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Sample records for pwr type core

  1. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  2. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  3. Natural vibrations of a core banel of a PWR type reactor by elements of revolution shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcellos, C.S. de.

    1980-01-01

    Aim to estimate the behavior of the cove barrel of PWR type reactors, submitted to several load conditions, their dynamic characteristic, were determined. In order to obtain the natural modes and frequencies of the core barrel, the CYLDYFE comprete code based in the finite element method, was developed. The obtained results are compared with results obtained by other programs such as SAP, ASKA and STRUDL/DYNAL and by other analytical methods. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. The development of emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR Candu type of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mursid Djokolelono.

    1976-01-01

    Emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR-Candu type of nuclear power plant are reviewed. In PWR and BWR the emergency cooling can be catagorized as active high pressure, active low pressure, and a passive one. The PWR uses components of the shutdown cooling system: whereas the BWR uses components of pressure suppression contaiment. HWR Candu also uses the shutdown cooling system similar to the PWR except some details coming out from moderator coolant separation and expensive cost of heavy water. (author)

  5. Feasibility study on thermal-hydraulic design of reduced-moderation PWR-type core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime

    2000-03-01

    At JAERI, a conceptual study on reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) has been performed as one of the advanced reactor system which is designed so as to realize the conversion ratio more than unity. In this reactor concept, the gap spacing between the fuel rods is remarkably narrower than in a reactor currently operated. Therefore, an evaluation of the core thermal margin becomes very important in the design of the RMWR. In this study, we have performed a feasibility evaluation on thermal-hydraulic design of RM-PWR type core (core thermal output: 2900 MWt, Rod gaps: 1 mm). In RM-PWR core, seed and blanket regions are exist. In the blanket region, power density is lower than that of the seed region. Then, evaluation was performed under setting a channel box to each fuel assembly in order to adjust the flow rate in each assembly, because it is possible that the coolant boils in the seed region. In the feasibility evaluations, subchannel code COBRA-IV-I was used in combination with KfK DNB (departure nucleate boiling) correlation. When coolant mass flow rate to the blanket fuel assembly is reduced by 40%, and that to the seed fuel assembly is increased, coolant boiling is not occurred in the assembly region calculation. Provided that the channel boxes to the blanket fuel assembly are set up and coolant mass flow rate to the blanket fuel assembly is reduced by 40%, it is confirmed by the whole core calculation that the boiling of the coolant is not occurred and the RM-PWR core is feasible. (author)

  6. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  7. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  8. Method of injecting cooling water in emergency core cooling system (ECCS) of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto; Adachi, Michihiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a cooling water injection method in an ECCS, which can perform effective cooling of the reactor core. Method: In a method of injecting cooling water in an ECCS as a countermeasure against a rupture accident of a pwr type reactor, cooling water in the first pressure storage injection system is injected into the upper plenum of the reactor pressure vessel at a set pressure of from 50 to 90 atg. and a set temperature of from 80 to 200 0 C, cooling water in the second pressure storage injection system is injected into the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel at a pressure of from 25 to 60 atg. which is lower than the set pressure and a temperature less than 60 0 C, and further in combination with these procedures, cooling water of less than 60 0 C is injected into a high-temperature side piping, in the high-pressure injection system of upstroke of 100 atg. by means of a pump and the low-pressure injection system of upstroke of 20 atg. also by means of a pump, thereby cooling the reactor core. (Aizawa, K.)

  9. Flow with boiling in four-cusp channels simulating damaged core in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of subcooled nucleate flow boiling in non-circular channels is of great importance to engineering applications in particular to Nuclear Engineering. In the present work, an experimental apparatus, consisting basically of a refrigeration system, running on refrigerant-12, has been developed. Preliminary tests were made with a circular tube. The main objective has been to analyse subcooled flow boiling in four-cusp channels simulating the flow conditions in a PWR core degraded by accident. Correlations were developed for the forced convection film coefficient for both single-phase and subcooled flow boiling. The incipience of boiling in such geometry has also been studied. (author) [pt

  10. New long-cycle small modular PWR cores using particle type burnable poisons for low boron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hoseong; Hwang, Dae Hee [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ser Gi, E-mail: sergihong@khu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ho Choel [Core and Fuel Analysis Group, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNP-CRI), Daejon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • New advanced burnable poison rods (BPR) are suggested for low boron operation in PWR. • The new SMR cores have long cycle length of ∼4.5 EFPYs with low boron concentration. • The SMR core satisfies all the design targets and constraints. - Abstract: In this paper, new small long-cycle PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) cores for low boron concentration operation are designed by employing advanced burnable poison rods (BPRs) in which the BISO (Bi-Isotropic) particles of burnable poison are distributed in a SiC matrix. The BPRs are designed by adjusting the kernel diameter, the kernel material and the packing fraction to effectively reduce the excess reactivity in order to reduce the boron concentration in the coolant and achieve a flat change in excess reactivity over a long operational cycle. In addition, axial zoning of the BPRs was suggested to improve the core performances, and it was shown that the suggested axial zoning of BPRs considerably extends the cycle length compared to a core with no BPR axial zoning. The results of the core physics analyses showed that the cores using BPRs with a B{sub 4}C kernel have long cycle lengths of ∼4.5 EFPYs (Effective Full Power Years), small maximum CBCs (Critical Boron Concentration) lower than 370 ppm, low power peaking factors, and large shutdown margins of control element assemblies.

  11. Evaluation of tight-pitch PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.; Driscoll, M.J.; Lanning, D.D.

    1979-08-01

    The impact of tight pinch cores on the consumption of natural uranium ore has been evaluated for two systems of coupled PWR's namely one particular type of thorium system - 235 U/UO 2 : Pu/ThO 2 : 233 U/ThO 2 - and the conventional recycle-mode uranium system - 235 U/UO 2 : Pu/UO 2 . The basic parameter varied was the fuel-to-moderator volume ratio (F/M) of the (uniform) lattice for the last core in each sequence. Although methods and data verification in the range of present interest, 0.5 (current lattices) 1.0, the EPRI-LEOPARD and LASER programs used for the thorium and uranium calculations, respectively, were successfully benchmarked against several of the more pertinent experiments

  12. Design study on PWR-type reduced-moderation light water core. Investigation of core adopting seed-blanket fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Shoichiro; Kugo, Teruhiko; Okubo, Tsutomu; Iwamura, Takamichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    As a part of the design study on PWR-type Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs), a light water cooled core with the seed-blanket type fuel assemblies has been investigated. An assembly with seed of 13 layers and blanket of 5 layers was selected by optimization calculations. The core was composed with the 163 assemblies. The following results were obtained by burn-up calculations with the MVP-BURN code; The cycle length is 15 months by 3-batch refueling. The discharge burn-up including the inner blanket is about 25 GWd/t. The conversion ratio is about 1.0. The void reactivity coefficient is about-26.1 pcm/%void at BOC and -21.7pcm%void at EOC. About 10% of MA makes conversion ratio decrease about 0.05 to obtain the same burn-up. The void reactivity coefficient increased significantly and it is necessary to reduce it. FP amount corresponding to about 2 % of total plutonium weight makes reactivity decrease about 0.5 %{delta}k/k and void reactivity coefficient increase, however these changes are within the design margins. Capability of multi-recycling of plutonium was confirmed, using discharged plutonium for 4 cycles, if fissile plutonium of 15.5wt% is used. The conversion ratio increases by about 0.026 with recycling. However, void reactivity coefficient increases and some effort to obtain negative void reactivity coefficient is necessary. (author)

  13. PWR type reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi.

    1993-01-01

    A water chamber of a horizontal U-shaped pipe type steam generator is partitioned to an upper high temperature water chamber portion and a lower low temperature water chamber portion. An exit nozzle of a reactor container containing a reactor core therein is connected to a suction port of a coolant pump by way of first high temperature pipelines. The exit port of the coolant pump is connected to the high temperature water chamber portion of the steam generator by way of second high temperature pipelines. The low temperature water chamber portion of the steam generator is connected to an inlet nozzle of the reactor container by way of the low temperature pipelines. The low temperature water chamber portion of the steam generator is positioned lower than the high temperature water chamber portion, but upper than the reactor core. Accordingly, all of the steam generator for a primary coolant system, coolant pumps as well as high temperature pipelines and low temperature pipelines connecting them are disposed above the reactor core. With such a constitution, there is no worry of interrupting core cooling even upon occurrence of an accident, to improve plant safety. (I.N.)

  14. Application of perturbation theory to sensitivity calculations of PWR type reactor cores using the two-channel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.C.J.G. de.

    1988-12-01

    Sensitivity calculations are very important in design and safety of nuclear reactor cores. Large codes with a great number of physical considerations have been used to perform sensitivity studies. However, these codes need long computation time involving high costs. The perturbation theory has constituted an efficient and economical method to perform sensitivity analysis. The present work is an application of the perturbation theory (matricial formalism) to a simplified model of DNB (Departure from Nucleate Boiling) analysis to perform sensitivity calculations in PWR cores. Expressions to calculate the sensitivity coefficients of enthalpy and coolant velocity with respect to coolant density and hot channel area were developed from the proposed model. The CASNUR.FOR code to evaluate these sensitivity coefficients was written in Fortran. The comparison between results obtained from the matricial formalism of perturbation theory with those obtained directly from the proposed model makes evident the efficiency and potentiality of this perturbation method for nuclear reactor cores sensitivity calculations (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 7 tabs

  15. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong.

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs

  16. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs.

  17. PWR type process heat reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Gilles; Petit, Guy.

    1974-01-01

    The nuclear reactor described is of the pressurized water type. It includes a prestressed concrete vessel, the upper part of which is shut by a closure, and a core surrounded by a core ring. The core fuel assemblies are supported by an initial set of vertical tubes integral with the bottom of the vessel, which serve to guide the rods of the control system. Over the core there is a second set of vertical tubes, able to receive the absorbing part of a control rod when this is raised above the core. An annular pressurizer around the core ring keeps the water in a liquid state. A pump is located above the second set of tubes and is integral with the closure. It circulates the water between the core and the intake of at least one primary heat exchanger, the exchanger (s) being placed between the wall of the vessel and the core ring [fr

  18. Economic optimization of PWR cores with ROSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhagen, F.C.M.; Wakker, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    The core-loading pattern is decisive for fuel cycle economics, fuel safety parameters and economic planning for future cycles. ROSA, NRG's loading pattern optimization code system for PWRs, has proven for over a decade to be a valuable tool to reactor operators for improving their fuel management economics. ROSA uses simulated annealing as loading pattern optimization technique, in combination with an extremely fast 3-D neutronics code for loading pattern calculations. The code is continuously extended with new optimization parameters and rules. This paper outlines recent developments of the ROSA code system and discusses results of PWR specific applications of ROSA. Core designs with a large variety of challenging constraints have been realized with ROSA. As a typical example, for the 193 assembly, Vantage 5H/RFA-2 fueled TVA's Watts Bar unit 1, a cycle 4 core with 76 feed assemblies was designed. This was followed by a high-energy cycle 5 with only 77 feed assemblies and approximately 535 days of natural cycle length. Subsequently, an economical core using 72 bundles was designed for cycle 6. This resulted in considerable savings in the cost of feed assemblies for reloads. The typical accuracy of ROSA compared to results of license codes in within ±0.02 for normalized assembly powers, ±0.03 for maximum enthalpy rise hot channel factor (F ΔH ), and ±3 days for natural cycle length. (author)

  19. Proposal for a advanced PWR core with adequate characteristics for passive safety concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, Jose Augusto

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a discussion upon the suitable from an advanced PWR core, classified by the EPRI as 'Passive PWR' (advanced reactor with passive safety concept to power plants with less than 600 MW electrical power). The discussion upon the type of core is based on nuclear fuel engineering concepts. Discussion is made on type of fuel materials, structural materials, geometric shapes and manufacturing process that are suitable to produce fuel assemblies which give good performance for this type of reactors. The analysis is guided by the EPRI requirements for Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR). By means of comparison, the analysis were done to Angra 1 (old type of 600 MWe PWR class), and the design of the Westinghouse Advanced PWR-AP600. It was verified as a conclusion of this work that the modern PWR fuels are suitable for advanced PWR's Nevertheless, this work presents a technical alternative to this kind of fuel, still using UO 2 as fuel, but changing its cylindrical form of pellets and pin type fuel element to plane shape pallets and plate type fuel element. This is not a novelty fuel, since it was used in the 50's at Shippingport Reactor and as an advanced version by CEA of France in the 70's. In this work it is proposed a new mechanical assembly design for this fuel, which can give adequate safety and operational performance to the core of a 'Passive PWR'. (author)

  20. The verification of PWR-fuel code for PWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surian Pinem; Tagor M Sembiring; Tukiran

    2015-01-01

    In-core fuel management for PWR is not easy because of the number of fuel assemblies in the core as much as 192 assemblies so many possibilities for placement of the fuel in the core. Configuration of fuel assemblies in the core must be precise and accurate so that the reactor operates safely and economically. It is necessary for verification of PWR-FUEL code that will be used in-core fuel management for PWR. PWR-FUEL code based on neutron transport theory and solved with the approach of multi-dimensional nodal diffusion method many groups and diffusion finite difference method (FDM). The goal is to check whether the program works fine, especially for the design and in-core fuel management for PWR. Verification is done with equilibrium core search model at three conditions that boron free, 1000 ppm boron concentration and critical boron concentration. The result of the average burn up fuel assemblies distribution and power distribution at BOC and EOC showed a consistent trend where the fuel with high power at BOC will produce a high burn up in the EOC. On the core without boron is obtained a high multiplication factor because absence of boron in the core and the effect of fission products on the core around 3.8 %. Reactivity effect at 1000 ppm boron solution of BOC and EOC is 6.44 % and 1.703 % respectively. Distribution neutron flux and power density using NODAL and FDM methods have the same result. The results show that the verification PWR-FUEL code work properly, especially for core design and in-core fuel management for PWR. (author)

  1. Cylindrization of a PWR core for neutronic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Rubens Souza dos

    2005-01-01

    In this work we propose a core cylindrization, starting from a PWR core configuration, through the use of an algorithm that becomes the process automated in the program, independent of the discretization. This approach overcomes the problem stemmed from the use of the neutron transport theory on the core boundary, in addition with the singularities associated with the presence of corners on the outer fuel element core of, existents in the light water reactors (LWR). The algorithm was implemented in a computational program used to identification of the control rod drop accident in a typical PWR core. The results showed that the algorithm presented consistent results comparing with an production code, for a problem with uniform properties. In our conclusions, we suggest, for future works, for analyzing the effect on mesh sizes for the Cylindrical geometry, and to compare the transport theory calculations versus diffusion theory, for the boundary conditions with corners, for typical PWR cores. (author)

  2. Two optimal control methods for PWR core control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karppinen, J.; Blomsnes, B.; Versluis, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    The Multistage Mathematical Programming (MMP) and State Variable Feedback (SVF) methods for PWR core control are presented in this paper. The MMP method is primarily intended for optimization of the core behaviour with respect to xenon induced power distribution effects in load cycle operation. The SVF method is most suited for xenon oscillation damping in situations where the core load is unpredictable or expected to stay constant. Results from simulation studies in which the two methods have been applied for control of simple PWR core models are presented. (orig./RW) [de

  3. Characterization of Factors affecting IASCC of PWR Core Internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Won Sam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    A lot works have been performed on IASCC in BWR. Recent efforts have been devoted to investigate IASCC in PWR, but the mechanism in PWR is not fully understood yet as compared with that in BWR due to a lack of data from laboratories and fields. Therefore it is strongly needed to review and analyse recent researches of IASCC in both BWR and PWR for establishing a proactive management technology for IASCC of core internals in Korean PWRs. This work is aimed to review mainly recent technical reports on IASCC of stainless steels for core internals in PWR. For comparison, the works on IASCC in BWR were also reviewed and briefly introduced in this report.

  4. An evaluation of tight - pitch PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.

    1980-01-01

    The subtask of a project carried out at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) for DOE (Department of Energy) as part of their NASAP/INFCE - related effects involving the optimization of PWR lattices in the recycle model is summarized. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Application of perturbation theory to sensitivity calculations of PWR type reactor cores using the two-channel model; Aplicacao da teoria de perturbacao para calculos de sensibilidade em nucleos de reatores PWR, usando um modelo de dois canais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, A.C.J.G. de

    1988-12-01

    Sensitivity calculations are very important in design and safety of nuclear reactor cores. Large codes with a great number of physical considerations have been used to perform sensitivity studies. However, these codes need long computation time involving high costs. The perturbation theory has constituted an efficient and economical method to perform sensitivity analysis. The present work is an application of the perturbation theory (matricial formalism) to a simplified model of DNB (Departure from Nucleate Boiling) analysis to perform sensitivity calculations in PWR cores. Expressions to calculate the sensitivity coefficients of enthalpy and coolant velocity with respect to coolant density and hot channel area were developed from the proposed model. The CASNUR.FOR code to evaluate these sensitivity coefficients was written in Fortran. The comparison between results obtained from the matricial formalism of perturbation theory with those obtained directly from the proposed model makes evident the efficiency and potentiality of this perturbation method for nuclear reactor cores sensitivity calculations (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 7 tabs.

  6. Reliability of PWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, A.A.T.; Muniz, A.A.

    1978-12-01

    Results of the analysis of factors influencing the reliability of international nuclear power plants of the PWR type are presented. The reliability factor is estimated and the probability of its having lower values than a certain specified value is discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. Utilization of thorium in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium 235 consumption is comparatively evaluated with thorium cycle for a PWR type reactor. Modifications are only made in fuels components. U-235 consumption is pratically unchanged in both cycles. Some good results are promised to the mixed U-238/Th-232 fuel cycle in 1/1 proportion [pt

  8. Three dimensions transport calculations for PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richebois, E.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work is to define improved 3-D core calculation methods based on the transport theory. These methods can be particularly useful and lead to more precise computations in areas of the core where anisotropy and steep flux gradients occur, especially near interface and boundary conditions and in regions of high heterogeneity (bundle with absorbent rods). In order to apply the transport theory a new method for calculating reflector constants has been developed, since traditional methods were only suited for 2-group diffusion core calculations and could not be extrapolated to transport calculations. In this thesis work, the new method for obtaining reflector constants is derived regardless of the number of energy groups and of the operator used. The core calculations results using the reflector constants thereof obtained have been validated on the EDF's power reactor Saint Laurent B1 with MOX loading. The advantages of a 3-D core transport calculation scheme have been highlighted as opposed to diffusion methods; there are a considerable number of significant effects and potential advantages to be gained in rod worth calculations for instance. These preliminary results obtained with on particular cycle will have to be confirmed by more systematic analysis. Accidents like MSLB (main steam line break) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) should also be investigated and constitute challenging situations where anisotropy is high and/or flux gradients are steep. This method is now being validated for others EDF's PWRs' reactors, as well as for experimental reactors and other types of commercial reactors. (author)

  9. Optimization of reload core design for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Wei; Xie Zhongsheng; Yin Banghua

    1995-01-01

    A direct efficient optimization technique has been effected for automatically optimizing the reload of PWR. The objective functions include: maximization of end-of-cycle (EOC) reactivity and maximization of average discharge burnup. The fuel loading optimization and burnable poison (BP) optimization are separated into two stages by using Haling principle. In the first stage, the optimum fuel reloading pattern without BP is determined by the linear programming method using enrichments as control variable, while in the second stage the optimum BP allocation is determined by the flexible tolerance method using the number of BP rods as control variable. A practical and efficient PWR reloading optimization program based on above theory has been encoded and successfully applied to Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNP) cycle 2 reloading design

  10. Design of a PWR emergency core cooling simulator loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, C.A. de.

    1982-12-01

    The preliminary design of a PWR Emergency Core Cooling Simulator Loop for investigations of the phenomena involved in a postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident, during the Reflooding Phase, is presented. The functions of each component of the loop, the design methods and calculations, the specification of the instrumentation, the system operation sequence, the materials list and a cost assessment are included. (Author) [pt

  11. Improvements to PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailloud, Jean; Monteil, Marcel.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements to pressurized water nuclear reactors are described, where the core coolant, called primary fluid, flows under the effect of a circulating pump in a primary loop between a steam generator and a pressure vessel containing the reactor core. The steam generator includes a bundle of tubes through which flows the primary fluid which exchanges calories with a secondary fluid, generally water, entering the generator as a liquid and issuing from it as steam. After expansion in turbines and recovery in a condenser, this steam is returned to the inside of the generator. Each primary fluid circulating pump is powered by a back-pressure turbine located in parallel with the high pressure section of the main turbine and hence fed with steam taken directly from the steam generator or the main steam pipe outside it [fr

  12. Serious accidents of PWR type reactors for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    This document presents the great lines of current knowledge on serious accidents relative to PWR type reactors. First, is exposed the physics of PWR type reactor core meltdown and the possible failure modes of the containment building in such a case. Then, are presented the dispositions implemented with regards to such accidents in France, particularly the pragmatic approach that prevails for the already built reactors. Then, the document tackles the case of the European pressurized reactor (E.P.R.), for which the dimensioning takes into account explicitly serious accidents: it is a question of objectives conception and their respect must be the object of a strict demonstration, by taking into account uncertainties. (N.C.)

  13. A Feasibility Study on Core Cooling of Reduced-Moderation PWR for the Large Break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroyuki Yoshida; Akira Ohnuki; Hajime Akimoto

    2002-01-01

    A design study of a reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) with tight lattice core is being carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) as one candidate for future reactors. The concept is developed to achieve a conversion ratio greater than unity using the tight lattice core (volume ratio of moderator to fuel is around 0.5 and the gap spacing between the fuel rods is remarkably narrower than in a reactor currently operated). Under such tight configuration, the core thermal margin becomes smaller and should be evaluated in a normal operation and also during the reflood phase in a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) for PWR type reactors. In this study, we have performed a feasibility evaluation on core cooling of reduced moderation PWR for the LBLOCA (200% break). The evaluation was performed for the primary system after the break by the REFLA/TRAC code. The core thermal output of the reduced moderation PWR is 2900 MWt, the gap between adjacent fuel rods is 1 mm, and heavy water is used as the moderator and coolant. The present design adopts seed fuel assemblies (MOX fuel) and several blanket fuel assemblies. In the blanket fuel assemblies, power density is lower than that of the seed fuel assemblies. Then, we set a channel box to each fuel assembly in order to adjust the flow rate in each assembly, because the possibility that the coolant boils in the seed fuel assemblies is very high. The pressure vessel diameter is bigger in comparison with a current PWR and core height is smaller than the current one. The current 4-loop PWR system is used, and, however, to fit into the bigger pressure vessel volume (about 1.5 times), we set up the capacity of the accumulator (1.5 times of the current PWR). Although the maximum clad temperature reached at about 1200 K in the position of 0.6 m from the lower core support plate, it is sufficiently lower than the design criteria of the current PWR (1500 K). The core cooling of the reduced moderation

  14. CORD, PWR Core Design and Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, Andrej

    1996-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CORD-2 is intended for core design applications of pressurised water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refuelling). 2 - Method of solution: The calculations are performed at the cell level with a lattice code in the supercell approximation to generate the single cell cross sections. Fuel assembly cross section homogenization is done in the diffusion approximation. Global core calculations can be done in the full three-dimensional cartesian geometry. Thermohydraulic feedbacks can be accounted for. The Effective Diffusion Homogenization method is used for generating the homogenized cross sections. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The complexity of the problem is selected by the user, depending on the capacity of his computer

  15. Reactor core design calculations and fuel management in PWR; Izracun projekta sredice in upravljanja z forivom tlacnovodnega reaktorja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravnik, M [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1987-07-01

    Computer programs and methods developed at J. Stefan Institute for nuclear core design of Krsko NPP are treated. development, scope, verification and organisation of core design procedure are presented. The core design procedure is applicable to any NPP of PWR type. (author)

  16. Core catcher concepts future PWR-Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Werle, H.

    1994-01-01

    Light water reactors of the next generation should have still greater passive safety, even in the most serious accidents. This includes the long term safe inclusion of the core inventory in the case of core meltdown accidents. The three concepts for cooling the liquefied core outside the reactor pressure vessel examined by KfK should remove the post-shutdown heat by direct contact of the melt with water. The geometric distribution of the melt increases its surface area, so that favourable conditions for heat removal from the poorly thermally-conducting melt are created and complete quick solidification occurs. The experiments examine both the relocation and distribution mechanisms of the melt and the reactions occurring when water enters. As strong interaction is possible on direct contact of the melt with water, an important aim is experimental determination and limitation of any resulting mechanical stresses. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Core power capability verification for PWR NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Chunyu; Liu Changwen; Zhang Hong; Liang Wei

    2002-01-01

    The Principle and methodology of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant core power capability verification for reload are introduced. The radial and axial power distributions of normal operation (category I or condition I) and abnormal operation (category II or condition II) are simulated by using neutronics calculation code. The linear power density margin and DNBR margin for both categories, which reflect core safety, are analyzed from the point view of reactor physics and T/H, and thus category I operating domain and category II protection set point are verified. Besides, the verification results of reference NPP are also given

  18. Reverse depletion method for PWR core reload design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1985-01-01

    Low-leakage fuel management is currently practiced in over half of all pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores. Prospects for even greater use of in-board fresh fuel loading are good as utilities seek to reduce core vessel fluence, mitigate pressurized thermal shock concerns, and extend vessel lifetime. Consequently, large numbers of burnable poison (BP) pins are being used to control the power peaking at the in-board fresh fuel positions. This has presented an additional complexity to the core reload design problem. In addition to determining the best location of each assembly in the core, the designer must concurrently determine the distribution of BP pins in the fresh fuel. A procedure was developed that utilizes the well-known Haling depletion to achieve an end-of-cycle (EOC) core state where the assembly pattern is configured in the absence of all control poison. This effectively separates the assembly assignment and BP distribution problems. Once an acceptable pattern at EOC is configured, the burnable and soluble poison required to control the power and core excess reactivity are solved for as unknown variables while depleting the cycle in reverse from the EOC exposure distribution to the beginning of cycle. The methods developed were implemented in an approved light water reactor licensing code to ensure the validity of the results obtained and provide for the maximum utility to PWR core reload design

  19. Fuel assembly for pressure loss variable PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikuni, Masaaki.

    1993-01-01

    In a PWR type reactor, a pressure loss control plate is attached detachably to a securing screw holes on the lower surface of a lower nozzle to reduce a water channel cross section and increase a pressure loss. If a fuel assembly attached with the pressure loss control plate is disposed at a periphery of the reactor core where the power is low and heat removal causes no significant problem, a flowrate at the periphery of the reactor core is reduced. Since this flowrate is utilized for removal of heat from fuel assemblies of high powder at the center of the reactor core where a pressure loss control plate is not attached, a thermal limit margin of the whole reactor core is increased. Thus, a limit of power peaking can be moderated, to obtain a fuel loading pattern improved with neutron economy. (N.H.)

  20. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  1. Model for calculating the boron concentration in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Martins Junior, L.L. dos; Vanni, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    A PWR boron concentration model has been developed for use with RETRAN code. The concentration model calculates the boron mass balance in the primary circuit as the injected boron mixes and is transported through the same circuit. RETRAN control blocks are used to calculate the boron concentration in fluid volumes during steady-state and transient conditions. The boron reactivity worth is obtained from the core concentration and used in RETRAN point kinetics model. A FSAR type analysis of a Steam Line Break Accident in Angra I plant was selected to test the model and the results obtained indicate a sucessfull performance. (Author) [pt

  2. Core management and performance analysis for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.B.; Lee, C.K.; Kim, J.S.; Lee, S.K.; Moon, K.S.; Chun, B.J.; Chang, J.W.; Kim, Y.J.

    1981-01-01

    The KINS (KAERI Improved Nodal Simulation) program, a three-dimensional nodal simulation code for pressurized water reactor fuel management, has been developed and benchmarked against the cycles 1 and 2 of the Kori-1 reactor. The critical boron concentration and three-dimensional power distribution at BOL, HZP condition have been calculated and compared with the operating data. A three-dimensional depletion calculation at HFP condition has been performed for cycle 1 with an interval of 1000 MWD/MTU and compared with the operating data. Similar calculation was also performed for cycle 2 and then compared with the design data of the reactor vendor. At the same time, a prediction of in-core detectors reaction rate was made so as to be compared with the operating data. As the result of comparisons, our calculation as well as the justification of the correlations is shown to be in excellent agreement with the operating data within an allowable limit

  3. A nodal model for the simulation of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Pinto, R. de.

    1981-06-01

    A computer program FORTRAN language was developed to simulate the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic transient behaviour of a PWR reactor core. The reator power is calculated using a point kinectics model with six groups of delayed neutron precursors. The fission product decay heat was considered assuming three effective decay heat groups. A nodal model was employed for the treatment of heat transfer in the fuel rod, with integration of the heat equation by the lumped parameter technique. Axial conduction was neglected. A single-channel nodal model was developed for the thermo-hydrodynamic simulation using mass and energy conservation equations for the control volumes. The effect of the axial pressure variation was neglected. The computer program was tested, with good results, through the simulation of the transient behaviour of postulated accidents in a typical PWR. (Author) [pt

  4. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of PWR cores in transient condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Galetti, M.R. da.

    1984-01-01

    A calculational methodology for thermal - hydraulic analysis of PWR cores under steady-state and transient condition was selected and made available to users. An evaluation of the COBRA-IIIP/MIT code, used for subchannel analysis, was done through comparison of the code results with experimental data on steady state and transient conditions. As a result, a comparison study allowing spatial and temporal localization of critical heat flux was obtained. A sensitivity study of the simulation model to variations in some empirically determined parameter is also presented. Two transient cases from Angra I FSAR were analysed, showing the evolution of minimum DNBR with time. (Author) [pt

  5. Thermal-hydraulic analysis for wire-wrapped PWR cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diller, P. [General Electric Company, 3901 Castle Hayne Rd., Wilmington, NC 28401 (United States)], E-mail: pdiller@gmail.com; Todreas, N. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)], E-mail: todreas@mit.edu; Hejzlar, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    This work focuses on the steady-state and transient thermal-hydraulic analyses for PWR cores using wire wraps in a hexagonal array with either U (45% w/o)-ZrH{sub 1.6} (referred to as U-ZrH{sub 1.6}) or UO{sub 2} fuels. Equivalences (thermal-hydraulic and neutronic) were created between grid spacer and wire wrap designs, and were used to apply results calculated for grid spacers to wire wrap designs. Design limits were placed on the pressure drop, critical heat flux (CHF), fuel and cladding temperature and vibrations. The vibrations limits were imposed for flow-induced vibrations (FIV) and thermal-hydraulic vibrations (THV). The transient analysis examined an overpower accident, loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and loss of flow accident (LOFA). The thermal-hydraulic performance of U-ZrH{sub 1.6} and UO{sub 2} were found very similar. Relative to grid spacer designs, wire wrap designs were found to have smaller fretting wear, substantially lower pressure drop and higher CHF. As a result, wire wrap cores were found to offer substantially higher maximum powers than grid spacer cores, allowing for a 25% power increase relative to the grid spacer uprate [Shuffler, C.A., Malen, J.A., Trant, J.M., Todreas, N.E., 2009a. Thermal-hydraulic analysis for grid supported and inverted fueled PWR cores. Nuclear Technology (this special issue devoted to hydride fuel in LWRs)] and a 58% power increase relative to the reference core.

  6. The new lattice code Paragon and its qualification for PWR core applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouisloumen, M.; Huria, H.C.; Mayhue, L.T.; Smith, R.M.; Kichty, M.J.; Matsumoto, H.; Tahara, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Paragon is a new two-dimensional transport code based on collision probability with interface current method and written entirely in Fortran 90/95. The qualification of Paragon has been completed and the results are very good. This qualification included a number of critical experiments. Comparisons to the Monte Carlo code MCNP for a wide variety of PWR assembly lattice types were also performed. In addition, Paragon-based core simulator models have been compared against PWR plant startup and operational data for a large number of plants. Some results of these calculations and also comparisons against models developed with a licensed Westinghouse lattice code, Phoenix-P, are presented. The qualification described in this paper provided the basis for the qualification of Paragon both as a validated transport code and as the nuclear data source for core simulator codes

  7. Four-fluid model of PWR degraded cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the new two-dimensional, four-fluid fluid dynamics and heat transfer (FLUIDS) module of the MELPROG code. MELPROG is designed to give an integrated, mechanistic treatment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) core meltdown accidents from accident initiation to vessel melt-through. The code has a modular data storage and transfer structure, with each module providing the others with boundary conditions at each computational time step. Thus the FLUIDS module receives mass and energy source terms from the fuel pin module, the structures module, and the debris bed module, and radiation energy source terms from the radiation module. MELPROG, which models the reactor vessel, is also designed to model the vessel as a component in the TRAC/PF1 networking solution of a PWR reactor coolant system (RCS). The coupling between TRAC and MELPROG is implicit in the fluid dynamics of the reactor coolant (liquid water and steam) allowing an accurate simulation of the coupling between the vessel and the rest of the RCS during an accident. This paper deals specifically with the numerical model of fluid dynamics and heat transfer within the reactor vessel, which allows a much more realistic simulation (with less restrictive assumptions on physical behavior) of the accident than has been possible before

  8. Integral type small PWR with stand-alone safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    A feasibility study is achieved on an integral type small PWR with stand-alone safety. It is designed to have the following features. (1) The coolant does not leak out at any accidental condition. (2) The fuel failure does never occur while it is supposed on the large scale PWR at the design base accident. (3) At any accidental condition the safety is secured without any support from the outside (stand-alone safety secure). (4) It has self-regulating characteristics and easy controllability. The above features can be satisfied by integrate the steam generator and CRDM in the reactor vessel while the pipe line break has to be considered on the conventional PWR. Several counter measures are planned to satisfy the above features. The economy feature is also attained by several simplifications such as (1) elimination of main coolant piping and pressurizer by the integration of primary cooling system and self-pressurizing, (2) elimination of RCP by application of natural circulating system, (3) elimination of ECCS and accumulator by application of static safety system, (4) large scale volume reduction of the container vessel by application of integrated primary cooling system, (5) elimination of boric acid treatment by deletion of chemical shim. The long operation period such as 10 years can be attained by the application of Gd fuel in one batch refueling. The construction period can be shortened by the standardizing the design and the introduction of modular component system. Furthermore the applicability of the reduced modulation core is also considered. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  9. Method of starting up PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadokami, Akira; Ueno, Ryuji; Tsuge, Ayao; Onimura, Kichiro; Ochi, Tatsuya.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To start-up a PWR type reactor so as to effectively impregnate and concentrate corrosion inhibitors in intergranular corrosive faces. Method: Upon reactor start-up, after transferring from the warm zero output state to thermal power loaded state and injecting corrosion inhibitors, thermal power is returned to zero and, subsequently, increased up to a rated power. By selecting the thermal power upon injecting the corrosion inhibitors to a steam generator body, that is, by selecting a thermal power load that starts to boil in heat conduction tubes, feedwater in the clavis portion can be formed into an appropriate boiling convection and, accordingly, the corrosion inhibitors can be penetrated to the clevis portion at a higher rate and in a greater amount as compared with those under zero power condition. Subsequently, when the thermal power is reduced, a sub-cooled state is attained in the clevis portion, in which steams present in the intergranular corrosion faces in the heat conduction tubes are condensated. As a result, the corrosion inhibitors at high concentration are impregnated into the intergranular corrosive faces to provide excellent effects. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Deboration in nuclear stations of the PWR type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Reactivity control in nuclear power stations of the PWR type is realised with boric acid. A method to concentrate boric acid without an evaporator has been studied. A flow-sheet with reverse osmosis is proposed. (author)

  11. Influence of spectral history on PWR full core calculation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilodid, Y.; Mittag, S.

    2011-01-01

    The few-group cross section libraries, used by reactor dynamics codes, are affected by the spectral history effect-a dependence of fuel cross sections not only on burnup, but also on local spectral conditions during burnup. A cross section correction method based on Pu-239 concentration was implemented in the reactor dynamic code DYN3D. This paper describes the influence of a cross section correction on full-core calculation results. Steady-state and burnup characteristics of a PWR equilibrium cycle, calculated by DYN3D with and without cross section corrections, are compared. A study has shown a significant influence of spectral history on axial power and burnup distributions as well as on calculated cycle length. An impact of the correction on transient calculations is studied for a control rod ejection example. (Authors)

  12. Transient performance of flow in circuits of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirdes, V.R.; Carajilescov, P.

    1988-09-01

    Generally, PWR's are designed with several primary loops, each one provided with a pump to circulate the coolant through the core. If one or more of these pumps fail, there would be a decrease in reactor flow rate which could cause coolant phase change in the core and components overheating. The present work establishes a simulation model for pump failure in PWR's and the SARDAN-FLOW computes code was developed, considering any combination of such failures. Based on the data of Angra I, several accident and operational transient conditions were simulated. (author) [pt

  13. Reflooding phenomena of German PWR estimated from CCTF [Cylindrical Core Test Facility], SCTF [Slab Core Test Facility] and UPTF [Upper Plenum Test Facility] results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Y.; Iguchi, T.; Sugimoto, J.

    1988-09-01

    The reflooding behavior in a PWR with a combined injection type ECCS was studied by comparing the test results from Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) and Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Core thermal-hydraulics is discussed mainly based on SCTF test data. In addition, the water accumulation behavior in hot legs and the break-through characteristics at tie plate are discussed

  14. Construction and utilization of linear empirical core models for PWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okafor, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    An empirical core-model construction procedure for pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core fuel management is developed that allows determining the optimal BOC k ∞ profiles in PWRs as a single linear-programming problem and thus facilitates the overall optimization process for in-core fuel management due to algorithmic simplification and reduction in computation time. The optimal profile is defined as one that maximizes cycle burnup. The model construction scheme treats the fuel-assembly power fractions, burnup, and leakage as state variables and BOC zone enrichments as control variables. The core model consists of linear correlations between the state and control variables that describe fuel-assembly behavior in time and space. These correlations are obtained through time-dependent two-dimensional core simulations. The core model incorporates the effects of composition changes in all the enrichment control zones on a given fuel assembly and is valid at all times during the cycle for a given range of control variables. No assumption is made on the geometry of the control zones. A scatter-composition distribution, as well as annular, can be considered for model construction. The application of the methodology to a typical PWR core indicates good agreement between the model and exact simulation results

  15. Determination of the hydrogen source term during the reflooding of an overheated core: Calculation results of the integral reflood test QUENCH-03 with PWR-type bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikhi, Nourdine; Nguyen, Nam Giang; Fleurot, Joelle

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Calculation of QUENCH-03 experiment with ASTEC/CATHARE. ► Validation of reflooding model in severe accidents conditions. ► Demonstration of a minimum flow rate for a successful reflood by using a system code. ► Effect of injection flow rate on hydrogen production. ► Effect of initial core temperature on hydrogen production. - Abstract: During a severe accident, one of the main accident management procedure consists of injecting water in the reactor core by means of various safety injection devices. Nevertheless, the success of a core reflood is not guaranteed because of possible negative effects: temperature escalation, enhanced hydrogen production, enhanced release of fission products, core degradation due to thermal shock, shattering, debris and melt formation. The QUENCH-03 experiment was carried out to investigate the behavior on reflooding at high temperature of LWR fuel rods with little oxidation. Posttest calculations with the ASTEC-CATHARE V2 code were made for code assessment and validation of the new reflooding model. This thermal–hydraulic model is used to detect the quench front position and to calculate the heat transfer between fuel and fluid in the transition boiling region. Comparisons between the calculational and experimental results are presented. Emphasis has been placed on clad temperature, hydrogen production and melt relocation. The effects of core state damage (initial temperature at reflooding onset) and the reflood mass flow rate on the hydrogen source term were investigated using the QUENCH-03 test as a base case. Calculations were made by varying both parameters in the input data deck. The results demonstrate (and confirm) the existence of a minimum flow rate for a successful reflood.

  16. Benefits of Low Boron Core Design Concept for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daing, Aung Tharn; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Nuclear design study was carried out to develop low boron core (LBC) based on one of current PWR concepts, OPR-1000. Most of design parameters were the same with those of Ulchin unit-5 except extensive utilization of burnable poison (BP) pins in order to compensate reactivity increase in LBC. For replacement of reduced soluble boron concentration, four different kinds of integral burnable absorbers (IBAs) such as gadolinia, integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbia and alumina boron carbide were considered in suppressing more excess reactivity. A parametric study was done to find the optimal core options from many design candidates for fuel assemblies and cores. Among them, the most feasible core design candidate was chosen in accordance with general design requirements. In this paper, the feasibility and design change benefits of the most favorable LBC design were investigated in more detail through the comparison of neutronic and thermal hydraulic design parameters of LBC with the reference plant (REF). As calculation tools, the HELIOS/MASTER code package and the MATRA code were utilized. The main purpose of research herein is to estimate feasibility and capability of LBC which was mainly designed to mitigate boron dilution accident (BDA), and for reduction of corrosion products. The LBC design concept using lower boron concentration with an elevated enrichment in {sup 10}B allows a reduction in the concentration of lithium in the primary coolant required to maintain the optimum coolant pH. All in all, LBC with operation at optimum pH is expected to achieve some benefits from radiation source reduction of reduced corrosion product, the limitation of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) and fuel cladding corrosion. Additionally, several merits of LBC are closely related to fluid systems and system related aspects, reduced boron and lithium costs, equipment size reduction for boric acid systems, elimination of heat tracing, and more aggressive fuel design concepts.

  17. Benefits of Low Boron Core Design Concept for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daing, Aung Tharn; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear design study was carried out to develop low boron core (LBC) based on one of current PWR concepts, OPR-1000. Most of design parameters were the same with those of Ulchin unit-5 except extensive utilization of burnable poison (BP) pins in order to compensate reactivity increase in LBC. For replacement of reduced soluble boron concentration, four different kinds of integral burnable absorbers (IBAs) such as gadolinia, integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbia and alumina boron carbide were considered in suppressing more excess reactivity. A parametric study was done to find the optimal core options from many design candidates for fuel assemblies and cores. Among them, the most feasible core design candidate was chosen in accordance with general design requirements. In this paper, the feasibility and design change benefits of the most favorable LBC design were investigated in more detail through the comparison of neutronic and thermal hydraulic design parameters of LBC with the reference plant (REF). As calculation tools, the HELIOS/MASTER code package and the MATRA code were utilized. The main purpose of research herein is to estimate feasibility and capability of LBC which was mainly designed to mitigate boron dilution accident (BDA), and for reduction of corrosion products. The LBC design concept using lower boron concentration with an elevated enrichment in 10 B allows a reduction in the concentration of lithium in the primary coolant required to maintain the optimum coolant pH. All in all, LBC with operation at optimum pH is expected to achieve some benefits from radiation source reduction of reduced corrosion product, the limitation of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) and fuel cladding corrosion. Additionally, several merits of LBC are closely related to fluid systems and system related aspects, reduced boron and lithium costs, equipment size reduction for boric acid systems, elimination of heat tracing, and more aggressive fuel design concepts

  18. Continuous firefly algorithm applied to PWR core pattern enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursalehi, N., E-mail: npsalehi@yahoo.com [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Moghaddam, H.K. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Numerical results indicate the reliability of CFA for the nuclear reactor LPO. ► The major advantages of CFA are its light computational cost and fast convergence. ► Our experiments demonstrate the ability of CFA to obtain the near optimal loading pattern. -- Abstract: In this research, the new meta-heuristic optimization strategy, firefly algorithm, is developed for the nuclear reactor loading pattern optimization problem. Two main goals in reactor core fuel management optimization are maximizing the core multiplication factor (K{sub eff}) in order to extract the maximum cycle energy and minimizing the power peaking factor due to safety constraints. In this work, we define a multi-objective fitness function according to above goals for the core fuel arrangement enhancement. In order to evaluate and demonstrate the ability of continuous firefly algorithm (CFA) to find the near optimal loading pattern, we developed CFA nodal expansion code (CFANEC) for the fuel management operation. This code consists of two main modules including CFA optimization program and a developed core analysis code implementing nodal expansion method to calculate with coarse meshes by dimensions of fuel assemblies. At first, CFA is applied for the Foxholes test case with continuous variables in order to validate CFA and then for KWU PWR using a decoding strategy for discrete variables. Results indicate the efficiency and relatively fast convergence of CFA in obtaining near optimal loading pattern with respect to considered fitness function. At last, our experience with the CFA confirms that the CFA is easy to implement and reliable.

  19. Continuous firefly algorithm applied to PWR core pattern enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poursalehi, N.; Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Moghaddam, H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Numerical results indicate the reliability of CFA for the nuclear reactor LPO. ► The major advantages of CFA are its light computational cost and fast convergence. ► Our experiments demonstrate the ability of CFA to obtain the near optimal loading pattern. -- Abstract: In this research, the new meta-heuristic optimization strategy, firefly algorithm, is developed for the nuclear reactor loading pattern optimization problem. Two main goals in reactor core fuel management optimization are maximizing the core multiplication factor (K eff ) in order to extract the maximum cycle energy and minimizing the power peaking factor due to safety constraints. In this work, we define a multi-objective fitness function according to above goals for the core fuel arrangement enhancement. In order to evaluate and demonstrate the ability of continuous firefly algorithm (CFA) to find the near optimal loading pattern, we developed CFA nodal expansion code (CFANEC) for the fuel management operation. This code consists of two main modules including CFA optimization program and a developed core analysis code implementing nodal expansion method to calculate with coarse meshes by dimensions of fuel assemblies. At first, CFA is applied for the Foxholes test case with continuous variables in order to validate CFA and then for KWU PWR using a decoding strategy for discrete variables. Results indicate the efficiency and relatively fast convergence of CFA in obtaining near optimal loading pattern with respect to considered fitness function. At last, our experience with the CFA confirms that the CFA is easy to implement and reliable

  20. Implementation in free software of the PWR type university nucleo electric simulator (SU-PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle H, J.; Hidago H, F.; Morales S, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    Presently work is shown like was carried out the implementation of the University Simulator of Nucleo-electric type PWR (SU-PWR). The implementation of the simulator was carried out in a free software simulation platform, as it is Scilab, what offers big advantages that go from the free use and without cost of the product, until the codes modification so much of the system like of the program with the purpose of to improve it or to adapt it to future routines and/or more advanced graphic interfaces. The SU-PWR shows the general behavior of a PWR nuclear plant (Pressurized Water Reactor) describing the dynamics of the plant from the generation process of thermal energy in the nuclear fuel, going by the process of energy transport toward the coolant of the primary circuit the one which in turn transfers this energy to the vapor generators of the secondary circuit where the vapor is expanded by means of turbines that in turn move the electric generator producing in this way the electricity. The pressurizer that is indispensable for the process is also modeled. Each one of these stages were implemented in scicos that is the Scilab tool specialized in the simulation. The simulation was carried out by means of modules that contain the differential equation that mathematically models each stage or equipment of the PWR plant. The result is a series of modules that based on certain entrances and characteristic of the system they generate exits that in turn are the entrance to other module. Because the SU-PWR is an experimental project in early phase, it is even work and modifications to carry out, for what the models that are presented in this work can vary a little the being integrated to the whole system to simulate, but however they already show clearly the operation and the conformation of the plant. (Author)

  1. Recycling schemes of Americium targets in PWR/MOX cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldague, Th.; Pilate, S.; Renard, A.; Harislur, A.; Mouney, H.; Rome, M.

    1999-01-01

    From the orientation studies performed so far, both ways to recycle Am in PWR/MOX cores, homogeneous in MOX or heterogeneous in target pins, appear feasible, provided that enriched UO 2 is used as support of the MOX fuel. Multiple recycling can then proceed and stabilize Pu and Am quantities. With respect to the Pu multiple recycling strategy, recycling Am in addition needs 1/3 more 235 U, and creates 3 times more Curium. Thus, although feasible, such a fuel cycle is complicated and brings about a significant cost penalty, not quantified yet. The advantage of the heterogeneous option is to allow to manage in different ways the Pu in MOX fuel and the Am in target pins. For example, should Am remain combined to Cm after reprocessing, the recycling of a mix of Am+Cm could be deferred to let Cm transform into Pu before irradiation. The Am+Cm targets could also stay longer in the reactor, so as to avoid further reprocessing if possible. (author)

  2. Advanced methods for the study of PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, M.; Salvatores, St.; Ferrier, A.; Pelet, J.; Nicaise, N.; Pouliquen, J.Y.; Foret, F.; Chauliac, C.; Johner, J.; Cohen, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers the transparencies presented at the 6. technical session of the French nuclear energy society (SFEN) in October 2003. The transparencies of the annual meeting are presented in the introductive part: 1 - status of the French nuclear park: nuclear energy results, management of an exceptional climatic situation: the heat wave of summer 2003 and the power generation (J.C. Barral); 2 - status of the research on controlled thermonuclear fusion (J. Johner). Then follows the technical session about the advanced methods for the study of PWR reactor cores: 1 - the evolution approach of study methodologies (M. Lambert, J. Pelet); 2 - the point of view of the nuclear safety authority (D. Brenot); 3 - the improved decoupled methodology for the steam pipe rupture (S. Salvatores, J.Y. Pouliquen); 4 - the MIR method for the pellet-clad interaction (renovated IPG methodology) (E. Baud, C. Royere); 5 - the improved fuel management (IFM) studies for Koeberg (C. Cohen); 6 - principle of the methods of accident study implemented for the European pressurized reactor (EPR) (F. Foret, A. Ferrier); 7 - accident studies with the EPR, steam pipe rupture (N. Nicaise, S. Salvatores); 8 - the co-development platform, a new generation of software tools for the new methodologies (C. Chauliac). (J.S.)

  3. Feasibility of using gadolinium as a burnable poison in PWR cores. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothleder, B.M.

    1981-02-01

    As an alternative to the use of lumped burnable absorbers in PWR cores, distributed burnable absorbers are being considered for generic application. These burnable absorbers take the form of Gd 2 O 3 mixed with UO 2 in selected fuel rods (as is currently done in BWR cores). The work discussed herein concerns a three-dimensional feasibility study of the use of such distributed burnable absorbers in PWR cores. This study of distributed burnable absorbers was performed for the first cycle of a typical current design PWR using the following steps: analysis of a generic reference core design; determination of gadolinium assembly designs; determination of a generic gadolinium core design; evaluation of feasibility by examining selected parameters; and redesign of the generic gadolinium core, using axial zoning

  4. Aqueous Boric acid injection facility of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi; Iwami, Masao.

    1996-01-01

    If a rupture should be caused in a secondary system of a PWR type reactor, pressure of a primary coolant recycling system is lowered, and a back flow check valve is opened in response to the lowering of the pressure. Then, low temperature aqueous boric acid in the lower portion of a pressurized tank is flown into the primary coolant recycling system based on the pressure difference, and the aqueous boric acid reaches the reactor core together with coolants to suppress reactivity. If the injection is continued, high temperature aqueous boric acid in the upper portion boils under a reduced pressure, further urges the low temperature aqueous boric acid in the lower portion by the steam pressure and injects the same to the primary system. The aqueous boric acid stream from the pressurized tank flowing by self evaporation of the high temperature aqueous boric acid itself is rectified by a rectifying device to prevent occurrence of vortex flow, and the steam is injected in a state of uniform stream. When the pressure in the pressurized tank is lowered, a bypass valve is opened to introduce the high pressure fluid of primary system into the pressurized tank to keep the pressure to a predetermined value. When the pressure in the pressurized tank is elevated to higher than the pressure of the primary system, a back flow check valve is opened, and high pressure aqueous boric acid is flown out of the pressurized tank to keep the pressure to a predetermined value. (N.H.)

  5. Transient analysis for PWR reactor core using neural networks predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueray, B.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, transient analysis for a Pressurized Water Reactor core has been performed. A lumped parameter approximation is preferred for that purpose, to describe the reactor core together with mechanism which play an important role in dynamic analysis. The dynamic behavior of the reactor core during transients is analyzed considering the transient initiating events, wich are an essential part of Safety Analysis Reports. several transients are simulated based on the employed core model. Simulation results are in accord the physical expectations. A neural network is developed to predict the future response of the reactor core, in advance. The neural network is trained using the simulation results of a number of representative transients. Structure of the neural network is optimized by proper selection of transfer functions for the neurons. Trained neural network is used to predict the future responses following an early observation of the changes in system variables. Estimated behaviour using the neural network is in good agreement with the simulation results for various for types of transients. Results of this study indicate that the designed neural network can be used as an estimator of the time dependent behavior of the reactor core under transient conditions

  6. Pu recycling in a full Th-MOX PWR core. Part I: Steady state analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, E.; Kliem, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Detailed 3D 100% Th-MOX PWR core design is developed. → Pu incineration increased by a factor of 2 as compared to a full MOX PWR core. → The core controllability under steady state conditions is demonstrated. - Abstract: Current practice of Pu recycling in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in the form of U-Pu mixed oxide fuel (MOX) is not efficient due to continuous Pu production from U-238. The use of Th-Pu mixed oxide (TOX) fuel will considerably improve Pu consumption rates because virtually no new Pu is generated from thorium. In this study, the feasibility of Pu recycling in a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fully loaded with TOX fuel is investigated. Detailed 3-dimensional 100% TOX and 100% MOX PWR core designs are developed. The full MOX core is considered for comparison purposes. The design stages included determination of Pu loading required to achieve 18-month fuel cycle assuming three-batch fuel management scheme, selection of poison materials, development of the core loading pattern, optimization of burnable poison loadings, evaluation of critical boron concentration requirements, estimation of reactivity coefficients, core kinetic parameters, and shutdown margin. The performance of the MOX and TOX cores under steady-state condition and during selected reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) is compared with that of the actual uranium oxide (UOX) PWR core. Part I of this paper describes the full TOX and MOX PWR core designs and reports the results of steady state analysis. The TOX core requires a slightly higher initial Pu loading than the MOX core to achieve the target fuel cycle length. However, the TOX core exhibits superior Pu incineration capabilities. The significantly degraded worth of control materials in Pu cores is partially addressed by the use of enriched soluble boron and B 4 C as a control rod absorbing material. Wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) rods are used to flatten radial power distribution

  7. Development of a computer code for transients simulation in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvim, A.C.M.; Botelho, D.A.; Oliveira Barroso, A.C. de

    1981-01-01

    A computer code for the simulation of operacional-transients and accidents in PWR type reactors is being developed at IEN (Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear). Accidents will be considered in which variations in thermohydraulics parameters of fuel and coolant don't cause nucleate boiling in the reactor core, but, otherwise are sufficiently strong to justify a more detailed simulation than that used in linearized models. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Design study of a PWR of 1.300 MWe of Angra-2 type operating in the thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, E.P.; Carneiro, F.A.N.; Schlosser, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of the thorium-highly enriched uranium and thorium-plutonium mixed oxide fuels in an unmodified PWR is analysed. The PWR of 1300 MWe from KWU (Angra-2 type) is taken as the reference reactor for the study. Reactor core design calculations for both types of fuels considering once-through and recycle fuels. The calculations were performed with the KWU design codes FASER-3 and MEDIUM 2.2 after introduction of the thorium chain and some addition of nuclide data in FASER-3. A two-energy group scheme and a two-dimensional (XY) representation of the reactor core were utilized. (Author) [pt

  9. Transient performance and design aspects of low boron PWR cores with increased utilization of burnable absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papukchiev, Angel; Schaefer, Anselm

    2008-01-01

    In conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, soluble boron is used for reactivity control over core fuel cycle. As high boron concentrations have significant impact on reactivity feedback properties and core transient behaviour, design changes to reduce boron concentration in the reactor coolant are of general interest in view of improving PWR inherent safety. In order to assess the potential advantages of such strategies in current PWRs, two low boron core configurations based on fuel with increased utilization of gadolinium and erbium burnable absorbers have been developed. The new PWR designs permit to reduce the natural boron concentration in reactor coolant at begin of cycle to 518 (Gd) and 805 (Er) ppm. An innovative low boron core design methodology was implemented combining a simplified reactivity balance search procedure with a core design approach based on detailed 3D diffusion calculations. Fuel cross sections needed for nuclear libraries were generated using the 2D lattice code HELIOS [2] and full core configurations were modelled with the 3D diffusion code QUABOX/CUBBOX [3]. For dynamic 3D calculations, the coupled code system ATHLET - QUABOX/CUBBOX was used [4]. The new cores meet German acceptance criteria regarding stuck rod, departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR), shutdown margin, and maximal linear power. For the assessment of potential safety advantages of the new cores, comparative analyses were performed for three PWR core designs: the already mentioned two low boron designs and a standard design. The improved safety performance of the low boron cores in anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), boron dilution scenarios and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA) has already been reported in [1, 2 and 3]. This paper gives a short reminder on the results obtained. Moreover, it deals not only with the potential advantages, but also addresses the drawbacks of the new PWR configurations - complex core design, increased power

  10. Coolant flow monitoring in a PWR core using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Lj.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the neutron and temperature noise field have been performed in the 1350 MW PWR nuclear power plant. Evaluation in the low frequency range, where both feedback effects and different thermohydraulics phenomena are dominant, succeeded in measuring the coolant velocity. This is important for determination and localization of essential deviations and possible anomalies. (author)

  11. Neutronic feasibility of PWR core with mixed oxide fuels in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Joo, H.K.; Jung, H.G.; Sohn, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Neutronic feasibility of a PWR core with mixed oxide (MOX) fuels has been investigated as part of the feasibility study for recycling spent fuels in Korea. A typical 3-loop PWR with 900 MWe capacity is selected as reference plant to develop equilibrium core designs with low-leakage fuel management scheme, while incorporating various MOX loading. The fuel management analyses and limited safety analyses show that, safely stated, MOX recycling with 1/3 reload fraction can be accommodated for both annual and 18 month fuel cycle schemes in Korean PWRs, without major design modifications on the reactor systems. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  12. PWR core follow calculations using the ELCOS code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, P.; Paratte, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The ELCOS code system developed at PSI is used to simulate a cycle of a PWR in which one fifth of the assemblies are MOX fuel. The reactor and the calculational methods are briefly described. The calculated critical boron concentrations and power distributions are compared with the measurements at the plant. Although the critical boron concentration is somewhat overpredicted and the computed power distributions are slightly flatter than the measured ones the results of the calculations agree generally well with the measured data. (author) 1 tab., 8 figs., 6 refs

  13. Study on Reactor Physics Characteristic of the PWR Core Using UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran Surbakti

    2009-01-01

    Study on reactor physics characteristic of the PWR core using UO 2 fuel it is necessary to be done to know the characteristic of geometry, condition and configuration of pin cell in the fuel assembly Because the geometry, configuration and condition of the pin cell in fuel core determine the loading strategy of in-core fuel management Calculation of k e ff is a part of the neutronic core parameter calculation to know the reactor physics characteristic. Generally, core calculation is done using computer code starts from modelling one unit fuel lattice cell, fuel assembly, reflector, irradiation facility and until core reactor. In this research, the modelling of pin cell and fuel assembly of the PWR 17 ×17 is done homogeneously. Calculation of the k-eff is done with variation of the fuel volume fraction, fuel pin diameter, fuel enrichment. The calculation is using by NITAWL and CENTRM, and then the results will be compared to KENOVI code. The result showed that the value of k e ff for pin cell and fuel assembly PWR 17 ×17 is not different significantly with homogenous and heterogenous models. The results for fuel volume fraction of 0.5; rod pitch 1.26 cm and fuel pin diameter of 9.6 mm is critical with burn up of 35,0 GWd/t. The modeling and calculation method accurately is needed to calculation the core physic parameter, but sometimes, it is needed along time to calculate one model. (author)

  14. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  15. 3-D full core calculations for the long-term behaviour of PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, H.J.; Koebke, K.; Wagner, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Presently, the most realistic simulation of a PWR core is by means of three-dimensional (3-D) full core calculations. Only by such 3-D representations can the large scope of axial effects be treated in an accurate and direct way, without the need to perform various auxiliary calculations. Although the computationally efficient burnup-corrected nodal expansion method (NEM-BC) is used, the computing effort for 3-D reactor calculations becomes rather high, e.g. a storage of about 320000 words is required to describe a 1300 MWe PWR. NEM-BC was introduced (1979) into KWU's package of PWR design codes because of its high accuracy and the great reduction of computing time and storage requirements in comparison to other methods. The application of NEM-BC to 3-dimensional PWR design is strongly correlated with the progress achieved in the solution of the homogenization and dehomogenization problem. By means of suitable methods (equivalence theory) the transport-theoretical information of the pinwise power and burnup distribution for the heterogeneous fuel assemblies is transferred in a consistent manner to the full core reactor solution. The new methods and the corresponding code system are explained in some detail. (orig.)

  16. A probabilistic SSYST-3 analysis for a PWR-core during a large break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.D.; Gulden, W.; Jacobs, G.; Meyder, R.; Sengpiel, W.

    1985-05-01

    This report demonstrates the SSYST-3 analysis and application for a German PWR of 1300 MW. The report is concerned with the probabilistic analysis of a PWR core during a loss-of-coolant accident due to a large break. With the probabilistic analysis, the distribution functions of the maximum temperatures and cladding elongations occuring in the core can be calculated. Parameters like rod power, the thermohydraulic boundary conditions, stored energy in the fuel rods and the heat transfer coefficient were found to be the most important. The expected value of core damage was determined to be 2.9% on the base of response surfaces for cladding temperature and strain deduced from SSYST-3 single rod results. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Xenon oscillation tests in four-loop PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Norihiko; Osaka, Kenichi; Shimada, Shoichiro; Tochihara, Hiroshi; Machii, Seigo

    1980-01-01

    The Kansai Electric Power Co.'s OHI Unit 1 and 2 are the first 4-loop PWRs in Japan which use 17 x 17 fuel assemblies and have essentially the same plant parameters. A 4-loop core has larger core radius and higher power density than those of 2- or 3-loop cores, and is less stable for Xe oscillation. It is therefore important to confirm that Xe oscillations in radial direction are sufficiently stable in a 4-loop core. Radial and axial Xe oscillation tests were performed during the startup physics tests of OHI Unit 1 and 2; Xe oscillation was induced by perturbation of control rods and the Xe effect on power distribution observed periodically. The test results show that the transverse Xe oscillation in the 4-loop core is sufficiently stable and that the agreement between the measurement and the calculated prediction is good. (author)

  18. Adaptive control of a PWR core power using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arab-Alibeik, H.; Setayeshi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Reactor power control is important because of safety concerns and the call for regular and appropriate operation of nuclear power plants. It seems that the load-follow operation of these plants will be unavoidable in the future. Discrepancies between the real plant and the model used in controller design for load-follow operation encourage one to use auto-tuning and (or) adaptive techniques. Neural network technology shows great promise for addressing many problems in non-model-based adaptive control methods. Also, there has been a great attention to inverse control especially in the neural and fuzzy control context. Fortunately, online adaptation eliminates some limitations of inverse control and its shortcomings for real world applications. We use a neural adaptive inverse controller to control the power of a PWR reactor. The stability of the system and convergence of the controller parameters are guaranteed during online adaptation phase provided the controller is near the plant's real inverse after offline training period. The performance of the controller is verified using nonlinear simulations in diverse operating conditions

  19. Optimal burnable poison utilization in PWR core reload design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    A method was developed for determining the optimal distribution and depletion of burnable poisons in a Pressurized Water Reactor core. The well-known Haling depletion technique is used to achieve the end-of-cycle core state where the fuel assembly arrangement is configured in the absence of all control poison. The soluble and burnable poison required to control the core reactivity and power distribution are solved for as unknown variables while step depleting the cycle in reverse with a target power distribution. The method was implemented in the NRC approved licensing code SIMULATE

  20. Some factors affecting radiative heat transport in PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.N.

    1989-04-01

    This report discusses radiative heat transport in Pressurized Water Reactor cores, using simple models to illustrate basic features of the transport process. Heat transport by conduction and convection is ignored in order to focus attention on the restrictions on radiative heat transport imposed by the geometry of the heat emitting and absorbing structures. The importance of the spacing of the emitting and absorbing structures is emphasised. Steady state temperature distributions are found for models of cores which are uniformly heated by fission product decay. In all of the models, a steady state temperature distribution can only be obtained if the central core temperature is in excess of the melting point of UO 2 . It has recently been reported that the MIMAS computer code, which takes into account radiative heat transport, has been used to model the heat-up of the Three Mile Island-2 reactor core, and the computations indicate that the core could not have reached the melting point of UO 2 at any time or any place. We discuss this result in the light of the calculations presented in this paper. It appears that the predicted stabilisation of the core temperatures at ∼ 2200 0 C may be a consequence of the artificially large spacing between the radial rings employed in the MIMAS code, rather than a result of physical significance. (author)

  1. ASCOT-1, Thermohydraulics of Axisymmetric PWR Core with Homogeneous Flow During LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: ASCOT-1 is used to analyze the thermo-hydraulic behaviour in a PWR core during a loss-of-coolant accident. 2 - Method of solution: The core is assumed to be axisymmetric two-dimensional and the conservation laws are solved by the method of characteristics. For the temperature response of fuel in the annular regions into which the core is divided, the heat conduction equations are solved by an explicit method with averaged flow conditions. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Axisymmetric two-dimensional homogeneous flows

  2. An expert system for PWR core operation management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Toshio; Masuda, Masahiro; Nishioka, Hiromasa

    1988-01-01

    Planning for restartup after planned or unplanned reactor shutdown and load-follow operations is an important task in the core operation management of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). These planning problems have been solved by planning experts using their expertise and the computational prediction of core behavior. Therefore, the quality of the plan and the time consumed in the planning depend heavily on the skillfulness of the planning experts. A knowledge engineering approach has been recently considered as a promising means to solve such complicated planning problems. Many knowledge-based systems have been developed so far, and some of them have already been applied because of their effectiveness. The expert system REPLEX has been developed to aid core management engineers in making a successful plan for the restartup or the load-follow operation of PWRs within a shorter time. It can maintain planning tasks at a high-quality level independent of the skillfulness of core management engineers and enhance the efficiency of management. REPLEX has an explanation function that helps user understanding of plans. It could be a useful took, therefore, for the training of core management engineers.

  3. An expert system for PWR core operation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Toshio; Masuda, Masahiro; Nishioka, Hiromasa.

    1988-01-01

    Planning for restartup after planned or unplanned reactor shutdown and load-follow operations is an important task in the core operation management of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). These planning problems have been solved by planning experts using their expertise and the computational prediction of core behavior. Therefore, the quality of the plan and the time consumed in the planning depend heavily on the skillfulness of the planning experts. A knowledge engineering approach has been recently considered as a promising means to solve such complicated planning problems. Many knowledge-based systems have been developed so far, and some of them have already been applied because of their effectiveness. The expert system REPLEX has been developed to aid core management engineers in making a successful plan for the restartup or the load-follow operation of PWRs within a shorter time. It can maintain planning tasks at a high-quality level independent of the skillfulness of core management engineers and enhance the efficiency of management. REPLEX has an explanation function that helps user understanding of plans. It could be a useful took, therefore, for the training of core management engineers

  4. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  5. Preliminary analysis of a large 1600 MWe PWR core loaded with 30% MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polidoro, Franco; Corsetti, Edoardo; Vimercati, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a full-core 3-D analysis of the performances of a large 1600 MWe PWR core, loaded with 30% MOX fuel, in accordance with the European Utility Requirements (EUR). These requirements state that the European next generation power plants have to be designed capable to use MOX (UO 2 - PuO 2 ) fuel assemblies up to 50% of the core, together with UO 2 fuel assemblies. The use of MOX assemblies has a significant impact on key physic parameters and on safety. A lot of studies have been carried out in the past to explore the feasibility of plutonium recycling strategies by loading LWR reactors with MOX fuel. Many of these works were based on lattice codes, in order to perform detailed analyses of the neutronic characteristics of MOX assemblies. With the aim to take into account their interaction with surrounding UO 2 fuel elements, and the global effects on the core at operational conditions, an integrated approach making use of a 3-D core simulation is required. In this light, the present study adopts the state-of-art numerical models CASMO-5 and SIMULATE-3 to analyze the behavior of the core fueled with 30% MOX and to compare it with that of a large PWR reference core, fueled with UO 2 . (author)

  6. Fluid-structure coupled dynamic response of PWR core barrel during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, M.W.; Zhang, Y.G.; Shi, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is engaged in the Fluid-Structure Interaction LOCA analysis of the core barrel of PWR. The analysis is performed by a multipurpose computer code SANES. The FSI inside the pressure vessel is treated by a FEM code including some structural and acoustic elements. The transient in the primary loop is solved by a two-phase flow code. Both codes are coupled one another. Some interesting conclusions are drawn. (author)

  7. Generalized perturbation theory error control within PWR core-loading pattern optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbriani, J.S.; Turinsky, P.J.; Kropaczek, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The fuel management optimization code FORMOSA-P has been developed to determine the family of near-optimum loading patterns for PWR reactors. The code couples the optimization technique of simulated annealing (SA) with a generalized perturbation theory (GPT) model for evaluating core physics characteristics. To ensure the accuracy of the GPT predictions, as well as to maximize the efficient of the SA search, a GPT error control method has been developed

  8. Evaluation of full MOX core capability for a 900 MWe PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung-Kook; Kim, Young-Jin; Jung, Hyung-Guk; Kim, Young-Il; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    1996-01-01

    Full MOX capability of a PWR core with 900 MWe capacity has been evaluated in view of plutonium consumption and design feasibility as an effective means for spent fuel management. Three full MOX cores have been conceptually designed; for annual cycle, for 18-month cycle, and for 18-month cycle with high moderation lattice. Fissile and total plutonium quantities at discharge are significantly reduced to 60% and 70% respectively of initial value for standard full MOX cores. It is estimated that one full MOX core demands about 1 tonne of plutonium per year to be reloaded, which is equivalent to reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels discharged from five nuclear reactors operating with uranium fuels. With low-leakage loading scheme, a full MOX core with either annual or 18-month cycle can be designed satisfactorily by installing additional rod cluster control system and modifying soluble boron system. Overall high moderation lattice case promises better core nuclear characteristics. (author)

  9. Study and analysis for the flow-induced vibration of the core barrel of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Weida; Shi Guolin; Jiang Nanyan

    1989-01-01

    The resemblance criteria are derived and a test model is designed by applying the flow-soild coupling theory. After having completed the model analysis of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core barrel in an 1:10 model, the dynamic characteristics are obtained. In an 1:5 reactor model with a hydraulic closed loop, the hydraulic vibration tests of the core barrel are performed, and the relations between the flow rate and the flow-induced pulse pressure on core barrel, acceleration and strain signals have been measured. The corresponding responses and a group of computational equations for hydraulic vibration are derived from these two experiments. The computational hydraulic vibration responses for core barrel in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant are in good agreement with the test results, and it shows that the core barrel is safe within its lifetime of 30 years

  10. Application of the pertubation theory to a two channels model for sensitivity calculations in PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.C.J.G. de; Andrade Lima, F.R. de

    1989-01-01

    The present work is an application of the perturbation theory (Matricial formalism) to a simplified two channels model, for sensitivity calculations in PWR cores. Expressions for some sensitivity coefficients of thermohydraulic interest were developed from the proposed model. The code CASNUR.FOR was written in FORTRAN to evaluate these sensitivity coefficients. The comparison between results obtained from the matrical formalism of pertubation theory with those obtained directly from the two channels model, makes evident the efficiency and potentiality of this perturbation method for nuclear reactor cores sensitivity calculations. (author) [pt

  11. Reactor building seismic analysis of a PWR type - NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakubo, Masao

    1983-01-01

    Earthquake engineering studies raised up in Brazil during design licensing and construction phases of Almirante Alvaro Alberto NPP, units 1 and 2. State of art of soil - structure interaction analysis with particular reference to the impedance function calculation analysis with particular reference to the impedance function calculation of a group of pile is presented in this M.Sc. Dissertation, as an example the reactor building dynamic response of a 1325 MWe NPP PWR type is calculated. The reactor building is supported by a pile foundation with 2002 end bearing piles. Upper and lower bound soil parameters are considered in order to observe their influence on dynamic response of structure. Dynamic response distribution on pile heads show pile-soil-pile interaction effects. (author)

  12. PWR core safety analysis with 3-dimensional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensler, A.; Kühnel, K.; Kuch, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An overview of AREVA’s safety analysis codes their coupling is provided. • The validation base and licensing applications of these codes are summarized. • Coupled codes and methods provide improved margins and non-conservative results. • Examples for REA and inadvertent opening of the pressurizer safety valve are given. - Abstract: The main focus of safety analysis is to demonstrate the required safety level of the reactor core. Because of the demanding requirements, the quality of the safety analysis strongly affects the confidence in the operational safety of a reactor. To ensure the highest quality, it is essential that the methodology consists of appropriate analysis tools, an extensive validation base, and last but not least highly educated engineers applying the methodology. The sophisticated 3-dimensional core models applied by AREVA ensure that all physical effects relevant for safety are treated and the results are reliable and conservative. Presently AREVA employs SCIENCE, CASMO/NEMO and CASCADE-3D for pressurized water reactors. These codes are currently being consolidated into the next generation 3D code system ARCADIA®. AREVA continuously extends the validation base, including measurement campaigns in test facilities and comparisons of the predictions of steady state and transient measured data gathered from plants during many years of operation. Thus, the core models provide reliable and comprehensive results for a wide range of applications. For the application of these powerful tools, AREVA is taking benefit of its interdisciplinary know-how and international teamwork. Experienced engineers of different technical backgrounds are working together to ensure an appropriate interpretation of the calculation results, uncertainty analysis, along with continuously maintaining and enhancing the quality of the analysis methodologies. In this paper, an overview of AREVA’s broad application experience as well as the broad validation

  13. Assessment of void swelling in austenitic stainless steel PWR core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    As many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) age and life extension of the aged plants is considered, void swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel (SS) core internals has become the subject of increasing attention. In this report, the available database on void swelling and density change of austenitic SSs was critically reviewed. Irradiation conditions, test procedures, and microstructural characteristics were carefully examined, and key factors that are important to determine the relevance of the database to PWR conditions were evaluated. Most swelling data were obtained from steels irradiated in fast breeder reactors at temperatures >385 C and at dose rates that are orders of magnitude higher than PWR dose rates. Even for a given irradiation temperature and given steel, the integral effects of dose and dose rate on void swelling should not be separated. It is incorrect to extrapolate swelling data on the basis of 'progressive compounded multiplication' of separate effects of factors such as dose, dose rate, temperature, steel composition, and fabrication procedure. Therefore, the fast reactor data should not be extrapolated to determine credible void swelling behavior for PWR end-of-life (EOL) or life-extension conditions. Although the void swelling data extracted from fast reactor studies is extensive and conclusive, only limited amounts of swelling data and information have been obtained on microstructural characteristics from discharged PWR internals or steels irradiated at temperatures and at dose rates comparable to those of a PWR. Based on this relatively small amount of information, swelling in thin-walled tubes and baffle bolts in a PWR is not considered a concern. As additional data and relevant research becomes available, the newer results should be integrated with existing data, and the worthiness of this conclusion should continue to be scrutinized. PWR baffle reentrant corners are the most likely location to experience high swelling rates, and

  14. A new uncertainty reduction method for PWR cores with erbia bearing fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Sano, Tadafumi; Kitada, Takanori; Kuroishi, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a PWR with erbia bearing high burnup fuel has been proposed. The erbia is added to all fuel with over 5% 235 U enrichment to retain the neutronics characteristics to that within 5% 235 U enrichment. There is a problem of the prediction accuracy of the neutronics characteristics with erbia bearing fuel because of the short of experimental data of erbia bearing fuel. The purpose of the present work is to reduce the uncertainty. A new method has been proposed by combining the bias factor method and the cross section adjustment method. For the PWR core, the uncertainty reduction, which shows the rate of reduction of uncertainty, of the k eff is 0.865 by the present method and 0.801 by the conventional bias factor method. Thus the prediction uncertainties are reduced by the present method compared to the bias factor method. (authors)

  15. Computer code validation study of PWR core design system, CASMO-3/MASTER-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. H.; Kim, M. H.; Woo, S. W.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of CASMO-3/MASTER-α nuclear design system was investigated for commercial PWR core. Validation calculation was performed as follows. Firstly, the accuracy of cross section generation from table set using linear feedback model was estimated. Secondly, the results of CASMO-3/MASTER-α was compared with CASMO-3/NESTLE 5.02 for a few benchmark problems. Microscopic cross sections computed from table set were almost the same with those from CASMO-3. There were small differences between calculated results of two code systems. Thirdly, the repetition of CASMO-3/MASTER-α calculation for Younggwang Unit-3, Cycle-1 core was done and their results were compared with nuclear design report(NDR) and uncertainty analysis results of KAERI. It was found that uncertainty analysis results were reliable enough because results were agreed each other. It was concluded that the use of nuclear design system CASMO-3/MASTER-α was validated for commercial PWR core

  16. Advanced PWR Core Design with Siemens High-Plutonium-Content MOX Fuel Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieter Porsch; Gerhard Schlosser; Hans-Dieter Berger

    2000-01-01

    The Siemens experience with plutonium recycling dates back to the late 1960s. Over the years, extensive research and development programs were performed for the qualification of mixed-oxide (MOX) technology and design methods. Today's typical reload enrichments for uranium and MOX fuel assemblies and modern core designs have become more demanding with respect to accuracy and reliability of design codes. This paper presents the status of plutonium recycling in operating high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores. Based on actual examples, it describes the validation status of the design methods and stresses current and future needs for fuel assembly and core design including those related to the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium

  17. STYCA, a computer program in the dynamic structural analysis of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Macedo, L.V. da; Breyne Salvagni, R. de

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for the dynamic structural analysis of a PWR core is presented, impacts between fuel assemblies may occur because of the existence of gaps between them. Thus, the problem is non-linear and an spectral analysis is avoided. A time-history response analysis is necessary. The Modal Superposition Method with the Duhamel integral was used in order to solve the problem. An algorithm of solution and also results obtained with the STYCA computer program, developed on the basis of what was proposed here, are presented. (author)

  18. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.; Trenberth, R.

    1987-12-01

    Modelling experiments have been done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Various liquids have been used to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor from a breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. High pressure air and helium have been used to simulate the discharge of steam and gas from the breach. The dispersion of liquid via the vault access shafts has been measured. Photographs have been taken of fluid flow patterns and velocity profiles have been obtained. The requirements for further experiments are indicated. (author)

  19. Development of the computer code system for the analyses of PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Iwao; Naito, Yoshitaka.

    1992-11-01

    This report is one of the materials for the work titled 'Development of the computer code system for the analyses of PWR core phenomena', which is performed under contracts between Shikoku Electric Power Company and JAERI. In this report, the numerical method adopted in our computer code system are described, that is, 'The basic course and the summary of the analysing method', 'Numerical method for solving the Boltzmann equation', 'Numerical method for solving the thermo-hydraulic equations' and 'Description on the computer code system'. (author)

  20. Degraded core accidents: review of aerosol behaviour in the containment of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Walker, B.C.

    1981-09-01

    Low probability-high consequence accidents have become an important issue in reactor safety studies. Such accidents would involve damage to the core and the subsequent release of radioactive fission products into the environment. Aerosols play a major role in the transport and removal of these fission products in the reactor building containment. The aerosol mechanisms, computer modelling codes and experimental studies used to predict aerosol behaviour in the containment of a PWR are reviewed. There are significant uncertainties in the aerosol source terms and specific recommendations have been made for further studies, particularly with respect to code development and high density aerosol-fission product transport within closed systems. (author)

  1. Dynamic structural analysis for assemblies of fuel elements in the core of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Macedo, L.V. da.

    1991-01-01

    It is presented a procedure for the dynamic structural analysis of a PWR core. Impacts between fuel assemblies may occur because of the existence of gaps between them. Thus, the problem is non-linear and an spectral analysis is avoided. It is necessary a time-history response analysis. The Modal Superposition Method with the Duhamel integral was used in order to solve the problem. It is presented an algorithm of solution and also results obtained with the STYCA computer program, developed in the basis of what was proposed here. (author)

  2. Simulation of nonlinear dynamics of a PWR core by an improved lumped formulation for fuel heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Jian; Cotta, Renato M.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, thermohydraulic behaviour of PWR, during reactivity insertion and partial loss-of-flow, is simulated by using a simplified mathematical model of reactor core and primary coolant. An improved lumped parameter formulation for transient heat conduction in fuel rod is used for core heat transfer modelling. Transient temperature response of fuel, cladding and coolant is analysed. (author)

  3. Thermal hydraulic design of a hydride-fueled inverted PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, J.A.; Todreas, N.E.; Hejzlar, P.; Ferroni, P.; Bergles, A.

    2009-01-01

    An inverted PWR core design utilizing U(45%, w/o)ZrH 1.6 fuel (here referred to as U-ZrH 1.6 ) is proposed and its thermal hydraulic performance is compared to that of a standard rod bundle core design also fueled with U-ZrH 1.6 . The inverted design features circular cooling channels surrounded by prisms of fuel. Hence the relative position of coolant and fuel is inverted with respect to the standard rod bundle design. Inverted core designs with and without twisted tape inserts, used to enhance critical heat flux, were analyzed. It was found that higher power and longer cycle length can be concurrently achieved by the inverted core with twisted tape relative to the optimal standard core, provided that higher core pressure drop can be accommodated. The optimal power of the inverted design with twisted tape is 6869 MW t , which is 135% of the optimally powered standard design (5080 MW t -determined herein). Uncertainties in this design regarding fuel and clad dimensions needed to accommodate mechanical loads and fuel swelling are presented. If mechanical and neutronic feasibility of these designs can be confirmed, these thermal assessments imply significant economic advantages for inverted core designs.

  4. Method of stopping operation of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Takashi; Tsuge, Ayao; Kawanishi, Yasuhira; Onimura, Kichiro; Kadokami, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors after long period of l00 % power operation, since boiling is caused in heat conduction pipes and water is depleted within the intergranular corrosion fracture face in the crevis portion to result in a dry-out state, impregnation and concentration of corrosion inhibitors into the intergranular corrosion fracture face are insufficient. In view of the above, the corrosion inhibitor at a high concentration is impregnated into the intergranular corrosion fracture face by keeping to inject the corrosion inhibitor from l00 % thermal power load by way of the thermal power reduction to the zero power state upon operatioin shutdown. That is, if the thermal power is reduced to or near the 0 power upon reactor shutdown, feedwater in the crevis portion is put to subcooled state, by which the steam present in the intergranular corrosion fracture face are condensated and the corrosion inhibitor at high concentration impregnated into the crevis portion are penetrated into the intergranular corrosion fracture face. (K.M.)

  5. NODAL3 Sensitivity Analysis for NEACRP 3D LWR Core Transient Benchmark (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surian Pinem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of sensitivity analysis of the multidimension, multigroup neutron diffusion NODAL3 code for the NEACRP 3D LWR core transient benchmarks (PWR. The code input parameters covered in the sensitivity analysis are the radial and axial node sizes (the number of radial node per fuel assembly and the number of axial layers, heat conduction node size in the fuel pellet and cladding, and the maximum time step. The output parameters considered in this analysis followed the above-mentioned core transient benchmarks, that is, power peak, time of power peak, power, averaged Doppler temperature, maximum fuel centerline temperature, and coolant outlet temperature at the end of simulation (5 s. The sensitivity analysis results showed that the radial node size and maximum time step give a significant effect on the transient parameters, especially the time of power peak, for the HZP and HFP conditions. The number of ring divisions for fuel pellet and cladding gives negligible effect on the transient solutions. For productive work of the PWR transient analysis, based on the present sensitivity analysis results, we recommend NODAL3 users to use 2×2 radial nodes per assembly, 1×18 axial layers per assembly, the maximum time step of 10 ms, and 9 and 1 ring divisions for fuel pellet and cladding, respectively.

  6. Optimization of refueling-shuffling scheme in PWR core by random search strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuan

    1991-11-01

    A random method for simulating optimization of refueling management in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core is described. The main purpose of the optimization was to select the 'best' refueling arrangement scheme which would produce maximum economic benefits under certain imposed conditions. To fulfill this goal, an effective optimization strategy, two-stage random search method was developed. First, the search was made in a manner similar to the stratified sampling technique. A local optimum can be reached by comparison of the successive results. Then the other random experiences would be carried on between different strata to try to find the global optimum. In general, it can be used as a practical tool for conventional fuel management scheme. However, it can also be used in studies on optimization of Low-Leakage fuel management. Some calculations were done for a typical PWR core on a CYBER-180/830 computer. The results show that the method proposed can obtain satisfactory approach at reasonable low computational cost

  7. Evaluation of the pressure difference across the core during PWR-LOCA reflood phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1979-03-01

    The flooding rate of the core influences largely cooling of the core during the reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA. Since the void fraction of two-phase flow in the core is important determining the flooding rate, it is essential to examine this void fraction. The void fraction in the core during the reflood phase obtained by experiment was compared with those predicted by the correlations respectively of Akagawa, Nicklin, Zuber, Yeh, Griffice, Behringer and Jhonson. Only Yeh's correlation was found to be usable for the purpose. The pressure difference of the core during the reflood phase was calculated by reflood analyzing code REFLA-1D using Yeh's correlation. Following are the results: (1) During the steady-state period after quenching of the heaters, the prediction agrees within +-15% with the experiment. (2) During the transient period when the quench front is advancing, the prediction is not in agreement with the experiment, the difference being about +-40%. Influence of the advancing quench front upon the void fraction in the core must further be studied. (author)

  8. Inference of core barrel motion from neutron noise spectral density. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.C.; Shahrokhi, F.; Kryter, R.C.

    1977-03-15

    A method was developed for inference of core barrel motion from the following statistical descriptors: cross-power spectral density, autopower spectral density, and amplitude probability density. To quantify the core barrel motion in a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR), a scale factor was calculated in both one- and two-dimensional geometries using forward, variational, and perturbation methods of discrete ordinates neutron transport. A procedure for selection of the proper frequency band limits for the statistical descriptors was developed. It was found that although perturbation theory is adequate for the calculation of the scale factor, two-dimensional geometric effects are important enough to rule out the use of a one-dimensional approximation for all but the crudest calculations. It was also found that contributions of gamma rays can be ignored and that the results are relatively insensitive to the cross-section set employed. The proper frequency band for the statistical descriptors is conveniently determined from the coherence and phase information from two ex-core power range neutron monitors positioned diametrically across the reactor vessel. Core barrel motion can then be quantified from the integral of the band-limited cross-power spectral density of two diametrically opposed ex-core monitors or, if the coherence between the pair is greater than or equal to 0.7, from a properly band-limited amplitude probability density function. Wide-band amplitude probability density functions were demonstrated to yield erroneous estimates for the magnitude of core barrel motion.

  9. Assessment of the insertion of reprocessed fuel spiked with thorium in a PWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Victor F.; Monteiro, Fabiana B.A.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: victorfc@fis.grad.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Reprocessed fuel by UREX+ technique and spiked with thorium was inserted in a PWR core and neutronic parameters have been analyzed. Based on the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) of the Angra-2 reactor, the core was modeled and simulated with SCALE6.0 package. The neutronic data evaluation was carried out by the analysis of the effective and infinite multiplication factors, and the fuel evolution during the burnup. The conversion ratio (CR) was also evaluated. The results show that, when inserting reprocessed fuel spiked with thorium, the insertion of burnable poison rods is not necessary, due to the amount of absorber isotopes present in the fuel. Besides, the conversion ratio obtained was greater than the presented by standard UO{sub 2} fuel, indicating the possibility of extending the burnup. (author)

  10. Research on 3D power distribution of PWR reactor core based on RBF neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Hong; Li Bin; Liu Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Real-time monitor for 3D power distribution is critical to nuclear safety and high efficiency of NPP's operation as well as the control system optimization. A method was proposed to set up a real-time monitor system for 3D power distribution by using of ex-core neutron detecting system and RBF neural network for improving the instantaneity of the monitoring results and reducing the fitting error of the 3D power distribution. A series of experiments were operated on a 300 MW PWR simulation system. The results demonstrate that the new monitor system works very well under condition of certain burnup range during the fuel cycle and reconstructs the real-time 3D distribution of reactor core power. The accuracy of the model is improved effectively with the help of several methods. (authors)

  11. Implementation in free software of the PWR type university nucleo electric simulator (SU-PWR); Implementacion en software libre del simulador universitario de nucleoelectrica tipo PWR (SU-PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Hidago H, F.; Morales S, J.B. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx

    2007-07-01

    Presently work is shown like was carried out the implementation of the University Simulator of Nucleo-electric type PWR (SU-PWR). The implementation of the simulator was carried out in a free software simulation platform, as it is Scilab, what offers big advantages that go from the free use and without cost of the product, until the codes modification so much of the system like of the program with the purpose of to improve it or to adapt it to future routines and/or more advanced graphic interfaces. The SU-PWR shows the general behavior of a PWR nuclear plant (Pressurized Water Reactor) describing the dynamics of the plant from the generation process of thermal energy in the nuclear fuel, going by the process of energy transport toward the coolant of the primary circuit the one which in turn transfers this energy to the vapor generators of the secondary circuit where the vapor is expanded by means of turbines that in turn move the electric generator producing in this way the electricity. The pressurizer that is indispensable for the process is also modeled. Each one of these stages were implemented in scicos that is the Scilab tool specialized in the simulation. The simulation was carried out by means of modules that contain the differential equation that mathematically models each stage or equipment of the PWR plant. The result is a series of modules that based on certain entrances and characteristic of the system they generate exits that in turn are the entrance to other module. Because the SU-PWR is an experimental project in early phase, it is even work and modifications to carry out, for what the models that are presented in this work can vary a little the being integrated to the whole system to simulate, but however they already show clearly the operation and the conformation of the plant. (Author)

  12. A novel optimization method, Gravitational Search Algorithm (GSA), for PWR core optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, S.M.; Aghaie, M.; Bahonar, M.; Poursalehi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The Gravitational Search Algorithm (GSA) is introduced. • The advantage of GSA is verified in Shekel’s Foxholes. • Reload optimizing in WWER-1000 and WWER-440 cases are performed. • Maximizing K eff , minimizing PPFs and flattening power density is considered. - Abstract: In-core fuel management optimization (ICFMO) is one of the most challenging concepts of nuclear engineering. In recent decades several meta-heuristic algorithms or computational intelligence methods have been expanded to optimize reactor core loading pattern. This paper presents a new method of using Gravitational Search Algorithm (GSA) for in-core fuel management optimization. The GSA is constructed based on the law of gravity and the notion of mass interactions. It uses the theory of Newtonian physics and searcher agents are the collection of masses. In this work, at the first step, GSA method is compared with other meta-heuristic algorithms on Shekel’s Foxholes problem. In the second step for finding the best core, the GSA algorithm has been performed for three PWR test cases including WWER-1000 and WWER-440 reactors. In these cases, Multi objective optimizations with the following goals are considered, increment of multiplication factor (K eff ), decrement of power peaking factor (PPF) and power density flattening. It is notable that for neutronic calculation, PARCS (Purdue Advanced Reactor Core Simulator) code is used. The results demonstrate that GSA algorithm have promising performance and could be proposed for other optimization problems of nuclear engineering field.

  13. Dissolution process for advanced-PWR-type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.E.; Decker, L.A.; Pearson, L.G.

    1979-01-01

    The new Fluorinel Dissolution Process and Fuel Storage (FAST) Facility at ICPP will provide underwater storage of spent PWR fuel and a new head-end process for fuel dissolution. The dissolution will be two-stage, using HF and HNO 3 , with an intermittent H 2 SO 4 dissolution for removing stainless steel components. Equipment operation is described

  14. Determination of PWR core water level using ex-core detectors signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, Alvaro; Abarca, Agustin; Miro, Rafael; Verdu, Gumersindo

    2013-01-01

    The core water level provides relevant neutronic and thermalhydraulic information of the reactor such as power, k eff and cooling ability; in fact, core water level monitoring could be used to predict LOCA and cooling reduction which may deal with core damage. Although different detection equipment is used to monitor several parameters such as the power, core water level monitoring is not an evident task. However, ex-core detectors can measure the fast neutrons leaking the core and several studies demonstrate the existence of a relationship between fast neutron leakage and core water level due to the shielding effect of the water. In addition, new ex-core detectors are being developed, such as silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors, monitoring the neutron flux with higher accuracy and in higher temperatures conditions. Therefore, a methodology to determine this relationship has been developed based on a Monte Carlo calculation using MCNP code and applying variance reduction with adjoint functions based on the adjoint flux obtained with the discrete ordinates code TORT. (author)

  15. A reduced scale two loop PWR core designed with particle swarm optimization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Junior, Carlos A. Souza; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Cunha, Joao J.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Reduced scale experiments are often employed in engineering projects because they are much cheaper than real scale testing. Unfortunately, designing reduced scale thermal-hydraulic circuit or equipment, with the capability of reproducing, both accurately and simultaneously, all physical phenomena that occur in real scale and at operating conditions, is a difficult task. To solve this problem, advanced optimization techniques, such as Genetic Algorithms, have been applied. Following this research line, we have performed investigations, using the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) Technique, to design a reduced scale two loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, considering 100% of nominal power and non accidental operating conditions. Obtained results show that the proposed methodology is a promising approach for forced flow reduced scale experiments. (author)

  16. Turbulent heat transfer in a coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Saha, Arun K.; Munshi, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Exact predictions in nuclear reactors are more crucial, because of the safety aspects. It necessitates the appropriate modeling of heat transfer phenomena in the reactors core. A two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics model is used to study the detailed analysis of the coolant region of a fuel pin. Governing equations are solved using Marker and Cell (MAC) method. Standard wall functions k-ε turbulence model is incorporated to consider the turbulent behaviour of the flow field. Validation of the code and a few results for a typical PWR running at normal operating conditions reported earlier. There were some discrepancies in the old calculations. These discrepancies have been resolved and updated results are presented in this work. 2D thermal-hydraulics model results have been compared with the 1D thermal-hydraulics model results and conclusions have been drawn. (author)

  17. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.W.

    1987-12-01

    In previous experiments, done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel, the instrument tubes support structure built into the vault was not included. It consists of a number of grids made up of fairly massive steel girders. These have now been added to the model and experiments performed using water to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor and high-pressure air to simulate the discharge of steam or gas from the assumed breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. The results show that the tubes support structure considerably reduces the carry-over of liquid via the vault access shafts. (author)

  18. Degraded core accidents for the Sizewell PWR A sensitivity analysis of the radiological consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N; Clarke, R H; Ferguson, L; Haywood, S M; Hemming, C R; Jones, J A

    1982-01-01

    The radiological impact of degraded core accidents postulated for the Sizewell PWR was assessed in an earlier study. In this report the sensitivity of the predicted consequences to variation in the values of a number of important parameters is investigated for one of the postulated accidental releases. The parameters subjected to sensitivity analyses are the dose-mortality relationship for bone marrow irradiation, the energy content of the release, the warning time before the release to the environment, and the dry deposition velocity for airborne material. These parameters were identified as among the more important in determining the uncertainty in the results obtained in the initial study. With a few exceptions the predicted consequences were found to be not very sensitive to the parameter values investigated, the range of variation in the consequences for the limiting values of each parameter rarely exceeded a factor of a few and in many cases was considerably less. The conclusions reached are, however, p...

  19. On-line thermal margin estimation of a PWR core using a neural network approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soon Ok; Kim, Hyun Koon; Lee, Seung Hynk; Chang, Soon Heung

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for on-line thermal margin monitoring of a PWR Core is proposed in this paper, where a neural network model is introduced to predict the DNBR values at the given reactor operating conditions. The neural network is learned by the Back Propagation algorithm with the optimized random training data and is tested to investigate the generalized performance for the steady state operating region as well as for the transient situations where DNB is of the primary concern. The test results show that the high level of accuracy in predicting the DNBR can be achieved by the neural network model compared to the detailed code results. An insight has been gained from this study that the neural network model for estimating DNB performance can be a viable tool for on-line thermal margin monitoring of a nuclear power plant

  20. Efficacious of estimatives of thermal-hydraulic conditions of the PWR core by measured parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, C.T.M.; Pontedeiro, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Using ALMOD 3W2 and COBRA IIIP computer codes an evaluation of usual methods of estimatives of heat transfer conditions in the PWR core was made, using variables of the monitored processes. It was done a parametric study in conditions of the permanent regim to verify the influence of variables such as, pressure, temperature and power in the value of critical heat flux. Parameters to prevent the DNB phenomenon in KWU power plants and Westinghouse were calculated and implemented in the ALMOD 3W2 program to estimate the DNBR evolution. It was identified a common origin to both methods and comparing with detailed calculations of the COBRA IIIP code, it was settled limitations in the application of parameters. (M.C.K.) [pt

  1. An axial calculation method for accurate two-dimensional PWR core simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, P.

    1985-02-01

    An axial calculation method, which improves the agreement of the multiplication factors determined by two- and three-dimensional PWR neutronic calculations, is presented. The axial buckling is determined at each time point so as to reproduce the increase of the leakage due to the flattening of the axial power distribution and the effect of the axial variation of the group constants of the fuel on the reactivity is taken into account. The results of a test example show that the differences of k-eff and cycle length between two- and three-dimensional calculations, which are unsatisfactorily large if a constant buckling is used, become negligible if the results of the axial calculation are used in the two-dimensional core simulation. (Auth.)

  2. Study On Safety Analysis Of PWR Reactor Core In Transient And Severe Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Dai Dien; Hoang Minh Giang; Nguyen Thi Thanh Thuy; Nguyen Thi Tu Oanh; Le Thi Thu; Pham Tuan Nam; Tran Van Trung; Le Van Hong; Vo Thi Huong

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation research project on the Study on Safety Analysis of PWR Reactor Core in Transient and Severe Accident Conditions between Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INST), VINATOM and Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Korea has been setup to strengthen the capability of researches in nuclear safety not only in mastering the methods and computer codes, but also in qualifying of young researchers in the field of nuclear safety analysis. Through the studies on the using of thermal hydraulics computer codes like RELAP5, COBRA, FLUENT and CFX the thermal hydraulics research group has made progress in the research including problems for safety analysis of APR1400 nuclear reactor, PIRT methodologies and sub-channel analysis. The study of severe accidents has been started by using MELCOR in collaboration with KAERI experts and the training on the fundamental phenomena occurred in postulated severe accident. For Vietnam side, VVER-1000 nuclear reactor is also intensively studied. The design of core catcher, reactor containment and severe accident management are the main tasks concerning VVER technology. The research results are presented in the 9 th National Conference on Mechanics, Ha Noi, December 8-9, 2012, the 10 th National Conference on Nuclear Science and Technology, Vung Tau, August 14-15, 2013, as well as published in the journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, Vietnam Nuclear Society and other journals. The skills and experience from using computer codes like RELAP5, MELCOR, ANSYS and COBRA in nuclear safety analysis are improved with the nuclear reactors APR1400, Westinghouse 4 loop PWR and especially the VVER-1000 chosen for the specific studies. During cooperation research project, man power and capability of Nuclear Safety center of INST have been strengthen. Three masters were graduated, 2 researchers are engaging in Ph.D course at Hanoi University of Science and Technology and University of Science and Technology, Korea

  3. Global calculation of PWR reactor core using the two group energy solution by the response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, C.F.S.; Watson, F.V.

    1991-01-01

    A computational code to solve a two energy group neutron diffusion problem has been developed base d on the Response Matrix Method. That method solves the global problem of PWR core, without using the cross sections homogenization process, thus it is equivalent to a pontwise core calculation. The present version of the code calculates the response matrices by the first order perturbative method and considers developments on arbitrary order Fourier series for the boundary fluxes and interior fluxes. (author)

  4. Mixed PWR core loadings with inert matrix Pu-fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanculescu, A.; Kasemeyer, U.; Paratte, J.-M.; Chawla, R.

    1999-01-01

    The most efficient way to enhance plutonium consumption in light water reactors is to eliminate the production of plutonium all together. This requirement leads to fuel concepts in which the uranium is replaced by an inert matrix. At PSI, studies have focused on employing ZrO 2 as inert matrix. Adding a burnable poison to such a fuel proves to be necessary. As a result of scoping studies, Er 2 O 3 was identified as the most suitable burnable poison material. The results of whole-core three-dimensional neutronics analyses indicated, for a present-day 1000 MW e pressurised water reactor, the feasibility of an asymptotic equilibrium four-batch cycle fuelled solely with the proposed PuO 2 -Er 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 inert matrix fuel (IMF). The present paper presents the results of more recent investigations related to 'real-life' situations, which call for transition configurations in which mixed IMF and UO 2 assembly loadings must be considered. To determine the influence of the introduction of IMF assemblies on the characteristics of a UO 2 -fuelled core, three-dimensional full-core calculations have been performed for a present-day 1000 MW e PWR containing up to 12 optimised IMF assemblies. (author)

  5. 3D thermal-hydraulic analysis on core of PWR nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhaohui; Wang Xuefang; Shen Mengyu

    1997-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic analysis of core is of great importance in reactor safety analysis. A computer code, thermal hydraulic analysis porous medium analysis (THAPMA), has been developed to simulate the flow and heat transfer characteristics of reactor components. It has been proved reliable by several numerical tests. In the THAPMA code, a new difference scheme and solution method have been studied in developing the computer software. For the difference scheme, a second order accurate, high resolution scheme, called WSUC scheme, has been proposed. This scheme is total variation bounded and unconditionally stable in convective numeral stability. Numerical tests show that the WSUC is better in accuracy and resolution than the 1-st order upwind, 2-nd order upwind, SOUCUP by Zhu and Rodi. In solution method, a modified PISO algorithm is used, which is not only simpler but also more accurate and more rapid in convergence than the original PISO algorithm. Moreover, the modified PISO algorithm can effectively solve steady and transient state problem. Besides, with the THAPMA code, the flow and heat transfer phenomena in reactor core have been numerically simulated in the light of the design condition of Qinshan PWR nuclear power station (the second-term project). The simulation results supply a theoretical basis for the core design

  6. New generation nuclear power units of PWR type integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitenkov, F.M.; Kurachen Kov, A.V.; Malamud, V.A.; Panov, Yu.K.; Runov, B.I.; Flerov, L.N.

    1997-01-01

    Design bases of new generation nuclear power units (nuclear power plants - NPP, nuclear co-generation plants - NCP, nuclear distract heating plants - NDHP), using integral type PWPS, developed in OKBM, Nizhny Novgorod and trends of design decisions optimization are considered in this report. The problems of diagnostics, servicing and repair of the integral reactor components in course of operation are discussed. The results of safety analysis, including the problems of several accident localization with postulated core melting and keeping corium in the reactor vessel and guard vessel are presented. Information on experimental substantiation of the suggested plant design decisions is presented. (author)

  7. Effect of operating conditions and environment on properties of materials of PWR type nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.

    1987-01-01

    Operating reliability and service life of PWR type nuclear power plants are discussed with respect to the material properties of the plant components. The effects of the operating environment on the material properties and the methods of their determination are characterized. Discussed are core materials, such as fuel, its cladding and regulating rod materials, and the materials of pipes, steam generators and condensers. The advances in the production of pressure vessel materials and their degradation during operation are treated in great detail. (Z.M.)

  8. Experiment and analyses on intentional secondary-side depressurization during PWR small break LOCA. Effects of depressurization rate and break area on core liquid level behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaka, Hideaki; Ohtsu, Iwao; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kukita, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the secondary-side depressurization rate and break area on the core liquid level behavior during a PWR small-break LOCA were studied using experimental data from the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and by using analysis results obtained with a JAERI modified version of RELAP5/MOD3 code. The LSTF is a 1/ 48 volumetrically scaled full-height integral model of a Westinghouse-type PWR. The code reproduced the thermal-hydraulic responses, observed in the experiment, for important parameters such as the primary and secondary side pressures and core liquid level behavior. The sensitivity of the core minimum liquid level to the depressurization rate and break area was studied by using the code assessed above. It was found that the core liquid level took a local minimum value for a given break area as a function of secondary side depressurization rate. Further efforts are, however, needed to quantitatively define the maximum core temperature as a function of break area and depressurization rate. (author)

  9. Assessment of the TASS 1-D neutronics model for the westinghouse and ABB-CE type PWR reactivity induced transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.D.; Yoon, H.Y.; Um, K.S.; Kim, H.C.; Sim, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Best estimate transient analysis code, TASS, has been developed for the normal and transient simulation of the Westinghouse and ABB-CE type PWRs. TASS thermal hydraulic model is based on the non-homogeneous, non-equilibrium two-phase continuity, energy and mixture momentum equations with constitutive relations for closure. Core neutronics model employs both the point kinetics and one-dimensional neutron diffusion model. Semi-implicit numerical scheme is used to solve the discretized finite difference equations. TASS one dimensional neutronics core model has been assessed through the reactivity induced transient analyses for the KORI-3, three loop Westinghouse PWR, and Younggwang-3 (YGN-3), two-loop ABB-CE PWR, nuclear power plants currently operating in Korea. The assessment showed that the TASS one dimensional neutronics core model can be applied for the Westinghouse and ABB-CE type PWRs to gain thermal margin which is necessary for a potential use of the high fuel burnup, extended fuel cycle, power upgrading and for the plant life extension

  10. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I.; St Clair, R.; Orr, D.

    2012-01-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  11. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); St Clair, R.; Orr, D. [Duke Energy, 526 S. Church St, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  12. Integral Full Core Multi-Physics PWR Benchmark with Measured Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord; Kumar, Shikhar; Rathbun, Miriam; Liang, Jingang

    2018-04-11

    In recent years, the importance of modeling and simulation has been highlighted extensively in the DOE research portfolio with concrete examples in nuclear engineering with the CASL and NEAMS programs. These research efforts and similar efforts worldwide aim at the development of high-fidelity multi-physics analysis tools for the simulation of current and next-generation nuclear power reactors. Like all analysis tools, verification and validation is essential to guarantee proper functioning of the software and methods employed. The current approach relies mainly on the validation of single physic phenomena (e.g. critical experiment, flow loops, etc.) and there is a lack of relevant multiphysics benchmark measurements that are necessary to validate high-fidelity methods being developed today. This work introduces a new multi-cycle full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) depletion benchmark based on two operational cycles of a commercial nuclear power plant that provides a detailed description of fuel assemblies, burnable absorbers, in-core fission detectors, core loading and re-loading patterns. This benchmark enables analysts to develop extremely detailed reactor core models that can be used for testing and validation of coupled neutron transport, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel isotopic depletion. The benchmark also provides measured reactor data for Hot Zero Power (HZP) physics tests, boron letdown curves, and three-dimensional in-core flux maps from 58 instrumented assemblies. The benchmark description is now available online and has been used by many groups. However, much work remains to be done on the quantification of uncertainties and modeling sensitivities. This work aims to address these deficiencies and make this benchmark a true non-proprietary international benchmark for the validation of high-fidelity tools. This report details the BEAVRS uncertainty quantification for the first two cycle of operations and serves as the final report of the project.

  13. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade 233 U-Thorium (U 3 ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade 233 U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U 3 ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core, the well designed U 3 ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly 233 U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U 3 ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U 3 ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U 3 ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no visible impacts on neutronic characteristics compared

  14. Study of corium radial spreading between fuel rods in a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, S.; Gatt, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of severe accident studies for PWR like Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), the reactor core essentially constituted of fuel rods begins to heat and then to melt. During the early degradation phase, a melt (essentially UO2 and ZrO2) that constitutes the corium flows first along the rods, and after a blockage formation, may radially propagate towards the core periphery. A simplified model has been elaborated to study the corium freezing phenomena during its crossflow between the fuel rods. The corium spreads on an horizontal support made, of either a corium crust, or a grid assembly. The model solves numerically the interface energy balance equation at the solid-liquid corium interface and the monodimensional heat balance equation in transient process with convective terms and heat source (residual power). ''Zukauskas'' correlations are used to calculate heat transfer coefficients. The model can be integrated in severe accident codes like ICARE II (IPSN) describing the in-vessel degradation scenarios. (author). 5 refs, 10 figs

  15. Technical report: fabrication of PWR type rodlet fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Uno, Hisao; Sasajima, Hideo

    1990-06-01

    With respect to the simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) experiments with pre-irradiated LWR type fuel rods at nuclear safety research reactor (NSRR), there were principally three technical difficulties which should be overcome: (1) Fabrication of the rodlet fuel; Fuel rods from the commercial power reactors had an active column length by 3.6m. To utilize this for NSRR pulse experiment, rodlet fuel having an active column length by 0.12m (reduced to one thirtieth) is requested to fabricate without changing the inside fuel conditions. (2) Development of in-core instrumentations: During pre-irradiation stages, a long-sized fuel rod had dimensional changes by waterside corrosion, bowing, creep down and so on. The fuel also had greater amount of radioactive fission products. This condition is significant to in-core instrumentations to be attached to the fuel rods. Well characterized data to be obtained from these, however, are quite necessary and important from research point of view. Remote handling techniques to attach the rod pressure sensor, the cladding extensometer, the fuel extensometer, and the cladding surface thermocouple to pre-irradiated fuel rods are, therefore, requested to develop. (3) Installation of PIE equipments for pulsed rodlet fuels: PIE on the pulsed rodlet fuels are necessary to better understanding the fuel performance detaily. Equipments which can easily detect the data related to PCMI type fuel failure are matter of concern. Since 1986, the technical difficulties have been tried to overcome by all staffs belonging to Reactivity Accident Laboratory, NSRR Operation Division, Department of Reactor Fuel Examination and Hot Laboratory. This report describes the technical achievements obtained through four years work. (author)

  16. Layout of PWR in-core instrumentation system tubing and support structure with Bechtel 3D-CADD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, T.; Pfeifer, B.W.; Mulay, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    The optimization study of the PWR In-Core Instrumentation System (ICIS) tubing layout and support structure presented an opportunity to utilize the Bechtel 3D-CADD program to perform this task. This paper provides a brief summary of the Bechtel 3D-CADD program development and capabilities and outlines the process of developing and optimizing the ICIS tube layout. Specific aspects relating to the ICIS tube layout criteria, support, alignment, electronic interference check and erection sequence are provided. (orig.)

  17. Assessment of fission product release from the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Evrard, J.M.; Generino, G.

    1984-07-01

    Fission product releases from the RCB associated with hypothetical core-melt accidents ABβ, S 2 CDβ and TLBβ in a PWR-900 MWe have been performed using French computer codes (in particular, the JERICHO Code for containment response analysis and AEROSOLS/B1 for aerosol behavior in the containment) related to thermalhydraulics and fission product behavior in the primary system and in the reactor containment building

  18. Programme of hot points eradication (Co-60) led on French PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocher, A.; Ridoux, P.; Anthoni, S.; Brun, C.

    1998-01-01

    The question of hot points (pellets rich in cobalt 59 or in cobalt 60 in a PWR type reactor), is studied from the radiation protection point of view. The purpose is to see how to optimize the radiation protection, the elimination of these hot points can bring an improvement. (N.C.)

  19. Fuel assemblies for PWR type reactors: fuel rods, fuel plates. CEA work presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delafosse, Jacques.

    1976-01-01

    French work on PWR type reactors is reported: basic knowledge on Zr and its alloys and on uranium oxide; experience gained on other programs (fast neutron and heavy water reactors); zircaloy-2 or zircaloy-4 clad UO 2 fuel rods; fuel plates consisting of zircaloy-2 clad UO 2 squares of thickness varying between 2 and 4mm [fr

  20. Analysis of Moderator Temperature Reactivity Coefficient of the PWR Core Using WIMS-ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran; Rokhmadi

    2007-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (MTRC) is an important parameter in design, control and safety, particularly in PWR reactor. It is then very important to validate any new processed library for an accurate prediction of this parameter. The objective of this work is to validate the newly WIMS library based on ENDF/B-VI nuclear data files, especially for the prediction of the MTRC parameter. For this purpose, it is used a set of light water moderated lattice experiments as the NORA experiment and R1-100H critical reactors, both of reactors using UO 2 fuel pellet. Analysis is used with WIMSD/4 lattice code with original cross section libraries and WIMS-ANL with ENDF/B-VI cross section libraries. The results showed that the moderator temperatures reactivity coefficients for the NORA reactor using original libraries is - 5.039E-04 %Δk/k/℃ but for ENDF/B-VI libraries is - 2.925E-03 %Δk/k/℃. Compared to the designed value of the reactor core, the difference is in the range of 1.8 - 3.8 % for ENDF/B-IV libraries. It can be concluded that for reactor safety and control analysis, it has to be used ENDF/B- VI libraries because the original libraries is not accurate any more. (author)

  1. Analysis of a small PWR core with the PARCS/Helios and PARCS/Serpent code systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baiocco, G.; Petruzzi, A.; Bznuni, S.; Kozlowski, T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The consistency between Helios and Serpent few-group cross sections is shown. • The PARCS model is validated against a Monte Carlo 3D model. • The fission and capture rates are compared. • The influence of the spacer grids on the axial power distribution is shown. - Abstract: Lattice physics codes are primarily used to generate cross-section data for nodal codes. In this work the methodology of homogenized constant generation was applied to a small Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, using the deterministic code Helios and the Monte Carlo code Serpent. Subsequently, a 3D analysis of the PWR core was performed with the nodal diffusion code PARCS using the two-group cross section data sets generated by Helios and Serpent. Moreover, a full 3D model of the PWR core was developed using Serpent in order to obtain a reference solution. Several parameters, such as k eff , axial and radial power, fission and capture rates were compared and found to be in good agreement.

  2. Design study of a PWR of 1300 MWe of Angra-2 type operating in the thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, E.P.; Carneiro, F.A.N.; Schlosser, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of the thorium-highly enriched uranium and of the thorium-plutonium mixed oxide fuels in an unmodified PWR is analysed. Reactor core design calculations were performed for both types of fuels considering once-through and recycle fuels. The calculations were performed with the KWU design codes FASER-3 and MEDIUM-2.2 after introduction of the thorium chain and some addition of nuclide data in FASER-3. A two-energy group scheme and a two-dimensional (XY) representation of the reactor core were utilized. No technical problem that precluded the utilization of any of the options analyzed was found. The savings in uranium ore introduced by the thorium cycle with fuel recycling ranges from 13% to 52% as compared with the usual uranium once-through cycle; the SWU savings goes from 13% to 22%. (Author) [pt

  3. Treatment of core components from nuclear power plants with PWR and BWR reactors - 16043

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viermann, Joerg; Friske, Andreas; Radzuweit, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    During operation of a Nuclear Power Plant components inside the RPV get irradiated. Irradiation has an effect on physical properties of these components. Some components have to be replaced after certain neutron doses or respectively after a certain operating time of the plant. Such components are for instance water channels and control rods from Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) or control elements, poisoning elements and flow restrictors from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Most of these components are stored in the fuel pool for a certain time after replacement. Then they have to be packaged for further treatment or for disposal. More than 25 years ago GNS developed a system for disposal of irradiated core components which was based on a waste container suitable for transport, storage and disposal of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW), the so-called MOSAIK R cask. The MOSAIK R family of casks is subject of a separate presentation at the ICEM 09 conference. Besides the MOSAIK R cask the treatment system developed by GNS comprised underwater shears to cut the components to size as well as different types of equipment to handle the components, the shears and the MOSAIK R casks in the fuel pool. Over a decade of experience it showed that this system although effective needed improvement for BWR plants where many water channels and control rods had to be replaced after a certain operating time. Because of the large numbers of components the time period needed to cut the components in the pool had a too big influence on other operational work like rearranging of fuel assemblies in the pool. The system was therefore further developed and again a suitable cask was the heart of the solution. GNS developed the type MOSAIK R 80 T, a cask that is capable to ship the unsegmented components with a length of approx. 4.5 m from the Power plants to an external treatment centre. This treatment centre consisting of a hot cell installation with a scrap shear, super-compactor and a heavy

  4. Comparative study T-type and I-type layout of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eko Rudi Iswanto and Siti Alimah

    2010-01-01

    Determining plant layout is one of the five major stages during the life time of a nuclear power plant. Some important factors that affect in the selecting of plant layout are availability of infrastructure, economic aspects, social aspects, public and environment safety, and also easy to do. Another factor to be considered is requirements as seismic design, which refers to the principles of good security workers, communities and the environment of radiological risks. There are many layout types of nuclear power plant, two of them are T-type layout and I-type layout. Each type of the plant layout has advantage and disadvantage, therefore this study is to understand them. Good layout is able to provide a high level of security against earthquakes. In term of earthquake design, I-type layout has a higher security level than T-type layout. Therefore, I-type layout can be a good choice for PWR nuclear power plants 1000 MWe that will be built in Indonesia. (author)

  5. Development of an advanced 16x165 Westinghouse type PWR fuel assembly for Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, M. L.; King, S. J.; Pulver, E. F.; Jeon, K.-L.; Esteves, R.; Kurincic, B.

    2004-01-01

    Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Company, Ltd. (KNFC), and Westinghouse Electric Company (Westinghouse) have jointly designed an advanced 16x16 Westinghouse type PWR fuel assembly. This advanced 16x16 Westinghouse type PWR fuel assembly, which will be implemented in both Kori Unit 2 (in Korea) and Angra Unit 1 (in Brazil) in January and March 2005, respectively, is an integral part of the utilities fuel management strategy. This same fuel design has also been developed for future use in Krsko Unit 1 (in Slovenia). In this paper we will describe the front-end nuclear fuel management activities utilized by the joint development team and describe how these activities played an integral part in defining the direction of the advanced 16x16 Westinghouse type PWR fuel assembly design. Additionally, this paper will describe how this design demonstrates improved margins under high duty plant operating conditions. The major reason for initiating this joint development program was to update the current 16x16 fuel assembly, which is also called 16STD. The current 16STD fuel assembly contains a non-optimized fuel rod diameter for the fuel rod pitch (i.e. 9.5 mm OD fuel rods at a 0.485 inch pitch), non-neutronic efficient components (i.e. Inconel Mid grids), no Intermediate Flow Mixer (IFM) grids, and other mechanical features. The advanced 16x16 fuel assembly is being designed for peak rod average burnups of up to 75 MWd/kgU and will use an optimized fuel rod diameter (i.e. 9.14 mm OD ZIRLO TM fuel rods), neutronic efficient components (i.e. ZIRLO TM Mid grids), ZIRLO TM Intermediate Flow Mixer (IFM) grids to improve Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) margin, and many other mechanical features that improve design margins. Nuclear design activities in the areas of fuel cycle cost and fuel management were performed in parallel to the fuel assembly design efforts. As the change in reactivity due to the change in the fuel rod diameter influences directly

  6. Analysis of the core reflooding of a PWR reactor under a loss-of-coolant postulated accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austregesilo Filho, H.

    1978-12-01

    The main purpose of this work is to analyse the termohydraulic behaviour of emergency cooling water, during reflooding of a PWR core submitted to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident, with the scope of giving the boundary conditions needed to verify fuel element and containment integrity. The analytical model presented was applied to the simulation of Angra I core reflooding phase, after a double-ended break between pressure vessel and discharge of one of the main coolant pumps. For this accident, with a discharge coefficient of C sub(D) = 0.4, the highest peak cladding temperature is expected. (author) [pt

  7. RELAP5/MOD3.3 Analyses of Core Heatup Prevention Strategy During Extended Station Blackout in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosek, A.

    2016-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant demonstrated the vulnerability of the plants on the loss of electrical power for several days, so called extended station blackout (SBO). A set of measures have been proposed and implemented in response of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The purpose of the study was to investigate the application of the deterministic safety analysis for core heatup prevention strategy of the extended SBO in pressurized water reactor, lasting 72 h. The prevention strategy selected was water injection into steam generators using turbine driven auxiliary feedwater pump (TD-AFW) or portable water injection pump. Method for assessment of the necessary pump injection flowrate is developed and presented. The necessary injection flowrate to the steam generators is determined from the calculated cumulative water mass injected by the turbine driven auxiliary feedwater pump in the analysed scenarios, when desired normal level is maintained automatically. The developed method allows assessment of the necessary injection flowrates of pump, TD-AFW or portable, for different plant configurations and number of flowrate changes. The RELAP5/MOD3.3 Patch04 computer code and input model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor is used for analyses, assuming different injection start times, flowrates and reactor coolant system losses. Three different reactor coolant system (RCS) coolant loss pathways, with corresponding leakage rate, can be expected in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) during the extended SBO: normal system leakage, reactor coolant pump seal leakage, and RCS coolant loss through letdown relief valve unless automatically isolated or until isolation is procedurally directed. Depressurization of RCS was also considered. In total, six types of RCS coolant loss scenarios were considered. Two cases were defined regarding the operation of the emergency diesel generators. Different delays of the pump

  8. Results of safety analysis on PWR type nuclear power plants with two and three loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The results of safety analysis on PWR type nuclear power plants with two and three loops are presented, which was conducted by the Resource and Energy Agency, in June, 1979. This analysis was made simulating the phenomenon relating to the pressurizer level gauge at the time of the TMI accident. The model plants were the Ikata nuclear power plant with two loops and the Takahama No. 1 nuclear power plant with three loops. The premise conditions for this safety analysis were as follows: 1) the main feed water flow is totally lost suddenly at the full power operation of the plants, and the feed water pump is started manually 15 minutes after the accident initiation, 2) the relief valve on the pressurizer is kept open even after the pressure drop in the primary cooling system, and the primary cooling water flows out into the containment vessel through the rupture disc of the pressurizer relief tank, and 3) the electric circuit, which sends out the signal of safety injection at the abnormal low pressure in the reactor vessel, is added from the view-point of starting the operation of the emergency core cooling system as early as possible. Relating to the analytical results, the pressure in the reactor vessels changes less, the water level in the pressurizers can be regulated, and the water level in the steam generators is recovered safely in both two and three-loop plants. It is recognized that the plants with both two- and three loops show the safe transient phenomena, and the integrity of the cores is kept under the premise conditions. The evaluation for each analyzed result was conducted in detail. (Nakai, Y.)

  9. Uncertainty evaluatins of CASMO-3/MASTER system for PWR core neutronics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jae Seung; Kim, Kang Seog; Lee, Kibog; Park, Jin Ha; Zee, Sung Quun

    1996-01-01

    Uncertainties in core neutronic calculations of CASMO-3/MASTER, which is a KAERI developed core nuclear design code system, were evaluated via comparisons with measured data. Comparisons were performed with plant measurement data from one Westinghouse type and one ABB-CE type plant and two Korean standard type plants. The CASMO-3/MASTER capability and levels of accuracy are concluded to be sufficient for the neutronics design including safety related parameters related with reactivity, power distributions, temperature and power coefficients, inverse boron worth and control bank worth

  10. Comparison of computational performance of GA and PSO optimization techniques when designing similar systems - Typical PWR core case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Lima, Carlos A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - Divisao de Reatores/PPGIEN, Rua Helio de Almeida 75, Cidade Universitaria - Ilha do Fundao, P.O. Box: 68550 - Zip Code: 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Politecnico, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional, Rua Alberto Rangel - s/n, Vila Nova, Nova Friburgo, Zip Code: 28630-050, Nova Friburgo (Brazil); Lapa, Celso Marcelo F.; Pereira, Claudio Marcio do N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - Divisao de Reatores/PPGIEN, Rua Helio de Almeida 75, Cidade Universitaria - Ilha do Fundao, P.O. Box: 68550 - Zip Code: 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT) (Brazil); Cunha, Joao J. da [Eletronuclear Eletrobras Termonuclear - Gerencia de Analise de Seguranca Nuclear, Rua da Candelaria, 65, 7 andar. Centro, Zip Code: 20091-906, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Alvim, Antonio Carlos M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE/Nuclear, Cidade Universitaria - Ilha do Fundao s/n, P.O.Box 68509 - Zip Code: 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT) (Brazil)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: > Performance of PSO and GA techniques applied to similar system design. > This work uses ANGRA1 (two loop PWR) core as a prototype. > Results indicate that PSO technique is more adequate than GA to solve this kind of problem. - Abstract: This paper compares the performance of two optimization techniques, particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) applied to the design a typical reduced scale two loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, at full power in single phase forced circulation flow. This comparison aims at analyzing the performance in reaching the global optimum, considering that both heuristics are based on population search methods, that is, methods whose population (candidate solution set) evolve from one generation to the next using a combination of deterministic and probabilistic rules. The simulated PWR, similar to ANGRA 1 power plant, was used as a case example to compare the performance of PSO and GA. Results from simulations indicated that PSO is more adequate to solve this kind of problem.

  11. Comparison of computational performance of GA and PSO optimization techniques when designing similar systems - Typical PWR core case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Lima, Carlos A.; Lapa, Celso Marcelo F.; Pereira, Claudio Marcio do N.A.; Cunha, Joao J. da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Performance of PSO and GA techniques applied to similar system design. → This work uses ANGRA1 (two loop PWR) core as a prototype. → Results indicate that PSO technique is more adequate than GA to solve this kind of problem. - Abstract: This paper compares the performance of two optimization techniques, particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) applied to the design a typical reduced scale two loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, at full power in single phase forced circulation flow. This comparison aims at analyzing the performance in reaching the global optimum, considering that both heuristics are based on population search methods, that is, methods whose population (candidate solution set) evolve from one generation to the next using a combination of deterministic and probabilistic rules. The simulated PWR, similar to ANGRA 1 power plant, was used as a case example to compare the performance of PSO and GA. Results from simulations indicated that PSO is more adequate to solve this kind of problem.

  12. Problems of control of WWER-type pressurized water reactors (PWR's)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drab, F.; Grof, V.

    1978-01-01

    The problems are dealt with of nuclear power reactor control. Special attention is paid to the reactor of the WWER type, which will play the most important part in the Czechoslovak power system in the near future. The subsystems are described which comprise the systems of reactor control and protection. The possibilities are outlined of using Czechoslovak instrumentation for the control and safety system of the WWER-type PWR. (author)

  13. WWER-440 type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizov, J.; Svec, P.; Rajci, T.

    1987-01-01

    Assemblies with patly spent fuel of enrichment within 5 and 36 MWd/kg U or lower than the maximum enrichment of freshly charged fuel are placed in at least one of the peripheral positions of each hexagonal sector of the WWER-440 reactor type core. This increases fuel availability and reduces the integral neutron dose to the reactor vessel. The duration is extended of the reactor campaign and/or the mean fuel enrichment necessary for the required duration of the period between refuellings is reduced. Thus, fuel costs are reduced by 1 up to 3%. The results obtained in the experiment are tabulated. (J.B.). 1 fig., 3 tabs

  14. Impact forces on a core shroud of an excited PWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, B.; Vallory, J. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    Seismic excitation of PWR internals may induce large motions of the fuel assemblies (FA). This could result in impact between assemblies or between assemblies and core shroud. Forces generated during these shocks are often the basis for the maximum design loads of the spacer grids and fuel rods. An experimental program has been conducted at the French Nuclear Reactor Directorate (CEA) to measure the impact forces of a reduced scale FA on the test section under different environmental conditions. Within the framework of the tests presented, the effect of the FA environment (air, stagnant water, water under flow) on the maximum impact forces measured at grid levels and on the energy dissipated during the shock is examined. A 'fluid cushioning' effect (dissipative) between the grids and the wall is sought. Experimental results show that the axial flow has a great influence on the impact forces. The greater the axial flow velocity is, the lower the impact forces are. The tests of impact of an assembly on a wall were analyzed compared to the tests carried out without impact. This analysis related on the measured forces of impact and the variation of the measured/computed total energy of the system. The whole of these tests in air and water shows that the 'fluid cushioning' effect required exists but is not significant. Thus the presence of water does not decrease the forces of impact, and does not amplify the quantity of energy dissipated during the shock. The fact that the 'fluid cushioning' effect is weak compared to more analytical tests probably comes from our 'not perfect' or 'realistic' conditions of tests which involve an angle between the grid and the wall at the shock moment.

  15. Impact forces on a core shroud of an excited PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, B.; Vallory, J.

    2001-01-01

    Seismic excitation of PWR internals may induce large motions of the fuel assemblies (FA). This could result in impact between assemblies or between assemblies and core shroud. Forces generated during these shocks are often the basis for the maximum design loads of the spacer grids and fuel rods. An experimental program has been conducted at the French Nuclear Reactor Directorate (CEA) to measure the impact forces of a reduced scale FA on the test section under different environmental conditions. Within the framework of the tests presented, the effect of the FA environment (air, stagnant water, water under flow) on the maximum impact forces measured at grid levels and on the energy dissipated during the shock is examined. A 'fluid cushioning' effect (dissipative) between the grids and the wall is sought. Experimental results show that the axial flow has a great influence on the impact forces. The greater the axial flow velocity is, the lower the impact forces are. The tests of impact of an assembly on a wall were analyzed compared to the tests carried out without impact. This analysis related on the measured forces of impact and the variation of the measured/computed total energy of the system. The whole of these tests in air and water shows that the 'fluid cushioning' effect required exists but is not significant. Thus the presence of water does not decrease the forces of impact, and does not amplify the quantity of energy dissipated during the shock. The fact that the 'fluid cushioning' effect is weak compared to more analytical tests probably comes from our 'not perfect' or 'realistic' conditions of tests which involve an angle between the grid and the wall at the shock moment

  16. The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents for the Sizewell PWR The impact of adopting revised frequencies of occurrence

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N

    1983-01-01

    The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents postulated for the Sizewell PWR were assessed in an earlier study and the results published in NRPB-R137. Further analyses have since been made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) of degraded core accidents which have led to a revision of their predicted frequencies of occurrence. The implications of these revised frequencies, in terms of the risk to the public from degraded core accidents, are evaluated in this report. Increases, by factors typically within the range of about 1.5 to 7, are predicted in the consequences, compared with those estimated in the earlier study. However, the predicted risk from degraded core accidents, despite these increases, remains exceedingly small.

  17. Calculation of local flow conditions in the lower core of a PWR with code-Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In order to better understand the stresses to which fuel rods are subjected, we need to improve our knowledge of the fluid flow inside the core. A code specialized for calculations in tube bundles is used to calculate the flow inside the whole of the core, with a resolution at the assembly level. Still, it is necessary to obtain realistic entry conditions, and these depend on the flow in the downcomer and lower plenum. Also, the flow in the first stages of the core features 4 incoming jets per assembly, and requires a resolution much finer than that used for the whole core calculation. A series of calculations are thus run with our incompressible Navier-Stokes solver, Code-Saturne, using a classical Ranse turbulence model. The first calculations involve a detailed geometry, including part of the cold legs, downcomer, lower plenum, and lower core of a pressurized water reactor. The level of detail includes most obstacles below the core. The lower core plate, being pierced with close to 800 holes, cannot be realistically represented within a practical mesh size, so that a head loss model is used. The lower core itself requiring even more detail is also represented with head losses. We make full use of Code-Saturne's non conforming mesh possibilities to represent a complex geometry, being careful to retain a good mesh quality. Starting just under the lower core, the mesh is aligned with fuel rod assemblies, so that different types of assemblies can be represented through different head loss coefficients. These calculations yield steady-state or near steady-state results, which are compared to experimental data, and should be sufficient to yield realistic entry conditions for full core calculations at assembly width resolution, and beyond those mechanical strain calculations. We are also interested in more detailed flow conditions and fluctuations in the lower core area, so as to better quantify vibrational input. This requires a much higher resolution, which we limit

  18. Three-dimensional transport coefficient model and prediction-correction numerical method for thermal margin analysis of PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion Engineering Inc. designs its modern PWR reactor cores using open-core thermal-hydraulic methods where the mass, momentum and energy equations are solved in three dimensions (one axial and two lateral directions). The resultant fluid properties are used to compute the minimum Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) which ultimately sets the power capability of the core. The on-line digital monitoring and protection systems require a small fast-running algorithm of the design code. This paper presents two techniques used in the development of the on-line DNB algorithm. First, a three-dimensional transport coefficient model is introduced to radially group the flow subchannel into channels for the thermal-hydraulic fluid properties calculation. Conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for this channels are derived using transport coefficients to modify the calculation of the radial transport of enthalpy and momentum. Second, a simplified, non-iterative numerical method, called the prediction-correction method, is applied together with the transport coefficient model to reduce the computer execution time in the determination of fluid properties. Comparison of the algorithm and the design thermal-hydraulic code shows agreement to within 0.65% equivalent power at a 95/95 confidence/probability level for all normal operating conditions of the PWR core. This algorithm accuracy is achieved with 1/800th of the computer processing time of its parent design code. (orig.)

  19. Nonlinear punctual dynamic applied to simulation of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cysne, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study some kinds of nuclear reactor accidents, a simulation is made using the punctual kinetics model to the reactor core. The following integration methods are used: Hansen's method in which a linearization is made and C S M P using a variable interval fourth-order Runge Kutta method. The results were good and were compared with those obtained by the code Dinamica I which uses a finite difference integration method of backward kind. (author)

  20. Core radial power profile effect on system and core cooling behavior during reflood phase of PWR-LOCA with CCTF data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1985-01-01

    In the reactor safety assessment during reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA, it is assumed implicitly that the core thermal hydraulic behavior is evaluated by the one-dimensional model with an average power rod. In order to assess the applicability of the one-dimensional treatment, integral tests were performed with various core radial power profiles using the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) whose core includes about 2,000 heater rods. The CCTF results confirm that the core radial power profile has weak effect on the thermal hydraulic behavior in the primary system except core. It is also confirmed that the core differential pressure in the axial direction is predicted by the one-dimensional core model with an average power rod even in the case with a steep radial power profile in the core. Even though the core heat transfer coefficient is dependent on the core radial power profile, it is found that the error of the peak clad surface temperature calculation is less than 15 K using the one-dimensional model in the CCTF tests. The CCTF results support the one-dimensional treatment assumed in the reactor safety assessment. (author)

  1. Control in fabrication of PWR and BWR type reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    Both destructive and non-destructive testing methods now in use in fabrication of BWR and PWR type reactor fuel elements at foreign plants are reviewed. Technological procedures applied in fabrication of fuel elements and fuel assemblies are described. Major attention is paid to radiographic, ultrasonic, metallographic, visual and autoclavic testings. A correspondence of the methods applied to the ASTM standards is discussed. The most part of the countries are concluded the apply similar testing methods enabling one to reliably evaluate the quality of primary materials and fabricated fuel elements and thus meeting the demands to contemporary PWR and BWR type reactor fuel elements. Practically all fuel element and pipe fabrication plants in Western Europe, Asia and America use the ASTM standards as the basis for the quality contr [ru

  2. International standard problem ISP36. Cora-W2 experiment on severe fuel damage for a Russian type PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    An OECD/NEA-CSNI International Standard Problem (ISP) has been performed on the experimental comparison basis of the severe fuel damage experiment CORA-W2. The out-of-pile experiment CORA-W2 was executed in February 1993 at he Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The objective of this experiment was the investigation of the behavior of a Russian type PWR fuel element (VVER-1000) during early core degradation. The main difference between a Western type and a Russian type PWR bundle is the B 4 C absorber rod instead of AgInCd. Measured quantities ar boundary conditions, bundle temperature, hydrogen generation and the final bundle configurations after cooldown. The ISP was conducted as a blind exercise. Boundary conditions were estimated using ATHLET-CD. Six different severe accident codes were used. The comparisons between experimental and analytical results were grouped by codes and examined separately. The thermal behavior up to significant oxidation has been predicted quite well. Larger deviations have been observed for the oxidation-induced temperature escalation, both time of onset and maximum temperature as well. The bundle behavior is greatly influenced by chemical interactions involving B 4 C absorber rod material, which failed relatively early at low temperature due to eutectic interaction between B 4 C and SS cladding as well as the SS guide tube. Regarding the complex material interaction larger differences can be recognized between calculated and measured results because of inappropriate models for material relocation and solidification processes and the lack of models describing the interactions of absorber rod materials with the fuel rods. For the total amount of H 2 generated, acceptable agreement could be achieved, if the total of oxidized zirconium was calculated correctly. The oxidation of stainless steel components and B 4 C were not treated. In general the confidence in code predictions decreases with processing core damage. (N.T.)

  3. International standard problem ISP36. Cora-W2 experiment on severe fuel damage for a Russian type PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    An OECD/NEA-CSNI International Standard Problem (ISP) has been performed on the experimental comparison basis of the severe fuel damage experiment CORA-W2. The out-of-pile experiment CORA-W2 was executed in February 1993 at he Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The objective of this experiment was the investigation of the behavior of a Russian type PWR fuel element (VVER-1000) during early core degradation. The main difference between a Western type and a Russian type PWR bundle is the B{sub 4}C absorber rod instead of AgInCd. Measured quantities ar boundary conditions, bundle temperature, hydrogen generation and the final bundle configurations after cooldown. The ISP was conducted as a blind exercise. Boundary conditions were estimated using ATHLET-CD. Six different severe accident codes were used. The comparisons between experimental and analytical results were grouped by codes and examined separately. The thermal behavior up to significant oxidation has been predicted quite well. Larger deviations have been observed for the oxidation-induced temperature escalation, both time of onset and maximum temperature as well. The bundle behavior is greatly influenced by chemical interactions involving B{sub 4}C absorber rod material, which failed relatively early at low temperature due to eutectic interaction between B{sub 4}C and SS cladding as well as the SS guide tube. Regarding the complex material interaction larger differences can be recognized between calculated and measured results because of inappropriate models for material relocation and solidification processes and the lack of models describing the interactions of absorber rod materials with the fuel rods. For the total amount of H{sub 2} generated, acceptable agreement could be achieved, if the total of oxidized zirconium was calculated correctly. The oxidation of stainless steel components and B{sub 4}C were not treated. In general the confidence in code predictions decreases with processing core damage. 36 refs.

  4. Study of crack propagation velocity in steel tanks of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amzallac, C.; Bernard, J.L.; Slama, G.

    1983-05-01

    Description and results of a serie of tests carried out on crack propagation velocity of steels in PWR environment (pressurized high temperature water), in order to examine the effects of metallurgical parameters such as chemical composition of steel, especially sulfur and carbon content, and steel type (laminate or forged steels), effects of mechanical parameters such as loading ratio, cycle form, frequency and application mode of loads and of chemical parameters (anodal dissolution or fatigue with hydrogen) [fr

  5. Automatic welding processes for reactor coolant pipes used in PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, T.; Nakamura, A.; Nagura, Y.; Sakamoto, N.

    1979-01-01

    The authors developed automatic welding processes (submerged arc welding process and TIG welding process) for application to the welding of reactor coolant pipes which constitute the most important part of the PWR type nuclear power plant. Submerged arc welding process is suitable for flat position welding in which pipes can be rotated, while TIG welding process is suitable for all position welding. This paper gives an outline of the two processes and the results of tests performed using these processes. (author)

  6. Experiments for simulating a great leak in the primary coolant circuit of a PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebig, E.

    1977-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident is to be simulated on a high pressure test rig. The accident is initiated by an externally induced rupture of a pair of rupture-disks installed in a coolant ejection device. Several problems of simulating leaks in the primary coolant circuit of PWR type reactors are dealt with. The selection of appropriate rupture-disks for such experiments is described

  7. The coupling of the Star-Cd software to a whole-core neutron transport code Decart for PWR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.W.; Lee, H.C.; Downar, T.J.; Sofu, T.; Weber, D.P.; Joo, H.G.; Cho, J.Y.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a U.S.- Korea collaborative U.S. Department of Energy INERI project, a comprehensive high-fidelity reactor-core modeling capability is being developed for detailed analysis of existing and advanced PWR reactor designs. An essential element of the project has been the development of an interface between the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) module, STAR-CD, and the neutronics module, DeCART. Since the computational mesh for CFD and neutronics calculations are generally different, the capability to average and decompose data on these different meshes has been an important part of code coupling activities. An averaging process has been developed to extract neutronics zone temperatures in the fuel and coolant and to generate appropriate multi group cross sections and densities. Similar procedures have also been established to map the power distribution from the neutronics zones to the mesh structure used in the CFD module. Since MPI is used as the parallel model in STAR-CD and conflicts arise during initiation of a second level of MPI, the interface developed here is based on using TCP/IP protocol sockets to establish communication between the CFD and neutronics modules. Preliminary coupled calculations have been performed for PWR fuel assembly size problems and converged solutions have been achieved for a series of steady-state problems ranging from a single pin to a 1/8 model of a 17 x 17 PWR fuel assembly. (authors)

  8. ASCOT-1: a computer program for analyzing the thermo-hydraulic behavior in a PWR core during a LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kensuke; Sato, Kazuo

    1978-09-01

    A digital computer code ASCOT-1 has been developed to analyze the thermo-hydraulic behavior in a PWR core during a loss-of-coolant accident. The core is assumed to be axi-symmetric two-dimensional and the conservation laws are solved by the method of characteristics. For the temperature response of representative fuels of the concentric annular subregions into which the core is divided, the heat conduction equations are solved by the explicit method with the averaged flow conditions decided above. The boundary conditions at the upper and lower plenum are given as inputs. The program is of an adjustable dimension so there are no restrictions to the numbers of meshes. ASCOT-1 is written in FORTRAN-IV for FACOM230-75. (author)

  9. VALIDATION OF FULL CORE GEOMETRY MODEL OF THE NODAL3 CODE IN THE PWR TRANSIENT BENCHMARK PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagor Malem Sembiring

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT VALIDATION OF FULL CORE GEOMETRY MODEL OF THE NODAL3 CODE IN THE PWR TRANSIENT BENCHMARK PROBLEMS. The coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (T/H code, NODAL3 code, has been validated in some PWR static benchmark and the NEACRP PWR transient benchmark cases. However, the NODAL3 code have not yet validated in the transient benchmark cases of a control rod assembly (CR ejection at peripheral core using a full core geometry model, the C1 and C2 cases.  By this research work, the accuracy of the NODAL3 code for one CR ejection or the unsymmetrical group of CRs ejection case can be validated. The calculations by the NODAL3 code have been carried out by the adiabatic method (AM and the improved quasistatic method (IQS. All calculated transient parameters by the NODAL3 code were compared with the reference results by the PANTHER code. The maximum relative difference of 16% occurs in the calculated time of power maximum parameter by using the IQS method, while the relative difference of the AM method is 4% for C2 case.  All calculation results by the NODAL3 code shows there is no systematic difference, it means the neutronic and T/H modules are adopted in the code are considered correct. Therefore, all calculation results by using the NODAL3 code are very good agreement with the reference results. Keywords: nodal method, coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code, PWR, transient case, control rod ejection.   ABSTRAK VALIDASI MODEL GEOMETRI TERAS PENUH PAKET PROGRAM NODAL3 DALAM PROBLEM BENCHMARK GAYUT WAKTU PWR. Paket program kopel neutronik dan termohidraulika (T/H, NODAL3, telah divalidasi dengan beberapa kasus benchmark statis PWR dan kasus benchmark gayut waktu PWR NEACRP.  Akan tetapi, paket program NODAL3 belum divalidasi dalam kasus benchmark gayut waktu akibat penarikan sebuah perangkat batang kendali (CR di tepi teras menggunakan model geometri teras penuh, yaitu kasus C1 dan C2. Dengan penelitian ini, akurasi paket program

  10. Quantification of cost of margin associated with in-core nuclear fuel management for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropaczek, D.J.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of in-core nuclear fuel management optimization is discussed. The problem is to determine the location of core material, such as the fuel and burnable poisons, so as to minimize (maximize) a stated objective within engineering constraints. Typical objectives include maximization of cycle energy production or discharged fuel exposure, and minimization of power peaking factor or reactor vessel fluence. Constraints include discharge burnup limits and one or more of the possible objectives if not selected as the objective. The optimization problem can be characterized as a large combinatorial problem with nonlinear objective function and constraints, which are likely to be active. The authors have elected to employ the integer Monte Carlo programming method to address this optimization problem because of the just-noted problem characteristics. To evaluate the core physics characteristics as a function of fuel loading pattern, second-order accurate perturbation theory is employed with successive application to improve estimates of the optimum loading pattern. No constraints on fuel movement other than requiring quarter-core symmetry were imposed. In this paper the authors employed this methodology to address a related problem. The problem being addressed can be stated as What is the cost associated with margin? Specifically, they wish to assign some financial value in terms of increased levelized fuel cycle cost associated with an increase in core margin of some type, such as power peaking factor

  11. Validation of full core geometry model of the NODAL3 code in the PWR transient Benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T-M Sembiring; S-Pinem; P-H Liem

    2015-01-01

    The coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (T/H) code, NODAL3 code, has been validated in some PWR static benchmark and the NEACRP PWR transient benchmark cases. However, the NODAL3 code have not yet validated in the transient benchmark cases of a control rod assembly (CR) ejection at peripheral core using a full core geometry model, the C1 and C2 cases. By this research work, the accuracy of the NODAL3 code for one CR ejection or the unsymmetrical group of CRs ejection case can be validated. The calculations by the NODAL3 code have been carried out by the adiabatic method (AM) and the improved quasistatic method (IQS). All calculated transient parameters by the NODAL3 code were compared with the reference results by the PANTHER code. The maximum relative difference of 16 % occurs in the calculated time of power maximum parameter by using the IQS method, while the relative difference of the AM method is 4 % for C2 case. All calculation results by the NODAL3 code shows there is no systematic difference, it means the neutronic and T/H modules are adopted in the code are considered correct. Therefore, all calculation results by using the NODAL3 code are very good agreement with the reference results. (author)

  12. Study on new-type fuel-related assembly handling tools for PWR NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiumei

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the design and study on a set of new-type fuel-related assembly snatching tools used for PWR NPP. The purpose is mainly to enhance the tool safety, reliability and convenientness by improvement of the mechanism and structure of the tool for snatching preciseness and avoiding from falling and abrasion of fuel-related assemblies for any condition. The new-type fuel-related assembly handling tools are compared with similar equipment in worldwide in terms of function, main technical characteristic, and safety and protection, some of them are better than the similar equipment in that they have reliable loading and unloading and conveying capabilities. (author)

  13. Alloy 690 in PWR type reactors; Aleaciones base niquel en condiciones de primario de los reactores tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Serrano, M.

    2005-07-01

    Alloy 690, used as replacement of Alloy 600 for vessel head penetration (VHP) nozzles in PWR, coexists in the primary loop with other components of Alloy 600. Alloy 690 shows an excellent resistance to primary water stress corrosion cracking, while Alloy 600 is very susceptible to this degradation mechanisms. This article analyse comparatively the PWSCC behaviour of both Ni-based alloys and associated weld metals 52/152 and 82/182. (Author)

  14. Optimization of reload core design for PWR and application to Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Wei; Zhongsheng Xie; Banghua Yin

    1995-01-01

    A direct efficient optimization technique has been effected for automatically optimizing the reload of PWR. The objective functions include: maximization of end-of-cycle (EOC) reactivity and maximization of average discharge burnup. The fuel loading optimization and burnable poison (BP) optimization are separated into two stages by using Haling principle. In the first stage, the optimum fuel reloading pattern without BP is determined by the Linear Programming method using enrichments as control variable. In the second stage the optimum BP allocation is determined by the Flexible Tolerance Method using the number of BP rods as control variable. A practical and efficient PWR reloading optimization program based on above theory has been encoded and successfully applied to Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant(QNP)cycle 2 reloading design

  15. Effect of transplutonium doping on approach to long-life core in uranium-fueled PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peryoga, Yoga; Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, Vladimir [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Shmelev, Anatolii [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-08-01

    The present paper advertises doping of transplutonium isotopes as an essential measure to improve proliferation-resistance properties and burnup characteristics of UOX fuel for PWR. Among them {sup 241}Am might play the decisive role of burnable absorber to reduce the initial reactivity excess while the short-lived nuclides {sup 242}Cm and {sup 244}Cm decay into even plutonium isotopes, thus increasing the extent of denaturation for primary fissile {sup 239}Pu in the course of reactor operation. The doping composition corresponds to one discharged from a current PWR. For definiteness, the case identity is ascribed to atomic percentage of {sup 241}Am, and then the other transplutonium nuclide contents follow their ratio as in the PWR discharged fuel. The case of 1 at% doping to 20% enriched uranium oxide fuel shows the potential of achieving the burnup value of 100 GWd/tHM with about 20% {sup 238}Pu fraction at the end of irradiation. Since so far, americium and curium do not require special proliferation resistance measures, their doping to UOX would assist in introducing nuclear technology in developing countries with simultaneous reduction of accumulated minor actinides stockpiles. (author)

  16. Effect of transplutonium doping on approach to long-life core in uranium-fueled PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peryoga, Yoga; Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The present paper advertises doping of transplutonium isotopes as an essential measure to improve proliferation-resistance properties and burnup characteristics of UOX fuel for PWR. Among them 241 Am might play the decisive role of burnable absorber to reduce the initial reactivity excess while the short-lived nuclides 242 Cm and 244 Cm decay into even plutonium isotopes, thus increasing the extent of denaturation for primary fissile 239 Pu in the course of reactor operation. The doping composition corresponds to one discharged from a current PWR. For definiteness, the case identity is ascribed to atomic percentage of 241 Am, and then the other transplutonium nuclide contents follow their ratio as in the PWR discharged fuel. The case of 1 at% doping to 20% enriched uranium oxide fuel shows the potential of achieving the burnup value of 100 GWd/tHM with about 20% 238 Pu fraction at the end of irradiation. Since so far, americium and curium do not require special proliferation resistance measures, their doping to UOX would assist in introducing nuclear technology in developing countries with simultaneous reduction of accumulated minor actinides stockpiles. (author)

  17. Design and fuel management of PWR cores to optimize the once-through fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, E.K.; Driscoll, M.J.; Lanning, D.D.

    1978-08-01

    The once-through fuel cycle has been analyzed to see if there are substantial prospects for improved uranium ore utilization in current light water reactors, with a specific focus on pressurized water reactors. The types of changes which have been examined are: (1) re-optimization of fuel pin diameter and lattice pitch, (2) axial power shaping by enrichment gradation in fresh fuel, (3) use of 6-batch cores with semi-annual refueling, (4) use of 6-batch cores with annual refueling, hence greater extended (approximately doubled) burnup, (5) use of radial reflector assemblies, (6) use of internally heterogeneous cores (simple seed/blanket configurations), (7) use of power/temperature coastdown at the end of life to extend burnup, (8) use of metal or diluted oxide fuel, (9) use of thorium, and (10) use of isotopically separated low sigma/sub a/ cladding material. State-of-the-art LWR computational methods, LEOPARD/PDQ-7/FLARE-G, were used to investigate these modifications

  18. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  19. An intelligent pedagogic tool for teaching the operators of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, B.; Guillermard, M.

    1990-01-01

    A tool was developed for assisting the instruction of the operators of a PWR type nuclear power plant. For achieving the objectives, an expert system and a simulator were combined. The main objective of the system is to improve the work of the operators in performing remedial actions in case of accident. The simulator applies two IBM PC AT3 and a MC 680 20 microprocessor. The use and the validation of the expert system are presented. The perspectives for the system, implanted on the Tricastin nuclear power plant, are analyzed [fr

  20. Computational methods and implementation of the 3-D PWR core dynamics SIMTRAN code for online surveillance and prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.; Ahnert, C.

    1995-01-01

    New computational methods have been developed in our 3-D PWR core dynamics SIMTRAN code for online surveillance and prediction. They improve the accuracy and efficiency of the coupled neutronic-thermalhydraulic solution and extend its scope to provide, mainly, the calculation of: the fission reaction rates at the incore mini-detectors; the responses at the excore detectors (power range); the temperatures at the thermocouple locations; and the in-vessel distribution of the loop cold-leg inlet coolant conditions in the reflector and core channels, and to the hot-leg outlets per loop. The functional capabilities implemented in the extended SIMTRAN code for online utilization include: online surveillance, incore-excore calibration, evaluation of peak power factors and thermal margins, nominal update and cycle follow, prediction of maneuvers and diagnosis of fast transients and oscillations. The new code has been installed at the Vandellos-II PWR unit in Spain, since the startup of its cycle 7 in mid-June, 1994. The computational implementation has been performed on HP-700 workstations under the HP-UX Unix system, including the machine-man interfaces for online acquisition of measured data and interactive graphical utilization, in C and X11. The agreement of the simulated results with the measured data, during the startup tests and first months of actual operation, is well within the accuracy requirements. The performance and usefulness shown during the testing and demo phase, to be extended along this cycle, has proved that SIMTRAN and the man-machine graphic user interface have the qualities for a fast, accurate, user friendly, reliable, detailed and comprehensive online core surveillance and prediction

  1. Laboratory results gained from cold worked type 316Ti under simulated PWR primary environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devrient, B.; Kilian, R.; Koenig, G.; Widera, M.; Wermelinger, T.

    2015-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of barrel bolts made from cold worked type 316Ti (German Material No. 1.4571 K) was observed in several S/KWU type PWRs. This mechanism was so far less understood for PWR primary conditions. Therefore an extended joint research program was launched by AREVA GmbH and VGB e.V. to clarify the specific conditions which contributed to the observed findings on barrel bolts. In the frame of this research program beneath the evaluation of the operational experience also laboratory tests on the general cracking behavior of cold worked type 316Ti material, which followed the same production line as for barrel bolt manufacturing in the eighties, with different cold work levels covering up to 30 % were performed to determine whether there is a specific susceptibility of cold worked austenitic stainless steel specimens to suffer IGSCC under simulated PWR primary conditions. All these slow strain rate tests on tapered specimens and component specimens came to the results that first, much higher cold work levels than used for the existing barrel bolts are needed for IGSCC initiation. Secondly, additional high active plastic deformation is needed to generate and propagate intergranular cracking. And thirdly, all specimens finally showed ductile fracture at the applied strain rates. (authors)

  2. Numerical simulation of the insulation material transport to a PWR core under loss of coolant accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höhne, Thomas; Grahn, Alexander; Kliem, Sören; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detailed results of a numerical simulation of the insulation material transport to a PWR core are shown. ► The spacer grid is modeled as a strainer which completely retains the insulation material carried by coolant. ► The CFD calculations showed that the fibers at the upper spacer grid plane are not uniformly distributed. ► Furthermore the pressure loss does not exceed a critical limit. ► The PWR core coolablity can be guaranteed all the time during the transient. -- Abstract: In 1992, strainers on the suction side of the ECCS pumps in Barsebäck NPP Unit 2 became partially clogged with mineral wool because after a safety valve opened the steam impinged on thermally insulated equipment and released mineral wool. This event pointed out that strainer clogging is an issue in the course of a loss-of-coolant accident. Modifications of the insulation material, the strainer area and mesh size were carried out in most of the German NPPs. Moreover, back flushing procedures to remove the mineral wool from the strainers and differential pressure measurements were implemented to assure the performance of emergency core cooling during the containment sump recirculation mode. Nevertheless, it cannot be completely ruled out, that a limited amount of small fractions of the insulation material is transported into the RPV. During a postulated cold leg LOCA with hot leg ECC injection, the fibers enter the upper plenum and can accumulate at the fuel element spacer grids, preferably at the uppermost grid level. This effect might affect the ECC flow into the core and could result in degradation of core cooling. It was the aim of the numerical simulations presented to study where and how many mineral wool fibers are deposited at the upper spacer grid. The 3D, time dependent, multi-phase flow problem was modeled applying the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The CFD calculation does not yet include steam production in the core and also does not include re-suspension of the

  3. Comparison of computer codes relative to the aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Dunbar, I.; Gauvain, J.; Ricchena, R.

    1986-02-01

    The present study concerns a comparative exercise, performed within the framework of the Commission of the European Communities, of the computer codes (AEROSISM-M, UK; AEROSOLS/BI, France; CORRAL-2, CEC and NAUA Mod5, Germany) used in order to assess the aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR

  4. PANTHER solution to the NEA-NSC 3-D PWR core transient benchmark. Uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods at zero power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains the results of PANTHER calculations for the ``NEA-NSC 3-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark: Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power``. PANTHER was able to model the benchmark problems without modifications to the code. All the calculations were performed in 3-D. (orig.).

  5. PANTHER solution to the NEA-NSC 3-D PWR core transient benchmark. Uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods at zero power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains the results of PANTHER calculations for the ''NEA-NSC 3-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark: Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power''. PANTHER was able to model the benchmark problems without modifications to the code. All the calculations were performed in 3-D. (orig.)

  6. Feasibility to convert an advanced PWR from UO2 to a mixed U/ThO2 core – Part I: Parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose R.; Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo; Moreira, João M.L.; Rossi, Pedro C.R.; Santos, Thiago A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronics calculation using SERPENT code. • Conversion of an advanced PWR from a UO 2 to (U-Th)O 2 core. • AP 1000-advanced PWR. • Parametric studies to define a converted core. • Demonstration of the feasibility to convert the AP 1000 by using mixed uranium thorium oxide fuel with advantages. - Abstract: This work presents the neutronics and thermal hydraulics feasibility to convert the UO 2 core of the Westinghouse AP1000 in a (U-Th)O 2 core by performing a parametric study varying the type of geometry of the pins in fuel elements, using the heterogeneous seed blanket concept and the homogeneous concept. In the parametric study, all geometry and materials for the burnable poison were kept the same as the AP 1000, and the only variable was the fuel pin material, in which we use several mass proportion of uranium and thorium but keeping the enrichment in 235 U, as LEU (20 w/o). The neutronics calculations were made by SERPENT code, and to validate the thermal limits we used a homemade code. The optimization criteria were to maximize the 233 U, and conversion factor, and minimize the plutonium production. The results obtained showed that the homogeneous concept with three different mass proportion zones, the first containing (32% UO 2 -68%ThO 2 ); the second with (24% UO 2 -76% ThO 2 ), and the third with (20% UO 2 -80% ThO 2 ), using 235 U LEU (20 w/o), and corresponding with the 3 enrichment zones of the AP 1000 (4.45 w/o; 3.40 w/o; 2.35 w/o), satisfies the optimization criteria as well as attending all thermal constrain. The concept showed advantages compared with the original UO 2 core, such a lower power density, and keeping the same 18 months of cycle a reduction of B-10 concentration at the soluble poison as well as eliminating in the integral boron poison coated (IFBA).

  7. Evaluation of the presence of a burnable absorber in an assembly 3x3 type PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez F, M. A.; Del Valle G, E.; Alonso V, G.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work the effect is evaluated that causes the presence of a burnable absorber in an adjustment of rods of 3x3 of a fuel assembly type PWR using CASMO-4 code, when comparing the infinite multiplication factor and some average cross sections by means of codes MCNP-4A, CASMO-3 and HELIOS. For this evaluation two cases are evaluated: first consists of an adjustment of rods of 3x3 full completely of fuel and the second consists of a central rod full with a burnable absorber type wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) and the remaining full fuel rods. In both cases the enrichment of the fissile isotopes is varied, for two types of fuel, MOX degree armament and UO 2 . (Author)

  8. Comparison of computer codes relative to the aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Bunz, H.; Dunbar, I.; Gauvain, J.; Ricchena, R.

    1986-01-01

    The present study concerns a comparative exercise, performed within the framework of the Commission of the European Communities, of the computer codes (AEROSIM-M, UK; AEROSOLS/B1, France; CORRAL-2, CEC and NAUA Mod5, Germany) used in order to assess the aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR. Topics considered in this paper include aerosols, containment buildings, reactor safety, fission product release, reactor cores, meltdown, and monitoring

  9. An assessment of the radiological consequences of releases to groundwater following a core-melt accident at the Sizewell PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, P.R.

    1984-03-01

    In the extremely unlikely event of a degraded core accident at the proposed Sizewell PWR it is theoretically possible for the core to melt through the containment, after which activity could enter groundwater directly or as a result of subsequent leaching of the core in the ground. The radiological consequences of such an event are analysed and compared with the analysis undertaken by the NRPB for the corresponding releases to atmosphere. It is concluded that the risks associated with the groundwater route are much less important than those associated with the atmospheric route. The much longer transport times in the ground compared with those in the atmosphere enable countermeasures to be taken, if necessary, to restrict doses to members of the public to very low levels in the first few years following the accident. The entry of long-lived radionuclides into the sea over very long timescales results in the largest contribution to population doses, but these are delivered at extremely low dose rates which would be negligible compared with background exposure. (author)

  10. Reactor control system. PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At present, 23 units of PWR type reactors have been operated in Japan since the start of Mihama Unit 1 operation in 1970 and various improvements have been made to upgrade operability of power stations as well as reliability and safety of power plants. As the share of nuclear power increases, further improvements of operating performance such as load following capability will be requested for power stations with more reliable and safer operation. This article outlined the reactor control system of PWR type reactors and described the control performance of power plants realized with those systems. The PWR control system is characterized that the turbine power is automatic or manually controlled with request of the electric power system and then the nuclear power is followingly controlled with the change of core reactivity. The system mainly consists of reactor automatic control system (control rod control system), pressurizer pressure control system, pressurizer water level control system, steam generator water level control system and turbine bypass control system. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Development, verification and validation of an FPGA-based core heat removal protection system for a PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yichun, E-mail: ycwu@xmu.edu.cn [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Shui, Xuanxuan, E-mail: 807001564@qq.com [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Cai, Yuanfeng, E-mail: 1056303902@qq.com [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Zhou, Junyi, E-mail: 1032133755@qq.com [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Wu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: npic_wu@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Reactor System Design Technology, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zheng, Jianxiang, E-mail: zwu@xmu.edu.cn [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • An example on life cycle development process and V&V on FPGA-based I&C is presented. • Software standards and guidelines are used in FPGA-based NPP I&C system logic V&V. • Diversified FPGA design and verification languages and tools are utilized. • An NPP operation principle simulator is used to simulate operation scenarios. - Abstract: To reach high confidence and ensure reliability of nuclear FPGA-based safety system, life cycle processes of discipline specification and implementation of design as well as regulations verification and validation (V&V) are needed. A specific example on how to conduct life cycle development process and V&V on FPGA-based core heat removal (CHR) protection system for CPR1000 pressure water reactor (PWR) is presented in this paper. Using the existing standards and guidelines for life cycle development and V&V, a simplified FPGA-based CHR protection system for PWR has been designed, implemented, verified and validated. Diversified verification and simulation languages and tools are used by the independent design team and the V&V team. In the system acceptance testing V&V phase, a CPR1000 NPP operation principle simulator (OPS) model is utilized to simulate normal and abnormal operation scenarios, and provide input data to the under-test FPGA-based CHR protection system and a verified C code CHR function module. The evaluation results are applied to validate the under-test FPGA-based CHR protection system. The OPS model operation outputs also provide reasonable references for the tests. Using an OPS model in the system acceptance testing V&V is cost-effective and high-efficient. A dedicated OPS, as a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) item, would contribute as an important tool in the V&V process of NPP I&C systems, including FPGA-based and microprocessor-based systems.

  12. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  13. Design of the control room of the N4-type PWR: main features and feedback operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrouton, J.M.; Guillas, J.; Nougaret, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the design, specificities and innovating features of the control room of the N4-type PWR. A brief description of control rooms of previous 900 MW and 1300 MW -type PWR allows us to assess the change. The design of the first control room dates back to 1972, at that time 2 considerations were taken into account: first the design has to be similar to that of control rooms for thermal plants because plant operators were satisfied with it and secondly the normal operating situation has to be privileged to the prejudice of accidental situations just as it was in a thermal plant. The turning point was the TMI accident that showed the weight of human factor in accidental situations in terms of pilot team, training, procedures and the ergonomics of the work station. The impact of TMI can be seen in the design of 1300 MW-type PWR. In the beginning of the eighties EDF decided to launch a study for a complete overhaul of the control room concept, the aim was to continue reducing the human factor risk and to provide a better quality of piloting the plant in any situation. The result is the control room of the N4-type PWR. Today the cumulated feedback experience of N4 control rooms represents more than 20 years over a wide range of situations from normal to incidental, a survey shows that the N4 design has fulfilled its aims. (A.C.)

  14. Validation of PWR core seismic models with shaking table tests on interacting scale 1 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viallet, E.; Bolsee, G.; Ladouceur, B.; Goubin, T.; Rigaudeau, J.

    2003-01-01

    The fuel assembly mechanical strength must be justified with respect to the lateral loads under accident conditions, in particular seismic loads. This justification is performed by means of time-history analyses with dynamic models of an assembly row in the core, allowing for assembly deformations, impacts at grid locations and reactor coolant effects. Due to necessary simplifications, the models include 'equivalent' parameters adjusted with respect to dynamic characterisation tests of the fuel assemblies. Complementing such tests on isolated assemblies by an overall model validation with shaking table tests on interacting assemblies is obviously desirable. Seismic tests have been performed by French CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) on a row of six full scale fuel assemblies, including two types of 17 x 17 12ft design. The row models are built according to the usual procedure, with preliminary characterisation tests performed on a single assembly. The test-calculation comparisons are made for two test configurations : in air and in water. The relatively large number of accelerograms (15, used for each configuration) is also favourable to significant comparisons. The results are presented for the impact forces at row ends, displacements at mid assembly, and also 'statistical' parameters. Despite a non-negligible scattering in the results obtained with different accelerograms, the calculations prove realistic, and the modelling process is validated with a good confidence level. This satisfactory validation allows to evaluate precisely the margins in the seismic design methodology of the fuel assemblies, and thus to confirm the safety of the plants in case of seismic event. (author)

  15. Study and analysis on the flow induced vibration of the core barrel of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Weida; Shi Guolin; Jiang Nanyan; Peng YongYong; Zhang Huijun; Wang Yufen; Xie Yongcheng; Guo Chunhua; Shen Qinping

    1989-01-01

    The deduction of the resemblance criterion and the design of the test model by applying flow-solid coupling theory are described. The model analysis of a core barrel both in the air and stationary water were performed in a 1:10 model, thus obtaining the dynamic characteristic. In a 1:5 reactor model with a hydraulic closed loop, the inner structure and support were modeled for performing hydraulic closed loop, the inner structure and support were modeled for performing hydraulic vibration test of the core barrel. The flow induced pulse pressure of the core barrel and corresponding response were obtained by using miniature pressure capsule, strain gauge and accelerometer. Power spectrum, correlation functions, transfer function and amplitudes under different flow velocities were calculated. The hydraulic vibration test shows that the core barrel will be in safety during its 30-year life time

  16. Modeling in fast dynamics of accidents in the primary circuit of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbe, M.F.

    2003-12-01

    Two kinds of accidents, liable to occur in the primary circuit of a Pressurized Water Reactor and involving fast dynamic phenomena, are analyzed. The Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is the accident used to define the current PWR. It consists in a large-size break located in a pipe of the primary circuit. A blowdown wave propagates through the circuit. The pressure differences between the different zones of the reactor induce high stresses in the structures of the lower head and may degrade the reactor core. The primary circuit starts emptying from the break opening. Pressure decreases very quickly, involving a large steaming. Two thermal-hydraulic simulations of the blowdown phase of a LOCA are computed with the Europlexus code. The primary circuit is represented by a pipe-model including the hydraulic peculiarities of the circuit. The main differences between both computations concern the kind of reactor, the break location and model, and the initialization of the accidental operation. Steam explosion is a hypothetical severe accident liable to happen after a core melting. The molten part of the core (called corium) falls in the lower part of the reactor. The interaction between the hot corium and the cold water remaining at the bottom of the vessel induces a massive and violent vaporization of water, similar to an explosive phenomenon. A shock wave propagates in the vessel. what can damage seriously the neighbouring structures or drill the vessel. This work presents a synthesis of in-vessel parametrical studies carried out with the Europlexus code, the linkage of the thermal-hydraulic code Mc3d dedicated to the pre-mixing phase with the Europlexus code dealing with the explosion, and finally a benchmark between the Cigalon and Europlexus codes relative to the Vulcano mock-up. (author)

  17. Improvement of Axial Reflector Cross Section Generation Model for PWR Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Cheon Bo; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Cho, Jin Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper covers the study for improvement of axial reflector XS generation model. In the next section, the improved 1D core model is represented in detail. Reflector XS generated by the improved model is compared to that of the conventional model in the third section. Nuclear design parameters generated by these two XS sets are also covered in that section. Significant of this study is discussed in the last section. Two-step procedure has been regarded as the most practical approach for reactor core designs because it offers core design parameters quite rapidly within acceptable range. Thus this approach is adopted for SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced Reac- Tor) core design in KAERI with the DeCART2D1.1/ MASTER4.0 (hereafter noted as DeCART2D/ MASTER) code system. Within the framework of the two-step procedure based SMART core design, various researches have been studied to improve the core design reliability and efficiency. One of them is improvement of reflector cross section (XS) generation models. While the conventional FA/reflector two-node model used for most core designs to generate reflector XS cannot consider the actual configuration of fuel rods that intersect at right angles to axial reflectors, the revised model reflects the axial fuel configuration by introducing the radially simplified core model. The significance of the model revision is evaluated by observing HGC generated by DeCART2D, reflector XS, and core design parameters generated by adopting the two models. And it is verified that about 30 ppm CBC error can be reduced and maximum Fq error decreases from about 6 % to 2.5 % by applying the revised model. Error of AO and axial power shapes are also reduced significantly. Therefore it can be concluded that the simplified 1D core model improves the accuracy of the axial reflector XS and leads to the two-step procedure reliability enhancement. Since it is hard for core designs to be free from the two-step approach, it is necessary to find

  18. Influence of fuel vibration on PWR neutron noise associated with core barrel motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; March-Leuba, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ex-core neutron detector noise has been utilized to monitor core support barrel (CSB) vibrations. In order to observe long-term changes, noise signals at Sequoyah-1 were monitored continuously during the whole first fuel cycle and part of the second cycle. Results suggest that neutron noise measurements performed infrequently may not provide adequate surveillance of the CSB because it may be difficult to separate noise amplitude changes due solely to CSB motion from changes caused by fuel motion and burnup

  19. ROX PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, H.; Yamashita, T.; Shirasu, N.; Takano, H.; Anoda, Y.; Kimura, H.

    1999-01-01

    For an efficient burnup of excess plutonium from nuclear reactors spent fuels and dismantled warheads, plutonium rock-like oxide(ROX) fuel has been investigated. The ROX fuel is expected to provide high Pu transmutation capability, irradiation stability and chemical and geological stability. While, a zirconia-based ROX(Zr-ROX)-fueled PWR core has some problems of Doppler reactivity coefficient and power peaking factor. For the improvement of these characteristics, two approaches were considered: the additives such as UO 2 , ThO 2 and Er 2 O 3 , and a heterogeneous core with Zr-ROX and UO 2 assemblies. As a result, the additives UO 2 + Er 2 O 3 are found to sufficiently improve the reactivity coefficients and accident behavior, and to flatten power distribution. On the other hand, in the 1/3Zr-ROX + 2/3UO 2 heterogeneous core, further reduction of power peaking seems necessary. (author)

  20. MC21 Monte Carlo analysis of the Hoogenboom-Martin full-core PWR benchmark problem - 301

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.J.; Sutton, Th.M.; Trumbull, T.H.; Dobreff, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    At the 2009 American Nuclear Society Mathematics and Computation conference, Hoogenboom and Martin proposed a full-core PWR model to monitor the improvement of Monte Carlo codes to compute detailed power density distributions. This paper describes the application of the MC21 Monte Carlo code to the analysis of this benchmark model. With the MC21 code, we obtained detailed power distributions over the entire core. The model consisted of 214 assemblies, each made up of a 17x17 array of pins. Each pin was subdivided into 100 axial nodes, thus resulting in over seven million tally regions. Various cases were run to assess the statistical convergence of the model. This included runs of 10 billion and 40 billion neutron histories, as well as ten independent runs of 4 billion neutron histories each. The 40 billion neutron-history calculation resulted in 43% of all regions having a 95% confidence level of 2% or less implying a relative standard deviation of 1%. Furthermore, 99.7% of regions having a relative power density of 1.0 or greater have a similar confidence level. We present timing results that assess the MC21 performance relative to the number of tallies requested. Source convergence was monitored by analyzing plots of the Shannon entropy and eigenvalue versus active cycle. We also obtained an estimate of the dominance ratio. Additionally, we performed an analysis of the error in an attempt to ascertain the validity of the confidence intervals predicted by MC21. Finally, we look forward to the prospect of full core 3-D Monte Carlo depletion by scoping out the required problem size. This study provides an initial data point for the Hoogenboom-Martin benchmark model using a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  1. A neural networks based ``trip`` analysis system for PWR-type reactors; Um sistema de analise de ``trip`` em reatores PWR usando redes neuronais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Antonio Carlos Pinto Dias

    1993-12-31

    The analysis short after automatic shutdown (trip) of a PWR-type nuclear reactor takes a considerable amount of time, not only because of the great number of variables involved in transients, but also the various equipment that compose a reactor of this kind. On the other hand, the transients`inter-relationship, intended to the detection of the type of the accident is an arduous task, since some of these accidents (like loss of FEEDWATER and station BLACKOUT, for example), generate transients similar in behavior (as cold leg temperature and steam generators mixture levels, for example). Also, the sequence-of-events analysis is not always sufficient for correctly pin point the causes of the trip. (author) 11 refs., 39 figs.

  2. A neural networks based ``trip`` analysis system for PWR-type reactors; Um sistema de analise de ``trip`` em reatores PWR usando redes neuronais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Antonio Carlos Pinto Dias

    1994-12-31

    The analysis short after automatic shutdown (trip) of a PWR-type nuclear reactor takes a considerable amount of time, not only because of the great number of variables involved in transients, but also the various equipment that compose a reactor of this kind. On the other hand, the transients`inter-relationship, intended to the detection of the type of the accident is an arduous task, since some of these accidents (like loss of FEEDWATER and station BLACKOUT, for example), generate transients similar in behavior (as cold leg temperature and steam generators mixture levels, for example). Also, the sequence-of-events analysis is not always sufficient for correctly pin point the causes of the trip. (author) 11 refs., 39 figs.

  3. Modelling of core protection and monitoring system for PWR nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung Kun Lee; Byoung Sung Han

    1997-01-01

    A nuclear power plant simulator was developed for Younggwang units 3 and 4 nuclear power plant (YGN Nos 3 and 4) in Korea; it has been in operation on training center since November 1996. The core protection calculator (CPC) and the core operating limit supervisory system (COLSS) for the simulator were also developed. The CPC is a digital computer-based core protection system, which performs on-line calculation of departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) and local power density (LPD). It initiates reactor trip when the core conditions exceed designated DNBR or LPD limitations. The COLSS is designed to assist operators by implementing the limiting conditions for operations in the technical specifications. With these systems, it is possible to increase capacity factor and safety of nuclear power plants, because the COLSS data can show accurate operation margin to plant operators and the CPC can protect reactor core. In this study, the function of CPC/COLSS is analyzed in detail, and then simulation model for CPC/COLSS is presented based on the function. Compared with the YGN Nos 3 and 4 plant operation data and CEDIPS/COLSS FORTRAN code test results, the predictions with the model show reasonable results. (Author)

  4. Early-type galaxy core phase densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Hartwick, F. D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Early-type galaxies have projected central density brightness profile logarithmic slopes, γ', ranging from about 0 to 1. We show that γ' is strongly correlated, r = 0.83, with the coarse grain phase density of the galaxy core, Q 0 ≡ ρ/σ 3 . The luminosity-γ' correlation is much weaker, r = –0.51. Q 0 also serves to separate the distribution of steep core profiles, γ' > 0.5, from shallow profiles, γ' < 0.3, although there are many galaxies of intermediate slope, at intermediate Q 0 , in a volume-limited sample. The transition phase density separating the two profile types is approximately 0.003 M ☉ pc –3 km –3 s 3 , which is also where the relation between Q 0 and core mass shows a change in slope, the rotation rate of the central part of the galaxy increases, and the ratio of the black hole to core mass increases. These relations are considered relative to the globular cluster inspiral core buildup and binary black hole core scouring mechanisms for core creation and evolution. Mass-enhanced globular cluster inspiral models have quantitative predictions that are supported by data, but no single model yet completely explains the correlations.

  5. Reactor core for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Bando, Masaru; Watari, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the power distribution fluctuations and obtain flat and stable power distribution throughout the operation period in an LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: In the inner reactor core region and the outer reactor core region surrounding the same, the thickness of the inner region is made smaller than the axial height of the reactor core region and the radial width thereof is made smaller than that of the reactor core region and the volume thereof is made to 30 - 50 % for the reactor core region. Further, the amount of the fuel material per unit volume in the inner region is made to 70 - 90 % of that in the outer region. The difference in the neutron infinite multiplication factor between the inner region and the outer region is substantially constant irrespective of the burnup degree and the power distribution fluctuation can be reduced to about 2/3, by which the effect of thermal striping to the reactor core upper mechanisms can be moderated. Further, the maximum linear power during operation can be reduced by 3 %, by which the thermal margin in the reactor core is increased and the reactor core fuels can be saved by 3 %. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Study for on-line system to identify inadvertent control rod drops in PWR reactors using ex-core detector and thermocouple measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Thiago J.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.; Goncalves, Alessandro C.

    2015-01-01

    Accidental control rod drops event in PWR reactors leads to an unsafe operating condition. It is important to quickly identify the rod to minimize undesirable effects in such a scenario. In this event, there is a distortion in the power distribution and temperature in the reactor core. The goal of this study is to develop an on-line model to identify the inadvertent control rod dropped in PWR reactor. The proposed model is based on physical correlations and pattern recognition of ex-core detector responses and thermocouples measures. The results of the study demonstrated the feasibility of an on-line system, contributing to safer operation conditions and preventing undesirable effects, as its shutdown. (author)

  7. Study for on-line system to identify inadvertent control rod drops in PWR reactors using ex-core detector and thermocouple measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Thiago J.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.; Goncalves, Alessandro C., E-mail: tsouza@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: canedo@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: alessandro@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Accidental control rod drops event in PWR reactors leads to an unsafe operating condition. It is important to quickly identify the rod to minimize undesirable effects in such a scenario. In this event, there is a distortion in the power distribution and temperature in the reactor core. The goal of this study is to develop an on-line model to identify the inadvertent control rod dropped in PWR reactor. The proposed model is based on physical correlations and pattern recognition of ex-core detector responses and thermocouples measures. The results of the study demonstrated the feasibility of an on-line system, contributing to safer operation conditions and preventing undesirable effects, as its shutdown. (author)

  8. Comparison of european computer codes relative to the aerosol behavior in PWR containment buildings during severe core damage accidents. (Modelling of steam condensation on the particles)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunz, H.; Dunbar, L.H.; Fermandjian, J.; Lhiaubet, G.

    1987-11-01

    An aerosol code comparison exercise was performed within the framework of the Commission of European Communities (Division of Safety of Nuclear Installations). This exercise, focused on the process of steam condensation onto the aerosols occurring in PWR containment buildings during severe core damage accidents, has allowed to understand the discrepancies between the results obtained. These discrepancies are due, in particular, to whether the curvature effect is modelled or not in the codes

  9. Analysis of subchannel effects and their treatment in average channel PWR core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo, D.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Neutronic thermal-hydraulic coupling is meanly made at this moment using whole plant thermal-hydraulic codes with one channel per assembly or quarter of assembly in more detailed cases. To extract safety limits variables a new calculation has to be performed using thermal-hydraulic subchannel codes in an embedded or off-line manner what implies an increase of calculation time. Another problem of this separated analysis of whole core and not channel is that the whole core calculation is not resolving the real problem due to the modification of the variables values by the homogenization process that is carried out to perform the whole core analysis. This process is making that some magnitudes are over or under-predicted causing that the problem that is being solved is not the original one. The purpose of the work that is being developed is to investigate the effects of the averaging process in the results obtained by the whole core analysis and to develop some corrections that may be included in this analysis to obtain results closer to the ones obtained by a detailed subchannel analysis. This paper shows the results obtained for a sample case and the conclusions for future work. (author)

  10. A non-algorithmic approach to the In-core-fuel management problem of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimhy, Y.

    1992-03-01

    The primary objective of a commercial nuclear power plant operation is to produce electricity a low cost while satisfying safety constraints imposed on the operating conditions. Design of a fuel reload cycle for the current generation nuclear power plant represents a multistage process with a series of design decisions taken at various time points. Of these stages, reload core design is an important stage, due to its impact on safety and economic plant performance parameters. Overall. performance of the plant during the power production cycle depends on chosen fresh fuel parameters, as well as specific fuel configuration of the reactor core. The motivation to computerize generation and optimization of fuel reload configurations follows from some reasons: first, reload is performed periodically and requires manipulation of a large amount of data. second, in recent years, more complicated fuel loading patterns were developed and implemented following changes in fuel design and/or operational requirements, such as, longer cycles, advanced burnable poison designs, low leakage loading patterns and reduction of irradiation-induced damage of the pressure vessel. An algorithmic approach to the problem was generally adopted. The nature of the reload design process is a 'heuristic' search performed manually by a fuel manager. The knowledge used by the fuel manager is mostly accumulated experience in reactor physics and core calculations. These features of the problem and the inherent disadvantage of the algorithmic method are the main reasons to explore a non-algorithmic approach for solving the reload configuration problem. Several features of the 'solutions space' ( a collection of acceptable final configurations ) are emphasized in this work: 1) the space contain numerous number of entities (> 25) that are distributed un homogeneously, 2) the lack of a monotonic objective function decrease the probability to find an isolated optimum configuration by depth first search or

  11. ACTRAN: a code for depletion calculations in PWR cores aiming the production of minor actinide for using in ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Rubens Souza dos

    2009-01-01

    Despite of the renewed willing to accept nuclear power as a mean of mitigate the climate changing, to deal with the long lived waste still cause some concerning in relation to maintain in safety condition, during so many years. A technological solution to overcome this leg of time is to use a facility that burn these waste, besides to generate electricity. This is the idea built in the accelerator driven systems (ADS). This technology is being though to use some minor actinides (MAs) as fuel. This work presents a program to assess actinide concentrations, aiming a fertile-free fuel to be used in the future ADS technology. For that, use was made of a numerical code to solve the steady-state multigroup diffusion equation 3D to calculate the neutron fluxes, coupled it with a new code to solve, also numerically, depletion equations, named ACTRAN code. This paper shows the simulation of a PWR core during the residence time of the nuclear fuel, for three years, and after, for almost four hundred years, to assess the MAs production. The results show some insight in the best management to get a minimum amount of some MAs to use in the future generations of ADS. (author)

  12. Advanced methods for the study of PWR cores; Les methodes d'etudes avancees pour les coeurs de REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M.; Salvatores, St.; Ferrier, A. [Electricite de France (EDF), Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires, 92 - Courbevoie (France); Pelet, J.; Nicaise, N.; Pouliquen, J.Y.; Foret, F. [FRAMATOME ANP, 92 - Paris La Defence (France); Chauliac, C. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Johner, J. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Cohen, Ch

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers the transparencies presented at the 6. technical session of the French nuclear energy society (SFEN) in October 2003. The transparencies of the annual meeting are presented in the introductive part: 1 - status of the French nuclear park: nuclear energy results, management of an exceptional climatic situation: the heat wave of summer 2003 and the power generation (J.C. Barral); 2 - status of the research on controlled thermonuclear fusion (J. Johner). Then follows the technical session about the advanced methods for the study of PWR reactor cores: 1 - the evolution approach of study methodologies (M. Lambert, J. Pelet); 2 - the point of view of the nuclear safety authority (D. Brenot); 3 - the improved decoupled methodology for the steam pipe rupture (S. Salvatores, J.Y. Pouliquen); 4 - the MIR method for the pellet-clad interaction (renovated IPG methodology) (E. Baud, C. Royere); 5 - the improved fuel management (IFM) studies for Koeberg (C. Cohen); 6 - principle of the methods of accident study implemented for the European pressurized reactor (EPR) (F. Foret, A. Ferrier); 7 - accident studies with the EPR, steam pipe rupture (N. Nicaise, S. Salvatores); 8 - the co-development platform, a new generation of software tools for the new methodologies (C. Chauliac). (J.S.)

  13. Computational simulation of natural convection of a molten core in lower head of a PWR pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila Braga; Romero, Gabriel Alves; Jian Su

    2010-01-01

    Computational simulation of natural convection in a molten core during a hypothetical severe accident in the lower head of a typical PWR pressure vessel was performed for two-dimensional semi-circular geometry with isothermal walls. Transient turbulent natural convection heat transfer of a fluid with uniformly distributed volumetric heat generation rate was simulated by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software ANSYS CFX 12.0. The Boussinesq model was used for the buoyancy effect generated by the internal heat source in the flow field. The two-equation k-ω based SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model was used to mould the turbulent stresses in the Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes equations (RANS). Two Prandtl numbers, 6:13 and 7:0, were considered. Five Rayleigh numbers were simulated for each Prandtl number used (109, 1010, 1011, 1012, and 1013). The average Nusselt numbers on the bottom surface of the semicircular cavity were in excellent agreement with Mayinger et al. (1976) correlation and only at Ra = 109 the average Nusselt number on the top flat surface was in agreement with Mayinger et al. (1976) and Kulacki and Emara (1975) correlations. (author)

  14. Simulation of single-phase rod bundle flow. Comparison between CFD-code ESTET, PWR core code THYC and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mur, J.; Larrauri, D.

    1998-07-01

    Computer simulation of flow in configurations close to pressurized water reactor (PWR) geometry is of great interest for Electricite de France (EDF). Although simulation of the flow through a whole PWR core with an all purpose CFD-code is not yet achievable, such a tool cna be quite useful to perform numerical experiments in order to try and improve the modeling introduced in computer codes devoted to reactor core thermal-hydraulic analysis. Further to simulation in small bare rod bundle configurations, the present study is focused on the simulation, with CFD-code ESTET and PWR core code THYC, of the flow in the experimental configuration VATICAN-1. ESTET simulation results are compared on the one hand to local velocity and concentration measurements, on the other hand with subchannel averaged values calculated by THYC. As far as the comparison with measurements is concerned, ESTET results are quite satisfactory relatively to available experimental data and their uncertainties. The effect of spacer grids and the prediction of the evolution of an unbalanced velocity profile seem to be correctly treated. As far as the comparison with THYC subchannel averaged values is concerned, the difficulty of a direct comparison between subchannel averaged and local values is pointed out. ESTET calculated local values are close to experimental local values. ESTET subchannel averaged values are also close to THYC calculation results. Thus, THYC results are satisfactory whereas their direct comparison to local measurements could show some disagreement. (author)

  15. Emotional learning based intelligent controller for a PWR nuclear reactor core during load following operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorramabadi, Sima Seidi; Boroushaki, Mehrdad; Lucas, Caro

    2008-01-01

    The design and evaluation of a novel approach to reactor core power control based on emotional learning is described. The controller includes a neuro-fuzzy system with power error and its derivative as inputs. A fuzzy critic evaluates the present situation, and provides the emotional signal (stress). The controller modifies its characteristics so that the critic's stress is reduced. Simulation results show that the controller has good convergence and performance robustness characteristics over a wide range of operational parameters

  16. Simulation study on insoluble granular corrosion products deposited in PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xu; Zhou Tao; Ru Xiaolong; Lin Daping; Fang Xiaolu

    2014-01-01

    In the operation of reactor, such as fuel rods, reactor vessel internals etc. will be affected by corrosion erosion of high pressure coolant. It will produce many insoluble corrosion products. The FLUENT software is adopted to simulate insoluble granular corrosion products deposit distribution in the reactor core. The fluid phase uses the standard model to predict the flow field in the channel and forecast turbulence variation in the near-wall region. The insoluble granular corrosion products use DPM (Discrete Phase Model) to track the trajectory of the particles. The discrete phase model in FLUENT follows the Euler-Lagrange approach. The fluid phase is treated as a continuum by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, while the dispersed phase is solved by tracking a large number of particles through the calculated flow field. Through the study found, Corrosion products particles form high concentration area near the symmetry, and the entrance section of the corrosion products particles concentration is higher than export section. Corrosion products particles deposition attached on large area for the entrance of the cladding, this will change the core neutron flux distribution and the thermal conductivity of cladding material, and cause core axial offset anomaly (AOA). Corrosion products particles dot deposit in the outlet of cladding, which can lead to pitting phenomenon in a sheath. Pitting area will cause deterioration of heat transfer, destroy the cladding integrity. In view of the law of corrosion products deposition and corrosion characteristics of components in the reactor core. this paper proposes regular targeted local cleanup and other mitigation measures. (authors)

  17. Streamlined analysis technique for the evaluation of pellet clad interaction in PWR reload cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, Ch.; Morita, T.; Brown, J.

    2007-01-01

    For some applications, an analysis is required to explicitly demonstrate that fuel failure due to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) is prevented by the core limits and the protection system for both Condition I (normal operation) operation and for Condition II (events of moderate frequency) events. This analysis needs to address the entire range of normal operation allowed by the Technical Specifications and all Condition II transients. The obvious approach which has been utilized for many years is a simulation of normal operation power maneuvers followed by explicit Condition II transients as a function of key core parameters. This is a sampling approach and has concerns about the overall coverage of the potential space. An alternative approach is the 3D FAC power distribution analysis methodology that was based upon the Westinghouse Relaxed Axial Offset Control Strategy (RAOC) evaluation process. The 3D FAC methodology uses a parametric representation of variables affecting the power distributions, defining a grid mesh over a space of Condition I and Condition II parameters. The operation space is defined by a power range, temperature range, rod position range, axial offset range, core protection limits and representative xenon distributions. Then the 3D FAC evaluation consists of systematically calculating the 3D power distribution and margin to the core and fuel limits for each mesh point of this multi-dimensional space. The PCI margin is obtained by the comparison of the 3D power distributions over the Condition II space and the 3D maximum allowed power, which is dependent on the fuel rod history. The fuel history model utilizes the power history developed in the 3-dimensional nuclear analysis code to define local powers for the specified fuel rods to be analyzed. It tracks the rod history and provides the maximum allowed power for the point. This model is appropriate for base load operation, extended reduced power operation, return to power operation and

  18. Streamlined analysis technique for the evaluation of pellet clad interaction in PWR reload cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, Ch.; Morita, T.; Brown, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Nuclear Fuel Div., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    For some applications, an analysis is required to explicitly demonstrate that fuel failure due to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) is prevented by the core limits and the protection system for both Condition I (normal operation) operation and for Condition II (events of moderate frequency) events. This analysis needs to address the entire range of normal operation allowed by the Technical Specifications and all Condition II transients. The obvious approach which has been utilized for many years is a simulation of normal operation power maneuvers followed by explicit Condition II transients as a function of key core parameters. This is a sampling approach and has concerns about the overall coverage of the potential space. An alternative approach is the 3D FAC power distribution analysis methodology that was based upon the Westinghouse Relaxed Axial Offset Control Strategy (RAOC) evaluation process. The 3D FAC methodology uses a parametric representation of variables affecting the power distributions, defining a grid mesh over a space of Condition I and Condition II parameters. The operation space is defined by a power range, temperature range, rod position range, axial offset range, core protection limits and representative xenon distributions. Then the 3D FAC evaluation consists of systematically calculating the 3D power distribution and margin to the core and fuel limits for each mesh point of this multi-dimensional space. The PCI margin is obtained by the comparison of the 3D power distributions over the Condition II space and the 3D maximum allowed power, which is dependent on the fuel rod history. The fuel history model utilizes the power history developed in the 3-dimensional nuclear analysis code to define local powers for the specified fuel rods to be analyzed. It tracks the rod history and provides the maximum allowed power for the point. This model is appropriate for base load operation, extended reduced power operation, return to power operation and

  19. A seismic analysis of Korean standard PWR fuels under transition core conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong Koo; Park, Nam Kyu; Jang, Young Ki; Kim, Jae Ik; Kim, Kyu Tae

    2005-01-01

    The PLUS7 fuel is developed to achieve higher thermal performance, burnup and more safety margin than the conventional fuel used in the Korean Standard Nuclear Plants (KSNPs) and to sustain structural integrity under increased seismic requirement in Korea. In this study, a series of seismic analysis have been performed in order to evaluate the structural integrity of fuel assemblies associated with seismic loads in the KSNPs under transition core conditions replacing the Guardian fuel, which is a resident fuel in the KSNP reactors, with the PLUS7 fuel. For the analysis, transition core seismic models have been developed, based on the possible fuel loading patterns. And the maximum impact forces on the spacer grid and various stresses acting on the fuel components have been evaluated and compared with the through-grid strength of spacer grids and the stress criteria specified in the ASME code for each fuel component, respectively. Then three noticeable parameters regarding as important parameters governing fuel assembly dynamic behavior are evaluated to clarify their effects on the fuel impact and stress response. As a result of the study, it has been confirmed that both the PLUS7 and the Guardian fuel sustain their structural integrity under the transition core condition. And when the damping ratio is constant, increasing the natural frequency of fuel assembly results in a decrease in impact force. The fuel assembly flexural stiffness has an effect increasing the stress of fuel assembly, but not the impact force. And the spacer grid stiffness is directly related with the impact force response. (author)

  20. PWR type overpower tests at 1620 GJ/KGU (18,800 MWD/MTU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, P.; Bagger, C.; Carlsen, H.

    1979-01-01

    Three PWR type test fuel pins accumulated a burnup of 1620 GJ/kgU at heat loads decreasing from 45 to 28 kW/m (avg. test levels). One pin was ramped to 43 kW/m at 31 W/m/s; after 15 ks the power was increased to 45 kW/m and held constant for 1.9 Ms without failure indication. The other two pins were ramped to 44 kW/m at 23 W/m/s and then to 49 kW/m in a further 1.2 ks; both failed after max. 360 s. The post-irradiation examination revealed large stress-corrosion (SCC) type cladding cracks. Other cracks, down to a few μm deep, were probably early stages of large SCC cracks. Fission gas release in the intact pin was as high as 42% and estimated to be much lower for the two failed pins

  1. Interaction between core analysis methodology and nuclear design: some PWR examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothleder, B.M.; Eich, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between core analysis methodology and nuclear design is exemplified by PSEUDAX, a major improvement related to the Advanced Recycle methodology program (ARMP) computer code system, still undergoing development by the Electric Power Research Institute. The mechanism of this interaction is explored by relating several specific nulcear design changes to the demands placed by these changes on the ARMP system, and by examining the meeting of these demands, first within the standard ARMP methodology and then through augmentation of the standard methodology by development of PSEUDAX

  2. PWR Core II blanket fuel disposition recommendation of storage option study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dana, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    After review of the options available for current storage of T Plant Fuel the recommended option is wet storage without the use of chillers. A test has been completed that verifies the maximum temperature reached is below the industrial standard for storage of spent fuel. This option will be the least costly and still maintain the fuel in a safe environment. The options that were evaluated included dry storage with and without chillers, and wet storage with and without chillers. Due to the low decay heat of the Shippingport Core II Blanket fuel assemblies the fuel pool temperature will not exceed 100 deg. F

  3. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of PWR core including intermediate flow mixers with the THYC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mur, J.; Meignin, J.C.

    1997-07-01

    Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) is one of the major limiting factors of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Safety requires that occurrence of DNB should be precluded under normal or incidental operating conditions. The thermal-hydraulic THYC code developed by EDF is described. The code is devoted to heat and mass transfer in nuclear components. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is predicted from local thermal-hydraulic parameters such as pressure, mass flow rate, and quality. A three stage methodology to evaluate thermal margins in order to perform standard core design is described. (K.A.)

  4. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of PWR core including intermediate flow mixers with the THYC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mur, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France); Meignin, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-07-01

    Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) is one of the major limiting factors of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Safety requires that occurrence of DNB should be precluded under normal or incidental operating conditions. The thermal-hydraulic THYC code developed by EDF is described. The code is devoted to heat and mass transfer in nuclear components. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is predicted from local thermal-hydraulic parameters such as pressure, mass flow rate, and quality. A three stage methodology to evaluate thermal margins in order to perform standard core design is described. (K.A.) 8 refs.

  5. INSIGHT: an integrated scoping analysis tool for in-core fuel management of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Noda, Hidefumi; Ito, Nobuaki; Maruyama, Taiji.

    1997-01-01

    An integrated software tool for scoping analysis of in-core fuel management, INSIGHT, has been developed to automate the scoping analysis and to improve the fuel cycle cost using advanced optimization techniques. INSIGHT is an interactive software tool executed on UNIX based workstations that is equipped with an X-window system. INSIGHT incorporates the GALLOP loading pattern (LP) optimization module that utilizes hybrid genetic algorithms, the PATMAKER interactive LP design module, the MCA multicycle analysis module, an integrated database, and other utilities. Two benchmark problems were analyzed to confirm the key capabilities of INSIGHT: LP optimization and multicycle analysis. The first was the single cycle LP optimization problem that included various constraints. The second one was the multicycle LP optimization problem that includes the assembly burnup limitation at rod cluster control (RCC) positions. The results for these problems showed the feasibility of INSIGHT for the practical scoping analysis, whose work almost consists of LP generation and multicycle analysis. (author)

  6. Comparison of problems and experience of core operation with distorted fuel element assemblies in VVER-1000 and PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, A.

    1999-01-01

    The main reactors leading to distortion of fuel element assemblies during reactor operation were studied. A series of actions which compensate this effect was proposed. Criteria of operation limitation in VVER-1000 and PWR reactors are described

  7. Vibration characteristics of a PWR fuel rod supported by optimized H type spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M. H.; Kang, H. S.; Yoon, K. H.; Kim, H. K.; Song, K. N.

    2002-01-01

    The spacer grids are one of the main structural components in the fuel assembly, which supports and protects the fuel rods from the external loads by seismic and coolant flow. In this study, a modal test and a FE vibration analysis using ABAQUS are performed on a PWR dummy fuel rod of 3.847 m which is continuously supported by eight Optimized H type spacer grids. The experimental results agree with previous works that the natural frequencies decrease, while the amplitudes increase, with the increase of the excitation force. The force levels showing the maximum displacement of 0.2 mm are in the range from 0.2 N to 0.3 N, and at the same force range the fundamental frequencies are measured around 42.0 Hz, at which the relatively big displacements are observed at the 7th span. The results from the modal tests and the FE analyses are compared by both Modal Assurance Criteria (MAC) values and mode shapes. The MAC values at 2nd, 4th, and 7th mode are below 50%. It is believed that the reason of the low MACs at those modes is that the vibration amplitudes of the modes are more distorted by the excitation force than those of the other modes

  8. Reliability analysis of 2 types of auxiliary feedwater system for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekariansyah, Andi Sofrany

    2002-01-01

    This paper will explain the application of Fault Three Method for analyzing the system reliability of Auxiliary Feedwater System with 2 different configurations taken from PWR type nuclear power plant (NPP) in the USA. The first configuration of Braidwood NPP (design A) basically consists of 1 motor driven pump and 1 diesel driven pump. The second configuration of Haddam Neck NPP (Design B) consists of 2 turbine driven pumps. Based on the P and ID and success criteria the fault trees are constructed to estimate the system failure probabilities quantified from software code PIRAS 1.0. The result shows the second configuration (Design B) with 2 turbine driven pumps have the higher failure probability of 1,06 x 10 - 2 compared with design A of 1,09 x 10 - 3 . The modification of both systems are also tried to analyze its effect to the end result. Qualitatively, the common cause failures of 2 turbine driven pumps contribute to the highest risk of system failure probability. Combination with 1 turbine driven pump and 1 motor driven pump or 1 diesel driven pump will increase the system reliability about 80% and 50% without considering if this configuration is possible to realize in a real plant

  9. Simplified model for the thermo-hydraulic simulation of the hot channel of a PWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belem, J.A.T.

    1993-09-01

    The present work deals with the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the hot channel of a standard PWR type reactor utilizing a simplified mathematical model that considers constant the water mass flux during single-phase flow and reduction of the flow when the steam quality is increasing in the channel (two-phase flow). The model has been applied to the Angra-1 reactor and it has proved satisfactory when compared to other ones. (author). 25 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Experimentation, modelling and simulation of water droplets impact on ballooned sheath of PWR core fuel assemblies in a LOCA situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelong, Franck

    2010-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), during a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), liquid water evaporates and the fuel assemblies are not cooled anymore; as a consequence, the temperature rises to such an extent that some parts of the fuel assemblies can be deformed resulting in 'ballooned regions'. When reflooding occurs, the cooling of these partially blocked parts of the fuel assemblies will depend on the coolant flow that is a mixture of overheated vapour and under-saturated droplets. The aim of this thesis is to study the heat transfer between droplets and hot walls of the fuel rods. In this purpose, an experimental device has been designed in accordance with droplets and wall features (droplet velocity and diameter, wall temperature) representative of LOCA conditions. The cooling of a hot Nickel disk, previously heated by induction, is cooled down by a stream of monodispersed droplet. The rear face temperature profiles are measured by infrared thermography. Then, the estimation of wall heat flux is performed by an inverse conduction technique from these infrared images. The effect of droplet dynamical properties (diameter, velocity) on the heat flux is studied. These experimental data allow us to validate an analytical model of heat exchange between droplet and hot slab. This model is based on combined dynamical and thermal considerations. On the one hand, the droplet dynamics is considered through a spring analogy in order to evaluate the evolution of droplet features such as the spreading diameter when the droplet is squeezed over the hot surface. On the other hand, thermal parameters, such as the thickness of the vapour cushion beneath the droplet, are determined from an energy balance. In the short term, this model will be integrated in a CFD code (named NEPTUNE-CFD) to simulate the cooling of a reactor core during a LOCA, taking into account the droplet/wall heat exchange. (author)

  11. An assessment of Class-9 (core-melt) accidents for PWR dry-containment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Saito, M.

    1981-01-01

    The phenomenology of core-melt accidents in dry containments was examined for the purpose of identifying the margins of safety in such Class-9 situations. The scale (geometry) effects appear to crucially limit the extent (severity) of steam explosions. This together with the established reduced explosivity of the corium-A/water system, and the inherently high capability of dry containments (redinforced concrete, and shields in some cases, seismic design etc.) lead to the conclusion that failure due to steam explosions may be considered essentially incredible. These premixture scaling considerations also impact ultimate debris disposition and coolability and need additional development. A water-flooded reactor cavity would have beneficial effects in limiting (but not necessarily eliminating) melt-concrete interactions. Independently of the initial degree of quenching and/or scale of fragmentation, mechanisms exist that drive the system towards ultimate stability (coolability). Additional studies, with intermediate-scale prototypic materials are recommended to better explore these mechanisms. Containment heat removal systems must provide the crucial capability of mitigating such accidents. Passive systems should be explored and assessed against currently available and/or improved active systems taking into account the rather loose time constraints required for activation. It appears that containment margins for accommodating the hydrogen problem are limited. This problem appears to stand out not only in terms of potential consequences but also in terms of lack of any readily available and clear cut solutions at this time. (orig.)

  12. Neutronics characteristics of micro-heterogeneous ThO2-UO2 PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.; Driscoll, M.J.; Kazimi, S.

    2001-01-01

    A new fuel concept, axially-micro-heterogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel, where ThO 2 fuel pellets and UO 2 fuel pellets are stacked in separate layers in the fuel rods, is being studied at MIT as an option to reduce plutonium production in LWR fuel. Very interesting neutronic behavior is observed: (1) A reactivity increase of 3% to 4% at EOL for a given 235 U inventory which results in a 20-30% increase in average core discharge burnup; (2) For certain configurations, a ''burnable poison'' effect is observed. Analysis shows that these effects are achieved due to a combination of changes in self-shielding, local fissile worth, and conversion ratio, among which self-shielding is the dominant effect at the end of a reactivity-limited burnup. Other variations of micro-heterogeneous UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel including duplex pellets, checkerboard pin distribution, and checkerboard-axial combinations have also been investigated, and their neutronic performance compared. It is concluded that the axial fuel micro-heterogeneity provides the largest gain in reactivity-limited burnup. (author)

  13. Three Types of Earth's Inner Core Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, D.; Wen, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's inner core boundary (ICB) is the site where the liquid outer core solidifies and the solid inner core grows. Thus, the fine-scale structure of the ICB is important for our understanding of the thermo-compositional state of the Earth's core. In this study, we collect a large set of seismic records with high-quality pre-critical PKiKP and PcP phase pairs, recorded by two dense seismic arrays, Hi-net in Japan and USArray in US. This dataset samples the ICB regions beneath East Asia, Mexico and the Bering Sea. We use differential travel times, amplitude ratios and waveform differences between PKiKP and PcP phases to constrain fine-scale structure of the ICB. The sampled ICB can be grouped into three types based on their seismic characteristics: (1) a simple ICB with a flat and sharp boundary, (2) a bumpy ICB with topographic height changes of 10 km, and (3) a localized mushy ICB with laterally varying thicknesses of 4-8 km. The laterally varying fine-scale structure of the ICB indicates existence of complex small-scale forces at the surface and a laterally varying solidification process of the inner core due to lateral variation of thermo-compositional condition near the ICB.

  14. Intergranular cracking mechanism in baffle former bolt materials for PWR core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Arioka, Koji; Kanasaki, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Koji [Takasago R and D Center, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Takasago, Hyogo (Japan); Ajiki, Kazuhide [Kobe Shipyard and Machinery, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Matsuoka, Takanori [Nuclear Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Urata, Sigeru; Mizuta, Hitoshi [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    In this study, the cause of intergranular cracking in baffle former bolts(BFBs) was estimated from metallurgical and chemical viewpoints based upon the experimental data and information published by EdF. At first, five kinds of possibilities were estimated as the cause of intergranular cracking in BFBs. Five possibilities estimated were (1) mechanical cracking caused by high strain in irradiation hardened austenitic stainless steels, (2) O{sub 2} SCC due to residual oxygen in the bolt stagnant region, (3) caustic SCC due to dry and wet phenomenon, (4) low pH SCC due to oxygen concentration cell, and (5) PWSCC due to radiation induced segregation. In this study each possibility was evaluated by the calculation and some out of pile tests. And also, the cause of the intergranular cracking in BFBs was estimated by the data of the post-irradiation examinations and basic out of pile tests for Type 316CW and Type 347 stainless steels in the authors' previous study. From these evaluation, the intergranular cracking in BFBs seems to be caused by the PWSCC, but not caused by mechanical cracking O{sub 2} SCC, caustic SCC or low pH SCC. (author)

  15. Performance of core exit thermocouple for PWR accident management action in vessel top break LOCA simulation experiment at OECD/NEA ROSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Presented are experiment results of the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with a focus on core exit thermocouple (CET) performance to detect core overheat during a vessel top break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation experiment. The CET temperatures are used to start accident management (AM) action to quickly depressurize steam generator (SG) secondary side in case of core temperature excursion. Test 6-1 is first test of the OECD/NEA ROSA Project started in 2005, simulating withdraw of a control rod drive mechanism penetration nozzle at the vessel top head. The break size is equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. The AM action was initiated when CET temperature rose up to 623K. There was no reflux water fallback onto the CETs during the core heat-up period. The core overheat, however, was detected with a time delay of about 230s. In addition, a large temperature discrepancy was observed between the CETs and the hottest core region. This paper clarifies the reason of time delay and temperature discrepancy between the CETs and heated core during boil-off including three-dimensional steam flows in the core and core exit. The paper discusses applicability of the LSTF CET performance to pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions and a possibility of alternative indicators for earlier AM action than in Test 6-1 is studied by using symptom-based plant parameters such as a reactor vessel water level detection. (author)

  16. Unlimited cooling capacity of the passive-type emergency core cooling system of the MARS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandini, G.; Caira, M.; Naviglio, A.; Sorabella, L.

    1995-01-01

    The MARS nuclear plant is equipped with a 600 MWth PWR type nuclear steam supply system, with completely innovative engineered core safeguards. The most relevant innovative safety system of this plant is its Emergency Core Cooling System, which is completely passive (with only one non static component). The Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) of the MARS reactor is natural-circulation, passive-type, and its intervention follows a core flow decrease, whatever was the cause. The operation of the system is based on a cascade of three fluid systems, functionally interfacing through heat exchangers; the first fluid system is connected to the reactor vessel and the last one includes an atmospheric-pressure condenser, cooled by external air. The infinite thermal capacity of the final heat sink provides the system an unlimited autonomy. The capability and operability of the system are based on its integrity and on the integrity of the primary coolant boundary (both of them are permanently enclosed in a pressurized containment; 100% redundancy is also foreseen) and on the operation of only one non static component (a check valve), with 400% redundancy. In the paper, all main thermal hydraulic transients occurring as a consequence of postulated accidents are analysed, to verify the capability of the passive-type ECCS to intervene always in time, without causing undue conditions of reduced coolability of the core (DNB, etc.), and to verify its capability to guarantee a long-term (indefinite) coolability of the core without the need of any external intervention. (author)

  17. Contribution to the study of the conversion PWR type reactors to the thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins Filho, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the thorium cycle in PWR reactors is discussed. The fuel has been calculated in the equilibrium condition for a economic comparison with the uranium cycle (in the same condition). First of all, a code named EQUILIBRIO has been developed for the fuel equilibrium calculation. The results gotten by this code, were introduced in the LEOPARD code for the fuel depletion calculation (in the equilibrium cycle). Same important physics details of fuel depletion are studied, for instance: the neutron balance, power sharing, fuel burnup, etc. The calculations have been done taking as reference the Angra-1 PWR reactor. (Author) [pt

  18. Reactor core for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hisao; Kasai, Shigeo; Yokoyama, Tsugio; Matsumoto, Hiroshi.

    1996-01-01

    In a gas-sealed assembly for a FBR type reactor, two or more kinds of assemblies having different eigen frequency and a structure for suppressing oscillation of liquid surface are disposed in a reactor core. Coolant introduction channels for introducing coolants from inside and outside are disposed in the inside of structural members of an upper shielding member to form a shielding member-cooling structure in the reactor core. A structure for promoting heat conduction between a sealed gas in the assembly and coolants at the inner side or the outside of the assembly is disposed in the reactor core. A material which generates heat by neutron irradiation is disposed in the assembly to heat the sealed gases positively by radiation heat from the heat generation member also upon occurrence of power elevation-type event to cause temperature expansion. Namely, the coolants flown out from or into the gas sealed-assemblies cause differential fluctuation on the liquid surface, and the change of the capacity of a gas region is also different on every gas-sealed assemblies thereby enabling to suppress fluctuation of the reactor power. Pressure loss is increased by a baffle plate or the like to lower the liquid surface of the sodium coolants or decrease the elevating speed thereof thereby suppressing fluctuation of the reactor power. (N.H.)

  19. Best estimate plus uncertainty analysis of departure from nucleate boiling limiting case with CASL core simulator VERA-CS in response to PWR main steam line break event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.S., E-mail: csbrown3@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2500 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States); Zhang, H., E-mail: Hongbin.Zhang@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States); Kucukboyaci, V., E-mail: kucukbvn@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Company, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States); Sung, Y., E-mail: sungy@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Company, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU) analyses of PWR core responses under main steam line break (MSLB) accident. • CASL’s coupled neutron transport/subchannel code VERA-CS. • Wilks’ nonparametric statistical method. • MDNBR 95/95 tolerance limit. - Abstract: VERA-CS (Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, Core Simulator) is a coupled neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics subchannel code under development by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). VERA-CS was applied to simulate core behavior of a typical Westinghouse-designed 4-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) with 17 × 17 fuel assemblies in response to two main steam line break (MSLB) accident scenarios initiated at hot zero power (HZP) at the end of the first fuel cycle with the most reactive rod cluster control assembly stuck out of the core. The reactor core boundary conditions at the most DNB limiting time step were determined by a system analysis code. The core inlet flow and temperature distributions were obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The two MSLB scenarios consisted of the high and low flow situations, where reactor coolant pumps either continue to operate with offsite power or do not continue to operate since offsite power is unavailable. The best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU) analysis method was applied using Wilks’ nonparametric statistical approach. In this demonstration of BEPU application, 59 full core simulations were performed for each accident scenario to provide the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR) at the 95/95 (95% probability with 95% confidence level) tolerance limit. A parametric goodness-of-fit approach was also applied to the results to obtain the MDNBR value at the 95/95 tolerance limit. Initial sensitivity analysis was performed with the 59 cases per accident scenario by use of Pearson correlation coefficients. The results show that this typical PWR core

  20. Best estimate plus uncertainty analysis of departure from nucleate boiling limiting case with CASL core simulator VERA-CS in response to PWR main steam line break event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.S.; Zhang, H.; Kucukboyaci, V.; Sung, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU) analyses of PWR core responses under main steam line break (MSLB) accident. • CASL’s coupled neutron transport/subchannel code VERA-CS. • Wilks’ nonparametric statistical method. • MDNBR 95/95 tolerance limit. - Abstract: VERA-CS (Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, Core Simulator) is a coupled neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics subchannel code under development by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). VERA-CS was applied to simulate core behavior of a typical Westinghouse-designed 4-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) with 17 × 17 fuel assemblies in response to two main steam line break (MSLB) accident scenarios initiated at hot zero power (HZP) at the end of the first fuel cycle with the most reactive rod cluster control assembly stuck out of the core. The reactor core boundary conditions at the most DNB limiting time step were determined by a system analysis code. The core inlet flow and temperature distributions were obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The two MSLB scenarios consisted of the high and low flow situations, where reactor coolant pumps either continue to operate with offsite power or do not continue to operate since offsite power is unavailable. The best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU) analysis method was applied using Wilks’ nonparametric statistical approach. In this demonstration of BEPU application, 59 full core simulations were performed for each accident scenario to provide the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR) at the 95/95 (95% probability with 95% confidence level) tolerance limit. A parametric goodness-of-fit approach was also applied to the results to obtain the MDNBR value at the 95/95 tolerance limit. Initial sensitivity analysis was performed with the 59 cases per accident scenario by use of Pearson correlation coefficients. The results show that this typical PWR core

  1. Corrosion behaviour of E110- and E635- type zirconium alloys under PWR irradiation simulating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelov, V.A.; Novikov, V.V.; Kon'kov, V.F.; Tselishchev, A.V.; Dologov, A.B.; Zmitko, M.; Maserik, V.; Kocik, J.

    2008-01-01

    As structural materials for VVER 1000 fuel rod claddings and FA components use is made of zirconium alloys E110 (Zr 1Nb) and E635 (Zr 1.2Sn 1Nb 0.35Fe) that meet the design parameters of operation. Nonetheless, the work is in progress to perfect those alloys to reach higher corrosion and shape change resistance. At VNIINM updated E110M and E635M alloys have been developed on E110 and E635 bases. To assess the corrosion behaviour of the updated alloys in comparison to the base alloys their cladding samples were tested in RVS 3 loop of LWR 15 reactor (NRI, Rez) in PWR water chemistry with coolant surface and volume boiling. The data are presented on the influence effected by in pile irradiation for up to 324 days on oxide coat thickness and microstructure of fuel claddings produced from the four tested alloys. It has been revealed that E110 alloy its updated version E110M and E635M alloy compared to E635 have higher corrosion resistances. The paper discusses th+e results on the in pile corrosion of cladding samples from the alloys under study in comparison to the results acquired for similar samples tested in LWR 15 inactive channel and under autoclave conditions. Using methods of TEM, EDX analyses of extraction replicas dislocation structure and phase composition changes were studied in samples of all four alloy claddings LWR 15 reactor irradiated to the material damage dose of 1.5 dpa. The interrelation is discussed between irradiation effected strengthening and corrosion of fuel claddings made of E110 and E635 type zirconium alloys and the evolution of their structure and phase states

  2. ROX PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akie, H.; Yamashita, T.; Shirasu, N.; Takano, H.; Anoda, Y.; Kimura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    For an efficient burnup of excess plutonium from nuclear reactors spent fuels and dismantled warheads, plutonium rock-like oxide(ROX) fuel has been investigated. The ROX fuel is expected to provide high Pu transmutation capability, irradiation stability and chemical and geological stability. While, a zirconia-based ROX(Zr-ROX)-fueled PWR core has some problems of Doppler reactivity coefficient and power peaking factor. For the improvement of these characteristics, two approaches were considered: the additives such as UO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a heterogeneous core with Zr-ROX and UO{sub 2} assemblies. As a result, the additives UO{sub 2}+ Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} are found to sufficiently improve the reactivity coefficients and accident behavior, and to flatten power distribution. On the other hand, in the 1/3Zr-ROX + 2/3UO{sub 2} heterogeneous core, further reduction of power peaking seems necessary. (author)

  3. Review of some problems encountered with In-Core Fission chambers and Self-Powered Neutron Detectors in PWR's. Tests - Present use - Outlook on the near future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, Jean; Verdant, Robert.

    1979-01-01

    The working conditions of in-core detectors are investigated as well as some reliability problems which depend on nuclear environment (such as decrease of sensibility, loss of insulation...). Then we review the long-term irradiation tests in experimental reactor that have been carried out by the CEA these last years, with fission chambers (FC) and Self-Powered Detectors (SPD). The travelling probe system with moveable FC used in the 900 MWe PWR is briefly described. Finally an outlook on future possibilities is given; for instance the use of fixed SPD and a moveable FC in the same thimble, allowing recalibration of the fixed detectors [fr

  4. Operation results of the secondary circuits of the French PWR type power plant park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Global results of performances realized since 1981 by the French PWR 900 MW power plants (installed power, availability, casual or planned shutdowns); analysis of the behaviour (casual unavailability) comparing together the performances of the different components in the secondary circuit; behaviour of the principal materials of the secondary circuit and their weight in the unavailabilities of the whole French nuclear park [fr

  5. Undermoderated spectrum MOX core study. Pressurized water-type breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochihara, Hiroshi; Komano, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this development is the advance of the PWR core. The conversion ratio (the breeding ratio) are examined. In the case of heavy water as the coolant, the breeding ratio can be achieved about 1.1 with using a hexagonal lattice and space about 1 mm assembly fuel. In the case of light water coolant, the breeding ratio becomes about 1.0, using a hexagonal lattice and fuel space about 0.5 mm fuel assembly. Here, it reports on the situation of the examination such as the nucleus design of core, the design of fuel assembly, the heat hydraulics design of the core, the structure design and so on. (author)

  6. Development of neutron own codes for the simulation of PWR reactor core; Desarrollo de codigos neutronicos propios para la simulacion del nucleo de reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnert, C.; Cabellos, O.; Garcia-Herranz, N.; Cuervo, D.; Herrero, J. J.; Jimenez, J.; Ochoa, R.

    2011-07-01

    The core physic simulation is enough complex to need computers and ad-hoc software, and its evolution is to best-estimate methodologies, in order to improve availability and safety margins in the power plant operation. the Nuclear Engineering Department (UPM) has developed the SEANAP System in use in several power plants in Spain, with simulation in 3D and at the pin level detail, of the nominal and actual core burnup, with the on-line surveillance, and operational maneuvers optimization. (Author) 8 refs.

  7. Performance Specification Shippinpark Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Drying and Canister Inerting System for PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies Stored within Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and basic design requirements imposed on the fuel drying and canister inerting system for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies (BFAs) stored within Shippingport spent fuel (SSFCs) canisters (fuel drying and canister inerting system). This fuel drying and canister inerting system is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Spent Nuclear Fuels Project at the Hanford Site. The fuel drying and canister inerting system provides for removing water and establishing an inert environment for Shippingport PWR Core 2 BFAs stored within SSFCs. A policy established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) states that new SNF facilities (this is interpreted to include structures, systems and components) shall achieve nuclear safety equivalence to comparable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. This will be accomplished in part by applying appropriate NRC requirements for comparable NRC-licensed facilities to the fuel drying and canister inerting system, in addition to applicable DOE regulations and orders

  8. In-pile post-DNB behavior of a nine-rod PWR-type fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnerson, F.S.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an in-pile power-cooling-mismatch (PCM) test designed to investigate the behavior of a nine-rod, PWR-type fuel bundle under intermittent and sustained periods of high temperature film boiling operation are presented. Primary emphasis is placed on the DNB and post-DNB events including rod-to-rod interactions, return to nucleate boiling (RNB), and fuel rod failure. A comparison of the DNB behavior of the individual bundle rods with single-rod data obtained from previous PCM tests is also made

  9. Modular simulation of the dynamics of a 925 MWe PWR electronuclear type reactor and design of a multivariable control algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansouri, S.

    1985-06-01

    This work has been consecrated to the modular simulation of a PWR 925 MWe power plant's dynamic and to the design of a multivariable algorithm control: a mathematical model of a plant type was developed. The programs were written on a structured manner in order to maximize flexibility. A multivariable control algorithm based on pole placement with output feedback was elaborated together with its correspondent program. The simulation results for different normal transients were shown and the capabilities of the new method of multivariable control are illustrated through many examples

  10. PWR and WWER fuel performance. A comparison of major characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.

    2006-01-01

    PWR and WWER fuel technologies have the same basic performance targets: most effective use of the energy stored in the fuel and highest possible reliability. Both fuel technologies use basically the same strategies to reach these targets: 1) Optimized reload strategies; 2) Maximal use of structural material with low neutron cross sections; 3) Decrease the fuel failure frequency towards a 'zero failure' performance by understanding and eliminating the root causes of those defects. The key driving force of the technology of both, PWR and WWER fuel is high burn-up. Presently a range of 45 - 50 MWD/kgU have been reached commercially for PWR and WWER fuel. The main technical limitations to reach high burn-up are typically different for PWR and WWER fuel: for PWR fuel it is the corrosion and hydrogen uptake of the Zr-based materials; for WWER fuel it is the mechanical and dimensional stability of the FA (and the whole core). Corrosion and hydrogen uptake of Zr-materials is a 'non-problem' for WWER fuel. Other performance criteria that are important for high burn-up are the creep and growth behaviour of the Zr materials and the fission gas release in the fuel rod. There exists a good and broad data base to model and design both fuel types. FA and fuel rod vibration appears to be a generic problem for both fuel types but with more evidence for PWR fuel performance reliability. Grid-to-rod fretting is still a major issue in the fuel failure statistics of PWR fuel. Fuel rod cladding defects by debris fretting is no longer a key problem for PWR fuel, while it still appears to be a significant root cause for WWER fuel failures. 'Zero defect' fuel performance is achievable with a high probability, as statistics for US PWR and WWER-1000 fuel has shown

  11. Analytical and sampling problems in primary coolant circuits of PWR-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illy, H.

    1980-10-01

    Details of recent analytical methods on the analysis and sampling of a PWR primary coolant are given in the order as follows: sampling and preparation; analysis of the gases dissolved in the water; monitoring of radiating substances; checking of boric acid concentration which controls the reactivity. The bibliography of this work and directions for its use are published in a separate report: KFKI-80-48 (1980). (author)

  12. Three dimensions transport calculations for PWR core; Calcul de coeur R.E.P. en transport 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richebois, E

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this work is to define improved 3-D core calculation methods based on the transport theory. These methods can be particularly useful and lead to more precise computations in areas of the core where anisotropy and steep flux gradients occur, especially near interface and boundary conditions and in regions of high heterogeneity (bundle with absorbent rods). In order to apply the transport theory a new method for calculating reflector constants has been developed, since traditional methods were only suited for 2-group diffusion core calculations and could not be extrapolated to transport calculations. In this thesis work, the new method for obtaining reflector constants is derived regardless of the number of energy groups and of the operator used. The core calculations results using the reflector constants thereof obtained have been validated on the EDF's power reactor Saint Laurent B1 with MOX loading. The advantages of a 3-D core transport calculation scheme have been highlighted as opposed to diffusion methods; there are a considerable number of significant effects and potential advantages to be gained in rod worth calculations for instance. These preliminary results obtained with on particular cycle will have to be confirmed by more systematic analysis. Accidents like MSLB (main steam line break) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) should also be investigated and constitute challenging situations where anisotropy is high and/or flux gradients are steep. This method is now being validated for others EDF's PWRs' reactors, as well as for experimental reactors and other types of commercial reactors. (author)

  13. Three dimensions transport calculations for PWR core; Calcul de coeur R.E.P. en transport 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richebois, E

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this work is to define improved 3-D core calculation methods based on the transport theory. These methods can be particularly useful and lead to more precise computations in areas of the core where anisotropy and steep flux gradients occur, especially near interface and boundary conditions and in regions of high heterogeneity (bundle with absorbent rods). In order to apply the transport theory a new method for calculating reflector constants has been developed, since traditional methods were only suited for 2-group diffusion core calculations and could not be extrapolated to transport calculations. In this thesis work, the new method for obtaining reflector constants is derived regardless of the number of energy groups and of the operator used. The core calculations results using the reflector constants thereof obtained have been validated on the EDF's power reactor Saint Laurent B1 with MOX loading. The advantages of a 3-D core transport calculation scheme have been highlighted as opposed to diffusion methods; there are a considerable number of significant effects and potential advantages to be gained in rod worth calculations for instance. These preliminary results obtained with on particular cycle will have to be confirmed by more systematic analysis. Accidents like MSLB (main steam line break) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) should also be investigated and constitute challenging situations where anisotropy is high and/or flux gradients are steep. This method is now being validated for others EDF's PWRs' reactors, as well as for experimental reactors and other types of commercial reactors. (author)

  14. A Comparative Physics Study of Commercial PWR Cores using Metallic Micro-cell UO{sub 2}-Cr (or Mo) Pellets with Cr-based Cladding Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); In, Wang Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a comparative neutronic analysis of the cores using ATFs which include metallic micro-cell UO{sub 2}-Cr, UO{sub 2}-Mo pellets and Cr-based alloy coating on cladding was performed to show the effects of the ATF fuels on the core performance. In this study, the cores having different ATFs use the same initial uranium enrichments. The ATF concepts studied in this work are the metallic microcell UO{sub 2} pellets containing Cr or Mo with cladding outer coating composed of Cr-based alloy which have been suggested as the ATF concepts in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The metallic micro-cell pellets and Cr-based alloy coating can enhance thermal conductivity of fuel and reduce the production of hydrogen from the reaction of cladding with coolant, respectively. The objective of this work is to compare neutronic characteristics of commercial PWR equilibrium cores utilizing the different variations of metallic micro-cell UO{sub 2} pellets with cladding coating composed of Cr-based alloy. The results showed that the cores using UO{sub 2}-Cr and UO{sub 2}-Mo pellets with Cr-based alloy coating on cladding have reduced cycle lengths by 60 and 106 EFPDs, respectively, in comparison with the reference UO{sub 2} fueled core due to the reduced heavy metal inventories and large thermal absorption cross section but they do not have any significant differences in the core performances parameters. However, it is notable that the core fueled the micro-cell UO{sub 2}-Mo pellet and Cr-based alloy coating has considerably more negative MTC and slightly more negative FTC than the other cases. These characteristics of the core using micro-cell UO{sub 2}-Mo pellet and Cr-based alloy coating is due to the hard neutron spectrum and large capture resonance cross section of Mo isotopes.

  15. Assessment of subcriticality during PWR-type reactor refueling; Evaluation de la sous-criticite lors des operations de chargement d'un reacteur nucleaire REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdier, A

    2005-04-15

    During the core loading period of a PWR, any fuel assembly misplacements may significantly reduce the existing criticality margin. The Dampierre 4-18 event showed the present monitoring based on the variations of the outside-core detector counting rate cannot detect such misplacements. In order to circumvent that, a more detailed analysis of the available signal was done. We particularly focused on the neutronic noise analysis methods such as MSM (modified source multiplication), MSA (amplified source multiplication), Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman-{alpha} methods. The experimental part of our work was dedicated to the application of those methods to a research reactor. Finally, our results showed that those methods cannot be used with the present PWR instrumentation. Various detector positions were then studied using Monte Carlo calculations capable of following the neutron origin. Our results showed that the present technology does not allow us to use any solution based on neutron detection for monitoring core loading. (author)

  16. Status of developing advanced PWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yotaro

    1982-01-01

    During past eleven years since the first PWR power plant, Mihama Unit 1 of Kansai Electric Power Co., started the commercial operation in 1970, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries has endeavored to improve PWR technologies on the basis of the advice from electric power companies and the technical information to overcome difficulties in PWR power plants. Now, the main objective is to improve the overall plant performance, and the rate of operation of Japanese PWR power plants has significantly risen. The improvement of the reliability, the shortening of regular inspection period and the reduction of radioactive waste handling were attempted. In view of the satisfactory operational experience of Westinghouse type PWRs, the basic reactor concept has not been changed so far. Mitsubishi and Westinghouse reached basic agreement in August, 1981, to develop a spectral shift type large capacity reactor as the advanced PWRs for Japan. This type of PWRs hab higher degree of freedom for extended fuel cycle operation and enhances the advantage of entire fuel cycle economy, particularly the significant reduction of uranium use. The improved neutron economy is attainable by reducing neutron loss, and the core design with low power density and the economical use of plutonium are advantageous for the fuel cycle economy. (Kako, I.)

  17. Pre design processing of waste of ex-resin without materials matrix from nuclear power plant type PWR 1000 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerdas Tarigan

    2010-01-01

    Have been done pre design processing of waste ex-resin without capacities matrix materials from nuclear power plant type PWR 1000 MW During the time radioactive waste of ex-resin processed to use process of immobilization use matrix materials like mixture cement and epoxy resin and then conditioning. This process is not effective and efficient because end result volume of end product bigger than volume early operation system and maintenance of its installation more difficult. To overcome this created a design of technology processing of waste of ex- resin without matrix materials through process of strainer, drying and conditioning represent technological innovation newly processing of radioactive waste of ex-resin. Besides this process more effective and efficient, volume of end product waste much more small from volume early and operation system and maintenance of its easier installation. Pre design is expected to be used as a basis to make conceptual of pre design installation of strainer, drying and conditioning for the processing of waste of ex-resin from nuclear power plant type PWR 1000 MW. (author)

  18. Study of development of non-destructive method for determining FGR from high burned PWR type fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Miyanishi, Hideyuki; Kitagawa, Isamu; Iida, Shozo; Ito, Tadaharu; Amano, Hidetoshi.

    1991-11-01

    Experimental study was made to evaluate the FGR (Fission Product Gas Release) from high burned PWR type fuel rods by means of non-destructive method through measurement of the gamma activity of 85 Kr isotope which was accumulated in the fuel top plenum. Experimental result shows that it is possible to know the amounts of FGR at fuel plenum by the equations given in the followings. FGR = 0.28C/V f or FGR = 0.07C where, FGR (%) is the amounts of Xe and Kr released from UO 2 fuel, C (counts/h) the radioactivity of 85 Kr at plenum of the tested fuel rod and V f (ml) the plenum volume of the tested fuel rod, respectively. The present study was made by using 14 x 14 PWR type fuel rods preirradiated up to the burn-up of 42.1 MWd/kgU, followed by the pulse irradiation at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The FGR of the tested segmented fuel rods were measured by puncturing and found to range from 0.6% to 12% according to the magnitude of the deposited energy given by pulse. Estimated experimental error bands against the above equations were within plus minus 30%. (author)

  19. Re-irradiation and limit testing of the fuels PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, M.; Molvault, M.

    1978-01-01

    In view of investigating the neutron radiation behavior of PWR fuel pins, the S.P.S. (Services des Piles de Saclay) developed a set of experimental means used at OSIRIS in Saclay Nuclear Research Center. Said devices are shown to be able to meet present problems concerning can failures, power and temperature cycling, remote-control studies. These means can also be used either for statistical studies, they can then receive several samples, or for analytical studies in instrumented devices of large capacity and accelerated irradiation rate [fr

  20. Sensitivity analysis on hot channel of PWR type reactors using matricial formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Edisson Savio G.; Andrade Lima, Fernando Roberto de; Lira, Carlos Alberto B.O.

    1995-01-01

    The matricial formalism of the perturbation theory is applied in a simplified model to study the hot channel of PWR reactors. Mass, linear momentum and energy conservation equations and appropriated heat transfer and fluid mechanics correlations describe the discretized system. After calculating system's thermalhydraulic properties, the matricial formalism is applied and the sensitivity coefficients are determined for each case of interest. Comparisons between perturbative method and direct results of the model have shown good agreement which demonstrates that the matricial formalism is an important tool for discretized system analysis. (author). 6 refs, 2 tabs

  1. A calculation methodology applied for fuel management in PWR type reactors using first order perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossini, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    An attempt has been made to obtain a strategy coherent with the available instruments and that could be implemented with future developments. A calculation methodology was developed for fuel reload in PWR reactors, which evolves cell calculation with the HAMMER-TECHNION code and neutronics calculation with the CITATION code.The management strategy adopted consists of fuel element position changing at the beginning of each reactor cycle in order to decrease the radial peak factor. The bi-dimensional, two group First Order perturbation theory was used for the mathematical modeling. (L.C.J.A.)

  2. Numerical simulation of thermohydraulic behavior of the steam generator of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, C.V.M.; Carajilescov, P.

    1981-01-01

    Generally, 'U' tube steam generators with natural internal recirculation are used in PWR power stations. A thermalhydraulic model is developed for simulation of such components, in steady state. The flow of the secondary cycle fluid is divided in two parts individually homogeneous, allowing for heat and mass exchange between them. The secondary pressure is determined by defining the moisture of the vapor that feeds the turbine. This model is applied to the Angra II steam generator, operating in nominal conditions and with tubing partially plugged. (Author) [pt

  3. Plutonium recycling in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youinou, G.; Girieud, R.; Guigon, B.

    2000-01-01

    Two concepts of 100% MOX PWR cores are presented. They are designed such as to minimize the consequences of the introduction of Pu on the core control. The first one has a high moderation ratio and the second one utilizes an enriched uranium support. The important design parameters as well as their capabilities to multi recycle Pu are discussed. We conclude with the potential interest of the two concepts. (author)

  4. Simplified model for the thermo-hydraulic simulation of the hot channel of a PWR type nuclear reactor; Modelo simplificado para simulacao do comportamento termohidraulico do canal quente de reator nuclear do tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belem, J A.T.

    1993-09-01

    The present work deals with the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the hot channel of a standard PWR type reactor utilizing a simplified mathematical model that considers constant the water mass flux during single-phase flow and reduction of the flow when the steam quality is increasing in the channel (two-phase flow). The model has been applied to the Angra-1 reactor and it has proved satisfactory when compared to other ones. (author). 25 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs.

  5. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  6. PWR type reactor equipped with a primary circuit loop water level gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro.

    1990-01-01

    The time of lowering a water level to less than the position of high temperature side pipeway nozzle has been rather delayed because of the swelling of mixed water level due to heat generation of the reactor core. Further, there has been a certain restriction for the installation, maintenance and adjustment of a water level gauge since it is at a position under high radiation exposure. Then, a differential pressure type water level gauge with temperature compensation is disposed at a portion below a water level gauge of a pressurizer and between the steam generator exit plenum and the lower end of the loop seal. Further, a similar water level system is disposed to all of the loops of the primary circulation circuits. In a case that the amount of water contained in a reactor container should decreased upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents caused by small rupture and stoppage of primary circuit pumps, lowering of the water level preceding to the lowering of the water level in the reactor core is detected to ensure the amount of water. Since they are disposed to all of the loops and ensure the excess margin, reliability for the detection of the amount of contained water can be improved by averaging time for the data of the water level and averaging the entire systems, even when there are vibrations in the fluid or pressure in the primary circuit. (N.H.)

  7. Reactor core of FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ichimiya, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is a homogeneous reactor core divided into two regions of an inner reactor core region at the center and an outer reactor core region surrounding the outside of the inner reactor core region. In this case, the inner reactor core region has a lower plutonium enrichment degree and less amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction, and the outer reactor core region has higher plutonium enrichment degree and greater amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction. Moderator materials containing hydrogen are added only to the inner reactor core fuels in the inner reactor core region. Pins loaded with the fuels with addition of the moderator materials are inserted at a ratio of from 3 to 10% of the total number of the fuel pins. The moderator materials containing hydrogen comprise zirconium hydride, titanium hydride, or calcium hydride. With such a constitution, fluctuation of the power distribution in the radial direction along with burning is suppressed. In addition, an absolute value of the Doppler coefficient can be increased, and a temperature coefficient of coolants can be reduced. (I.N.)

  8. Verification of NUREC Code Transient Calculation Capability Using OECD NEA/US NRC PWR MOX/UO2 Core Transient Benchmark Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Lee, Hyung Chul; Yoo, Jae Woon

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we verified the NUREC code transient calculation capability using OECD NEA/US NRC PWR MOX/UO2 Core Transient Benchmark Problem. The benchmark problem consists of Part 1, a 2-D problem with given T/H conditions, Part 2, a 3-D problem at HFP condition, Part 3, a 3-D problem at HZP condition, and Part 4, a transient state initiated by a control rod ejection at HZP condition in Part 3. In Part 1, the results of NUREC code agreed well with the reference solution obtained from DeCART calculation except for the pin power distributions at the rodded assemblies. In Part 2, the results of NUREC code agreed well with the reference DeCART solutions. In Part 3, some results of NUREC code such as critical boron concentration and core averaged delayed neutron fraction agreed well with the reference PARCS 2G solutions. But the error of the assembly power at the core center was quite large. The pin power errors of NUREC code at the rodded assemblies was much smaller the those of PARCS code. The axial power distribution also agreed well with the reference solution. In Part 4, the results of NUREC code agreed well with those of PARCS 2G code which was taken as the reference solution. From the above results we can conclude that the results of NUREC code for steady states and transient states of the MOX loaded LWR core agree well with those of the other codes

  9. Steady-state and transient core feasibility analysis for a thorium-fuelled reduced-moderation PWR performing full transuranic recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Ahmad, Ali; Zainuddin, N. Zara; Franceschini, Fausto; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a core analysis for a thorium-transuranic fuelled reduced-moderation PWR. • There is the possibility of positive reactivity in severe large break LOCAs. • Mechanical shim is used to control reactivity within power peaking constraints. • Adequate shutdown margin can be achieved with B 4 C control rods are required. • The response to a rod ejection accident is within likely licensing limits. - Abstract: It is difficult to perform multiple recycle of transuranic (TRU) isotopes in PWRs as the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) tends to become positive after a few recycles and the core may have positive reactivity when fully voided. Due to the favourable impact on the MTC fostered by use of thorium (Th), the possibility of performing Th–TRU multiple-recycle in reduced-moderation PWRs (RMPWRs) is under consideration. Heterogeneous fuel design with spatial separation of Th–U and Th–TRU is necessary to improve neutronic performance. This can take the form of a heterogeneous fuel assembly (TPUC), or whole assembly heterogeneity (WATU). Satisfactory discharge burn-up can be maintained while ensuring negative MTC, with the pin diameter of a standard PWR increased from 9.5 to 11 mm. However, the reactivity becomes positive when the coolant density in the core becomes extremely low. This could lead to positive reactivity in some loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenarios, for example a surge line break, if the reactor does not trip. To protect against this beyond design basis accident, a second redundant set of shutdown rods is added to the reactor, so that either the usual or secondary rods can trip the reactor when there is zero coolant in the core. Even so, this condition is likely to be concerning from a regulatory standpoint. Reactivity control is a key challenge due to the reduced worth of neutron absorbers and their detrimental effect on the void coefficients, especially when diluted, as is the case for soluble boron

  10. Model for the probability of core uncovery in loss of offsite power induced accidents, as applied in the Probabilistic Safety Study for ENEL PWR standard power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, E.; Serra, S.; Paddleford, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses one particular aspect of the Probabilistic Safety Study conducted for the Italian reference PWR or Progetto Unificato Nucleare (PUN) design. The event scenario addressed involves the loss of offsite power (LOOSP) initiating event in conjunction with an independent loss of certain support systems (to the exclusion of the total independent loss of on-site power which is treated similarly in a separate event tree). An event tree is developed to address the potential for a consequential small LOCA due to reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal failure under conditions of inadequate seal cooling and the subsequent potential for core uncovery should emergency systems be unavailable and not recovered in adequate time. The event scenario and the quantification methodology used are described. Results and sensitivities are presented

  11. Safety considerations of PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.H. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The safety of the central station pressurized water reactor is well established and substantiated by its excellent operating record. Operating data from 55 reactors of this type have established a record of safe operating history unparalleled by any modern large scale industry. The 186 plants under construction require a continuing commitment to maintain this outstanding record. The safety of the PWR has been further verified by the recently completed Reactor Safety Study (''Rasmussen'' Report). Not only has this study confirmed the exceptionally low risk associated with PWR operation, it has also introduced a valuable new tool in the decision making process. PWR designs, utilizing the philosophy of defense in depth, provide the bases for evaluating margins of safety. The design of the reactor coolant system, the containment system, emergency core cooling system and other related systems and components provide substantial margins of safety under both normal and postulated accident conditions even considering simultaneous effects of earthquakes and other environmental phenomena. Margins of safety in the assessment of various postulated accident conditions, with emphasis on the postulated loss of reactor coolant accident (LOCA), have been evaluated in depth as exemplified by the comprehensive ECCS rulemaking hearings followed by imposition of very conservative Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. When evaluated on an engineering best estimate approach, the significant margins to safety for a LOCA become more apparent. Extensive test programs have also substantiated margins to safety limits. These programs have included both separate effects and systems tests. Component testing has also been performed to substantiate performance levels under adverse combinations of environmental stress. The importance of utilizing past experience and of optimizing the deployment of incremental resources is self evident. Recent safety concerns have included specific areas such

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tube and primary pipe in PWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weiguo; Gao Fengqin; Zhou Hongyi

    1992-03-01

    The behavior of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by slow strain rate test (SSRT), constant load test (CLT) and low frequency cyclic loading test (LFCLT). The purpose of these tests is to get the test data for evaluating the integrity of pressurized boundary of pipes in Qinshan and Guangdong nuclear power plants (NPPs). Tested materials are 316 nuclear grade stainless steel (SS) for primary pipes in welded heat affected zone (WHAZ) and tubes of heat transfer, such as Incoloy-800, Inconel-600 and 321 SS which are used for steam generator in PWR NPPs. The effects of material metallurgy, shot peening treatment, tensile load, strain rate, cyclic load and water chemistry on the behavior of SCC were considered

  13. Velocity of crack growing of Inconel-600, sensitized, contaminated with sulphur in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, M. L.; Blazquez, F.; Gomez Briceno, D.; Lagares, A.

    1998-01-01

    The origin of the vessel head penetration cracking of Jose Cabrera NPP has been attributed to an IGA/SCC process in a highly sensitized Alloy 600 assisted by sulphur species, as both acid sulphates and reduced species originated by the thermal breakdown of the cationic resins present in the primary coolant. The thermal degradation of the cationic resins leads sulphonic acid group scission and sulphates. Under the operating conditions the reduction of sulphates to sulphides is produced. The sulphides formed from the reduction of sulphate can precipitate with metallic cations and be incorporated into the oxide layers of the materials, preferably into nickel alloys. Others components at Jose Cabrera NPP are fabricated from sensitized alloy 600, as bottom vessel penetrations. In order to determine the influence of sulphur incorporated to the oxide layers of bottom vessel penetration alloy 600, an experimental work has been performed to obtained crack growth rate data under PWR primary conditions on sensitized alloy 600. (Author) 5 refs

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tube and primary pipe in PWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weiguo; Gao Fengqin; Zhou Hongyi

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is studied by slow strain rate test (SSRT), constant load test (CLT) and low frequency cyclic loading test (LFCLT). The purpose of these tests is to get the test data for evaluating the integrity of pressurized boundary of pipes in Qinshan and Guangdong nuclear power plants. Tested materials are 316 nuclear grade stainless steel (SS) for primary pipes in welded heat affected zone (WHAZ) and steam generator tubes, such as Incoloy-800, Inconel-600, Inconel-690 and 321 SS which are used for steam generator in PWR. The effects of material metallurgy, shot-peening treatment, tensile load, strain rate, cyclic load and water chemistry on the behavior of SCC are investigated

  15. Drilling equipment for difficult coring conditions: a new type of core lifter and triple tube core barrel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J B

    1968-08-01

    Although considerable improvements in diamond drilling equipment have been made since the early 1950's, deficiencies in existing equipment led to the development of a new type core lifter and special 20 ft triple tube core barrel designed to operate in bad coring conditions. It is claimed that although developed essentially for coal drilling, the new equipment could be adapted to other fields of diamond drilling with the cost advantage of increased life of the core lifter.

  16. Validating Westinghouse atom 16 x 16 and 18 x 18 PWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, S.; Gustafson, J.; Jourdain, P.; Lindstroem, L.; Hallstadius, L.; Hofling, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Atom designs and fabricates PWR fuel for all major European fuel types: 17 x 17 standard (12 ft) and 17 x 17 XL (14 ft) for Westinghouse type PWRs, and 16 x 16 and 18 x 18 fuel for Siemens type PWRs. The W Atom PWR fuel designs are based on the extensive Westinghouse CE PWR fuel experience from combustion engineering type PWRs. The W atom designs utilise basic design features from the W CE fuel tradition, such as all-Zircaloy mid grids and the proven ( 6 rod years) Guardian TM debris catcher, which is integrated in the bottom Inconel grid. Several new features have been developed to meet with stringent European requirements originating from requirements on very high burnup, in combination with low-leakage core operating strategies and high coolant temperatures. The overall reliability of the Westinghouse Atom PWR fuel is very high; no fuel failure has been detected since 1997. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of european computer codes relative to the aerosol behavior in PWR containment buildings during severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Beonio-Brocchieri, F.

    1986-09-01

    The present study concerns a comparative exercise, performed within the framework of the Commission of the European Communities, of the computer codes used in reactor safety in order to assess their capability of realistically describing the aerosol behavior in PWR reactor containment buildings during severe accidents. The codes included in the present study are the following: AEROSIM-M, AEROSOLS/Bl, CORRAL-2, NAUA Mod5. In AEROSIM-M, AEROSOLS/Bl and NAUA Mod5, the integro-differential equation for the evolution of the particle mass distribution is approximated by a set of coupled first order differential equations. To this end, the particle distribution function is replaced by a number of discrete monodisperse fractions. The CORRAL-2 has an essentially empirical basis (processes not explicitely modelled, but their net effects accounted for). The physical processes taken into account in the codes are shown finally

  18. Horizontal loading test by whole model specimen simulating inner concrete structure of PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Noriyuki; Sekine, Masataka; Kimura, Kozo; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Tsuneo; Takeda, Toshikazu

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center has performed a horizontal loading test by a whole model specimen simulating the inner concrete structure of a PWR type nuclear power plant in order to investigate restoring force characteristics of reactor buildings. This report describes the results of examination of applicability to the test results of analysis methods based on elastic theory. The analysis results of elastic stiffness, concrete cracking load, rebar yielding loads and ultimate strength were compared with the test results. According to this examination, it is recognized that even these analysis methods based on elastic theory are comparatively effective for analysis of an inner concrete structure of fairly complex configuration, although there are limits of the scope of applicability. (author)

  19. Preventive testing and leakage detection in pipe-lines of steam condensers and generators of a PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canalini, A.; Carvalho, N.C. de

    1985-01-01

    The non-destructive methods: Spum, Helium and Hydrostatic used in leakage detection in condenser pipelines for PWR type reactors are presented. The time, costs, sensitivity, resources necessary and personnel development factors are considered to choose adequated method, in function of nuclear power plant conditions. The leakage tests are applied in pressurized systems or vacuum. Eddy Current testing is used in condensers and steam generators aiming to avoid leakage in these equipments. The spume testing for leakage detection in condenser pipelines - which operation - and hydrostatic testing for leakage detection through reaming with shutdown - were most efficients. The Helium testing applied in pressurized systems or submitted to vacuum systems presented satisfactory results. The Eddy Current testing in condenser and steam generator pipelines reached desired objective, reducing leakage in the first and preserving the integrity in the second. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. A Multi-Physics PWR Model for the Load Following

    OpenAIRE

    Muniglia , Mathieu; Do , Jean-Michel; Jean-Charles , Le Pallec; Grard , Hubert; Verel , Sébastien; David , S.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, a new model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is described. This model includes the description of the core as well as a simplified secondary loop: the goal is to reproduce a load-following type transient, where the output power of the plant is controlled by the electric grid. Consequently, the control systems are also modeled, as the control rods or the soluble boron. The reference power plant is a 1300MW electrical PWR, managed with the french G mode.

  1. Determination of the level of water in the core of reactors PWR using neutron detectors signal ex core; Determinacion del nivel del agua del nucleo de reactores PWR usando la senal de detectores neutronicos excore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, A.; Abarca, A.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    The level of water from the core provides relevant information of the neutronic and thermal hydraulic of the reactor as the power, k EFF and cooling capacity. In fact, this level monitoring can be used for prediction of LOCA and reduction of cooling that can cause damage to the core. There are several teams that measure a variety of parameters of the reactor, as opposed to the level of the water of the core. However, the detectors 'excore' measure fast neutrons which escape from the core and there are studies that demonstrate the existence of a relationship between them and the water level of the kernel due to the water shield. Therefore, a methodology has been developed to determine this relationship, using the Monte Carlo method using the MCNP code and apply variance reduction techniques based on the attached flow that is obtained using the method of discrete ordinates using code TORT. (Author)

  2. Fatigue-crack growth behavior of Type 347 stainless steels under simulated PWR water conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seokmin; Min, Ki-Deuk; Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Bong-Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) curve of stainless steel exists in ASME code section XI, but it is still not considering the environmental effects. The longer time nuclear power plant is operated, the more the environmental degradation issues of materials pop up. There are some researches on fatigue crack growth rate of S304 and S316, but researches of FCGR of S347 used in Korea nuclear power plant are insufficient. In this study, the FCGR of S347 stainless steel was evaluated in the PWR high temperature water conditions. The FCGRs of S347 stainless steel under pressurized-water conditions were measured by using compact-tension (CT) specimens at different levels of dissolved oxygen (DO) and frequency. 1. FCGRs of SS347 were slower than that in ASME XI and environmental effect did not occur when frequency was higher than 1Hz. 2. Fatigue crack growth is accelerated by corrosion fatigue and it is more severe when frequency is slower than 0.1Hz. 3. Increase of crack tip opening time increased corrosion fatigue and it deteriorated environmental fatigue properties.

  3. Scaling studies - PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneck, G.

    1983-05-01

    A RELAP 4/MOD 6 study was made based on the blowdown phase of the intermediate break experiment LOFT L5-1. The method was to set up a base model and to vary parametrically some areas where it is known or suspected that LOFT differs from a commercial PWR. The aim was not to simulate LOFT or a PWR exactly but to understand the influence of the following parameters on the thermohydraulic behaviour of the system and the clad temperature: stored heat in the downcomer (LOFT has rather large filler blocks in this part of the pressure vessel); bypass between downcomer and upper plenum; and core length. The results show that LOFT is prototypical for all calculated blowdowns. As the clad temperatures decrease with decreasing stored energy in the downcomer, increased bypass and increased core length, LOFT results seem to be realistic as long as realistic bypass sizes are considered; they are conservative in the two other areas. (author)

  4. From fundamental mode to the PWR type reactors blow off: physical analysis and contribution to the qualification of calculation tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghnouj, A.

    1996-01-01

    The work reported in this thesis centres on the resolution of reactor physics problems posed by the use in pressurised water reactors of fuel assemblies containing mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel (MOX). The work is essentially dependent on the results of the EPICURE experimental programme carried out between 1988 and 1994 in the reactor EOLE at the Cadarache Research Centre of the CEA. Our contribution to the validation of the computer program APOLLO2 and of its nuclear data library CEA93 shows that this code system satisfactorily calculates the neutronic characteristics of PWR cores. The validation of the experiments has provided useful information concerning the modifications required to be made to the library CEA93, which is based on the basic library of evaluated nuclear data, JEF2. This approach should now be extended to a wider basis of reactor experimental data. The studies of methods for calculating coolant voiding coefficients has made it possible to select suitable methods based on the available deterministic methods of transport theory in 2 ad 3 dimensions. These schemes have given results in satisfactory agreement with the measurements made in EPICURE programme for both local and total coolant voiding. It would now be worth while to validate the chosen methods by comparisons with calculations made using continuous energy Monte Carlo methods. (author)

  5. The integrated PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the integrated reactors concepts by a presentation of four reactors: PIUS, SIR, IRIS and CAREM. The core conception, the operating, the safety, the economical aspects and the possible users are detailed. From the performance of the classical integrated PWR, the necessity of new innovative fuels utilization, the research of a simplified design to make easier the safety and the KWh cost decrease, a new integrated reactor is presented: SCAR 600. (A.L.B.)

  6. CORES AND THE KINEMATICS OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, Tod R.

    2012-01-01

    I have combined the Emsellem et al. ATLAS 3D rotation measures of a large sample of early-type galaxies with Hubble Space Telescope based classifications of their central structure to characterize the rotation velocities of galaxies with cores. 'Core galaxies' rotate slowly, while 'power-law galaxies' (galaxies that lack cores) rotate rapidly, confirming the analysis of Faber et al. Significantly, the amplitude of rotation sharply discriminates between the two types in the –19 > M V > –22 domain over which the two types coexist. The slow rotation in the small set of core galaxies with M V > –20, in particular, brings them into concordance with the more massive core galaxies. The ATLAS 3D 'fast-rotating' and 'slow-rotating' early-type galaxies are essentially the same as power-law and core galaxies, respectively, or the Kormendy and Bender two families of elliptical galaxies based on rotation, isophote shape, and central structure. The ATLAS 3D fast rotators do include roughly half of the core galaxies, but their rotation amplitudes are always at the lower boundary of that subset. Essentially, all core galaxies have ATLAS 3D rotation amplitudes λ R e /2 ≤0.25, while all galaxies with λ R e /2 >0.25 and figure eccentricity >0.2 lack cores. Both figure rotation and the central structure of early-type galaxies should be used together to separate systems that appear to have formed from 'wet' versus 'dry' mergers.

  7. Study of the noise propagation in PWR with coupled codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Garcia-Fenoll, M.; Abarca, A.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.

    2011-01-01

    The in-core detectors provide signals of the power distribution monitoring for the Reactor Protection System (RPS). The advanced fuel management strategies (high exposure) and the power upratings for PWR reactor types have led to an increase in the noise amplitude in detectors signals. In the present work a study of the propagation along the reactor core and the effects on the core power evolution of a small perturbation on the moderator density, using the coupled code RELAP5-MOD3.3/PARCSv2.7 is presented. The purpose of these studies is to be able to reproduce and analyze the in-core detector simulated signals. (author)

  8. Analysis of radiation safety for Small Modular Reactor (SMR) on PWR-100 MWe type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udiyani, P. M.; Husnayani, I.; Deswandri; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Indonesia as an archipelago country, including big, medium and small islands is suitable to construction of Small Medium/Modular reactors. Preliminary technology assessment on various SMR has been started, indeed the SMR is grouped into Light Water Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactor, and Solid Cooled Reactor and from its site it is group into Land Based reactor and Water Based Reactor. Fukushima accident made people doubt about the safety of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), which impact on the public perception of the safety of nuclear power plants. The paper will describe the assessment of safety and radiation consequences on site for normal operation and Design Basis Accident postulation of SMR based on PWR-100 MWe in Bangka Island. Consequences of radiation for normal operation simulated for 3 units SMR. The source term was generated from an inventory by using ORIGEN-2 software and the consequence of routine calculated by PC-Cream and accident by PC Cosyma. The adopted methodology used was based on site-specific meteorological and spatial data. According to calculation by PC-CREAM 08 computer code, the highest individual dose in site area for adults is 5.34E-02 mSv/y in ESE direction within 1 km distance from stack. The result of calculation is that doses on public for normal operation below 1mSv/y. The calculation result from PC Cosyma, the highest individual dose is 1.92.E+00 mSv in ESE direction within 1km distance from stack. The total collective dose (all pathway) is 3.39E-01 manSv, with dominant supporting from cloud pathway. Results show that there are no evacuation countermeasure will be taken based on the regulation of emergency.

  9. Next generation PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiko; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Usui, Shuji

    2001-01-01

    Development of LWR for power generation in Japan has been intended to upgrade its reliability, safety, operability, maintenance and economy as well as to increase its capacity in order, since nuclear power generation for commercial use was begun on 1970, to steadily increase its generation power. And, in Japan, ABWR (advanced BWR) of the most promising LWR in the world, was already used actually and APWR (advanced PWR) with the largest output in the world is also at a step of its actual use. And, development of the APWR in Japan was begun on 1980s, and is at a step of plan on construction of its first machine at early of this century. However, by large change of social affairs, economy of nuclear power generation is extremely required, to be positioned at an APWR improved development reactor promoted by collaboration of five PWR generation companies and the Mitsubishi Electric Co., Ltd. Therefore, on its development, investigation on effect of change in social affairs on nuclear power stations was at first carried out, to establish a design requirement for the next generation PWR. Here were described on outline, reactor core design, safety concept, and safety evaluation of APWR+ and development of an innovative PWR. (G.K.)

  10. Use of standard spectra for the short life radionuclides and ratios for long life radionuclides in the wastes of EDF PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantes, B.; Bienvenu, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the type of declaration of radioactivity in the wastes of PWR type reactors park. Particularly, it insists on the justification of use of spectra for the declaration of short live radionuclides. It tackles the important developments of methods and measures of radiochemical analysis made by the Cea in order to determine the ratios to declare the long life radioisotopes. (N.C.)

  11. A small long-cycle PWR core design concept using fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) and UO2–ThO2 fuels for burning of TRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Gonghoon; Hong, Ser Gi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new small pressurized water reactor (PWR) core design concept using fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) particle fuels and UO 2 –ThO 2 fuels was studied for effective burning of transuranics from a view point of core neutronics. The core of this concept rate is 100 MWe. The core designs use the current PWR-proven technologies except for a mixed use of the FCM and UO 2 –ThO 2 fuel pins of low-enriched uranium. The significant burning of TRU is achieved with tri-isotropic particle fuels of FCM fuel pins, and the ThO 2 –UO 2 fuel pins are employed to achieve long-cycle length of ∼4 EFPYs (effective full-power year). Also, the effects of several candidate materials for reflector are analyzed in terms of core neutronics because the small core size leads to high sensitivity of reflector material on the cycle length. The final cores having 10 w/o SS303 and 90 w/o graphite reflector are shown to have high TRU burning rates of 33%–35% in FCM pins and significant net burning rates of 24%–25% in the total core with negative reactivity coefficients, low power peaking factors, and sufficient shutdown margins of control rods. (author)

  12. Monitoring of core barrel vibrations in WWER type reactor using out-of-reactor ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, K.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration of the core barrel is least desirable for safe operation of the PWR reactor. These mechanical vibrations are in correlation with the fluctuations of neutron flux density whose time and frequency analysis serves failure diagnosis. The mathematical model is described of the transfer of mechanical vibrations of the core barrel to neutron noise. Other steps are indicated indispensable for the application of the method of neutron noise analysis for in-service diagnostics of nuclear power plants. (Z.M.)

  13. Full MOX high burn-up PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Kugo, Teruhiko; Shimada, Shoichiro; Araya, Fumimasa; Ochiai, Masaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    As a part of conceptual investigation on advanced light water reactors for the future, a light water reactor with the high burn-up of 100 GWd/t, the long cycle operation of 3 years and the full MOX core is being studied, aiming at the improvement on economical aspects, the reduction of the spent fuel production, the utilization of Plutonium and so forth. The present report summarizes investigation on PWR-type reactors. The core with the increased moderation of the moderator-to-fuel volume ratio of 2.6 {approx} 3.0 has been proposed be such a core that accomplishes requirements mentioned above. Through the neutronic and the thermo-hydrodynamic evaluation, the performances of the core have been evaluated. Also, the safety designing is underway considering the reactor system with the passive safety features. (author)

  14. A methodology for evaluating weighting functions using MCNP and its application to PWR ex-core analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchia, Marco; Vasiliev, Alexander; Ferroukhi, Hakim; Pautz, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluation of neutron source importance for a given tally. • Assessment of ex-core detector response plus its uncertainty. • Direct use of neutron track evaluated by a Monte Carlo neutron transport code. - Abstract: The ex-core neutron detectors are commonly used to control reactor power in light water reactors. Therefore, it is relevant to understand the importance of a neutron source to the ex-core detectors response. In mathematical terms, this information is conveniently represented by the so called weighting functions. A new methodology based on the MCNP code for evaluating the weighting functions starting from the neutron history database is presented in this work. A simultaneous evaluation of the weighting functions in a user-given Cartesian coverage mesh is the main advantage of the method. The capability to generate weighting functions simultaneously in both spatial and energy ranges is the innovative part of this work. Then, an interpolation tool complements the methodology, allowing the generation of weighting functions up to the pin-by-pin fuel segment, where a direct evaluation is not possible due to low statistical precision. A comparison to reference results provides a verification of the methodology. Finally, an application to investigate the role of ex-core detectors spatial location and core burnup for a Swiss nuclear power plant is provided.

  15. SEDRIO/INCORE, an automatic optimal loading pattern search system for PWR NPP reload core using an expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Chunyu; Zhang Zongyao

    2003-01-01

    The expert knowledge library for Daya Bay and Qinshan phase II NPP has been established based on expert knowledge, and the reload core loading pattern heuristic search is performed. The in-core fuel management code system INCORE that has been used in engineering design is employed for neutron calculation, and loading pattern is evaluated by using of cycle length and core radial power peaking factor. The developed system SEDRIO/INCORE has been applied in cycle 4 for unit 2 of Daya Bay NPP and cycle 4 for Phase II in Qinshan NPP. The application demonstrated that the loading patterns obtained by SEDRIO/INCORE system are much better than reference ones from the view of the radial power peak and the cycle length

  16. Contribution to the modelling of flows and heat transfers during the reflooding phase of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, D.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis contributes to modelise thermohydraulic phenomena occuring in a pressurized water nuclear reactor core during the reflood phase of a LOCA. The reference accident and phenomena occuring during reflooding are described as well as flow regime and heat transfer proposed models. With these models, we developed a code to compute fluid conditions and fuel rods temperatures in a reactor core chanel. In order to test this code, results of computation are compared with experiments (FLECHT Skewed Tests) and a conclusion is drawn [fr

  17. Potential of thorium-based fuel cycle for PWR core to reduce plutonium and long-term toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Kim, Taek Kyum; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    The cross section libraries and calculation methods of the participants were inter-compared through the first stage benchmark calculation. The multiplication factor of unit cell benchmark are in good agreement, but there is significant discrepancies of 2.3 to 3.5 %k at BOC and at EOC between the calculated infinite multiplication factors of each participants for the assembly benchmark. Our results with HELIOS show a reasonable agreement with the others except the MTC value at EOC. To verify the potential of the thorium-based fuel to consume the plutonium and to reduce the radioactivity from the spent fuel, the conceptual core with ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} or MOX fuel were constructed. The composition and quantity of plutonium isotopes and the radioactivity level of spent fuel for conceptual cores were analyzed, and the neutronic characteristics of conceptual cores were also calculated. The nuclear characteristics for ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fueled core was similar to MOX fueled core, mainly due to the same seed fuel material, plutonium. For the capability of plutonium consumption, ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fuel can consume plutonium 2.1-2.4 times MOX fuel. The fraction of fissile plutonium in the spent ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fuel is more favorable in view of plutonium consumption and non-proliferation than MOX fuel. The radioactivity of spent ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium and MOX fuel batches were calculated. Since plutonium isotopes are dominant for the long-term radioactivity, ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium has almost the same level of radioactivity as in MOX fuel for a long-term perspective. (author). 22 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Core arrangement in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Masayuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the number of fuel assemblies whose locations are to be changed upon fuel exchange, as well as unify the power distribution in the core by arranging, in a chess board configuration, a plurality pattern of unit reactor lattices each containing fuel assemblies of different burnup degrees in orthogonal positions to each other. Constitution: A first pattern of unit reactor lattice is formed by disposing fuel assemblies of burnup degree 1 and fuel assemblies of burnup degree 3 at orthogonal positions to each other. A second pattern of unit reactor lattice is formed by disposing fuel assemblies of burnup degree 2 and fuel assemblies of burnup degree 1 at orthogonal positions to each other. The unit lattices each in such a dispositions are arranged in a chess board arrangement. Since, the fuel assemblies of the burnup degree 1 in the first pattern unit lattices proceed to the burnup degree 2 and the fuel assemblies of the burnup degree 2 in the second pattern unit lattices proceed to the burnup degree 3 up to the fuel exchange stage, fuel exchange and movement have only to be made, not for those fuel assemblies, but for another half of the fuel assemblies. (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. Core monitoring system for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To determine power distribution ON-line after the change of the insertion degree of control rods by the provision of means for calculating power change coefficient at each of the points due to the change in the insertion degree from the specific change of insertion degree and multiplying the same with the newest power distribution determined periodically by the diffusion calculation. Constitution: The monitoring system additionally comprises a calculation device for power change coefficient that calculates the power change coefficient in a fuel assembly adjacent to a control rod based on the data concerning the operation of the control rod, and a provisional power distribution calculation device that executes multiplication between the power distribution calculated in a periodical power distribution calculation device based on the calculation instruction and stored in the core and the power change coefficient from the power change coefficient calculation device and forecasts the provisional power distribution. Then, based on the result of the foregoing calculations, 2-dimensional power distribution, maximum temperature for the cladding tube of the specified fuel assembly, maximum temperature of pellets in the specified fuel assembly, maximum power density and the like are calculated in various display value calculation devices and displayed on a display device. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. PWR in-core nuclear fuel management optimization utilizing nodal (non-linear NEM) generalized perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G.I.; Turinsky, P.J.; Kropaczek, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The computational capability of efficiently and accurately evaluate reactor core attributes (i.e., k eff and power distributions as a function of cycle burnup) utilizing a second-order accurate advanced nodal Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) model has been developed. The GPT model is derived from the forward non-linear iterative Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) strategy, thereby extending its inherent savings in memory storage and high computational efficiency to also encompass GPT via the preservation of the finite-difference matrix structure. The above development was easily implemented into the existing coarse-mesh finite-difference GPT-based in-core fuel management optimization code FORMOSA-P, thus combining the proven robustness of its adaptive Simulated Annealing (SA) multiple-objective optimization algorithm with a high-fidelity NEM GPT neutronics model to produce a powerful computational tool used to generate families of near-optimum loading patterns for PWRs. (orig.)

  1. Study of the spatial dependence of neutronic flow oscillations caused by fluctuations thermohydraulics at the entrance of the core of a reactor PWR; Estudio de la dependencia espacial de las oscilaciones de flujo neutronico causadas por flucturaciones termohidraulicas a la entrada del nucleo de un reactor PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermejo, J. A.; Lopez, A.; Ortego, A.

    2014-07-01

    It presents a theoretical study on spatial dependence of flow oscillations neutronic caused by thermal hydraulics fluctuations at the entrance of the core of a PWR reactor. To simulate, with SIMULATE code - 3K different fluctuations thermohydraulics at the entrance to the core and the spatial dependence of the oscillations and is analyzed neutronic flow obtained at locations of neutron detectors. the work It is part of the r and d program initiated in CNAT to investigate the phenomenon of the noise neutronic. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARS) performance for a PWR-konvoi containment type with Gothic 8.1 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Alonso Conty, E.; Papini, D.; Jimenez Varas, G.

    2016-01-01

    The study presented in this work analyses the evaluation of Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners (PARs) performance for a PWR-Konvoi containment type as a result of an international collaboration between the Paul Scherrer institute (PSI) and the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM). The implementation study analyzes the size, location and number of the PARs to minimize the risk arising from a hydrogen release and its distribution in the containment building during a hypothetical severe accident. A detailed 3D model of containment was used for the simulations developed for the Gothic 8.1 code. In the first place, the hydrogen preferential pathways and points of hydrogen accumulation were studies and identified starting from the base case scenario without any mitigation measure. The severe accident scenario chosen is a fast release of hydrogen-steam mixture from hot leg creep rupture during SBO (Station Black-Out) accident. Secondly a configuration of PARs was simulated under the same conditions of the unmitigated case. The PAR configuration offered an improvement in the chosen accident scenario, decreasing the hydrogen concentration values below the flammability limit /hydrogen concentration below 7%) in all the containment compartments. (Author)

  3. Feasibility to convert an advanced PWR from UO2 to a mixed (U,Th)O2 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo de; Maiorino, José Rubens; Moreira, João Manoel de Losada; Santos, Thiago Augusto dos; Rossi, Pedro Carlos Russo

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the neutronics and thermal hydraulics feasibility to convert the UO2 core of the Westinghouse AP1000 in a (U-Th)O 2 core, rather than the traditional uranium dioxide, for the purpose of reducing long-lived actinides, especially plutonium, and generates a stock pile of 233 U, which could in the future be used in advanced fuel cycles, in a more sustainable process and taking advantage of the large stock of thorium available on the planet and especially in Brazil. The reactor chosen as reference was the AP1000, which is considered to be one of the most reliable and modern reactor of the current Generation III, and its similarity to the reactors already consolidated and used in Brazil for electric power generation. The results show the feasibility and potentiality of the concept, without the necessity of changes in the core of the AP1000, and even with advantages over this. The neutron calculations were made by the SERPENT code. The results provided a maximum linear power density lower than the AP1000, favoring safety. In addition, the delayed neutron fraction and the reactivity coefficients proved to be adequate to ensure the safety of the concept. The results show that a production of about 260 Kg of 233 U per cycle is possible, with a minimum production of fissile plutonium that favors the use of the concept in U-Th cycles. (author)

  4. Investigation into fuel pin reshuffling options in PWR in-core fuel management for enhancement of efficient use of nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daing, Aung Tharn, E-mail: atdaing@khu.ac.kr; Kim, Myung Hyun, E-mail: mhkim@khu.ac.kr

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • This paper discusses an alternative option, fuel pin reshuffling for maximization of cycle energy production. • The prediction results of isotopic compositions of each burnt pin are verified. • The operating performance is analyzed at equilibrium core with fuel pin reshuffling. • The possibility of reuse of spent fuel pins for reduction of fresh fuel assemblies is investigated. - Abstract: An alternative way to enhance efficient use of nuclear fuel is investigated through fuel pin reshuffling options within PWR fuel assembly (FA). In modeling FA with reshuffled pins, as prerequisite, the single pin calculation method is proposed to estimate the isotopic compositions of each pin of burnt FA in the core-wide environment. Subsequently, such estimation has been verified by comparing with the neutronic performance of the reference design. Two scenarios are concerned, i.e., first scenario was targeted on the improvement of the uniform flux spatial distribution and on the enhancement of neutron economy by simply reshuffling the existing fuel pins in once-burnt fuel assemblies, and second one was focused on reduction of fresh fuel loading and discharged fuel assemblies with more economic incentives by reusing some available spent fuel pins still carrying enough reactivity that are mechanically sound ascertained. In scenario-1, the operating time was merely somewhat increased for few minutes when treating eight FAs by keeping enough safety margins. The scenario-2 was proved to reduce four fresh FAs loading without largely losing any targeted parameters from the safety aspect despite loss of 14 effective full power days for operation at reference plant full rated power.

  5. Mathematical modelling of plant transients in the PWR for simulator purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartel, K.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter presents the results of the testing of anticipated and abnormal plant transients in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) of the type WWER 440 by means of the numerical simulation of 32 different, stationary and nonstationary, operational regimes. Topics considered include the formation of the PWR mathematical model, the physical approximation of the reactor core, the structure of the reactor core model, a mathematical approximation of the reactor model, the selection of numerical methods, and a computerized simulation system. The necessity of a PWR simulator in Czechoslovakia is justified by the present status and the outlook for the further development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power complex

  6. Integrated TRAC/MELPROG analysis of core damage from a severe feedwater transient in the Oconee-1 PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henninger, R.J.; Boyack, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    A postulated complete loss-of-feedwater event in the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor has been analyzed. With an initial version of the lonked TRAC and MELPROG codes, we have modeled the loss-of-feedwater event from initiation to the time of complete disruption of the core, which was calculated to occur by 6800 s. The highest structure temperatures otuside the vessel are on the flow path from the vessel to the pressurizer relief valve. Temperatures in excess of 1200 K could result in failure and depressurization of the primary system before vessel failure

  7. Study of coolant flow distribution within the PWR type reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, L.M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The thermohydraulic design of a pressurized water reactor requires the determination of the coolant flow distributions within the reactor vessel, particulary at the core inlet. In this work it is proposed the study of this flow, using potencial flow theory governed by Laplace's equation, nabla 2 φ = O. The solution of the potential field is obtained by the finite element method, which simplifies considerably the treatment of complex geometrical configurations. The equation is solved by the finite element computer code ANSYS, developed and licensed for structural and thermal analysis by using the analogy between steady state heat transfer equation without heat generation, nabla 2 T=O, and Laplace's equation of the velocity potential. The proposed method has been applied to a commercial reactor, and the results are consistent with the available experimental data. (author) [pt

  8. Development of fabrication process of upper nozzle BIBLIS type of PWR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, O.; Lorenzo, D.F.R.

    1982-01-01

    Process and parameters of milling and welding of a upper nozzle BIBLIS type prototype are presented. Milling process, cutting tools studies, production devices and inspection were developed and researched. (author) [pt

  9. Babcock and Wilcox advanced PWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulynych, G.E.; Lemon, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Babcock and Wilcox 600 MWe PWR design is discussed. Main features of the new B-600 design are improvements in reactor system configuration, glandless coolant pumps, safety features, core design and steam generators

  10. Design and preliminary analysis of in-vessel core catcher made of high-temperature ceramics material in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hong; Ma Li; Wang Junrong; Zhou Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    In order to protect the interior wall of pressure vessel from melting, as an additional way to external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC), a kind of in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) made of high-temperature ceramics material was designed. Through the high-temperature and thermal-resistance characteristic of IVCC, the distributing of heat flux was optimized. The results show that the downward average heat flux from melt in ceramic layer reduces obviously and the interior wall of pressure vessel doesn't melt, keeping its integrity perfectly. Increasing of upward heat flux from metallic layer makes the upper plenum structure's temperature ascend, but the temperature doesn't exceed its melting point. In conclusion, the results indicate the potential feasibility of IVCC made of high-temperature ceramics material. (authors)

  11. 'Kazmer' a complex noise diagnostic system for 1000 MWe PWR WWER type nuclear power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.

    1992-06-01

    Noise diagnostic systems have previously been developed and installed for the WWER-440 type reactors at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary. Based on the experiences, the system has been extended and modified for use in 1000 MWe, WWER-1000 type units. KAZMER consists of three subsystem, the KARD reactor noise diagnostic system, ARGUS vibration monitoring system for rotation machinery, and ALMOS acoustic monitoring system. The installation of the KAZMER system at the Kalinin Nuclear Power Station, Russia, and the first operational experiences are outlined. (R.P.) 15 refs.; 9 figs

  12. High temperature filtration of radioactivable corrosion products in the primary circuit of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.

    1976-01-01

    A effective limitation to the deposition of radioactive corrosion products in the core of a reactor at power operation, is to be obtained by filtering the water of the primary circuit at a flow rate upper than 1% of the coolant flow rate. However, in view of accounting for more important release of corrosion products during the reactor start-up and also for some possible variations in the efficiency of the system, it is better that the flow rate to be treated by the cleaning circuit is stated at 5%. Filtration must be effected at the temperature of the primary circuit and preferably on each loop. To this end, the feasibility of electromagnetic filtration or filtration through a deep bed of granulated graphite has been studied. The on-loop tests effected on each filter gave efficiencies and yields respectively upper than 90% and 99% for magnetite and ferrite particles in suspension in water at 250 deg C. Such results confirm the interest lying in high temperature filtration and lead to envisage its application to reactors [fr

  13. In-Core Fuel Managements for PWRs: Investigation on solution for optimal utilization of PWR fuel through the use of fuel assemblies with differently enriched 235U fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caprioli, Sara

    2004-04-01

    A possibility for more efficient use of the nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor is investigated. The alternative proposed here consists of the implementation of PWR fuel assemblies with differently enriched 235 U fuel pins. This possibility is examined in comparison with the standard assembly design. The comparison is performed both in terms of single assembly performance and in the terms of nuclear reactor core performance and fuel utility. For the evaluation of the actual performance of the new assembly types, 5 operated fuel core sequences of R3 (Ringhals' third unit), for the period 1999 - 2004 (cycles 17 - 21) were examined. For every cycle, the standard fresh fuel assemblies have been identified and taken as reference cases for the study of the new type of assemblies with differently enriched uranium rods. In every cycle, assemblies with and without burnable absorber are freshly loaded into the core. The axial enrichment distribution is kept uniform, allowing for a radial (planar) enrichment level distribution only. At an assembly level, it has been observed that the implementation of the alternative enrichment configuration can lead to lower and flatter internal peaking factor distribution with respect to the uniformly enriched reference assemblies. This can be achieved by limiting the enrichment levels distribution to a rather narrow range. The highest enrichment level chosen has the greatest impact on the power distribution of the assemblies. As it increases, the enrichment level drives the internal peaking factor to greater values than in the reference assemblies. Generally, the highest enrichment level that would allow an improvement in the power performance of the assembly lies between 3.95 w/o and 4.17 w/o. The highest possible enrichment level depends on the average enrichment of the overall assembly, which is kept constant to the average enrichment of the reference assemblies. The improvements that can be obtained at this level are rather

  14. Development of an engineering simulator for integral type PWR for nuclear ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Teruo; Shimazaki, Junya; Nakazawa, Toshio

    2000-01-01

    JAERI has developed a real-time engineering simulator for the integral type reactor MRX (Marine Reactor X) of power 100 MWt to evaluate the design and operational performance and to study highly automatic operations of a reactor plant. Marine reactor is operated under the conditions of pitching and rolling and load change, in comparison with a reactor for a land-based generating plant. And the MRX has systems with structural features, such as water-filled containment vessel, once-through type steam generator and emergency decay heat removal system. Considerations are paid to take these operational conditions and structural features into the simulation model. It is shown that the simulated results are consistent with the planned design and operational performance, and on the other hand present us some technical issues to be investigated in the design specifications. (author)

  15. In-vessel core melt retention by RPV external cooling for high power PWR. MAAP 4 analysis on a LBLOCA scenario without SI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognet, C.; Gandrille, P.

    1999-01-01

    In-, ex-vessel reflooding or both simultaneously can be envisaged as Accident Management Measures to stop a Severe Accident (SA) in vessel. This paper addresses the possibility of in-vessel core melt retention by RPV external flooding for a high power PWR (4250 MWth). The reactor vessel is assumed to have no lower head penetration and thermal insulation is neglected. The effects of external cooling of high power density debris, where the margin for such a strategy is low, are investigated with the MAAP4 code. MAAP4 code is used to verify the system capability to flood the reactor pit and to predict simultaneously the corium relocation into the lower head with the thermal and mechanical response of the RPV in transient conditions. The corium pool cooling and holding in the RPV lower head is analysed. Attention is paid to the internal heat exchanges between corium components. This paper focuses particularly the heat transfer between oxidic and metallic phases as well as between the molten metallic phase and the RPV wall of utmost importance for challenging the RPV integrity in vicinity of the metallic phase. The metal segregation has a decisive influence upon the attack of the vessel wall due to a very strong peaking of the lateral flux ('focusing effect'). Thus, the dynamics of the formation of the metallic layer characterized by a growing inventory of steel, both from a partial vessel ablation and the degradation of internals steel structures by the radiative heat flux from the debris, is displayed. The analysed sequence is a surge line rupture near the hot leg (LBLOCA) leading to the fastest accident progression

  16. Nondestructive testing of PWR type fuel rods by eddy currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.; Marchand, L.

    1985-02-01

    The Saclay Reactor Department has developed a nondestructive test bench, now installed above channel 1 of the OSIRIS reactor. As part of investigations into the dynamics of PWR fuel degradation, a number of fuel rods underwent metrological and eddy current inspection, after irradiation [fr

  17. Study of behaviour of radioactive iodine inorganic compounds in PWR type reactor loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alm, M.; Johannsen, K.-H.; Dreyer, R.

    1980-01-01

    Compounds of radioactive iodine and its distribution between water and vapour depending on temperature, pressure and water regime of reactor coolant with water under pressure are investigated. The field of variation of parameters indicated is widened as compared with operating reactor parameters (pressure 2-14 MPa, temperature 210-335 deg C). Distribution of iodine compounds has been studied by a statistical method. For WWER-type reactors the following conclusions have been drawn: radioactive iodine in water and vapor in the first and second loops exists in the form of iodide, radioactive iodine concentration in water vapour at constant temperature and pressure mainly is depended on water pH value, radioactive iodine solubility in water vapor at normal parameters of the reactor first loop can be approximately calculated by the equation: Ksub(d)=Csub(g)/Csub(l)=(rhosub(g)/rhosub(l))sup(2), where Ksub(d) is a coefficient of solid distribution between water and vapour, rho is density c is concentration [ru

  18. Development of core sampling technique for ITER Type B radwaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. G.; Hong, K. P.; Oh, W. H.; Park, M. C.; Jung, S. H.; Ahn, S. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Type B radwaste (intermediate level and long lived radioactive waste) imported from ITER vacuum vessel are to be treated and stored in basement of hot cell building. The Type B radwaste treatment process is composed of buffer storage, cutting, sampling/tritium measurement, tritium removal, characterization, pre-packaging, inspection/decontamination, and storage etc. The cut slices of Type B radwaste components generated from cutting process undergo sampling process before and after tritium removal process. The purpose of sampling is to obtain small pieces of samples in order to investigate the tritium content and concentration of Type B radwaste. Core sampling, which is the candidates of sampling technique to be applied to ITER hot cell, is available for not thick (less than 50 mm) metal without use of coolant. Experimented materials were SS316L and CuCrZr in order to simulate ITER Type B radwaste. In core sampling, substantial secondary wastes from cutting chips will be produced unavoidably. Thus, core sampling machine will have to be equipped with disposal system such as suction equipment. Core sampling is considered an unfavorable method for tool wear compared to conventional drilling.

  19. Fuel management and core design code systems for pressurized water reactor neutronic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnert, C.; Arayones, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    A package of connected code systems for the neutronic calculations relevant in fuel management and core design has been developed and applied for validation to the startup tests and first operating cycle of a 900MW (electric) PWR. The package includes the MARIA code system for the modeling of the different types of PWR fuel assemblies, the CARMEN code system for detailed few group diffusion calculations for PWR cores at operating and burnup conditions, and the LOLA code system for core simulation using onegroup nodal theory parameters explicitly calculated from the detailed solutions

  20. Study on thermal-hydraulics during a PWR reflood phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tadashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    In-core thermal-hydraulics during a PWR reflood phase following a large-break LOCA are quite unique in comparison with two-phase flow which has been studied widely in previous researches, because the geometry of the flow path is complicated (bundle geometry) and water is at extremely low superficial velocity and almost under stagnant condition. Hence, some phenomena realized during a PWR reflood phase are not understood enough and appropriate analytical models have not been developed, although they are important in a viewpoint of reactor safety evaluation. Therefore, author investigated some phenomena specified as important issues for quantitative prediction, i.e. (1) void fraction in a bundle during a PWR reflood phase, (2) effect of radial core power profile on reflood behavior, (3) effect of combined emergency core coolant injection on reflood behavior, and (4) the core separation into two thermal-hydraulically different regions and the in-core flow circulation behavior observed during a combined injection PWR reflood phase. Further, author made analytical models for these specified issues, and succeeded to predict reflood behaviors at representative types of PWRs, i.e.cold leg injection PWRs and Combined injection PWRs, in good accuracy. Above results were incorporated into REFLA code which is developed at JAERI, and they improved accuracy in prediction and enlarged applicability of the code. In the present study, models were intended to be utilized in a practical use, and hence these models are simplified ones. However, physical understanding on the specified issues in the present study is basic and principal for reflood behavior, and then it is considered to be used in a future advanced code development and improvement. (author). 110 refs.

  1. PACTEL and PWR PACTEL Test Facilities for Versatile LWR Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virpi Kouhia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes construction and experimental research activities with two test facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL. The PACTEL facility, comprising of reactor pressure vessel parts, three loops with horizontal steam generators, a pressurizer, and emergency core cooling systems, was designed to model the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of VVER-440-type reactors. The facility has been utilized in miscellaneous applications and experiments, for example, in the OECD International Standard Problem ISP-33. PACTEL has been upgraded and modified on a case-by-case basis. The latest facility configuration, the PWR PACTEL facility, was constructed for research activities associated with the EPR-type reactor. A significant design basis is to utilize certain parts of PACTEL, and at the same time, to focus on a proper construction of two new loops and vertical steam generators with an extensive instrumentation. The PWR PACTEL benchmark exercise was launched in 2010 with a small break loss-of-coolant accident test as the chosen transient. Both facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL, are maintained fully operational side by side.

  2. PACTEL and PWR PACTEL Test Facilities for Versatile LWR Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virpi Kouhia, V.; Purhonen, H.; Riikonen, V.; Puustinen, M.; Kyrki-Rajamaki, R.; Vihavainen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes construction and experimental research activities with two test facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL. The PACTEL facility, comprising of reactor pressure vessel parts, three loops with horizontal steam generators, a pressurizer, and emergency core cooling systems, was designed to model the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of VVER-440-type reactors. The facility has been utilized in miscellaneous applications and experiments, for example, in the OECD International Standard Problem ISP-33. PACTEL has been upgraded and modified on a case-by-case basis. The latest facility configuration, the PWR PACTEL facility, was constructed for research activities associated with the EPR-type reactor. A significant design basis is to utilize certain parts of PACTEL, and at the same time, to focus on a proper construction of two new loops and vertical steam generators with an extensive instrumentation. The PWR PACTEL benchmark exercise was launched in 2010 with a small break loss-of-coolant accident test as the chosen transient. Both facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL, are maintained fully operational side by side.

  3. Genomic variation in Salmonella enterica core genes for epidemiological typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Rundsten, Carsten Friis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Technological advances in high throughput genome sequencing are making whole genome sequencing (WGS) available as a routine tool for bacterial typing. Standardized procedures for identification of relevant genes and of variation are needed to enable comparison between studies and over...... genomes and evaluate their value as typing targets, comparing whole genome typing and traditional methods such as 16S and MLST. A consensus tree based on variation of core genes gives much better resolution than 16S and MLST; the pan-genome family tree is similar to the consensus tree, but with higher...... that there is a positive selection towards mutations leading to amino acid changes. Conclusions: Genomic variation within the core genome is useful for investigating molecular evolution and providing candidate genes for bacterial genome typing. Identification of genes with different degrees of variation is important...

  4. A new type of In-core sensor validation outline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figedy, S.

    2006-01-01

    In this a new type of in-core sensor validation method is outlined, which is based on combination of correlation coefficients and mutual information indices. First experience with this approach is described and further improvements to enhance the outcome reliability are proposed namely through computational intelligence techniques (Authors)

  5. Research of natural resources saving by design studies of Pressurized Light Water Reactors and High Conversion PWR cores with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, V.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of innovative neutronic conception of Pressurized Light Water Reactors (PWR) of 3. generation, saving of natural resources is of paramount importance for sustainable nuclear energy production. This study consists in the one hand to design high Conversion Reactors exploiting mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and in the other hand, to elaborate multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233 U, in order to maximize natural resources economy. This study has two main objectives: first the design of High Conversion PWR (HCPWR) with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and secondly the setting up of multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233 U, to better natural resources economy. The approach took place in four stages. Two ways of introducing thorium into PWR have been identified: the first is with low moderator to fuel volume ratios (MR) and ThPuO 2 fuel, and the second is with standard or high MR and ThUO 2 fuel. The first way led to the design of under-moderated HCPWR following the criteria of high 233 U production and low plutonium consumption. This second step came up with two specific concepts, from which multi-recycling strategies have been elaborated. The exclusive production and recycling of 233 U inside HCPWR limits the annual economy of natural uranium to approximately 30%. It was brought to light that the strong need in plutonium in the HCPWR dedicated to 233 U production is the limiting factor. That is why it was eventually proposed to study how the production of 233 U within PWR (with standard MR), from 2020. It was shown that the anticipated production of 233 U in dedicated PWR relaxes the constraint on plutonium inventories and favours the transition toward a symbiotic reactor fleet composed of both PWR and HCPWR loaded with thorium fuel. This strategy is more adapted and leads to an annual economy of natural uranium of about 65%. (author) [fr

  6. Towards a PSA harmonization French-Belgian comparison of the level 1 PSA for two similar PWR types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, P.; Corenwinder, F.; Lanore, J.M.; Gryffroy, D.; Gelder, P. de; Hulsmans, M.

    2002-06-01

    In the framework of the cooperation between French and Belgian regulatory authorities, a PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) comparison exercise has been carried out for several years. This comparison deals with two PSA level 1 studies for internal events, performed for both power and shutdown states: the French PSA of the 900 MWe-series PWR, and the Belgian PSA of the Tihange 1 PWR, which both concern PWRs with a similar Framatome design. The purpose of this paper is to describe the PSA comparison methodology and to present, in a qualitative way, an overview of the insights obtained up to now. It also shows that such an 'a posteriori' benchmark exercise turns out to be a step towards PSA harmonization, and gives more confidence in the results of plant specific PSA when used for applications like precursor analysis or evaluations of importance to safety. (authors)

  7. Expert system for assisting the repair operations on the control racks of the control rods assembly in a 900 MW PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, B.; Doutre, J.L.; Franco, A.

    1990-01-01

    The expert system presented was developed for assisting the repair operations on the control equipment of the control rod assembly in a PWR type reactor. The expert system allows the representation of expert knowledge and diagnostic reasoning. The objective of the expert system is to achieve the most precise diagnostic and localizing of the breakdown elements, by processing the data acquired during breakdown. The development steps, the structure and the applications of the expert system are summarized. The expert system operates in an IBM PC equipped with a AMAIA 8 Mo card. A time schedule of 18 months is predicted [fr

  8. Application of the perturbation theory-differential formalism-for sensitivity analysis in steam generators of PWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.M.G.; Andrade Lima, F.R. de; Alvim, A.C.M.

    1987-06-01

    An homogeneous model which simulates the stationary behavior of steam generators of PWR type reactors and uses the differential formalism of perturbation theory for analysing sensibility of linear and non-linear responses, is presented. The PERGEVAP computer code to calculate the temperature distribution in the steam generator and associated importance function, is developed. The code also evaluates effects of the thermohydraulic parameter variation on selected functionals. The obtained results are compared with results obtained by GEVAP computer code . (M.C.K.) [pt

  9. Application of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique to the thermal-hydraulics project of a PWR reactor core in reduced scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Junior, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2008-09-01

    The reduced scale models design have been employed by engineers from several different industries fields such as offshore, spatial, oil extraction, nuclear industries and others. Reduced scale models are used in experiments because they are economically attractive than its own prototype (real scale) because in many cases they are cheaper than a real scale one and most of time they are also easier to build providing a way to lead the real scale design allowing indirect investigations and analysis to the real scale system (prototype). A reduced scale model (or experiment) must be able to represent all physical phenomena that occurs and further will do in the real scale one under operational conditions, e.g., in this case the reduced scale model is called similar. There are some different methods to design a reduced scale model and from those two are basic: the empiric method based on the expert's skill to determine which physical measures are relevant to the desired model; and the differential equation method that is based on a mathematical description of the prototype (real scale system) to model. Applying a mathematical technique to the differential equation that describes the prototype then highlighting the relevant physical measures so the reduced scale model design problem may be treated as an optimization problem. Many optimization techniques as Genetic Algorithm (GA), for example, have been developed to solve this class of problems and have also been applied to the reduced scale model design problem as well. In this work, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique is investigated as an alternative optimization tool for such problem. In this investigation a computational approach, based on particle swarm optimization technique (PSO), is used to perform a reduced scale two loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, considering 100% of nominal power operation on a forced flow cooling circulation and non-accidental operating conditions. A performance comparison

  10. Enlarged level-1 PSA in regard to assessment of cross-cutting effects of hazards and consideration of their uncertainties for a KONVOI type PWR reference plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, C.; Hofer, E.; Kloos, M.; Kuntze, W.; Liemersdorf, H.; Roewekamp, M.; Schwinges, B.; Tuerschmann, M.; Brenig, H.W.; Sommerfeld, H.

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of supporting BMU regarding generic questions concerning probabilistic safety analyses for nuclear power plants as well as regarding evaluation of nuclear specific standards and guidelines the significant contributions to damage states resulting from plant internal and external hazards had to be estimated for a German Konvoi type PWR reference plant. Furthermore, the suitability of the available methods for assessing these hazards should be checked. In the report presented hereafter, only the plant internal hazard Fire out of all the hazards to be considered was probabilistically analysed in detail First of all, screening analyses were carried out for identifying relevant plant areas and to assess their respective efficiency for a proper selection procedure. For a selected, plant area identified to be relevant (area of the cable distributions inside the reactor containment) an indepth analysis was performed. This analysis included all the steps of the probabilistic assessment, starting from the estimation of the fire occurrence frequency, followed by investigations on the fire effects and fire propagation, up to the determination of the fire induced failure probabilities of safety related equipment including the consequences on systems. In addition, the analyses contained particular uncertainty and sensitivity studies, for which aleatoric and epistemic uncertainties were distinguished. As a result of the screening analyses as well as of the in-depth investigations regarding the fire hazard, no significant contributions for the total frequencies for system, core, or plant damage states have been found. In this context, it has to be noticed that the study presented hereafter does not cover a complete fire PSA. With respect to assessing the available methods it has been found that improvements concerning the screening process as well as concerning the probabilistic fire event tree analyses are necessary. With regard to further hazards, a site specific

  11. In-Core Fuel Managements for PWRs: Investigation on solution for optimal utilization of PWR fuel through the use of fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Sara

    2004-04-01

    A possibility for more efficient use of the nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor is investigated. The alternative proposed here consists of the implementation of PWR fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins. This possibility is examined in comparison with the standard assembly design. The comparison is performed both in terms of single assembly performance and in the terms of nuclear reactor core performance and fuel utility. For the evaluation of the actual performance of the new assembly types, 5 operated fuel core sequences of R3 (Ringhals' third unit), for the period 1999 - 2004 (cycles 17 - 21) were examined. For every cycle, the standard fresh fuel assemblies have been identified and taken as reference cases for the study of the new type of assemblies with differently enriched uranium rods. In every cycle, assemblies with and without burnable absorber are freshly loaded into the core. The axial enrichment distribution is kept uniform, allowing for a radial (planar) enrichment level distribution only. At an assembly level, it has been observed that the implementation of the alternative enrichment configuration can lead to lower and flatter internal peaking factor distribution with respect to the uniformly enriched reference assemblies. This can be achieved by limiting the enrichment levels distribution to a rather narrow range. The highest enrichment level chosen has the greatest impact on the power distribution of the assemblies. As it increases, the enrichment level drives the internal peaking factor to greater values than in the reference assemblies. Generally, the highest enrichment level that would allow an improvement in the power performance of the assembly lies between 3.95 w/o and 4.17 w/o. The highest possible enrichment level depends on the average enrichment of the overall assembly, which is kept constant to the average enrichment of the reference assemblies. The improvements that can be obtained at this level are

  12. FLUOLE-2: An Experiment for PWR Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiollay Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FLUOLE-2 is a benchmark-type experiment dedicated to 900 and 1450 MWe PWR vessels surveillance dosimetry. This two-year program started in 2014 and will end in 2015. It will provide precise experimental data for the validation of the neutron spectrum propagation calculation from core to vessel. It is composed of a square core surrounded by a stainless steel baffe and internals: PWR barrel is simulated by steel structures leading to different steel-water slides; two steel components stand for a surveillance capsule holder and for a part of the pressure vessel. Measurement locations are available on the whole experimental structure. The experimental knowledge of core sources will be obtained by integral gamma scanning measurements directly on fuel pins. Reaction rates measured by calibrated fission chambers and a large set of dosimeters will give information on the neutron energy and spatial distributions. Due to the low level neutron flux of EOLE ZPR a special, high efficiency, calibrated gamma spectrometry device will be used for some dosimeters, allowing to measure an activity as low as 7. 10−2 Bq per sample. 103mRh activities will be measured on an absolute calibrated X spectrometry device. FLUOLE-2 experiment goal is to usefully complete the current experimental benchmarks database used for the validation of neutron calculation codes. This two-year program completes the initial FLUOLE program held in 2006–2007 in a geometry representative of 1300 MWe PWR.

  13. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

  14. Estimating probable flaw distributions in PWR steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, J.A.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes methods for estimating the number and size distributions of flaws of various types in PWR steam generator tubes. These estimates are needed when calculating the probable primary to secondary leakage through steam generator tubes under postulated accidents such as severe core accidents and steam line breaks. The paper describes methods for two types of predictions: (1) the numbers of tubes with detectable flaws of various types as a function of time, and (2) the distributions in size of these flaws. Results are provided for hypothetical severely affected, moderately affected and lightly affected units. Discussion is provided regarding uncertainties and assumptions in the data and analyses

  15. Fuel assembly for FBR type reactor and reactor core thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a fuel assembly to be loaded to a reactor core of a large sized FBR type reactor, in which a coolant density coefficient can be reduced without causing power peaking in the peripheral region of neutron moderators loaded in the reactor core. Namely, the fuel assembly for the FBR type reactor comprises a plurality of fission product-loaded fuel rods and a plurality of fertile material-loaded fuel rods and one or more rods loading neutron moderators. In this case, the plurality of fertile material-loaded fuel rods are disposed to the peripheral region of the neutron moderator-loaded rods. The plurality of fission product-loaded fuel rods are disposed surrounding the peripheral region of the plurality of fertile material-loaded fuel rods. The neutron moderator comprises zirconium hydride, yttrium hydride and calcium hydride. The fission products are mixed oxide fuels. The fertile material comprises depleted uranium or natural uranium. (I.S.)

  16. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  17. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  18. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs

  19. Operating function tests of the PWR type RHR pump for engineering safety system under simulated strong ground excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uga, Takeo; Shiraki, Kazuhiro; Homma, Toshiaki; Inazuka, Hisashi; Nakajima, Norifumi.

    1979-08-01

    Results are described of operating function verification tests of a PWR RHR pump during an earthquake. Of the active reactor components, the PWR residual heat removal pump was chosen from view points of aseismic classification, safety function, structural complexity and past aseismic tests. Through survey of the service conditions and structure of this pump, seismic test conditions such as acceleration level, simulated seismic wave form and earthquake duration were decided for seismicity of the operating pump. Then, plans were prepared to evaluate vibration chracteristics of the pump and to estimate its aseismic design margins. Subsequently, test facility and instrumentation system were designed and constructed. Experimental results could thus be acquired on vibration characteristics of the pump and its dynamic behavior during different kinds and levels of simulated earthquake. In conclusion: (1) Stiffeners attached to the auxiliary system piping do improve aseismic performance of the pump. (2) The rotor-shaft-bearing system is secure unless it is subjected to transient disturbunces having high frequency content. (3) The motor and pump casing having resonance frequencies much higher than frequency content of the seismic wave show only small amplifications. (4) The RHR pump possesses an aseismic design margin more than 2.6 times the expected ultimate earthquake on design basis. (author)

  20. Sensitivity analysis for thermo-hydraulics model of a Westinghouse type PWR. Verification of the simulation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahani, Aref Zarnooshe [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch; Yousefpour, Faramarz [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hoseyni, Seyed Mohsen [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Basic Sciences; Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Young Researchers and Elite Club

    2017-07-15

    Development of a steady-state model is the first step in nuclear safety analysis. The developed model should be qualitatively analyzed first, then a sensitivity analysis is required on the number of nodes for models of different systems to ensure the reliability of the obtained results. This contribution aims to show through sensitivity analysis, the independence of modeling results to the number of nodes in a qualified MELCOR model for a Westinghouse type pressurized power plant. For this purpose, and to minimize user error, the nuclear analysis software, SNAP, is employed. Different sensitivity cases were developed by modification of the existing model and refinement of the nodes for the simulated systems including steam generators, reactor coolant system and also reactor core and its connecting flow paths. By comparing the obtained results to those of the original model no significant difference is observed which is indicative of the model independence to the finer nodes.

  1. PWR burnable absorber evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Weader, R.J.; Malone, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative neurotic efficiency and fuel cycle cost benefits of PWR burnable absorbers. Establishment of reference low-leakage equilibrium in-core fuel management plans for 12-, 18- and 24-month cycles. Review of the fuel management impact of the integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbium and gadolinium. Calculation of the U 3 O 8 , UF 6 , SWU, fuel fabrication, and burnable absorber requirements for the defined fuel management plans. Estimation of fuel cycle costs of each fuel management plan at spot market and long-term market fuel prices. Estimation of the comparative savings of the different burnable absorbers in dollar equivalent per kgU of fabricated fuel. (author)

  2. Probes for inspections of heat exchanges installed at nuclear power plants type PWR by eddy current method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Alonso F.O.

    2007-01-01

    From all non destructive examination methods usable to perform integrity evaluation of critical equipment installed at nuclear power plants (NPP), eddy current test (ET) may be considered the most important one, when examining heat exchangers. For its application, special probes and reference calibration standards are employed. In pressurized water reactor (PWR) NPPs, a particularly critical equipment is the steam generator (SG), a huge heat exchanger that contains thousands of U-bend thin wall tubes. Due to its severe working conditions (pressure and temperature), that component is periodically examined by means of ET. In this paper a revision of the operating fundamentals of the main ET probes, used to perform SG inspections is presented. (author)

  3. The power control system of the Siemens-KWU nuclear power station of the PWR [pressurized water reactors] type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    Starting with the first nuclear power plant constructed by Siemens AG of the pressurized light water reactor line (PWR), the Obrigheim Nuclear Power Plant (340 MWe net), until the recently constructed plants of 1300 MWe (named 'Konvoi'), the design of the power control system of the plant was continuously improved and optimized using the experience gained in the operation of the earlier generations of plants. The reactor power control system of the Siemens - KWU nuclear power plants is described. The features of this design and of the Siemens designed heavy water power plants (PHWR) Atucha I and Atucha II are mentioned. Curves showing the behaviour of the controlled variables during load changes obtained from plant tests are also shown. (Author) [es

  4. Safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointner, W.; Broecker, A.

    2012-01-01

    The report on safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release covers the following issues: assessment of the relevant status for PWR, evaluation of the national and international (USA, Canada, France) status, actualization of recommendations, transferability from PWR to BWR. Generic studies on the core cooling capability in case of insulation material release in BWR-type reactors were evaluated.

  5. Emergency core cooling system for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamano, Toyomi; Fukutomi, Shigeki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable elimination of decay heat in an LMFBR type reactor by securing natural cycling force in any state and securing reactor core cooling capacity even when both an external power supply and an emergency power supply are failed in emergency case. Method: Heat insulating material portion for surrounding a descent tube of a steam drum provided at high position for obtaining necessary flow rate for flowing resistance is removed from heat transmitting surface of a recycling type steam generator to provide a heat sink. That is, when both an external power supply and an emergency power supply are failed in emergency, the heat insulator at part of a steam generator recycling loop is removed to produce natural cycling force between it and the heat transmitting portion of the steam generator as a heat source for the heat sink so as to secure the flow rate of the recycling loop. When the power supply is failed in emergency, the heat removing capacity of the steam generator is secured so as to remove the decay heat produced in the reactor core. (Yoshihara, H.)

  6. Assessment of the uncertainties of COBRA sub-channel calculations by using a PWR type rod bundle and the OECD NEA UAM and the PSBT benchmarks data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panka, I.; Kereszturi, A.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of the uncertainties of COBRA-IIIC thermal-hydraulic analyses of rod bundles is performed for a 5-by-5 bundle representing a PWR fuel assembly. In the first part of the paper the modeling uncertainties are evaluated in the term of the uncertainty of the turbulent mixing factor using the OECD NEA/NRC PSBT benchmark data. After that the uncertainties of the COBRA calculations are discussed performing Monte-Carlo type statistical analyses taking into account the modeling uncertainties and other uncertainties prescribed in the OECD NEA UAM benchmark specification. Both steady-state and transient cases are investigated. The target quantities are the uncertainties of the void distribution, the moderator density, the moderator temperature and the DNBR. We will see that - beyond the uncertainties of the geometry and the boundary conditions - it is very important to take into account the modeling uncertainties in case of bundle or sub-channel thermo-hydraulic calculations.

  7. Water-hammer experimental set-up and water-hammer experimental study for new types of check valve applied to PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanxun.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a self-designed constant temperature water-hammer shock test rig with stainless steel loop in which deionized water is used as working medium. To conduct water-hammer shock simulation tests for the countercurrent phenomenon occurred in the process of shutting, stopping, parallelling and switching the coolant loops of nuclear reactor, a specially designed four-way switching valve and its pneumatic mechanism are used. Water-hammer experimental study is performed for two types of PWR's nonshock check valve with diameter of 150 mm and 200 mm simultaneously. Transient performance of the shock waves, magnitude of their peaks and durations of their fluctuation, is obtained. Some analyses for existing calculational method on water-hammer are made

  8. Static core performance simulator SCOPERS-2 for light water reactors and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooke, Takanori; Itagaki, Masafumi; Osanai, Masao.

    1979-05-01

    SCOPERS-2 is a generalized FLARE-type computer program simulating both PWR and BWR. Features and the calculation model (generalized FLARE-type nodal equation, migration kernel, etc.) are first described. A calculation is then given of the core of nuclear ship MUTSU (PWR) for an example of the code application. The power distribution calculated by SCOPERS-2 and by CITATION (3-dimensional diffusion code) are in good agreement. (author)

  9. Design of the control room of the N4-type PWR: main features and feedback operating experience; La salle de commande du palier N4: principales caracteristiques et retour d'experience d'exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouton, J.M.; Guillas, J.; Nougaret, Ch. [Electricite de France (EDF/DPN/CAPE), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    This article presents the design, specificities and innovating features of the control room of the N4-type PWR. A brief description of control rooms of previous 900 MW and 1300 MW -type PWR allows us to assess the change. The design of the first control room dates back to 1972, at that time 2 considerations were taken into account: first the design has to be similar to that of control rooms for thermal plants because plant operators were satisfied with it and secondly the normal operating situation has to be privileged to the prejudice of accidental situations just as it was in a thermal plant. The turning point was the TMI accident that showed the weight of human factor in accidental situations in terms of pilot team, training, procedures and the ergonomics of the work station. The impact of TMI can be seen in the design of 1300 MW-type PWR. In the beginning of the eighties EDF decided to launch a study for a complete overhaul of the control room concept, the aim was to continue reducing the human factor risk and to provide a better quality of piloting the plant in any situation. The result is the control room of the N4-type PWR. Today the cumulated feedback experience of N4 control rooms represents more than 20 years over a wide range of situations from normal to incidental, a survey shows that the N4 design has fulfilled its aims. (A.C.)

  10. The simulation research for the dynamic performance of integrated PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jiandong; Xia Guoqing; Fu Mingyu

    2005-01-01

    The mathematical model of the reactor core of integrated PWR has been studied and simplified properly. With the lumped parameter method, authors have established the mathematical model of the reactor core, including the neutron dynamic equation, the feedback reactivities model and the thermo-hydraulic model of the reactor. Based on the above equations and models, the incremental transfer functions of the reactor core model have been built. By simulation experimentation, authors have compared the dynamic characteristics of the integrated PWR with the traditional dispersed PWR. The simulation results show that the mathematical models and equations are correct. (authors)

  11. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of a 1400MW PWR for designing a scale-down test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Bo. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    A scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of 1400MWe PWR is described. The scaling criteria for reproducing the same thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as the prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility is derived and the resulting natural circulation flow characteristics of the prototype and scale-down facility analyzed and compared. The purpose of this study is to apply the similarity law to the prototype EU-APR1400 core catcher cooling system and the model test facility of this prototype system and derive a relationship between the heating channel characteristics and the down-comer piping characteristics so as to determine the down-comer pipe size and the orifice size of the model test facility. As the geometry and the heating wall heat flux of the heating channel of the model test facility will be the same as those of the prototype core catcher cooling system except the width of the heating channel is reduced, the axial distribution of the coolant quality (or void fraction) is expected to resemble each other between the prototype and model facility. Thus using this fact, the down-comer piping design characteristics of the model facility can be determined from the relationship derived from the similarity law

  12. Gadolinia experience and design for PWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe Siemens Power Corporation's (SPC) current experience with the burnable absorber gadolinia in PWR fuel assemblies, including optimized features of SPC's PWR gadolinia designs, and comparisons with other burnable absorbers. Siemens is the world leader in PWR gadolinia experience. More than 5,900 Siemens PWR gadolinia-bearing fuel assemblies have been irradiated. The use of gadolinia-bearing fuel provides significant flexibility in fuel cycle designs, allows for low radial leakage fuel management and extended operating cycles, and reduces BOC (beginning-of-cycle) soluble boron concentrations. The optimized use of an integral burnable neutron absorber is a design feature which provides improved economic performance for PWR fuel assemblies. This paper includes a comparison between three different types of integral burnable absorbers: gadolinia, Zirconium diboride and erbia. Fuel cycle design studies performed by Siemens have shown that the enrichment requirements for 18-24 month fuel cycles utilizing gadolinia or zirconium diboride integral fuel burnable absorbers can be approximately the same. Although a typical gadolinia residual penalty for a cycle design of this length is as low as 0.02-0.03 wt% U-235, the design flexibility of gadolinia allows for very aggressive low-leakage core loading plans which reduces the enrichment requirements for gadolinia-bearing fuel. SPC has optimized its use of gadolinia in PWR fuel cycles. Typically, low (2-4) weight percent Gd 2 O 3 is used for beginning to middle of cycle reactivity hold down as well as soluble boron concentration holddown at BOC. Higher concentrations of Gd 2 O 3 , such as 6 and 8 wt%, are used to control power peaking in assemblies later in the cycle. SPC has developed core strategies that maximize the use of lower gadolinia concentrations which significantly reduces the gadolinia residual reactivity penalty. This optimization includes minimizing the number of rods with

  13. Solid-Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-01-01

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP). Like the SAFE 400 space nuclear reactor core, the HPENHS core is comprised of fuel rods and HPs embedded in a solid structure arranged in a hexagonal lattice in a 3:1 ratio. The core is oriented horizontally and has a square rather cylindrical cross section for effective heat transfer. The HPs extend from the two axial reflectors in which the fission gas plena are embedded and transfer heat to an intermediate coolant that flows by natural-circulation. The HP-ENHS is designed to preserve many features of the ENHS including 20-year operation without refueling, very small excess reactivity throughout life, natural circulation cooling, walkaway passive safety, and robust proliferation resistance. The target power level and specific power of the HP-ENHS reactor are those of the reference ENHS reactor. Compared to previous ENHS reactor designs utilizing a lead or lead-bismuth alloy natural circulation cooling system, the HP-ENHS reactor offers a number of advantageous features including: (1) significantly enhanced passive decay heat removal capability; (2) no positive void reactivity coefficients; (3) relatively lower corrosion of the cladding (4) a core that is more robust for transportation; (5) higher temperature potentially offering higher efficiency and hydrogen production capability. This preliminary study focuses on five areas: material compatibility analysis, HP performance analysis, neutronic analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety analysis. Of the four high-temperature structural materials evaluated, Mo TZM alloy is the preferred choice; its upper estimated feasible operating temperature is 1350 K. HP performance is evaluated as a function of working fluid type, operating temperature, wick design and HP diameter and length. Sodium is the

  14. VALIDATION OF SIMBAT-PWR USING STANDARD CODE OF COBRA-EN ON REACTOR TRANSIENT CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Darwis Isnaini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The validation of Pressurized Water Reactor typed Nuclear Power Plant simulator developed by BATAN (SIMBAT-PWR using standard code of COBRA-EN on reactor transient condition has been done. The development of SIMBAT-PWR has accomplished several neutronics and thermal-hydraulic calculation modules. Therefore, the validation of the simulator is needed, especially in transient reactor operation condition. The research purpose is for characterizing the thermal-hydraulic parameters of PWR1000 core, which be able to be applied or as a comparison in developing the SIMBAT-PWR. The validation involves the calculation of the thermal-hydraulic parameters using COBRA-EN code. Furthermore, the calculation schemes are based on COBRA-EN with fixed material properties and dynamic properties that calculated by MATPRO subroutine (COBRA-EN+MATPRO for reactor condition of startup, power rise and power fluctuation from nominal to over power. The comparison of the temperature distribution at nominal 100% power shows that the fuel centerline temperature calculated by SIMBAT-PWR has 8.76% higher result than COBRA-EN result and 7.70% lower result than COBRA-EN+MATPRO. In general, SIMBAT-PWR calculation results on fuel temperature distribution are mostly between COBRA-EN and COBRA-EN+MATPRO results. The deviations of the fuel centerline, fuel surface, inner and outer cladding as well as coolant bulk temperature in the SIMBAT-PWR and the COBRA-EN calculation, are due to the value difference of the gap heat transfer coefficient and the cladding thermal conductivity.

  15. A study on thimble plug removal for PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong Soo; Lee, Chang Sup; Lee, Jae Yong; Jun, Hwang Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic effects of removing the RCC guide thimble plugs are evaluated for 8 Westinghouse type PWR plants in Korea as a part of feasibility study: core outlet loss coefficient, thimble bypass flow, and best estimate flow. It is resulted that the best estimate thimble bypass flow increases about by 2% and the best estimate flow increases approximately by 1.2%. The resulting DNBR penalties can be covered with the current DNBR margin. Accident analyses are also investigated that the dropped rod transient is shown to be limiting and relatively sensitive to bypass flow variation. 8 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  16. A study on thimble plug removal for PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong Soo; Lee, Chang Sup; Lee, Jae Yong; Jun, Hwang Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic effects of removing the RCC guide thimble plugs are evaluated for 8 Westinghouse type PWR plants in Korea as a part of feasibility study: core outlet loss coefficient, thimble bypass flow, and best estimate flow. It is resulted that the best estimate thimble bypass flow increases about by 2% and the best estimate flow increases approximately by 1.2%. The resulting DNBR penalties can be covered with the current DNBR margin. Accident analyses are also investigated that the dropped rod transient is shown to be limiting and relatively sensitive to bypass flow variation. 8 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  17. Validation of the REL2005 code package on Gd-poisoned PWR type assemblies through the CAMELEON experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, Patrick; Vidal, Jean-Francois; Santamarina, Alain

    2009-01-01

    This paper details the validation of Gd-poisoned 17x17 PWR lattices, through several configurations of the CAMELEON experimental program, by using the newly qualified REL2005 French code package. After a general presentation of the CAMELEON program that took place in the EOLE critical Facility in Cadarache, one describes the new REL2005 code package relying on the deterministic transport code APOLLO2.8 based on characteristics method (MOC), and its new CEA2005 library based on the latest JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data evaluation. For critical masses, the average Calculation-to-Experiment C/E's on the k eff are (136 ± 80) pcm and (300 ± 76) pcm for the reference 281 groups MOC and optimized 26 groups MOC schemes respectively. These values include also a drastic improvement of about 250 pcm due to the change in the library from JEF2.2 to JEFF3.1. For pin-by-pin radial power distributions, reference and REL2005 results are very close, with maximum discrepancies of the order of 2%, i.e., in the experimental uncertainty limits. The Optimized REL2005 code package allows to predict the reactivity worth of the Gd-clusters (averaged on 9 experimental configurations) to be C/E Δρ(Gd clusters) = +1.3% ± 2.3%. (author)

  18. Seismic response of a block-type nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, R.C.; Bennett, J.G.; Merson, J.L.

    1976-05-01

    An analytical model is developed to predict seismic response of large gas-cooled reactor cores. The model is used to investigate scaling laws involved in the design of physical models of such cores, and to make parameter studies

  19. Parallel GPU implementation of PWR reactor burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimlich, A.; Silva, F.C.; Martinez, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three GPU algorithms used to evaluate the burn-up in a PWR reactor. • Exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential. • The C++ container is expansible to accept new nuclides chains. - Abstract: This paper surveys three methods, implemented for multi-core CPU and graphic processor unit (GPU), to evaluate the fuel burn-up in a pressurized light water nuclear reactor (PWR) using the solutions of a large system of coupled ordinary differential equations. The reactor physics simulation of a PWR reactor spends a long execution time with burnup calculations, so performance improvement using GPU can imply in better core design and thus extended fuel life cycle. The results of this study exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential solver, within 1% accuracy.

  20. Galois Corings and a Jacobson-Bourbaki type Correspondence

    OpenAIRE

    Cuadra, J.; Gomez-Torrecillas, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Jacobson-Bourbaki Theorem for division rings was formulated in terms of corings by Sweedler in 1975. Finiteness conditions hypotheses are not required in this new approach. In this paper we extend Sweedler's result to simple artinian rings using a particular class of corings, comatrix corings. A Jacobson-Bourbaki like correspondence for simple artinian rings is then obtained by duality.

  1. Maturity of the PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.; Rapin, M.; Aboudarham, L.; Bitsch, D.

    1983-03-01

    Figures illustrating the predominant position of the PWR system are presented. The question is whether on the basis of these figures the PWR can be considered to have reached maturity. The following analysis, based on the French program experience, is an attempt to pinpoint those areas in which industrial maturity of the PWR has been attained, and in which areas a certain evolution can still be expected to take place

  2. Severe accident considerations for modern KWU-PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyink, J.

    1987-01-01

    In assumption of severe accident on modern KWU-PWR plants the author discusses on the: selection of core meltdown sequences, course of the accident, containment behaviour and source terms for fission products release to the environment

  3. Research on Shock Responses of Three Types of Honeycomb Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Yang, Zhiguang; Jiang, Liangliang; Ren, Yanting

    2018-03-01

    The shock responses of three kinds of honeycomb cores have been investigated and analyzed based on explicit dynamics analysis. According to the real geometric configuration and the current main manufacturing methods of aluminum alloy honeycomb cores, the finite element models of honeycomb cores with three different cellular configurations (conventional hexagon honeycomb core, rectangle honeycomb core and auxetic honeycomb core with negative Poisson’s ratio) have been established through FEM parametric modeling method based on Python and Abaqus. In order to highlight the impact response characteristics of the above three honeycomb cores, a 5 mm thick panel with the same mass and material was taken as contrast. The analysis results showed that the peak values of longitudinal acceleration history curves of the three honeycomb cores were lower than those of the aluminum alloy panel in all three reference points under the loading of a longitudinal pulse pressure load with the peak value of 1 MPa and the pulse width of 1 μs. It could be concluded that due to the complex reflection and diffraction of stress wave induced by shock in honeycomb structures, the impact energy was redistributed which led to a decrease in the peak values of the longitudinal acceleration at the measuring points of honeycomb cores relative to the panel.

  4. Seismic responses of a pool-type fast reactor with different core support designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In designing the core support system for a pool-type fast reactor, there are many issues which must be considered in order to achieve an optimum and balanced design. These issues include safety, reliability, as well as costs. Several design options are possible to support the reactor core. Different core support options yield different frequency ranges and responses. Seismic responses of a large pool-type fast reactor incorporated with different core support designs have been investigated. 4 refs., 3 figs

  5. Fuel loading method to exchangeable reactor core of BWR type reactor and its core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koguchi, Kazushige.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel loading method for an exchangeable reactor core of a BWR type reactor, at least two kinds of fresh fuel assemblies having different reactivities between axial upper and lower portions are preliminarily prepared, and upon taking out fuel assemblies of advanced combustion and loading the fresh fuel assemblies dispersingly, they are disposed so as to attain a predetermined axial power distribution in the reactor. At least two kinds of fresh fuel assemblies have a content of burnable poisons different between the axial upper portion and lower portions. In addition, reactivity characteristics are made different at a region higher than the central boundary and a region lower than the central boundary which is set within a range of about 6/24 to 16/24 from the lower portion of the fuel effective length. There can be attained axial power distribution as desired such as easy optimization of the axial power distribution, high flexibility, and flexible flattening of the power distribution, and it requires no special change in view of the design and has a good economical property. (N.H.)

  6. Operational characteristics of hybrid-type SFCL with closed and open cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.S.; Lee, N.Y.; Choi, H.S.; Chung, D.C.; Lim, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the operational characteristics of the hybrid-type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) with the closed and the open cores, which induced the variation of the magnetic flux between the primary and the secondary windings. The experimental set-up of the hybrid-type SFCL with the closed and the open cores were prepared and the experimental analyses for the current limiting characteristics were performed. The peak value of the fault current in the hybrid-type SFCL with the open core was higher than that of the closed core at the first cycle after fault occurrence. However, in the case of the hybrid-type SFCL with the open core, the limiting current level after fault occurrence was decreased less than that of the hybrid-type SFCL with the closed core, because the magnetic leakage reluctance of the open core was higher than that of the closed core. The quench time (T q ) and the arrival time (T a ) for the peak voltage (V SC ) in the hybrid-type SFCL with the closed core were faster than that of the hybrid-type SFCL with the open core due to the increase of the mutual flux. We verified that the consumption power in the hybrid-type SFCL with the open core was larger owing to the increase of leakage flux by the reduction of mutual inductance between primary and secondary windings

  7. Surveillance of vibrations in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espefaelt, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1980-07-01

    The core of a PWR - including fuel elements, internal structure, control rods and core support structure inside the pressure vessel - is subjected to forces which can cause vibrations. One sensitive means to detect and analyse such vibrations is by means of the noise from incore and excore neutron detector signals. In this project noise recordings have been made on two occasions in the Ringhals 2 plant and the obtained data been analysed using the Studsvik Noise Analysis Program System (SNAPS). The results have been intepreted and a detailed description of the vibrational status of the core and pressure vessel internals has been produced. On the basis of the obtained results it is proposed that neutron signal noise analysis should be performed at each PWR plant in the beginning, middle and end of each fuel cycle and an analysis be made using the methods developed in the project. It would also provide a contribution to a higher degree of preparedness for diagnostic tasks in case of unexpected and abnormal events. (author)

  8. PWR thermocouple mechanical sealing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qiuping; He Youguang

    1991-08-01

    The PWR in-core temperature detection device, which is one of measures to insure reactor safety operation, is to monitor and diagnose reactor thermal power output and in-core power distribution. The temperature detection device system uses thermocouples as measuring elements with stainless steel protecting sleeves. The thermocouple has a limited service time and should be replaced after its service time has reached. A new sealing device for the thermocouples of reactor in-core temperature detection system has been developed to facilitate replacement. The structure is complete tight under high temperature and pressure without any leakage and seepage, and easy to be assembled or disassembled in radioactive environment. The device is designed to make it possible to replace the thermocouple one by one if necessary. This is a new, simple and practical structure

  9. Contribution to fuel depletion study in PWR type reactors, reactor core with three and four regions of enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, M.C.C.

    1977-03-01

    The main methods for calculation of fuel depletion are studied and some approaches to do it are mentioned; the LEOPARD Code is described and full details are given for each subroutine, flow charts are included; the method given by the code for calculation of fuel depletion is described; some imperfections from the IPR's version are listed, and corrected, for instance: the method for burn-up calculation of heavy isotopes; the results of calculations for a reference reactor based on data of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for Angra I Nuclear Power Plant are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Radionuclide compositions of spent fuel and high level waste for the uranium and plutonium fuelled PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairclough, M.P.; Tymons, B.J.

    1985-06-01

    The activities of a selection of radionuclides are presented for three types of reactor fuel of interest in radioactive waste management. The fuel types are for a uranium 'burning' PWR, a plutonium 'burning' PWR using plutonium recycled from spent uranium fuel and a plutonium 'burning' PWR using plutonium which has undergone multiple recycle. (author)

  11. Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) / Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS Evaluation of Risk-Informed Margins Management Strategies for a Representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) toolkit and methodology are proposed for investigating nuclear power plant core, fuels design and safety analysis, including postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. This toolkit, under an integrated evaluation model framework, is name LOCA toolkit for the US (LOTUS). This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermal hydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results.

  12. Reactor analysis support package (RASP). Volume 7. PWR set-point methodology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temple, S.M.; Robbins, T.R.

    1986-09-01

    This report provides an overview of the basis and methodology requirements for determining Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) technical specifications related setpoints and focuses on development of the methodology for a reload core. Additionally, the report documents the implementation and typical methods of analysis used by PWR vendors during the 1970's to develop Protection System Trip Limits (or Limiting Safety System Settings) and Limiting Conditions for Operation. The descriptions of the typical setpoint methodologies are provided for Nuclear Steam Supply Systems as designed and supplied by Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, and Westinghouse. The description of the methods of analysis includes the discussion of the computer codes used in the setpoint methodology. Next, the report addresses the treatment of calculational and measurement uncertainties based on the extent to which such information was available for each of the three types of PWR. Finally, the major features of the setpoint methodologies are compared, and the principal effects of each particular methodology on plant operation are summarized for each of the three types of PWR

  13. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  14. Hydraulic Profiling of a Parallel Channel Type Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyong-Won; Hwang, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Chan

    2006-01-01

    An advanced reactor core which consisted of closed multiple parallel channels was optimized to maximize the thermal margin of the core. The closed multiple parallel channel configurations have different characteristics to the open channels of conventional PWRs. The channels, usually assemblies, are isolated hydraulically from each other and there is no cross flow between channels. The distribution of inlet flow rate between channels is a very important design parameter in the core because distribution of inlet flow is directly proportional to a margin for a certain hydraulic parameter. The thermal hydraulic parameter may be the boiling margin, maximum fuel temperature, and critical heat flux. The inlet flow distribution of the core was optimized for the boiling margins by grouping the inlet orifices by several hydraulic regions. The procedure is called a hydraulic profiling

  15. A study on Monte Carlo analysis of Pebble-type VHTR core for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Chul

    2005-02-01

    In order to pursue exact the core analysis for VHTR core which will be developed in future, a study on Monte Carol method was carried out. In Korea, pebble and prism type core are under investigation for VHTR core analysis. In this study, pebble-type core was investigated because it was known that it should not only maintain the nuclear fuel integrity but also have the advantage in economical efficiency and safety. The pebble-bed cores of HTR-PROTEUS critical facility in Swiss were selected for the benchmark model. After the detailed MCNP modeling of the whole facility, calculations of nuclear characteristics were performed. The two core configurations, Core 4.3 and Core 5 (reference state no. 3), among the 10 configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS cores were chosen to be analyzed in order to treat different fuel loading pattern and modeled. The former is a random packing core and the latter deterministic packing core. Based on the experimental data and the benchmark result of other research groups for the two different cores, some nuclear characteristics were calculated. Firstly, keff was calculated for these cores. The effect for TRIO homogeneity model was investigated. Control rod and shutdown rod worths also were calculated and the sensitivity analysis on cross-section library and reflector thickness was pursued. Lastly, neutron flux profiles were investigated in reflector regions. It is noted that Monte Carlo analysis of pebble-type VHTR core was firstly carried out in Korea. Also, this study should not only provide the basic data for pebble-type VHTR core analysis for hydrogen production but also be utilized as the verified data to validate a computer code for VHTR core analysis which will be developed in future

  16. Minor actinide transmutation on PWR burnable poison rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenchao; Liu, Bin; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Tu, Jing; Liu, Fang; Huang, Liming; Fu, Juan; Meng, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Key issues associated with MA transmutation are the appropriate loading pattern. • Commercial PWRs are the only choice to transmute MAs in large scale currently. • Considerable amount of MA can be loaded to PWR without disturbing k eff markedly. • Loading MA to PWR burnable poison rods for transmutation is an optimal loading pattern. - Abstract: Minor actinides are the primary contributors to long term radiotoxicity in spent fuel. The majority of commercial reactors in operation in the world are PWRs, so to study the minor actinide transmutation characteristics in the PWRs and ultimately realize the successful minor actinide transmutation in PWRs are crucial problem in the area of the nuclear waste disposal. The key issues associated with the minor actinide transmutation are the appropriate loading patterns when introducing minor actinides to the PWR core. We study two different minor actinide transmutation materials loading patterns on the PWR burnable poison rods, one is to coat a thin layer of minor actinide in the water gap between the zircaloy cladding and the stainless steel which is filled with water, another one is that minor actinides substitute for burnable poison directly within burnable poison rods. Simulation calculation indicates that the two loading patterns can load approximately equivalent to 5–6 PWR annual minor actinide yields without disturbing the PWR k eff markedly. The PWR k eff can return criticality again by slightly reducing the boric acid concentration in the coolant of PWR or removing some burnable poison rods without coating the minor actinide transmutation materials from PWR core. In other words, loading minor actinide transmutation material to PWR does not consume extra neutron, minor actinide just consumes the neutrons which absorbed by the removed control poisons. Both minor actinide loading patterns are technically feasible; most importantly do not need to modify the configuration of the PWR core and

  17. PWR-to-PWR fuel cycle model using dry process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Jeong, Chang Joon; Rho, Gyu Hong

    2002-03-01

    PWR-to-PWR fuel cycle model has been developed to recycle the spent fuel using the dry fabrication process. Two types of fuels were considered; first fuel was based on low initial enrichment with low discharge burnup and second one was based on more initial enrichment with high discharge burnup in PWR. For recycling calculations, the HELIOS code was used, in which all of the available fission products were considered. The decay of 10 years was applied for reuse of the spent fuel. Sensitivity analysis for the fresh feed material enrichment has also been carried out. If enrichment of the mixing material is increased the saving of uranium reserves would be decreased. The uranium saving of low burned fuel increased from 4.2% to 7.4% in fifth recycling step for 5 wt% to 19.00wt% mixing material enrichment. While for high burned fuel, there was no uranium saving, which implies that higher uranium enrichment required than 5 wt%. For mixing of 15 wt% enriched fuel, the required mixing is about 21.0% and 37.0% of total fuel volume for low and high burned fuel, respectively. With multiple recycling, reductions in waste for low and high burned fuel became 80% and 60%, for first recycling, respectively. In this way, waste can be reduced more and the cost of the waste disposal reduction can provide the economic balance

  18. Aseismic study of high temperature gas-cooled reactor core with block-type fuel, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    A two-dimensional horizontal seismic experiment with single axis and simultaneous two-axes excitations was performed to obtain the core seismic design data on the block-type high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Effects of excitation directions and core side support stiffness on characteristics of core displacements and reaction forces of support were revealed. The values of the side reaction forces are the largest in the excitation of flat-to-flat of hexagonal block. Preload from the core periphery to the core center are effective to decrease core displacements and side reaction forces. (author)

  19. Coupling of 3-D core computational codes and a reactor simulation software for the computation of PWR reactivity accidents induced by thermal-hydraulic transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, P.; Caruge, D.; Paik, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    The French CEA has recently developed a set of new computer codes for reactor physics computations called the Saphir system which includes CRONOS-2, a three-dimensional neutronic code, FLICA-4, a three-dimensional core thermal hydraulic code, and FLICA-S, a primary loops thermal-hydraulic transient computation code, which are coupled and applied to analyze a severe reactivity accident induced by a thermal hydraulic transient: the Steamline Break accident for a pressurized water reactor until soluble boron begins to accumulate in the core. The coupling of these codes has proved to be numerically stable. 15 figs., 7 refs

  20. Thermohydraulic behaviour of the hot channel in a PWR type reactor under loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.R.

    1978-12-01

    An analysis is done of the core behavior for a 1861 MW(th) pressurized water reactor with two coolant loops, during the blowdown phase of a double-ended cold leg rupture, between the main feedwater pump, and the pressure vessel. The analysis is done through a detailed thermohydraulic study of the hot pin channel with RELAP4/MOD 5 code, including the Evaluatin Model options. The problem is solved separately for two values of discharge coefficient (C sub(D)= 1,0 and 0,4). The results show that the maximum clad temperature is lower than the limit value for licensing purposes. Concerning clad material oxidation, the maximum value obtained is also under the limit of acceptance. (author) [pt

  1. Study of the functionalization of cross sections of cell in multi groups for calculations in best-estimate 3D pin-by-pin of PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso, C.; Sanchez-Cervera, S.; Herrero, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of the European project NURISP (Nuclear Reactor Integrated Platform) of 7th framework Programme is to advance the simulation of light water reactors by coupling the best-estimate codes to deepen core physics, thermal-hydraulic behaviour of biphasic and fuel.

  2. Microscopic findings in EUS-guided fine needle (SharkCore) biopsies with type 1 and type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2017-01-01

    The International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria (ICDC) for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) include the histological criterion that is based on either pancreatic core needle biopsies (CNBs) or surgical specimens. However, CNBs are difficult to obtain by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS......). EUS fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology is usually not sufficient for the diagnosis of AIP, but may sometimes contain tissue microfragments. Another approach is EUS-guided histological fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB), using needles such as the SharkCore or ProCore needle. Published data regarding...... EUS-guided SharkCore FNB for the diagnosis of AIP are lacking. We aimed to describe our histological findings in one type 1 and two type 2 AIP patients who underwent EUS SharkCore FNB. The EUS-FNBs of two patients fulfilled the histological level 2 ICDC for type 1 AIP or type 2 AIP. The EUS-FNB of one...

  3. An analysis of transients in the PWR downcomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, A.

    1981-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of determining non-stationary temperature field in the downcomer of a PWR type reactor. For this purpose, an analytical model has been developed. The model covers five components of (PWR - Krsko) downcomer: the core-barrel, floor between the core-barrel and the thermal shield, the thermal shield, flow between the thermal shield and the reactor vessel wall, the reactor vessel wall. The model includes internal heat generation in metal structures. The governing equations of the model have been written in the finite difference explicit form. The system of resulting algebraic equations was solved bu Gauss-Seidel method, using a modular computer code. Several characteristic transients were examined (step and continuous change of fluid temperature at the inlet nozzle). Also, an analysis of main parameters (heat transfer coefficient and flow rate) has been performed. The model is intended to be used as basics for further development of a more realistic model that could be used for practical safety analysis. (author)

  4. Solitons in a hard-core bosonic system: Gross–Pitaevskii type and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-20

    Oct 20, 2015 ... Solitons in a hard-core bosonic system: Gross–Pitaevskii type and beyond ... the corresponding class of magnetic solitons in Heisenberg spin chains with different types of anisotropy. ... Pramana – Journal of Physics | News.

  5. Feasibility to convert an advanced PWR from UO{sub 2} to a mixed (U,Th)O{sub 2} core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo de; Maiorino, José Rubens; Moreira, João Manoel de Losada; Santos, Thiago Augusto dos, E-mail: giovanni_laranjo@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rossi, Pedro Carlos Russo [Department of Energy, System, Territory, and Construction Engineering (DESTEC), Pisa (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    This work presents the neutronics and thermal hydraulics feasibility to convert the UO2 core of the Westinghouse AP1000 in a (U-Th)O{sub 2} core, rather than the traditional uranium dioxide, for the purpose of reducing long-lived actinides, especially plutonium, and generates a stock pile of {sup 233}U, which could in the future be used in advanced fuel cycles, in a more sustainable process and taking advantage of the large stock of thorium available on the planet and especially in Brazil. The reactor chosen as reference was the AP1000, which is considered to be one of the most reliable and modern reactor of the current Generation III, and its similarity to the reactors already consolidated and used in Brazil for electric power generation. The results show the feasibility and potentiality of the concept, without the necessity of changes in the core of the AP1000, and even with advantages over this. The neutron calculations were made by the SERPENT code. The results provided a maximum linear power density lower than the AP1000, favoring safety. In addition, the delayed neutron fraction and the reactivity coefficients proved to be adequate to ensure the safety of the concept. The results show that a production of about 260 Kg of {sup 233}U per cycle is possible, with a minimum production of fissile plutonium that favors the use of the concept in U-Th cycles. (author)

  6. Evaluation report on SCTF Core-III test S3-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Ohnuki, Akira; Adachi, Hiromichi; Murao, Yoshio; Minato, Akihiko; Sakaki, Isao.

    1988-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of radial power distribution on the thermal-hydraulic characteristics during the reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA with a combined injection type ECCS, a core cooling separate effect test S3-06 and a combined injection test S3-16-Phase 2 were performed using the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-III. The radial power distributions in these two tests simulated a reference distribution for a PWR with a combined injection type ECCS and a steep distribution for a PWR with a cold leg injection type ECCS, respectively. Under the radial power distribution of a PWR with a combined injection type ECCS, the radial power distribution had little effect on the thermal-hydraulic behavior in the two-phase up-flow region due to the approximately flat power distribution in this region (power ratio = 1.04 ∼ 1.08). The overall fluid behavior in the pressure vessel was also little affected by the radial power distribution. On the other hand, under the steep radial power distribution (peak power ratio = 1.36), the degree of heat transfer enhancement in high power bundles in the two-phase up-flow region was dominated by the bundlewise radial power ratio as in the case of a PWR with a cold leg injection type ECCS. (author)

  7. Modelling activity transport behavior in PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshaw, Jim; McGurk, John; Dickinson, Shirley; Burrows, Robert; Hinds, Kelvin; Hussey, Dennis; Deshon, Jeff; Barrios Figueras, Joan Pau; Maldonado Sanchez, Santiago; Fernandez Lillo, Enrique; Garbett, Keith

    2012-09-01

    The activation and transport of corrosion products around a PWR circuit is a major concern to PWR plant operators as these may give rise to high personnel doses. The understanding of what controls dose rates on ex-core surfaces and shutdown releases has improved over the years but still several questions remain unanswered. For example the relative importance of particle and soluble deposition in the core to activity levels in the plant is not clear. Wide plant to plant and cycle to cycle variations are noted with no apparent explanations why such variations are observed. Over the past few years this group have been developing models to simulate corrosion product transport around a PWR circuit. These models form the basis for the latest version of the BOA code and simulate the movement of Fe and Ni around the primary circuit. Part of this development is to include the activation and subsequent transport of radioactive species around the circuit and this paper describes some initial modelling work in this area. A simple model of activation, release and deposition is described and then applied to explain the plant behaviour at Sizewell B and Vandellos II. This model accounts for activation in the core, soluble and particulate activity movement around the circuit and for activity capture ex-core on both the inner and outer oxides. The model gives a reasonable comparison with plant observations and highlights what controls activity transport in these plants and importantly what factors can be ignored. (authors)

  8. Behaviour of a PWR with core protection system (SSN) in case of accidents due to power failure, ATWS and steam generator rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncompagni, S.; Fulceri, P.; Oriolo, F.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the transient fallowing internal and external power failure, without scram, in the nuclear power plant of the Italian Unified Nuclear Project are examined. The availability of ECCS is excluded while the breakage of a tube in each steam generator is supposed, togheter with the presence of an original safety system known as SSN (core protection system). Computations have been performed by using Mark 6 RELAP4 code. The study of the transient and the physical model used are briefly illustrated. Finally the results achieved are analysed

  9. Sensitivity of risk parameters to human errors for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, P.; Hall, R.E.; Kerr, W.

    1980-01-01

    Sensitivities of the risk parameters, emergency safety system unavailabilities, accident sequence probabilities, release category probabilities and core melt probability were investigated for changes in the human error rates within the general methodological framework of the Reactor Safety Study for a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Impact of individual human errors were assessed both in terms of their structural importance to core melt and reliability importance on core melt probability. The Human Error Sensitivity Assessment of a PWR (HESAP) computer code was written for the purpose of this study

  10. Reactor core and control rod assembly in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Itooka, Satoshi.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel assemblies and control rod assemblies are attached respectively to reactor core support plates each in a cantilever fashion. Intermediate spacer pads are disposed to the lateral side of a wrapper tube just above the fuel rod region. Intermediate space pads are disposed to the lateral side of a control rod guide tube just above a fuel rod region. The thickness of the intermediate spacer pad for the control rod assembly is made smaller than the thickness of the intermediate spacer pad for the fuel assembly. This can prevent contact between intermediate spacer pads of the control guide tube and the fuel assembly even if the temperature of coolants is elevated to thermally expand the intermediate spacer pad, by which the radial displacement amount of the reactor core region along the direction of the height of the control guide tube is reduced substantially to zero. Accordingly, contribution of the control rod assembly to the radial expansion reactivity can be reduced to zero or negative level, by which the effect of the negative radial expansion reactivity of the reactor is increased to improve the safety upon thermal transient stage, for example, loss of coolant flow rate accident. (I.N.)

  11. Emergency core cooling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Yoji

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly recover the water level in the reactor upon occurrence of slight leakages in the reactor coolant pressure boundary, by promoting the depressurization in the reactor to thereby rapidly increase the high pressure core spray flow rate. Constitution: Upon occurrence of reactor water level reduction, a reactor isolation cooling system and a high pressure core spray system are actuated to start the injection of coolants into a reactor pressure vessel. In this case, if the isolation cooling system is failed to decrease the flow rate in a return pipeway, flow rate indicators show a lower value as compared with a predetermined value. The control device detects it and further confirms the rotation of a high pressure spray pump to open a valve. By the above operation, coolants pumped by the high pressure spray pump is flown by way of a communication pipeway to the return pipeway and sprayed from the top of the pressure vessel. This allows the vapors on the water surface in the pressure vessel to be cooled rapidly and increases the depressurization effects. (Horiuchi, T.)

  12. The research on burnup characteristic of doping burnable poison in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang Shenglong; Qin Dong; Chai Xiaoming; Yao Dong

    2014-01-01

    In PWR core design, burnable poisons are usually used for reactive compensation and power flatten. The choice of burnable poisons and how to match burnup would be the key-points for a long-life core design. We study the burnup character of doping burnable poisons (such as natural element, manual nuclide and soluble boron) in the PWR by the core burnup code MOI based on Monte Carlo method. The results show that Hf, Er and Eu doping burnable poison would be applicable for the nuclear design research on the long-life PWR core. (authors)

  13. Benchmark for Neutronic Analysis of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor Cores with Various Fuel Types and Core Sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauff, N.E.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Buiron, L.; Rimpault, G.; Brun, E.; Lee, Y.K.; Pataki, I.; Kereszturi, A.; Tota, A.; Parisi, C.; Fridman, E.; Guilliard, N.; Kugo, T.; Sugino, K.; Uematsu, M.M.; Ponomarev, A.; Messaoudi, N.; Lin Tan, R.; Kozlowski, T.; Bernnat, W.; Blanchet, D.; Brun, E.; Buiron, L.; Fridman, E.; Guilliard, N.; Kereszturi, A.; Kim, T.K.; Kozlowski, T.; Kugo, T.; Lee, Y.K.; Lin Tan, R.; Messaoudi, N.; Parisi, C.; Pataki, I.; Ponomarev, A.; Rimpault, G.; Stauff, N.E.; Sugino, K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Tota, A.; Uematsu, M.M.; Monti, S.; Yamaji, A.; Nakahara, Y.; Gulliford, J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the foremost Generation IV International Forum (GIF) objectives is to design nuclear reactor cores that can passively avoid damage of the reactor when control rods fail to scram in response to postulated accident initiators (e.g. inadvertent reactivity insertion or loss of coolant flow). The analysis of such unprotected transients depends primarily on the physical properties of the fuel and the reactivity feedback coefficients of the core. Within the activities of the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS), the Sodium Fast Reactor core Feed-back and Transient response (SFR-FT) Task Force was proposed to evaluate core performance characteristics of several Generation IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) concepts. A set of four numerical benchmark cases was initially developed with different core sizes and fuel types in order to perform neutronic characterisation, evaluation of the feedback coefficients and transient calculations. Two 'large' SFR core designs were proposed by CEA: those generate 3 600 MW(th) and employ oxide and carbide fuel technologies. Two 'medium' SFR core designs proposed by ANL complete the set. These medium SFR cores generate 1 000 MW(th) and employ oxide and metallic fuel technologies. The present report summarises the results obtained by the WPRS for the neutronic characterisation benchmark exercise proposed. The benchmark definition is detailed in Chapter 2. Eleven institutions contributed to this benchmark: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives (CEA of Cadarache), Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives (CEA of Saclay), Centre for Energy Research (CER-EK), Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT

  14. Defining the Core Genome of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium for Genomic Surveillance and Epidemiological Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Songzhe; Octavia, Sophie; Tanaka, Mark M.; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is the most common Salmonella serovar causing foodborne infections in Australia and many other countries. Twenty-one S. Typhimurium strains from Salmonella reference collection A (SARA) were analyzed using Illumina high-throughput genome sequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 21 SARA strains ranged from 46 to 11,916 SNPs, with an average of 1,577 SNPs per strain. Together with 47 strains selected from publicly available S. Typhimurium genomes, the S. Typhimurium core genes (STCG) were determined. The STCG consist of 3,846 genes, a set that is much larger than that of the 2,882 Salmonella core genes (SCG) found previously. The STCG together with 1,576 core intergenic regions (IGRs) were defined as the S. Typhimurium core genome. Using 93 S. Typhimurium genomes from 13 epidemiologically confirmed community outbreaks, we demonstrated that typing based on the S. Typhimurium core genome (STCG plus core IGRs) provides superior resolution and higher discriminatory power than that based on SCG for outbreak investigation and molecular epidemiology of S. Typhimurium. STCG and STCG plus core IGR typing achieved 100% separation of all outbreaks compared to that of SCG typing, which failed to separate isolates from two outbreaks from background isolates. Defining the S. Typhimurium core genome allows standardization of genes/regions to be used for high-resolution epidemiological typing and genomic surveillance of S. Typhimurium. PMID:26019201

  15. Evaluation of the radiative transfer in the core of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) during the reflooding step of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerardin, J.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method of resolution of radiative transfer inside a medium of vapor-droplets surrounded by hot walls, in order to couple it with a simulation of the flow at the CFD scale. The scope is the study of the cooling of the core of nuclear reactor following a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The problem of radiative transfer can be cut into two sub problems, one concerning the evaluation of the radiative properties of the medium and a second concerning the solution of the radiative transfer equation. The radiative properties of the droplets have been computed with the use of the Mie Theory and those of the vapor have been computed with a Ck model. The medium made of vapor and droplets is an absorbing, anisotropically scattering, emissive, non grey, non homogeneous medium. Hence, owing to the possible variations of the flow properties (diameter and volumetric fraction of the droplets, temperature and pressure of the vapor), the medium can be optically thin or thick. Consequently, a method is required which solves the radiative transfer accurately, with a moderate calculation time for all of these prerequisites. The IDA has been chosen, derived from the well-known P1-approximation. Its accuracy has been checked on academical cases found in the literature and by comparison with experimental data. Simulations of LOCA flows have been conducted taking account of the radiative transfer, evaluating the radiative fluxes and showing that radiative transfer influence cannot be neglected. (author)

  16. Self-powered in-core detectors of cobalt type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Georg

    1975-01-01

    Testing and development of self-powered neutron detectors with a cobalt emitter is described. Long term irradiation at 400 deg C is expected to indicate insulation quality, change in calibration and 60 Co build-up. Dynamic tests to investigate possible transient effects due to temperature changes are being performed on a number of detectors up to about 600 deg C. A long term irradiation at low temperature has been terminated after 4.5 years. On completion, neutron dose was estimated to be 5.6 x 10 21 nvt and the 60 Co background was 9.3 % of the full flux signal. A recently introduced long term test is expected to provide data on instability effects due to 61 Co. For a BWR in-core detector installation, the main advantage of cobalt detectors, apart from the small size, appears to be long life. Development work is being done on detectors with vanadium-cobalt emitters, electronic separation of fast and delayed signals and reduction of gamma sensitivity. (O.T.)

  17. Experience feedback examination in PWR type reactors operating for the 1997-1999 period; Examen du retour d'experience en exploitation des reacteurs a eau sous pression pour la periode 1997-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The present report is relative to the examination that the permanent group has made on the experience feedback in operation for PWR type reactors for the period 1997-1999 that was on eleven themes chosen by the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Authority. It used analysis reports made by I.R.S.N. in support of four meetings of the permanent group devoted to this examination from April 2001 to June 2002. The different themes were operating uncertainties, machining to vibrations, analysis of incidents and gaseous releases, circuits, human factors, behaviour of electric batteries, risk of cold source loss. (N.C.)

  18. Announcement of recommendations of the Reaktor-Sicherheitskommission. As of 24 July 1997. Joint recommendations of RSK and GPR for safety requirements of future nuclear PWR-type power plants. English versions published in the years 1995 through 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The recommendations, most parts given in English, refer to the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and have been established by the German RSK (reactor safety commission), the corresponding French organization GPR and the German SSK (radiation protection commission). This publication continues earlier joint recommendations by the national bodies, last published by the German BMU (responsible German ministry) on 5 May 1995, in BAnz. page 7452. The safety recommendations establish the basis for further activities in the Franco-German project for development of the EPR, a PWR type reactor of the next generation. (CB) [de

  19. Lightweight submersed 'Walking' NDE manipulators for PWR and BWR vessel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saernmark, Ivan; Lenz, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Three new manipulators developed by WesDyne TRC in Sweden have under the year 2007 performed three very successful inspections in the PWR reactor Ringhals 3 and the BWR reactors Ringhals 1 and Oskarshamn 1. The manipulator systems can be used to perform inspection of circumferential and vertical welds on the reactor pressure vessel, the core shroud, core shroud support in BWR reactors or vessel and core barrel welds in PWR reactors. Most other flat or curved surfaces can be inspected using the new concept through relatively simple mechanical reconfigurations of system modules. The first inspection was performed on the R3 PWR core barrel in June 2007 with a very good result. This Manipulator is designed for access in very narrow gaps and for the type of core barrels with a shield covering the whole area of the perimeter. The manipulator is attached to the inspection area by means of a new unique suction cup system. The current manipulators consist of a curved horizontal beam, with radius similar to the reactor vessel, and a straight vertical beam, forming a T-shaped structure. By alternating the application of suction cup pairs on the horizontal beam and the vertical beam and by driving the scanning motors, the manipulator performs an incremental translational movement upwards/downwards or from side to side. The principles of this system give a well defined and stable platform for global and local positioning accuracy. A combination of advanced sensor solutions provides accurate position information in the absence of other physical reference objects. The system is controlled by the new WesDyne TRC Motor Control Panel and software, the MCP is specifically designed for remote control of submersed manipulators using techniques for cable reduction

  20. Lightweight submersed 'Walking' NDE manipulators for PWR and BWR vessel weld inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saernmark, Ivan; Lenz, Herbert [WesDyne TRC AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-04-15

    Three new manipulators developed by WesDyne TRC in Sweden have under the year 2007 performed three very successful inspections in the PWR reactor Ringhals 3 and the BWR reactors Ringhals 1 and Oskarshamn 1. The manipulator systems can be used to perform inspection of circumferential and vertical welds on the reactor pressure vessel, the core shroud, core shroud support in BWR reactors or vessel and core barrel welds in PWR reactors. Most other flat or curved surfaces can be inspected using the new concept through relatively simple mechanical reconfigurations of system modules. The first inspection was performed on the R3 PWR core barrel in June 2007 with a very good result. This Manipulator is designed for access in very narrow gaps and for the type of core barrels with a shield covering the whole area of the perimeter. The manipulator is attached to the inspection area by means of a new unique suction cup system. The current manipulators consist of a curved horizontal beam, with radius similar to the reactor vessel, and a straight vertical beam, forming a T-shaped structure. By alternating the application of suction cup pairs on the horizontal beam and the vertical beam and by driving the scanning motors, the manipulator performs an incremental translational movement upwards/downwards or from side to side. The principles of this system give a well defined and stable platform for global and local positioning accuracy. A combination of advanced sensor solutions provides accurate position information in the absence of other physical reference objects. The system is controlled by the new WesDyne TRC Motor Control Panel and software, the MCP is specifically designed for remote control of submersed manipulators using techniques for cable reduction.

  1. Development of MHI PWR fuel assembly with high thermal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasushi Makino; Masaya Hoshi; Masaji Mori; Hidetoshi Kido; Kazuo Ikeda

    2005-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been developing a PWR fuel assembly to meet the needs of Japanese fuel market with mainly improving its reliability such as a mechanical strength, a seismic strength and endurance. For burn-up extension of the fuel to 55 GWd/t, MHI has introduced a Zircaloy spacer grid with better neutron economics with retaining the reliability in an operating core. However, for a future power up-rating and a longer cycle operation, a higher thermal performance is required for PWR fuel assembly. To meet the needs of fuel market, MHI has developed an advanced type of Zircaloy spacer grid with a greater DNB performance while retaining the reliability of a fuel and a relatively low pressure drop. For the greater DNB performance, MHI optimized geometrical shape of mixing vane to promote a fluid mixing performance. In this report, higher DNB performance provided by the advanced Zircaloy spacer grid is presented. The results of 3D simulation for the flow behavior in 5 x 5 partial assembly, a mixing test and a water DNB test were compared between the current and the advanced spacer grids. Consequently, it was confirmed that a crossover vane enhanced a fluid mixing and the advanced spacer grid could significantly improve DNB performance compared with the current design of spacer grids. (authors)

  2. Core construction in a pressure tube type heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Aoki, Katsutada.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To replace a centrally positioned fuel assembly of a fuel assembly unit with a reactor controlling machinery to decrease a distance between the fuel assemblies thereby saving use of heavy water and enhancing economy. Structure: A centrally positioned fuel assembly of a fuel assembly unit, which is composed of a plurality of fuel assemblies orderly arranged in lattice fashion, is replaced with a reactor controlling members such as control rods, poison tubes and the like to provide an arrangement of lattice-free type fuel assembly, thus reducing the pitch as small as possible. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Development of inherent technologies for advanced PWR core - A study on the current status and the construction feasibility of critical facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Sik; Yang, Hyun Seok [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea); Kim, Chang Hyo; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the appropriateness of constructing critical facilities in our country and to decide a course of constructing them if necessary by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. We investigated the status and the utilization of foreign critical facilities through literature survey and personal visitation. In our judgement, critical facilities are necessary for developing the advanced reactors and fuels which are being studied as parts of the Nuclear R and D Program by MOST. Considering the construction cost and the current state of domestic economy, however, it is unjustifiable to build three different types of critical facilities (the light water, the heavy water, and the fast critical facility). It appears to be reasonable to build a light water critical, considering the construction cost, degree of utilization, and other constraints. (author). 89 refs., 134 figs., 64 tabs.

  4. Tunable Band Gap and Conductivity Type of ZnSe/Si Core-Shell Nanowire Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijie Zeng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The electronic properties of zincblende ZnSe/Si core-shell nanowires (NWs with a diameter of 1.1–2.8 nm are calculated by means of the first principle calculation. Band gaps of both ZnSe-core/Si-shell and Si-core/ZnSe-shell NWs are much smaller than those of pure ZnSe or Si NWs. Band alignment analysis reveals that the small band gaps of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs are caused by the interface state. Fixing the ZnSe core size and enlarging the Si shell would turn the NWs from intrinsic to p-type, then to metallic. However, Fixing the Si core and enlarging the ZnSe shell would not change the band gap significantly. The partial charge distribution diagram shows that the conduction band maximum (CBM is confined in Si, while the valence band maximum (VBM is mainly distributed around the interface. Our findings also show that the band gap and conductivity type of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs can be tuned by the concentration and diameter of the core-shell material, respectively.

  5. Power distribution gradients in WWER type cores and fuel failure root causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuš, Ján M., E-mail: JanMikus.nrc@hotmail.com

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Power (fission rate) distribution gradients can represent fuel failure root causes. • Positions with above gradients were investigated in WWER type cores on reactor LR-0. • Above gradients were evaluated near core heterogeneities and construction materials. • Results can be used for code validation and fuel failure occurrence investigation. - Abstract: Neutron flux non-uniformity and gradients of neutron current resulting in corresponding power (fission rate) distribution changes can represent root causes of the fuel failure. Such situation can be expected in vicinity of some core heterogeneities and construction materials. Since needed data cannot be obtained from nuclear power plant (NPP), results of some benchmark type experiments performed on light water, zero-power research reactor LR-0 were used for investigation of the above phenomenon. Attention was focused on determination of the spatial power distribution changes in fuel assemblies (FAs): Containing fuel rods (FRs) with Gd burnable absorber in WWER-440 and WWER-1000 type cores, Neighboring the core blanket and dummy steel assembly simulators on the periphery of the WWER-440 standard and low leakage type cores, resp., Neighboring baffle in WWER-1000 type cores, and Neighboring control rod (CR) in WWER-440 type cores, namely (a) power peak in axial power distribution in periphery FRs of the adjacent FAs near the area between CR fuel part and butt joint to the CR absorbing part and (b) decrease in radial power distribution in FRs near CR absorbing part. An overview of relevant experimental results from reactor LR-0 and some information concerning leaking FAs on NPP Temelín are presented. Obtained data can be used for code validation and subsequently for the fuel failure occurrence investigation.

  6. Study on natural convection in core barrel. Experimental and numerical results for band type spacer pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kenji; Kawamata, Nobuhiro; Kamide, Hideki

    2003-03-01

    In a fast reactor an Inter-Wrapper Flow (IWF) is one of significant phenomena for decay heat removal under natural circulation condition, when a direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) is adopted for decay heat removal system. Cold coolant provided by dipped heat exchangers (DHX) of DRACS can penetrate into the core barrel (region between the subassemblies) and it makes natural convection int he core barrel. Such IWF will depend on a spacer pad geometry of subassemblies. Water experiment, TRIF (Test Rig for Inter-wrapper Flow), was carried out for IWF in a reactor core. The test section modeled a 1/12th sector of the core and upper plenum of reactor vessel. Experimental parameters were the spacer pad geometry and flow path geometries connecting the upper plenum and core barrel. Numerical simulation using AQUA code was also performed to confirm applicability of a simulation method. An experimental series using a button type spacer pad had been carried out. Here a band type spacer pad was examined. Temperatures at subassembly wall were measured with parameter of the flow path geometries; one was a connection pipe between the upper plenum and core barrel and the other was flow hole in core former plates between the outermost subassemblies and the core barrel. It was found that these flow paths were effective to remove heat in the core in case of the band type spacer pad. A general purpose three dimensional analysis code, AQUA, was applied to the experimental analysis. Each subassembly and inter wrapper gap region were modeled by slab mesh geometry. Pressure loss coefficient at the pacer pad was set based on the geometry. The numerical simulation results were in good agreement with measured temperature profiles in the core. (author)

  7. BEACON TSM application system to the operation of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, J. A.; Mildrum, C.; Serrano, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    BEACON-TSM is an advanced core monitoring system for PWR reactor cores, and also offers the possibility to perform a wide range of predictive calculation in support of reactor operation. BEACON-TSM is presently installed and licensed in the 5 Spanish PWR reactors of standard Westinghouse design. the purpose of this paper is to describe the features of this software system and to show the advantages obtainable by a nuclear power plant from its use. To illustrate the capabilities and benefits of BEACON-TSM two real case reactor operating situations are presented. (Author)

  8. Transient performance of flow in PWR reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirdes, V.R.T.R.; Carajilescov, P.

    1988-12-01

    Generally, PWR's are designed with several primary loops, each one provided with a pump to circulate the coolant through the core. If one or more of these pumps fail, there would be a decrease in reactor flow rate which cause coolant phase change in the core and components overheating. The present work establishes a simulation model for pump failure in PWR's and the SARDAN-FLOW computes code was developed, considering any combination of such failures. Based on the data of Angra I, several accident and operational transient conditions were simulated. (author) [pt

  9. Application of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique to the thermal-hydraulics project of a PWR reactor core in reduced scale; Aplicacao da tecnica de otimizacao por enxame de particulas no projeto termo-hidraulico em escala reduzida do nucleo de um reator PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Junior, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2008-09-15

    The reduced scale models design have been employed by engineers from several different industries fields such as offshore, spatial, oil extraction, nuclear industries and others. Reduced scale models are used in experiments because they are economically attractive than its own prototype (real scale) because in many cases they are cheaper than a real scale one and most of time they are also easier to build providing a way to lead the real scale design allowing indirect investigations and analysis to the real scale system (prototype). A reduced scale model (or experiment) must be able to represent all physical phenomena that occurs and further will do in the real scale one under operational conditions, e.g., in this case the reduced scale model is called similar. There are some different methods to design a reduced scale model and from those two are basic: the empiric method based on the expert's skill to determine which physical measures are relevant to the desired model; and the differential equation method that is based on a mathematical description of the prototype (real scale system) to model. Applying a mathematical technique to the differential equation that describes the prototype then highlighting the relevant physical measures so the reduced scale model design problem may be treated as an optimization problem. Many optimization techniques as Genetic Algorithm (GA), for example, have been developed to solve this class of problems and have also been applied to the reduced scale model design problem as well. In this work, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique is investigated as an alternative optimization tool for such problem. In this investigation a computational approach, based on particle swarm optimization technique (PSO), is used to perform a reduced scale two loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, considering 100% of nominal power operation on a forced flow cooling circulation and non-accidental operating conditions. A performance

  10. The Conceptual Design of Innovative Safe PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han-Gon [Centural Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Sun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Most of countries operating NPPs have been performed post-Fukushima improvements as short-term countermeasure to enhance the safety of operating NPPs. Separately, vendors have made efforts on developing passive safety systems as long-term and ultimate countermeasures. AP1000 designed by Westinghouse Electric Company has passive safety systems including the passive emergency core cooling system (PECCS), the passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS), and the passive containment cooling system (PCCS). ESBWR designed by GE-Hitachi also has passive safety systems consisting of the isolation condenser system, the gravity driven cooling system and the PCCS. Other countries including China and Russia have made efforts on developing passive safety systems for enhancing the safety of their plants. In this paper, we summarize the design goals and main design feature of innovative safe PWR, iPOWER which is standing for Innovative Passive Optimized World-wide Economical Reactor, and show the developing status and results of research projects. To mitigate an accident without electric power and enhance the safety level of PWR, the conceptual designs of passive safety system and innovative safe PWR have been performed. It includes the PECCS for core cooling and the PCCS for containment cooling. Now we are performing the small scale and separate effect tests for the PECCS and the PCCS and preparing the integral effect test for the PECCS and real scale test for the PCCS.

  11. Analysis of fuel management pattern of research reactor core of the MTR type design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lily Suparlina; Tukiran Surbakti

    2014-01-01

    Research reactor core design needs neutronics parameter calculation use computer codes. Research reactor MTR type is very interested because can be used as research and also a radioisotope production. The research reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 years old. Therefore, it is needed to design a new research reactor as a compact core. Recent research reactor core is not enough to meet criteria acceptance in the UCD which already determined namely thermal neutron flux in the core is 1.0x10 15 n/cm 2 s. so that it is necessary to be redesign the alternative core design. The new research reactor design is a MTR type with 5x5 configuration core, uses U9Mo-Al fuel, 70 cm of high and uses two certainly fuel management pattern. The aim of this research is to achieve neutron flux in the core to meet the criteria acceptance in the UCD. Calculation is done by using WIMSD-B, Batan-FUEL and Batan-3DIFF codes. The neutronic parameters to be achieved by this calculation are the power level of 50 MW thermal and core cycle of 20 days. The neutronics parameter calculation is done for new U-9Mo-Al fuel with variation of densities.The result of calculation showed that the fresh core with 5x5 configuration, 360 gram, 390 gram and 450 gram of fuel loadings have meet safety margin and acceptance criteria in the UCD at the thermal neutron flux is more then 1.0 x 10 15 n/cm 2 s. But for equilibrium core is only the 450 gram of loading meet the acceptance criteria. (author)

  12. Calculation analysis of TRIGA MARK II reactor core composed of two types of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.

    1988-11-01

    The most important properties of mixed cores are treated for TRIGA MARK II reactor, composed of standard (20% enriched, 8.5w% U content) and FLIP (70% enriched, 8.5w% U content) fuel elements. Large difference in enrichment and presence of burnable poison in FLIP fuel have strong influence on the main core characteristics, such as: fuel temperature coefficient, power defect, Xe and Sm worth, power and flux distributions, etc. They are significantly different for both types of fuel. Optimal loading of mixed cores therefore strongly depends on the loading pattern of both types of fuel elements. Results of systematic calculational analysis of mixed cores are presented. Calculations on the level of fuel element are performed with WIMSD-4 computer code with extended cross-section library. Core calculations are performed with TRIGAP two-group 1-D diffusion code. Results are compared to measurements and physical explanation is provided. Special concern is devoted to realistic mixed cores, for which optimal in-core fuel management is derived. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. [Influence of different types of posts and cores on color of IPS-Empress 2 crown].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-fang; Yang, Jing-yuan; Yang, Xing-mei; Yang, Liu; Xu, Qiang; Guan, Hong-yu; Wan, Qian-bing

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of different types of posts and cores on the final color of the IPS-Emperss 2 crown. Five types of posts and cores (Cerapost with Empress cosmo, Cerapost with composite resin, gilded Ni-Cr alloy, gold alloy and Ni-Cr alloy) were made. The shifts in color of three points of IPS-Empress 2 crown surface (cervical, middle and incisal) with different posts and cores was measured with a spectroradiometer (PR-650). The L* a* b* values of zirconium oxide and gilded Ni-Cr alloy posts and cores with ceramic crown were the highest. The L* a* values of zirconium oxide posts composite cores were higher while the b* values were lower. The L* a* b* values of Ni-Cr alloy were lower than that of gold alloy and were the lowest. In combination with IPS-Empress 2 crown, zirconium oxide posts are suitable for routine use in the anterior dentition, and gilded Ni-Cr alloy and gold alloy posts and cores can be recommended for clinical practice. Ni-Cr alloy posts and cores can not be recommended for clinical practice.

  14. First evaluation of low frequency noise measurements of in core detector signals in the measuring assembly Rheinsberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collatz, S.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor noise spectra of in core neutron detectors are measured in the low frequency range (0.03 Hz to 1 Hz) and evaluated. The increase of the effective noise signal value is due to pressure oscillations or oscillations of special steam volume portions. Thus boiling monitoring of reactor cores in PWR type reactors may be possible, if the low frequency noise of the whole set of in core detectors is taken into account

  15. Activity transport models for PWR primary circuits; PWR-ydinvoimalaitoksen primaeaeripiirin aktiivisuuskulkeutumismallit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, V; Rosenberg, R [VTT Chemical Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1995-03-01

    The corrosion products activated in the primary circuit form a major source of occupational radiation dose in the PWR reactors. Transport of corrosion activity is a complex process including chemistry, reactor physics, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. All the mechanisms involved are not known and there is no comprehensive theory for the process, so experimental test loops and plant data are very important in research efforts. Several activity transport modelling attempts have been made to improve the water chemistry control and to minimise corrosion in PWR`s. In this research report some of these models are reviewed with special emphasis on models designed for Soviet VVER type reactors. (51 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.).

  16. AGR v PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1986-01-01

    When the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) invited tenders and placed a contract for the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) at Dungeness B in 1965 -preferring it to the Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) -the AGR was lamentably ill developed. The effects of the decision were widely felt, for it took the British nuclear industry off the light water reactor highway of world reactor business and up and idiosyncratic private highway of its own, excluding it altogether from any material export business in the two decades which followed. Yet although the UK may have made wrong decisions in rejecting the PWR in 1965, that does not mean that it can necessarily now either correct them, or redeem their consequence, by reversing the choice in 1985. In the 20 years since 1965 the whole world economic and energy picture has been transformed and the national picture with it. Picking up the PWR now could prove as big a disaster as rejecting it may have been in 1965. (author)

  17. Water chemistry in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    This article outlines major features and basic concept of the secondary system of PWR's and water properties control measures adopted in recent PWR plants. The secondary system of a PWR consists of a condenser cooling pipe (aluminum-brass, titanium, or stainless steel), low-pressure make-up water heating pipe (aluminum-brass or stainless steel), high-ressure make-up water heating pipe (cupro-nickel or stainless steel), steam generator heat-transfer pipe (Inconel 600 or 690), and bleed/drain pipe (carbon steel, low alloy steel or stainless steel). Other major pipes and equipment are made of carbon steel or stainless steel. Major troubles likely to be caused by water in the secondary system include reduction in wall thickness of the heat-transfer pipe, stress corrosion cracking in the heat-transfer pipe, and denting. All of these are caused by local corrosion due to concentration of purities contained in water. For controlling the water properties in the secondary system, it is necessary to prevent impurities from entering the system, to remove impurities and corrosion products from the system, and to prevent corrosion of apparatus making up the system. Measures widely adopted for controlling the formation of IGA include the addition of boric acid for decreasing the concentration of free alkali and high hydrazine operation for providing a highly reducing atmospere. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Core conversion from rod to plate type fuel elements in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.S.; Mina, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Core thermalhydraulic analysis have been performed for rod and plate types fuel elements without altering the core bundles square grid spacer (68 mm, side) and coolant mass flow rate. The U O 2 -Mg, 10% enrichment rod type fuel elements are replaced by the MTR plate type, U-Al alloy of 20% enrichment. Coolant mass flux increased from 2000 kg/m 2 S to 5000 kg/m 2 S. Reactor power could be upgraded from 2 to 10 MW without significantly altering the steady state, thermal-hydraulic safety margins. Fuel, clad and coolant transient temperatures are determined inside the core hot channel during flow coast down using paret code. Residual heat removal system of 20% coolant capacity is necessary for upgrading reactor power to encounter the case of pumps off at 10 MW nominal operation. 6 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of a PWR reactor using zircaloy and carbide silicon reinforced with type S fibers as fuel claddings: Simulation of a channel blockage transient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuck, Vinicius; Ramos, Mario C.; Faria, Rochkhudson B.; Reis, Patricia A.L.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: rochkdefaria@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: matuck747@gmail.com, E-mail: patricialire@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    A detailed thermal-hydraulic reactor model using as reference data from the Angra 2 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) has been developed and SiC reinforced with Hi-Nicalon type S fibers (SiC HNS) was used as fuel cladding. The goal is to compare its behavior from the thermal viewpoint with the Zircaloy, at the steady- state and transient conditions. The RELAP-3D was used to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis and a blockage transient has been investigated at full power operation. The transient considered is related to total obstruction of a core cooling channel of one fuel assembly. The calculations were performed using a point kinetic model. The reactor behavior after this transient was analyzed and the time evolution of cladding and coolant temperatures mass flow and void fraction are presented. (author)

  20. PWR: 10 years after and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    These proceedings of the SFEN days on PWR (Ten years after and perspectives) comprise 13 conferences bearing on: - From the occurential approach to the state approach - Evolution of calculating tools - Human factors and safety - Reactor safety in the PWR 2000 - The PWR and the electrical power grid load follow - Fuel aspect of PWR management - PWR chemistry evolution - Balance of radiation protection - PWR modifications balance and influence on reactor operation - Design and maintenance of reactor components: 4 conferences [fr

  1. Activity of corrosion products in pool type reactors with ascending flow in the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade e Silva, Graciete S. de; Queiroz Bogado Leite, Sergio de

    1995-01-01

    A model for the activity of corrosion products in the water of a pool type reactor with ascending flow is presented. The problem is described by a set of coupled differential equations relating the radioisotope concentrations in the core and pool circuits and taking into account two types of radioactive sources: i) those from radioactive species formed in the fuel cladding, control elements, reflector, etc, and afterwards released to the primary stream by corrosion (named reactor sources) and ii) those formed from non radioactive isotopes entering the primary stream by corrosion of the circuit components and being activated when passing through the core (named circuit sources). (author). 6 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  2. In-pile data analysis of the comparative WWER/PWR test IFA-503.1. Final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, B.; Devold, H.; Ryazantzev, E.; Yakovlev, V.

    1999-04-15

    The comparative WWER/PWR test in IFA-503.1 was commenced in July 1995 and successfully finished at the end of November 1998. The main objective of the test was generation of representative and comparative data of standard WWER-440 fuel fabricated at the 'MSZ' Electrostal (Russia) and PWR type fuel manufactured at IFE Kjeller (Norway). The test assembly comprised two clusters, each with 3 WWER rods and 3 PWR type rods. Eight rods with two types of fuel were instrumented with expansion thermometers, four rods were equipped with both fuel stack elongation detectors and pressure transducers. All sensors worked satisfactorily during the test. The average burnups achieved in the lower and upper clusters were around 25 and 20 MWd/kgUO{sub 2}, respectively. Some difference in densification of the two types of fuel was revealed during the first irradiation period. However, the fuel temperatures and commencement of fuel stack swelling were similar despite this fact. At the end of the test the rig was moved to a higher flux position in the HBWR core with the aim of promoting FGR and to compare the behaviour of the two types of fuel under higher power. Pressure measurements indicated a comparable low FGR (around 1 percent) in both types of rods. The centreline temperatures measured in the PWR rods were very close to the Halden FGR threshold whilst the WWER fuel temperatures were slightly lower. Despite the differences found in the behaviour of the two types of fuel during the test, the analysis of the in-pile data showed that these differences would not affect the fuel efficiency, at least, up to the burnup achieved in the test. It is supposed that these differences can be related to the fuel microstructure, in particular to the fuel grain and pore sizes (author) (ml)

  3. In-pile data analysis of the comparative WWER/PWR test IFA-503.1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, B.; Devold, H.; Ryazantzev, E.; Yakovlev, V

    1999-04-15

    The comparative WWER/PWR test in IFA-503.1 was commenced in July 1995 and successfully finished at the end of November 1998. The main objective of the test was generation of representative and comparative data of standard WWER-440 fuel fabricated at the 'MSZ' Electrostal (Russia) and PWR type fuel manufactured at IFE Kjeller (Norway). The test assembly comprised two clusters, each with 3 WWER rods and 3 PWR type rods. Eight rods with two types of fuel were instrumented with expansion thermometers, four rods were equipped with both fuel stack elongation detectors and pressure transducers. All sensors worked satisfactorily during the test. The average burnups achieved in the lower and upper clusters were around 25 and 20 MWd/kgUO{sub 2}, respectively. Some difference in densification of the two types of fuel was revealed during the first irradiation period. However, the fuel temperatures and commencement of fuel stack swelling were similar despite this fact. At the end of the test the rig was moved to a higher flux position in the HBWR core with the aim of promoting FGR and to compare the behaviour of the two types of fuel under higher power. Pressure measurements indicated a comparable low FGR (around 1 percent) in both types of rods. The centreline temperatures measured in the PWR rods were very close to the Halden FGR threshold whilst the WWER fuel temperatures were slightly lower. Despite the differences found in the behaviour of the two types of fuel during the test, the analysis of the in-pile data showed that these differences would not affect the fuel efficiency, at least, up to the burnup achieved in the test. It is supposed that these differences can be related to the fuel microstructure, in particular to the fuel grain and pore sizes (author) (ml)

  4. PWR plant operator training used full scope simulator incorporated MAAP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Tabuchi, T.; Yamashita, T.; Komatsu, Y.; Tsubouchi, K.; Banka, T.; Mochizuki, T.; Nishimura, K.; Iizuka, H.

    2015-01-01

    NTC makes an effort with the understanding of plant behavior of core damage accident as part of our advanced training. For the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, we introduced the MAAP model into PWR operator training full scope simulator and also made the Severe Accident Visual Display unit. From 2014, we will introduce new training program for a core damage accident with PWR operator training full scope simulator incorporated the MAAP model and the Severe Accident Visual Display unit. (author)

  5. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Material Samples: Tensile and SSRT Testing (Nonproprietary Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, M.; Shogan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs requires detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel (internals) subjected to such conditions. This project studied the effects of reactor service on the mechanical and corrosion properties of samples of baffle plate, former plate, and core barrel from a decommissioned PWR

  6. Influence of boron reduction strategies on PWR accident management flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papukchiev, Angel Aleksandrov; Liu, Yubo; Schaefer, Anselm

    2007-01-01

    In conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, soluble boron is used for reactivity control over core fuel cycle. Design changes to reduce boron concentration in the reactor coolant are of general interest regarding three aspects - improved reactivity feedback properties, lower impact of boron dilution scenarios on PWR safety and eventually more flexible accident management procedures. In order to assess the potential advantages through the introduction of boron reduction strategies in current PWRs, two low boron core configurations based on fuel with increased utilization of gadolinium and erbium burnable absorbers have been developed. The new PWR designs permit to reduce the natural boron concentration in reactor coolant at begin of cycle to 518 ppm and 805 ppm. For the assessment of the potential safety advantages of these cores a hypothetical beyond design basis accident has been simulated with the system code ATHLET. The analyses showed improved inherent safety and increased accident management flexibility of the low boron cores in comparison with the standard PWR. (author)

  7. Fluid-structure-interaction of the pressurized water reactor core internals during blowdown - numerical simulation with a homogenization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, J.

    1984-03-01

    A method for the numerical simulation of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core internal's behaviour during a blowdown accident is described, by which the motion of the reactor core and the interaction of the fuel elements with the core barrel and the coolant medium is calculated. Furthermore, some simple models for the support columns, lower and upper core support and the grid plate are provided. All these models have been implemented into the code Flux-4. For the solution of the very complex, coupled equations of motions for fluid and fuel rods an efficient numerical solution technique has been developed. With the new code-version Flux-5 the PWR-blowdown is parametically investigated. The calculated core barrel loadings are compared with Flux-4 results, simulating the core's inertia by a mass ring of HDR type. (orig.) [de

  8. Nuclear characteristic simulation device for reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Kobayashi, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    In a simulation device for nuclear characteristic of a PWR type reactor, there are provided a one-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic model for simulating one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core and average reactor power based on each of inputted signals of control rod pattern, a reactor core flow rate, reactor core pressure and reactor core inlet enthalphy, and a three-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic mode for simulating three-dimensional power distribution of the reactor core, and a nuclear instrumentation model for calculating read value of the nuclear instrumentation disposed in the reactor based on the average reactor core power and the reactor core three-dimensional power distribution. A one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core, a reactor core average power, a reactor core three-dimensional power distribution and a nuclear instrumentation read value are calculated. As a result, the three-dimensional power distribution and the power level are continuously calculated. Further, since the transient change of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution is calculated accurately on real time, more actual response relative to a power monitoring device of the reactor core and operation performance can be simulated. (N.H.)

  9. Investigation of conditions inside the reactor building annulus of a PWR plant of KONVOI type in case of severe accidents with increased containment leakages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalov, Ivan [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Berlin (Germany); Sonnenkalb, Martin [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Improvements of the implemented severe accident management (SAM) concepts have been done in all operating German NPPs after the Fukushima Daiichi accidents following recommendations of the German Reactor Safety Commission (RSK) and as a result of the stress test being performed. The efficiency of newly developed severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for a PWR KONVOI reference plant related to the mitigation of challenging conditions inside the reactor building (RB) annulus due to increased containment leakages during severe accidents have been assessed. Based on two representative severe accident scenarios the releases of both hydrogen and radionuclides into the RB annulus have been predicted with different boundary conditions. The accident scenarios have been analysed without and with the impact of several SAM measures (already planned or proposed in addition), which turned out to be efficient to mitigate the consequences. The work was done within the frame of a research project financially supported by the Federal Ministry BMUB.

  10. Investigation of conditions inside the reactor building annulus of a PWR plant of KONVOI type in case of severe accidents with increased containment leakages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakalov, Ivan; Sonnenkalb, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Improvements of the implemented severe accident management (SAM) concepts have been done in all operating German NPPs after the Fukushima Daiichi accidents following recommendations of the German Reactor Safety Commission (RSK) and as a result of the stress test being performed. The efficiency of newly developed severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for a PWR KONVOI reference plant related to the mitigation of challenging conditions inside the reactor building (RB) annulus due to increased containment leakages during severe accidents have been assessed. Based on two representative severe accident scenarios the releases of both hydrogen and radionuclides into the RB annulus have been predicted with different boundary conditions. The accident scenarios have been analysed without and with the impact of several SAM measures (already planned or proposed in addition), which turned out to be efficient to mitigate the consequences. The work was done within the frame of a research project financially supported by the Federal Ministry BMUB.

  11. Bituminization of simulated PWR type reactor wastes, boric evaporator bottons and ion exchange resins, carried out in CNEN/SP using commercial bitumen available in the Brazilian market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosche Filho, C.E.; Chandra, U.

    1986-01-01

    The first results of the study of bituminization of simulated PWR wastes, boric evaporator bottons and spent ion-exclange resins (OH - , H + ) and incinerated ash-wates are presented and discussed. The study consisted of characterization of the commercial bitumen, locally available and bitumen wastes products of varying whight compositions. The characterization was carried out using standard analysis methods of ABNT and ASTM, and included measurement of, penetration, softening point and flash point. In addition, the bitumen samples were analized for their resin and asphaltene contents. For leaching studies, wastes products of bitumen and resin loaded with 134 Cs were utilized. The method used was according to the ISO norms. The simulation of the industrial process was carried out using an extruder-evaporator typically used in the plastic industries offered by Industria de Maquinas Miotto Ltda., Sao Bernardo do Campo - SP. (Author) [pt

  12. Optimized core design and fuel management of a pebble-bed type nuclear reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The core design of a pebble-bed type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is optimized, aiming for an increase of the coolant outlet temperature to 1000 C, while retaining its inherent safety features. The VHTR has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the

  13. Stochastic optimization of loading pattern for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smuc, T.; Pevec, D.

    1994-01-01

    The application of stochastic optimization methods in solving in-core fuel management problems is restrained by the need for a large number of proposed solutions loading patterns, if a high quality final solution is wanted. Proposed loading patterns have to be evaluated by core neutronics simulator, which can impose unrealistic computer time requirements. A new loading pattern optimization code Monte Carlo Loading Pattern Search has been developed by coupling the simulated annealing optimization algorithm with a fast one-and-a-half dimensional core depletion simulator. The structure of the optimization method provides more efficient performance and allows the user to empty precious experience in the search process, thus reducing the search space size. Hereinafter, we discuss the characteristics of the method and illustrate them on the results obtained by solving the PWR reload problem. (authors). 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  14. Minimization of PWR reactor control rods wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, Pedro; Moura Angelkorte, Gunther de

    1995-01-01

    The Rod Cluster Control Assemblies (RCCA's) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's) have experienced a continuously wall cladding wear when Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) are running. Fretting wear is a result of vibrational contact between RCCA rodlets and the guide cards which provide lateral support for the rodlets when RCCA's are withdrawn from the core. A procedure is developed to minimize the rodlets wear, by the shuffling and axial reposition of RCCA's every operating cycle. These shuffling and repositions are based on measurement of the rodlet cladding thickness of all RCCA's. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Development of flow network analysis code for block type VHTR core by linear theory method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Yoon, S. J.; Park, J. W.; Park, G. C.

    2012-01-01

    VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) is high-efficiency nuclear reactor which is capable of generating hydrogen with high temperature of coolant. PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor) type reactor consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks. The flow paths in the prismatic VHTR core consist of coolant holes, bypass gaps and cross gaps. Complicated flow paths are formed in the core since the coolant holes and bypass gap are connected by the cross gap. Distributed coolant was mixed in the core through the cross gap so that the flow characteristics could not be modeled as a simple parallel pipe system. It requires lot of effort and takes very long time to analyze the core flow with CFD analysis. Hence, it is important to develop the code for VHTR core flow which can predict the core flow distribution fast and accurate. In this study, steady state flow network analysis code is developed using flow network algorithm. Developed flow network analysis code was named as FLASH code and it was validated with the experimental data and CFD simulation results. (authors)

  16. Preliminary Core Design Analysis of a 200MWth Pebble Bed-type VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Chang Keun; Noh, Jae Man

    2007-01-01

    This paper intends to suggest the preliminary core design analysis of a VHTR for a hydrogen production. The nuclear hydrogen system that utilizes the high temperature heat generated from the VHTR is a promising candidate for a cost effective, safe and clean supply of hydrogen in the age of hydrogen economy. Among two candidate VHTR cores, that is, a prismatic modular reactor (PMR) and a pebble bed-type reactor (PBR), we focus on the design of a 200MWth PBR (hereinafter PBR200) in this paper. Here, the 200MWth power is selected for a demonstration plant. The core configuration of the PBR200 is similar to the PBMR (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor, 400MWth) of South Africa, but the overall dimension of the reactor system is scaled-down. This paper is to suggest two candidate PBR200 cores. One is an annular core with an inner reflector (PBR200-CD1) which was presented at IWRES07, and the other is a cylindrical core without an inner reflector (PBR200-CD2)

  17. Simulation of the Long period Core Design for WH type of KHNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Moon, Sang-Rae

    2016-01-01

    The current core design of the reactor and the new design of long period based on ANC code are compared here targeting the unit of WH type(Westinghouse nuclear steam supply system) operated by KHNP. The reactor core is composed of 157 fuel assemblies, consisting of a 17×17 array with 264 fuel rods, 24 guide thimbles. To investigate susceptibility of CIPS(crud-induced power shift) for long period core design, the boron mass is also calculated here. The long period core design for WH type of KHNP is simulated and evaluated the risk assessment for the result. 89 feed assemblies and 4.95w/o uranium enrichment (3.2w/o for Axial-blanket) are used for fresh fuel rods. The cycle length of long period design is increased by 6 month than the average of operated cycles satisfying the criteria of risk assessment for the core design; maximum F△h and maximum pin burnup and so on, except burndown curve

  18. Simulation of the Long period Core Design for WH type of KHNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Moon, Sang-Rae [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The current core design of the reactor and the new design of long period based on ANC code are compared here targeting the unit of WH type(Westinghouse nuclear steam supply system) operated by KHNP. The reactor core is composed of 157 fuel assemblies, consisting of a 17×17 array with 264 fuel rods, 24 guide thimbles. To investigate susceptibility of CIPS(crud-induced power shift) for long period core design, the boron mass is also calculated here. The long period core design for WH type of KHNP is simulated and evaluated the risk assessment for the result. 89 feed assemblies and 4.95w/o uranium enrichment (3.2w/o for Axial-blanket) are used for fresh fuel rods. The cycle length of long period design is increased by 6 month than the average of operated cycles satisfying the criteria of risk assessment for the core design; maximum F△h and maximum pin burnup and so on, except burndown curve.

  19. French PWR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.

    1986-05-01

    Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach, each of them having possibilities and limits. As a consequence of the global risk objective set in 1977 for nuclear reactors, safety analysis was extended to the evaluation of events more complex than the conventional ones, and later to the evaluation of the feasibility of the offsite emergency plans in case of severe accidents

  20. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  1. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  2. Solution of a benchmark set problems for BWR and PWR reactors with UO2 and MOX fuels using CASMO-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez F, M.A.; Valle G, E. del; Alonso V, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this work some of the results for a group of benchmark problems of light water reactors that allow to study the physics of the fuels of these reactors are presented. These benchmark problems were proposed by Akio Yamamoto and collaborators in 2002 and they include two fuel types; uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and mixed oxides (MOX). The range of problems that its cover embraces three different configurations: unitary cell for a fuel bar, fuel assemble of PWR and fuel assemble of BWR what allows to carry out an understanding analysis of the problems related with the fuel performance of new generation in light water reactors with high burnt. Also these benchmark problems help to understand the fuel administration in core of a BWR like of a PWR. The calculations were carried out with CMS (of their initials in English Core Management Software), particularly with CASMO-4 that is a code designed to carry out analysis of fuels burnt of fuel bars cells as well as fuel assemblies as much for PWR as for BWR and that it is part in turn of the CMS code. (Author)

  3. PHEDRE model for the simulation of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Patrice; Dupraz, Remy; Vasile, Alfredo.

    1979-11-01

    This note presents the model of PHEDRE, simulator of a PWR, set on the hybrid computers of CISI, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache. The model mainly concerns the primary part and the steam production of the PWR constructed in France. It includes an axial modelization of the core, the pressurizer, two loops of steam production and the inlet of the turbine, and the regulations concerning these components. The note presents the equations of the model, the structures of the codes concerning the initialization and the dynamic resolution, and describes the control panel of PHEDRE [fr

  4. Provision of reliable core cooling in vessel-type boiling reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alferov, N.S.; Balunov, B.F.; Davydov, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Methods for providing reliable core cooling in vessel-type boiling reactors with natural circulation for heat supply are analysed. The solution of this problem is reduced to satisfaction of two conditions such as: water confinement over the reactor core necessary in case of an accident and confinement of sufficient coolant flow rate through the bottom cross section of fuel assemblies for some time. The reliable fuel element cooling under conditions of a maximum credible accident (brittle failure of a reactor vessel) is shown to be provided practically in any accident, using the safety vessel in combination with the application of means of standard operation and minimal composition and capacity of ECCS

  5. Effect of Core Configurations on Burn-Up Calculations For MTR Type Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, H.M.; Sakr, A.M.; Amin, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional burn-up calculations of MTR-type research reactor were performed using different patterns of control rods , to examine their effect on power density and neutron flux distributions throughout the entire core and on the local burn-up distribution. Calculations were performed using the computer codes' package M TR P C system , using the cell calculation transport code WIMS-D4 and the core calculation diffusion code CITVAP. A depletion study was done and the effects on the reactor fuel were studied, then an empirical formula was generated for every fuel element type, to correlate irradiation to burn-up percentage. Keywords: Neutronic Calculations, Burn-Up, MTR-Type Research Reactors, MTR P C Package, Empirical Formula For Fuel Burn-Up.

  6. Development of core technology for research reactors using plate type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jae Joo; Lee, Doo Jeong; Park, Cheol

    2009-12-01

    Around 250 research reactors are under operation over the world. However, about 2/3 have been operated more than 30 years and demands for replacements are expected in the near future. The number of expected units is around 110, and around 55 units from 40 countries will be expected to be bid in the world market. In 2007, Netherlands started international bidding process to construct a new 80MW RR (named PALLAS) with the target of commercial operation in 2016, which will replace the existing HFR(45MW). KAERI consortium has been participated in that bid. Most of RRs use plate type fuels as a fuel assembly, Be and Graphite as a reflector. On the other hand, in Korea, the KAERI is operating the HANARO, which uses a rod type fuel assembly and heavy water as a reflector. Hence, core technologies for RRs using plate type fuels are in short. Therefore, core technologies should be secured for exporting a RR. In chapter 2, the conceptual design of PALLAS which use plate type fuels are described including core, cooling system and connected systems, layout of general components. Experimental verification tests for the plate type fuel and second shutdown system and the code verification for nuclear design are explained in Chapter 3 and 4, respectively

  7. Modeling in fast dynamics of accidents in the primary circuit of PWR type reactors; Modelisation en dynamique rapide d'accidents dans le circuit primaire des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F

    2003-12-01

    Two kinds of accidents, liable to occur in the primary circuit of a Pressurized Water Reactor and involving fast dynamic phenomena, are analyzed. The Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is the accident used to define the current PWR. It consists in a large-size break located in a pipe of the primary circuit. A blowdown wave propagates through the circuit. The pressure differences between the different zones of the reactor induce high stresses in the structures of the lower head and may degrade the reactor core. The primary circuit starts emptying from the break opening. Pressure decreases very quickly, involving a large steaming. Two thermal-hydraulic simulations of the blowdown phase of a LOCA are computed with the Europlexus code. The primary circuit is represented by a pipe-model including the hydraulic peculiarities of the circuit. The main differences between both computations concern the kind of reactor, the break location and model, and the initialization of the accidental operation. Steam explosion is a hypothetical severe accident liable to happen after a core melting. The molten part of the core (called corium) falls in the lower part of the reactor. The interaction between the hot corium and the cold water remaining at the bottom of the vessel induces a massive and violent vaporization of water, similar to an explosive phenomenon. A shock wave propagates in the vessel. what can damage seriously the neighbouring structures or drill the vessel. This work presents a synthesis of in-vessel parametrical studies carried out with the Europlexus code, the linkage of the thermal-hydraulic code Mc3d dedicated to the pre-mixing phase with the Europlexus code dealing with the explosion, and finally a benchmark between the Cigalon and Europlexus codes relative to the Vulcano mock-up. (author)

  8. Developing and analyzing long-term fuel management strategies for an advanced Small Modular PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Afshin, E-mail: ahedayat@aeoi.org.ir

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Comprehensive introduction and supplementary concepts as a review paper. • Developing an integrated long-term fuel management strategy for a SMR. • High reliable 3-D core modeling over fuel pins against the traditional LRM. • Verifying the expert rules of large PWRs for an advanced small PWR. • Investigating large numbers of safety parameters coherently. - Abstract: In this paper, long-term fuel management (FM) strategies are introduced and analyzed for a new advanced Pressurized Light Water Reactor (PWR) type of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs). The FM strategies are developed to be safe and practical for implementation as much as possible. Safety performances, economy of fuel, and Quality Assurance (QA) of periodic equilibrium conditions are chosen as the main goals. Flattening power density distribution over fuel pins is the major method to ensure safety performance; also maximum energy output or permissible discharging burn up indicates economy of fuel fabrication costs. Burn up effects from BOC to EOC have been traced, studied, and highly visualized in both of transport lattice cell calculations and diffusion core calculations. Long-term characteristics are searched to gain periodical equilibrium characteristics. They are fissile changes, neutron spectrum, refueling pattern, fuel cycle length, core excess reactivity, average, and maximum burn up of discharged fuels, radial Power Peaking Factors (PPF), total PPF, radial and axial power distributions, batch effects, and enrichment effects for fine regulations. Traditional linear reactivity model have been successfully simulated and adapted via fine core and burn up calculations. Effects of high burnable neutron poison and soluble boron are analyzed. Different numbers of batches via different refueling patterns have been studied and visualized. Expert rules for large type PWRs have been influenced and well tested throughout accurate equilibrium core calculations.

  9. Comparative accident analyses for a KONVOI-type PWR using the integral codes ASTEC V1.33 and MELCOR 1.8.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinke, Nils; Erdmann, Walter; Nowack, Holger; Sonnenkalb, Martin

    2010-08-01

    In the frame of the project RS1180 funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economics and Technology (BMWi) calculations have been carried out with the integral code ASTEC V1.33 p3 developed by GRS for two postulated accidents in a nuclear power plant with KONVOI type a pressurized water reactor and compared to calculations with MELCOR 1.8.6 YU. Major objective was to assess the capability of ASTEC for application in level 2 probabilistic safety analyses (PSA). In particular, it was investigated to which extent ASTEC is able to perform such integral calculations meeting criteria with regard to both reasonable calculation time and specific boundary conditions necessary for PSA analyses. Two exemplary accidents were selected: - A transient with loss of steam generator feed water, - A small break loss of coolant accident (50 cm 2 ) in the cold leg of the coolant line connected to the pressurizer. In principle, the results demonstrate the capability of ASTEC V1.33 to carry out such PSA level 2 calculations. In addition, it has to be noted that for both ASTEC and MELCOR the requirements in view of the quality of the results leads to prolonged calculation times due to more detailed nodalisations of the whole plant. This is valid for the core region as well as for the primary circuit and for the containment. Consequently, calculation times in the order of one day to two weeks are accomplished, thereby excluding extensive parameter analyses in order to assess the sensitivity of the calculation results. Concerning the quality of the results a good agreement can be stated between ASTEC and MELCOR results in terms of global data. In detail some results are sensitive to user effects. Here, the nodalisation seems to be of major influence besides differences in modeling specific phenomena. The comparison suggests that in particular the influence of the nodalisation defined by the user and depending on the user's experience should be carefully evaluated. Since some

  10. Radiation detectors for the control of PWR nuclear boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, J.

    1977-01-01

    The neutronic control in French PWR is effected by: 2 channels of measurement of intermediate power using γ'-compensated boron-coated ionization chambers 4 channels of measurement of high power with 'long' boron chambers also used in axial off-set measurement. A movable in-core measuring system is used for the fuel management and the power distribution monitoring. The instrumentation of start-up and intermediate power is conventional; the chambers of the axial off-set measurement and the in-core system are special for this type of power plant, they are discussed in details. The essential properties of the various types of detector, their major advantages or drawbacks, their comparative adaptation to the functions to be performed in the plant are summarized in a table. The 'long chambers' (on use in Fessenheim I and II, and soon in Bugey II) are boron coated current ionization chambers, without γ compensation, intended for power measurement. In-core measurements first involved activation methods - movable wires giving flux profiles, -or activable nuts (the Aeroball System at Trino Vercellese, Chooz...). In on-line neutron detectors, used at fixed positions, the electric signal is generated from: ionization the gas filling fission ionization chambers and γ ionization chambers; direct collection of the charged particles emitted from the convertor element in self-powered neutron detectors (rhodium, silver or vanadium) or self-powered γ detectors (cobalt); or thermoelectric effect in neutron and γ thermometers. The in-core measurement unit developped by Framatome is a movable miniaturized fission chamber system (at Tihange), every French exported power plant being now equipped with it [fr

  11. SCORPIO-VVER core monitoring and surveillance system with advanced capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, J.; Vocka, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work authors present 12 years of operation experience of core monitoring and surveillance system with advanced capabilities on nuclear power plants on 6 unit of VVER-440 type of reactors at two different NPPs. The original version of the SCORPIO (Surveillance of reactor CORe by PIcture On-line display) system was developed for the western type of PWR reactors. The first version of the SCORPIO-VVER Core Monitoring System for Dukovany NPP (VVER-440 type of reactor, Czech Republic) was developed in 1998. For SCORPIO-VVER implementation at Bohunice NPP in Slovakia (2001) the system was enhanced with startup module KRITEX.

  12. Guiding and amplification properties of rod-type photonic crystal fibers with sectioned core doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleri, S.; Poli, F.; Passaro, D.; Cucinotta, A.; Lægsgaard, J.; Broeng, J.

    2009-05-01

    Rod-type photonic crystal fibers are large mode area double-cladding fibers with an outer diameter of few millimeters which can provide important advantages for high-power lasers and amplifiers. Numerical studies have recently demonstrated the guidance of higher-order modes in these fibers, which can worsen the output beam quality of lasers and amplifiers. In the present analysis a sectioned core doping has been proposed for Ybdoped rod-type photonic crystal fibers, with the aim to improve the higher-order mode suppression. A full-vector modal solver based on the finite element method has been applied to properly design the low refractive index ring in the fiber core, which can provide an increase of the differential overlap between the fundamental and the higher-order mode. Then, the gain competition among the guided modes along the Yb-doped rod-type fibers has been investigated with a spatial and spectral amplifier model. Simulation results have shown the effectiveness of the sectioned core doping in worsening the higher-order mode overlap on the doped area, thus providing an effective single-mode behavior of the Yb-doped rod-type photonic crystal fibers.

  13. Microstructural characterization of stainless steel 17-4 PH used in the control element of PWR-Type reactors submitted to different heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Douglas F.A.; Rezende, Renato P.; Turcarelli, Tiago

    2017-01-01

    The Control Element is a set of mechanical components of pressurized water cooled nuclear reactors (PWR), with the function of modifying the reactivity of the nucleus by insertion and withdrawal of neutron absorptive rod, in order to change the flow of neutrons (power) to the necessary and desired levels. The control element also has a safety function when there is a need to have negative reactivity available to shut down the reactor in normal operating or accident situations. In this situation, the control element descends instantly and inserts the rods with absorptive material into the fuel element thus shutting down the reactor. The control element consists of control rods, which carry the neutron absorption material and is supported by the spider, pin, spring and spring retainer assembly. The control element has some components that need to have high resistance to impacts when the safety function is activated, so the material of this component must have high mechanical strength and toughness. One of the materials in which can be specified for this application is martensitic stainless steel 17- 4PH (UNS 17400). This steel, when subjected to the aging heat treatment, has its mechanical properties altered due to the precipitation of dispersed intermetallic compounds in the matrix. In all heat treatments performed the predominant microstructure is lath martensite. The heat treatment of the 620 °C / 4 h presented lower hardness when compared to the other treatments and when increase time and temperature the material presents Nb precipitates that increase the hardness. (author)

  14. Microstructural characterization of stainless steel 17-4 PH used in the control element of PWR-Type reactors submitted to different heat treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Douglas F.A.; Rezende, Renato P.; Turcarelli, Tiago, E-mail: ferreira@marinha.mil.br, E-mail: renato.rezende@marinha.mil.br, E-mail: tiago.turcarelli@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (DDNM/CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Diretoria de Desenvolvimento Nuclear da Marinha

    2017-07-01

    The Control Element is a set of mechanical components of pressurized water cooled nuclear reactors (PWR), with the function of modifying the reactivity of the nucleus by insertion and withdrawal of neutron absorptive rod, in order to change the flow of neutrons (power) to the necessary and desired levels. The control element also has a safety function when there is a need to have negative reactivity available to shut down the reactor in normal operating or accident situations. In this situation, the control element descends instantly and inserts the rods with absorptive material into the fuel element thus shutting down the reactor. The control element consists of control rods, which carry the neutron absorption material and is supported by the spider, pin, spring and spring retainer assembly. The control element has some components that need to have high resistance to impacts when the safety function is activated, so the material of this component must have high mechanical strength and toughness. One of the materials in which can be specified for this application is martensitic stainless steel 17- 4PH (UNS 17400). This steel, when subjected to the aging heat treatment, has its mechanical properties altered due to the precipitation of dispersed intermetallic compounds in the matrix. In all heat treatments performed the predominant microstructure is lath martensite. The heat treatment of the 620 °C / 4 h presented lower hardness when compared to the other treatments and when increase time and temperature the material presents Nb precipitates that increase the hardness. (author)

  15. Development of Cost Estimation Methodology of Decommissioning for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae; Lim, Yong Kyu; Chang, Hyeon Sik; Song, Geun Ho

    2013-01-01

    The permanent closure of nuclear power plant should be conducted with the strict laws and the profound planning including the cost and schedule estimation because the plant is very contaminated with the radioactivity. In Korea, there are two types of the nuclear power plant. One is the pressurized light water reactor (PWR) and the other is the pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) called as CANDU reactor. Also, the 50% of the operating nuclear power plant in Korea is the PWRs which were originally designed by CE (Combustion Engineering). There have been experiences about the decommissioning of Westinghouse type PWR, but are few experiences on that of CE type PWR. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to develop the cost estimation methodology and evaluate technical level of decommissioning for the application to CE type PWR based on the system engineering technology. The aim of present study is to develop the cost estimation methodology of decommissioning for application to PWR. Through the study, the following conclusions are obtained: · Based on the system engineering, the decommissioning work can be classified as Set, Subset, Task, Subtask and Work cost units. · The Set and Task structure are grouped as 29 Sets and 15 Task s, respectively. · The final result shows the cost and project schedule for the project control and risk management. · The present results are preliminary and should be refined and improved based on the modeling and cost data reflecting available technology and current costs like labor and waste data

  16. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Blomgren, J.C.; Fackelmann, J.M.

    1982-10-01

    Steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants have experienced tubing degradation by a variety of corrosion-related mechanisms which depend directly on secondary water chemistry. As a result of this experience, the Steam Generator Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major program to provide solutions to PWR steam generator problems. This report, PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines, in addition to presenting justification for water chemistry control parameters, discusses available analytical methods, data management and surveillance, and the management philosophy required to successfully implement the guidelines

  17. Development of Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Mostafa; El-Gazzar, Mohamed

    2018-05-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) is a poultry pathogen with reported increased prevalence and virulence in recent years. MS strain identification is essential for prevention, control efforts and epidemiological outbreak investigations. Multiple multilocus based sequence typing schemes have been developed for MS, yet the resolution of these schemes could be limited for outbreak investigation. The cost of whole genome sequencing became close to that of sequencing the seven MLST targets; however, there is no standardized method for typing MS strains based on whole genome sequences. In this paper, we propose a core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) scheme as a standardized and reproducible method for typing MS based whole genome sequences. A diverse set of 25 MS whole genome sequences were used to identify 302 core genome genes as cgMLST targets (35.5% of MS genome) and 44 whole genome sequences of MS isolates from six countries in four continents were used for typing applying this scheme. cgMLST based phylogenetic trees displayed a high degree of agreement with core genome SNP based analysis and available epidemiological information. cgMLST allowed evaluation of two conventional MLST schemes of MS. The high discriminatory power of cgMLST allowed differentiation between samples of the same conventional MLST type. cgMLST represents a standardized, accurate, highly discriminatory, and reproducible method for differentiation between MS isolates. Like conventional MLST, it provides stable and expandable nomenclature, allowing for comparing and sharing the typing results between different laboratories worldwide. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Somatization as a core symptom of melancholic type depression. Evidence from a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D; Martus, P

    1994-12-01

    The study questions whether different types of somatization may be a core symptom of melancholia, thus, being invariable across cultures and being a candidate for neurobiological research and diagnostic criteria. 51 Turkish patients and 51 education-matched German patients with melancholic depression were compared for two types of somatization. Turkish patients had higher frequencies of somatic preoccupation and hypochondriasis but they were not different in the perception and experience of somatic symptoms. It is concluded that: (1) somatization has to be differentiated psychopathologically; (2) it may be a neurobiological core symptom of melancholia in the well-defined sense of 'perceiving abnormal somatic symptoms'; and (3) it may be a culture-bound symptom in the sense of 'being abnormally concerned with somatic symptoms or hypochondrial fears'.

  19. Vibration Finite Element Analysis of SC10 Dry-type Transformer Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Sheng Wei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As the popularization and application of dry-type power transformer, its work when the vibration noise problem widely concerned, on the basis of time-varying electromagnetic field and structural mechanics equation, this paper established a finite element analysis model of dry-type transformer, through the electromagnetic field – Structural mechanics field – sound field more than physical field coupling calculation analysis, obtained in no load and the vibration modes of the core under different load and frequency. According to the transformer vibration mechanism, compared with the experimental data, verified the accuracy of the calculation results, as the core of how to provide the theory foundation and to reduce the noise of the experiment.

  20. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme for High-resolution Typing of Enterococcus faecium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Been, Mark; Pinholt, Mette; Top, Janetta

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium, a common inhabitant of the human gut, has emerged as an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen in the last two decades. Since the start of the 21(st) century, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) has been used to study the molecular epidemiology of E. faecium. However...

  1. Minor actinide transmutation in a board type sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Meiyin; Tian, Wenxi; Zhang, Dalin; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 1250 MWt board type sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core is further designed. • MCNP–ORIGEN coupled code MCORE is applied to perform neutronics and depletion calculation. • Transmutation efficiency and neutronic safety parameters are compared under different MA weight fraction. - Abstract: In this paper, a board type sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core is further designed and applied to perform minor actinide (MA) transmutation. MA is homogeneously loaded in all the fuel sub-assemblies with a weight fraction of 2.0 wt.%, 4.0 wt.%, 6.0 wt.%, 8.0 wt.%, 10.0 wt.% and 12.0 wt.%, respectively. The transmutation efficiency, transmutation amount, power density distribution, neutron fluence distribution and neutronic safety parameters, such as reactivity, Doppler feedback, void worth and delayed neutron fraction, are compared under different MA weight fraction. Neutronics and depletion calculations are performed based on the self-developed MCNP–ORIGEN coupled code with the ENDF/B-VII data library. In the breed and burn reactor core, a number of breeding sub-assemblies are arranged in the inner core in a board type way (scatter load) to breed, and a number of absorbing sub-assemblies are arranged in the inner side of the outer core to absorb neutrons and reduce power density in this area. All the fuel sub-assemblies (ignition and breeding sub-assemblies) are shuffled from outside in. The core reached asymptotically steady state after about 22 years, and the average and maximum discharged burn-up were about 17.0% and 35.3%, respectively. The transmutation amount increased linearly with the MA weight fraction, while the transmutation rate parabolically varied with the MA weight fraction. Power density in ignition sub-assembly positions increased with the MA weight fraction, while decreased in breeding sub-assembly positions. Neutron fluence decreased with the increase of MA weight fraction. Generally speaking, the core reactivity and void

  2. Matérn's hard core models of types I and II with arbitrary compact grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Hörig, Mario

    Matérn's classical hard core models can be interpreted as models obtained from a stationary marked Poisson process by dependent thinning. The marks are balls of fixed radius, and a point is retained when its associated ball does not hit any other balls (type I) or when its random birth time is st...... of this model with the process of intact grains of the dead leaves model and the Stienen model leads to analogous results for the latter....

  3. PWR systems transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, M.F.; Peeler, G.B.; Abramson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of transients in pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems involves the assessment of the response of the total plant, including primary and secondary coolant systems, steam piping and turbine (possibly including the complete feedwater train), and various control and safety systems. Transient analysis is performed as part of the plant safety analysis to insure the adequacy of the reactor design and operating procedures and to verify the applicable plant emergency guidelines. Event sequences which must be examined are developed by considering possible failures or maloperations of plant components. These vary in severity (and calculational difficulty) from a series of normal operational transients, such as minor load changes, reactor trips, valve and pump malfunctions, up to the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary reactor coolant system pipe known as a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA). The focus of this paper is the analysis of all those transients and accidents except loss of coolant accidents

  4. Steam generators in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.

    1974-01-01

    The steam generator of the PWR operates according to the principle of natural circulation. It consists of a U-shaped tube bundle whose free ends are welded to a bottom plate. The tube bundle is surrounded by a cylinder jacket which has slots closely above the bottom or tube plate. The feed water mixed with boiling water enters the tube bundle through these slots. Because of its buoyancy, the steam-water mixture flows upwards. Below the tube plate there are chambers for distributing and collecting pressurized water separated by means of a partition wall. By omitting some tubes, a free alloy is created so that the tubes in the center get sufficient water, too. By asymmetrical arrangement of the partition wall it is further possible to limit the tube alloy only to the inlet side for pressurized water. The flow over the tube plate is thus improved on the inlet side. (DG) [de

  5. Summary of CCTF test results - assessment of current safety evaluation analysis on reflood behaviour during a LOCA in a PWR with cold-leg-injection-type ECCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Jun; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Hojo, Tsuneyuki

    1988-01-01

    The conservatism of the current safety analysis was assessed by comparing the predicted results with cylindrical core test facility (CCTF) test results performed at JAERI. The WREM code was selected for the assessment. The overall conservatism of the WREM code on the peak clad temperature prediction was confirmed against CCTF EM test which simulated the typical initial and boundary conditions in the safety evaluation analysis. The WREM code predicted the reasonable core boundary conditions and the conservatism of the code came mainly from the core calculation. The conservatism of the WREM code against CCTF data could be attributed to the following three points: (i) no horizontal mixing assumption between subchannels at each elevation, (ii) no modeling on heat transfer enhancement caused by the radial core power profile, (iii) usage of conservative heat transfer correlations in the code. (orig./HP)

  6. TRANSPORT CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED PWR LOCA GENERATED DEBRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAJI, A. K.; MARSHALL, B.

    2000-01-01

    In the unlikely event of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), break jet impingement would dislodge thermal insulation FR-om nearby piping, as well as other materials within the containment, such as paint chips, concrete dust, and fire barrier materials. Steam/water flows induced by the break and by the containment sprays would transport debris to the containment floor. Subsequently, debris would likely transport to and accumulate on the suction sump screens of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) pumps, thereby potentially degrading ECCS performance and possibly even failing the ECCS. In 1998, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a generic study (Generic Safety Issue-191) to evaluate the potential for the accumulation of LOCA related debris on the PWR sump screen and the consequent loss of ECCS pump net positive suction head (NPSH). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), supporting the resolution of GSI-191, was tasked with developing a method for estimating debris transport in PWR containments to estimate the quantity of debris that would accumulate on the sump screen for use in plant specific evaluations. The analytical method proposed by LANL, to predict debris transport within the water that would accumulate on the containment floor, is to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combined with experimental debris transport data to predict debris transport and accumulation on the screen. CFD simulations of actual plant containment designs would provide flow data for a postulated accident in that plant, e.g., three-dimensional patterns of flow velocities and flow turbulence. Small-scale experiments would determine parameters defining the debris transport characteristics for each type of debris. The containment floor transport methodology will merge debris transport characteristics with CFD results to provide a reasonable and conservative estimate of debris transport within the containment floor pool and

  7. Simplified model of a PWR primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.L.; Faya, A.J.G.

    1988-07-01

    The computer program RENUR was developed to perform a very simplified simulation of a typical PWR primary circuit. The program has mathematical models for the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor core and the pressurizer, the rest of the circuit being treated as a single volume. Heat conduction in the fuel rod is analyzed by a nodal model. Average and hot channels are treated so that bulk response of the core and DNBR can be evaluated. A homogenenous model is employed in the pressurizer. Results are presented for a steady-state situation as well as for a loss of load transient. Agreement with the results of more elaborate computer codes is good with substantial reduction in computer costs. (author) [pt

  8. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  9. Fabrication of a solenoid-type inductor with Fe-based soft magnetic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Chong; Zhou Yong; Gao Xiaoyu; Ding Wen; Cao Ying; Choi, Hyung; Won, Jonghwa

    2007-01-01

    A solenoid-type inductor was fabricated by MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) technique. The fabrication process uses UV-LIGA, dry etching, fine polishing, and electroplating technique to achieve high performance of the solenoid-type inductor. Fe-based soft magnetic thin film was sputtered as the magnetic core, and polyimide was used as the insulation materials. The inductor was in size of 4x4 mm with coil width of 20 μm and space of 35 μm. The inductance is 1.61 μH at a frequency of 5 MHz with the maximum quality factor of 1.42

  10. Guiding and amplification properties of rod-type photonic crystal fibers with sectioned core doping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selleri, Stefano; Poli, Federica; Passaro, Davide

    2009-01-01

    Rod-type photonic crystal fibers are large mode area double-cladding fibers with an outer diameter of few millimeters which can provide important advantages for high-power lasers and amplifiers. Numerical studies have recently demonstrated the guidance of higher-order modes in these fibers, which...... can worsen the output beam quality of lasers and amplifiers. In the present analysis a sectioned core doping has been proposed for Yb-doped rod-type photonic crystal fibers, with the aim to improve the higher-order mode suppression. A full-vector modal solver based on the finite element method has...

  11. An experimental study on effective depressurization actions for PWR vessel bottom small break LOCA with HPI failure and gas inflow (ROSA-V test SB-PV-04)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2006-03-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V program to study effects of accident management (AM) measures on core cooling, which are important in case of total failure of high pressure injection (HPI) system during an SBLOCA at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The LSTF is a full-height and 1/48 volume-scaled facility simulating a 4-loop Westing-house-type PWR (3423 MWt). The experiment, SB-PV-04, simulated a PWR vessel bottom SBLOCA with a rupture of ten instrument-tubes which is equivalent to 0.2% cold leg break. It is clarified that AM actions with steam generator (SG) rapid depressurization by fully opening relief valves and auxiliary feedwater supply are effective to avoid core uncovery by actuating the low pressure injection (LPI) system though the primary depressurization is degraded by non-condensable gas inflow to the primary loops from the accumulator injection system. The effective core cooling was established by the rapid depressurization which contributed to preserve larger primary coolant mass than in the previous experiment (SB-PV-03) which was conducted with smaller primary cooling rate of -55 K/h as AM actions. (author)

  12. Power distribution investigation in the transition phase of the low moderation type MOX fueled LWR from the high conversion core to the breeding core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The key concept of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) is a core transition from a high conversion (HC) type to a plutonium breeding (BR) type in a same reactor system only by replacing fuel assemblies. Consequently in this transition phase, there are two types of assemblies in the same core. Due to the differences of the two assembly types, region-wise soft to hard neutron spectra appears and result in a large power peaking. Therefore, power distribution of FLWR in the HC to BR transition phase was studied by performing assembly and core calculations. For the whole core calculation, a new 14-group energy structure is developed to better represent the power distribution obtained with the fine 107-group structure than the 9-group structure in the previous evaluations. Calculations on few assemblies geometries show large local power peakings can be effectively reduced by considering plutonium enrichment distribution in an assembly. In the whole core calculation, there is a power level mismatch between HC and BR assemblies, but overall power distribution flattening is possible by optimizing fuel assemblies loading. Although the fuel loading should be decided also taking into account the void coefficient, transition from HC to BR type FLWR seems feasible without difficulty. (author)

  13. EFFECTS OF FOSSIL MAGNETIC FIELDS ON CONVECTIVE CORE DYNAMOS IN A-TYPE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Toomre, Juri; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2009-01-01

    The vigorous magnetic dynamo action achieved within the convective cores of A-type stars may be influenced by fossil magnetic fields within their radiative envelopes. We study such effects through three-dimensional simulations that model the inner 30% by radius of a 2 M sun A-type star, capturing the convective core and a portion of the overlying radiative envelope within our computational domain. We employ the three-dimensional anelastic spherical harmonic code to model turbulent dynamics within a deep rotating spherical shell. The interaction between a fossil field and the core dynamo is examined by introducing a large-scale magnetic field into the radiative envelope of a mature A star dynamo simulation. We find that the inclusion of a twisted toroidal fossil field can lead to a remarkable transition in the core dynamo behavior. Namely, a super-equipartition state can be realized in which the magnetic energy built by dynamo action is 10-fold greater than the kinetic energy of the convection itself. Such strong-field states may suggest that the resulting Lorentz forces should seek to quench the flows, yet we have achieved super-equipartition dynamo action that persists for multiple diffusion times. This is achieved by the relative co-alignment of the flows and magnetic fields in much of the domain, along with some lateral displacements of the fastest flows from the strongest fields. Convection in the presence of such strong magnetic fields typically manifests as 4-6 cylindrical rolls aligned with the rotation axis, each possessing central axial flows that imbue the rolls with a helical nature. The roll system also possesses core-crossing flows that couple distant regions of the core. We find that the magnetic fields exhibit a comparable global topology with broad, continuous swathes of magnetic field linking opposite sides of the convective core. We have explored several poloidal and toroidal fossil field geometries, finding that a poloidal component is essential

  14. Parameterized representation of macroscopic cross section for PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiel, João Cláudio Batista; Carvalho da Silva, Fernando; Senra Martinez, Aquilino; Leal, Luiz C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work describes a parameterized representation of the homogenized macroscopic cross section for PWR reactor. • Parameterization enables a quick determination of problem-dependent cross-sections to be used in few group calculations. • This work allows generating group cross-section data to perform PWR core calculations without computer code calculations. - Abstract: The purpose of this work is to describe, by means of Chebyshev polynomials, a parameterized representation of the homogenized macroscopic cross section for PWR fuel element as a function of soluble boron concentration, moderator temperature, fuel temperature, moderator density and 235 92 U enrichment. The cross-section data analyzed are fission, scattering, total, transport, absorption and capture. The parameterization enables a quick and easy determination of problem-dependent cross-sections to be used in few group calculations. The methodology presented in this paper will allow generation of group cross-section data from stored polynomials to perform PWR core calculations without the need to generate them based on computer code calculations using standard steps. The results obtained by the proposed methodology when compared with results from the SCALE code calculations show very good agreement

  15. Xenon oscillation in a large PHWR core (Atucha II type): TRISIC code applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanilla, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    A three dimensional nuclear reactor simulation code (TRISIC) was developed many years ago to design a PHWR (pressurizer heavy water reactors - Atucha type) based in the 'source-sink model' (heterogeneous theory). The limited processor computational performance available at that time was the constraint of the code when a detailed reactor description was necessary. A modern PC (pentium) code version with a full reactor core representation (461 fuel channels) including diagonal control rod banks and flux-reading detectors with theirs tube guide was used in the present paper for simulation of the Xenon transient when a local asymmetric perturbation was produced in a large core (Atucha II type). The results obtained and the computer time required for the 70 hour's simulation with an adequate time step, established the potential of the code to deal with this kind of transients. The paper shows that the method of TRISIC allows to detect and control azimuthal, radial and axial oscillation. This code is a proper way to elaborate a program of control rods movement from the flux reading detectors to damp the oscillation. TRISIC could also be a accurate tool to supervise the full core flux distribution in real time during the operation of the reactor. (author)

  16. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Fuel management and safety analysis-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Boh Wook; Choi, Hang Bok; Lee, Yung Wook; Cho, Jae Sun; Huh, Chang Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The reference DUPIC fuel composition was determined based on the reactor safety, thermal-hydraulics, economics, and refabrication aspects. The center pin of the reference DUPIC fuel bundle is poisoned with natural dysprosium. The worst LOCA analysis has shown that the transient power and heat deposition of the reference DUPIC core are the same as those of natural uranium CANDU core. The intra-code comparison has shown that the accuracy of DUPIC physics code system is comparable to the current CANDU core design code system. The sensitivity studies were performed for the refuelling schemes of DUPIC core and the 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme was selected as the standard refuelling scheme of the DUPIC core. The application of 4-bundle shift refuelling scheme will be studied in parallel as the auto-refuelling method is improved and the reference core parameters of the heterogeneous DUPIC core are defined. The heterogeneity effect was analyzed in a preliminary fashion using 33 fuel types and the random loading strategy. The refuelling simulation has shown that the DUPIC core satisfies the current CANDU 6 operating limits of channel and bundle power regardless of the fuel composition heterogeneity. The 33 fuel types used in the heterogeneity analysis was determined based on the initial enrichment and discharge burnup of the PWR fuel. 90 figs, 62 tabs, 63 refs. (Author).

  17. Analysis of gamma heating at TRIGA mark reactor core Bandung using plate type fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyanto; Tukiran Surbakti

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with the discontinuation of TRIGA fuel element production by its producer, the operation of all TRIGA type reactor of at all over the word will be disturbed, as well as TRIGA reactor in Bandung. In order to support the continuous operation of Bandung TRIGA reactor, a study on utilization of fuel plate mode, as used at RSG-GAS reactor, to replace the cylindrical model has been done. Various assessments have been done, including core design calculation and its safety aspects. Based on the neutronic calculation, utilization of fuel plate shows that Bandung TRIGA reactor can be operated by 20 fuel elements only. Compared with the original core, the new reactor core configuration is smaller and it results in some empty space that can be used for in-core irradiation facilities. Due to the existing of in-core irradiation facilities, the gamma heating value became a new factor that should be evaluated for safety analysis. For this reason, the gamma heating for TRIGA Bandung reactor using fuel plate was calculated by Gamset computer code. The calculations based on linear attenuation equations, line sources and gamma propagation on space. Calculations were also done for reflector positions (Lazy Susan irradiation facilities) and central irradiation position (CIP), especially for any material samples. The calculation results show that gamma heating for CIP is significantly important (0.87 W/g), but very low value for Lazy Susan position (lest then 0.11 W/g). Based on this results, it can be concluded that the utilization of CIP as irradiation facilities need to consider of gamma heating as data for safety analysis report. (author)

  18. Seismic response of high temperature gas-cooled reactor core with block-type fuel, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1980-01-01

    For the aseismic design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) with block-type fuel, it is necessary to predict the motion and force of core columns and blocks. To reveal column vibration characteristics in three-dimensional space and impact response, column vibration tests were carried out with a scale model of a one-region section (seven columns) of the HTGR core. The results are as follows: (1) the column has a soft spring characteristic based on stacked blocks connected with loose pins, (2) the column has whirling phenomena, (3) the compression spring force simulating the gas pressure has the effect of raising the column resonance frequency, and (4) the vibration behavior of the stacked block column and impact response of the surrounding columns show agreement between experiment and analysis. (author)

  19. Polyaniline Coated Core-Shell Typed Stimuli-Responsive Microspheres and Their Electrorheology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhen Dong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional core-shell-structured particles have attracted considerable attention recently. This paper reviews the synthetic methods and morphologies of various electro-stimuli responsive polyaniline (PANI-coated core-shell-type microspheres, including PANI-coated Fe3O4, SiO2, Fe2O3, TiO2, poly(methyl methacrylate, poly(glycidyl methacrylate, and polystyrene along with their electrorheological (ER characteristics when prepared by dispersing these particles in an insulating medium. In addition to the various rheological characteristics and their analysis, such as shear stress and yield stress of their ER fluids, this paper summarizes some of the mechanisms proposed for ER fluids to further understand the responses of ER fluids to an externally applied electric field.

  20. The advanced main control console for next japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, A.; Ito, K.; Yokoyama, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the improvement of main control room designing in a nuclear power plant is to reduce operators' workload and potential human errors by offering a better working environment where operators can maximize their abilities. In order to satisfy such requirements, the design of main control board applied to Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type nuclear power plant has been continuously modified and improved. the Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Utilities (Electric Power Companies) and Mitsubishi Group have developed an advanced main control board (console) reflecting on the study of human factors, as well as using a state of the art electronics technology. In this report, we would like to introduce the configuration and features of the Advanced Main Control Console for the practical application to the next generation PWR type nuclear power plants including TOMARI No.3 Unit of Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc. (author)

  1. PWR secondary water chemistry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

    1977-02-01

    Several types of corrosion damage are currently chronic problems in PWR recirculating steam generators. One probable cause of damage is a local high concentration of an aggressive chemical even though only trace levels are present in feedwater. A wide variety of trace chemicals can find their way into feedwater, depending on the sources of condenser cooling water and the specific feedwater treatment. In February 1975, Nuclear Water and Waste Technology Corporation (NWT), was contracted to characterize secondary system water chemistry at five operating PWRs. Plants were selected to allow effects of cooling water chemistry and operating history on steam generator corrosion to be evaluated. Calvert Cliffs 1, Prairie Island 1 and 2, Surry 2, and Turkey Point 4 were monitored during the program. Results to date in the following areas are summarized: (1) plant chemistry variations during normal operation, transients, and shutdowns; (2) effects of condenser leakage on steam generator chemistry; (3) corrosion product transport during all phases of operation; (4) analytical prediction of chemistry in local areas from bulk water chemistry measurements; and (5) correlation of corrosion damage to chemistry variation

  2. Identification and evaluation of PWR in-vessel severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukelow, J.S.; Harrison, D.G.; Morgenstern, M.

    1992-03-01

    This reports documents work performed the NRC/RES Accident Management Guidance Program to evaluate possible strategies for mitigating the consequences of PWR severe accidents. The selection and evaluation of strategies was limited to the in-vessel phase of the severe accident, i.e., after the initiation of core degradation and prior to RPV failure. A parallel project at BNL has been considering strategies applicable to the ex-vessel phase of PWR severe accidents

  3. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Materials Samples: Material Certification, Fluence, and Temperature (Nonproprietary Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, M.; Shogan, R.; Fero, A.; Snyder, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores, operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs require detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel. This report contains basic material characterization information of the as-installed samples of reactor internals material which were harvested from a decommissioned PWR

  4. Contribution to fuel depletion study in PWR type reactors, reactor core with three and four regions of enrichment; Contribuicao ao estudo da evolucao da composicao do combustivel em reatores tipo PWR nucleos a tres e a quatro regioes de enriquecimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, M C.C.

    1977-03-01

    The main methods for calculation of fuel depletion are studied and some approaches to do it are mentioned; the LEOPARD Code is described and full details are given for each subroutine, flow charts are included; the method given by the code for calculation of fuel depletion is described; some imperfections from the IPR`s version are listed, and corrected, for instance: the method for burn-up calculation of heavy isotopes; the results of calculations for a reference reactor based on data of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for Angra I Nuclear Power Plant are presented and discussed. (author).

  5. French PWR Safety Philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    The first 900 MWe units, built under the American Westinghouse licence and with reference to the U. S. regulation, were followed by 28 standardized units, C P1 and C P2 series. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. As early as 1976, this experience was taken into account by French Safety organisms to discuss, with Electricite de France, the safety options for the planned 1300 MWe units, P4 and P4 series. In 1983, the new reactor scheduled, Ni4 series 1400 MWe, is a totally French design which satisfies the French regulations and other French standards and codes. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach each of them having possibilities and limits. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from operating experience have contributed to the French safety philosophy improvement. The methodology now applied to safety evaluation develops a new facet of the in depth defense concept by taking highly unlikely events into consideration, by developing the search of safety consistency of the design, and by completing the deterministic approach by the probabilistic one

  6. Scope and procedures of fuel management for PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zenghua

    1997-01-01

    The fuel management scope of PWR nuclear power plant includes nuclear fuel purchase and spent fuel disposal, ex-core fuel management, in-core fuel management, core management and fuel assembly behavior follow up. A suit of complete and efficient fuel management procedures have to be created to ensure the quality and efficiency of fuel management work. The hierarchy of fuel management procedure is divided into four levels: main procedure, administration procedure, implement procedure and technic procedure. A brief introduction to the fuel management scope and procedures of PWR nuclear power plant are given

  7. The optimum fuel and power distribution for a PWR burnup cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the optimum fuel and power distributions for a PWR burnup cycle. The backward diffusion calculation [1] and the Core-wise Green's Function [2] method were used for the core model which provided analytic derivatives for solving the nonlinear optimization problem using successive linear programming [3] methods. The solution algorithm consisted of a reverse depletion strategy which begins at the end of cycle and solves simultaneously for the optimal fuel and burnable absorber distributions while the core is depleted to the beginning of cycle. The resulting optimal solutions minimize the required fissile fuel inventory and burnable absorber loading for a PWR

  8. Core physics design calculation of mini-type fast reactor based on Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Keyu; Han Weishi

    2007-01-01

    An accurate physics calculation model has been set up for the mini-type sodium-cooled fast reactor (MFR) based on MCNP-4C code, then a detailed calculation of its critical physics characteristics, neutron flux distribution, power distribution and reactivity control has been carried out. The results indicate that the basic physics characteristics of MFR can satisfy the requirement and objectives of the core design. The power density and neutron flux distribution are symmetrical and reasonable. The control system is able to make a reliable reactivity balance efficiently and meets the request for long-playing operation. (authors)

  9. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 2. TRAB-3D/SMABRE Calculation of the OECD/ NRC PWR MSLB Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, A.; Haemaelaeinen, A.; Kyrki-Rajamaki, R.

    2001-01-01

    All three exercises of the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark were calculated at VTT Energy. The SMABRE thermal-hydraulics code was used for the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetics neutronics. The second exercise was calculated with the TRAB-3D three-dimensional reactor dynamics code. The third exercise was calculated with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. Both codes have been developed at VTT Energy. The results of all the exercises agree reasonably well with those of the other participants; thus, instead of reporting the results, this paper concentrates on describing the computational aspects of the calculation with the foregoing codes and on some observations of the sensitivity of the results. In the TRAB-3D neutron kinetics, the two-group diffusion equations are solved in homogenized fuel assembly geometry with an efficient two-level nodal method. The point of the two-level iteration scheme is that only one unknown variable per node, the average neutron flux, is calculated during the inner iteration. The nodal flux shapes and cross sections are recalculated only once in the outer iteration loop. The TRAB-3D core model includes also parallel one-dimensional channel hydraulics with detailed fuel models. Advanced implicit time discretization methods are used in all submodels. SMABRE is a fast-running five-equation model completed by a drift-flux model, with a time discretization based on a non-iterative semi-implicit algorithm. For the third exercise of the benchmark, the TMI-1 models of TRAB-3D and SMABRE were coupled. This was the first time these codes were coupled together. However, similar coupling of the HEXTRAN and SMABRE codes has been shown to be stable and efficient, when used in safety analyses of Finnish and foreign VVER-type reactors. The coupling used between the two codes is called a parallel coupling. SMABRE solves the thermal hydraulics both in the cooling circuit and in the core

  10. Material property changes of stainless steels under PWR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Nishioka, Hiromasa; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Kamaya, Masayuki; Miura, Terumitsu; Torimaru, Tadahiko

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity of core structural materials is one of the key issues for long and safe operation of pressurized water reactors. The stainless steel components are exposed to neutron irradiation and high-temperature water, which cause significant property changes and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in some cases. Understanding of irradiation induced material property changes is essential to predict integrity of core components. In the present study, microstructure and microchemistry, mechanical properties, and IASCC behavior were examined in 316 stainless steels irradiated to 1 - 73 dpa in a PWR. Dose-dependent changes of dislocation loops and cavities, grain boundary segregation, tensile properties and fracture mode, deformation behavior, and their interrelation were discussed. Tensile properties and deformation behavior were well coincident with microstructural changes. IASCC susceptibility under slow strain rate tensile tests, IASCC initiation under constant load tests in simulated PWR primary water, and their relationship to material changes were discussed. (author)

  11. Industrial assessment of nonbackfittable PWR design modifications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Daleas, R.S.; Miller, D.D.

    1980-11-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Reactor Design Study, various nonbackfittable PWR design modifications were evaluated to determine their potential for improved uranium utilization and commercial viability. Combustion Engineering, Inc. contributed to this effort through participation in the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory industrial assessment of such design modifications. Seven modifications, including the use of higher primary system temperatures and pressures, rapid-frequent refueling, end-of-cycle stretchout, core periphery modifications, radial blankets, low power density cores, and small PWR assemblies, were evaluated with respect to uranium utilization, economics, technical and operational complexity, and several other subjective considerations. Rapid-frequent refueling was judged to have the highest potential although it would probably not be economical for the majority of reactors with the design assumptions used in this assessment

  12. Transient study of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotoma, H.

    1973-01-01

    An appropriate method for the calculation and transient performance of the pressurizer of a pressurized water reactor is presented. The study shows a digital program of simulation of pressurizer dynamics based on the First Law of Thermodynamic and Laws of Heat and Mass Transfer. The importance of the digital program that was written for a pressurizer of PWR, lies in the fact that, this can be of practical use in the safety analysis of a reactor of Angra dos Reis type with a power of about 500 M We. (author)

  13. A new approach to PWR power control using intelligent techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroushaki, M.; Ghofrani, M.B.; Lucas, C.; Yazdanpanah, M.J.; Sadati, N.

    2004-01-01

    Improved load following capability is one of the main technical performances of advanced PWR(APWR). Controlling the nuclear reactor core during load following operation encounters some difficulties. These difficulties mainly arise from nuclear reactor core limitations in local power peaking, while the core is subject to large and sharp variation of local power density during transients. Axial offset (A.O) is the parameter usually used to represent of core power peaking, in form of a practical parameter. This paper, proposes a new intelligent approach to A.o control of PWR nuclear reactors core during load following operation. This method uses a neural network model of the core to predict the dynamic behavior of the core and a fuzzy critic based on the operator knowledge and experience for the purpose of decision-making during load following operations. Simulation results show that this method can use optimum control rod groups maneuver with variable overlapping and may improve the reactor load following capability

  14. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2017-04-15

    This paper presents the radiation shielding model of a typical PWR (CNPP-II) at Chashma, Pakistan. The model was developed using Monte Carlo N Particle code [2], equipped with ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross section libraries. This model was applied to calculate the neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in the radial direction at core mid plane. The simulated results were compared with the reference results of Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute (SNERDI).

  15. Ciclon: A neutronic fuel management program for PWR's consecutive cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The program description and user's manual of a new computer code is given. Ciclon performs the neutronic calculation of consecutive reload cycles for PWR's fuel management optimization. Fuel characteristics and burnup data, region or batch sizes, loading schemes and state of previously irradiated fuel are input to the code. Cycle lengths or feed enrichments and burnup sharing for each region or batch are calculate using different core neutronic models and printed or punched in standard fuel management format. (author) [es

  16. SACHET, Dynamic Fission Products Inventory in PWR Multiple Compartment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Hideki

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SACHET evaluates the dynamic fission product inventories in the multiple compartment system of pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants. 2 - Method of solution: SACHET utilizes a matrix of fission product core inventory which is previously calculated by the ORIGEN code. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Liquid wastes such as chemical waste and detergent waste are not included

  17. Contribution to the study of the evolution of nuclear fuel composition in PWR type reactors. Reactor cores in three and four regions of enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, M.C.C.

    1976-01-01

    The main methods for calculations of fuel depletion are studied and some approaches to do it are mentioned; the LEOPARD Code is described and full details are given for each subroutine, flow charts are included; the method given by the code for calculation of fuel depletion is described; some imperfections from the IPR's version are listed, and corrected, for instance: the method for burn-up calculation of heavy isotopes; the results of calculations for a reference reactor based on data of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for Angra I Nuclear Plant are presented and discussed. (author) [pt

  18. Irradiation behavior of German PWR RPV steels under operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, J.; Hein, H. [AREVA NP Gmbh (Germany); Ganswind, J. [VGB PowerTech e.V. (Germany); Widera, M. [RWE Power AG (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In 2007, the last standard surveillance capsule of the original RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) surveillance programs of the 11 currently operating German PWR has been evaluated. With it the standard irradiation surveillance programs of these plants was completed. In the present paper, irradiation data of these surveillance programs will be presented and a final assessment of the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels with respect to current standards KTA 3203 and Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2 will be given. Data from two units which are currently under decommissioning will also be included, so that data from all 13 German PWR manufactured by the former Siemens/KWU company (now AREVA NP GmbH) are shown. It will be shown that all surveillance data within the approved area of chemical composition verify the limit curve RT(limit) of the KTA 3203, which is the relevant safety standard for these plants. An analysis of the data shows, that the prediction formulas of Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2 Pos. 1 or from the TTS model tend to overestimate the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels. Possible reasons for this behavior are discussed. Additionally, the data will be compared to data from the research project CARISMA to demonstrate that these data are representative for the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels. Since the data of these research projects cover a larger neutron fluence range than the original surveillance data, they offer a future outlook into the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels under long term conditions. In general, as a consequence of the relatively large and beneficial water gap between core and RPV, especially in all Siemens/KWU 4-loop PWR, the EOL neutron fluence and therefore the irradiation induced changes in mechanical properties of the German PWR RPV materials are rather low. Moreover the irradiation data indicate that the optimized RPV materials specifications that have been applied in particular for the

  19. Fabrication of solenoid-type inductor with electroplated NiFe magnetic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiaoyu; Cao Ying; Zhou Yong; Ding Wen; Lei Chong; Chen Jian

    2006-01-01

    Solenoid-type inductor with ultra-low profile was fabricated by MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) technique. NiFe film was electroplated as the magnetic core, and polyimide with a low relative permittivity was used as the insulation material. In the fabrication process, UV-LIGA, dry etching, fine polishing and electroplating technique have been adopted to achieve high performance of the solenoid-type inductor. The inductor was in size of 1.5 mmx0.9 mmx0.1 mm with coil width of 20 μm and aspect ratio of 5:1. The inductance and the quality factor were 0.42-0.345 μH and 1.8-5.3 in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz, respectively

  20. Swing-Down of 21-PWR Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.K. Scheider

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) swinging down from a horizontally suspended height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 13). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 18) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design of the type of 21-PWR WP design considered in this calculation and provides the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design