is the CII line at 158 microns (1900.5 GHz). We propose a "pencil-beam" survey of CII with HIFI band 7b, based on deep integrations and systematic sparse sampling of the Galactic disk plus selected targets, totaling over 900 lines of sight. We will detect both emission and, against the bright inner Galaxy and selected continuum sources, absorption lines. These spectra will provide the astronomical community with a large rich statistical database of the diffuse cloud properties throughout the Galaxy for understanding the Milky Way ISM and, by extension, other galaxies. It will be extremely valuable for determining the properties of the atomic gas, the role of barometric pressure and turbulence in cloud evolution, and the properties of the interface between the atomic and molecular clouds. The CII line is one of the major ISM cooling lines and is present throughout the Galactic plane. It is the strongest far-IR emission line in the Galaxy, with a total luminosity about a 1000 times that of the CO J=1-0 line. Combined with other data, it can be used to determine density, pressure, and radiation environment in gas clouds, and PDRs, and their dynamics via velocity fields. HSO is the best opportunity over the next several years to probe the ISM in this tracer and will provide a template for large-scale surveys with dedicated small telescopes and future surveys of other important ISM tracers.

  12. Observation of D^{0} Meson Decays to π^{+}π^{-}μ^{+}μ^{-} and K^{+}K^{-}μ^{+}μ^{-} Final States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alfonso Albero, A; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Beliy, N; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Berninghoff, D; Bertholet, E; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Bjørn, M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brundu, D; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Byczynski, W; Cadeddu, S; Cai, H; Calabrese, R; Calladine, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chitic, S-G; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Ciambrone, P; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Colombo, T; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Douglas, L; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Federici, L; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Declara, P; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Grabowski, J P; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hancock, T H; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hasse, C; Hatch, M; He, J; Hecker, M; Heinicke, K; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Z-C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Ibis, P; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kazeev, N; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozeiha, M; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, P-R; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Lisovskyi, V; Liu, X; Loh, D; Loi, A; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Macko, V; Mackowiak, P; Maddrell-Mander, S; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Maisuzenko, D; Majewski, M W; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Marangotto, D; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Mead, J V; Meadows, B; Meaux, C; Meier, F; Meinert, N; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Millard, E; Minard, M-N; Minzoni, L; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Mombacher, T; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Pullen, H; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Quintana, B; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Robert, A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Ruiz Vidal, J; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarpis, G; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stepanova, M; Stevens, H; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; Szymanski, M; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Usachov, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagner, A; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-11-03

    The first observation of the D^{0}→π^{+}π^{-}μ^{+}μ^{-} and D^{0}→K^{+}K^{-}μ^{+}μ^{-} decays is reported using a sample of proton-proton collisions collected by LHCb at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to 2  fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. The corresponding branching fractions are measured using as normalization the decay D^{0}→K^{-}π^{+}[μ^{+}μ^{-}]_{ρ^{0}/ω}, where the two muons are consistent with coming from the decay of a ρ^{0} or ω meson. The results are B(D^{0}→π^{+}π^{-}μ^{+}μ^{-})=(9.64±0.48±0.51±0.97)×10^{-7} and B(D^{0}→K^{+}K^{-}μ^{+}μ^{-})=(1.54±0.27±0.09±0.16)×10^{-7}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the limited knowledge of the normalization branching fraction. The dependence of the branching fraction on the dimuon mass is also investigated.

  13. Causes of death and infant mortality rates among full-term births in the United States between 2010 and 2012: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairoliya, Neha; Fink, Günther

    2018-03-01

    While the high prevalence of preterm births and its impact on infant mortality in the US have been widely acknowledged, recent data suggest that even full-term births in the US face substantially higher mortality risks compared to European countries with low infant mortality rates. In this paper, we use the most recent birth records in the US to more closely analyze the primary causes underlying mortality rates among full-term births. Linked birth and death records for the period 2010-2012 were used to identify the state- and cause-specific burden of infant mortality among full-term infants (born at 37-42 weeks of gestation). Multivariable logistic models were used to assess the extent to which state-level differences in full-term infant mortality (FTIM) were attributable to observed differences in maternal and birth characteristics. Random effects models were used to assess the relative contribution of state-level variation to FTIM. Hypothetical mortality outcomes were computed under the assumption that all states could achieve the survival rates of the best-performing states. A total of 10,175,481 infants born full-term in the US between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012, were analyzed. FTIM rate (FTIMR) was 2.2 per 1,000 live births overall, and ranged between 1.29 (Connecticut, 95% CI 1.08, 1.53) and 3.77 (Mississippi, 95% CI 3.39, 4.19) at the state level. Zero states reached the rates reported in the 6 low-mortality European countries analyzed (FTIMR 2.75. Sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) accounted for 43% of FTIM; congenital malformations and perinatal conditions accounted for 31% and 11.3% of FTIM, respectively. The largest mortality differentials between states with good and states with poor FTIMR were found for SUDI, with particularly large risk differentials for deaths due to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) (odds ratio [OR] 2.52, 95% CI 1.86, 3.42) and suffocation (OR 4.40, 95% CI 3.71, 5.21). Even though these mortality differences

  14. Evaluation of NASA's MERRA Precipitation Product in Reproducing the Observed Trend and Distribution of Extreme Precipitation Events in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Hamed; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Hsu, Kuo-Lin; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Lee, Jaechoul; Wehner, Michael F.; Collow, Allison

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) precipitation product in reproducing the trend and distribution of extreme precipitation events. Utilizing the extreme value theory, time-invariant and time-variant extreme value distributions are developed to model the trends and changes in the patterns of extreme precipitation events over the contiguous United States during 1979-2010. The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) U.S.Unified gridded observation data are used as the observational dataset. The CPC analysis shows that the eastern and western parts of the United States are experiencing positive and negative trends in annual maxima, respectively. The continental-scale patterns of change found in MERRA seem to reasonably mirror the observed patterns of change found in CPC. This is not previously expected, given the difficulty in constraining precipitation in reanalysis products. MERRA tends to overestimate the frequency at which the 99th percentile of precipitation is exceeded because this threshold tends to be lower in MERRA, making it easier to be exceeded. This feature is dominant during the summer months. MERRA tends to reproduce spatial patterns of the scale and location parameters of the generalized extreme value and generalized Pareto distributions. However, MERRA underestimates these parameters, particularly over the Gulf Coast states, leading to lower magnitudes in extreme precipitation events. Two issues in MERRA are identified: 1) MERRA shows a spurious negative trend in Nebraska and Kansas, which is most likely related to the changes in the satellite observing system over time that has apparently affected the water cycle in the central United States, and 2) the patterns of positive trend over the Gulf Coast states and along the East Coast seem to be correlated with the tropical cyclones in these regions. The analysis of the trends in the seasonal precipitation extremes indicates that

  15. The FDA Unapproved Drugs Initiative: An Observational Study of the Consequences for Drug Prices and Shortages in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Dhruva, Sanket S; Fox, Erin R; Ross, Joseph S

    2017-10-01

    Hundreds of drug products are currently marketed in the United States without approval from the FDA. The 2006 Unapproved Drugs Initiative (UDI) requires manufacturers to remove these drug products from the market or obtain FDA approval by demonstrating evidence of safety and efficacy. Once the FDA acts against an unapproved drug, fewer manufacturers remain in the market, potentially enabling drug price increases and greater susceptibility to drug shortages. There is a need for systematic study of the UDI's effect on prices and shortages of all targeted drugs. To examine the clinical evidence for approval and association with prices and shortages of previously unapproved prescription drugs after being addressed by the UDI. Previously unapproved prescription drugs that faced UDI regulatory action or with at least 1 product that received FDA approval through manufacturers' voluntary compliance with the UDI between 2006 and 2015 were identified. The clinical evidence was categorized as either newly conducted clinical trials or use of previously published literature and/or bioequivalence studies to demonstrate safety and efficacy. We determined the change in average wholesale price, presence of shortage, and duration of shortage for each drug during the 2 years before and after UDI regulatory action or approval through voluntary compliance. Between 2006 and 2015, 34 previously unapproved prescription drugs were addressed by the UDI. Nearly 90% of those with a drug product that received FDA approval were supported by literature reviews or bioequivalence studies, not new clinical trial evidence. Among the 26 drugs with available pricing data, average wholesale price during the 2 years before and after voluntary approval or UDI action increased by a median of 37% (interquartile range [IQR] = 23%-204%; P Innovation; from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association to better understand medical technology evidence generation; from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to

  16. First direct observation of bound-state beta-decay. Measurements of branching and lifetime of {sup 207}Tl{sup 81+} fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutin, D.

    2005-08-01

    The first experimental observation of bound-state beta-decay showed, that due solely to the electron stripping, a stable nuclide, e.g. {sup 163}Dy, became unstable. Also a drastic modification of the half-life of bare {sup 187}Re, from 4.12(2) x 10{sup 10} years down to 32.9(20) years, could be observed. It was mainly due to the possibility for the mother nuclide to decay into a previously inaccessible nuclear level of the daughter nuclide. It was proposed to study a nuclide where this decay mode was competing with continuum-state beta-decay, in order to measure their respective branchings. The ratio {beta}{sub b}/{beta}{sub c} could also be evaluated for the first time. {sup 207}Tl was chosen due to its high atomic number, and Q-value of about 1.4 MeV, small enough to enhance the {beta}{sub b} probability and large enough to allow the use of time-resolved Schottky Mass Spectrometry (SMS) to study the evolution of mother and bound-state beta-decay daughter ions. The decay properties of the ground state and isomeric state of {sup 207}Tl{sup 81+} have been investigated at the GSI accelerator facility in two separate experiments. For the first time {beta}-decay where the electron could go either to a bound state (atomic orbitals) and lead to {sup 207}Pb{sup 81+} as a daughter nuclide, or to a continuum state and lead to {sup 207}Pb{sup 82+}, has been observed. The respective branchings of these two processes could be measured as well. The deduced total nuclear half-life of 255(17) s for {sup 207}Tl{sup 81+}, was slightly modified with respect to the half-life of the neutral atom of 286(2) s. It was nevertheless in very good agreement with calculations based on the assumption that the beta-decay was following an allowed type of transition. The branching {beta}{sub b}/{beta}{sub c}=0.192(20), was also in very good agreement with the same calculations. The application of stochastic precooling allowed to observe in addition the 1348 keV short-lived isomeric state of {sup

  17. Observation of the long-lived triplet excited state of perylenebisimide (PBI) in C^N cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes and application in photocatalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jifu; Zhong, Fangfang; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2013-07-14

    Perylenebisimide (PBI) was used to prepare C^N cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes that show strong absorption of visible light and it is the first time the long-lived triplet excited state of PBI chromophore was observed in a transition metal complex (τT = 22.3 μs). Previously, the lifetime of the triplet state of PBI in transition metal complexes was usually shorter than 1.0 μs. Long-lived triplet excited states are useful for applications in photocatalysis or other photophysical processes concerning triplet-triplet-energy-transfer. PBI and amino-PBI were used for preparation of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir-2 and Ir-3), in which the PBI chromophore was connected to the coordination center via C≡C π-conjugation bond. The new complexes show strong absorption in visible region (ε = 34,200 M(-1) cm(-1) at 541 nm for Ir-2, and ε = 19,000 at 669 nm for Ir-3), compared to the model complex Ir(ppy)(bpy)[PF6] Ir-1 (ε PBI-localized long-lived (3)IL states were populated for Ir-2 and Ir-3 upon photoexcitation. The complexes were used as triplet photosensitizers for (1)O2-mediated photooxidation of 1,5-dihydronaphthalene to produce juglone, an important intermediate for preparation of anti-cancer compounds. (1)O2 quantum yields (Φ(Δ)) up to 91% were observed for the new Ir(III) complexes and the overall photosensitizing ability is much higher than the conventional Ir(III) complex Ir-1, which shows the typical weak visible light absorption in visible region. Our results are useful for preparation of transition metal complexes that show strong absorption of visible light and long-lived triplet excited state and for the application of these complexes in photocatalysis.

  18. Rainfall and runoff Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Washington State considering the change and uncertainty of observed and anticipated extreme rainfall and snow events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Y. K.; Mortuza, M. R.; Li, H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The observed and anticipated increasing trends in extreme storm magnitude and frequency, as well as the associated flooding risk in the Pacific Northwest highlighted the need for revising and updating the local intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves, which are commonly used for designing critical water infrastructure. In Washington State, much of the drainage system installed in the last several decades uses IDF curves that are outdated by as much as half a century, making the system inadequate and vulnerable for flooding as seen more frequently in recent years. In this study, we have developed new and forward looking rainfall and runoff IDF curves for each county in Washington State using recently observed and projected precipitation data. Regional frequency analysis coupled with Bayesian uncertainty quantification and model averaging methods were used to developed and update the rainfall IDF curves, which were then used in watershed and snow models to develop the runoff IDF curves that explicitly account for effects of snow and drainage characteristic into the IDF curves and related designs. The resulted rainfall and runoff IDF curves provide more reliable, forward looking, and spatially resolved characteristics of storm events that can assist local decision makers and engineers to thoroughly review and/or update the current design standards for urban and rural storm water management infrastructure in order to reduce the potential ramifications of increasing severe storms and resulting floods on existing and planned storm drainage and flood management systems in the state.

  19. Observation of J/ψp resonances consistent with pentaquark states in Λb→J/ψpK- decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    It has now been over 50 years since the inception of the quark model. The original papers by Gell-Mann and Zweig included the description of the now well known three-quark baryons and quark-antiquark mesons. They also included the possibility of "exotic" hadrons, such as mesons containing two quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), or four quarks and an antiquark (pentaquarks). There is no clear reason why such exotic combinations of quarks should not exist. Indeed, in recent years strong tetraquark candidates have been discovered. However, until recently the observation of any lasting pentaquark candidates had eluded all searches. Using the LHCb Run 1 dataset, two J/ψp resonances consistent with pentaquark states have been observed in Λb→J/ψpK- decays. I will describe a full amplitude analysis which was performed in order to be most sensitive to the underlying physics and best study the resonant nature of these states. These states are overwhelmingly significant, and mark the first convincing observati...

  20. Multiband Observations of the Quasar PKS 2326–502 during Active and Quiescent Gamma-Ray States in 2010–2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutka, Michael S. [The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Carpenter, Bryce D.; Gehrels, Neil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ojha, Roopesh [UMBC/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Finke, Justin D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); D’Ammando, Filippo [Università di Bologna Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, INAF-IRA, Bologna (Italy); Kadler, Matthias [Lehrstuhl für Astronomie, Universität Würzburg, Emil -Fischer-Straße 31, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Edwards, Philip G. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Stevens, Jamie [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, 1828 Yarrie Lake Road, Narrabri NSW 2390 (Australia); Torresi, Eleonora; Grandi, Paola [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, (National Institute of Astrophysics) INAF-IASFBO, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Nesci, Roberto [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, (National Institute of Astrophysics) INAF-IAPS, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Krauß, Felicia [GRAPPA and Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Müller, Cornelia [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wilms, Joern, E-mail: ditko86@gmail.com, E-mail: carpbr01@gmail.com [Remeis Observatory and ECAP, Sternwartstr. 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    Quasi-simultaneous observations of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar PKS 2326−502 were carried out in the γ -ray, X-ray, UV, optical, near-infrared, and radio bands. Using these observations, we are able to characterize the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source during two flaring and one quiescent γ -ray states. These data were used to constrain one-zone leptonic models of the SEDs of each flare and investigate the physical conditions giving rise to them. While modeling one flare required only changes in the electron spectrum compared to the quiescent state, modeling the other flare required changes in both the electron spectrum and the size of the emitting region. These results are consistent with an emerging pattern of two broad classes of flaring states seen in blazars. Type 1 flares are explained by changes solely in the electron distribution, whereas type 2 flares require a change in an additional parameter. This suggests that different flares, even in the same source, may result from different physical conditions or different regions in the jet.

  1. State updating of a distributed hydrological model with Ensemble Kalman Filtering: effects of updating frequency and observation network density on forecast accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rakovec

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the optimal setup for discharge assimilation within a spatially distributed hydrological model. The Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF is employed to update the grid-based distributed states of such an hourly spatially distributed version of the HBV-96 model. By using a physically based model for the routing, the time delay and attenuation are modelled more realistically. The discharge and states at a given time step are assumed to be dependent on the previous time step only (Markov property.

    Synthetic and real world experiments are carried out for the Upper Ourthe (1600 km2, a relatively quickly responding catchment in the Belgian Ardennes. We assess the impact on the forecasted discharge of (1 various sets of the spatially distributed discharge gauges and (2 the filtering frequency. The results show that the hydrological forecast at the catchment outlet is improved by assimilating interior gauges. This augmentation of the observation vector improves the forecast more than increasing the updating frequency. In terms of the model states, the EnKF procedure is found to mainly change the pdfs of the two routing model storages, even when the uncertainty in the discharge simulations is smaller than the defined observation uncertainty.

  2. Observation of $J/\\psi p$ resonances consistent with pentaquark states in ${\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi K^-p}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Ninci, Daniele; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-08-12

    Observations of exotic structures in the $J/\\psi p$ channel, that we refer to as pentaquark-charmonium states, in $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi K^- p$ decays are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3/fb acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions. An amplitude analysis is performed on the three-body final-state that reproduces the two-body mass and angular distributions. To obtain a satisfactory fit of the structures seen in the $J/\\psi p$ mass spectrum, it is necessary to include two Breit-Wigner amplitudes that each describe a resonant state. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. One has a mass of $4380\\pm 8\\pm 29$ MeV and a width of $205\\pm 18\\pm 86$ MeV, while the second is narrower, with a mass of $4449.8\\pm 1.7\\pm 2.5$ MeV and a width of $39\\pm 5\\pm 19$ MeV. The preferred $J^P$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  3. Observation of J/ψp Resonances Consistent with Pentaquark States in Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψK^{-}p Decays.</