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Sample records for pwr pressurizer instrumentation

  1. Bias identification in PWR pressurizer instrumentation using the generalized liklihood-ratio technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for detecting and identifying biases in the pressure and level sensors of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressurizer is described. The generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) technique performs statistical tests on the innovations sequence of a Kalman filter state estimator and is capable of determining when a bias appears, in what sensor the bias exists, and estimating the bias magnitude. Simulation results using a second-order linear, discrete PWR pressurizer model demonstrate the capabilities of the GLR method

  2. Transient study of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotoma, H.

    1973-01-01

    An appropriate method for the calculation and transient performance of the pressurizer of a pressurized water reactor is presented. The study shows a digital program of simulation of pressurizer dynamics based on the First Law of Thermodynamic and Laws of Heat and Mass Transfer. The importance of the digital program that was written for a pressurizer of PWR, lies in the fact that, this can be of practical use in the safety analysis of a reactor of Angra dos Reis type with a power of about 500 M We. (author)

  3. Microcomputer simulation of PWR power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, L.R.A. de; Calixto Neto, J.; Martinez, A.S.; Schirru, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is presented a method for the simulation of the pressurizer behavior of a PWR power plant. The method was implanted in a microcomputer, and it considers all the devices for the pressure control (spray and relief valves, heaters, controller, etc.). The physical phenomena and the PID (Proportional + Integral + Derivative) controller were mathematically represented by linear relations, uncoupled, discretized in the time. There are three different algorithms which take into account the non-linear effects introduced by the variation of the physical properties due to the temperature and pressure, and also the mutual effects between the physical phenomena and the PID controller. (author)

  4. Sensitivity analysis of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruel, Renata Nunes

    1997-01-01

    A sensitivity analysis relative to the parameters and modelling of the physical process in a PWR pressurizer has been performed. The sensitivity analysis was developed by implementing the key parameters and theoretical model lings which generated a comprehensive matrix of influences of each changes analysed. The major influences that have been observed were the flashing phenomenon and the steam condensation on the spray drops. The present analysis is also applicable to the several theoretical and experimental areas. (author)

  5. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  6. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  7. Scoping Study Investigating PWR Instrumentation during a Severe Accident Scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J. L. [Rempe and Associates, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knudson, D. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lutz, R. J. [Lutz Nuclear Safety Consultant, LLC, Asheville, NC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The accidents at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) and Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 nuclear power plants demonstrate the critical importance of accurate, relevant, and timely information on the status of reactor systems during a severe accident. These events also highlight the critical importance of understanding and focusing on the key elements of system status information in an environment where operators may be overwhelmed with superfluous and sometimes conflicting data. While progress in these areas has been made since TMI-2, the events at Fukushima suggests that there may still be a potential need to ensure that critical plant information is available to plant operators. Recognizing the significant technical and economic challenges associated with plant modifications, it is important to focus on instrumentation that can address these information critical needs. As part of a program initiated by the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a scoping effort was initiated to assess critical information needs identified for severe accident management and mitigation in commercial Light Water Reactors (LWRs), to quantify the environment instruments monitoring this data would have to survive, and to identify gaps where predicted environments exceed instrumentation qualification envelop (QE) limits. Results from the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) scoping evaluations are documented in this report. The PWR evaluations were limited in this scoping evaluation to quantifying the environmental conditions for an unmitigated Short-Term Station BlackOut (STSBO) sequence in one unit at the Surry nuclear power station. Results were obtained using the MELCOR models developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-sponsored State of the Art Consequence Assessment (SOARCA) program project. Results from this scoping evaluation indicate that some instrumentation identified to provide critical information would be exposed to conditions that

  8. Application of radioactive procedures to PWR instrumentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeyer-Dherbey, J.

    1982-04-01

    This thesis deals with the measurement of the coolant characteristics in PWRs. First, experimental methods not involving radioactive are presented. Then, one presents methods using gamma-ray or neutron transmission for which the following applications are given and detailed: measurement of temperature and flow rate in the pressurizer expansion line by gamma-ray transmission; measurement of the pressurizer level by radiation transmission; measurement of the mass of water in the tank, after reactor shutdown, by gamma-ray detection; measurement of the vacuum fraction in a hot branch by gamma-ray transmission [fr

  9. Pressurizer and steam-generator behavior under PWR transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahba, A.B.; Berta, V.T.; Pointner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) pressurized water reactor (PWR), at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in which transient phenomena arising from accident events with and without reactor scram were studied. The main purpose of the LOFT facility is to provide data for the development of computer codes for PWR transient analyses. Significant thermal-hydraulic differences have been observed between the measured and calculated results for those transients in which the pressurizer and steam generator strongly influence the dominant transient phenomena. Pressurizer and steam generator phenomena that occurred during four specific PWR transients in the LOFT facility are discussed. Two transients were accompanied by pressurizer inflow and a reduction of the heat transfer in the steam generator to a very small value. The other two transients were accompanied by pressurizer outflow while the steam generator behavior was controlled

  10. PWR [pressurized water reactor] pressurizer transient response: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, S.I.

    1987-08-01

    To predict PWR pressurizer transients, Ahl proposed a three region model with a universal coefficient to represent condensation on the water surface. Specifically, this work checks the need for three regions and the modeling of the interfacial condensation coefficient. A computer model has been formulated using the basic mass and energy conservation laws. A two region vapor and liquid model was first used to predict transients run on a one-eleventh scale Freon pressurizer. These predictions verified the need for a second liquid region. As a result, a three region model was developed and used to predict full-scale pressurizer transients at TMI-2, Shippingport, and Stade. Full-scale pressurizer predictions verified the three region model and pointed out the shortcomings of Ahl's universal condensation coefficient. In addition, experiments were run using water at low pressure to study interface condensation. These experiments showed interface condensation to be significant only when spray flow is turned on; this result was incorporated in the final three region model

  11. Approximation for maximum pressure calculation in containment of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.L. de

    1989-01-01

    A correlation was developed to estimate the maximum pressure of dry containment of PWR following a Loss-of-Coolant Accident - LOCA. The expression proposed is a function of the total energy released to the containment by the primary circuit, of the free volume of the containment building and of the total surface are of the heat-conducting structures. The results show good agreement with those present in Final Safety Analysis Report - FSAR of several PWR's plants. The errors are in the order of ± 12%. (author) [pt

  12. Instrumentation of fuel safety test rods of the PWR system in the Phebus reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schley, Robert; Leveque, J.P.; Aujollet, J.M.; Dutraive, Pierre; Colome, Jean; Bouly, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The tests were performed in an experimental cell centred in the core of the PHEBUS water reactor of 50 MW. The CEA make two types of apparatus for testing the safety of PWR fuel. One is for testing a single fuel stick and the other a bunch of 25 sticks. The instrumentation described enables the main parameters of the test to be known: temperatures of the fuel - central temperature of the UO 2 - cladding surface temperatures; temperature of the cooling circuits - thermal balance - temperatures of the structures, etc.; coolant pressure; internal pressure of the fuel sticks; direction and flow rate of the fluid. This instrumentation and the technological problems to be overcome are described and the results of the first tests carried out are given [fr

  13. Metallurgy of steels for PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, M.; Mocek, J.; Barackova, L.

    1980-01-01

    A survey and the chemical compositions are presented of reactor pressure vessel steels. The metallurgy is described of steel making for pressure vessels in Japan and the USSR. Both acidic and alkaline open-hearth steel is used for the manufacture of ingots. The leading world manufacturers of forging ingots for pressure vessels, however, exclusively use electric steel. Vacuum casting techniques are exclusively used. Experience is shown gained with the introduction of the manufacture of forging ingots for pressure vessels at SKODA, Plzen. The metallurgical procedure was tested utilizing alkaline open hearths, electric arc furnaces and facilities for vacuum casting of steel. Pure charge raw materials should be used for securing high steel purity. Prior to forging pressure vessel rings, not only should sufficiently big bottoms and heads be removed but also the ingot middle part should be scrapped showing higher contents of impurities and nonhomogeneous structure. (B.S.)

  14. Metallurgy of steels for PWR pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepka, M; Mocek, J; Barackova, L [Skoda, Plzen (Czechoslovakia)

    1980-09-01

    A survey and the chemical compositions are presented of reactor pressure vessel steels. The metallurgy is described of steel making for pressure vessels in Japan and the USSR. Both acidic and alkaline open-hearth steel is used for the manufacture of ingots. The leading world manufacturers of forging ingots for pressure vessels, however, exclusively use electric steel. Vacuum casting techniques are exclusively used. Experience is shown gained with the introduction of the manufacture of forging ingots for pressure vessels at SKODA, Plzen. The metallurgical procedure was tested utilizing alkaline open hearths, electric arc furnaces and facilities for vacuum casting of steel. Pure charge raw materials should be used for securing high steel purity. Prior to forging pressure vessel rings, not only should sufficiently big bottoms and heads be removed but also the ingot middle part should be scrapped showing higher contents of impurities and nonhomogeneous structure.

  15. Prevention against fragile fracture in PWR pressure vessel in the presence of pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, E.G.D. do; Oliveira, L.F.S. de; Roberty, N.C.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the determination of operational limit curves (primary pressure versus temperature) for PWR is presented. Such curves give the operators indications related to the safety status of the plant concerning the possibility of a pressurized thermal shock. The method begins by a thermal analysis for several postulated transients, followed by the determination of the thermomechanical stresses in the vessel and finally it makes use of the linear elasticity fracture mechanics. Curves are shown for a typical PWR. (Author) [pt

  16. PWR pressure vessel integrity during overcooling accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Pressurized water reactors are susceptible to certain types of hypothetical accidents that under some circumstances, including operation of the reactor beyond a critical time in its life, could result in failure of the pressure vessel as a result of propagation of crack-like defects in the vessel wall. The accidents of concern are those that result in thermal shock to the vessel while the vessel is subjected to internal pressure. Such accidents, referred to as pressurized thermal shock or overcooling accidents (OCA), include a steamline break, small-break LOCA, turbine trip followed by stuck-open bypass valves, the 1978 Rancho Seco and the TMI accidents and many other postulated and actual accidents. The source of cold water for the thermal shock is either emergency core coolant or the normal primary-system coolant. ORNL performed fracture-mechanics calculations for a steamline break in 1978 and for a turbine-trip case in 1980 and concluded on the basis of the results that many more such calculations would be required. To meet the expected demand in a realistic way a computer code, OCA-I, was developed that accepts primary-system temperature and pressure transients as input and then performs one-dimensional thermal and stress analyses for the wall and a corresponding fracture-mechanics analysis for a long axial flaw. The code is briefly described, and its use in both generic and specific plant analyses is discussed

  17. Development of PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, S.; Edwards, B.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements to be met by vessel steels for pressurized water reactors are analyzed. Chemicat composition of low-alloyed steels, mechanical properties of sheets and forgings made of these steels and changes in the composition and properties over the wall thickness of the reactor vessel are presented. Problems of the vessel manufacturing including welding and heat treatment processes of sheets and forgings are considered. Special attention is paid to steel embrittlement during vessel fabrication and operation (radiation embrittlement, thermal embrittlement). The role of non-metal inclusions and their effect on anisotropy of fracture toughness is discussed. Possible developments of vessel steels and procedures for producing reactor vessels are reviewed

  18. Development of PWR pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, S.; Edwards, B.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements to be met by vessel steels for pressurized water reactors are analyzed. Chemicat composition of low-alloyed steels, mechanical properties of sheets and forgings made of these steels and changes in the composition and properties over the wall thickness of the reactor vessel are presented. Problems of the vessel manufacturing including welding and heat treatment processes of sheets and forgings are considered. Special attention is paid to steel embrittlement during vessel fabrication and operation (radiation embrittlement, thermal embrittlement). The role of non-metal inclusions and their effect on anisotropy of fracture toughness is discussed. Possible developments of vessel steels and procedures for producing reactor vessels are reviewed.

  19. FLUOLE-2: An Experiment for PWR Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiollay Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FLUOLE-2 is a benchmark-type experiment dedicated to 900 and 1450 MWe PWR vessels surveillance dosimetry. This two-year program started in 2014 and will end in 2015. It will provide precise experimental data for the validation of the neutron spectrum propagation calculation from core to vessel. It is composed of a square core surrounded by a stainless steel baffe and internals: PWR barrel is simulated by steel structures leading to different steel-water slides; two steel components stand for a surveillance capsule holder and for a part of the pressure vessel. Measurement locations are available on the whole experimental structure. The experimental knowledge of core sources will be obtained by integral gamma scanning measurements directly on fuel pins. Reaction rates measured by calibrated fission chambers and a large set of dosimeters will give information on the neutron energy and spatial distributions. Due to the low level neutron flux of EOLE ZPR a special, high efficiency, calibrated gamma spectrometry device will be used for some dosimeters, allowing to measure an activity as low as 7. 10−2 Bq per sample. 103mRh activities will be measured on an absolute calibrated X spectrometry device. FLUOLE-2 experiment goal is to usefully complete the current experimental benchmarks database used for the validation of neutron calculation codes. This two-year program completes the initial FLUOLE program held in 2006–2007 in a geometry representative of 1300 MWe PWR.

  20. Fuel assembly for pressure loss variable PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikuni, Masaaki.

    1993-01-01

    In a PWR type reactor, a pressure loss control plate is attached detachably to a securing screw holes on the lower surface of a lower nozzle to reduce a water channel cross section and increase a pressure loss. If a fuel assembly attached with the pressure loss control plate is disposed at a periphery of the reactor core where the power is low and heat removal causes no significant problem, a flowrate at the periphery of the reactor core is reduced. Since this flowrate is utilized for removal of heat from fuel assemblies of high powder at the center of the reactor core where a pressure loss control plate is not attached, a thermal limit margin of the whole reactor core is increased. Thus, a limit of power peaking can be moderated, to obtain a fuel loading pattern improved with neutron economy. (N.H.)

  1. Assessment of environmentally assisted cracking in PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    There is a possibility that extension of pre-existing flaws in the reactor pressure vessel of a pressurised water reactor (PWR) may occur by environmentally assisted cracking, in particular by corrosion fatigue under cyclic transient loading. Crack growth predictions have usually been carried out using cyclic crack growth rate (da/dN) versus stress intensity range (δK) curves, such as those given in Section XI, Appendix A of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. However, the inherent time dependent nature of environmental cracking processes renders such an approach unrealistic. The present paper describes the development of an alternative time based assessment methodology. Illustrative calculations of expected crack growth of assumed defects made using the cyclic (ASME XIA) and time-based approaches are compared. The results illustrate that crack growth predicted by the time-based approach can be greater or less than that calculated by the traditional method. For a PWR operated with good control of water chemistry, actual crack growth rates are expected to be well below those predicted by the ASME code. (Author)

  2. PWR pressurizer discharge piping system on-site testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglaret, G.; Lasne, M.

    1983-08-01

    Framatome PWR systems includes the installation of safety valves and relief valves wich permit the discharge of steam from the pressurizer to the pressurizer relief tank through discharge piping system. Water seal expulsion pluration then depends on valve stem lift dynamics which can vary according to water-stem interaction. In order to approaches the different phenomenons, it was decided to perform a test on a 900 MWe French plant, test wich objectives are: characterize the mechanical response of the discharge piping to validate a mechanical model; open one, two or several valves among the following: one safety valve and three pilot operated relief valves, at a time or sequentially and measure the discharge piping transient response, the support loads, the

  3. Real-time instrument-failure detection in the LOFT pressurizer using functional redundancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1982-07-01

    The functional redundancy approach to detecting instrument failures in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressurizer is described and evaluated. This real-time method uses a bank of Kalman filters (one for each instrument) to generate optimal estimates of the pressurizer state. By performing consistency checks between the output of each filter, failed instruments can be identified. Simulation results and actual pressurizer data are used to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique

  4. Integrity of PWR pressure vessels during overcooling accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Iskander, S.K.; Whitman, G.D.

    1982-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel in a pressurized water reactor is normally subjected to temperatures and pressures that preclude propagation of sharp, crack-like defects that might exist in the wall of the vessel. However, there is a class of postulated accidents, referred to as overcooling accidents, that can subject the pressure vessel to severe thermal shock while the pressure is substantial. As a result of such accidents vessels containing high concentrations of copper and nickel, which enhance radiation embrittlement, may possess a potential for extensive propagation of preexistent inner surface flaws prior to the vessel's normal end of life. For the purpose of evaluating this problem a state-of-the-art fracture mechanics model was developed and has been used for conducting parametric analyses and for calculating several recorded PWR transients. Results of the latter analysis indicate that there may be some vessels that have a potential for failure today if subjected to a Rancho Seco (1978) or TMI-2 (1979) type transient. However, the calculational model may be excessively conservative, and this possibility is under investigation

  5. Integrity of PWR pressure vessels during overcooling accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Iskander, S.K.; Whitman, G.D.

    1982-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel in a pressurized water reactor is normally subjected to temperatures and pressures that preclude propagation of sharp, crack-like defects that might exist in the wall of the vessel. However, there is a class of postulated accidents, referred to as overcooling accidents, that can subject the pressure vessel to severe thermal shock while the pressure is substantial. As a result of such accidents, vessels containing high concentrations of copper and nickel, which enhance radiation embrittlement, may possess a potential for extensive propagation of preexistent inner surface flaws prior to the vessel's normal end of life. A state-of-the-art fracture-mechanics model was developed and has been used for conducting parametric analyses and for calculating several recorded PWR transients. Results of the latter analysis indicate that there may be some vessels that have a potential for failure in a few years if subjected to a Rancho Seco-type transient. However, the calculational model may be excessively conservative, and this possibility is under investigation

  6. Out-pile test of non-instrumented capsule for the advanced PWR fuel pellets in HANARO irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Oh, D. S.; Bang, J. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Yang, Y. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Jeon, H. K.; Ryu, J. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    Non-instrumental capsule were designed and fabricated to irradiate the advanced pellet developed for the high burn-up LWR fuel in the HANARO in-pile capsule. This capsule was out-pie tested at Cold Test Loop-I in KAERI. From the pressure drop test results, it is noted that the flow velocity across the non-instrumented capsule of advanced PWR fuel pellet corresponding to the pressure drop of 200 kPa is measured to be about 7.45 kg/sec. Vibration frequency for the capsule ranges from 13.0 to 32.3 Hz. RMS displacement for non-instrumented capsule of advanced PWR fuel pellet is less than 11.6 {mu}m, and the maximum displacement is less that 30.5 {mu}m. The flow rate for endurance test were 8.19 kg/s, which was 110% of 7.45 kg/s. And the endurance test was carried out for 100 days and 17 hours. The test results found not to the wear satisfied to the limits of pressure drop, flow rate, vibration and wear in the non-instrumented capsule.

  7. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.W.

    1987-12-01

    In previous experiments, done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel, the instrument tubes support structure built into the vault was not included. It consists of a number of grids made up of fairly massive steel girders. These have now been added to the model and experiments performed using water to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor and high-pressure air to simulate the discharge of steam or gas from the assumed breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. The results show that the tubes support structure considerably reduces the carry-over of liquid via the vault access shafts. (author)

  8. Structural integrity evaluation of PWR nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Julio R.B.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is the most important structural component of a PWR nuclear power plant. It contains the reactor core and is the main component of the primary system pressure boundary, the system responsible for removing the heat generated by the nuclear reactions. It is considered not replaceable and, therefore, its lifetime is a key element to define the plant life as a whole. Three critical issues related to the reliability of the RPV structural integrity come out by reason of the radiation damage imposed to the vessel material during operation. These issues concern the definition of pressure versus temperature limits for reactor heatup and cooldown, pressurized thermal shock evaluation and assessment of reactor vessels with low upper shelf Charpy impact energy levels. This work aims to present the major aspects related to these topics. The requirements for preventing fracture of the RPV are reviewed as well as the available technology for assessing the safety margins. For each mentioned problem, the several steps for structural integrity evaluation are described and the analysis methods are discussed. (author)

  9. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  10. A comparison of fuzzy logic-PID control strategies for PWR pressurizer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavaklioglu, K.; Ikonomopoulos, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained from a comparison performed between classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and fuzzy logic (FL) controlling the pressure in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The two methodologies have been tested under various transient scenarios, and their performances are evaluated with respect to robustness and on-time response to external stimuli. One of the main concerns in the safe operation of PWR is the pressure control in the primary side of the system. In order to maintain the pressure in a PWR at the desired level, the pressurizer component equipped with sprayers, heaters, and safety relief valves is used. The control strategy in a Westinghouse PWR is implemented with a PID controller that initiates either the electric heaters or the sprayers, depending on the direction of the coolant pressure deviation from the setpoint

  11. Improving MODPRESS heat loss calculations for PWR pressurizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Natalia V.; Lira, Carlos A. Brayner O.; Castrillho, Lazara S.

    2009-01-01

    The improvement of heat loss calculations in MODPRESS transient code for PWR pressurizer analysis is the main focus of this investigation. Initially, a heat loss model was built based on heat transfer coefficient (HTC) correlations obtained in handbooks of thermal engineering. A hand calculation for Neptunus experimental test number U47 yielded a thermal power loss of 11.2 kW against 17.3 kW given by MODPRESS at the same conditions, while the experimental estimate is given as 17 kW. This comparison is valid only for steady state or before starting the transient experiment, because MODPRESS does not update HTC's when the transient phase begins. Furthermore, it must be noted that MODPRESS heat transfer coefficients are adjusted to reproduce the experimental value of the specific type of pressurizer. After inserting the new routine for HTC's into MODPRESS, the heat loss was calculated as 11.4 kW, a value very close to the first estimate but far below 17 kW found in the U47 experiment. In this paper, the heat loss model and results will be described. Further research is being developed to find a more general HTC that allows the analysis of the effects of heat losses on transient behavior of Neptunus and IRIS pressurizers. (author)

  12. Reassessment of PWR pressure-vessel integrity during overcooling accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    A continuing analysis of the PTS problem associated with PWR postuated OCA's indicates that the previously accepted degree of conservatism in the fracture-mechanics model needs to be more closely evaluated, and if excessive, reducted. One feature that was believed to be conservative was the use of two-dimensional as opposed to finite-length (three-dimensional) flaws. A flaw of particular interest is one that is located in an axial weld of a plate-type vessel. For those vessels that suffer relatively high radiation damage in the welds, the length of the flaw will be no greater than the length of the weld, and recent calculations indicate that a deep flaw of that length (approx. 2 m) is not effectively infinitely long, contrary to previous thinking. The benefit to be derived from consideration of the 2-m flaw and also a semielliptical flaw with a length-to-depth ratio of 6/1 was investigated by analyzing several postulated transients. In doing so the sensitivity of the benefit to a specified maximum crack arrest toughness and to the duration of the transient was investigated. Results of the analysis indicate that for some conditions the benefit in using the 2-m flaw is substantial, but it decreases with increasing pressure, and above a certain pressure there may be no benefit, depending on the duration of the transient and the limit on crack arrest toughness

  13. Delayed phenomena analysis from French PWR containment instrumentation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costaz, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of the large amount of measurements which has been now gathered by EDF on its twenty two PWR 900 MW shows that the behaviour of concrete under creep and shrinkage effects is in good agreement with the values given as correct estimates by french regulations and taken into account for the design of nuclear prestressed structures. None of the containment buildings studied here showed significant differences with the regulations theoretical values and consequently all the measurements remain in the field of the allowable strain variations used for design. On the other hand, if the instant loading elastic modulus is clearly determined for each containment, and its effect on theoretical creep taken into account, it was not possible up till now to extract from measurements some particular effects such as type of concrete and agregates or climatic effects. (orig.)

  14. Maintenance service for major component of PWR plant. Replacement of pressurizer safe end weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Ueda, Takeshi; Suda, Naoki; Shintani, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016, MHI completed the replacement of safe end weld of pressurizer (Pz) of Ringhals unit 3, which was the first maintenance work for main component of pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant in Europe. For higher reliability and longer lifetime of PWR plant, MHI has conducted many kinds of maintenance works of main components of PWR plants in Japan against stress corrosion cracking due to aging degradation. Technical process for replacement of Pz safe end weld were established by MHI. MHI has experienced the work for 21 PWR units in Japan. That of Ringhals unit 3 was planned and conducted based on the experiences. In this work, Alloy 600 used for welds of nozzles of Pz was replaced with Alloy 690. Alloy 690 is more corrosive-resistant than Alloy 600. Specially designed equipment and technical process were developed and established by MHI to replace safe end weld of Pz and applied for the Ringhals unit 3 as a first application in Europe. The application had been performed in success and achieved the planned replacement work duration and total radiation dose by using sophisticated machining and welding equipment designed to meet the requirements to be small, lightweight and remote-controlled and operating by well skilled MHI personnel experienced in maintenance activities for major components of PWR plant in Japan. The success shows that the experience, activities and technology developed in Japan for main components of PWR plant shall be applicable to contribute reliable operations of nuclear power plants in Europe and other countries. (author)

  15. Long-term preventive maintenance of instrumentation control equipment for PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugitani, S.; Nanba, M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the PWR plants in Japan have been operated more than 30 years, main instrumentation control equipment of analog systems has been renewed to digital control systems. Renewal works had to be done in short period within periodical inspection term and for several facilities. The Mitsubishi LTD group had been provided with these market needs by its digital control system (MELTAC-NplusR 3) applicable to main instrumentation control equipment for primary and secondary systems and had already finished the renewal for practical plants. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Stress analysis on a PWR pressure vessel support structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, J.R.B.; Mattar Neto, M.; Jesus Miranda, C.A. de.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the stress analysis of a research PWR vessel support structure. Different geometries and thermal boundary conditions are evaluated. The finite element analysis is performed using ANSYS program. The ASME Section III criteria are applied for the stress verification and the following points are discussed: stress classification and linearization; jurisdictional boundary between ASME Subsection NB (Class 1 Components) and Subsection NF (Component Supports). (author)

  17. Identification of mechanical vibrations in a PWR reactor using neutron noise signal analysis of the standard instrumentation; Identifikacija mehanichkih varijacija analizom signala shuma standardne neutronske instrumentacije PWR reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostic, Lj [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Runkel, J [Institut fuer Kerntechnik und Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Hannover (Germany)

    1988-07-01

    The neutron noise signals in a PWR power plant were analysed in terms of auto- and cross-power spectral densities, phases and coherences. Core barrel motion, fuel element vibrations and reactivity noise effect due to pressure variations have been monitored and analysed. (author)

  18. Pressure-temperature response of a full-pressure PWR containment to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, J.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model and computer code TRACO III for pressure-temperature transients in the full-pressure containment of PWR during LOCA is described. Main attention is devoted to the analysis of parametric calculations with respect to the estimation of effect of various factors on the transient process and to the comparison of the theoretical and the experimental results on CVTR. (author)

  19. Modeling and simulation of pressurizer dynamic process in PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jin; Liu Changliang; Li Shu'na

    2010-01-01

    By analysis of the actual operating characteristics of pressurizer in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant and based on some reasonable simplification and basic assumptions, the quality and energy conservation equations about pressurizer' s steam zone and the liquid zone are set up. The purpose of this paper is to build a pressurizer model of two imbalance districts. Water level and pressure control system of pressurizer is formed though model encapsulation. Dynamic simulation curves of main parameters are also shown. At last, comparisons between the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the pressurizer model of two imbalance districts is reasonable. (authors)

  20. Contribution for the improvement of pressurized thermal shock assessment methodologies in PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Paulo de Tarso Vida

    2005-01-01

    The structural integrity assessment of nuclear reactor pressure vessel, concerned to Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) accidents, became a necessity and has been investigated since the eighty's. The recognition of the importance of PTS assessment has led the international nuclear technology community to devote a considerable research effort directed to the complete integrity assessment process of the Reactor Pressure Vessels (VPR). Researchers in Europe, Japan and U.S.A. have concentrated efforts in the VPR structural and fracture analysis, conducting experiments to best understand how specific factors act on the behavior of discontinuities, under PTS loading conditions. The main goal of this work is to study de structural behavior of an 'in scale' PWR nuclear reactor pressure vessel model, containing actual discontinuities, under loading conditions generated by a pressurized thermal shock. To construct the pressure vessel model utilized in this research, the approach developed by Barroso (1995) and based on likelihood studies, related to thermal-hydraulic behavior during the PTS was employed. To achieve the objective of this research, a new methodology to generate cracks, with known geometry and localization in the vessel model wall was developed. Additionally, an hydraulic circuit, able to flood the vessel model, heated to 300 deg C, with 10 m 3 of water at 8 deg C, in 170 seconds, was built. Thermo-hydraulic calculations using RELAP5/M0D 3.2.2γ computational code were done, to estimate the temperature profiles during the cooling time. The resulting data subsidized the thermo-structural calculations that were accomplished using ANSYS 7.01 computational code, for both 2D and 3D models. So, the stress profiles obtained with these calculations were associated with fracture mechanics concepts, to assess the crack growth behavior in the VPR model wall. After the PTS test, the VPR model was submitted to destructive and non-destructive inspections. The results

  1. Corrosion fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel welds in PWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, W.H.; Ceschini, L.J.; Moon, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate behavior of several pressure vessel steel welds in PWR environment is discussed. The behavior is compared with associated heat-affected zone behavior, and with comparable base metal results. The welds show different degrees of susceptibility to the environmental influence, and this is discussed in some detail, along with fractographic observations on the tested specimens

  2. Application on electrochemistry measurement of high temperature high pressure condition in PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuchun; Xiao Zhongliang; Jiang Ya; Yu Xiaowei; Pang Feifei; Deng Fenfang; Gao Fan; Zhou Nianguang

    2011-01-01

    High temperature high pressure electrochemistry testing system was comprehensively analyzed in this paper, according to actual status for supervision in primary and secondary circuits of PWR nuclear power plants. Three research methods were reviewed and discussed for in-situ monitor system. By combination with ECP realtime measurement it was executed for evaluation and water chemistry optimization in nuclear power plants. It is pointed out that in-situ electrochemistry measurement has great potential application for water chemistry evaluation in PWR nuclear power plants. (authors)

  3. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  4. Replacement of the control and instrumentation system with the microprocessor based systems in Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.

    1998-01-01

    In Ohi Units 3 and 4, Ikata Unit 3, and Genkai Units 3 and 4, the latest of PWR plants now under operation in Japan, the reactor control system and turbine control system employ the microprocessor base digital control systems with a view to improving reliability, operability and maintainability. In the next stage plants, another application of such digital system is also planned for the instrumentation rack for the reactor protection system for further improvement. On the other hand, in Mihama Unit 1, the first of domestic PWR plants, and later plants except for the latest 5 plants, analog control systems are employed for the instrumentation racks. For the analog control systems of these plants, FOXBORO H-Line instruments, equivalent domestic box type instruments or WH7300 Series card type instruments were initially employed, and later replaced with domestic card type control systems after 10-15 year operation. However, 8-12 years have passed since these replacements, so the 15th year generally quoted as an interval for replacing C and I systems is near at hand. This is the time to consider next replacement. This replacement will be based on the latest digital technology. However, it is not practical way for the existing plants to apply the same integrated digital C and I system configuration for the next stage plants, because it requires the drastic change of the C and I system configuration and significant cost-up. Therefore, we must investigate the optimum digital C and I system configuration for the existing system. (author)

  5. Assessment of environmentally assisted cracking in PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    1) Since environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) is a time dependent process, assessment should be based on time rather than cycle dependent parameters. Thus an a/sub e/ vs a/sub i/ (or strain rate) basis for assessment should be used in preference to da/dN vs ΔK. 2) The threshold strain rate or velocity for the onset of EAC is controlled by material and environmental factors (e.g. steel sulphur content and water chemistry), and possibly by mechanical loading factors such as R ratio and load interaction effects. Above the threshold, crack growth rates are usually unacceptably rapid. 3) Sample calculations show that predicted crack growth rates using a time based model can be below or above those calculated using ASME XI depending on the value of the EAC threshold velocity but that for normal PWR operating conditions rates are likely to be below those predicted by the ASME code

  6. The NCSU [North Carolina State Univ.] freon PWR [pressurized water reactor] loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caves, J.R.; Doster, J.M.; Miller, G.D.; Wehring, B.W.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear engineering department at North Carolina State University has designed and constructed an operating scale model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply system (NSSS). This facility will be used for education, training, and research. The loop uses electric heaters to simulate the reactor core and Freon as the primary and secondary coolant. Viewing ports at various locations in the loop allow the students to visualize flow regimes in normal and off-normal operating conditions. The objective of the design effort was to scale the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a two-loop Westinghouse NSSS. Provisions have been made for the simulation of various abnormal occurrences. The model is instrumented in much the same manner as the actual NSSS. Current research projects using the loop include the development of adaptive expert systems to monitor the performance of the facility, diagnose mechanical faults, and to make recommendations to operators for mitigation of accidents. This involves having thermal-hydraulics and core-physics simulators running faster than real time on a mini-supercomputer, with operating parameters updated by communication with the data acquisition and control computer. Further opportunities for research will be investigated as they arise

  7. Lumped-parameter modeling of PWR downcomer and pressurizer for LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Saha, P.; Dubow, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two lumped-parameter models, one for a PWR downcomer and the other for a pressurizer, are presented. The models are based on the transient, nonhomogeneous, drift-flux description of two-phase flow, and are suitable for simulating a hypothetical LOCA condition. Effects of thermal nonequilibrium are incorporated in the downcomer model, whereas the pressurizer model can track the interfaces among various flow regimes. Semiimplicit numerical schemes are used for solution. Encouraging results have been obtained for both the models. (author)

  8. Sensing line effects on PWR-based differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.P.; Neff, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    An incorrrect configuration of the fluid-filled pressure sensing lines connecting differential pressure transducers to the pressure taps in a pressurized water reactor system can cause errors in the measurement and, during rapid pressure transients, could cause the transducer to fail. Testing was performed in both static and dynamic modes to experimentally determine the effects of sensing lines of various lengths, diameters, and materials. Testing was performed at ambient temperature with absolute line pressures at about 17 MPa using water as the pressure transmission fluid

  9. Improvements of nuclear fuel management in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1978-07-01

    The severe variations to which the different elements contributing to the determination of the fuel cycle cost are subjected have led to a reopening of the problem of ''optimization'' of nuclear fuel management. The increase in costs of uranium ore, isotope separation work units (swu), reprocessing, the political implications of proliferation associated with the employment of reprocessing operations have been at the origin of a reassessment of present-day management. It therefore appeared to be appropriate to study variants with respect to a reference mode represented by the management of the PWR 900 MWe systems, without burnable poison in the cycle at equilibrium (Case 3 of Table 1). In order to obtain a complete view of impacts of such modifications, computations were carried out as far as the appraisal of the cycle cost and with reprocessing. There has likewise been added to this the estimate of the gain anticipated from certain improvements in the neutron balance contributed at the level of the lattice

  10. The deformation of zircaloy PWR cladding with low internal pressures, under mainly convective cooling by steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.; Reynolds, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    The deformation behaviour is reported of specimens of Zircaloy PWR fuel cladding when directly heated in flowing steam. The range of internal pressures studied was 0.69-2.07 MPa; this extended earlier studies using higher pressures. The specimens were ramped and then held at a steady test temperature until rupture or until 600 seconds had elapsed. Under these conditions it was found that extended deformation occurred with pressures down to 1 MPa at temperatures up to 900 deg C. At lower pressures and higher temperatures there was no large extended deformation; this is believed to result from the effects of oxidation

  11. Problems of control of WWER-type pressurized water reactors (PWR's)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drab, F.; Grof, V.

    1978-01-01

    The problems are dealt with of nuclear power reactor control. Special attention is paid to the reactor of the WWER type, which will play the most important part in the Czechoslovak power system in the near future. The subsystems are described which comprise the systems of reactor control and protection. The possibilities are outlined of using Czechoslovak instrumentation for the control and safety system of the WWER-type PWR. (author)

  12. Characteristics of pressure control system on PWR/PHWR in pile loop facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwani; Hendro, P.; Suwoto; Sutrisno

    1998-01-01

    PWR/PHWR in-pile loop facility is used for testing of fuel element bundle which is correspond to the condition of power reactor operation. So, this facility is designed at 150 bar of pressure and 350 o C of temperature. Pressure control system is one of the components of the facility and it is equipped with 6 electrical heaters (30 KW), water spray, pressure and temperature monitors. The characterization test of pressure control system has been carried out with operating of 2 electrical heaters (10 KW). The K eff calculation value is different 5.2% from pressure in the pressure control system can be increased to 160 bar within 27 hours. After the system pressure reached the nominal pressure, the pressure control system was in the steady state condition

  13. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR [pressurized-water-reactor] plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  14. DOMPAC dosimetry experiment. Neutronic simulation of the thickness of a PWR pressure vessel. Irradiation damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberman, A.; Faure, M.; Thierry, M.; Hoclet, O.; Le Dieu de Ville, A.; Nimal, J.C.; Soulat, P.

    1979-01-01

    For suitable extrapolation of irradiated PWR ferritic steel results, proper irradiation of the pressure vessel has been 'simulated' in test reactor. For this purpose, a huge steel block (20 cm in depth) was loaded with Saclay's graphite (GAMIN) and tungsten damage detectors. Core-block water gap was optimized through spectrum indexes method, by ANISN and SABINE codes so that spectrum in 1/4 thickness matches with ANISN computations for PWR Fessenheim 1. A good experimental agreement is found with calculated dpa damage gradient. 3D Monte Carlo computation (TRIPOLI), was performed on the DOMPAC device, and spectrum indexes evolution was found consistent with experimental results. Surveillance rigs behind a 'thermal shield' were also simulated, including damage and activation monitors. Dosimetry results give an order of magnitude of accuracies involved in projecting steel sample embrittlement to the pressure vessel [fr

  15. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.; Trenberth, R.

    1987-12-01

    Modelling experiments have been done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Various liquids have been used to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor from a breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. High pressure air and helium have been used to simulate the discharge of steam and gas from the breach. The dispersion of liquid via the vault access shafts has been measured. Photographs have been taken of fluid flow patterns and velocity profiles have been obtained. The requirements for further experiments are indicated. (author)

  16. A new model for simulation of pressurizers in PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madeira, A.A.

    1981-02-01

    The pressurizer of a PWR type reactor was simulated as a thermodynamical system made up of three regions with movable boundaries. The mechanisms of normal condensation, condensation induced by spray, flashing and heat exchange across the water - steam interface, were studied. Various tests have been carried out and satisfactory results were obtained when compared with those from other models and also with some available experimental data. (E.G.) [pt

  17. PWR reactor pressure vessel internals license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirian, R.; Robison, G.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). Pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals designed by all three U.S. PWR nuclear steam supply system vendors have been evaluated relative to the effects of age-related degradation mechanisms; the capability of current design limits; inservice examination, testing, repair, refurbishment, and other programs to manage these effects; and the assurance that these internals can continue to perform their intended safety functions in the license renewal term. This industry report (IR), one of a series of ten, provides a generic technical basis for evaluation of PWR reactor pressure vessel internals for license renewal

  18. Calculation of sample problems related to two-phase flow blowdown transients in pressure relief piping of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.

    1984-02-01

    A method was published, based on the integral method of characteristics, by which the junction and boundary conditions needed in computation of a flow in a piping network can be accurately formulated. The method for the junction and boundary conditions formulation together with the two-step Lax-Wendroff scheme are used in a computer program; the program in turn, is used here in calculating sample problems related to the blowdown transient of a two-phase flow in the piping network downstream of a PWR pressurizer. Independent, nearly exact analytical solutions also are obtained for the sample problems. Comparison of the results obtained by the hybrid numerical technique with the analytical solutions showed generally good agreement. The good numerical accuracy shown by the results of our scheme suggest that the hybrid numerical technique is suitable for both benchmark and design calculations of PWR pressurizer blowdown transients

  19. A digital simulation of a pressurizer in a PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, E.F.

    1980-11-01

    A model for pressurizer digital simulation of a PWR nuclear power plant during transients, considering all pressurizer control features, is presented. The pressurizer is divided into two regions separated by a water-vapor interface and non-equilibrium conditions are considered. The particular thermodynamic process followed during insurge and outsurges is determined at each instant of analysis without any previous assumption. The pressure behavior is defined by an explicit equation in any of four possible pressurizer thermodynamic conditions. Thermodynamic properties of steam and water are computed by ASME subroutines and the mathematical formulation presented in this study was programed in FORTRAN IV for a Burroughs-6700 digital computer system. This program was employed to simulate the Shippingport Atomic Power Station and Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant - Unit 1 pressurizers. The test results compared with experimental or vendor data show the validity of this analysis method. (Author) [pt

  20. Process and device for replacing heater in PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gente, D.; Giron, M.

    1990-01-01

    To assure the tight fixation of replacing heater on a pressurizer penetration sleeve, a gas metal-arc welding single pass is executed. A tubular shaft is fixed over end of heater projecting from penetration sleeve. Over shaft is fixed tubular support for the torch which can rotate about axis of support axis heater. Welding torch and welding wire feeder roll are rotated in synchronisation by appropriate motors. Weld is made in single pass round periphery of heater and penetration sleeve [fr

  1. RNL NDT studies related to PWR pressure vessel inlet nozzle inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogerson, A.; Poulter, L.N.J.; Clough, P.; Cooper, A.

    1984-01-01

    Non-destructive examinations of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) play an important role in assuring vessel integrity throughout its operational life. Automated ultrasonic techniques for the detection and sizing of flaws in thick-section seam welds and near-surface regions in a PWR RPV have been under development at RNL for some time. Techniques for the inspection of complex geometry welds and other regions of the vessel are now being assessed and further developed as part of the UK NDT development programme in support of the Sizewell PWR. One objective of this programme is to demonstrate that the range of ultrasonic techniques already shown to be effective for the inspection of seam welds and inlet nozzle corner regions, through exercises such as the Defect Detection Trials, can also be effective for inspection of these other vessel regions. The nozzle-to-vessel welds and nozzle crotch corners associated with the RPV water inlet and outlet nozzles are two such regions being examined in this programme. In this paper, a review is given of the work performed at RNL in the development of a laboratory-based inspection system for inlet nozzle inspection. The main features of the system in its current stage of development are explained. (author)

  2. Probabilistic study of PWR reactor pressure vessel fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.; Lucia, A.C.; Grandemange, J.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Different methods are used to evaluate the rupture probability of a nuclear pressure vessel. On of them extrapolates to nuclear pressure vessels, data of failure found in conventional pressure vessels. The disadvantage of such an approach is that the effects of systematic changes in key parameters cannot be taken into account. For example, the influence of irradiation and the use of quality assurance programs encompassing design, fabrication and materials cannot be considered. But the most important disadvantage of this method is the limited size of the representative population and consequently the high value of the upper bound failure rate corresponding to a requested confidence level. The method used in the present work involves the development of physical models based on an understanding of the failure modes and expressing the conventional concepts of fracture mechanics in a probabilistic form; the fatigue crack growth rate, calculated for conditions of cyclic loading, the initiation of unstable crack propagation, and the possibility of crack arrest. The analysis therefore requires the statistical expression of the factors and parameters which appear in the expressions of the law of crack growth and of toughness, and also those which are used in the calculation of the stress intensity factor K 1 . All input data are entered in COVASTOL code in histogram form. This code takes into account the degree of correlation between the flaw size and the Paris' law coefficients. It computes the propagation of a given defect in a given position, and the corresponding failure probability during accidental loading

  3. A model to simulate the dynamic of a PWR pressurizer using the CSMP program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woiski, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of a PWR pressurizer using the CSMP program. A two-control-volume formulation non-equilibrium model has been used for this purpose. Thermodynamic states are obtained after each integration cycle. The code was tested against experimental results of Shippingport and NPD (Nuclear Power Demonstration Plant) pressurizers. It was also tested against available data from Angra I and Angra II/III safety analysis report. Despite the model simplicity, the lack of important data and the low reliability or the experimental curves, the calculated and experimental results compared well. (Author) [pt

  4. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Seung Dong

    2001-03-01

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3·4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident

  5. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Seung Dong [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3{center_dot}4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident.

  6. Aging assessment of PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Auxiliary Feedwater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a review of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater Systems. Two of the objectives of the NPAR Program are to identify failure modes and causes and identify methods to detect and track degradation. In Phase I of the Auxiliary Feedwater System study, a detailed review of system design and operating and surveillance practices at a reference plant is being conducted to determine failure modes and to provide an indication of the ability of current monitoring methods to detect system degradation. The extent to which current practices are contributing to aging and service wear related degradation is also being assessed. This paper provides a description of the study approach, examples of results, and some interim observations and conclusions. 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Research study of pressure instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, L.; Hull-Allen, G.

    1984-01-01

    To obtain a more vibration resistant pressure sensor for use on the Space Shuttle Main Engine, a proximity probe based, diaphragm type pressure sensor breadboard was developed. A fiber optic proximity probe was selected as the sensor. In combination with existing electronics, a thermal stability evaluation of the entire probe system was made. Based upon the results, a breadboard design of the pressure sensor and electronics was made and fabricated. A brief series of functional experiments was made with the breadboard to calibrate, thermally compensate, and linearize its response. In these experiments, the performance obtained in the temperature range of -320 F (liquid N2) to +200 F was comparable to that of the strain gage based sensor presently in use on the engine. In tests at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), after some time at or near liquid nitrogen temperatures, the sensor output varied over the entire output range. These large spurious signals were attributed to condensation of air in the sensing gap. In the next phase of development of this sensor, an evaluation of fabrication techniques toward greater thermal and mechanical stability of the fiber probe assembly must be made. In addition to this, a positive optics to metal seal must be developed to withstand the pressure that would result from a diaphragm failure.

  8. Apparatus for localizing disturbances in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1989-01-01

    The invention according to CS-PS 177386, entitled ''Apparatus for increasing the efficiency and passivity of the functioning of a bubbling-vacuum system for localizing disturbances in nuclear power plants with a pressurized water reactor'', concerns an important area of nuclear power engineering that is being developed in the RGW member countries. The invention solves the problems of increasing the reliability and intensification during the operation of the above very important system for guaranteeing the safety of the standard nuclear power plants of Soviet design. The essence of the invention consists in the installation of a simple passively operating supplementary apparatus. Consequently, the following can be observed in the system: first an improvement and simultaneous increase in the reliability of its function during the critical transition period, which follows the filling of the second space with air from the first space; secondly, elimination of the hitherto unavoidable initiating role of the active sprinkler-condensation device present; thirdly, a more effective performance and subjection of the elements to disintegration of the water flowing from the bubbling condenser into the first space; and fourthly, an enhanced utilization of the heat-conducting ability of the water reservoir of the bubbling condenser. Representatives of the supplementary apparatus are autonomous and local secondary systems of the sprinkler-sprayer without an insert, which spray the water under the effect of gravity. 1 fig

  9. Pressure loss tests for DR-BEP of fullsize 17 x 17 PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Chun, Se Young; Chang, Seok Kyu; Won, Soon Youn; Cho, Young Rho; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyoung Ho

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the conditions, procedure and results in the pressure loss tests carried out for a double grid type debris resistance bottom end piece (DR-BEP) designed by KAERI. In this test, the pressure loss coefficients of the full size 17 x 17 PWR simulated fuel assembly with DR-BET and with standard-BEP were measured respectively, and the pressure loss coefficients of DR-BEP were compared with the coefficients of STD-BET. The test conditions fall within the ranges of loop pressure from 5.2 to 45 bar, loop temperature from 27 to 221 deg C and Reynolds number in fuel bundle from 2.17 x 10 4 to 3.85 x 10 5 . (Author) 5 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Instrumentation and control system upgrade plan for operating PWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Hirofumi

    1993-01-01

    Digital technology has been applied to all non-safety grade instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in the latest Japanese PWR plants, and has achieved more reliable and operable systems, easier maintenance and cable reductions. In the next stage APWR plants, the digital technology will be also applied to all the I ampersand C systems including safety grade systems. Parallel to the above efforts, many backfitting programs in which the digital technology is applied to operating plants are under way to improve reliability and operability. The backfitting programs for operating plants are proceeded in two phases, synthesizing various utility's needs to improve plant availability and operability, improvement of digital technology, and complexity of the practicable replacement procedures. Phase 1 is a partial application of digital technology, while Phase 2 is a complete application of digital technology. Phase 1 has been implemented in a number of operation plants, while Phase 2 studies are in the design stage, but have not been implemented at this point. This paper presents examples of the partial application of digital technology to operating plants, and the contents of basic design for the complete application of digital technology

  11. Layout of PWR in-core instrumentation system tubing and support structure with Bechtel 3D-CADD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, T.; Pfeifer, B.W.; Mulay, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    The optimization study of the PWR In-Core Instrumentation System (ICIS) tubing layout and support structure presented an opportunity to utilize the Bechtel 3D-CADD program to perform this task. This paper provides a brief summary of the Bechtel 3D-CADD program development and capabilities and outlines the process of developing and optimizing the ICIS tube layout. Specific aspects relating to the ICIS tube layout criteria, support, alignment, electronic interference check and erection sequence are provided. (orig.)

  12. Bidimensional analysis of thermal stratification flow in the surge line of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, M.L.; Botelho, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    A numerical model is developed in order to understand the coolant thermal stratification and to develop a capability of predicting the failure of reactor components caused by this phenomenon. A period of this phenomenon in the surge line of a PWR reactor is simulated in two dimensions using the TURBO computer program. The flow cylindrical geometry is represented in 2 D by the space between two parallel plates, and the separation of the plates is estimated using similarity (the equivalence in the pressure drop). The results are compared to experimental data and to analogous results obtained from the COMMIX-1 C code (3 D). (author). 13 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  13. Consideration of loading conditions initiated by thermal transients in PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azodi; Glahn; Kersting; Schulz; Jansky.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the present state of PWR-plants in the Federal Republic of Germany with respect to - the design of the primary pressure boundary - the analysis of thermal transients and resulting loads - the material conditions and neutron fluence - the requirements for protection against fast fracture. The experimental and analytical research and development programs are delineated together with some foreign R and D programs. It is shown that the parameters investigated (loading condition, crack shape and orientation etc.) cover a broad range. Extensive analytical investigations are emphasized. (orig./RW) [de

  14. Logic flowgraph model for disturbance analysis of a PWR pressurizer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarro, S.; Okrent, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Logic Flowgraph Methodology (LFM) has been developed as a synthetic simulation language for process reliability or disturbance analysis applications. A Disturbance Analysis System (DAS) using the LFM models can store the necessary information concerning a given process in an efficient way, and automatically construct in real time the diagnostic tree(s) showing the root cause(s) of occurring disturbances. A comprehensive LFM model for a PWR pressurizer system is presented and discussed, and the latest version of the LFM tree synthesis routine, optimized to achieve reduction of computer memory usage, is used to show the LFM diagnoses of selected hypothetic disturbances

  15. Analysis of bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel has been modeled based on measured rim width, porosity and bubble density. Using the assumption that excessive bubble pressure in the rim is inversely proportional to its radius, proportionality constant is derived as a function of average pellet burnup and bubble radius. This approach is possible because the integration of the number of Xe atoms retained in the rim bubbles, which can be calculated as a function of bubble radius, over the bubble radius gives the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles. Here the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles can be derived from the measured Xe depletion fraction in the matrix and the calculated rim thickness. Then the rim bubble pressure is obtained as a function of fuel burnup and bubble size from the proportionality constant. Therefore, the present model can provide some useful information that would be required to analyze the behavior of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel under both normal and transient operating conditions. 28 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  16. Ultimate analysis of PWR prestressed concrete containment subjected to internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, H.-T.; Lin, Y.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical analyses are carried out by using the ABAQUS finite element program to predict the ultimate pressure capacity and the failure mode of the PWR prestressed concrete containment at Maanshan nuclear power plant. Material nonlinearity such as concrete cracking, tension stiffening, shear retention, concrete plasticity, yielding of prestressing tendon, yielding of steel reinforcing bar and degradation of material properties due to high temperature are all simulated with proper constitutive models. Geometric nonlinearity due to finite deformation has also been considered. The results of the analysis show that when the prestressed concrete containment fails, extensive cracks take place at the apex of the dome, the junction of the dome and cylinder, and the bottom of the cylinder connecting to the base slab. In addition, the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment is higher than the design pressure by 86%

  17. Digibaro pressure instrument onboard the Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Polkko, J.; Kahanpää, H. H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M. M.; Haukka, H.; Savijarv1, H.; Kauhanen, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Phoenix Lander landed successfully on the Martian northern polar region. The mission is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Scout program. Pressure observations onboard the Phoenix lander were performed by an FMI (Finnish Meteorological Institute) instrument, based on a silicon diaphragm sensor head manufactured by Vaisala Inc., combined with MDA data processing electronics. The pressure instrument performed successfully throughout the Phoenix mission. The pressure instrument had 3 pressure sensor heads. One of these was the primary sensor head and the other two were used for monitoring the condition of the primary sensor head during the mission. During the mission the primary sensor was read with a sampling interval of 2 s and the other two were read less frequently as a check of instrument health. The pressure sensor system had a real-time data-processing and calibration algorithm that allowed the removal of temperature dependent calibration effects. In the same manner as the temperature sensor, a total of 256 data records (8.53 min) were buffered and they could either be stored at full resolution, or processed to provide mean, standard deviation, maximum and minimum values for storage on the Phoenix Lander's Meteorological (MET) unit.The time constant was approximately 3s due to locational constraints and dust filtering requirements. Using algorithms compensating for the time constant effect the temporal resolution was good enough to detect pressure drops associated with the passage of nearby dust devils.

  18. Simulation of small break loss of coolant accident in pressurized water reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, N. M. N.

    2012-02-01

    A major safety concern in pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) design is the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA),in which a break in the primary coolant circuit leads to depressurization, boiling of the coolant, consequent reduced cooling of the reactor core, and , unless remedial measures are taken, overheating of the fuel rods. This concern has led to the development of several simulators for safety analysis. This study demonstrates how the passive and active safety systems in conventional and advanced PWR behave during the small break loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). The consequences of SBOLOCA have been simulated using IAEA Generic pressurized Water Reactor Simulator (GPWRS) and personal Computer Transient analyzer (PCTRAN) . The results were presented and discussed. The study has confirmed the major safety advantage of passive plants versus conventional PWRs is that the passive safety systems provide long-term core cooling and decay heat removal without the need for operator actions and without reliance on active safety-related system. (Author)

  19. INETEC new system for inspection of PWR reactor pressure vessel head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadinic, B.; Postruzin, Z.

    2004-01-01

    INETEC Institute for Nuclear Technology developed new equipment for inspection of PWR and VVER reactor pressure vessel head. The new advances in inspection technology are presented in this article, as the following: New advance manipulator for inspection of RPVH with high speed of inspection possibilities and total automated work; New sophisticated software for manipulator driving which includes 3D virtual presentation of manipulator movement and collision detection possibilities; New multi axis controller MAC-8; New end effector system for inspection of penetration tube and G weld; New eddy current and ultrasonic probes for inspection of G weld and penetration tube; New Eddy One Raster scan software for analysis of eddy current data with mant advanced features which allows easy and quick data analysis. Also the results of laboratory testing and laboratory qualification are presented on reactor pressure vessel head mock, as well as obtained speed of inspection and quality of collected data.(author)

  20. Effects of temperature on corrosion fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Bramwell, I.L.; Fairbrother, H.; Worswick, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results concerning crack propagation rates in A508-III pressure vessel steel (medium sulphur content) exposed to PWR primary water at temperatures between 130 and 290 C. The results indicate that the greatest increase in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate occurs at temperatures in the range 150 to 200 C. Under these conditions, there was a marked change in the appearance of the fracture surface, with extensive micro-branching of the crack front and occasional bifurcation of the whole crack path. In contrast, at 290 C, the fracture surface is smoother, similar to that due to inert fatigue. The implication of these observations for assessment of the pressure vessel integrity, is examined. 14 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Earthquake resistance of residual heat removed (RHR) pump for pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uga, Takeo; Shiraki, K.; Honma, T.; Matsubayashi, H.; Inazuka, H.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with the earthquake resistance of the residual heat removed (RHR) pump of single stage double volute type, which is one of the structurally simplest pumps used for pressurized water reactors (PWR). The results of the study can be summarized as follows: (1) Any trouble which can give effect on the functions of the pump at earthquake does not become a problem so long as each part of the pump is of aseismatically rigid structure. (2) Aseismatic tolerance test in the pump's operating condition has shown that the earthquake resistance of the pump at its location has a tolerance about five times the dynamic design acceleration. (3) The pump is provided with an impeller-casing wear ring at the pressure boundary between the suction side pressure and discharge side pressure. This wear ring acts as an underwater bearing when the pump is in operation, and improves the vibration characteristics, particularly damping ratio, of the pump shaft to a great extent to make the pump more aseismatic. (4) In the evaluation of the underwater bearing characteristics of the wear ring, the evaluation accuracy of the vibration characteristics of the pump shaft can be improved by taking into consideration the pressure loss in the wear ring part from the head of the single stage of the pump due to the rotation of the impeller. (author)

  2. Simulating the steam generator and the pressurizer of a PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Greef, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    In a PWR nuclear power plant, considered as a power generating device, the steam generator as a subset plays an important role in the generation process, whereas the pressurizer rather acts as a control device for security purposes. Nevertheless, from a thermodynamical point of view, the two subsets behave basically in the same way, so that a common set of basic equations may be suggested to develop for each the proper mathematical simulation model. In this paper the generation of this common set of basic equations is described, from which a specific model for each device is derived. A numerical illustration of the behaviour of the two devices for typical inputs to the derived simulation model is pictured. (author)

  3. Manufacturing and properties of closure head forging integrated with flange for PWR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoharu Sasaki; Iku Kurihara; Etsuo Murai; Yasuhiko Tanaka; Koumei Suzuki

    2003-01-01

    Closure head forging (SA508, Gr.3 Cl.1) integrated with flange for PWR reactor pressure vessel has been developed. This is intended to enhance structural integrity of closure head resulted in elimination of ISI, by eliminating weld joint between closure head and flange in the conventional design. Manufacturing procedures have been established so that homogeneity and isotropy of the material properties can be assured in the closure head forging integrated with flange. Acceptance tensile and impact test specimens are taken and tested regarding the closure head forging integrated with flange as very thick and complex forgings. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies and material properties of the closure head forging integrated with flange. (orig.)

  4. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) round robin benchmark for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Shin K., E-mail: paengki1@tamu.edu; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The capabilities of steady RANS models were directly assessed for full axial scale experiment. • The importance of mesh and conjugate heat transfer was reaffirmed. • The rod inner-surface temperature was directly compared. • The steady RANS calculations showed a limitation in the prediction of circumferential distribution of the rod surface temperature. - Abstract: This study examined the capabilities and limitations of steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) approach for pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle problems, based on the round robin benchmark of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes against the NESTOR experiment for a 5 × 5 rod bundle with typical split-type mixing vane grids (MVGs). The round robin exercise against the high-fidelity, broad-range (covering multi-spans and entire lateral domain) NESTOR experimental data for both the flow field and the rod temperatures enabled us to obtain important insights into CFD prediction and validation for the split-type MVG PWR rod bundle problem. It was found that the steady RANS turbulence models with wall function could reasonably predict two key variables for a rod bundle problem – grid span pressure loss and the rod surface temperature – once mesh (type, resolution, and configuration) was suitable and conjugate heat transfer was properly considered. However, they over-predicted the magnitude of the circumferential variation of the rod surface temperature and could not capture its peak azimuthal locations for a central rod in the wake of the MVG. These discrepancies in the rod surface temperature were probably because the steady RANS approach could not capture unsteady, large-scale cross-flow fluctuations and qualitative cross-flow pattern change due to the laterally confined test section. Based on this benchmarking study, lessons and recommendations about experimental methods as well as CFD methods were also provided for the future research.

  5. Design and manufacturing of non-instrumented capsule for advanced PWR fuel pellet irradiation test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Song, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This project is preparing to irradiation test of the developed large grain UO{sub 2} fuel pellet in HANARO for pursuit fuel safety and high burn-up in 'Advanced LWR Fuel Technology Development Project' as a part Nuclear Mid and Long-term R and D Program. On the basis test rod is performed the nuclei property and preliminary fuel performance analysis, test rod and non-instrumented capsule are designed and manufactured for irradiation test in HANARO. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel pellet was referred the non-instrumented capsule for an irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel in HANARO(DUPIC Rig-001) and 18-element HANARO fuel, was designed to ensure the integrity and the endurance of non-instrumented capsule during the long term(2.5 years) irradiation. To irradiate the UO{sub 2} pellets up to the burn-up 70 MWD/kgU, need the time about 60 months and ensure the integrity of non-instrumented capsule for 30 months until replace the new capsule. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule will be based to develope the non-instrumented capsule for the more long term irradiation in HANARO. 22 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  6. Brief account of the effect of overcooling accidents on the integrity of PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The occurrence in recent years of several (PWR) accident initiating events that could lead to severe thermal shock to the reactor pressure vessel, and the growing awareness that copper and nickel in the vessel material significantly enhance radiation damage in the vessel, have resulted in a reevaluation of pressure-vessel integrity during postulated overcooling accidents. Analyses indicate that the accidents of concern are those involving both thermal shock and pressure loadings, and that an accident similar to that at Rancho Seco in 1978 could, under some circumstances and at a time late in the normal life of the vessel, result in propagation of preexistent flaws in the vessel wall to the extent that they might completely penetrate the wall. More severe accidents have been postulated that would result in even shorter permissible lifetimes. However, the state-of-the-art fracture-mechanics analysis may contain excessive conservatism, and this possibility is being investigated. Furthermore, there are several remedial measures, such as fuel shuffling, to reduce the damage rate, and vessel annealing, to restore favorable material properties, that may be practical and used if necessary. 5 figures

  7. The deformation of Zircaloy PWR cladding with low internal pressures, under mainly convective cooling by steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.; Reynolds, A.E.

    1981-08-01

    Simulated PWR fuel rods clad with Zircaloy-4 were tested under convective steam cooling conditions, by pressurising to 0.69-2.07MPa (100-300lb/in 2 ), then ramping at 10 0 C/s to various temperatures in the region 800-955 0 C and holding until either 600 s elapsed or rupture occurred. The length of cladding strained 33% or more was greatest (about 20 times the original diameter) when the initial internal pressure was 1.38+-0.17 PMa (200+-25lb/in 2 ), and the temperature 885 0 C. It is thought that this results from oxidation strengthening of the surface layers acting as an additional mechanism for stabilising the deformation and/or partial superplastic deformation. To avoid adjacent rods in a fuel assembly touching at any temperature, the pressure would have to be less than about 1MPa (145 1b/in 2 ). If the pressure was 1.38MPa (200lb/in 2 ) then the rods would not swell sufficiently to touch if the temperature did not exceed about 840 0 C. (author)

  8. Fuel rod-to-support contact pressure and stress measurement for CHASNUPP-1(PWR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem; Elahi, N.; Siddiqui, A.; Murtaza, G.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A detailed finite element model of spacer grid cell with fuel rod-to-support has been developed to determine the contact pressure between the supports of the grid and fuel rod cladding. → The spring hold-down force is calculated using the contact pressure obtained from the FE model. → Experiment has also been conducted in the same environment for the measurement of this force. → The spring hold-down force values obtained from both studies confirm the validation of this analysis. → The stress obtained through this analysis is less than the yield strength of spacer grid material, thus fulfils the structural integrity criteria of grid. - Abstract: This analysis has been made in an attempt to measure the contact pressure of the PWR fuel assembly spacer grid spring and to verify its structural integrity at room temperature in air. A detailed finite element (FE) model of spacer grid cell with fuel rod-to-support has been developed to determine the contact pressure between the supports of the grid and fuel rod cladding. The FE model of a fuel rod-to-support system is produced with shell and contact elements. The spring hold-down force is calculated using the contact pressure obtained from the FE model. Experiment has also been conducted in the same environment for the measurement of this force. The spring hold-down force values obtained from both studies are compared, which show good agreement, and in turn confirm the validation of this analysis. The Stress obtained through this analysis is less than the yield strength of spacer grid material (Inconel-718), thus fulfils the structural integrity criteria of grid.

  9. Fuel rod-to-support contact pressure and stress measurement for CHASNUPP-1(PWR) fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseem, E-mail: wazim_me@hotmail.co [Directorate General Nuclear Power Fuel, Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box No. 1847, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Elahi, N.; Siddiqui, A.; Murtaza, G. [Directorate General Nuclear Power Fuel, Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box No. 1847, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: A detailed finite element model of spacer grid cell with fuel rod-to-support has been developed to determine the contact pressure between the supports of the grid and fuel rod cladding. The spring hold-down force is calculated using the contact pressure obtained from the FE model. Experiment has also been conducted in the same environment for the measurement of this force. The spring hold-down force values obtained from both studies confirm the validation of this analysis. The stress obtained through this analysis is less than the yield strength of spacer grid material, thus fulfils the structural integrity criteria of grid. - Abstract: This analysis has been made in an attempt to measure the contact pressure of the PWR fuel assembly spacer grid spring and to verify its structural integrity at room temperature in air. A detailed finite element (FE) model of spacer grid cell with fuel rod-to-support has been developed to determine the contact pressure between the supports of the grid and fuel rod cladding. The FE model of a fuel rod-to-support system is produced with shell and contact elements. The spring hold-down force is calculated using the contact pressure obtained from the FE model. Experiment has also been conducted in the same environment for the measurement of this force. The spring hold-down force values obtained from both studies are compared, which show good agreement, and in turn confirm the validation of this analysis. The Stress obtained through this analysis is less than the yield strength of spacer grid material (Inconel-718), thus fulfils the structural integrity criteria of grid.

  10. Sub-critical crack growth and clad integrity in a PWR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Foreman, A.J.E.; Sharples, J.K.

    1987-10-01

    The possibility of in-service growth of sub-critical defects in a PWR reactor pressure vessel to a critical size which could result in vessel failure was addressed in both the 1976 and 1982 reports of the Light Water Reactor Study Group (LWRSG), under the Chairmanship of Dr W Marshall (now Lord Marshall). An addendum to this report was published by UKAEA in April 1987. The section of the addendum dealing with subcritical crack growth and the related issue of integrity of the stainless steel cladding on the inner vessel surface is reproduced in this report. This section of the LWRSG addendum provides a review of the current status of fatigue crack growth and environmentally assisted cracking research for pressure vessel steels in light water reactor environments, as well as a review of developments in crack growth assessment methods. The review concludes that the alternative assessment procedures now being developed give a more realistic prediction of in service crack growth than the ASME Section XI Appendix A fatigue crack growth curves. (author)

  11. Comparative study of the contribution of various PWR spacer grid components to hydrodynamic and wall pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Saptarshi, E-mail: saptarshi.bhattacharjee@outlook.com [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) – Cadarache, DEN/DTN/STCP/LHC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Mécanique, Modélisation et Procédés Propres (M2P2), UMR7340 CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Centrale Marseille, 13451 Marseille Cedex (France); Ricciardi, Guillaume [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) – Cadarache, DEN/DTN/STCP/LHC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Viazzo, Stéphane [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Modélisation et Procédés Propres (M2P2), UMR7340 CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Centrale Marseille, 13451 Marseille Cedex (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Complex geometry inside a PWR fuel assembly is simulated using simplified 3D models. • Structured meshes are generated as far as possible. • Fluctuating hydrodynamic and wall pressure field are analyzed using LES. • Comparative studies between square spacer grid, circular spacer grid and mixing vanes are presented. • Simulations are compared with experimental data. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibrations in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core can cause fretting wear in fuel rods. These vibrations can compromise safety of a nuclear reactor. So, it is necessary to know the random fluctuating forces acting on the rods which cause these vibrations. In this paper, simplified 3D models like square spacer grid, circular spacer grid and symmetric mixing vanes have been used inside an annular pipe. Hydrodynamic and wall pressure characteristics are evaluated using large eddy simulations (LES). Structured meshes are generated as far as possible. Simulations are compared with an experiment. Results show that the grid and vanes have a combined effect: grid accelerates the flow whereas the vanes contribute to the swirl structures. Spectral analysis of the simulations illustrate vortex shedding phenomenon in the wake of spacer grids. This initial study opens up interesting perspectives towards improving the modeling strategy and understanding the complex phenomenon inside a PWR core.

  12. Comparative study of the contribution of various PWR spacer grid components to hydrodynamic and wall pressure characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Saptarshi; Ricciardi, Guillaume; Viazzo, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Complex geometry inside a PWR fuel assembly is simulated using simplified 3D models. • Structured meshes are generated as far as possible. • Fluctuating hydrodynamic and wall pressure field are analyzed using LES. • Comparative studies between square spacer grid, circular spacer grid and mixing vanes are presented. • Simulations are compared with experimental data. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibrations in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core can cause fretting wear in fuel rods. These vibrations can compromise safety of a nuclear reactor. So, it is necessary to know the random fluctuating forces acting on the rods which cause these vibrations. In this paper, simplified 3D models like square spacer grid, circular spacer grid and symmetric mixing vanes have been used inside an annular pipe. Hydrodynamic and wall pressure characteristics are evaluated using large eddy simulations (LES). Structured meshes are generated as far as possible. Simulations are compared with an experiment. Results show that the grid and vanes have a combined effect: grid accelerates the flow whereas the vanes contribute to the swirl structures. Spectral analysis of the simulations illustrate vortex shedding phenomenon in the wake of spacer grids. This initial study opens up interesting perspectives towards improving the modeling strategy and understanding the complex phenomenon inside a PWR core.

  13. TMI-2 - A Case Study for PWR Instrumentation Performance during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson

    2014-05-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor provided a unique opportunity to evaluate sensors exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during this accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. As part of a program initiated in 2012 by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a review was completed to gain insights from prior TMI-2 sensor survivability and data qualification efforts. This new effort focussed upon a set of sensors that provided critical data to TMI-2 operators for assessing the condition of the plant and the effects of mitigating actions taken by these operators. In addition, the effort considered sensors providing data required for subsequent accident simulations. Over 100 references related to instrumentation performance and post-accident evaluations of TMI-2 sensors and measurements were reviewed. Insights gained from this review are summarized within this report. For each sensor, a description is provided with the measured data and conclusions related to the sensor’s survivability, and the basis for conclusions about its survivability. As noted within this document, several techniques were invoked in the TMI-2 post-accident evaluation program to assess sensor status, including comparisons with data from other sensors, analytical calculations, laboratory testing, and comparisons with sensors subjected to similar conditions in large-scale integral tests and with sensors that were similar in design but more easily removed from the TMI-2 plant for evaluations. Conclusions from this review provide important insights related to sensor survivability and enhancement options for improving sensor performance. In addition, this document provides recommendations related to the sensor survivability and data evaluation

  14. TMI-2 - A Case Study for PWR Instrumentation Performance during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson

    2013-03-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor provided a unique opportunity to evaluate sensors exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during this accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. As part of a program initiated in 2012 by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a review was completed to gain insights from prior TMI-2 sensor survivability and data qualification efforts. This new effort focussed upon a set of sensors that provided critical data to TMI-2 operators for assessing the condition of the plant and the effects of mitigating actions taken by these operators. In addition, the effort considered sensors providing data required for subsequent accident simulations. Over 100 references related to instrumentation performance and post-accident evaluations of TMI-2 sensors and measurements were reviewed. Insights gained from this review are summarized within this report. For each sensor, a description is provided with the measured data and conclusions related to the sensor’s survivability, and the basis for conclusions about its survivability. As noted within this document, several techniques were invoked in the TMI-2 post-accident evaluation program to assess sensor status, including comparisons with data from other sensors, analytical calculations, laboratory testing, and comparisons with sensors subjected to similar conditions in large-scale integral tests and with sensors that were similar in design but more easily removed from the TMI-2 plant for evaluations. Conclusions from this review provide important insights related to sensor survivability and enhancement options for improving sensor performance. In addition, this document provides recommendations related to the sensor survivability and data evaluation

  15. Evaluation of the pressure difference across the core during PWR-LOCA reflood phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1979-03-01

    The flooding rate of the core influences largely cooling of the core during the reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA. Since the void fraction of two-phase flow in the core is important determining the flooding rate, it is essential to examine this void fraction. The void fraction in the core during the reflood phase obtained by experiment was compared with those predicted by the correlations respectively of Akagawa, Nicklin, Zuber, Yeh, Griffice, Behringer and Jhonson. Only Yeh's correlation was found to be usable for the purpose. The pressure difference of the core during the reflood phase was calculated by reflood analyzing code REFLA-1D using Yeh's correlation. Following are the results: (1) During the steady-state period after quenching of the heaters, the prediction agrees within +-15% with the experiment. (2) During the transient period when the quench front is advancing, the prediction is not in agreement with the experiment, the difference being about +-40%. Influence of the advancing quench front upon the void fraction in the core must further be studied. (author)

  16. Containment venting sliding pressure venting process for PWR and BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, B.

    1991-01-01

    In order to reduce the residual risk associated with hypothetical severe nuclear accidents, nuclear power plants in Germany as well as in certain other European countries have been or will be backfitted with a system for filtered containment venting. During venting system process design, particular importance is attached to the requirements regarding, for example, high aerosol loading capability, provision for decay heat removal from the scrubber unit, the aerosol spectrum to be retained and entirely passive functioning of the scrubber unit. The aerosol spectrum relevant for process design and testing varies depending on aerosol concentrations, the time at which venting is commenced and whether there is an upstream wetwell, etc. Because of this the Reactor Safety Commission in Germany has specified that SnO 2 with a mass mean diameter of approximately 0.5 μm should be used as an enveloping test aerosol. To meet the above-mentioned requirements, a combined venturi scrubber system was developed which comprises a venturi section and a filter demister section and is operated in the sliding pressure mode. This scrubber system was tested using a full-scale model and has now been installed in 14 PWR and BWR plants in Germany and Finland

  17. PWR [pressurized water reactor] optimal reload configuration with an intelligent workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greek, K.J.; Robinson, A.H.

    1990-01-01

    In a previous paper, the implementation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) refueling expert system that combined object-oriented programming in Smalltalk and a FORTRAN power calculation to evaluate loading patterns was discussed. The expert system applies heuristics and constraints that lead the search toward an optimal configuration. Its rate of improvement depends on the expertise coded for a search and the loading pattern from where the search begins. Due to its complexity, however, the solution normally cannot be served by a rule-based expert system alone. A knowledge base may take years of development before final acceptance. Also, the human pattern-matching capability to view a two-dimensional power profile, recognize an imbalance, and select an appropriate response has not yet been surpassed by a rule-based system. The user should be given the ability to take control of the search if he believes the solution needs a new direction and should be able to configure a loading pattern and resume the search. This paper introduces the workstation features of Shuffle important to aid the user to manipulate the configuration and retain a record of the solution

  18. Aging mechanisms in the Westinghouse PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Control Rod Drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1991-01-01

    An aging assessment of the Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Control Rod System (CRD) has been completed as part of the US NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research, (NPAR) Program. This study examined the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the system to determine its potential for degradation as the plant ages. Selected results from this study are presented in this paper. The operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. From our evaluation of the data, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and the operating environment, we conclude that the Westinghouse CRD system is subject to degradation which, if unchecked, could affect its safety function as a plant ages. Ways to detect and mitigate the effects of aging are included in this paper. The current maintenance for the control rod drive system at fifteen Westinghouse PWRs was obtained through a survey conducted in cooperation with EPRI and NUMARC. The results of the survey indicate that some plants have modified the system, replaced components, or expanded preventive maintenance. Several of these activities have effectively addressed the aging issue. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovchenko, Mariya; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Burn, Kenneth W.; Console Camprini, Patrizio; Duhamel, Isabelle; Peron, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  20. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovchenko Mariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR. The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  1. Uncertainty study of the PWR pressure vessel fluence. Adjustment of the nuclear data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodeli, I.A.

    1994-01-01

    The code system devoted to the calculation of the sensitivity and uncertainty of of the neutron flux and reaction rates calculated by the transport codes, has been developed. Adjustment of the basic data to experimental results can be performed as well. Various sources of uncertainties can be taken into account, such as those due to the uncertainties in the cross-sections, response functions, fission spectrum and space distribution of neutron source, geometry and material composition uncertainties... One -As well as two- dimensional analysis can be performed. Linear perturbation theory is applied. The code system is sufficiently general to be used for various analysis in the fields of fission and fusion. The principal objective of our studies concerns the capsule dosimetry study realized in the framework of the 900 MWe PWR pressure vessel surveillance program. The analysis indicates that the present calculations, performed by the code TRIPOLI-2, using the ENDF/B-IV based, non-perturbed neutron cross-section library in 315 energy groups, allows to estimate the neutron flux and the reaction rates in the surveillance capsules and in the most calculated and measured reaction rates permits to reduce these uncertainties. The results obtained with the adjusted iron cross-sections, response functions and fission spectrum show that the agreement between the calculation and the experiment was improved to become within 10% approximately. The neutron flux deduced from the experiment is then extrapolated from the capsule to the most exposed pressure vessel location using the calculated lead factor. The uncertainty in this factor was estimated to be about 7%. (author). 39 refs., 52 figs., 30 tabs

  2. Pressure vessel fracture studies pertaining to a PWR LOCA-ECC thermal shock: experiments TSE-1 and TSE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1976-09-01

    The LOCA-ECC Thermal Shock Program was established to investigate the potential for flaw propagation in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) vessels during injection of emergency core coolant following a loss-of-coolant accident. Studies thus far have included fracture mechanics analyses of typical PWRs, the design and construction of a thermal shock test facility, determination of material properties for test specimens, and two thermal shock experiments with 0.53-m-OD (21-in.) by 0.15-m-wall (6-in.) cylindrical test specimens. The PWR calculations indicated that under some circumstances crack propagation could be expected and that experiments should be conducted for cracks that would have the potential for propagation at least halfway through the wall

  3. A multi-agent design for a pressurized water reactor (P.W.R.) control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimar-Lichtenberger, M.

    1999-01-01

    This PhD work is in keeping with the complex industrial process control. The starting point is the analysis of control principles in a Pressurized Water Reactor (P.W.R). In order to cope with the limits of the present control procedures, a new control organisation by objectives and means is defined. This functional organisation is based on the state approach and is characterized by the parallel management of control functions to ensure the continuous control of the installation essential variables. With regard to this complex system problematic, we search the most adapted computer modeling. We show that a multi-agent system approach brings an interesting answer to manage the distribution and parallelism of control decisions and tasks. We present a synthetic study of multi-agent systems and their application fields.The choice of a multi-agent approach proceeds with the design of an agent model. This model gains experiences from other applications. This model is implemented in a computer environment which combines the mechanisms of an object language with Prolog. We propose in this frame a multi-agent modeling of the control system where each function is represented by an agent. The agents are structured in a hierarchical organisation and deal with different abstraction levers of the problem. Following a prototype process, the validation is realized by an implementation and by a coupling to a reactor simulator. The essential contributions of an agent approach turn on the mastery of the system complexity, the openness, the robustness and the potentialities of human-machine cooperation. (author)

  4. Response of pressurized water reactor (PWR) to network power generation demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The flexibility of the PWR type reactor in terms of response to the variations of the network power demands, is demonstrated. The factors that affect the transitory flexibility and some design prospects that allow the reactor fits the requirements of the network power demands, are also discussed. (M.J.A.)

  5. Aging considerations for PWR [pressurized water reactor] control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes age-related degradation mechanisms affecting life extension of pressurized water reactor control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals. The major sources of age-related degradation for control rod drive mechanisms are thermal transients such as plant heatups and cooldowns, latchings and unlatchings, long-term aging effects on electrical insulation, and the high temperature corrosive environment. Flow induced loads, the high-temperature corrosive environment, radiation exposure, and high tensile stresses in bolts all contribute to aging related degradation of reactor internals. Another problem has been wear and fretting of instrument guide tubes. The paper also discusses age-related failures that have occurred to date in pressurized water reactors

  6. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: PWR pressure vessels. 2007 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that effective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) is one of the most important issues for plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wear-out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. IAEA-TECDOC-1120 documented ageing assessment and management practices for pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) that were current at the time of its finalization in 1997-1998. Safety significant operating events have occurred since the finalization of the TECDOC, e.g. primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetrations and boric acid corrosion/wastage of RPV heads, which threatened the integrity of the RPV heads. These events led to new ageing management actions by both NPP operators and regulators. Therefore it was recognized that IAEA-TECDOC-1120 should be updated by incorporating those new events and their countermeasures. The objective of this report is to update IAEA-TECDOC-1120 in order to provide current ageing management guidance for PWR RPVs to all involved in the operation and regulation of PWRs and thus to help ensure PWR RPV integrity in IAEA Member States throughout their entire service life

  7. Research on pressure sensors for biomedical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a piezo-resistive pressure transducer is discussed suitable for recording pressures typically encountered in biomedical applications. The pressure transducer consists of a thin silicon diaphragm containing four strain-sensitive resistors, and is fabricated using silicon monolithic integrated-circuit technology. The pressure transducers can be as small as 0.7 mm outer diameter, and are, as a result, suitable for mounting at the tip of a catheter. Pressure-induced stress in the diaphragm is sensed by the resistors, which are interconnected to form a Wheatstone bridge.

  8. A comparison of the BUGLE-80, SAILOR, and ELXSIR neutron cross-section libraries for PWR pressure vessels surveillance dosimetry and shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, H.S.; Manahan, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper three multigroup neutron cross-section libraries are used in synthesized three-dimensional discrete ordinates transport analyses to investigate their similarities, differences, and results for pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry and shielding applications. The calculated-to-experimental (C/E) rations and the calculated reaction rates of several fast reactions are compared for the BUGLE-80, SAILOR, and ELXSIR cross-section libraries at the 97-deg surveillance capsule of the San Onofre Nuclear Generation Station Unit 2 (SONGS-2) and at the 90- and 97-deg (C/E ratios only) cavity dosimetry locations for another PWR (referred to as Reactor X)

  9. Proposals for investigating instrument tube line breaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, C.D.; Charlton, T.R.; Loomis, G.G.; Hall, D.G.; Cozzuol, J.M.

    1985-11-01

    Questions posed by the NRC pertaining to instrument tube critical flow and applicability of the Semiscale experimental facility are evaluated. A program is recommended to investigate the issue of generic PWR safety following hypothetical rupture of instrument tubes due to consequences of seismic events

  10. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II, and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel-support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all light-water-reactor vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed thus far indicate best-estimate critical flaw sizes, corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.2 in. for one plant and /approximately/0.4 in. for the other. These flaw sizes are small enough to be of concern. However, it appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size, and thus, presumably, such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 59 refs., 128 figs., 49 tabs.

  11. The role of phosphorus in the irradiation embrittlement of PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.B.; Buswell, J.T.

    1987-02-01

    An analysis has been performed of the influence of phosphorus on post-irradiation materials properties and microstructures determined on a variety of PWR steels and variants following exposure to MTR or reactor surveillance irradiations to doses not exceeding 7 x 10 19 n.cm -2 (E>1.0MeV) at 250-290 0 C. The irradiation-induced shifts in impact transition temperature, matrix hardening and the relative small angle neutron scattering response were found to rise most rapidly with increasing phosphorus when the copper content of the steel was 0.03 w/o. The sensitivity of the changes in mechanical properties to phosphorus content decreased as the copper content was increased. At copper levels typical of modern PWR steel manufacture (Cu 3 P) produced by the irradiation induced segregation of phosphorus to defect sinks and the depletion of phosphorus in solid solution as detected by high sensitivity electron microscopy and other analytical techniques. At higher levels of copper (approx. 0.3 w/o) the effect of phosphorus on properties was reduced by a factor of three due to the observed incorporation of phosphorus into the small copper precipitates formed during irradiation. Grain boundary embrittlement by phosphorus under irradiation is not thought to be important but further evidence concerning the post-irradiation fracture mode and the development of the deleterious influence of phosphorus with irradiation dose is required for a comprehensive understanding of its action. Some suggestions for future work are made. (author)

  12. The power control system of the Siemens-KWU nuclear power station of the PWR [pressurized water reactors] type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    Starting with the first nuclear power plant constructed by Siemens AG of the pressurized light water reactor line (PWR), the Obrigheim Nuclear Power Plant (340 MWe net), until the recently constructed plants of 1300 MWe (named 'Konvoi'), the design of the power control system of the plant was continuously improved and optimized using the experience gained in the operation of the earlier generations of plants. The reactor power control system of the Siemens - KWU nuclear power plants is described. The features of this design and of the Siemens designed heavy water power plants (PHWR) Atucha I and Atucha II are mentioned. Curves showing the behaviour of the controlled variables during load changes obtained from plant tests are also shown. (Author) [es

  13. Pressure loss coefficient evaluation based on CFD analysis for simple geometries and PWR reactor vessel without geometry simplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko II, B.; Park, J. P.; Jeong, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear vendors and utilities perform lots of simulations and analyses in order to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). In general, the simulations are carried out using vendor-specific design codes and best-estimate system analysis codes and most of them were developed based on 1-dimensional lumped parameter models. These thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes require user input for pressure loss coefficient, k-factor; since they numerically solve Euler-equation. In spite of its high impact on the safety analysis results, there has not been good validation method for the selection of loss coefficient. During the past decade, however; computers, parallel computation methods, and 3-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes have been dramatically enhanced. It is believed to be beneficial to take advantage of advanced commercial CFD codes in safety analysis and design of NPP5. The present work aims to validate pressure loss coefficient evaluation for simple geometries and k-factor calculation for PWR based on CFD. The performances of standard k-ε model, RNG k-ε model, Reynolds stress model (RSM) on the simulation of pressure drop for simple geometry such as, or sudden-expansion, and sudden-contraction are evaluated. The calculated value was compared with pressure loss coefficient in handbook of hydraulic resistance. Then the present work carried out analysis for flow distribution in downcomer and lower plenum of Korean standard nuclear power plants (KSNPs) using STAR-CD. The lower plenum geometry of a PWR is very complicated since there are so many reactor internals, which hinders in CFD analysis for real reactor geometry up to now. The present work takes advantage of 3D CAD model so that real geometry of lower plenum is used. The results give a clear figure about flow fields in the reactor vessel, which is one of major safety concerns. The calculated pressure drop across downcomer and lower plenum appears to be in good agreement

  14. Turbulent heat transfer in a coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Saha, Arun K.; Munshi, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Exact predictions in nuclear reactors are more crucial, because of the safety aspects. It necessitates the appropriate modeling of heat transfer phenomena in the reactors core. A two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics model is used to study the detailed analysis of the coolant region of a fuel pin. Governing equations are solved using Marker and Cell (MAC) method. Standard wall functions k-ε turbulence model is incorporated to consider the turbulent behaviour of the flow field. Validation of the code and a few results for a typical PWR running at normal operating conditions reported earlier. There were some discrepancies in the old calculations. These discrepancies have been resolved and updated results are presented in this work. 2D thermal-hydraulics model results have been compared with the 1D thermal-hydraulics model results and conclusions have been drawn. (author)

  15. Requirements and Specifications for a Simplified, Low Pressure Medium Sized PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisan, S.; Raymond, P.; Gautier, G-M.; Pignatel, J-F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarises part of our on-going investigations on the possible introduction of nuclear energy in developing countries or countries with low capacity electrical grids. These investigations are principally concerned with future PWR developments and basically try to search for plausible and economic answers to the three difficult questions that each nuclear technology exporting country faces today: 1)- how to compensate the apparent loss of economic competitiveness, related to the scaling effect, of a small or medium sized reactor? 2)- how to reconcile the introduction of nuclear energy on the large scale with the two major preoccupations of nuclear safety and nuclear proliferation? 3)- how to demonstrate that the proposed concept(s) can effectively meet the safety objectives of the requirements for future reactors in Europe and in other countries?

  16. Research of natural resources saving by design studies of Pressurized Light Water Reactors and High Conversion PWR cores with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, V.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of innovative neutronic conception of Pressurized Light Water Reactors (PWR) of 3. generation, saving of natural resources is of paramount importance for sustainable nuclear energy production. This study consists in the one hand to design high Conversion Reactors exploiting mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and in the other hand, to elaborate multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233 U, in order to maximize natural resources economy. This study has two main objectives: first the design of High Conversion PWR (HCPWR) with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and secondly the setting up of multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233 U, to better natural resources economy. The approach took place in four stages. Two ways of introducing thorium into PWR have been identified: the first is with low moderator to fuel volume ratios (MR) and ThPuO 2 fuel, and the second is with standard or high MR and ThUO 2 fuel. The first way led to the design of under-moderated HCPWR following the criteria of high 233 U production and low plutonium consumption. This second step came up with two specific concepts, from which multi-recycling strategies have been elaborated. The exclusive production and recycling of 233 U inside HCPWR limits the annual economy of natural uranium to approximately 30%. It was brought to light that the strong need in plutonium in the HCPWR dedicated to 233 U production is the limiting factor. That is why it was eventually proposed to study how the production of 233 U within PWR (with standard MR), from 2020. It was shown that the anticipated production of 233 U in dedicated PWR relaxes the constraint on plutonium inventories and favours the transition toward a symbiotic reactor fleet composed of both PWR and HCPWR loaded with thorium fuel. This strategy is more adapted and leads to an annual economy of natural uranium of about 65%. (author) [fr

  17. Dynamic surface-pressure instrumentation for rods in parallel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Lawrence, W.

    1979-01-01

    Methods employed and experience gained in measuring random fluid boundary layer pressures on the surface of a small diameter cylindrical rod subject to dense, nonhomogeneous, turbulent, parallel flow in a relatively noise-contaminated flow loop are described. Emphasis is placed on identification of instrumentation problems; description of transducer construction, mounting, and waterproofing; and the pretest calibration required to achieve instrumentation capable of reliable data acquisition

  18. Bidimensional analysis of thermal stratification flow in the surge line of a PWR pressurizer; Analise bidimensional da estratificacao termica do escoamento na linha de surto do pressurizador de um PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, M L; Botelho, D A

    1994-11-01

    A numerical model is developed in order to understand the coolant thermal stratification and to develop a capability of predicting the failure of reactor components caused by this phenomenon. A period of this phenomenon in the surge line of a PWR reactor is simulated in two dimensions using the TURBO computer program. The flow cylindrical geometry is represented in 2 D by the space between two parallel plates, and the separation of the plates is estimated using similarity (the equivalence in the pressure drop). The results are compared to experimental data and to analogous results obtained from the COMMIX-1 C code (3 D). (author). 13 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab.

  19. The effect of pressurizer-water-level on the low frequency component of the pressure spectrum in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.; Izsak, E.; Valko, J.

    1984-09-01

    The pressure fluctuations were measured in the cooling system of the Paks-1 reactor. A shift of the peak was detected in low frequency component of the pressure fluctuation spectrum which is due to the fluctuations of water level in the pressurizer. Using the model of Katona and Nagy (1983), the eigenfrequencies, the magnitude of the shift and the sensitivity to the pressurizer water level were reproduced in good accordance with the experimental data. (D.Gy.)

  20. Factors affecting the integrity of PWR pressure vessels during overcooling accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel in a pressurized water reactor is normally subjected to temperatures and pressures that preclude propagation of sharp, crack-like defects that might exist in the wall of the vessel. However, if certain postulated accidents, referred to as overcooling accidents, were to occur, the pressure vessel could be subjected to severe thermal shock while the pressure is substantial. As a result, vessels containing high concentrations of copper and nickel, which enhance radiation embrittlement, may possess a potential for extensive propagation of preexistent inner-surface flaws prior to the vessel's normal end of life. A fracture-mechanics analysis for a typical postulated accident and also related thermal-shock experiments indicate that very shallow surface flaws that extend through the cladding into the base material could propagate. This is of particular concern because shallow flaws appear to be the most probable and presumably are the most difficult to detect

  1. Integrated equipment for increasing and maintaining coolant pressure in primary circuit of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1986-01-01

    An open heat pump circuit is claimed connected to the primary circuit. The pump circuit consists of a steam pressurizer with a built-in steam distributor, a compressor, an expander, a reducing valve, an auxiliary pump, and of water and steam pipes. The operation is described and a block diagram is shown of integrated equipment for increasing and maintaining pressure in the nuclear power plant primary circuit. The appropriate entropy diagram is also shown. The advantage of the open pump circuit consists in reducing the electric power input and electric power consumption for the steam pressurizers, removing entropy loss in heat transfer with high temperature gradient, in the possibility of inserting, between the expander and the auxiliary pump, a primary circuit coolant treatment station, in simplified design and manufacture of the high-pressure steam pressurizer vessel, reducing the weight of the steam pressurizer by changing its shape from cylindrical to spherical, increasing the rate of pressure growth in the primary circuit. (E.S.)

  2. Identification of Standing Pressure Waves Sources in Primary Loops of NPP with WWER and PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Proskuriakov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Results of measurement and calculation of Eigen frequencies of coolant pressure oscillations in primary loops of NPP are presented. The simple calculation model based on equivalence of electric circuit with elastic wave propagation in liquids and gases, which gives a sensible interpretation of standing pressure waves sources is developed. It is shown, that pressurizer manifest itself as managed Helmholtz resonator generating a number of SPW (with Eigen frequencies of steam volume, water volume and their combination with coolant volume of respiratory line.

  3. The influence of slightly different main circulation pumps on PWR coolant pressure pulsations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, K.; Pecinka, L.

    1989-01-01

    Pressure distribution along the core barrel circumference caused by the simultaneous operation of six main circulating pumps with slightly different revolutions obtained as a result of measurement in operated NPP is determined on the basis of the well-known Penzes method based on the solving of the wave equation with source term using the expansion into the infinite series of eigenfunctions. Results of calculations can be summarized as follows: the pressure distribution and the resulting force acting on the core barrel has a random character. The same is valid for core barrel vibrations and mainly for the joint between core barrel and pressure vessel. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) code Open FOAM in the study of the pressurized thermal stress of PWR reactors. Comparison with the commercial code Ansys-CFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu Martin, G.; Chiva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this work is proposed to evaluate the potential of the OpenFOAM code for the simulation of typical fluid flows in reactors PWR, in particular for the study of pressurized thermal stress. Test T1-1 has been simulated , within the OECD ROSA project, with the objective of evaluating the performance of the code OpenFOAM and models of turbulence that has implemented to capture the effect of the thrust forces in the case study.

  5. On the domestically-made heavy forging for reactor pressure vessels of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiren; Zhang Chen.

    1988-01-01

    The present situation of the foreign heavy forgings for nuclear reactor pressure vessels and the heavy forgings condition which is used for the Qinshan 300MWe nuclear power plant are described. Some opinions of domestic products is proposed

  6. Reliability of an HTR-module primary circuit pressure boundary. Influences, sensitivity, and comparison with a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staat, M.

    1995-01-01

    The reliability of the HTR-module for electricity and steam generation was analysed for normal operation, as well as accident conditions. The probabilistic fracture mechanics assessment was performed with a modification of the ZERBERUS code on the basis of widely used data. The calculated failure probabilities may thus be compared with similar investigations. The HTR-module primary circuit pressure boundary as a unit showed leak-before-break behaviour in a probabilistic sense, although a break was more probable than a leak for some of its parts.However, the findings may depend greatly on the stochastic data. Therefore a stochastic reference problem is defined and the results are compared with the Japanese round robin on a PWR section. Possible changes of failure probabilities and of the leak-before-break behaviour are discussed for different criteria for the events leading to a leak, and for modifications of the stochastic reference problem such as the inclusion of NDE. The results may be used to identify those stochastic variables which have the greatest influence on the computed failure probabilities, and to perhaps justify further work which would provide more detailed information on these probabilities. Furthermore, there is an obvious need for reduction of the non-statistical reasons for great variations of failure probabilities. (orig.)

  7. Criteria for safety-related nuclear-power-plant operator actions: 1982 pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) simulator exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, D.S.; Beare, A.N.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-06-01

    The primary objective of the Safety-Related Operator Action (SROA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to provide a data base to support development of criteria for safety-related actions by nuclear power plant operators. When compared to field data collected on similar events, a base of operator performance data developed from the simulator experiments can then be used to establish safety-related operator action design evaluation criteria, evaluate the effects of performance shaping factors, and support safety/risk assessment analyses. This report presents data obtained from refresher training exercises conducted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant control room simulator. The 14 exercises were performed by 24 teams of licensed operators from one utility, and operator performance was recorded by an automatic Performance Measurement System. Data tapes were analyzed to extract operator response times (RTs) and error rate information. Demographic and subjective data were collected by means of brief questionnaires and analyzed in an attempt to evaluate the effects of selected performance shaping factors on operator performance

  8. Computational simulation of natural convection of a molten core in lower head of a PWR pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila Braga; Romero, Gabriel Alves; Jian Su

    2010-01-01

    Computational simulation of natural convection in a molten core during a hypothetical severe accident in the lower head of a typical PWR pressure vessel was performed for two-dimensional semi-circular geometry with isothermal walls. Transient turbulent natural convection heat transfer of a fluid with uniformly distributed volumetric heat generation rate was simulated by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software ANSYS CFX 12.0. The Boussinesq model was used for the buoyancy effect generated by the internal heat source in the flow field. The two-equation k-ω based SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model was used to mould the turbulent stresses in the Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes equations (RANS). Two Prandtl numbers, 6:13 and 7:0, were considered. Five Rayleigh numbers were simulated for each Prandtl number used (109, 1010, 1011, 1012, and 1013). The average Nusselt numbers on the bottom surface of the semicircular cavity were in excellent agreement with Mayinger et al. (1976) correlation and only at Ra = 109 the average Nusselt number on the top flat surface was in agreement with Mayinger et al. (1976) and Kulacki and Emara (1975) correlations. (author)

  9. Stochastic simulation of PWR vessel integrity for pressurized thermal shock conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.S.; Moelling, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    A stochastic simulation methodology is presented for performing probabilistic analyses of Pressurized Water Reactor vessel integrity. Application of the methodology to vessel-specific integrity analyses is described in the context of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) conditions. A Bayesian method is described for developing vessel-specific models of the density of undetected volumetric flaws from ultrasonic inservice inspection results. Uncertainty limits on the probabilistic results due to sampling errors are determined from the results of the stochastic simulation. An example is provided to illustrate the methodology

  10. PWR pressurizer with heaters well which can be obturate and sealing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godin, B.; Guicherd, L.

    1991-01-01

    Each heater well is prolongated at the end located outer the pressurizer containment by a sleeve internally tapped which is prolongated at the other end by a guiding and fixation sleeve for welding the heater. The heater well can be obturated by a threaded plug introduce in the tapped part of the sleeve after cutting the welding sleeve and extraction of the heater [fr

  11. Corrosion fatigue of pressure vessel steels in PWR environments--influence of steel sulfur content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P.M.; Druce, S.G.; Truswell, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Large effects of simulated light water reactor environments at 288 C on fatigue crack growth in low alloy pressure vessel steels are observed only when specific mechanical, metallurgical, and electrochemical conditions are satisfied simultaneously. In this paper, the relative importance of three key variables--steel impurity content, water chemistry, and flow rate--and their interaction with loading rate or strain rate are examined. In particular, the results of a systematic examination of the influence of a steel's sulfur content are described

  12. Babcock experience of automated ultrasonic non-destructive testing of PWR pressure vessels during manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikstra, B.J.; Farley, J.M.; Scruton, G.

    1990-01-01

    Major developments in ultrasonic techniques, equipment and systems for automated inspection have lead, over a period of about ten years, to the regular application of sophisticated computer-controlled systems during the manufacture of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Ten years ago the use of procedures defined in a code such as ASME XI might have been considered sufficient, but it is now necessary, as was demonstrated by the results of the UKAEA defect detection trials and the PISC II trials, to apply more comprehensive arrays of probes and higher test sensitivities. The ultrasonic techniques selected are demonstrated to be adequate by modelling or test-block exercises, the automated systems applied are subject to stringent quality assurance testing, and very rigorous inspection procedures are used in conjunction with a high degree of automation to ensure reproducibility of inspection quality. The state-of-the-art in automated ultrasonic testing of pressure vessels by Babcock is described. Current developments by the company, including automated flaw recognition, integrated modelling of inspection capability, and the use of electronically scanned variable-angle probes are reviewed. Examples quoted include the automated ultrasonic inspections of the Sizewell B pressurized water reactor vessel. (author)

  13. Thermophysical instruments for non-destructive examination of tightness and internal gas pressure or irradiated power reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastoushin, V.V.; Novikov, A.Yu.; Bibilashvili, Yu.K.

    1998-01-01

    The developed thermophysical method and technical instruments for non-destructive leak-tightness and gas pressure inspection inside irradiated power reactor fuel rods and FAs under poolside and hot cell conditions are described. The method of gas pressure measuring based on the examination of parameters of thermal convection that aroused in gas volume of rod plenum by special technical instruments. The developed method and technique allows accurate value determination of not only one of the main critical rod parameters, namely total internal gas pressure, that forms rod mean life in the reactor core, but also the partial pressure of every main constituent of gaseous mixture inside irradiated fuel rod, that provides the feasibility of authentic and reliable leak-tightness detection. The described techniques were experimentally checked during the examination of all types power reactor fuel rods existing in Russia (WWER, BN, RBMK) and could form the basis for new technique development for non-destructive examination of PWR (and other) type rods and FAs having gas plenum filled with spring or another elements of design. (author)

  14. Analysis of French (Paluel) pressurized water reactor design differences compared to current US PWR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    To understand better the regulatory approaches to reactor safety in foreign countries, the staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commisssion has reviewed design information on the Paluel nuclear power plant, one of the current standard 1300-MWe plant operating in France. This report provides the staff's evaluation of major design differences between this standardized French plant and current US pressurized water reactor plants, as well as insights concerning French regulatory practices. The staff identified approximately 25 design differences, and an analysis of the safety significance of each of these design features is presented, along with an assessment comparing the relative safety benefit of each

  15. Corrosion fatigue of pressure vessel steels in PWR environments--influence of steel sulfur content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.M.; Druce, S.G.; Truswell, A.E.

    1984-07-01

    Large effects of simulated light water reactor environments at 288 C on fatigue crack growth in low alloy pressure vessel steels are observed only when specific mechanical, metallurgical, and electrochemical conditions are satisfied simultaneously. In this paper, the relative importance of three key variables--steel impurity content, water chemistry, and flow rate--and their interaction with loading rate or strain rate are examined. In particular, the results of a systematic examination of the influence of a steel's sulfur content are described.

  16. Ultimate state substantiation and methods of the life extension for pwr pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshchenko, V.T.; Pokrovsky, V.V.; Yasniy, P.V.; Kaplunenko, V.G.; Fedorov, V.G.; Dragunov, Y.G.; Timofeev, B.T.

    1991-01-01

    A model of brittle fracture was developed for structural materials with cracks under cyclic loading. The authors proposed a method of lifetime evaluation for structural elements (including pressure vessels) using the brittle fracture criteria and taking into account the stage of unstable crack growth. The influence of preliminary mechanical overloading of the metal with a crack in plastic state (warm prestress) upon fracture toughness characteristics of the parent metal and that of the weld was studied. The tests were carried out on 25 to 150 mm thick compact and three-point bend specimens with a long through-the-thickness crack and a short semi-elliptical one. (author)

  17. A stochastic-bayesian model for the fracture probability of PWR pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, Alexandre S.; Duran, Jorge Alberto R., E-mail: afrancisco@metal.eeimvr.uff.br, E-mail: duran@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2013-07-01

    Fracture probability of pressure vessels containing cracks can be obtained by methodologies of easy understanding, which require a deterministic treatment, complemented by statistical methods. However, more accurate results are required, methodologies need to be better formulated. This paper presents a new methodology to address this problem. First, a more rigorous methodology is obtained by means of the relationship of probability distributions that model crack incidence and nondestructive inspection efficiency using the Bayes' theorem. The result is an updated crack incidence distribution. Further, the accuracy of the methodology is improved by using a stochastic model for the crack growth. The stochastic model incorporates the statistical variability of the crack growth process, combining the stochastic theory with experimental data. Stochastic differential equations are derived by the randomization of empirical equations. From the solution of this equation, a distribution function related to the crack growth is derived. The fracture probability using both probability distribution functions is in agreement with theory, and presents realistic value for pressure vessels. (author)

  18. A stochastic-bayesian model for the fracture probability of PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, Alexandre S.; Duran, Jorge Alberto R.

    2013-01-01

    Fracture probability of pressure vessels containing cracks can be obtained by methodologies of easy understanding, which require a deterministic treatment, complemented by statistical methods. However, more accurate results are required, methodologies need to be better formulated. This paper presents a new methodology to address this problem. First, a more rigorous methodology is obtained by means of the relationship of probability distributions that model crack incidence and nondestructive inspection efficiency using the Bayes' theorem. The result is an updated crack incidence distribution. Further, the accuracy of the methodology is improved by using a stochastic model for the crack growth. The stochastic model incorporates the statistical variability of the crack growth process, combining the stochastic theory with experimental data. Stochastic differential equations are derived by the randomization of empirical equations. From the solution of this equation, a distribution function related to the crack growth is derived. The fracture probability using both probability distribution functions is in agreement with theory, and presents realistic value for pressure vessels. (author)

  19. BWR [boiling-water reactor] and PWR [pressurized-water reactor] off-normal event descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document chronicles a total of 87 reactor event descriptions for use by operator licensing examiners in the construction of simulator scenarios. Events are organized into four categories: (1) boiling-water reactor abnormal events; (2) boiling-water reactor emergency events; (3) pressurized-water reactor abnormal events; and (4) pressurized-water reactor emergency events. Each event described includes a cover sheet and a progression of operator actions flow chart. The cover sheet contains the following general information: initial plant state, sequence initiator, important plant parameters, major plant systems affected, tolerance ranges, final plant state, and competencies tested. The progression of operator actions flow chart depicts, in a flow chart manner, the representative sequence(s) of expected immediate and subsequent candidate actions, including communications, that can be observed during the event. These descriptions are intended to provide examiners with a reliable, performance-based source of information from which to design simulator scenarios that will provide a valid test of the candidates' ability to safely and competently perform all licensed duties and responsibilities

  20. Pressurized thermal shock re-evaluation studies for Korean PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sung Gyu; Kim, Hyun Su; Jin, Tae Eun; Jang, Chang Hee

    2001-01-01

    The PTS reference temperature of reactor pressure vessel for one of the Korean NPPs has been predicted to exceed the screening criteria before it reaches it's design life. To cope with this issue, a plant-specific PTS analysis had been performed in accordance with the Regulatory Guide 1.154 in 1999. As a result of that analysis, it was found that current methodology of RG. 1.154 was very conservative. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of changing various input parameters and to determine the amount of conservatism of the current PTS analysis method. To do this, based on the past PTS analysis experience, parametric study were performed for various models using modified VISA-II code. This paper discusses the analysis results and recommendations to reduce the conservatism of current analysis method

  1. Microstructural characteristics of PWR [pressurized water reactor] spent fuel relative to its leaching behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural, compositional and thermochemical properties of spent nuclear fuel are discussed relative to its potential performance as a high-level waste form under proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project tuff repository conditions. Pressurized water reactor spent fuel specimens with various artificially induced cladding defects were leach tested in deionized water and in a reference tuff groundwater under ambient hot cell air and temperature conditions. Greater fractional actinide release was observed with bare fuel than with clad fuel leached through a cladding defect. Congruent actinide release and preferential release of cesium and technetium were observed in both water types. Selected summary radionuclide release data are presented and correlated to pre- and post-test microstructural characterization data

  2. An instrument to measure differential pore pressures in deep ocean sediments: Pop-Up-Pore-Pressure-Instrument (PUPPI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, P.J.; McPhail, S.D.; Packwood, A.R.; Hart, B.

    1985-01-01

    A Pop-Up-Pore-Pressure-Instrument (PUPPI) has been developed to measure differential pore pressures in sediments. The differential pressure is the pressure above or below normal hydrostatic pressure at the depth of the measurement. It is designed to operate in water depths up to 6000 metres for periods of weeks or months, if required, and measures differential pore pressures at depths of up to 3 metres into the sediments with a resolution of 0.05 kPa. It is a free-fall device with a lance which penetrates the sediments. This lance and the ballast weight is disposed when the PUPPI is acoustically released from the sea floor. When combined with permeability and porosity values of deep-sea sediments the pore pressure measurements made using the PUPPI suggest advection velocities as low as 8.8 mm/yr. The mechanical, electrical and acoustic systems are described together with data obtained from both shallow and deep water trials. (author)

  3. The European pressurized water reactor. The French-German advanced PWR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watteau, M.P.; Seidelberger, H.; Broecker, B.; Serviere, G.

    1995-01-01

    In order to derive full benefit from the Franco-German experience and to maintain a continuous development process, the EPR is of an evolutionary design. It is also an innovative product, intended to combine competitiveness, improved operability and enhanced safety. With a large electrical output, in the range of 1400-1500 MW, the EPR has an excellent cost-size ratio and is fully adapted to the scarcity of sites. It is also suitable for the development of scale-down products based on the same technology. The progress in safety that can be achieved with the EPR can be used to further enhance the already very high level of safety of the current French and German nuclear plants: (1) by an improvement of the preventive level of the defence-in-depth concept, and (2) by the implementation of additional features, mainly for the containment, to mitigate the consequences of severe accidents. Economically, the generation cost objective of the EPR will be at least as good as that of the French N4 reactor series. Improvements in safety may imply some additional investment costs, compared with those of the current plants, but the EPR is designed to achieve reductions of the other components of the generation costs, i.e. the fuel cycle costs and the operation and maintenance costs. The paper also describes some major design features of of the EPR: the safety systems, the containment and confinement functions, the arrangement of buildings, protection against external attacks, the man-machine interface, and instrumentation and control. 5 figs, 2 tabs

  4. The analysis of optimal crack ratio for PWR pressure vessel cladding using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Susmikanti; Roziq Himawan; Jos Budi Sulistyo

    2018-01-01

    Several aspects of material failure have been investigated, especially for materials used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) cladding. One aspect that needs to be analyzed is the crack ratio. The crack ratio is a parameter that compares the depth of the gap to its width. The optimal value of the crack ratio reflects the material's resistance to the fracture. Fracture resistance of the material to fracture mechanics is indicated by the value of Stress Intensity Factor (SIF). This value can be obtained from a J-integral calculation that expresses the energy release rate. The detection of the crack ratio is conducted through the calculation of J-integral value. The Genetic Algorithm (GA) is one way to determine the optimal value for a problem. The purpose of this study is to analyze the possibility of fracture caused by crack. It was conducted by optimizing the crack ratio of AISI 308L and AISI 309L stainless steels using GA. Those materials are used for RPV cladding. The minimum crack ratio and J-Integral values were obtained for AISI 308L and AISI 309L. The SIF value was derived from the J-Integral calculation. The SIF value was then compared with the fracture toughness of those material. With the optimal crack ratio, it can be predicted that the material boundaries are protected from damaged events. It can be a reference material for the durability of a mechanical fracture event. (author)

  5. Assessment and Management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    ageing management and economic planning. The target audience of the reports consists of technical experts from NPPs and from regulatory, plant design, manufacturing and technical support organizations dealing with specific plant components addressed in the reports. The NPP component addressed in the present publication is the PWR pressure vessel

  6. Validation of a methodology to develop a test facility in reduced scale related to boron dispersion in a pressurizer of an iPWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Samira R.V.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Bezerra, Jair L.; Silva, Mário A.B., E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociências. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The conception and the project of a 1:200 reduced scale test facility have been developed in earlier researches. Such a facility aims to investigate boron homogenization process inside the pressurizer of an iPWR (integral PWR) by considering water mixing from this component with that coming from the reactor core. For this kind of reactor, the pressurizer is located at the top of the pressure vessel demanding the need of identifying the proper mechanisms in order to warrant an adequate homogenization for the water mixture. Once the installation of the experimental setup was concluded, its behavior has been analyzed by considering the concentration of a tracer diluted in the circulation water, whose measurements were obtained at the pressurizer outlet orifices. Two experiments representing boration(boron concentration increase)/deboration(boron concentration decrease) scenarios have been accomplished. Sample acquisition was carried out for every ten minutes during a total time equal to 180 minutes. Results showed that the combination of Fractional Scaling Analysis with local Froude number consisted of an appropriate methodology to provide the reduced scale test facility parameters, inasmuch the measured concentrations from the experiments reproduced the theoretical behavior with sufficient accuracy. (author)

  7. Validation of a methodology to develop a test facility in reduced scale related to boron dispersion in a pressurizer of an iPWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Samira R.V.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Bezerra, Jair L.; Silva, Mário A.B.

    2017-01-01

    The conception and the project of a 1:200 reduced scale test facility have been developed in earlier researches. Such a facility aims to investigate boron homogenization process inside the pressurizer of an iPWR (integral PWR) by considering water mixing from this component with that coming from the reactor core. For this kind of reactor, the pressurizer is located at the top of the pressure vessel demanding the need of identifying the proper mechanisms in order to warrant an adequate homogenization for the water mixture. Once the installation of the experimental setup was concluded, its behavior has been analyzed by considering the concentration of a tracer diluted in the circulation water, whose measurements were obtained at the pressurizer outlet orifices. Two experiments representing boration(boron concentration increase)/deboration(boron concentration decrease) scenarios have been accomplished. Sample acquisition was carried out for every ten minutes during a total time equal to 180 minutes. Results showed that the combination of Fractional Scaling Analysis with local Froude number consisted of an appropriate methodology to provide the reduced scale test facility parameters, inasmuch the measured concentrations from the experiments reproduced the theoretical behavior with sufficient accuracy. (author)

  8. Temperature and pressure instrumentation in WWERs and their testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.

    1998-01-01

    A description of WWER model V-213 reactors of second generation is presented and compared to analogous NPPs including description of temperature and pressure instrumentation which was tested at Paks NPP. From the experimental results it was concluded that measured response of in core neutron detector to bubbles strongly depends on the relative position of detector and point bubble injection. Neutron noise spectra show characteristic sink when the origin of bubbles is close to the detectors. Dependence of phase behaviour on the boiling conditions is included as well

  9. CFD - neutronic coupled calculation of a quarter of a simplified PWR fuel assembly including spacer pressure drop and turbulence enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, C.; Pellacani, F.; Macian Juan, R., E-mail: carlos.pena@ntech.mw.tum.de, E-mail: pellacani@ntech.mw.tum.de, E-mail: macian@ntech.mw.tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Ntech Lehrstuhl fuer Nukleartechnik; Chiva, S., E-mail: schiva@emc.uji.es [Universitat Jaume I, Castellon de la Plana (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica y Construccion; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R., E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@iqn.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (ISIRYM/UPV) (Spain). Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety

    2011-07-01

    been developed for calculation and synchronization purposes. The data exchange is realized by means of the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software package. In this contribution, steady-state and transient results of a quarter of PWR fuel assembly with cold water injection are presented and compared with obtained results from a RELAP5/PARCS v2.7 coupled calculation. A simplified model for the spacers has been included. A methodology has been introduced to take into account the pressure drop and the turbulence enhancement produced by the spacers. (author)

  10. CFD - neutronic coupled calculation of a quarter of a simplified PWR fuel assembly including spacer pressure drop and turbulence enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, C.; Pellacani, F.; Macian Juan, R.; Chiva, S.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.

    2011-01-01

    developed for calculation and synchronization purposes. The data exchange is realized by means of the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software package. In this contribution, steady-state and transient results of a quarter of PWR fuel assembly with cold water injection are presented and compared with obtained results from a RELAP5/PARCS v2.7 coupled calculation. A simplified model for the spacers has been included. A methodology has been introduced to take into account the pressure drop and the turbulence enhancement produced by the spacers. (author)

  11. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Blomgren, J.C.; Fackelmann, J.M.

    1982-10-01

    Steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants have experienced tubing degradation by a variety of corrosion-related mechanisms which depend directly on secondary water chemistry. As a result of this experience, the Steam Generator Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major program to provide solutions to PWR steam generator problems. This report, PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines, in addition to presenting justification for water chemistry control parameters, discusses available analytical methods, data management and surveillance, and the management philosophy required to successfully implement the guidelines

  12. Reactor control system. PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At present, 23 units of PWR type reactors have been operated in Japan since the start of Mihama Unit 1 operation in 1970 and various improvements have been made to upgrade operability of power stations as well as reliability and safety of power plants. As the share of nuclear power increases, further improvements of operating performance such as load following capability will be requested for power stations with more reliable and safer operation. This article outlined the reactor control system of PWR type reactors and described the control performance of power plants realized with those systems. The PWR control system is characterized that the turbine power is automatic or manually controlled with request of the electric power system and then the nuclear power is followingly controlled with the change of core reactivity. The system mainly consists of reactor automatic control system (control rod control system), pressurizer pressure control system, pressurizer water level control system, steam generator water level control system and turbine bypass control system. (T. Tanaka)

  13. CHF experiments of tight pitch lattice rod bundles under PWR pressure condition for development of reduced moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Fumimasa; Nakatsuka, Toru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu

    2002-10-01

    In order to improve plutonium utilization, design studies of reduced moderation water reactors which have hard neutron energy spectrum have been carried out at Division of Energy System Research of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). At present, triangle, tight pitch lattice cores with about 1 mm gap width between fuel rods have been focused in the neutronic core design. Since a degradation of the heat removal from the fuel rods is worried, an evaluation of heat removal capability i.e. critical heat flux becomes one of important evaluation items in the feasibility study. However, any of published data base, which can be applicable to the evaluation on such narrow gap width cores, does not exist. Therefore, in the present study, in order to accumulate applicable data and to confirm applicability of an evaluation methodology of critical heat flux, basic experiments on the critical heat flux were performed using the test sections consisted of 7 heater rods bundles with the gap widths of 1.5, 1.0 and 0.6 mm under the PWR pressure conditions. The present report describes the experimental apparatus, experimental conditions and accumulated data. Analysis results of the data and the applicability of the evaluation methodology used for the design work are also discussed in this report. As the results of the experiment, it was found that the critical heat flux increased as the mass flux and the inlet subcooling increased. In the region of the mass flux less than about 2,000 kg/m 2 /s, the critical heat flux decreased as the gap width decreased. In the larger mass flux region, obvious trend of effects of the gap width on critical heat flux were not observed due to data scatterings. The flow-area-averaged thermal-equilibrium quality at the CHF position was in the higher ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 in the cases of gap widths of 1.0 and 0.6 mm, and 0.1 to 0.3 in the 1.5 mm case. Based on the experimental results such that the CHFs occurred in the higher quality range and

  14. PACTEL and PWR PACTEL Test Facilities for Versatile LWR Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virpi Kouhia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes construction and experimental research activities with two test facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL. The PACTEL facility, comprising of reactor pressure vessel parts, three loops with horizontal steam generators, a pressurizer, and emergency core cooling systems, was designed to model the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of VVER-440-type reactors. The facility has been utilized in miscellaneous applications and experiments, for example, in the OECD International Standard Problem ISP-33. PACTEL has been upgraded and modified on a case-by-case basis. The latest facility configuration, the PWR PACTEL facility, was constructed for research activities associated with the EPR-type reactor. A significant design basis is to utilize certain parts of PACTEL, and at the same time, to focus on a proper construction of two new loops and vertical steam generators with an extensive instrumentation. The PWR PACTEL benchmark exercise was launched in 2010 with a small break loss-of-coolant accident test as the chosen transient. Both facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL, are maintained fully operational side by side.

  15. PACTEL and PWR PACTEL Test Facilities for Versatile LWR Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virpi Kouhia, V.; Purhonen, H.; Riikonen, V.; Puustinen, M.; Kyrki-Rajamaki, R.; Vihavainen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes construction and experimental research activities with two test facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL. The PACTEL facility, comprising of reactor pressure vessel parts, three loops with horizontal steam generators, a pressurizer, and emergency core cooling systems, was designed to model the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of VVER-440-type reactors. The facility has been utilized in miscellaneous applications and experiments, for example, in the OECD International Standard Problem ISP-33. PACTEL has been upgraded and modified on a case-by-case basis. The latest facility configuration, the PWR PACTEL facility, was constructed for research activities associated with the EPR-type reactor. A significant design basis is to utilize certain parts of PACTEL, and at the same time, to focus on a proper construction of two new loops and vertical steam generators with an extensive instrumentation. The PWR PACTEL benchmark exercise was launched in 2010 with a small break loss-of-coolant accident test as the chosen transient. Both facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL, are maintained fully operational side by side.

  16. Development of a Blood Pressure Measurement Instrument with Active Cuff Pressure Control Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an oscillometric blood pressure (BP measurement approach based on the active control schemes of cuff pressure. Compared with conventional electronic BP instruments, the novelty of the proposed BP measurement approach is to utilize a variable volume chamber which actively and stably alters the cuff pressure during inflating or deflating cycles. The variable volume chamber is operated with a closed-loop pressure control scheme, and it is activated by controlling the piston position of a single-acting cylinder driven by a screw motor. Therefore, the variable volume chamber could significantly eliminate the air turbulence disturbance during the air injection stage when compared to an air pump mechanism. Furthermore, the proposed active BP measurement approach is capable of measuring BP characteristics, including systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, during the inflating cycle. Two modes of air injection measurement (AIM and accurate dual-way measurement (ADM were proposed. According to the healthy subject experiment results, AIM reduced 34.21% and ADM reduced 15.78% of the measurement time when compared to a commercial BP monitor. Furthermore, the ADM performed much consistently (i.e., less standard deviation in the measurements when compared to a commercial BP monitor.

  17. Regulatory research of the PWR severe accident information needs and instrumentation availability for hydrogen control and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae-Hong; Park, Gun-Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Kang, Yun-Moon; Lee, Un-Jang; Oh, Se-Chul; Lee, Jin-Yong [Seoul Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    During the current research period, we have set forth the methodology for identification of a severe accident, developed a framework for hydrogen management decision trees, and analyzed the literature on hydrogen management and experimental data for hydrogen bum. Specifically, we have summarized me results for information needs in a severe accident obtained in the U.S. and other countries, and applied the methodology to the reference plant YGN 3 and 4 as part of severe accident management. We have also examined the existing instruments in terms of their availability and survivability during a severe accident, and identified additionally needed information needs and instruments. We have identified dominant accident sequences for me reference plant YGN 3 and 4 to construct decision trees, and extracted available data from the IPE study of the plant. Based upon the data we have performed preliminary study on the decision tree and decision node. Last, we have examined various mechanisms for hydrogen generation and reIevant experimental data to predict me amount of hydrogen generation and governing factors in me process. We have also reviewed the hydrogen generation related models in the severe accident analysis.

  18. Study of the influence of temperature and time on the electroplating nickel layer in Inconel 718 strips used in spacer grid of Pressurized Water Cooled nuclear reactors (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Renato; Abati, Amanda; Verne, Júlio; Panossian, Zehbour, E-mail: amanda.abati@marinha.mil.br, E-mail: jvernegropp@gmail.com, E-mail: renato.rezende@marinha.mil.br, E-mail: zep@ipt.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Desenvolvimento e Instrumentação de Combustível Nuclear; Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnológicas (IPT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Inconel 718 (UNS N07718: Ni-{sup 19}Cr-{sup 18}Fe-{sup 5}Nb-3 Mo) is a precipitation hardenable nickel alloy that has good corrosion resistance and high mechanical strength. These strips are used for assembling the spacer grid of fuel element of pressurized water cooled nuclear reactors (PWR). The spacer grid is a structural component of fundamental importance in fuel elements of PWR reactors, maintaining the position and necessary spacing of the fuel rods within the arrangement of the fuel element. The spacer grid is formed by joining the points of intersection of the strips, by a joint process called brazing. For this process, these strips are stamped and plated with a thin layer of nickel by means of electroplating in order to protect against oxidation and allow a better flowability and wettability of the addition metal in the strips during brazing. Oxidation at the surface of the base material harms wettability and inhibits spreading of the liquid addition metal on the substrate surface during the brazing process. The use of coatings such as nickel plating is used to ensure such conditions. The results showed that there is a process of diffusion de some chemical elements such as chromium, iron, titanium and aluminum from the substrate to the nickel layer and nickel from the layer to the substrate. These chemical elements are responsible for the oxidation at the surface of the strip. (author)

  19. Performance Specification Shippinpark Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Drying and Canister Inerting System for PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies Stored within Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and basic design requirements imposed on the fuel drying and canister inerting system for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies (BFAs) stored within Shippingport spent fuel (SSFCs) canisters (fuel drying and canister inerting system). This fuel drying and canister inerting system is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Spent Nuclear Fuels Project at the Hanford Site. The fuel drying and canister inerting system provides for removing water and establishing an inert environment for Shippingport PWR Core 2 BFAs stored within SSFCs. A policy established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) states that new SNF facilities (this is interpreted to include structures, systems and components) shall achieve nuclear safety equivalence to comparable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. This will be accomplished in part by applying appropriate NRC requirements for comparable NRC-licensed facilities to the fuel drying and canister inerting system, in addition to applicable DOE regulations and orders

  20. Scaling studies - PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneck, G.

    1983-05-01

    A RELAP 4/MOD 6 study was made based on the blowdown phase of the intermediate break experiment LOFT L5-1. The method was to set up a base model and to vary parametrically some areas where it is known or suspected that LOFT differs from a commercial PWR. The aim was not to simulate LOFT or a PWR exactly but to understand the influence of the following parameters on the thermohydraulic behaviour of the system and the clad temperature: stored heat in the downcomer (LOFT has rather large filler blocks in this part of the pressure vessel); bypass between downcomer and upper plenum; and core length. The results show that LOFT is prototypical for all calculated blowdowns. As the clad temperatures decrease with decreasing stored energy in the downcomer, increased bypass and increased core length, LOFT results seem to be realistic as long as realistic bypass sizes are considered; they are conservative in the two other areas. (author)

  1. Pressure vessel fracture studies pertaining to a PWR LOCA-ECC thermal shock: experiments TSE-3 and TSE-4 and update of TSE-1 and TSE-2 analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Bolt, S.E.

    1977-01-01

    The LOCA-ECC Thermal Shock Program was established to investigate the potential for flaw propagation in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) vessels during injection of emergency core coolant following a loss-of-coolant accident. Studies thus far have included fracture mechanics analyses of typical PWRs, the design and construction of a thermal shock test facility, determination of material properties for test specimens, and four thermal shock experiments with 0.53-m-OD (21-in.) by 0.15-m-wall (6-in.) cylindrical test specimens. In the first experiment, initiation was not expected and did not occur, although there was a small amount of subcritical crack growth. In the second experiment, initiation of a semicircular flaw took place as expected; the final length along the surface was about four times the initial length, but there was no radial growth. The third and fourth experiments were similar, and the long axial flaw initiated in good agreement with predictions

  2. Pressure ulcers: development and psychometric evaluation of the attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention instrument (APuP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeckman, D; Defloor, T; Demarré, L; Van Hecke, A; Vanderwee, K

    2010-11-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a significant problem in hospitals, nursing homes and community care settings. Pressure ulcer incidence is widely accepted as an indicator for the quality of care. Negative attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention may result in suboptimal preventive care. A reliable and valid instrument to assess attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention is lacking. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Attitude towards Pressure ulcer Prevention instrument (APuP). Prospective psychometric instrument validation study. A literature review was performed to design the instrument. Content validity was evaluated by nine European pressure ulcer experts and five experts in psychometric instrument validation in a double Delphi procedure. A convenience sample of 258 nurses and 291 nursing students from Belgium and The Netherlands participated in order to evaluate construct validity and stability reliability of the instrument. The data were collected between February and May 2008. A factor analysis indicated the construct of a 13 item instrument in a five factor solution: (1) attitude towards personal competency to prevent pressure ulcers (three items); (2) attitude towards the priority of pressure ulcer prevention (three items); (3) attitude towards the impact of pressure ulcers (three items); (4) attitude towards personal responsibility in pressure ulcer prevention (two items); and (5) attitude towards confidence in the effectiveness of prevention (two items). This five factor solution accounted for 61.4% of the variance in responses related to attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention. All items demonstrated factor loadings over 0.60. The instrument produced similar results during stability testing [ICC=0.88 (95% CI=0.84-0.91, Ppressure ulcer prevention in patient care, education, and research. In further research, the association between attitude, knowledge and clinical performance should be explored. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  3. PWR blowdown heat transfer separate-effects program: thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, D.M.; White, M.D.; Moore, P.A.; Hedrick, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test 104, which is part of the ORNL Pressurized-Water Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program. The objective of the program is to investigate the thermal-hydraulic phenomenon governing the energy transfer and transport processes that occur during a loss-of-coolant accident in the PWR system. Test 104 was conducted to obtain CHF in bundle 1 under blowdown conditions. The primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses during test 104 available

  4. Estimating pressurized water reactor decommissioning costs: A user's manual for the PWR Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.; Mencinsky, G.J.

    1993-10-01

    With the issuance of the Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), nuclear power plant licensees are required to submit to the US Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. This user's manual and the accompanying Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software provide a cost-calculating methodology to the NRC staff that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals. The CECP, designed to be used on a personnel computer, provides estimates for the cost of decommissioning PWR plant stations to the point of license termination. Such cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial costs; and manpower costs. In addition to costs, the CECP also calculates burial volumes, person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning

  5. Influence of structure improvement of guide tubes and bundles in pressurized water reactor (PWR) on drop of control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xiuzhong; Yu Pingan; Yang Guanyue

    1996-01-01

    In order to alleviate the cross hydraulic load on control rod guide tubes and bundles, some protective sleeves are added to those near the upper plenum outlet nozzles (4 symmetric bundles: 02-26, 03-25, 11-29, 12-28). In a 1/4 scale transparent model of the PWR upper plenum of Qinshan Nuclear Power Station, water was chosen as the fluid and hydraulic experiments with improved control rod guide tubes and bundles were carried out. The results were carefully compared with those of the experiments with unimproved control rod guide tubes and bundles. It is concluded that adding protective sleeves to the control rod guide tubes and bundles near the outlet nozzles will help to lighten the hydraulic load on them and make certain of the free movement and rapid dropping of control rods in the tubes and bundles in emergency by order

  6. Studies of fuel loading pattern optimization for a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) using improved pivot particle swarm method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shichang; Cai, Jiejin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The mathematical model of loading pattern problems for PWR has been established. ► IPPSO was integrated with ‘donjon’ and ‘dragon’ into fuel arrangement optimizing code. ► The novel method showed highly efficiency for the LP problems. ► The core effective multiplication factor increases by about 10% in simulation cases. ► The power peaking factor decreases by about 0.6% in simulation cases. -- Abstract: An in-core fuel reload design tool using the improved pivot particle swarm method was developed for the loading pattern optimization problems in a typical PWR, such as Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant. The discrete, multi-objective improved pivot particle swarm optimization, was integrated with the in-core physics calculation code ‘donjon’ based on finite element method, and assemblies’ group constant calculation code ‘dragon’, composing the optimization code for fuel arrangement. The codes of both ‘donjon’ and ‘dragon’ were programmed by Institute of Nuclear Engineering of Polytechnique Montréal, Canada. This optimization code was aiming to maximize the core effective multiplication factor (Keff), while keeping the local power peaking factor (Ppf) lower than a predetermined value to maintain fuel integrity. At last, the code was applied to the first cycle loading of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant. The result showed that, compared with the reference loading pattern design, the core effective multiplication factor increased by 9.6%, while the power peaking factor decreased by 0.6%, meeting the safety requirement.

  7. Water chemistry in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    This article outlines major features and basic concept of the secondary system of PWR's and water properties control measures adopted in recent PWR plants. The secondary system of a PWR consists of a condenser cooling pipe (aluminum-brass, titanium, or stainless steel), low-pressure make-up water heating pipe (aluminum-brass or stainless steel), high-ressure make-up water heating pipe (cupro-nickel or stainless steel), steam generator heat-transfer pipe (Inconel 600 or 690), and bleed/drain pipe (carbon steel, low alloy steel or stainless steel). Other major pipes and equipment are made of carbon steel or stainless steel. Major troubles likely to be caused by water in the secondary system include reduction in wall thickness of the heat-transfer pipe, stress corrosion cracking in the heat-transfer pipe, and denting. All of these are caused by local corrosion due to concentration of purities contained in water. For controlling the water properties in the secondary system, it is necessary to prevent impurities from entering the system, to remove impurities and corrosion products from the system, and to prevent corrosion of apparatus making up the system. Measures widely adopted for controlling the formation of IGA include the addition of boric acid for decreasing the concentration of free alkali and high hydrazine operation for providing a highly reducing atmospere. (Nogami, K.)

  8. Analysis of the behaviour of pressure and temperature of the containment of a PWR reactor, submitted to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D.E. da; Arrieta, L.A.J.; Costa, J.R.; Camargo, C.; Santos, C.M. dos; Rochedo, E.R.R.

    1979-12-01

    The main purpose of this work is to analyse the pressure and temperature behaviour of the metalic containment of a PWR building, submitted to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) caused by a double-ended rupture in the main line of the primary circuit. The scope of the study was directed to verify the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) results for the integrity of the metalic containment of the Angra I power plant. The highest containment pressure peak for this unit is expected for a break in the suction line of one of the main pumps of the primary coolant. Using the same input data, our results are very similar to those presented in the FSAR which shows a reasonable equivalence between the two analytical models. Using as input data the results of a previous LOCA study at CNEN, which yields to more conservative boundary conditions than those presented by the FSAR, the pressure and temperature peak values determined by our model are quite larger than those presented by the cited Safety Report. (author) [pt

  9. Instrumenting a pressure suppression experiment for a MK I boiling water reactor: another measurements engineering challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, W.M.; Brough, W.G.; Miller, T.B.

    1977-01-01

    A scale test facility of a pressure suppression system from a boiling water reactor was instrumented with seven types of transducers to obtain high-accuracy experimental data during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. The instrumentation verified the analysis of the dynamic loading of the pressure suppression system

  10. Special points of view about development and construction of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    1.0) The reactor core and its components, 1.1) design of the fuel assemblies, 1.2) incore instrumentation, 2.0) reactor pressure vessel with internals, 3.0) components of the reactor coolant loops, 3.1) steam generator, 3.2) pressurizer, 3.3) pressurizer relief tank, 3.4) reactor coolant pumps, 4.0) instrumentation and control of a PWR, 4.1) ex-core measuring system, 4.2) reactor protection system, 4.3) control systems, 4.4) radiation monitoring. (orig.) [de

  11. Evaluation of Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) code Open FOAM in the study of the pressurized thermal stress of PWR reactors. Comparison with the commercial code Ansys-CFX; Evaluacion del codigo de Dinamica de Fluidos Computacional (CFD) Open FOAM en el estudio del estres termico presurizado de los reactores PWR. Comparacion con el codigo comercial Ansys-CFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu Martin, G.; Chiva, S.

    2012-07-01

    In this work is proposed to evaluate the potential of the OpenFOAM code for the simulation of typical fluid flows in reactors PWR, in particular for the study of pressurized thermal stress. Test T1-1 has been simulated , within the OECD ROSA project, with the objective of evaluating the performance of the code OpenFOAM and models of turbulence that has implemented to capture the effect of the thrust forces in the case study.

  12. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umminger, K.

    2008-01-01

    A proper measurement of the relevant single and two-phase flow parameters is the basis for the understanding of many complex thermal-hydraulic processes. Reliable instrumentation is therefore necessary for the interaction between analysis and experiment especially in the field of nuclear safety research where postulated accident scenarios have to be simulated in experimental facilities and predicted by complex computer code systems. The so-called conventional instrumentation for the measurement of e. g. pressures, temperatures, pressure differences and single phase flow velocities is still a solid basis for the investigation and interpretation of many phenomena and especially for the understanding of the overall system behavior. Measurement data from such instrumentation still serves in many cases as a database for thermal-hydraulic system codes. However some special instrumentation such as online concentration measurement for boric acid in the water phase or for non-condensibles in steam atmosphere as well as flow visualization techniques were further developed and successfully applied during the recent years. Concerning the modeling needs for advanced thermal-hydraulic codes, significant advances have been accomplished in the last few years in the local instrumentation technology for two-phase flow by the application of new sensor techniques, optical or beam methods and electronic technology. This paper will give insight into the current state of instrumentation technology for safety-related thermohydraulic experiments. Advantages and limitations of some measurement processes and systems will be indicated as well as trends and possibilities for further development. Aspects of instrumentation in operating reactors will also be mentioned.

  13. ROX PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, H.; Yamashita, T.; Shirasu, N.; Takano, H.; Anoda, Y.; Kimura, H.

    1999-01-01

    For an efficient burnup of excess plutonium from nuclear reactors spent fuels and dismantled warheads, plutonium rock-like oxide(ROX) fuel has been investigated. The ROX fuel is expected to provide high Pu transmutation capability, irradiation stability and chemical and geological stability. While, a zirconia-based ROX(Zr-ROX)-fueled PWR core has some problems of Doppler reactivity coefficient and power peaking factor. For the improvement of these characteristics, two approaches were considered: the additives such as UO 2 , ThO 2 and Er 2 O 3 , and a heterogeneous core with Zr-ROX and UO 2 assemblies. As a result, the additives UO 2 + Er 2 O 3 are found to sufficiently improve the reactivity coefficients and accident behavior, and to flatten power distribution. On the other hand, in the 1/3Zr-ROX + 2/3UO 2 heterogeneous core, further reduction of power peaking seems necessary. (author)

  14. Irradiated stainless steel material constitutive model for use in the performance evaluation of PWR pressure vessel internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, J.Y.; Dunham, R.S. [ANATECH (United States); Demma, A. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Demonstration of component functionality requires analytical simulations of reactor internals behavior. Towards that aim, EPRI has undertaken the development of irradiated material constitutive model and damage criteria for use in global and local finite-element based functionality analysis methodology. The constitutive behavioral regimes of irradiated stainless steel types 316 and 304 materials included in the model consist of: elastic-plastic material response considering irradiation hardening of the stress-strain curve, irradiation creep, stress relaxation, and void swelling. IASCC and degradation of ductility with irradiation are the primary damage mechanisms considered in the model. The material behavior model development consists of two parts: the first part is a user-material subroutine that can interface with a general-purpose finite element computer program to adapt it to the special-purpose of functionality analysis of reactor internals. The second part is a user utility in the form of Excel Spread sheets that permit users to extract a given property, e.g. the elastic-plastic stress-strain curve, creep curve, or void-swelling curve, as function of the relevant independent variables. The development of the model takes full advantage of the significant work that has been undertaken within EPRI's Material Reliability Program (MRP) to improve the knowledge of the material properties of irradiated stainless steels. Data from EPRI's MRP database have been utilized to develop equations that characterize the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, total elongation, reduction in area, void swelling and irradiation creep of stainless steels in a PWR environment. It is noted that, while the development of the model's equations has been statistically faithful to the material database, approximations were introduced in the model to ensure appropriate conservatism in the model's application consistently with accepted

  15. Rod consolidation of RG and E's [Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation] spent PWR [pressurized water reactor] fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1987-05-01

    The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling the fuel rods from five fuel assemblies from Unit 1 of RG and E's R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant. Slow and careful rod pulling efforts were used for the first and second fuel assemblies. Rod pulling then proceeded smoothly and rapidly after some minor modifications were made to the UST and D consolidation equipment. The compaction ratios attained ranged from 1.85 to 2.00 (rods with collapsed cladding were replaced by dummy rods in one fuel assembly to demonstrate the 2:1 compaction ratio capability). This demonstration involved 895 PWR fuel rods, among which there were some known defective rods (over 50 had collapsed cladding); no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. However, one of the rods with collapsed cladding unexplainably broke during handling operations (i.e., reconfiguration in the failed fuel canister), subsequent to the rod consolidation demonstration. The broken rod created no facility problems; the pieces were encapsulated for subsequent storage. Another broken rod was found during postdemonstration cutting operations on the nonfuel-bearing structural components from the five assemblies; evidence indicates it was broken prior to any rod consolidation operations. During the demonstration, burnish-type lines or scratches were visible on the rods that were pulled; however, experience indicates that such lines are generally produced when rods are pulled (or pushed) through the spacer grids. Rods with collapsed cladding would not enter the funnel (the transition device between the fuel assembly and the canister that aids in obtaining high compaction ratios). Reforming of the flattened areas of the cladding on those rods was attempted to make the rod cross sections more nearly circular; some of the reformed rods passed through the funnel and into the canister

  16. Pressure loss characteristics of LSTF steam generator heat-transfer tubes. Pressure loss increase due to tube internal instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro

    1994-11-01

    The steam generator of the Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) includes 141 heat-transfer U-tubes with different lengths. Six U-tubes among them are furnished with 15 or 17 probe-type instruments (conduction probe with a thermocouple; CPT) protuberant into the primary side of the U-tubes. Other 135 U-tubes are not instrumented. This results in different hydraulic conditions between the instrumented and non-instrumented U-tubes with the same length. A series of pressure loss characteristics tests was conducted at a test apparatus simulating both types of U-tube. The following pressure loss coefficient (K CPT ) was reduced as a function of Reynolds number (Re) from these tests under single-phase water flow conditions. K CPT =0.16 5600≤Re≤52820, K CPT =60.66xRe -0.688 2420≤Re≤5600, K CPT =2.664x10 6 Re -2.06 1371≤Re≤2420. The maximum uncertainty is 22%. By using these results, the total pressure loss coefficients of full length U-tubes were estimated. It is clarified that the total pressure loss of the shortest instrumented U-tube is equivalent to that of the middle-length non-instrumented U-tube and also that a middle-length instrumented U-tube is equivalent to the longest non-instrumented U-tube. Concludingly. it is important to take account of the CPT pressure loss mentioned above in estimation of fluid behavior at the non-instrumented U-tubes either by using the LSTF experiment data from the CPT-installed U-tubes or by using any analytical codes. (author)

  17. Fundamentals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, L.

    1982-01-01

    In many countries, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used, even though it requires enrichment of the uranium to about 3% in U-235 and the moderator-coolant must be maintained at a high pressure, about 2200 pounds per square inch. Our objective in this series of seven lectures is to describe the design and operating characteristics of the PWR system, discuss the reactor physics methods used to evaluate performance, examine the way fuel is consumed and produced, study the instrumentation system, review the physics measurements made during initial startup of the reactor, and outline the administrative aspects of starting up a reactor and operating it safely and effectively

  18. Data assimilation and PWR primary measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Thibaud

    2015-01-01

    A Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS) is a highly complex physical process: heterogeneous power, flow and temperature distributions are difficult to be accurately measured, since instrumentations are limited in number, thus leading to the relevant safety and protection margins. EDF R and D is seeking to assess the potential benefits of applying Data Assimilation to a PWR's RCS (Reactor Coolant System) measurements, in order to improve the estimators for parameters of a reactor's operating setpoint, i.e. improving accuracy and reducing uncertainties and biases of measured RCS parameters. In this thesis, we define a 0D semi-empirical model for RCS, satisfying the description level usually chosen by plant operators, and construct a Monte-Carlo Method (inspired from Ensemble Methods) in order to use this model with Data Assimilation tools. We apply this method on simulated data in order to assess the reduction of uncertainties on key parameters: results are beyond expectations, however strong hypothesis are required, implying a careful preprocessing of input data. (author)

  19. ROX PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akie, H.; Yamashita, T.; Shirasu, N.; Takano, H.; Anoda, Y.; Kimura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    For an efficient burnup of excess plutonium from nuclear reactors spent fuels and dismantled warheads, plutonium rock-like oxide(ROX) fuel has been investigated. The ROX fuel is expected to provide high Pu transmutation capability, irradiation stability and chemical and geological stability. While, a zirconia-based ROX(Zr-ROX)-fueled PWR core has some problems of Doppler reactivity coefficient and power peaking factor. For the improvement of these characteristics, two approaches were considered: the additives such as UO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a heterogeneous core with Zr-ROX and UO{sub 2} assemblies. As a result, the additives UO{sub 2}+ Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} are found to sufficiently improve the reactivity coefficients and accident behavior, and to flatten power distribution. On the other hand, in the 1/3Zr-ROX + 2/3UO{sub 2} heterogeneous core, further reduction of power peaking seems necessary. (author)

  20. Validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the pressure ulcer prevention knowledge assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Polat, Cansu; Ozkan, Ilknur; Theofanidis, Dimitris; Togrol, Rifat Erdem

    2016-11-01

    Sound knowledge of pressure ulcers is important to enable good prevention. There are limited instruments assessing pressure ulcer knowledge. The Pressure Ulcer Prevention Knowledge Assessment Instrument is among the scales of which psychometric properties have been studied rigorously and reflects the latest evidence. This study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Knowledge Assessment Instrument (PUPKAI-T), an instrument that assesses knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention by using multiple-choice questions. Linguistic validity was verified through front-to-back translation. Psychometric properties of the instrument were studied on a sample of 150 nurses working in a tertiary hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. The content validity index of the translated instrument was 0.94, intra-class correlation coefficients were between 0.37 and 0.80, item difficulty indices were between 0.21 and 0.88, discrimination indices were 0.20-0.78, and the Kuder Richardson for the internal consistency was 0.803. The PUPKAI-T was found to be a valid and reliable tool to evaluate nurses' knowledge on pressure ulcer prevention. The PUPKAI-T may be a useful tool for determining educational needs of nurses on pressure ulcer prevention. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Steam generators in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.

    1974-01-01

    The steam generator of the PWR operates according to the principle of natural circulation. It consists of a U-shaped tube bundle whose free ends are welded to a bottom plate. The tube bundle is surrounded by a cylinder jacket which has slots closely above the bottom or tube plate. The feed water mixed with boiling water enters the tube bundle through these slots. Because of its buoyancy, the steam-water mixture flows upwards. Below the tube plate there are chambers for distributing and collecting pressurized water separated by means of a partition wall. By omitting some tubes, a free alloy is created so that the tubes in the center get sufficient water, too. By asymmetrical arrangement of the partition wall it is further possible to limit the tube alloy only to the inlet side for pressurized water. The flow over the tube plate is thus improved on the inlet side. (DG) [de

  2. Review of the models and mechanisms for environmentally-assisted crack growth of pressure vessel and piping steels in PWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, W.; Gabetta, G.; Hanninen, H.

    1985-12-01

    The crack-tip micromechanisms and the computational models for environmentally-assisted cracking in pressure vessel and piping steels in high-temperature, low-oxygen (PWR), reactor-grade water are described and evaluated in this report. The report begins with a brief description of the critical variables which are known to affect environmentally-assisted subcritical cracking in these metal/environment systems. The micromechanistic models are discussed in some detail, with anodic dissolution and hydrogen assistance being the prime candidates for the successful explanation of the observed phenomena. The anodic dissolution model offers far better quantification of the environmentally-assisted crack growth rates, but tends to overpredict the rates for a large number of conditions. The hydrogen assistance models qualitatively could account for a wider range of effects, but quantification of the model is virtually nonexistent. A variety of calculational models are in various stages of development; all of them are far from use as a predictive tool. Crack-tip strain rate models have received the most attention, and the approach to their use has been to partition the environmentally-assisted growth rates into a mechanically-driven component, with the environmental enhancement superposed. The environment component is then correlated with a calculated crack-tip strain rate. 141 refs., 59 figs

  3. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B andW 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001)

  4. Instrumentation for Examining Microbial Response to Changes In Environmental Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaich, J.; Storrs, A.; Wang, J.; Ouandji, C.; Arismendi, D.; Hernandez, J.; Sardesh, N.; Ibanez, C. R.; Owyang, S.; Gentry, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Automated Adaptive Directed Evolution Chamber (AADEC) is a device that allows operators to generate a micro-scale analog of real world systems that can be used to model the local-scale effects of climate change on microbial ecosystems. The AADEC uses an artificial environment to expose cultures of micro-organisms to environmental pressures, such as UV-C radiation, chemical toxins, and temperature. The AADEC autonomously exposes micro-organisms to slection pressures. This improves upon standard manual laboratory techniques: the process can take place over a longer period of time, involve more stressors, implement real-time adjustments based on the state of the population, and minimize the risk of contamination. We currently use UV-C radiation as the main selection pressure, UV-C is well studied both for its cell and DNA damaging effects as a type of selection pressure and for its related effectiveness as a mutagen; having these functions united makes it a good choice for a proof of concept. The AADEC roadmap includes expansion to different selection pressures, including heavy metal toxicity, temperature, and other forms of radiation. The AADEC uses closed-loop control to feedback the current state of the culture to the AADEC controller that modifies selection pressure intensity during experimentation, in this case culture density and growth rate. Culture density and growth rate are determined by measuring the optical density of the culture using 600 nm light. An array of 600 nm LEDs illuminate the culture and photodiodes are used to measure the shadow on the opposite side of the chamber. Previous experiments showed that we can produce a million fold increase to UV-C radiation over seven iterations. The most recent implements a microfluidic system that can expose cultures to multiple different selection pressures, perform non-survival based selection, and autonomously perform hundreds of exposure cycles. A scalable pump system gives the ability to pump in various

  5. Hard alloys testing-machine for values of PWR primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campan, J.L.; Sauze, A.

    1980-01-01

    Testing of valve parts or material used in valve fabrication and particularly seizing conditions in friction of plane surfaces coated with hard alloys of the type stellite. The testing equipment called Marguerite is composed of a hot pressurized water loop in conditions similar to PWR primary coolant circuits (320 0 C, 150 bars) and a testing-machine with measuring instruments. Testing conditions and samples are described [fr

  6. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIPR) or underwater laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick, Grendys; Marc, Piccolino; Cunthia, Pezze; Badlani, Manu

    2009-01-01

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP R) , depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development

  7. TRAC-PF1 analyses of potential pressurized-thermal-shock transients at a Combustion-Engineering PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, J.E.; Spriggs, G.D.; Smith, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Los Alamos is participating in a program to assess the risk of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) to a reactor vessel. Our role is to provide best-estimate thermal-hydraulic analyses of 12 postulated overcooling transients using TRAC-PF1. These transients are hypothetical and include multiple operator/equipment failures. Calvert Cliffs/Unit-1, a Combustion-Engineering plant, is the pressurized water reactor modeled for this study. The utility and the vendor supplied information for the comprehensive TRAC-PF1 model. Secondary and primary breaks from both hot-zero-power and full-power conditions were simulated for 7200 s (2 h). Low bulk temperatures and loop-flow stagnation while the system was at a high pressure were of particular interest for PTS analysis. Three transients produced primary temperatures below 405 K (270 0 F - the NRC screening criterion) with system repressurization. Six transients indicated flow stagnation would occur in one loop but not both. One transient showed flow stagnation might occur in both loops. Oak Ridge National Laboratory will do fracture-mechanics analysis using these TRAC-PF1 results and make the final determination of the risk of PTS

  8. Instrumentation availability for a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcieri, W.C.; Hanson, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, the availability of instruments to supply accident management information during a broad range of severe accidents is evaluated for a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment. Results from this evaluation include the following: (a) identification of plant conditions that would impact instrument performance and information needs during severe accidents, (b) definition of envelopes of parameters that would be important in assessing the performance of plant instrumentation for a broad range of severe accident sequences, and (c) assessment of the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  9. The Hydraulic Test Report for Non-instrumented Irradiation Test Rig of DUO-Cooled Annular Pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Song, Kun Woo

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of pressure drop test and vibration test for non-instrumented rig of Advanced PWR DUO-Fuel Annular Pellet which were designed and fabricated by KAERI. From the pressure drop test results, it is noted that the flow velocity across the non-instrumented rig of Advanced PWR DUO-Fuel Annular Pellet corresponding to the pressure drop of 200 kPa is measured to be about 8.30 kg/sec. Vibration frequency results for the non-instrumented rig at the pump spin frequency ranges from 19.0 to 32.0 Hz, RMS(Root Mean Square) displacement for the non-instrumented rig of Advanced PWR DUO-Fuel Annular Pellet is less than 7.25 m, and the maximum displacement is less than 31.27 μm. This test was performed at the FIVPET facility

  10. Estimation of maximum pressure in small containments of PWR reactors due to loss of coolant accident in primary circuit; Estimativa da pressao maxima em contencoes de reatores PWR de pequeno porte devido a um acidente de perda de refrigerante no circuito primario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes Neto, Teofilo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Moreira, Joao Manoel Losada [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    This work studies the problem of containment pressurization after a LOCA in reactors with small containment free volumes. The relationship between the reactor power and the containment free volume is described with the ratio between the volumes of the primary circuit and of the containment. The maximum pressure in a containment, following a LOCA, obtained after a correlation based on large containment PWR, is around 185 psia for a primary circuit and containment volumes ratio of 0.025. For the same problem, calculations with the CONTEMPT-LT code produced a maximum pressure of 162 psia. The behavior of the temperature after a LOCA to the containment, as a function of the ratio between the primary circuit and containment volume, is such that it increases reaching asymptotically to a maximum; differently, the pressure increases almost linearly with the ratio of volumes. (author)

  11. The physico-chemical radioiodine species in the exhaust air of a pressurized water reactor (PWR2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1981-12-01

    In a German pressurized water reactor, the physico-chemical 131 I species were determined in the plant exhaust and in the individual exhausts during 6 months. These measurements aimed in particular at determining the percentage and the source of the radiologically decisive elemental 131 I released to the environment. The retention of the 131 I species by iodine filters was also investigated. 20 to 30% of the 131 I discharged with the plant exhaust consisted of elemental iodine. This was largely released with the unfiltered exhaust from the chemical laboratory hoods and from the annular compartment. (orig.) [de

  12. Development of a feed-and-bleed operation strategy with hybrid-SIT under low pressure condition of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, In Seop, E-mail: jeoni@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States); Han, Sang Hoon, E-mail: shhan2@kaeri.re.kr [Advanced Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 70 Daedeok-daero 989 Beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sang Hee, E-mail: sanghee.kang@khnp.co.kr [NSSS Design Group, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Central Research Institute, 70, 1312-beongil, Yuseongdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Gook, E-mail: hyungook@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The novel F&B operation strategy with H-SIT and LPSI is developed. • The effectiveness of the H-SITs is verified using thermo-hydraulic simulations. • Success criteria considered for the new F&B operation strategy is identified. • A PSA model of APR+ reflecting the new F&B strategy with H-SIT is developed. • A risk analysis of the proposed F&B operation strategy is performed. - Abstract: While safety functions in current nuclear power plants are mainly provided by active safety systems, recently passive safety systems are being combined with the active systems to strengthen accident mitigation capability and therefore enhance overall plant safety. To this end, securing long-term cooling of the core is of particular importance. This study considers the hybrid safety injection tank (H-SIT), a passive injection system, as a target component to develop a long-term cooling strategy using active and passive systems concurrently. In the feed-and-bleed (F&B) operation, one of the important long-term cooling strategies to maintain core safety in pressurized water reactors, low pressure safety injection (LPSI) pumps are typically considered inoperable as depressurization is first required, which leads to core dry-out before reaching LPSI operable pressure. This study investigates whether H-SITs, with the important design feature of passive coolant injection under any pressure condition of the primary coolant system, can make up the core during depressurization thereby allowing LPSI pumps to be used in F&B operation as an additional means of long-term cooling. The effectiveness of the H-SITs is verified using thermal-hydraulic simulations, and based on the results a novel F&B operation strategy with H-SITs and LPSI pumps is developed. A probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) model is then developed in order to assess the risk effect of the suggested strategy. PSA results demonstrate that the proposed strategy lowers core damage frequency in the target

  13. Optimization of the size and shape of the set-in nozzle for a PWR reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, Usman Tariq, E-mail: maniiut@yahoo.com; Javed Hyder, M., E-mail: hyder@pieas.edu.pk

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • The size and shape of the set-in nozzle of the RPV have been optimized. • The optimized nozzle ensure the reduction of the mass around 198 kg per nozzle. • The mass of the RPV should be minimized for better fracture toughness. - Abstract: The objective of this research work is to optimize the size and shape of the set-in nozzle for a typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of a 300 MW pressurized water reactor. The analysis was performed by optimizing the four design variables which control the size and shape of the nozzle. These variables are inner radius of the nozzle, thickness of the nozzle, taper angle at the nozzle-cylinder intersection, and the point where taper of the nozzle starts from. It is concluded that the optimum design of the nozzle is the one that minimizes the two conflicting state variables, i.e., the stress intensity (Tresca yield criterion) and the mass of the RPV.

  14. PWR systems transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, M.F.; Peeler, G.B.; Abramson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of transients in pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems involves the assessment of the response of the total plant, including primary and secondary coolant systems, steam piping and turbine (possibly including the complete feedwater train), and various control and safety systems. Transient analysis is performed as part of the plant safety analysis to insure the adequacy of the reactor design and operating procedures and to verify the applicable plant emergency guidelines. Event sequences which must be examined are developed by considering possible failures or maloperations of plant components. These vary in severity (and calculational difficulty) from a series of normal operational transients, such as minor load changes, reactor trips, valve and pump malfunctions, up to the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary reactor coolant system pipe known as a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA). The focus of this paper is the analysis of all those transients and accidents except loss of coolant accidents

  15. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  16. Review of modern instrumentation for magnetic measurements at high pressure and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Kamenev, K.V.

    2015-01-01

    High-pressure magnetic susceptibility experiments can provide insights into the changes in magnetic behavior and electric properties which can accompany extreme compressions of material. Instrumentation plays an important role in the experimental work in this field since 1990s. Here we present a comprehensive review of the high-pressure instrumentation development for magnetic measurement from the engineering perspective in the last 20 years. Suitable nonmagnetic materials for high pressure cell are introduced initially. Then we focus on the existing cells developed for magnetic property measurement system (MPMS) SQUID magnetometer from Quantum Design (USA). Two categories of high pressure cells for this system are discussed in detail respectively. Some high pressure cells with built-in magnetic measurement system are also reviewed

  17. LOFT instrumented fuel design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A summary description of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) system instrumented core construction details and operating experience through reactor startup and loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) operations performed to date are discussed. The discussion includes details of the test instrumentation attachment to the fuel assembly, the structural response of the fuel modules to the forces generated by a double-ended break of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant pipe at the inlet to the reactor vessel, the durability of the LOFT fuel and test instrumentation, and the plans for incorporation of improved fuel assembly test instrumentation features in the LOFT core

  18. Feasibility study for CPR1000 incore measurement instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel upper head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guang Jianwei; Liu Qian; Li Wenhong; Duan Yuangang

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses about the feasibility of in-core measurement instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) upper head. Incore instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel upper head is one of advanced technology in the third generation nuclear power plant. This technology can reduce the manufacture problem of RPV; decrease the manufacture time effectively. Furthermore, this technology can get rid of the trouble for loss of water caused by many penetrations in the RPV bottom head, can increase security of nuclear power plant. By the description of structure analysis, comparison, maturity for four type incore instrumentation detectors, the incore instrumentation can be educed from RPV upper head, which can increase reactor's security, reduce the manufacture time, decrease group dose in refueling period. The core design ability can be enhanced through this study. (authors)

  19. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  20. Instrumentation needs and data management by the French protection and nuclear safety institute for the diagnosis and prognosis of the release during an emergency on a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rague, B.; Janot, L.; Jouzier, A.

    1992-01-01

    IPSN in conjunction with EDF has been developing for the last years an approach for the diagnosis and prognosis of the Source Term during an accident on a PWR. Intended for the off-site emergency teams, this methodology is implemented with dedicated manual and computerized tools within the frame of the SESAME project. It is necessary to have access during the accident to various information dealing with the state of the plant. These information needs and the various means available to pick up data from the plant are described in this paper. Emphasis is given on the analysis of data that is needed to avoid any failure in the assessment of the state of the safety barriers and functions. This analysis deals with: the quality of the information depending on the environmental conditions and on the availability of the supply systems, the cross-check between measurements of same type, the cross-check between measurements of different types

  1. Instrumenting a pressure suppression experiment for a Mark I boiling water reactor: another measurements engineering challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, W.M.; Brough, W.G.; Miller, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    A 1 / 5 -scale test facility of a pressure-suppression system from a Mark I boiling water reactor was instrumented with seven types of transducers to obtain high-accuracy, dynamic loading data during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. A total of 27 air tests have been completed with an average of 175 transducers recorded for each test. An end-to-end calibration of the total measurement system was run to establish accuracy of the data. The instrumentation verified the analysis of the dynamic loading of the pressure-suppression system

  2. Safety considerations of PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.H. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The safety of the central station pressurized water reactor is well established and substantiated by its excellent operating record. Operating data from 55 reactors of this type have established a record of safe operating history unparalleled by any modern large scale industry. The 186 plants under construction require a continuing commitment to maintain this outstanding record. The safety of the PWR has been further verified by the recently completed Reactor Safety Study (''Rasmussen'' Report). Not only has this study confirmed the exceptionally low risk associated with PWR operation, it has also introduced a valuable new tool in the decision making process. PWR designs, utilizing the philosophy of defense in depth, provide the bases for evaluating margins of safety. The design of the reactor coolant system, the containment system, emergency core cooling system and other related systems and components provide substantial margins of safety under both normal and postulated accident conditions even considering simultaneous effects of earthquakes and other environmental phenomena. Margins of safety in the assessment of various postulated accident conditions, with emphasis on the postulated loss of reactor coolant accident (LOCA), have been evaluated in depth as exemplified by the comprehensive ECCS rulemaking hearings followed by imposition of very conservative Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. When evaluated on an engineering best estimate approach, the significant margins to safety for a LOCA become more apparent. Extensive test programs have also substantiated margins to safety limits. These programs have included both separate effects and systems tests. Component testing has also been performed to substantiate performance levels under adverse combinations of environmental stress. The importance of utilizing past experience and of optimizing the deployment of incremental resources is self evident. Recent safety concerns have included specific areas such

  3. Maturity of the PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.; Rapin, M.; Aboudarham, L.; Bitsch, D.

    1983-03-01

    Figures illustrating the predominant position of the PWR system are presented. The question is whether on the basis of these figures the PWR can be considered to have reached maturity. The following analysis, based on the French program experience, is an attempt to pinpoint those areas in which industrial maturity of the PWR has been attained, and in which areas a certain evolution can still be expected to take place

  4. PWR blowdown heat transfer separate-effects program: Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test 100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.D.; Hedrick, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test 100, which is part of the ORNL Pressurized-Water-Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program. The objective of the program is to investigate the thermal-hydraulic phenomenon governing the energy transfer and transport processes that occur during a loss-of-coolant accident in a PWR system. Test 100 was conducted to investigate the response of heater rod bundle 1 and instrumented spool pieces with flow homogenizing screens to a double-ended rupture with equal break areas at the test section inlet and outlet. The primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses during test 100 available. The responses are presented in graphical form in engineering units and have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to assure reasonableness and consistency

  5. Changes in 900 MW PWR alarm processing policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pont, M [Electricite de France, Generation and Transmission, Nuclear Power Plant Operations, Paris (France)

    1997-09-01

    Following a brief description of the current 900 MW PWR alarm processing system, this document presents the feasibility study carried out within the scope of the Instrumentation and Control Refurbishment project (R2C). (author). 4 figs, tabs.

  6. Changes in 900 MW PWR alarm processing policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pont, M.

    1997-01-01

    Following a brief description of the current 900 MW PWR alarm processing system, this document presents the feasibility study carried out within the scope of the Instrumentation and Control Refurbishment project (R2C). (author). 4 figs, tabs

  7. Research pressure instrumentation for NASA Space Shuttle main engine, modification no. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P. J.; Nussbaum, P.; Gustafson, G.

    1984-01-01

    Research concerning the development of pressure instrumentation for the space shuttle main engine is reported. The following specific topics were addressed: (1) transducer design and materials, (2) silicon piezoresistor characterization at cryogenic temperatures, (3) chip mounting characterization, and (4) frequency response optimization.

  8. Abnormal transient analysis by using PWR plant simulator, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Akira; Murakami, Yoshimitsu; Yokobayashi, Masao.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes results of abnormal transient analysis by using a PWR plant simulator. The simulator is based on an existing 822MWe power plant with 3 loops, and designed to cover wide range of plant operation from cold shutdown to full power at EOL. In the simulator, malfunctions are provided for abnormal conditions of equipment failures, and in this report, 17 malfunctions for secondary system and 4 malfunctions for nuclear instrumentation systems were simulated. The abnormal conditions are turbine and generator trip, failure of condenser, feedwater system and valve and detector failures of pressure and water level. Fathermore, failure of nuclear instrumentations are involved such as source range channel, intermediate range channel and audio counter. Transient behaviors caused by added malfunctions were reasonable and detail information of dynamic characteristics for turbine-condenser system were obtained. (author)

  9. Model for transient simulation in a PWR steam circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, L.A. de.

    1982-11-01

    A computer code (SURF) was developed and used to simulate pressure losses along the tubes of the main steam circuit of a PWR nuclear power plant, and the steam flow through relief and safety valves when pressure reactors its thresholds values. A thermodynamic model of turbines (high and low pressure), and its associated components are simulated too. The SURF computer code was coupled to the GEVAP computer code, complementing the simulation of a PWR nuclear power plant main steam circuit. (Author) [pt

  10. Comprehensive exergetic and economic comparison of PWR and hybrid fossil fuel-PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayyaadi, Hoseyn; Sabzaligol, Tooraj

    2010-01-01

    A typical 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant and two similar hybrid 1000 MW PWR plants operate with natural gas and coal fired fossil fuel superheater-economizers (Hybrid PWR-Fossil fuel plants) are compared exergetically and economically. Comparison is performed based on energetic and economic features of three systems. In order to compare system at their optimum operating point, three workable base case systems including the conventional PWR, and gas and coal fired hybrid PWR-Fossil fuel power plants considered and optimized in exergetic and exergoeconomic optimization scenarios, separately. The thermodynamic modeling of three systems is performed based on energy and exergy analyses, while an economic model is developed according to the exergoeconomic analysis and Total Revenue Requirement (TRR) method. The objective functions based on exergetic and exergoeconomic analyses are developed. The exergetic and exergoeconomic optimizations are performed using the Genetic Algorithm (GA). Energetic and economic features of exergetic and exergoeconomic optimized conventional PWR and gas and coal fired Hybrid PWR-Fossil fuel power plants are compared and discussed comprehensively.

  11. Assessing information needs and instrument availability for a pressurized water reactor during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Duane J. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)); Arcieri, William C. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)); Ward, Leonard W. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States))

    1994-07-01

    A five-step methodology was developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information that personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and severe accident conditions, to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information. This methodology was applied to a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment and the results are presented. A companion article describes application of the methodology to a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment. ((orig.))

  12. Assessing information needs and instrument availability for a pressurized water reactor during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, Duane J.; Arcieri, William C.; Ward, Leonard W.

    1994-01-01

    A five-step methodology was developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information that personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and severe accident conditions, to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information. This methodology was applied to a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment and the results are presented. A companion article describes application of the methodology to a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment. ((orig.))

  13. A real time study of the human equilibrium using an instrumented insole with 3 pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Ghaida, Hussein; Mottet, Serge; Goujon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The present work deals with the study of the human equilibrium using an ambulatory e-health system. One of the point on which we focus is the fall risk, when losing equilibrium control. A specific postural learning model is presented, and an ambulatory instrumented insole is developed using 3 pressures sensors per foot, in order to determine the real-time displacement and the velocity of the centre of pressure (CoP). The increase of these parameters signals a loss of physiological sensation, usually of vision or of the inner ear. The results are compared to those obtained from classical more complex systems.

  14. MetBaro - Pressure Instrument for Mars MetNet Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkko, J.; Haukka, H.; Harri, A.-M.; Schmidt, W.; Leinonen, J.; Mäkinen, T.

    2009-04-01

    THE METNET MISSION FOCUSED ON THE Martian atmospheric science is based on a new semihard landing vehicle called the MetNet Lander (MNL). The MNL will have a versatile science payload focused on the atmospheric science of Mars. The scientific payload of the MetNet Mission encompasses separate instrument packages for the atmospheric entry and descent phase and for the surface operation phase. MetBaro is the pressure instrument of MetNet Lander designed to work on Martian surface. It is based on Barocap® technology developed by Vaisala, Inc. MetBaro is a capacitic type of sensing device where capasitor plates are moved by ambient pressure. MetBaro device consists of two pressure transducers including a total of 6 Barocap® sensor heads of high-stability and high-resolution types. The long-term stability of MetBaro is in order of 20…50 µBar and resolution a few µBar. MetBaro is small, lightweighed and has low power consumption. It weighs about 50g without wires and controlling FPGA, and consumes 15 mW of power. A similar device has successfully flown in Phoenix mission, where it performed months of measurements on Martian ground. Another device is also part of the Mars Science Laboratory REMS instrument (to be launched in 2011).

  15. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieur, G.; Nadi, M.; Hedjiedj, A.; Weber, S.

    1995-01-01

    This second chapter on instrumentation gives little general consideration on history and classification of instrumentation, and two specific states of the art. The first one concerns NMR (block diagram of instrumentation chain with details on the magnets, gradients, probes, reception unit). The first one concerns precision instrumentation (optical fiber gyro-meter and scanning electron microscope), and its data processing tools (programmability, VXI standard and its history). The chapter ends with future trends on smart sensors and Field Emission Displays. (D.L.). Refs., figs

  16. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  17. PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test 166S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemons, V.D.; White, M.D.; Hedrick, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test 166S, which is part of the ORNL Pressurized-Water Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program. The objective of the program is to investigate the thermal-hydraulic phenomenon governing the energy transfer and transport processes that occur during a loss-of-coolant accident in a PWR system. Test 166S was conducted to obtain thermal-hydraulic and CHF information in THTF bundle 1 with an intact hot leg. The primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses during tests 166S available. These are presented in graphical form in engineering units and have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to ensure reasonableness and consistency

  18. Parallel GPU implementation of PWR reactor burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimlich, A.; Silva, F.C.; Martinez, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three GPU algorithms used to evaluate the burn-up in a PWR reactor. • Exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential. • The C++ container is expansible to accept new nuclides chains. - Abstract: This paper surveys three methods, implemented for multi-core CPU and graphic processor unit (GPU), to evaluate the fuel burn-up in a pressurized light water nuclear reactor (PWR) using the solutions of a large system of coupled ordinary differential equations. The reactor physics simulation of a PWR reactor spends a long execution time with burnup calculations, so performance improvement using GPU can imply in better core design and thus extended fuel life cycle. The results of this study exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential solver, within 1% accuracy.

  19. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation aims at evaluating the potentials of new instrumentation technologies under the severe constraints of a nuclear application. It focuses on the tolerance of sensors to high radiation doses, including optical fibre sensors, and on the related intelligent data processing needed to cope with the nuclear constraints. Main achievements in these domains in 1999 are summarised

  20. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2001-04-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor.

  1. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor

  2. Experimental study of the solubilization of various elements likely to be emitted following a serious accident on a pressurized water reactor (P.W.R.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfort, M.; Picat, P.; Cartier, Y.

    1988-09-01

    The solubility of various constituents (Ru0 2 , Ce0 2 , Ag, In 2 0 3 , Fe 2 0 3 ) of aerosols released into the environment following a serious accident at a PWR have been studied using four types of natural waters (rain water and soil solutions). Very small quantities of each of the products studied pass into solution. The soluble fraction of Ru0 2 , composed of microparticles of oxide, appears to be more mobile in soils than that of Ag, consisting in part of Ag + ions [fr

  3. Maintenance technologies for SCC of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okimura, Koji; Hori, Nobuyuki; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Tokuhisa, Kiichi; Kamo, Kazuhiko; Kurokawa, Masaaki

    2007-01-01

    The recent technologies of test, relaxation of deterioration, repairing and change of materials are explained for safe and stable operation of pressurized water reactor (PWR). Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is originated by three factors such as materials, stress and environment. The eddy current test (ECT) method for the stream generator pipe and the ultrasonic test method for welding part of pipe were developed as the test technologies. Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Inconel 600 in the welding part is explained. The shot peening of instrument in the gas, the water jet peening of it in water, and laser irradiation on the surface are illustrated as some examples of improvement technology of stress. The cladding of Inconel 690 on Inconel 600 is carried out under the condition of environmental cut. Total or some parts of the upper part of reactor, stream generator and structure in the reactor are changed by the improvement technologies. Changing Inconel 600 joint in the exit pipe of reactor with Inconel 690 is illustrated. (S.Y.)

  4. Summary of PWR leak detection studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J.H.; Elia, F.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis can be used to determine the location and magnitude of leaks inside and location of leaks outside a pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment as required by plant technical specifications. The major advantage of this detection method is that it minimizes radiation exposure of maintenance personnel because most of the leak detection process is performed from the control room outside containment. Plant-specific analyses are utilized to predict change in parameters such as local dew point temperature, relative humidity, dry bulb temperature, and flow rate to sump for various leak rates and enthalpies. These parameter responses are then programmed into the plant computer and instrumentation is provided for area monitoring. The actual inputs are continuously monitored and compared to the predicted plant responses to identify the leak location and quantify the leak. This study concludes that a system that monitors dew point (or relative humidity) and dry bulb temperature changes together with the flow rate to the sump will provide the capability to both locate and quantify a leak inside a containment, while a system that monitors dew point temperature (or relative humidity) changes will provide the capability to locate a leak outside a containment

  5. Surveillance of vibrations in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espefaelt, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1980-07-01

    The core of a PWR - including fuel elements, internal structure, control rods and core support structure inside the pressure vessel - is subjected to forces which can cause vibrations. One sensitive means to detect and analyse such vibrations is by means of the noise from incore and excore neutron detector signals. In this project noise recordings have been made on two occasions in the Ringhals 2 plant and the obtained data been analysed using the Studsvik Noise Analysis Program System (SNAPS). The results have been intepreted and a detailed description of the vibrational status of the core and pressure vessel internals has been produced. On the basis of the obtained results it is proposed that neutron signal noise analysis should be performed at each PWR plant in the beginning, middle and end of each fuel cycle and an analysis be made using the methods developed in the project. It would also provide a contribution to a higher degree of preparedness for diagnostic tasks in case of unexpected and abnormal events. (author)

  6. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described

  7. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described.

  8. Evaluation of a Kalman filter based power pressurizer instrument failure detection system implemented on a nuclear power plant training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegmiller, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The usefulness of a nuclear power plant training simulator for developing and testing modern estimation and control applications for nuclear power plants is demonstrated. A Kalman filter based instrument failure detection technique for a pressurized water reactor pressurizer is implemented on the Department of Energy N Reactor Training Simulator. This real-time failure detection method computes the first two moments (mean and variance) of each element of a normalized filter innovations vector. Failed pressurizer instrumentation can be detected by comparing these moments to the known statistical properties of the steady state, linear Kalman fitler innovations sequence. The capabilities of the detection system are evaluated using simulated plant transients and instrument failures

  9. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation aims at evaluating the potentials of new instrumentation technologies under the severe constraints of a nuclear application. It focuses on the tolerance of sensors to high radiation doses, including optical fibre sensors, and on the related intelligent data processing needed to cope with the nuclear constraints. Main achievements in these domains in 1999 are summarised.

  10. Micro-controller based air pressure monitoring instrumentation system using optical fibers as sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, D.; Pegu, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a micro-controller based instrumentation system to monitor air pressure using optical fiber sensors. The principle of macrobending is used to develop the sensor system. The instrumentation system consists of a laser source, a beam splitter, two multi mode optical fibers, two Light Dependent Resistance (LDR) based timer circuits and a AT89S8252 micro-controller. The beam splitter is used to divide the laser beam into two parts and then these two beams are launched into two multi mode fibers. One of the multi mode fibers is used as the sensor fiber and the other one is used as the reference fiber. The use of the reference fiber is to eliminate the environmental effects while measuring the air pressure magnitude. The laser beams from the sensor and reference fibers are applied to two identical LDR based timer circuits. The LDR based timer circuits are interfaced to a micro-controller through its counter pins. The micro-controller samples the frequencies of the timer circuits using its counter-0 and counter-1 and the counter values are then processed to provide the measure of air pressure magnitude.

  11. Brazing of Sealing for Instrumentation Feed through of high Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, H. Y.; Ahn, S. H.; Joung, C. Y.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, C. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Fuel Test Loop(FTL) is a facility which could conduct a fuel irradiation test at HANARO(High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor). FTL simulates commercial NPP's operating conditions such as the pressure, temperature and neutron flux levels to conduct the irradiation and thermo-hydraulic tests. It is composed of an In-Pile test Section(IPS) and an Out- Pile System(OPS). The OPS contains a pressurizer, cooler, pump, heater and purification system which are necessary to maintain the proper fluid conditions. In addition, the OPS contains engineered safety systems that could safely shutdown both HANARO and FTL if an accident occurs. The IPS accommodating fuel pins has loaded IP-1 hole in HANARO has a double pressure vessel for the design conditions of 350 .deg. C, 17.5MPa and is composed of outer assembly and inner assembly. It has instruments such as a thermocouple, LVDT and SPND to measure the fuel performances during the test. FTL coolant is supplied to the IPS at the core of commercial nuclear power plants and the same temperature, pressure and flow conditions. Sensors installed on the inside of IPS to send a signal transmission MI-Cables to the outside for instrumentation is through the pressure boundary. Therefore, pressure boundary should be maintained in the sealing performance. Brazing is typically lower than the melting point of material without melting the material almost would be like welding when it is necessary to use. It is commonly used to use BAg(ASME II SFA-5.8 UNS-P07563) filler metal, but corrosion occurs containing a large quantity of copper in Bag, and when contact with the coolant, the coolant water quality is influenced. Therefore, using BNi-2(ASME II SFA-5.8 UNS-N99620) filler metal is considered. Brazing at the Sealing Plug in the top of IPS was considered for Mi-cable's integrity and to maintain the pressure boundary. After brazing is performed, brazing the Mi-cable integrity and pressure boundary sealing performance was

  12. Brazing of Sealing for Instrumentation Feed through of high Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H. Y.; Ahn, S. H.; Joung, C. Y.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Fuel Test Loop(FTL) is a facility which could conduct a fuel irradiation test at HANARO(High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor). FTL simulates commercial NPP's operating conditions such as the pressure, temperature and neutron flux levels to conduct the irradiation and thermo-hydraulic tests. It is composed of an In-Pile test Section(IPS) and an Out- Pile System(OPS). The OPS contains a pressurizer, cooler, pump, heater and purification system which are necessary to maintain the proper fluid conditions. In addition, the OPS contains engineered safety systems that could safely shutdown both HANARO and FTL if an accident occurs. The IPS accommodating fuel pins has loaded IP-1 hole in HANARO has a double pressure vessel for the design conditions of 350 .deg. C, 17.5MPa and is composed of outer assembly and inner assembly. It has instruments such as a thermocouple, LVDT and SPND to measure the fuel performances during the test. FTL coolant is supplied to the IPS at the core of commercial nuclear power plants and the same temperature, pressure and flow conditions. Sensors installed on the inside of IPS to send a signal transmission MI-Cables to the outside for instrumentation is through the pressure boundary. Therefore, pressure boundary should be maintained in the sealing performance. Brazing is typically lower than the melting point of material without melting the material almost would be like welding when it is necessary to use. It is commonly used to use BAg(ASME II SFA-5.8 UNS-P07563) filler metal, but corrosion occurs containing a large quantity of copper in Bag, and when contact with the coolant, the coolant water quality is influenced. Therefore, using BNi-2(ASME II SFA-5.8 UNS-N99620) filler metal is considered. Brazing at the Sealing Plug in the top of IPS was considered for Mi-cable's integrity and to maintain the pressure boundary. After brazing is performed, brazing the Mi-cable integrity and pressure boundary sealing performance was tested

  13. Subcritical crack growth in the ligament between the instrumentation rods of the BBR pressure vessel bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marci, G.; Bazant, E.; Kautz, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    A fracture mechanics fatigue analysis is made for an assumed crack emanating from the bore of an instrumentation rod. This assumed crack has partially penetrated the Inconel buttering of the 22 Ni Mo Cr 37 on which the structural Inconel welds are laid. Our analysis shows that the assumed crack could only penetrate 26% of the remaining ligament of the Inconel structural weld as a result of the fatigue crack growth during the entire operating life of the pressure vessel. Therefore a leak caused by a flaw missed during pre-service and in-service non-destructive testing can be excluded. (author)

  14. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  15. Investigation of irradiation embrittlement and annealing behaviour of JRQ pressure vessel steel by instrumented impact tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valo, M; Rintamaa, R; Nevalainen, M; Wallin, K; Torronen, K [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Tipping, P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Seven series of A533-B type pressure vessel steel specimens irradiated as well as irradiated - annealed - re-irradiated to different fast neutron fluences (up to 5.10{sup 19}/cm{sup 2}) have been tested with a new type of instrumented impact test machine. The radiation embrittlement and the effect of the intermediate annealing was assessed by using the ductile and cleavage fracture initiation toughness. Although the ductile fracture initiation toughness exhibited scatter, the transition temperature shift corresponding to the dynamic cleavage fracture initiation agreed well with the 41 J Charpy-V shift. The results indicate that annealing is beneficial in restoring mechanical properties in an irradiated nuclear pressure vessel steel. (authors). 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Reactivity and isotopic composition of spent PWR [pressurized-water-reactor] fuel as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerne, S.P.; Hermann, O.W.; Westfall, R.M.

    1987-10-01

    This study presents the reactivity loss of spent PWR fuel due to burnup in terms of the infinite lattice multiplications factor, k/sub ∞/. Calculations were performed using the SAS2 and CSAS1 control modules of the SCALE system. The k/sub ∞/ values calculated for all combinations of six enrichments, seven burnups, and five cooling times. The results are presented as a primary function of enrichment in both tabular and graphic form. An equation has been developed to estimate the tabulated values of k/sub ∞/'s by specifying enrichment, cooling time, and burnup. Atom densities for fresh fuel, and spent fuel at cooling times of 2, 10, and 20 years are included. 13 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehrer, W.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper mediates a basic knowledge of the most commonly used experimental techniques. We discuss the principles and concepts necessary to understand what one is doing if one performs an experiment on a certain instrument. (author) 29 figs., 1 tab., refs

  18. Fatigue resistance of rotary ProTaper Universal instruments after use with and without lateral pressure motion

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Evandro Pires; Pereira, Érika Sales Joviano; Peixoto, Isabella Faria da Cunha; Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes; Bahia, Maria Guiomar de Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the fatigue resistance of rotary ProTaper Universal instruments after multiple clinical uses with and without lateral pressure motion. Methods: Thirty sets of ProTaper Universal (PTU) instruments (Dentsply-Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), types S1, S2, F1 and F2, totaling 120 files, were analyzed and divided into three groups, as follows: Control Group (CG), with 10 sets of new instruments, which were fatigue tested until rupture to determine their fatigue resistance; Lat...

  19. Weld region corrosion during chemical cleaning of PWR [pressurized-water reactor] steam generators: Volume 2, Tests and analyses: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, J.L.; Bozeka, S.A.; Jevec, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The potential for preferential corrosion of steam generator weld regions during chemical cleaning using the generic SGOG solvents was investigated. The investigations included development and use of a corrosion assessment test facility which measured corrosion currents in a realistic model of the steam generator geometry in the vicinity of a specific weld during a simulated chemical dissolution of sludge consisting of essentially pure magnetite. A corrosion monitoring technique was developed and qualified. In this technique free corrosion rates measured by linear polarization techniques are added to corrosion rates calculated from galvanic current measured using a zero resistance ammeter to give an estimate of total corrosion rate for a galvanically corroding material. An analytic modeling technique was developed and proved useful in determining the size requirements for the weld region mockup used in the corrosion assessment test facility. The technique predicted galvanic corrosion rates consistent with that observed in a corrosion assessement test when polarization data used as model input were obtained on-line during the test. The test results obtained during this investigation indicated that chemical cleaning using the SGOG magnetite dissolution solvent can be performed with a small amount of corrosion of secondary side internals and pressure boundary welds. The maximum weld region corrosion measured during a typical chemical cleaning cycle to remove essentially pure magnetite sludge was about 8 mils. However, additional site specific weld region corrosion assessment testing and qualification will be required prior to chemical cleaning steam generators at a specific plant. Recommendations for site specific qualification of chemical cleaning processes and for use of process monitors and on-line corrosion instrumentation are included in this report

  20. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Colsher, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reviews the parameters which are important to positron-imaging instruments. It summarizes the options which various groups have explored in designing tomographs and the methods which have been developed to overcome some of the limitations inherent in the technique as well as in present instruments. The chapter is not presented as a defense of positron imaging versus single-photon or other imaging modality, neither does it contain a description of various existing instruments, but rather stresses their common properties and problems. Design parameters which are considered are resolution, sampling requirements, sensitivity, methods of eliminating scattered radiation, random coincidences and attenuation. The implementation of these parameters is considered, with special reference to sampling, choice of detector material, detector ring diameter and shielding and variations in point spread function. Quantitation problems discussed are normalization, and attenuation and random corrections. Present developments mentioned are noise reduction through time-of-flight-assisted tomography and signal to noise improvements through high intrinsic resolution. Extensive bibliography. (U.K.)

  1. An instrumented object for hand exercise and assessment using a pneumatic pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, A.; Tharion, G.; Kumar, R. K.; Devasahayam, S. R.

    2018-05-01

    Measurement of grip force is important for both exercise training and assessment of the hand during physical rehabilitation. The standard method uses a grip dynamometer which measures the force between the fingers and opposing thumb. The primary limitation of the grip dynamometer is the restriction of measurement to cylindrical grasps. Any deformation of the hand due to muscular or skeletal disease makes the grip dynamometer difficult or impossible to use. An alternative to the grip dynamometer is a sealed pneumatic object that can be gripped by the hand. Measurement of the internal pressure in the object can be related to the grip force. In this paper, we analyze such a pneumatic pressure sensing object for hand grip assessment and also describe an easy fabrication of the grip sensor. The instrumented object presented in this paper is designed to assess both the maximal voluntary grip forces and continuous grip force to monitor control of hand function during exercise under instruction from a therapist. Potential uses of such a pneumatic pressure sensing object for hand grip are in physical rehabilitation of patients following paralysing illnesses like stroke and spinal cord injury.

  2. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  3. Next generation PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiko; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Usui, Shuji

    2001-01-01

    Development of LWR for power generation in Japan has been intended to upgrade its reliability, safety, operability, maintenance and economy as well as to increase its capacity in order, since nuclear power generation for commercial use was begun on 1970, to steadily increase its generation power. And, in Japan, ABWR (advanced BWR) of the most promising LWR in the world, was already used actually and APWR (advanced PWR) with the largest output in the world is also at a step of its actual use. And, development of the APWR in Japan was begun on 1980s, and is at a step of plan on construction of its first machine at early of this century. However, by large change of social affairs, economy of nuclear power generation is extremely required, to be positioned at an APWR improved development reactor promoted by collaboration of five PWR generation companies and the Mitsubishi Electric Co., Ltd. Therefore, on its development, investigation on effect of change in social affairs on nuclear power stations was at first carried out, to establish a design requirement for the next generation PWR. Here were described on outline, reactor core design, safety concept, and safety evaluation of APWR+ and development of an innovative PWR. (G.K.)

  4. Instrumentation and testing of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Pace, D.W.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1997-01-01

    Static overpressurization tests of two scale models of nuclear containment structures - a steel containment vessel (SCV) representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR) - are being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper discusses plans for instrumentation and testing of the PCCV model. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Implementation in free software of the PWR type university nucleo electric simulator (SU-PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle H, J.; Hidago H, F.; Morales S, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    Presently work is shown like was carried out the implementation of the University Simulator of Nucleo-electric type PWR (SU-PWR). The implementation of the simulator was carried out in a free software simulation platform, as it is Scilab, what offers big advantages that go from the free use and without cost of the product, until the codes modification so much of the system like of the program with the purpose of to improve it or to adapt it to future routines and/or more advanced graphic interfaces. The SU-PWR shows the general behavior of a PWR nuclear plant (Pressurized Water Reactor) describing the dynamics of the plant from the generation process of thermal energy in the nuclear fuel, going by the process of energy transport toward the coolant of the primary circuit the one which in turn transfers this energy to the vapor generators of the secondary circuit where the vapor is expanded by means of turbines that in turn move the electric generator producing in this way the electricity. The pressurizer that is indispensable for the process is also modeled. Each one of these stages were implemented in scicos that is the Scilab tool specialized in the simulation. The simulation was carried out by means of modules that contain the differential equation that mathematically models each stage or equipment of the PWR plant. The result is a series of modules that based on certain entrances and characteristic of the system they generate exits that in turn are the entrance to other module. Because the SU-PWR is an experimental project in early phase, it is even work and modifications to carry out, for what the models that are presented in this work can vary a little the being integrated to the whole system to simulate, but however they already show clearly the operation and the conformation of the plant. (Author)

  6. Long-Term Dry Storage of High Burn-Up Spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Fuel in TAD (Transportation, Aging, and Disposal) Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Soo

    2008-12-01

    A TAD canister, in conjunction with specially-designed over-packs can accomplish the functions of transportation, aging, and disposal (TAD) in the management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Industrial dry cask systems currently available for SNF are licensed for storage-only or for dual-purpose (i.e., storage and transportation). By extending the function to include the indefinite storage and perhaps, eventual geologic disposal, the TAD canister would have to be designed to enhance, among others, corrosion resistance, thermal stability, and criticality-safety control. This investigative paper introduces the use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials for SNF transportation, aging, and disposal.The objective of this investigative project is to explore the interest that KAERI would research and develop its specific SAM coating materials for the TAD canisters to satisfy the requirements of corrosion-resistance, thermal stability, and criticality-controls for long-term dry storage of high burn-up spent PWR fuel

  7. PWR thermocouple mechanical sealing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qiuping; He Youguang

    1991-08-01

    The PWR in-core temperature detection device, which is one of measures to insure reactor safety operation, is to monitor and diagnose reactor thermal power output and in-core power distribution. The temperature detection device system uses thermocouples as measuring elements with stainless steel protecting sleeves. The thermocouple has a limited service time and should be replaced after its service time has reached. A new sealing device for the thermocouples of reactor in-core temperature detection system has been developed to facilitate replacement. The structure is complete tight under high temperature and pressure without any leakage and seepage, and easy to be assembled or disassembled in radioactive environment. The device is designed to make it possible to replace the thermocouple one by one if necessary. This is a new, simple and practical structure

  8. PWR fuel behavior: lessons learned from LOFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the experience with the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) fuel during loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs), operational and overpower transient tests and steady-state operation is presented. LOFT provides unique capabilities for obtaining pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel behavior information because it features the representative thermal-hydraulic conditions which control fuel behavior during transient conditions and an elaborate measurement system to record the history of the fuel behavior

  9. Chemical and radiochemical specifications - PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stutzmann, A.

    1997-01-01

    Published by EDF this document gives the chemical specifications of the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear power plants. Among the chemical parameters, some have to be respected for the safety. These parameters are listed in the STE (Technical Specifications of Exploitation). The values to respect, the analysis frequencies and the time states of possible drops are noticed in this document with the motion STE under the concerned parameter. (A.L.B.)

  10. Thermal-hydraulic study of integrated steam generator in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osakabe, Masahiro

    1989-01-01

    One of the safety aspects of innovative reactor concepts is the integration of steam generators (SGs) into the reactor vessel in the case of the pressurized water reactor (PWR). All of the reactor system components including the pressurizer are within the reactor vessel in the SG integrated PWR. The simple heat transfer code was developed for the parametric study of the integrated SG. The code was compared to the once-through 19-tube SG experiment and the good agreement between the experimental results and the code predictions was obtained. The assessed code was used for the parametric study of the integrated once-through 16 m-straight-tube SG installed in the annular downcomer. The proposed integrated SG as a first attempt has approximately the same tube size and pitch as the present PWR and the SG primary and secondary sides in the present PWR is inverted in the integrated PWR. Based on the study, the reactor vessel size of the SG integrated PWR was calculated. (author)

  11. Reactor instrumentation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wach, D.; Beraha, D.

    1980-01-01

    The methods for measuring radiation are shortly reviewed. The instrumentation for neutron flux measurement is classified into out-of-core and in-core instrumentation. The out-of-core instrumentation monitors the operational range from the subcritical reactor to full power. This large range is covered by several measurement channels which derive their signals from counter tubes and ionization chambers. The in-core instrumentation provides more detailed information on the power distribution in the core. The self-powered neutron detectors and the aeroball system in PWR reactors are discussed. Temperature and pressure measurement devices are briefly discussed. The different methods for leak detection are described. In concluding the plant instrumentation part some new monitoring systems and analysis methods are presented: early failure detection methods by noise analysis, acoustic monitoring and vibration monitoring. The presentation of the control starts from an qualitative assessment of the reactor dynamics. The chosen control strategy leads to the definition of the part-load diagram, which provides the set-points for the different control systems. The tasks and the functions of these control systems are described. In additiion to the control, a number of limiting systems is employed to keep the reactor in a safe operating region. Finally, an outlook is given on future developments in control, concerning mainly the increased application of process computers. (orig./RW)

  12. Plutonium recycling in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youinou, G.; Girieud, R.; Guigon, B.

    2000-01-01

    Two concepts of 100% MOX PWR cores are presented. They are designed such as to minimize the consequences of the introduction of Pu on the core control. The first one has a high moderation ratio and the second one utilizes an enriched uranium support. The important design parameters as well as their capabilities to multi recycle Pu are discussed. We conclude with the potential interest of the two concepts. (author)

  13. The integrated PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the integrated reactors concepts by a presentation of four reactors: PIUS, SIR, IRIS and CAREM. The core conception, the operating, the safety, the economical aspects and the possible users are detailed. From the performance of the classical integrated PWR, the necessity of new innovative fuels utilization, the research of a simplified design to make easier the safety and the KWh cost decrease, a new integrated reactor is presented: SCAR 600. (A.L.B.)

  14. AGR v PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1986-01-01

    When the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) invited tenders and placed a contract for the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) at Dungeness B in 1965 -preferring it to the Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) -the AGR was lamentably ill developed. The effects of the decision were widely felt, for it took the British nuclear industry off the light water reactor highway of world reactor business and up and idiosyncratic private highway of its own, excluding it altogether from any material export business in the two decades which followed. Yet although the UK may have made wrong decisions in rejecting the PWR in 1965, that does not mean that it can necessarily now either correct them, or redeem their consequence, by reversing the choice in 1985. In the 20 years since 1965 the whole world economic and energy picture has been transformed and the national picture with it. Picking up the PWR now could prove as big a disaster as rejecting it may have been in 1965. (author)

  15. The development of emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR Candu type of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mursid Djokolelono.

    1976-01-01

    Emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR-Candu type of nuclear power plant are reviewed. In PWR and BWR the emergency cooling can be catagorized as active high pressure, active low pressure, and a passive one. The PWR uses components of the shutdown cooling system: whereas the BWR uses components of pressure suppression contaiment. HWR Candu also uses the shutdown cooling system similar to the PWR except some details coming out from moderator coolant separation and expensive cost of heavy water. (author)

  16. Study on virtual simulation technology for operation and control of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Baoguo; Zhang Dafa; Lin Yajun

    2006-01-01

    The way to build graphical models of PWR with MultiGen Creator is discussed, and the three-dimensional model used in the virtual simulation is built. The mathematical simulation model for PWR based on the platform of MFC and Vega is built through the analysis of the mathematical simulation of PWR. The way to perform the virtual effect is introduced associating with the Pressurizer. And, all above parts are connected in one with VC++ to perform the whole virtual simulation of PWR. (authors)

  17. PWR: 10 years after and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    These proceedings of the SFEN days on PWR (Ten years after and perspectives) comprise 13 conferences bearing on: - From the occurential approach to the state approach - Evolution of calculating tools - Human factors and safety - Reactor safety in the PWR 2000 - The PWR and the electrical power grid load follow - Fuel aspect of PWR management - PWR chemistry evolution - Balance of radiation protection - PWR modifications balance and influence on reactor operation - Design and maintenance of reactor components: 4 conferences [fr

  18. Burst protected nuclear reactor plant with PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Michel, E.

    1978-01-01

    In the PWR, several integrated components from the steam raising unit and the main coolant pump are grouped around the reactor pressure vessel in a multiloop circuit and in a vertical arrangement. For safety reasons all primary circuit components and pipelines are situated in burst protection covers. To reduce the area of the plant straight tube steam raising units with forced circulation are used as steam raising units. The boiler pumps are connected to the vertical tubes and to the pressure vessel via double pipelines made as twin chamber pipes. (DG) [de

  19. The use of cluster analysis method for the localization of acoustic emission sources detected during the hydrotest of PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, J.; Svetlik, M.; Slama, K.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustic emission method is a promising tool for checking reactor pressure vessel integrity. Localization of emission sources is the first and the most important step in processing emission signals. The paper describes the emission sources localization method which is based on cluster analysis of a set of points depicting the emission events in the plane of coordinates of their occurrence. The method is based on using this set of points for constructing the minimum spanning tree and its partition into fragments corresponding to point clusters. Furthermore, the laws are considered of probability distribution of the minimum spanning tree edge length for one and several clusters with the aim of finding the optimum length of the critical edge for the partition of the tree. Practical application of the method is demonstrated on localizing the emission sources detected during a hydrotest of a pressure vessel used for testing the reactor pressure vessel covers. (author)

  20. An instrumented mixer setup for making tackifier dispersions used to make pressure-sensitive adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Daoyun; Zhang, Wu; Gupta, Rakesh K; Melby, Earl G

    2008-01-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are made by combining a tackifier dispersion and a polymer latex. During the process of making the tackifier dispersion, the system initially forms a water-in-oil emulsion, and then inverts to an oil-in-water one as more water is continuously added with constant agitation. To better understand the process, an instrumented mixer setup was constructed to simulate the manufacturing process, and agitation was provided by an inner impeller and an outer impeller. Several variables were monitored in situ. They are the electrical resistance of the emulsion, torque exerted on the inner impeller, agitation speeds of both impellers, power consumption of both impellers and the flow rate of feeding water. Our measurements showed that torque reached a maximum at phase inversion, and this was verified by direct measurements of viscosity during the process. Simultaneously electrical resistance measurements monitored the chemical changes as well as phase inversion. Experiments showed that under a certain low water feeding flow rate, there appeared to be an intermediate agitation speed at which the phase inversion occurred the earliest. This, from the industrial standpoint, is really favorable due to both time and energy efficiency. Furthermore, this intermediate agitation speed also corresponded to a better quality product. All this information may be used for optimizing this process in the future

  1. Pressurized water reactor inspection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, D.; Mueller, G.; Otte, H.J.; Roth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Inspections of the reactor pressure vessels of pressurized water reactors (PWR) so far used to be carried out with different central mast manipulators. For technical reasons, parallel inspections of two manipulators alongside work on the refueling cavity, so as to reduce the time spent on the critical path in a revision outage, are not possible. Efforts made to minimize the inspection time required with one manipulator have been successful, but their effects are limited. Major reductions in inspection time can be achieved only if inspections are run with two manipulators in parallel. The decentralized manipulator built by GEC Alsthom Energie and so far emmployed in boiling water reactors in the USA, Spain, Switzerland and Japan allows two systems to be used in parallel, thus reducing the time required for standard inspection of a pressure vessel from some six days to three days. These savings of approximately three days are made possible without any compromises in terms of positioning by rail-bound systems. During inspection, the reactor refueling cavity is available for other revision work without any restrictions. The manipulator can be used equally well for inspecting standard PWR, PWR with a thermal shield, for inspecting the land between in-core instrumentation nozzles, BWR with and without jet pumps (complementary inspection), and for inspecting core support shrouds. (orig.) [de

  2. Uncertainty study of the PWR pressure vessel fluence. Adjustment of the nuclear data base; Etudes des incertitudes sur la fluence dans les cuves des REP. Ajustement des donnees de base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodeli, I A

    1994-01-01

    The code system devoted to the calculation of the sensitivity and uncertainty of of the neutron flux and reaction rates calculated by the transport codes, has been developed. Adjustment of the basic data to experimental results can be performed as well. Various sources of uncertainties can be taken into account, such as those due to the uncertainties in the cross-sections, response functions, fission spectrum and space distribution of neutron source, geometry and material composition uncertainties... One -As well as two- dimensional analysis can be performed. Linear perturbation theory is applied. The code system is sufficiently general to be used for various analysis in the fields of fission and fusion. The principal objective of our studies concerns the capsule dosimetry study realized in the framework of the 900 MWe PWR pressure vessel surveillance program. The analysis indicates that the present calculations, performed by the code TRIPOLI-2, using the ENDF/B-IV based, non-perturbed neutron cross-section library in 315 energy groups, allows to estimate the neutron flux and the reaction rates in the surveillance capsules and in the most calculated and measured reaction rates permits to reduce these uncertainties. The results obtained with the adjusted iron cross-sections, response functions and fission spectrum show that the agreement between the calculation and the experiment was improved to become within 10% approximately. The neutron flux deduced from the experiment is then extrapolated from the capsule to the most exposed pressure vessel location using the calculated lead factor. The uncertainty in this factor was estimated to be about 7%. (author). 39 refs., 52 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Design of a PWR emergency core cooling simulator loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, C.A. de.

    1982-12-01

    The preliminary design of a PWR Emergency Core Cooling Simulator Loop for investigations of the phenomena involved in a postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident, during the Reflooding Phase, is presented. The functions of each component of the loop, the design methods and calculations, the specification of the instrumentation, the system operation sequence, the materials list and a cost assessment are included. (Author) [pt

  4. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Tobin, S.J.; Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hu, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (Sweden); Trellue, H.; Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-11

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 134}Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  5. French PWR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.

    1986-05-01

    Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach, each of them having possibilities and limits. As a consequence of the global risk objective set in 1977 for nuclear reactors, safety analysis was extended to the evaluation of events more complex than the conventional ones, and later to the evaluation of the feasibility of the offsite emergency plans in case of severe accidents

  6. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  7. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  8. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  9. The advanced main control console for next japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, A.; Ito, K.; Yokoyama, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the improvement of main control room designing in a nuclear power plant is to reduce operators' workload and potential human errors by offering a better working environment where operators can maximize their abilities. In order to satisfy such requirements, the design of main control board applied to Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type nuclear power plant has been continuously modified and improved. the Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Utilities (Electric Power Companies) and Mitsubishi Group have developed an advanced main control board (console) reflecting on the study of human factors, as well as using a state of the art electronics technology. In this report, we would like to introduce the configuration and features of the Advanced Main Control Console for the practical application to the next generation PWR type nuclear power plants including TOMARI No.3 Unit of Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc. (author)

  10. Fast response, 2.5K psi (17.24 MPa) transducer for measurement of gas pressure in PWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, T.C.

    1976-09-01

    A strain gage pressure transducer of 2,500 psi (17.24 MPa) range for operation in a 650 0 F environment is described. Specific design parameters are given along with the calibration results obtained from typical transducers. Appendices delineate the bridge output to be expected and the actual open circuit value of a strain gage calculated from measurements taken with the bridge completed

  11. PETER loop. Multifunctional test facility for thermal hydraulic investigations of PWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzmann, I.; Hille, D.; Staude, U.

    2009-01-01

    The reliable fuel element behavior during the complete fuel cycle is one of the fundamental prerequisites of a safe and efficient nuclear power plant operation. The fuel element behavior with respect to pressure drop and vibration impact cannot be simulated by means of fluid-structure interaction codes. Therefore it is necessary to perform tests using fuel element mock-ups (1:1). AREVA NP has constructed the test facility PETER (PWR fuel element tests in Erlangen) loop. The modular construction allows maximum flexibility for any type of fuel elements. Modern measuring instrumentation for flow, pressure and vibration characterization allows the analysis of cause and consequences of thermal hydraulic phenomena. PETER loop is the standard test facility for the qualification of dynamic fuel element behavior in flowing fluid and is used for failure mode analysis.

  12. Analysis of some antecipated transients without scram for a pressurized water cooled reactor (PWR) using coupling of the containment code CORAN to the system model code ALMOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F. de A.T. de.

    1985-01-01

    Some antecipated transients without scram (ATWS) for a pressurized water cooled reactor, model KWU 1300 MWe, are studied using coupling of the containment code CORAN to the system model code ALMOD, under severe random conditions. This coupling has the objective of including containment model as part of a unified code system. These severe conditions include failure of reactor scram, following a station black-out and emergency power initiation for the burn-up status at the beginning and end of the cycle. Furthermore, for the burn-up status at the end of the cycle a failure in the closure of the pressurizer relief valve was also investigated. For the beginning of the cycle, the containment participates actively during the transient. It is noted that the effect of the burn-up in the fuel is to reduce the seriousness of these transients. On the other hand, the failure in the closure of the pressurized relief valve makes this transients more severe. Moreover, the containment safety or radiological public safety is not affected in any of the cases. (Author) [pt

  13. Valve testing for UK PWR safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.T.; Bryant, S.

    1989-01-01

    Extensive testing and development has been done by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) to support the design, construction and operation of Sizewell B, the UK's first PWR. A Blowdown Rig for the Assessment of Valve Operability - (BRAVO) has been constructed at the CEGB Marchwood Engineering Laboratory to reproduce PWR Pressurizer fluid conditions for the full scale testing of Pressurizer Relief System (PRS) valves. A full size tandem pair of Pilot Operated Safety Relief Valves (POSRVs) is being tested under the full range of pressurizer fluid conditions. Tests to date have produced important data on the performance of the valve in its Cold Overpressure protection mode of operation and on methods for the in-service testing of the valve. Also, a full size pressurizer safety valve has been tested under full PRS fluid conditions to develop a methodology for the pre-service testing of the Sizewell valves. Further work will be carried out to develop procedures for the in-service testing of the valve. In the Main Steam Safety Valve test program carried out at the Siemens-KWU Test Facilities, a single MSSV from three potential suppliers was tested under full secondary system conditions. The test results have been analyzed and are reflected in the CEGB's arrangements for the pre-service and in-service testing of the Sizewell MSSVs. Valves required to interrupt pipebreak flow must be qualified for this duty by testing or a combination of testing and analysis. To obtain guidance on the performance of such tests gate and globe valves have been subjected to simulated pipebreaks under PWR primary circuit conditions. In the light of problems encountered with gate valve closure under these conditions, further tests are currently being carried out on the BRAVO facility on a gate valve, in preparation for the full scale flow interruption qualification testing of the Sizewell main steam isolation valve

  14. Nondestructive examination requirements for PWR vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanner, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements for the nondestructive examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessel internals in accordance with the requirements of the EPRI Material Reliability Program (MRP) inspection standard for PWR internals (MRP-228) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Section XI In-service Inspection. The MRP vessel internals examinations have been performed at nuclear plants in the USA since 2009. The objective of the inspection standard is to provide the requirements for the nondestructive examination (NDE) methods implemented to support the inspection and evaluation of the internals. The inspection standard contains requirements specific to the inspection methodologies involved as well as requirements for qualification of the NDE procedures, equipment and personnel used to perform the vessel internals inspections. The qualification requirements for the NDE systems will be summarized. Six PWR plants in the USA have completed inspections of their internals using the Inspection and Evaluation Guideline (MRP-227) and the Inspection Standard (MRP-228). Examination results show few instances of service-induced degradation flaws, as expected. The few instances of degradation have mostly occurred in bolting

  15. Compilation of three-dimensional coordinates and specific data of the instrumentation of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel/high temperature helium test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausinger, D.

    1977-04-01

    The positions of the thermoelements, strain gauges of various types, and of Gloetzl instruments installed by SGAE in the model vessel of the Common Project Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessel/High Temperature Helium Test Rig are defined in cylindrical coordinates. The specific data of the instruments are given like configuration of multiple instruments; type, group and number of the instrument; number of cable and of channel; calibration factors; resistances of instruments and cables. (author)

  16. In-pile data analysis of the comparative WWER/PWR test IFA-503.1. Final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, B.; Devold, H.; Ryazantzev, E.; Yakovlev, V.

    1999-04-15

    The comparative WWER/PWR test in IFA-503.1 was commenced in July 1995 and successfully finished at the end of November 1998. The main objective of the test was generation of representative and comparative data of standard WWER-440 fuel fabricated at the 'MSZ' Electrostal (Russia) and PWR type fuel manufactured at IFE Kjeller (Norway). The test assembly comprised two clusters, each with 3 WWER rods and 3 PWR type rods. Eight rods with two types of fuel were instrumented with expansion thermometers, four rods were equipped with both fuel stack elongation detectors and pressure transducers. All sensors worked satisfactorily during the test. The average burnups achieved in the lower and upper clusters were around 25 and 20 MWd/kgUO{sub 2}, respectively. Some difference in densification of the two types of fuel was revealed during the first irradiation period. However, the fuel temperatures and commencement of fuel stack swelling were similar despite this fact. At the end of the test the rig was moved to a higher flux position in the HBWR core with the aim of promoting FGR and to compare the behaviour of the two types of fuel under higher power. Pressure measurements indicated a comparable low FGR (around 1 percent) in both types of rods. The centreline temperatures measured in the PWR rods were very close to the Halden FGR threshold whilst the WWER fuel temperatures were slightly lower. Despite the differences found in the behaviour of the two types of fuel during the test, the analysis of the in-pile data showed that these differences would not affect the fuel efficiency, at least, up to the burnup achieved in the test. It is supposed that these differences can be related to the fuel microstructure, in particular to the fuel grain and pore sizes (author) (ml)

  17. In-pile data analysis of the comparative WWER/PWR test IFA-503.1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, B.; Devold, H.; Ryazantzev, E.; Yakovlev, V

    1999-04-15

    The comparative WWER/PWR test in IFA-503.1 was commenced in July 1995 and successfully finished at the end of November 1998. The main objective of the test was generation of representative and comparative data of standard WWER-440 fuel fabricated at the 'MSZ' Electrostal (Russia) and PWR type fuel manufactured at IFE Kjeller (Norway). The test assembly comprised two clusters, each with 3 WWER rods and 3 PWR type rods. Eight rods with two types of fuel were instrumented with expansion thermometers, four rods were equipped with both fuel stack elongation detectors and pressure transducers. All sensors worked satisfactorily during the test. The average burnups achieved in the lower and upper clusters were around 25 and 20 MWd/kgUO{sub 2}, respectively. Some difference in densification of the two types of fuel was revealed during the first irradiation period. However, the fuel temperatures and commencement of fuel stack swelling were similar despite this fact. At the end of the test the rig was moved to a higher flux position in the HBWR core with the aim of promoting FGR and to compare the behaviour of the two types of fuel under higher power. Pressure measurements indicated a comparable low FGR (around 1 percent) in both types of rods. The centreline temperatures measured in the PWR rods were very close to the Halden FGR threshold whilst the WWER fuel temperatures were slightly lower. Despite the differences found in the behaviour of the two types of fuel during the test, the analysis of the in-pile data showed that these differences would not affect the fuel efficiency, at least, up to the burnup achieved in the test. It is supposed that these differences can be related to the fuel microstructure, in particular to the fuel grain and pore sizes (author) (ml)

  18. EPRI PWR primary water chemistry guidelines revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElrath, Joel; Fruzzetti, Keith

    2014-01-01

    EPRI periodically updates the PWR Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines as new information becomes available and as required by NEI 97-06 (Steam Generator Program Guidelines) and NEI 03-08 (Guideline for the Management of Materials Issues). The last revision of the PWR water chemistry guidelines identified an optimum primary water chemistry program based on then-current understanding of research and field information. This new revision provides further details with regard to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), fuel integrity, and shutdown dose rates. A committee of industry experts, including utility specialists, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) and fuel vendor representatives, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) representatives, consultants, and EPRI staff collaborated in reviewing the available data on primary water chemistry, reactor water coolant system materials issues, fuel integrity and performance issues, and radiation dose rate issues. From the data, the committee updated the water chemistry guidelines that all PWR nuclear plants should adopt. The committee revised guidance with regard to optimization to reflect industry experience gained since the publication of Revision 6. Among the changes, the technical information regarding the impact of zinc injection on PWSCC initiation and dose rate reduction has been updated to reflect the current level of knowledge within the industry. Similarly, industry experience with elevated lithium concentrations with regard to fuel performance and radiation dose rates has been updated to reflect data collected to date. Recognizing that each nuclear plant owner has a unique set of design, operating, and corporate concerns, the guidelines committee has retained a method for plant-specific optimization. Revision 7 of the Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines provides guidance for PWR primary systems of all manufacture and design. The guidelines continue to emphasize plant

  19. Development of Cost Estimation Methodology of Decommissioning for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae; Lim, Yong Kyu; Chang, Hyeon Sik; Song, Geun Ho

    2013-01-01

    The permanent closure of nuclear power plant should be conducted with the strict laws and the profound planning including the cost and schedule estimation because the plant is very contaminated with the radioactivity. In Korea, there are two types of the nuclear power plant. One is the pressurized light water reactor (PWR) and the other is the pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) called as CANDU reactor. Also, the 50% of the operating nuclear power plant in Korea is the PWRs which were originally designed by CE (Combustion Engineering). There have been experiences about the decommissioning of Westinghouse type PWR, but are few experiences on that of CE type PWR. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to develop the cost estimation methodology and evaluate technical level of decommissioning for the application to CE type PWR based on the system engineering technology. The aim of present study is to develop the cost estimation methodology of decommissioning for application to PWR. Through the study, the following conclusions are obtained: · Based on the system engineering, the decommissioning work can be classified as Set, Subset, Task, Subtask and Work cost units. · The Set and Task structure are grouped as 29 Sets and 15 Task s, respectively. · The final result shows the cost and project schedule for the project control and risk management. · The present results are preliminary and should be refined and improved based on the modeling and cost data reflecting available technology and current costs like labor and waste data

  20. Reduction of PWR containment pressure after hypothetical accidents by water-cooling of the outer containment surface - annular space spray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, J.; Dietrich, D.P.; Roedder, P.

    1980-12-01

    The consequences of a core melt-out accident in the vicinity of a nuclear power station are determined by the integrity of the safety containment. This can be adversely affected by different events during the course of the core melt-out accident. The most important phenomenon is the contact between the melt and sump water. Due to the evaporation of the sump water, there is a continuous rise in pressure of the safety containment, which finally leads to failure due to excess pressure. In order to reduce the fission product release due to the resulting leakage, one must try to reduce the pressure as quickly as possible. As heat cannot be removed from the steel containment to the environment because of the thick concrete containment, it is best to bypass the insulating effect of the concrete by cooling the steel containment from outside. The aim of this investigation is therefore to work out a technically relatively simple system, which offers the possibility of backfitting, setting to work and repair. Such a system is an annular space spray system, by which the annular space between the concrete and steel containment has water pumped to the level of the dome and evenly sprayed over the top hemisphere. Mobile pumps on fire engines belonging to the fire brigade are sufficient to supply the cooling water and these will be available some hours after the accident occurs. The used spray water without any radioactive components is collected outside the reactor building and/or drained off. (orig./GL) [de

  1. An integrated PWR for marine propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letouze, A.; Marecaux, A.; Rollason, J.; Heap, S.; Foster, A.; Jewer, S.; Thompson, A. C.; Williams, A. M.; Beeley, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Results from a design study for a nuclear propulsion plant utilising a small integrated PWR using many of the inherent safety features of the IRIS design. The design consists of a single pass, low enrichment core housed, together with all associated primary circuit components, within a reactor pressure vessel 10.3 m high and 4.1 m in diameter. Reactor physics calculations were conducted with the codes WIMS9a and MONK8b. The core design contains 21 fuel assemblies each containing 264 UO 2 fuel pins. Each fuel module has a cluster of 24 boron carbide control rods and a central instrumentation channel. The fuel enrichment was 9% in order to achieve the core lifetime requirement of 3000 EFPD at a reactor power of 120 MWth. This gives a discharge burnup of 51,000 MWd/t. To control excess reactivity, two forms of burnable poison are employed: a zirconium dibromide (ZrB 2 ) coating on the fuel compacts, and gadolinium oxide homogeneously mixed in the fuel. Thermal hydraulic calculations were performed using TRAC-P(ND) for steady-state operation and for a number of fault transients. The helical once through steam generators were modelled using heat structure and pipe components and their performance compared to independent calculations including heat transfer correlations for the helical coiled geometry. Intact circuit calculations for steady state were followed by a small break LOCA calculation including the effect of a containment volume which reproduced the gain of coolant effect reported for IRIS. It was demonstrated that the thermal limits were not exceeded for the identified key transients. The dynamic response of the reactor plant to typical power demands was modelled using AcslXtreme software. Several schemes for limiting the power overshoot that was found on rapid increase to full power were examined. It was concluded that the SG must be operated with variable secondary pressure and the best means of reducing power overshoot is to step back the throttle opening

  2. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S D; Kim, J S; Han, S H; Ha, Y K; Song, K S; Jee, K Y

    2009-09-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of (129)I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The (129)I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67+/-3% and 5.43+/-0.53 g, 70+/-7% and 10.40+/-1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of (129)I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, (129)I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher (129)I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g.

  3. A multi-agent design for a pressurized water reactor (P.W.R.) control system; Modelisation multi-agents pour la conduite d'un reacteur a eau sous pression (REP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimar-Lichtenberger, M. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-01-01

    This PhD work is in keeping with the complex industrial process control. The starting point is the analysis of control principles in a Pressurized Water Reactor (P.W.R). In order to cope with the limits of the present control procedures, a new control organisation by objectives and means is defined. This functional organisation is based on the state approach and is characterized by the parallel management of control functions to ensure the continuous control of the installation essential variables. With regard to this complex system problematic, we search the most adapted computer modeling. We show that a multi-agent system approach brings an interesting answer to manage the distribution and parallelism of control decisions and tasks. We present a synthetic study of multi-agent systems and their application fields.The choice of a multi-agent approach proceeds with the design of an agent model. This model gains experiences from other applications. This model is implemented in a computer environment which combines the mechanisms of an object language with Prolog. We propose in this frame a multi-agent modeling of the control system where each function is represented by an agent. The agents are structured in a hierarchical organisation and deal with different abstraction levers of the problem. Following a prototype process, the validation is realized by an implementation and by a coupling to a reactor simulator. The essential contributions of an agent approach turn on the mastery of the system complexity, the openness, the robustness and the potentialities of human-machine cooperation. (author)

  4. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.D.; Kim, J.S.; Han, S.H.; Ha, Y.K.; Song, K.S.; Jee, K.Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of 129 I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The 129 I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67±3% and 5.43±0.53 g, 70±7% and 10.40±1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 129 I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, 129 I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher 129 I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g.

  5. Identification of the excitation source of the pressure vessel vibration in a Soviet built WWER PWR with signal transmission path analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Mourtzanos, K.; Por, G.

    1996-01-01

    Signal transmission path analysis via multivariate auto-regressive modelling was applied at signals recorded at a WWER power reactor (Paks reactor, Hungary). The core is equipped with strings of self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs). Each string has seven SPNDs. The signals were high pass filtered with cut-off at 0.03 Hz and low pass-filtered with cut-off at 25 Hz. The analysis suggests that the source of excitation of all signals at 25 Hz is due to main coolant pump vibration. It was confirmed that there is vibration of main coolant pumps at this frequency due to a bearing problem. Signal transmission path analysis also suggests direct paths from outlet coolant to inlet coolant pressure and in-core neutron detectors at the upper part of the core. (author)

  6. Experimental study on secondary depressurization action for PWR vessel bottom small break LOCA with HPI failure and gas inflow (ROSA-V/LSTF test SB-PV-03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2005-06-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V program to study effects of accident management (AM) measures on core cooling, which is important in case of high pressure injection (HPI) system failure during an SBLOCA at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The LSTF is a full-height and 1/48 volume-scaled facility simulating 4-loop Westinghouse-type PWR (3423 MWt). The experiment, SB-PV-03, simulated a PWR vessel bottom SBLOCA with a rupture of ten instrument-tubes which is equivalent to 0.2% cold leg break. Total HPI failure, non-condensable gas inflow from accumulator injection system (AIS) and operator AM actions on steam generator (SG) secondary depressurization at a rate of -55 K/h and auxiliary feedwater (AFW) supply for 30 minutes were assumed as experiment conditions. It is clarified that the AM actions are effective on primary system depressurization until the end of AIS injection at 1.6 MPa, but thereafter become less effective due to inflow of the non-condensable gas, resulting in delay of low pressure injection (LPI) actuation and whole core heatup under continuous water discharge through the bottom break. The report describes these thermohydraulic phenomena related with transient primary coolant mass and AM actions in addition to estimation of non-condensable gas behavior which affected primary-to-secondary heat transfer. (author)

  7. An experimental study on effective depressurization actions for PWR vessel bottom small break LOCA with HPI failure and gas inflow (ROSA-V test SB-PV-04)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2006-03-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V program to study effects of accident management (AM) measures on core cooling, which are important in case of total failure of high pressure injection (HPI) system during an SBLOCA at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The LSTF is a full-height and 1/48 volume-scaled facility simulating a 4-loop Westing-house-type PWR (3423 MWt). The experiment, SB-PV-04, simulated a PWR vessel bottom SBLOCA with a rupture of ten instrument-tubes which is equivalent to 0.2% cold leg break. It is clarified that AM actions with steam generator (SG) rapid depressurization by fully opening relief valves and auxiliary feedwater supply are effective to avoid core uncovery by actuating the low pressure injection (LPI) system though the primary depressurization is degraded by non-condensable gas inflow to the primary loops from the accumulator injection system. The effective core cooling was established by the rapid depressurization which contributed to preserve larger primary coolant mass than in the previous experiment (SB-PV-03) which was conducted with smaller primary cooling rate of -55 K/h as AM actions. (author)

  8. PWR vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Kinsman, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on PWR pressure vessels which operate under NRC rules and regulatory guides intended to prevent failure of the vessels. Plants failing to meet the operating criteria specified under these rules and regulations are required to analytically demonstrate fitness for service in order to continue operation. The initial flaw size or distribution of initial vessel flaws is a key input to the required vessel integrity analyses. However, the flaw distribution assumed in the development of the NRC Regulations and recommended for the plant specific analyses is potentially over-conservative. This is because the distribution is based on the limited amount of vessel inspection data available at the time the criteria were being developed and does not take full advantage of the more recent and reliable domestic vessel inspection results. The U.S. Department of Energy is funding an effort through Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of developing a new flaw distribution based on the increased amount and improved reliability of domestic vessel inspection data. Results of Phase I of the program indicate that state-of-the-art NDE systems' capabilities are sufficient for development of a new flaw distribution that could ultimately provide life extension benefits over the presently required operating practice

  9. Industrywide survey of PWR organics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, J.E.; Byers, W.A.

    1986-07-01

    Thirteen Pressurized Water reactor (PWR) secondary cycles were sampled for organic acids, total organic carbon, and inorganic anions. The distribution and removal of organics in a makeup water treatment system were investigted at an additional plant. TOC analyses were used for the analysis of makeup water systems; anion ion chromatography and ion exclusion chromatography were used for the analysis of secondary water systems. Additional information on plant operation and water chemistry was collected in a survey. The analytical and survey data were compared and correlations made

  10. Minimization of PWR reactor control rods wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, Pedro; Moura Angelkorte, Gunther de

    1995-01-01

    The Rod Cluster Control Assemblies (RCCA's) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's) have experienced a continuously wall cladding wear when Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) are running. Fretting wear is a result of vibrational contact between RCCA rodlets and the guide cards which provide lateral support for the rodlets when RCCA's are withdrawn from the core. A procedure is developed to minimize the rodlets wear, by the shuffling and axial reposition of RCCA's every operating cycle. These shuffling and repositions are based on measurement of the rodlet cladding thickness of all RCCA's. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Intraocular pressure measurements in relation to head position and through soft contact lenses: comparison of three portable instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ainat; Shemesh, Gabi; Loewenstein, Anat; Kurtz, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    to compare the reproducibility of three portable instruments-the Tono-Pen tonometer (Reichert Ophthalmic Instruments, Depew, NY), the Phosphene tonometer (Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY), and the TERT (Through Eyelid Russian Tonometer; Rjazan State Instrument Making, Rjazan, Russia)-in the measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) with and without soft contact lenses and in different head positions. twenty-six eyes of healthy volunteers were examined by the three instruments while the subjects were sitting, recumbent, and hyperextending their heads, and with and without contact lenses. IOP measurements were compared and the effects of head position and presence of contact lenses on the resultant values were analyzed. the average difference between the recumbent and sitting positions was 3.56, 2.68, and 2.62 mm Hg for the Tono-Pen tonometer, Phosphene tonometer, and TERT, respectively. There was an increase of 5.60, 2.78, and 2.63 mm Hg in hyperextension compared to sitting for the Tono-Pen tonometer, Phosphene tonometer, and TERT, respectively. The difference in the IOP values obtained in the presence and absence of therapeutic contact lens for the three instruments in the three positions was between -1.23 and +1.47 mm Hg. IOP measurements of bedridden patients are only slightly higher than those of sitting patients except for the Tono-Pen tonometer in the hyperextension position. The presence of contact lenses does not affect IOP values obtained by the three evaluated instruments.

  12. Contribution to study and design of PWR plant simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delourme, Didier.

    1980-11-01

    This paper presents an improvement of PICOLO, a package for PWR plants simulation. Its describes principally the integration to the code of a primary loop and pressurizer model and the corresponding control loops. Fast transients are tested on the packages and results are compared with real transients obtained on plants [fr

  13. The new French code for PWR in service inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R; Hutin, J P [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1988-12-31

    This document presents the new french code for pressured water reactor in service inspection. The historic regulatory basis is presented, together with the new regulatory act (dating back to the 26 february 1974) and the major guidelines of the french practice for in service inspection of PWR components. (TEC).

  14. Evaluation of the in-pile pressure data from instrumented fuel assemblies IFA-431 and IFA-432

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, E.R.; Cunningham, M.E.; Lanning, D.D.; Williford, R.E.

    1979-10-01

    This report includes results of the examination of the in-pile pressure data from instrumented test assemblies IFA-431 and 432. The pressure data have been used to estimate the fission gas release fraction as a function of fuel burnup. Included are comparisons of the estimated release functions and those predicted by three fission gas release models using the experimental temperature histories of the fuel rods. These comparisons show that fuel temperature is the primary factor in determining fission gas release and that burnup-enhanced fission gas release is not important in UO 2 fuels irradiated to 1700 GJ/kgU

  15. Evaluation of the radiative transfer in the core of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) during the reflooding step of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerardin, J.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method of resolution of radiative transfer inside a medium of vapor-droplets surrounded by hot walls, in order to couple it with a simulation of the flow at the CFD scale. The scope is the study of the cooling of the core of nuclear reactor following a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The problem of radiative transfer can be cut into two sub problems, one concerning the evaluation of the radiative properties of the medium and a second concerning the solution of the radiative transfer equation. The radiative properties of the droplets have been computed with the use of the Mie Theory and those of the vapor have been computed with a Ck model. The medium made of vapor and droplets is an absorbing, anisotropically scattering, emissive, non grey, non homogeneous medium. Hence, owing to the possible variations of the flow properties (diameter and volumetric fraction of the droplets, temperature and pressure of the vapor), the medium can be optically thin or thick. Consequently, a method is required which solves the radiative transfer accurately, with a moderate calculation time for all of these prerequisites. The IDA has been chosen, derived from the well-known P1-approximation. Its accuracy has been checked on academical cases found in the literature and by comparison with experimental data. Simulations of LOCA flows have been conducted taking account of the radiative transfer, evaluating the radiative fluxes and showing that radiative transfer influence cannot be neglected. (author)

  16. Classification and modelling of functional outputs of computation codes. Application to accidental thermal-hydraulic calculations in pressurized water reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auder, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    This research thesis has been made within the frame of a project on nuclear reactor vessel life. It deals with the use of numerical codes aimed at estimating probability densities for every input parameter in order to calculate probability margins at the output level. More precisely, it deals with codes with one-dimensional functional responses. The author studies the numerical simulation of a pressurized thermal shock on a nuclear reactor vessel, i.e. one of the possible accident types. The study of the vessel integrity relies on a thermal-hydraulic analysis and on a mechanical analysis. Algorithms are developed and proposed for each of them. Input-output data are classified using a clustering technique and a graph-based representation. A method for output dimension reduction is proposed, and a regression is applied between inputs and reduced representations. Applications are discussed in the case of modelling and sensitivity analysis for the CATHARE code (a code used at the CEA for the thermal-hydraulic analysis)

  17. PWR burnable absorber evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Weader, R.J.; Malone, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative neurotic efficiency and fuel cycle cost benefits of PWR burnable absorbers. Establishment of reference low-leakage equilibrium in-core fuel management plans for 12-, 18- and 24-month cycles. Review of the fuel management impact of the integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbium and gadolinium. Calculation of the U 3 O 8 , UF 6 , SWU, fuel fabrication, and burnable absorber requirements for the defined fuel management plans. Estimation of fuel cycle costs of each fuel management plan at spot market and long-term market fuel prices. Estimation of the comparative savings of the different burnable absorbers in dollar equivalent per kgU of fabricated fuel. (author)

  18. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  19. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Infected Wound following Posterior Spinal Instrumentation using Simple Self-assembled System: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CW Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative wound infection in an instrumented spine patient is often disastrous. Management includes implant removal leading to spine instability. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT applied to the spine surgical wound is one of the wound care technique with successful results. We report a case of a man who sustained Chance fracture of Lumbar 1 (L1 vertebra treated with long segment posterior instrumentation, who unfortunately developed Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL positive E. coli infection one month after the operation. After careful debridement of the wound, the implant became exposed. Three cycles of NPWT were applied and the wound healed with granulation tissue completely covering the implant, and thus negating the need to remove the implant. In conclusion, the NPWT is a good alternative in postoperative wound management especially in an instrumented spine patient.

  20. Steam Generator Owners Group PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, C.S. Jr.; Green, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    In 1981 the Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG), a group of domestic and foreign pressurized water reactor (PWR) owners, developed and issued the PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines. The guidelines were prepared in response to the growing recognition that a majority of the problems causing reduced steam generator reliability (e.g., denting, wasteage, pitting, etc.) were related to secondary (steam) side water purity. The guidelines were subsequently issued as an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report. In 1984 they were revised to reflect industry experience in adopting the original issuance and to incorporate new information on causes of corrosion damage. The guidelines have been endorsed and their adoption recommended by the SGOG

  1. Sensitivity of risk parameters to human errors for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, P.; Hall, R.E.; Kerr, W.

    1980-01-01

    Sensitivities of the risk parameters, emergency safety system unavailabilities, accident sequence probabilities, release category probabilities and core melt probability were investigated for changes in the human error rates within the general methodological framework of the Reactor Safety Study for a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Impact of individual human errors were assessed both in terms of their structural importance to core melt and reliability importance on core melt probability. The Human Error Sensitivity Assessment of a PWR (HESAP) computer code was written for the purpose of this study

  2. Advanced ion exchange resins for PWR condensate polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, B.; Tsuzuki, S.

    2002-01-01

    The severe chemical and mechanical requirements of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) condensate polishing plant (CPP) present a major challenge to the design of ion exchange resins. This paper describes the development and initial operating experience of improved cation and anion exchange resins that were specifically designed to meet PWR CPP needs. Although this paper focuses specifically on the ion exchange resins and their role in plant performance, it is also recognized and acknowledged that excellent mechanical design and operation of the CPP system are equally essential to obtaining good results. (authors)

  3. PHEDRE model for the simulation of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Patrice; Dupraz, Remy; Vasile, Alfredo.

    1979-11-01

    This note presents the model of PHEDRE, simulator of a PWR, set on the hybrid computers of CISI, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache. The model mainly concerns the primary part and the steam production of the PWR constructed in France. It includes an axial modelization of the core, the pressurizer, two loops of steam production and the inlet of the turbine, and the regulations concerning these components. The note presents the equations of the model, the structures of the codes concerning the initialization and the dynamic resolution, and describes the control panel of PHEDRE [fr

  4. Leak before break application in French PWR plants under operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faidy, C. [EDF SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-01

    Practical applications of the leak-before break concept are presently limited in French Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) compared to Fast Breeder Reactors. Neithertheless, different fracture mechanic demonstrations have been done on different primary, auxiliary and secondary PWR piping systems based on similar requirements that the American NUREG 1061 specifications. The consequences of the success in different demonstrations are still in discussion to be included in the global safety assessment of the plants, such as the consequences on in-service inspections, leak detection systems, support optimization,.... A large research and development program, realized in different co-operative agreements, completes the general approach.

  5. A Multi-Physics PWR Model for the Load Following

    OpenAIRE

    Muniglia , Mathieu; Do , Jean-Michel; Jean-Charles , Le Pallec; Grard , Hubert; Verel , Sébastien; David , S.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, a new model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is described. This model includes the description of the core as well as a simplified secondary loop: the goal is to reproduce a load-following type transient, where the output power of the plant is controlled by the electric grid. Consequently, the control systems are also modeled, as the control rods or the soluble boron. The reference power plant is a 1300MW electrical PWR, managed with the french G mode.

  6. Project description: ORNL PWR blowdown heat transfer separate-effects program, Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The ORNL Pressurized-Water Reactor Blowdown Heat Transfer (PWR-BDHT) Program is an experimental separate-effects study of the relations among the principal variables that can alter the rate of blowdown, the presence of flow reversal and rereversal, time delay to critical heat flux, the rate at which dryout progresses, and similar time-related functions that are important to LOCA analysis. Primary test results will be obtained from the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF), a large nonnuclear pressurized-water loop that incorporates a 49-rod electrically heated bundle. Supporting experiments will be carried out in two additional test loops - the Forced Convection Test Facility (FCTF), a small high-pressure facility in which single heater rods can be tested in annular geometry; and an air-water loop which is used to evaluate two-phase flow-measuring instrumentation

  7. Swing-Down of 21-PWR Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.K. Scheider

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) swinging down from a horizontally suspended height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 13). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 18) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design of the type of 21-PWR WP design considered in this calculation and provides the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design

  8. Seismic qualification of PWR plant auxiliary feedwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Tsai, N.C.

    1983-08-01

    The NRC Standard Review Plan specifies that the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is a safeguard system that functions in the event of a Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) to remove the decay heat via the steam generator. Only recently licensed PWR plants have an AFW system designed to the current Standard Review Plan specifications. The NRC devised the Multiplant Action Plan C-14 in order to make a survey of the seismic capability of the AFW systems of operating PWR plants. The purpose of this survey is to enable the NRC to make decisions regarding the need of requiring the licensees to upgrade the AFW systems to an SSE level of seismic capability. To implement the first phase of the C-14 plan, the NRC issued a Generic Letter (GL) 81-14 to all operating PWR licensees requesting information on the seismic capability of their AFW systems. This report summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's efforts to assist the NRC in evaluating the status of seismic qualification of the AFW systems in 40 PWR plants, by reviewing the licensees' responses to GL 81-14

  9. Implementation in free software of the PWR type university nucleo electric simulator (SU-PWR); Implementacion en software libre del simulador universitario de nucleoelectrica tipo PWR (SU-PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Hidago H, F.; Morales S, J.B. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx

    2007-07-01

    Presently work is shown like was carried out the implementation of the University Simulator of Nucleo-electric type PWR (SU-PWR). The implementation of the simulator was carried out in a free software simulation platform, as it is Scilab, what offers big advantages that go from the free use and without cost of the product, until the codes modification so much of the system like of the program with the purpose of to improve it or to adapt it to future routines and/or more advanced graphic interfaces. The SU-PWR shows the general behavior of a PWR nuclear plant (Pressurized Water Reactor) describing the dynamics of the plant from the generation process of thermal energy in the nuclear fuel, going by the process of energy transport toward the coolant of the primary circuit the one which in turn transfers this energy to the vapor generators of the secondary circuit where the vapor is expanded by means of turbines that in turn move the electric generator producing in this way the electricity. The pressurizer that is indispensable for the process is also modeled. Each one of these stages were implemented in scicos that is the Scilab tool specialized in the simulation. The simulation was carried out by means of modules that contain the differential equation that mathematically models each stage or equipment of the PWR plant. The result is a series of modules that based on certain entrances and characteristic of the system they generate exits that in turn are the entrance to other module. Because the SU-PWR is an experimental project in early phase, it is even work and modifications to carry out, for what the models that are presented in this work can vary a little the being integrated to the whole system to simulate, but however they already show clearly the operation and the conformation of the plant. (Author)

  10. Residual life assessment of French PWR vessel head penetrations through metallurgical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, C.; Boudot, R.; Benhamou, C.; Gelpi, A.

    1994-01-01

    In September 1991, a vessel head penetration was found leaking at Bugey 3 plant during the hydrotest included in the framework of decennial In Service Inspections. Non destructive examinations performed afterwards on several other plants have shown some cracked penetrations. Destructive expertise confirmed quickly that again this new problem is related to stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 used as base material. During the last 15 years, similar cracking have been met in steam generator tubes and secondly in pressurizer instrumentation tubes. In spite of all the work performed since that time an extension appears to be necessary for explaining the features of this new event; however material sensitivity, stress and temperature still remain the key parameters governing the behavior of Alloy 600 in PWR environment. In this paper, only the material sensitivity of vessel head penetrations is examined through metallurgical analysis in relation with SCC tests. On the basis of vessel head field experience in combination with thermomechanical process used for fabrication of original bars criteria for a sensitivity ranking of penetrations are proposed. Metallurgical investigations and SCC tests were carried out to support this sensitivity ranking. The final aim is to use such information among those quoted above for assessment of vessel heads residual life. This document is an overview of the work performed in France concerning the material sensitivity of forged Alloy 600. It represents an important part of the assessments and investigations undertaken in France on the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon affecting the reactor vessel head penetrations in PWR's

  11. French PWR Safety Philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    The first 900 MWe units, built under the American Westinghouse licence and with reference to the U. S. regulation, were followed by 28 standardized units, C P1 and C P2 series. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. As early as 1976, this experience was taken into account by French Safety organisms to discuss, with Electricite de France, the safety options for the planned 1300 MWe units, P4 and P4 series. In 1983, the new reactor scheduled, Ni4 series 1400 MWe, is a totally French design which satisfies the French regulations and other French standards and codes. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach each of them having possibilities and limits. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from operating experience have contributed to the French safety philosophy improvement. The methodology now applied to safety evaluation develops a new facet of the in depth defense concept by taking highly unlikely events into consideration, by developing the search of safety consistency of the design, and by completing the deterministic approach by the probabilistic one

  12. Measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow around horizontal tube bundle using SF6-water. Simulating high-pressure high-temperature gas-liquid two-phase flow of PWR/SG secondary coolant side at normal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Imai, Ryoj; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve prediction accuracy of analysis code used for design and development of industrial products, technology had been developed to create and evaluate constitutive equation incorporated in analysis code. The experimental facility for PWR/SG U tubes part was manufactured to measure local void fraction and gas-liquid interfacial velocity with forming gas-liquid upward two-phase flow simulating high-pressure high-temperature secondary coolant (water-steam) rising vertically around horizontal tube bundle. The experimental facility could reproduce flow field having gas-liquid density ratio equivalent to real system with no heating using SF6 (Sulfur Hexafluoride) gas at normal temperature and pressure less than 1 MPa, because gas-liquid density ratio, surface tension and gas-liquid viscosity ratio were important parameters to determine state of gas-liquid two-phase flow and gas-liquid density ratio was most influential. Void fraction was measured by two different methods of bi-optical probe and conductivity type probe. Test results of gas-liquid interfacial velocity vs. apparent velocity were in good agreement with existing empirical equation within 10% error, which could confirm integrity of experimental facility and appropriateness of measuring method so as to set up original constitutive equation in the future. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Optical fiber Bragg grating-instrumented silicone liner for interface pressure measurement within prosthetic sockets of lower-limb amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fakih, Ebrahim; Arifin, Nooranida; Pirouzi, Gholamhossein; Mahamd Adikan, Faisal Rafiq; Shasmin, Hanie Nadia; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-instrumented prosthetic silicone liner that provides cushioning for the residual limb and can successfully measure interface pressures inside prosthetic sockets of lower-limb amputees in a simple and practical means of sensing. The liner is made of two silicone layers between which 12 FBG sensors were embedded at locations of clinical interest. The sensors were then calibrated using a custom calibration platform that mimics a real-life situation. Afterward, a custom gait simulating machine was built to test the liner performance during an amputee's simulated gait. To validate the findings, the results were compared to those obtained by the commonly used F-socket mats. As the statistical findings reveal, both pressure mapping methods measured the interface pressure in a consistent way, with no significant difference (P-values ≥0.05). This pressure mapping technique in the form of a prosthetic liner will allow prosthetics professionals to quickly and accurately create an overall picture of the interface pressure distribution inside sockets in research and clinical settings, thereby improving the socket fit and amputee's satisfaction.

  14. PWR reactor pressure vessel failure probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.; Lanore, J.M.; Lucia, A.C.; Elbaz, J.; Brunnhuber, R.

    1980-05-01

    To evaluate the rupture probability of a LWR vessel a probabilistic method using the fracture mechanics under probabilistic form has been proposed previously, but it appears that more accurate evaluation is possible. In consequence a joint collaboration agreement signed in 1976 between CEA, EURATOM, JRC Ispra and FRAMATOME set up and started a research program covering three parts: a computer code development, data acquisition and processing, and a support experimental program which aims at clarifying the most important parameters used in the COVASTOL computer code

  15. Chemical decontamination solutions: Effects on PWR equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezze, C.M.; Colvin, E.R.; Aspden, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical objective for the nuclear industry is the reduction of personnel exposure to radiation. Reductions have been achieved through industry's radiation management programs including training and radiation awareness concepts. Increased plant maintenance and higher radiation fields at many sites continue to raise concerns. To alleviate the radiation exposure problem, the sources of radiation which contribute to personnel exposure must be removed from the plant. A feasible was of significantly reducing these sources from a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is to chemically decontaminate the entire reactor coolant system (RCS). A program was conducted to determine the technical acceptability of using certain dilute chemical solvent processes for full RCS chemical decontamination. The two processes evaluated were CAN-DEREM and LOMI. The purpose of the program was to define and complete a systematic evaluation of the major issues that need to be addressed for the successful decontamination of the entire RCS and affected portions of the auxiliary systems of a four-loop PWR system. A test program was designed to evaluate the corrosion effects of the two decontamination processes under expected plant conditions. Materials and sample configurations dictated by generic PWR components were evaluated. The testing also included many standard corrosion coupons. The test data were then used to assess the impact of chemical decontamination on the physical condition and operability of the components, equipment and mechanical systems that make up the RCS. An overview of the test program, sample configurations, data and engineering evaluations is presented. The data demonstrate that through detailed engineering evaluations of corrosion data and equipment function, the impact of full RCS chemical decontamination on plant equipment is established

  16. Simplified model of a PWR primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.L.; Faya, A.J.G.

    1988-07-01

    The computer program RENUR was developed to perform a very simplified simulation of a typical PWR primary circuit. The program has mathematical models for the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor core and the pressurizer, the rest of the circuit being treated as a single volume. Heat conduction in the fuel rod is analyzed by a nodal model. Average and hot channels are treated so that bulk response of the core and DNBR can be evaluated. A homogenenous model is employed in the pressurizer. Results are presented for a steady-state situation as well as for a loss of load transient. Agreement with the results of more elaborate computer codes is good with substantial reduction in computer costs. (author) [pt

  17. Design and Testing of a Controller for the Martian Atmosphere Pressure and Humidity Instrument DREAMS-P/H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapani Nikkanen, Timo; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri

    2013-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA), driven by the goal of performing a soft landing on Mars, is planning to launch the Entry, descent and landing Demonstrator Module (EDM)[1] simultaneously with the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) as a part of the ExoMars program towards Mars in 2016. As a secondary objective, the EDM will gather meteorological data and observe the electrical environment of the landing site with its Dust characterisation, Risk assessment, and Environmental Analyser on the Martian Surface (DREAMS). The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) is participating in the project by designing, building and testing a pressure and a humidity instrument for Mars, named DREAMS-P and DREAMS-H, respectively. The instruments are based on previous FMI designs, including ones flown on board the Huygens, Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory.[2] Traditionally, the FMI pressure and humidity instruments have been controlled by an FPGA. However, the need to incorporate more autonomy and modifiability into instruments, cut the development time and component costs, stimulated interest to study a Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Microcontroller Unit (MCU) based instrument design. Thus, in the DREAMS-P/H design, an automotive MCU is used as the instrument controller. The MCU has been qualified for space by tests in and outside FMI. The DREAMS-P/H controller command and data interface utilizes a RS-422 connection to receive telecommands from and to transmit data to the Central Electronics Unit (CEU) of the DREAMS science package. The two pressure transducers of DREAMS-P and one humidity transducer of DREAMS-H are controlled by a single MCU. The MCU controls the power flow for each transducer and performs pulse counting measurements on sensor and reference channels to retrieve scientific data. Pressure and humidity measurements are scheduled and set up according to a configuration table assigned to each transducer. The configuration tables can be modified during the flight. The whole

  18. The development of flow test technology for PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Cha, Chong Hee; Chung, Chang Hwan; Chun, Se Young; Song, Chul Hwa; Chung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yeun; Cho, Yeong Rho; Kim, Bok Deuk

    1988-05-01

    KAERI has an extensive program to develope PWR fuel assembly. In relation to the program, development of flow test technology is needed to evaluate the thermal hydraulic compactibility and mechanical integrity of domestically fabricated nuclear fuels. A high-pressure and high-temperature flow test facility was designed to test domestically fabricated fuel assembly. The test section of the facility has capacity of a 6x6 full length PWR fuel assembly. A flow test rig was designed and installed at Cold Test Loop to carry out model experiments with 5x5 rod assembly under atmosphere pressure to get information about the characteristics of pressure loss of spacer grids and velocity distribution in the subchannels. LDV measuring technology was established using TSI's Laser Dopper Velocimeter 9100-3 System

  19. Using cognitive pre-testing methods in the development of a new evidenced-based pressure ulcer risk assessment instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Coleman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in development methods of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Instruments has led to inconsistent inclusion of risk factors and concerns about content validity. A new evidenced-based Risk Assessment Instrument, the Pressure Ulcer Risk Primary Or Secondary Evaluation Tool - PURPOSE-T was developed as part of a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR funded Pressure Ulcer Research Programme (PURPOSE: RP-PG-0407-10056. This paper reports the pre-test phase to assess and improve PURPOSE-T acceptability, usability and confirm content validity. Methods A descriptive study incorporating cognitive pre-testing methods and integration of service user views was undertaken over 3 cycles comprising PURPOSE-T training, a focus group and one-to-one think-aloud interviews. Clinical nurses from 2 acute and 2 community NHS Trusts, were grouped according to job role. Focus group participants used 3 vignettes to complete PURPOSE-T assessments and then participated in the focus group. Think-aloud participants were interviewed during their completion of PURPOSE-T. After each pre-test cycle analysis was undertaken and adjustment/improvements made to PURPOSE-T in an iterative process. This incorporated the use of descriptive statistics for data completeness and decision rule compliance and directed content analysis for interview and focus group data. Data were collected April 2012-June 2012. Results Thirty-four nurses participated in 3 pre-test cycles. Data from 3 focus groups, 12 think-aloud interviews incorporating 101 PURPOSE-T assessments led to changes to improve instrument content and design, flow and format, decision support and item-specific wording. Acceptability and usability were demonstrated by improved data completion and appropriate risk pathway allocation. The pre-test also confirmed content validity with clinical nurses. Conclusions The pre-test was an important step in the development of the preliminary PURPOSE-T and the

  20. Preliminary study of the economics of enriching PWR fuel with a fusion hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.L.

    1978-09-01

    This study is a comparison of the economics of enriching uranium oxide for pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant fuel using a fusion hybrid reactor versus the present isotopic enrichment process. The conclusion is that privately owned hybrid fusion reactors, which simultaneously produce electrical power and enrich fuel, are competitive with the gaseous diffusion enrichment process if spent PWR fuel rods are reenriched without refabrication. Analysis of irradiation damage effects should be performed to determine if the fuel rod cladding can withstand the additional irradiation in the hybrid and second PWR power cycle. The cost competitiveness shown by this initial study clearly justifies further investigations

  1. On site PWR fuel inspection measurements for operational and design verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The on-site inspection of irradiated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel and Non-Fuel Bearing Components (NFBC) is typically limited to visual inspections during refuelings using underwater TV cameras and is intended primarily to confirm whether the components will continue in operation. These inspections do not normally provide data for design verification nor information to benefit future fuel designs. Japanese PWR utilities and Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd. designed, built, and performed demonstration tests of on-site inspection equipment that confirms operational readiness of PWR fuel and NFBC and also gathers data for design verification of these components. 4 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Novel instrument for high-pressure research at ultra-high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiferl, D.; Katz, A.I.; Mills, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    A resistively heated diamond-anvil cell has been used to achieve pressures of 110 kbar at temperatures exceeding 1200 0 C for periods long enough to collect x-ray powder diffraction data with energy-dispersive techniques using ''white'' x-radiation produced at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. 9 refs., 1 fig

  3. Advanced high conversion PWR: preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfier, H.; Bellanger, V.; Bergeron, A.; Dolci, F.; Gastaldi, B.; Koberl, O.; Mignot, G.; Thevenot, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, physical aspects of a HCPWR (High Conversion Light Water Reactor), which is an innovative PWR fuelled with mixed oxide and having a higher conversion ratio due to a lower moderation ratio. Moderation ratios lower than unity are considered which has led to low moderation PWR fuel assembly designs. The objectives of this parametric study are to define a feasibility area with regard to the following neutronic aspects: moderation ratio, Pu loading, reactor spectrum, irradiation time, and neutronic coefficients. Important thermohydraulic parameters are the pressure drop, the critical heat flux, the maximum temperature in the fuel rod and the pumping power. The thermohydraulic analysis shows that a range of moderation ratios from 0.8 to 1.2 is technically possible. A compromise between improved fuel utilization and research and development effort has been found for the moderation ration of about 1. The parametric study shows that there are 2 ranges of interest for the moderation ratio: -) moderation ratio between 0.8 and 1.2 with reduced fissile heights (> 3 m), hexagonal arrangement fuel assembly and square arrangement fuel assembly are possible; and -) moderation between 0.6 and 0.7 with a modification of the reactor operating conditions (reduction of the primary flow and of the thermal power), the fuel rods could be arranged inside a hexagonal fuel rod assembly. (A.C.)

  4. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  5. Sizewell 'B' PWR reference design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The reference design for a PWR power station to be constructed as Sizewell 'B' is presented in 3 volumes containing 14 chapters and in a volume of drawings. The report describes the proposed design and provides the basis upon which the safety case and the Pre-Construction Safety Report have been prepared. The station is based on a 3425MWt Westinghouse PWR providing steam to two turbine generators each of 600 MW. The layout and many of the systems are based on the SNUPPS design for Callaway which has been chosen as the US reference plant for the project. (U.K.)

  6. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  7. Instrumentation for determining rock mass permeability by hydro-pneumatic pressure testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    In order to eliminate the problems encountered with existing pressure test equipment, a downhole control unit was designed for conducting tests in NX boreholes. The unit maintains a preset minimum differential pressure between the packers and the test section, and controls inflation and deflation of the packers. The packer response to inflation and deflation commands is greatly increased in deep borings since the control unit is located downhole, and inflation is accomplished with the testing fluid (which is normally either water or air). For increased flexibility, the control unit was designed with the capacity for operating as either a single- or double-packer system by the use of simple ground surface control commands

  8. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Material Samples: Tensile and SSRT Testing (Nonproprietary Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, M.; Shogan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs requires detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel (internals) subjected to such conditions. This project studied the effects of reactor service on the mechanical and corrosion properties of samples of baffle plate, former plate, and core barrel from a decommissioned PWR

  9. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Materials Samples: Material Certification, Fluence, and Temperature (Nonproprietary Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, M.; Shogan, R.; Fero, A.; Snyder, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores, operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs require detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel. This report contains basic material characterization information of the as-installed samples of reactor internals material which were harvested from a decommissioned PWR

  10. Irradiation behavior of German PWR RPV steels under operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, J.; Hein, H. [AREVA NP Gmbh (Germany); Ganswind, J. [VGB PowerTech e.V. (Germany); Widera, M. [RWE Power AG (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In 2007, the last standard surveillance capsule of the original RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) surveillance programs of the 11 currently operating German PWR has been evaluated. With it the standard irradiation surveillance programs of these plants was completed. In the present paper, irradiation data of these surveillance programs will be presented and a final assessment of the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels with respect to current standards KTA 3203 and Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2 will be given. Data from two units which are currently under decommissioning will also be included, so that data from all 13 German PWR manufactured by the former Siemens/KWU company (now AREVA NP GmbH) are shown. It will be shown that all surveillance data within the approved area of chemical composition verify the limit curve RT(limit) of the KTA 3203, which is the relevant safety standard for these plants. An analysis of the data shows, that the prediction formulas of Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2 Pos. 1 or from the TTS model tend to overestimate the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels. Possible reasons for this behavior are discussed. Additionally, the data will be compared to data from the research project CARISMA to demonstrate that these data are representative for the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels. Since the data of these research projects cover a larger neutron fluence range than the original surveillance data, they offer a future outlook into the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels under long term conditions. In general, as a consequence of the relatively large and beneficial water gap between core and RPV, especially in all Siemens/KWU 4-loop PWR, the EOL neutron fluence and therefore the irradiation induced changes in mechanical properties of the German PWR RPV materials are rather low. Moreover the irradiation data indicate that the optimized RPV materials specifications that have been applied in particular for the

  11. Remote Monitoring and Instrumentation Strategies for Integral Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Lish, Matthew R.; Tarver, Rayan A.; Hines, J. Wesley

    2014-01-01

    The University of Tennessee is engaged in research and development projects related to instrumentation and controls for small modular reactors (SMR) and integral pressurized water reactors (iPWR). The approach incorporates the deployment of physics-based models for control design and parameter estimation, development of noncontact sensors for flow monitoring, and placement of sensors to maximize fault detection and isolation. The results of research and development illustrate the feasibility of sensor location in space-constrained environment. Major issues and challenges in I and C design are addressed

  12. Remote Monitoring and Instrumentation Strategies for Integral Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Lish, Matthew R.; Tarver, Rayan A.; Hines, J. Wesley [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The University of Tennessee is engaged in research and development projects related to instrumentation and controls for small modular reactors (SMR) and integral pressurized water reactors (iPWR). The approach incorporates the deployment of physics-based models for control design and parameter estimation, development of noncontact sensors for flow monitoring, and placement of sensors to maximize fault detection and isolation. The results of research and development illustrate the feasibility of sensor location in space-constrained environment. Major issues and challenges in I and C design are addressed.

  13. Development of instrumentation systems for severe accidents. 4. New accident tolerant in-containment pressure transducer for containment pressure monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Masato; Teruya, Kuniyuki; Yoshitsugu, Makoto; Ikeuchi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (TF-1 accident) caused severe situations and resulted in a difficulty in measuring important parameters for monitoring plant conditions. Therefore, we have studied the TF-1 accident to select the important parameters that should be monitored at the severe accident and are developing the Severe Accident Instrumentations and Monitoring Systems that could measure the parameters in severe accident conditions. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD (MHI) developed a new accident tolerant containment pressure monitoring system and demonstrated that the monitoring system could endure extremely harsh environmental conditions that envelop severe accident environmental conditions inside a containment such as maximum operating temperature of up to 300degC and total integrated dose (TID) of 1 MGy gamma. The new containment pressure monitoring system comprises of a strain gage type pressure transducer and a mineral insulated (MI) cable with ceramic connectors, which are located in the containment, and a strain measuring amplifier located outside the containment. Less thermal and radiation degradation is achieved because of minimizing use of organic materials for in-containment equipment such as the transducer and connectors. Several tests were performed to demonstrate the performance and capability of the in-containment equipment under severe accident environmental conditions and the major steps in this testing were run in the following test sequences: (1) the baseline functional tests (e.g., repeatability, non-linearity, hysteresis, and so on) under normal conditions, (2) accident radiation testing, (3) seismic testing, and (4) steam/temperature test exposed to simulated severe accident environmental conditions. The test results demonstrate that the new pressure transducer can endure the simulated severe accident conditions. (author)

  14. Influence of boron reduction strategies on PWR accident management flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papukchiev, Angel Aleksandrov; Liu, Yubo; Schaefer, Anselm

    2007-01-01

    In conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, soluble boron is used for reactivity control over core fuel cycle. Design changes to reduce boron concentration in the reactor coolant are of general interest regarding three aspects - improved reactivity feedback properties, lower impact of boron dilution scenarios on PWR safety and eventually more flexible accident management procedures. In order to assess the potential advantages through the introduction of boron reduction strategies in current PWRs, two low boron core configurations based on fuel with increased utilization of gadolinium and erbium burnable absorbers have been developed. The new PWR designs permit to reduce the natural boron concentration in reactor coolant at begin of cycle to 518 ppm and 805 ppm. For the assessment of the potential safety advantages of these cores a hypothetical beyond design basis accident has been simulated with the system code ATHLET. The analyses showed improved inherent safety and increased accident management flexibility of the low boron cores in comparison with the standard PWR. (author)

  15. Effects of Burnable Absorbers on PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, P.M.; Pitts, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing issue in designing and licensing transportation and storage casks for spent nuclear fuel (SNF). To address this issue, in July 1999, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Spent Fuel Project Office, issued Interim Staff Guidance-8 (ISG-8), Revision 1 allowing limited burnup credit for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be used in transport and storage casks. However, one of the key limitations for a licensing basis analysis as stipulated in ISG-8, Revision 1 is that ''burnup credit is restricted to intact fuel assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers''. Because many PWR fuel designs have incorporated burnable-absorber rods for more than twenty years, this restriction places an unnecessary burden on the commercial nuclear power industry. This paper summarizes the effects of in-reactor irradiation on the isotopic inventory of PWR fuels containing different types of integral burnable absorbers (BAs). The work presented is illustrative and intended to represent typical magnitudes of the reactivity effects from depleting PWR fuel with different types of burnable absorbers

  16. PWR plant transient analyses using TRAC-PF1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, J.R.; Boyack, B.E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes some of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) transient analyses performed at Los Alamos for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC-PF1). Many of the transient analyses performed directly address current PWR safety issues. Included in this paper are examples of two safety issues addressed by TRAC-PF1. These examples are pressurized thermal shock (PTS) and feed-and-bleed cooling for Oconee-1. The calculations performed were plant specific in that details of both the primary and secondary sides were modeled in addition to models of the plant integrated control systems. The results of these analyses show that for these two transients, the reactor cores remained covered and cooled at all times posing no real threat to the reactor system nor to the public

  17. A concept of PWR using plate and shell heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de

    2015-01-01

    In previous work it was verified the physical possibility of using plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in a PWR for merchant ships. This work studies the possibility of using GESMEX commercial of the shelf plate and shell heat exchanger of series XPS. It was found it is feasible for this type of heat exchanger to meet operational and accidental requirements for steam generation in PWR. Additionally, it is proposed an arrangement of such heat exchangers inside the reactor pressure vessel. Such arrangement may avoid ANSI/ANS51.1 nuclear class I requirements on those heat exchangers because they are contained in the reactor coolant pressure barrier and play no role in accidental scenarios. Additionally, those plates work under compression, preventing the risk of rupture. Being considered non-nuclear safety, having a modular architecture and working under compression may turn such architectural choice a must to meet safety objectives with improved economics. (author)

  18. A concept of PWR using plate and shell heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: luciano.ondir@gmail.com, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In previous work it was verified the physical possibility of using plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in a PWR for merchant ships. This work studies the possibility of using GESMEX commercial of the shelf plate and shell heat exchanger of series XPS. It was found it is feasible for this type of heat exchanger to meet operational and accidental requirements for steam generation in PWR. Additionally, it is proposed an arrangement of such heat exchangers inside the reactor pressure vessel. Such arrangement may avoid ANSI/ANS51.1 nuclear class I requirements on those heat exchangers because they are contained in the reactor coolant pressure barrier and play no role in accidental scenarios. Additionally, those plates work under compression, preventing the risk of rupture. Being considered non-nuclear safety, having a modular architecture and working under compression may turn such architectural choice a must to meet safety objectives with improved economics. (author)

  19. A study on effective system depressurization during a PWR vessel bottom break LOCA with HPI failure and gas inflow prevention. ROSA-V/LSTF test SB-PV-05

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2006-11-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V program to study effects of accident management (AM) measures on core cooling, which are important in case of total failure of high pressure injection (HPI) system during an SBLOCA at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The LSTF is a full-height and 1/48 volume-scaled facility simulating a 4-loop Westinghouse-type PWR (3423 MWt). The experiment, SB-PV-05, simulated a PWR vessel bottom SBLOCA with a rupture of nine instrument tubes, which is equivalent to 0.18% cold leg break. It is clarified that AM actions with steam generator (SG) depressurization to achieve a primary loop cooling rate at -55 K/h and auxiliary feedwater supply for 30 minutes are effective to avoid core uncovery by actuating the low pressure injection (LPI) system. It is also shown through the comparison with the previous experiment of SB-PV-03 that prevention of non-condensable gas inflow from the accumulator injection system (AIS) is very important to actuate the LPI to achieve adequate core cooling. This report presents experiment results of SB-PV-05 in detail and shows the effects of gas inflow prevention on core cooling through the estimation of primary coolant mass and energy balance in the primary system. (author)

  20. Chemical cleaning of nuclear (PWR) steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, C.S. Jr.; Mundis, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on a significant research program sponsored by a group of utilities (the Steam Generator Owners Group), which was undertaken to develop a process to chemically remove corrosion product deposits from the secondary side of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant steam generators. Results of this work have defined a process (solvent system and application methods) that is capable of removing sludge and tube-to-tube support plate crevice corrosion products generated during operation with all-volatile treatment (AVT) water chemistry. Considers a plant-specific test program that includes all materials in the steam generator to be cleaned and accounts for the physical locations (proximity and contact) of those materials. Points out that prior to applying the process in an operational unit, the utility, with the participation of the NSSR vendor, must define allowable total corrosion to the materials of construction of the unit

  1. Improvement on main control room for Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumiya, Masayuki

    1996-01-01

    The main control room which is the information center of nuclear power plant has been continuously improved utilizing the state of the art ergonomics, a high performance computer, computer graphic technologies, etc. For the latest Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant, the CRT monitoring system is applied as the major information source for facilitating operators' plant monitoring tasks. For an operating plant, enhancement of monitoring and logging functions has been made adopting a high performance computer

  2. Natural circulation in a scaled PWR integral test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiang, R.L.; Jeuck, P.R. III

    1987-01-01

    Natural circulation is an important mechanism for cooling a nuclear power plant under abnormal operating conditions. To study natural circulation, we modeled a type of pressurized water reactor (PWR) that incorporates once-through steam generators. We conducted tests of single-phase natural circulations, two-phase natural circulations, and a boiler condenser mode. Because of complex geometry, the natural circulations observed in this facility exhibit some phenomena not commonly seen in a simple thermosyphon loop

  3. PWR surveillance based on correspondence between empirical models and physical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, G.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kerlin, T.W.

    1976-01-01

    An on line surveillance method based on the correspondence between empirical models and physicals models is proposed for pressurized water reactors. Two types of empirical models are considered as well as the mathematical models defining the correspondence between the physical and empirical parameters. The efficiency of this method is illustrated for the surveillance of the Doppler coefficient for Oconee I (an 886 MWe PWR) [fr

  4. SACHET, Dynamic Fission Products Inventory in PWR Multiple Compartment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Hideki

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SACHET evaluates the dynamic fission product inventories in the multiple compartment system of pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants. 2 - Method of solution: SACHET utilizes a matrix of fission product core inventory which is previously calculated by the ORIGEN code. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Liquid wastes such as chemical waste and detergent waste are not included

  5. Atmospheric-pressure electric discharge as an instrument of chemical activation of water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkin, V. V.; Shutov, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    Results of experimental studies and numerical simulations of physicochemical characteristics of plasmas generated in different types of atmospheric-pressure discharges (pulsed streamer corona, gliding electric arc, dielectric barrier discharge, glow-discharge electrolysis, diaphragmatic discharge, and dc glow discharge) used to initiate various chemical processes in water solutions are analyzed. Typical reactor designs are considered. Data on the power supply characteristics, plasma electron parameters, gas temperatures, and densities of active particles in different types of discharges excited in different gases and their dependences on the external parameters of discharges are presented. The chemical composition of active particles formed in water is described. Possible mechanisms of production and loss of plasma particles are discussed.

  6. Instrument for evaluation of sedentary lifestyle in patients with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; da Silva, Viviane Martins; de Araujo, Thelma Leite; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; Martins, Larissa Castelo Guedes; Teixeira, Iane Ximenes

    2015-01-01

    this article describes the diagnostic accuracy of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire to identify the nursing diagnosis of sedentary lifestyle. a diagnostic accuracy study was developed with 240 individuals with established high blood pressure. The analysis of diagnostic accuracy was based on measures of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, likelihood ratios, efficiency, diagnostic odds ratio, Youden index, and area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. statistical differences between genders were observed for activities of moderate intensity and for total physical activity. Age was negatively correlated with activities of moderate intensity and total physical activity. the analysis of area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for moderate intensity activities, walking, and total physical activity showed that the International Physical Activity Questionnaire present moderate capacity to correctly classify individuals with and without sedentary lifestyle.

  7. Aqueous Boric acid injection facility of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi; Iwami, Masao.

    1996-01-01

    If a rupture should be caused in a secondary system of a PWR type reactor, pressure of a primary coolant recycling system is lowered, and a back flow check valve is opened in response to the lowering of the pressure. Then, low temperature aqueous boric acid in the lower portion of a pressurized tank is flown into the primary coolant recycling system based on the pressure difference, and the aqueous boric acid reaches the reactor core together with coolants to suppress reactivity. If the injection is continued, high temperature aqueous boric acid in the upper portion boils under a reduced pressure, further urges the low temperature aqueous boric acid in the lower portion by the steam pressure and injects the same to the primary system. The aqueous boric acid stream from the pressurized tank flowing by self evaporation of the high temperature aqueous boric acid itself is rectified by a rectifying device to prevent occurrence of vortex flow, and the steam is injected in a state of uniform stream. When the pressure in the pressurized tank is lowered, a bypass valve is opened to introduce the high pressure fluid of primary system into the pressurized tank to keep the pressure to a predetermined value. When the pressure in the pressurized tank is elevated to higher than the pressure of the primary system, a back flow check valve is opened, and high pressure aqueous boric acid is flown out of the pressurized tank to keep the pressure to a predetermined value. (N.H.)

  8. The Hydraulic Test Procedure for Non-instrumented Irradiation Test Rig of Annular Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Park, Chan Kook

    2008-08-15

    This report presents the procedure of pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test for the non-instrumented rig using the irradiation test in HANARO of advanced PWR annular fuel which were designed and fabricated by KAERI. From the out-pile thermal hydraulic tests, confirm the flow rate at the 200 kPa pressure drop and measure the RMS displacement at this time. And the endurance test is confirmed the wear and the integrity of the non-instrumented rig at the 110% design flow rate. This out-pile test perform the Flow-Induced Vibration and Pressure Drop Experimental Tester(FIVPET) facility. The instruments in FIVPET facility was calibrated in KAERI and the pump and the thermocouple were certified by manufacturer.

  9. Applanation optical coherence elastography: noncontact measurement of intraocular pressure, corneal biomechanical properties, and corneal geometry with a single instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manmohan; Han, Zhaolong; Nair, Achuth; Schill, Alexander; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Current clinical tools provide critical information about ocular health such as intraocular pressure (IOP). However, they lack the ability to quantify tissue material properties, which are potent markers for ocular tissue health and integrity. We describe a single instrument to measure the eye-globe IOP, quantify corneal biomechanical properties, and measure corneal geometry with a technique termed applanation optical coherence elastography (Appl-OCE). An ultrafast OCT system enabled visualization of corneal dynamics during noncontact applanation tonometry and direct measurement of micro air-pulse induced elastic wave propagation. Our preliminary results show that the proposed Appl-OCE system can be used to quantify IOP, corneal biomechanical properties, and corneal geometry, which builds a solid foundation for a unique device that can provide a more complete picture of ocular health.

  10. Analytical technical of lightning surges induced on grounding mesh of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, I.; Tani, M.; Yonezawa, T.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical lightning surge technique is needed to make a qualitative and predictive evaluation of transient voltages induced on local grounding meshes and instrumentation cables by a lightning strike on a lightning rod in a PWR plant. This paper discusses an experiment with lightning surge impulses in a PWR plant which was setup to observe lightning caused transient voltages. Experimental data when compared with EMTP simulation results improved the simulation method. The improved method provides a good estimation of induced voltages on grounding meshes and instrumentation cables

  11. Idealized digital models for conical reed instruments, with focus on the internal pressure waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergomard, J; Guillemain, P; Silva, F; Karkar, S

    2016-02-01

    Two models for the generation of self-oscillations of reed conical woodwinds are presented. The models use the fewest parameters (of either the resonator or the exciter), whose influence can be quickly explored. The formulation extends iterated maps obtained for lossless cylindrical pipes without reed dynamics. It uses spherical wave variables in idealized resonators, with one parameter more than for cylinders: the missing length of the cone. The mouthpiece volume equals that of the missing part of the cone, and is implemented as either a cylindrical pipe (first model) or a lumped element (second model). Only the first model adds a length parameter for the mouthpiece and leads to the solving of an implicit equation. For the second model, any shape of nonlinear characteristic can be directly considered. The complex characteristic impedance for spherical waves requires sampling times smaller than a round trip in the resonator. The convergence of the two models is shown when the length of the cylindrical mouthpiece tends to zero. The waveform is in semi-quantitative agreement with experiment. It is concluded that the oscillations of the positive episode of the mouthpiece pressure are related to the length of the missing part, not to the reed dynamics.

  12. PWR-to-PWR fuel cycle model using dry process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Jeong, Chang Joon; Rho, Gyu Hong

    2002-03-01

    PWR-to-PWR fuel cycle model has been developed to recycle the spent fuel using the dry fabrication process. Two types of fuels were considered; first fuel was based on low initial enrichment with low discharge burnup and second one was based on more initial enrichment with high discharge burnup in PWR. For recycling calculations, the HELIOS code was used, in which all of the available fission products were considered. The decay of 10 years was applied for reuse of the spent fuel. Sensitivity analysis for the fresh feed material enrichment has also been carried out. If enrichment of the mixing material is increased the saving of uranium reserves would be decreased. The uranium saving of low burned fuel increased from 4.2% to 7.4% in fifth recycling step for 5 wt% to 19.00wt% mixing material enrichment. While for high burned fuel, there was no uranium saving, which implies that higher uranium enrichment required than 5 wt%. For mixing of 15 wt% enriched fuel, the required mixing is about 21.0% and 37.0% of total fuel volume for low and high burned fuel, respectively. With multiple recycling, reductions in waste for low and high burned fuel became 80% and 60%, for first recycling, respectively. In this way, waste can be reduced more and the cost of the waste disposal reduction can provide the economic balance

  13. Optimal Design of Safety Instrumented Systems for Pressure Control of Methanol Separation Columns in the Bisphenol a Manufacturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Bok Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A bisphenol A production plant possesses considerable potential risks in the top of the methanol separation column, as pressurized acetone, methanol, and water are processed at an elevated temperature, especially in the event of an abnormal pressure increase due to a sudden power outage. This study assesses the potential risks in the methanol separation column through hazard and operability assessments and evaluates the damages in the case of fire and explosion accident scenarios. The study chooses three leakage scenarios: a 5-mm puncture on the methanol separation column, a 50-mm diameter fracture of a discharge pipe and a catastrophic rupture, and, simulated using Phast (Ver. 6.531, the concentration distribution of scattered methanol, thermal radiation distribution of fires, and overpressure distribution of vapor cloud explosions. Implementation of a safety-instrumented system equipped with two-out-of-three voting as a safety measure can detect overpressure at the top of the column and shut down the main control valve and the emergency shutoff valve simultaneously. By applying a safety integrity level of three, the maximal release volume of the safety relief valve can be reduced and, therefore, the design capacity of the flare stack can also be reduced. Such integration will lead to improved safety at a reduced cost.

  14. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Siewenie, Joan [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Xu, Hongwu [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Zhu, Jinlong [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, USA and National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Page, Katharine, E-mail: pagekl@ornl.gov [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO{sub 2} measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H{sub 2} and natural gas uptake/storage.

  15. PWR plant construction in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Toshifumi

    2002-01-01

    The construction methods based on the experiences on the Nuclear Island, which is a critical path in the total construction schedule, have been studied and reconsidered in order to construct by more reliable and economical method. So various improved construction method are being applied and the duration of construction is being reduced continuously. So various improved construction method are being applied and the duration of construction is being reduced continuously. In this paper, the history of construction of twenty-three (23) PWR Plant, the actual construction methods and schedule of Ohi-3/4, to which the many improved methods were applied during their construction, are introduced mainly with the improved points for previously constructed plants. And also the situation of construction method for the next PWR Plant is simply explained

  16. PWR system reliability improvement activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Yuichiro

    1985-01-01

    In Japan lacking in energy resources, it is our basic energy policy to accelerate the development program of nuclear power, thereby reducing our dependence. As referred to in the foregoing, every effort has been exerted on our part to improve the PWR system reliability by dint of the so-called 'HOMEMADE' TQC activities, which is our brain-child as a result of applying to the energy industry the quality control philosophy developed in the field of manufacturing industry

  17. Conceptual study on advanced PWR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Young; Chang, M H; Yu, K J; Lee, D J; Cho, B H; Kim, H Y; Yoon, J H; Lee, Y J; Kim, J P; Park, C T; Seo, J K; Kang, H S; Kim, J I; Kim, Y W; Kim, Y H

    1997-07-01

    In this study, the adoptable essential technologies and reference design concept of the advanced reactor were developed and related basic experiments were performed. (1) Once-through Helical Steam Generator: a performance analysis computer code for heli-coiled steam generator was developed for thermal sizing of steam generator and determination of thermal-hydraulic parameters. (2) Self-pressurizing pressurizer : a performance analysis computer code for cold pressurizer was developed. (3) Control rod drive mechanism for fine control : type and function were surveyed. (4) CHF in passive PWR condition : development of the prediction model bundle CHF by introducing the correction factor from the data base. (5) Passive cooling concepts for concrete containment systems: development of the PCCS heat transfer coefficient. (6) Steam injector concepts: analysis and experiment were conducted. (7) Fluidic diode concepts : analysis and experiment were conducted. (8) Wet thermal insulator : tests for thin steel layers and assessment of materials. (9) Passive residual heat removal system : a performance analysis computer code for PRHRS was developed and the conformance to EPRI requirement was checked. (author). 18 refs., 55 tabs., 137 figs.

  18. Conceptual study on advanced PWR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Yoon Young; Chang, M. H.; Yu, K. J.; Lee, D. J.; Cho, B. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Kim, J. P.; Park, C. T.; Seo, J. K.; Kang, H. S.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. W.; Kim, Y. H.

    1997-07-01

    In this study, the adoptable essential technologies and reference design concept of the advanced reactor were developed and related basic experiments were performed. 1) Once-through Helical Steam Generator: a performance analysis computer code for heli-coiled steam generator was developed for thermal sizing of steam generator and determination of thermal-hydraulic parameters. 2) Self-pressurizing pressurizer : a performance analysis computer code for cold pressurizer was developed. 3) Control rod drive mechanism for fine control : type and function were surveyed. 4) CHF in passive PWR condition : development of the prediction model bundle CHF by introducing the correction factor from the data base. 5) Passive cooling concepts for concrete containment systems: development of the PCCS heat transfer coefficient. 6) Steam injector concepts: analysis and experiment were conducted. 7) Fluidic diode concepts : analysis and experiment were conducted. 8) Wet thermal insulator : tests for thin steel layers and assessment of materials. 9) Passive residual heat removal system : a performance analysis computer code for PRHRS was developed and the conformance to EPRI requirement was checked. (author). 18 refs., 55 tabs., 137 figs

  19. Development of a pressurizer level compensator for use on N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussell, J.H.

    1985-07-01

    The instrument described in this report has been developed to compensate the measured water level in the N Reactor pressurizer for temperature effects. N Reactor is a pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR). The instrument is defined as a pressurizer level compensator (PLC). A pressurizer is used in a PWR to control the primary coolant pressure and provide a surge volume for primary coolant expansion and contraction. A means of compensating for water and steam density is required because of the wide range of pressure and temperature that result from different steady state and transient reactor power levels. The uncompensated level is determined by measurement of differential pressure between the top of the level measurement zone and the bottom of the level measurement zone. Temperature of the water in the pressurizer is the parameter that is used to determine the proper level compensation since water and steam density are primarily functions of temperature in this case. The PLC uses a microprocessor to calculate the compensated level from temperature and differential pressure measurements. This report includes a description of the design, development, and implementation of software and hardware that are in the PLC. 9 refs., 51 figs., 17 tabs

  20. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, S.; Bucci, G.; Johnson, L.; King, M.; Lamanna, L.; Morgan, E.; Bates, J.; Burns, R.; Eaker, R.; Ward, G.; Linnenbom, V.; Millet, P.; Paine, J.P.; Wood, C.J.; Gatten, T.; Meatheany, D.; Seager, J.; Thompson, R.; Brobst, G.; Connor, W.; Lewis, G.; Shirmer, R.; Gillen, J.; Kerns, M.; Jones, V.; Lappegaard, S.; Sawochka, S.; Smith, F.; Spires, D.; Pagan, S.; Gardner, J.; Polidoroff, T.; Lambert, S.; Dahl, B.; Hundley, F.; Miller, B.; Andersson, P.; Briden, D.; Fellers, B.; Harvey, S.; Polchow, J.; Rootham, M.; Fredrichs, T.; Flint, W.

    1993-05-01

    An effective, state-of-the art secondary water chemistry control program is essential to maximize the availability and operating life of major PWR components. Furthermore, the costs related to maintaining secondary water chemistry will likely be less than the repair or replacement of steam generators or large turbine rotors, with resulting outages taken into account. The revised PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines in this report represent the latest field and laboratory data on steam generator corrosion phenomena. This document supersedes Interim PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Recommendations for IGA/SCC Control (EPRI report TR-101230) as well as PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines--Revision 2 (NP-6239)

  1. On-line testing of nuclear plant temperature and pressure instrumentation and other critical plant equipment. IAEA regional workshop. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    Under European regional TC project RER/4/011, IAEA and VUJE Training centre organized a workshop on On-line Testing of Nuclear Power Plant Temperature and Pressure Instrumentation and Other Critical Plant Equipment in Trnava, Slovak Republic, from 25 to 29 May 1998. The objective of the workshop was to review the state-of-the-art in NPP instrumentation, cover typical instrumentation problems and solutions, describe technical and regulatory requirements for verifying the performance of nuclear power plant instrumentation, describe new methods developed and applied in NPPs for on-line verification and performance of instrumentation and present new techniques using existing instrumentation to identify the on-set problems in the plant electrical, mechanical and thermal hydraulic systems. Particular emphasis was placed on temperature measurements by Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and thermocouples and pressure measurements using motion-balanced and forced-balanced pressure transmitters. This proceedings includes papers presented by the invited speakers and the participants each with an abstract as wells as a summary of the Round-Table discussions Refs, figs, tabs

  2. On-line testing of nuclear plant temperature and pressure instrumentation and other critical plant equipment. IAEA regional workshop. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Under European regional TC project RER/4/011, IAEA and VUJE Training centre organized a workshop on On-line Testing of Nuclear Power Plant Temperature and Pressure Instrumentation and Other Critical Plant Equipment in Trnava, Slovak Republic, from 25 to 29 May 1998. The objective of the workshop was to review the state-of-the-art in NPP instrumentation, cover typical instrumentation problems and solutions, describe technical and regulatory requirements for verifying the performance of nuclear power plant instrumentation, describe new methods developed and applied in NPPs for on-line verification and performance of instrumentation and present new techniques using existing instrumentation to identify the on-set problems in the plant electrical, mechanical and thermal hydraulic systems. Particular emphasis was placed on temperature measurements by Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and thermocouples and pressure measurements using motion-balanced and forced-balanced pressure transmitters. This proceedings includes papers presented by the invited speakers and the participants each with an abstract as wells as a summary of the Round-Table discussions

  3. Material property changes of stainless steels under PWR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Nishioka, Hiromasa; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Kamaya, Masayuki; Miura, Terumitsu; Torimaru, Tadahiko

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity of core structural materials is one of the key issues for long and safe operation of pressurized water reactors. The stainless steel components are exposed to neutron irradiation and high-temperature water, which cause significant property changes and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in some cases. Understanding of irradiation induced material property changes is essential to predict integrity of core components. In the present study, microstructure and microchemistry, mechanical properties, and IASCC behavior were examined in 316 stainless steels irradiated to 1 - 73 dpa in a PWR. Dose-dependent changes of dislocation loops and cavities, grain boundary segregation, tensile properties and fracture mode, deformation behavior, and their interrelation were discussed. Tensile properties and deformation behavior were well coincident with microstructural changes. IASCC susceptibility under slow strain rate tensile tests, IASCC initiation under constant load tests in simulated PWR primary water, and their relationship to material changes were discussed. (author)

  4. Industrial assessment of nonbackfittable PWR design modifications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Daleas, R.S.; Miller, D.D.

    1980-11-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Reactor Design Study, various nonbackfittable PWR design modifications were evaluated to determine their potential for improved uranium utilization and commercial viability. Combustion Engineering, Inc. contributed to this effort through participation in the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory industrial assessment of such design modifications. Seven modifications, including the use of higher primary system temperatures and pressures, rapid-frequent refueling, end-of-cycle stretchout, core periphery modifications, radial blankets, low power density cores, and small PWR assemblies, were evaluated with respect to uranium utilization, economics, technical and operational complexity, and several other subjective considerations. Rapid-frequent refueling was judged to have the highest potential although it would probably not be economical for the majority of reactors with the design assumptions used in this assessment

  5. Electrical and control aspects of the Sizewell B PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The pressurized water reactor, Sizewell-B, which is being built in Suffolk is well on in its construction schedule. This conference looked at the electrical and control aspects of the first PWR to be built in the United Kingdom. Although based on the standard Westinghouse PWR design, modifications have been made to meet the particular requirements of the site and the UK licensing regulations. There are 11 papers on all aspects of the electrical systems, 5 papers on the cables and cable installation, 5 on the main control rooms and auxiliary shutdown room, 5 on the integrated system and centralised operation, 6 on the monitoring and protection systems and 9 on the reactor protection systems. All 41 are indexed separately. (UK)

  6. Serious accidents of PWR type reactors for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    This document presents the great lines of current knowledge on serious accidents relative to PWR type reactors. First, is exposed the physics of PWR type reactor core meltdown and the possible failure modes of the containment building in such a case. Then, are presented the dispositions implemented with regards to such accidents in France, particularly the pragmatic approach that prevails for the already built reactors. Then, the document tackles the case of the European pressurized reactor (E.P.R.), for which the dimensioning takes into account explicitly serious accidents: it is a question of objectives conception and their respect must be the object of a strict demonstration, by taking into account uncertainties. (N.C.)

  7. PWR accident management realated tests: some Bethsy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, P.; Chataing, T.; Deruaz, R.

    1993-01-01

    The BETHSY integral test facility which is a scaled down model of a 3 loop FRAMATOME PWR and is currently operated at the Nuclear Center of Grenoble, forms an important part of the French strategy for PWR Accident Management. In this paper the features of both the facility and the experimental program are presented. Two accident transients: a total loss of feedwater and a 2'' cold leg break in case of High Pressure Safety Injection System failure, involving either Event Oriented - or State Oriented-Emergency Operating Procedures (EO-EOP or SO-EOP) are described and the system response analyzed. CATHARE calculation results are also presented which illustrate the ability of this code to adequately predict the key phenomena of these transients. (authors). 13 figs., 11 refs., 2 tabs

  8. A nodal model for the simulation of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Pinto, R. de.

    1981-06-01

    A computer program FORTRAN language was developed to simulate the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic transient behaviour of a PWR reactor core. The reator power is calculated using a point kinectics model with six groups of delayed neutron precursors. The fission product decay heat was considered assuming three effective decay heat groups. A nodal model was employed for the treatment of heat transfer in the fuel rod, with integration of the heat equation by the lumped parameter technique. Axial conduction was neglected. A single-channel nodal model was developed for the thermo-hydrodynamic simulation using mass and energy conservation equations for the control volumes. The effect of the axial pressure variation was neglected. The computer program was tested, with good results, through the simulation of the transient behaviour of postulated accidents in a typical PWR. (Author) [pt

  9. The plutonium recycle for PWR reactors from brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. The study starts with the calculation of a reference reactor and has flexibility to evaluate the demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): Without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5% U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the fifth operation cycle of the thermal reactors. (author)

  10. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, D.J. [Consumers Power Co., Covert, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  11. PWR: nuclear islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Framatome and its partners have produced this glossary of technical terms that can be used in writing English language documents relating to power plants (nuclear islands, individual components, nuclear services, etc.) with the hope of improving the quality of the documents intended for their clients, suppliers and partners and for others. This glossary will be particularly useful to the translators and authors of technical proposals, design documents, manufacturing documents, construction and operating documents concerning Pressurized Water Reactors written in English or French. It can also be useful as a reference document for students, researchers, journalists, etc., having to write on this subject. We would like to thank all those individuals working at the Ministere de la Recherche et de la Technologie, Electricite de France, Jeumont Schneider and Framatome who have contributed to this glossary. We would also appreciate any comments or sugestions intended to improve subsequent editions of this glossary [fr

  12. CFD simulation of a four-loop PWR at asymmetric operation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jian-Ping; Yan, Li-Ming; Li, Feng-Chen, E-mail: lifch@hit.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • A CFD numerical simulation procedure was established for simulating RPV of VVER-1000. • The established CFD approach was validated by comparing with available data. • Thermal hydraulic characteristics under asymmetric operation condition were investigated. • Apparent influences of the shutdown loop on its neighboring loops were obtained. - Abstract: The pressurized water reactor (PWR) with multiple loops may have abnormal working conditions with coolant pumps out of running in some loops. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical study of the four-loop VVER-1000 PWR pressure vessel model was presented. Numerical simulations of the thermohydrodynamic characteristics in the pressure vessel were carried out at different inlet conditions with four and three loops running, respectively. At normal stead-state condition (four-loop running), different parameters were obtained for the full fluid domain, including pressure losses across different parts, pressure, velocity and temperature distributions in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and mass flow distribution of the coolant at the inlet of reactor core. The obtained results for pressure losses matched with the experimental reference values of the VVER-1000 PWR at Tianwan nuclear power plant (NPP). For most fuel assemblies (FAs), the inlet flow rates presented a symmetrical distribution about the center under full-loop operation conditions, which accorded with the practical distribution. These results indicate that it is now possible to study the dynamic transition process between different asymmetric operation conditions in a multi-loop PWR using the established CFD method.

  13. Natural-circulation-cooling characteristics during PWR accident simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.P.; McCreery, G.E.; Berta, V.T.

    1983-01-01

    A description of natural circulation cooling characteristics is presented. Data were obtained from several pressurized water reactor accident simulations in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) pressurized water reactor (PWR). The reliability of natural circulation cooling, its cooling effectiveness, and the effect of changing system conditions are described. Quantitative comparison of flow rates and time constants with theory for both single- and two-phase fluid conditions were made. It is concluded that natural circulation cooling can be relied on in plant recovery procedures in the absence of forced convection whenever the steam generator heat sink is available

  14. Structure-dynamic model verification calculation of PWR 5 tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.

    1980-02-01

    Within reactor safety research project RS 16 B of the German Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT), blowdown experiments are conducted at Battelle Institut e.V. Frankfurt/Main using a model reactor pressure vessel with a height of 11,2 m and internals corresponding to those in a PWR. In the present report the dynamic loading on the pressure vessel internals (upper perforated plate and barrel suspension) during the DWR 5 experiment are calculated by means of a vertical and horizontal dynamic model using the CESHOCK code. The equations of motion are resolved by direct integration. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Development and evaluation of a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese sleep apnea patients receiving continuous positive airway pressure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayako Saito,1 Shigeko Kojima,2 Fumihiko Sasaki,3 Masamichi Hayashi,4 Yuki Mieno,4 Hiroki Sakakibara,5 Shuji Hashimoto1 1Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; 2Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Nihon Fukushi University, Handa, Japan; 3SDB Research Laboratory, Takaoka Clinic, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Clinical Allergy, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; 5Tokushige Kokyuki Clinic, Nagoya, Japan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Analyzed subjects were 653 Japanese OSA patients (619 males and 34 females treated with CPAP at a sleep laboratory in a respiratory clinic in a Japanese city. Based on Bandura's social cognitive theory, the CPAP Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Sleep Apnea in Japanese (CSESA-J was developed by a focus group of experts, using a group interview of OSA patients for the items of two previous self-efficacy scales for Western sleep apnea patients receiving CPAP treatment. CSESA-J has two subscales, one for self-efficacy and the other for outcome expectancy, and consists of a total of 15 items. Content validity was confirmed by the focus group. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the factor loadings of self-efficacy and outcome expectancy were 0.47–0.76 and 0.41–0.92, respectively, for the corresponding items. CSESA-J had a significant but weak positive association with the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a strong positive association with “Self-efficacy scale on health behavior in patients with chronic disease.” Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.85 for the self-efficacy subscale and 0.89 for the outcome expectancy subscale. The intraclass correlation coefficient using data from the first and second measurements with

  16. Acceptance test for 900 MWe PWR unit replacement steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourguechon, B.

    1993-01-01

    During the first half of 1994, the Gravelines 1 steam generators will be replaced (SG replacement procedure). The new SG's differ from the former components notably by the alloy used for the tube bundle, in this case, the high chromium content Inconel 690. So, from this standpoint, they are to be considered as PWR 900 replacement SG first models and their thermal efficiency has consequently to be assessed. This will provide an opportunity of ensuring that the performance of the components delivered is in compliance with requirements and of making the necessary provisions if significant deviations are observed. The EFMT branch, which has been in charge of the instrumentation and acceptance of the different SG first models since the first PWR plants were commissioned, will be responsible for the acceptance tests and the ultimate validation of a performance assessment procedure applicable to the future replacement steam generators. The methods and tests proposed for SG expert appraisal are based on consideration of the importance of primary measurement quality for satisfactory SG assessment and of the new test facilities with which the 900 and 1 300 PWR plants are gradually being equipped. These facilities provide an on-site computer environment for tests compatible with the tools (PATTERN, etc.) used at EFMT and in other departments. This test is the first of this kind performed by EFMT and the test facility of a nuclear power plant. (author). 6 figs

  17. Transient analysis of blowdown thrust force under PWR LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Toshikazu; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Isozaki, Toshikuni

    1982-10-01

    The analytical results of blowdown characteristics and thrust forces were compared with the experiments, which were performed as pipe whip and jet discharge tests under the PWR LOCA conditions. The blowdown thrust forces obtained by Navier-Stokes momentum equation about a single-phase, homogeneous and separated two-phase flow, assuming critical pressure at the exit if a critical flow condition was satisfied. The following results are obtained. (1) The node-junction method is useful for both the analyses of the blowdown thrust force and of the water hammer phenomena. (2) The Henry-Fauske model for subcooled critical flow is effective for the analysis of the maximum thrust force under the PWR LOCA conditions. The jet thrust parameter of the analysis and experiment is equal to 1.08. (3) The thrust parameter of saturated blowdown has the same one with the value under pressurized condition when the stagnant pressure is chosen as the saturated one. (4) The dominant terms of the blowdown thrust force in the momentum equation are the pressure and momentum terms except that the acceleration term has large contribution only just after the break. (5) The blowdown thrust force in the analysis greatly depends on the selection of the exit pressure. (author)

  18. Application of the BEACON-TSM system to the operation of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, J. A.; Mildrum, C.; Serrano, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    BEACON-TSM is an advanced system of the operation support of PWR reactors that combines the capabilities of an advanced nodal neutronic model and the measures of the instrumentation available in plant to determine, accurately and continuously, the distribution of power in the core and the available margins to the limits of the beak factors.

  19. Space qualification of an automotive microcontroller for the DREAMS-P/H pressure and humidity instrument on board the ExoMars 2016 Schiaparelli lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkanen, T.; Schmidt, W.; Harri, A.-M.; Genzer, M.; Hieta, M.; Haukka, H.; Kemppinen, O.

    2015-10-01

    Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) has developed a novel kind of pressure and humidity instrument for the Schiaparelli Mars lander, which is a part of the ExoMars 2016 mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) [1]. The DREAMS-P pressure instrument and DREAMS-H humidity instrument are part of the DREAMS science package on board the lander. DREAMS-P (seen in Fig. 1 and DREAMS-H were evolved from earlier planetary pressure and humidity instrument designs by FMI with a completely redesigned control and data unit. Instead of using the conventional approach of utilizing a space grade processor component, a commercial off the shelf microcontroller was selected for handling the pressure and humidity measurements. The new controller is based on the Freescale MC9S12XEP100 16-bit automotive microcontroller. Coordinated by FMI, a batch of these microcontroller units (MCUs) went through a custom qualification process in order to accept the component for spaceflight on board a Mars lander.

  20. Conceptual design of simplified PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Hiroaki

    1996-01-01

    The limited availability for location of nuclear power plant in Japan makes plants with higher power ratings more desirable. Having no intention of constructing medium-sized plants as a next generation standard plant, Japanese utilities are interested in applying passive technologies to large ones. So, Japanese utilities have studied large passive plants based on AP600 and SBWR as alternative future LWRs. In a joint effort to develop a new generation nuclear power plant which is more friendly to operator and maintenance personnel and is economically competitive with alternative sources of power generation, JAPC and Japanese Utilities started the study to modify AP600 and SBWR, in order to accommodate the Japanese requirements. During a six year program up to 1994, basic concepts for 1000 MWe class Simplified PWR (SPWR) and Simplified BWR (SBWR) were developed, though there still remain several areas to be improved. These studies have now stepped into the phase of reducing construction cost and searching for maximum power rating that can be attained by reasonably practical technology. These results also suggest that it is hopeful to develop a large 3-loop passive plant (∼1200 MWe). Since Korea mainly deals with PWR, this paper summarizes SPWR study. The SPWR is jointly studied by JAPC, Japanese PWR Utilities, EdF, WH and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry. Using the AP-600 reference design as a basis, we enlarged the plant size to 3-loops and added engineering features to conform with Japanese practice and Utilities' preference. The SPWR program definitively confirmed the feasibility of a passive plant with an NSSS rating about 1000 MWe and 3 loops. (J.P.N.)

  1. A multi-instrument non-parametric reconstruction of the electron pressure profile in the galaxy cluster CLJ1226.9+3332

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, C.; McWilliam, M.; Macías-Pérez, J.-F.; Adam, R.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Aussel, H.; Beelen, A.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Comis, B.; de Petris, M.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Lagache, G.; Leclercq, S.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Mauskopf, P.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Revéret, V.; Ritacco, A.; Roussel, H.; Ruppin, F.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2018-04-01

    Context. In the past decade, sensitive, resolved Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) studies of galaxy clusters have become common. Whereas many previous SZ studies have parameterized the pressure profiles of galaxy clusters, non-parametric reconstructions will provide insights into the thermodynamic state of the intracluster medium. Aim. We seek to recover the non-parametric pressure profiles of the high redshift (z = 0.89) galaxy cluster CLJ 1226.9+3332 as inferred from SZ data from the MUSTANG, NIKA, Bolocam, and Planck instruments, which all probe different angular scales. Methods: Our non-parametric algorithm makes use of logarithmic interpolation, which under the assumption of ellipsoidal symmetry is analytically integrable. For MUSTANG, NIKA, and Bolocam we derive a non-parametric pressure profile independently and find good agreement among the instruments. In particular, we find that the non-parametric profiles are consistent with a fitted generalized Navaro-Frenk-White (gNFW) profile. Given the ability of Planck to constrain the total signal, we include a prior on the integrated Compton Y parameter as determined by Planck. Results: For a given instrument, constraints on the pressure profile diminish rapidly beyond the field of view. The overlap in spatial scales probed by these four datasets is therefore critical in checking for consistency between instruments. By using multiple instruments, our analysis of CLJ 1226.9+3332 covers a large radial range, from the central regions to the cluster outskirts: 0.05 R500 generation of SZ instruments such as NIKA2 and MUSTANG2.

  2. PWR-related integral safety experiments in the PKL 111 test facility SBLOCA under beyond-design-basis accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P.; Umminger, K.J.; Schoen, B. [Siemens AG Power Generation Group (KWU), Erlangen (France)

    1995-09-01

    The thermal hydraulic behavior of a PWR during beyond-design-basis accident scenarios is of vital interest for the verification and optimization of accident management procedures. Within the scope of the German reactor safety research program experiments were performed in the volumetrically scaled PKL 111 test facility by Siemens/KWU. This highly instrumented test rig simulates a KWU-design PWR (1300 MWe). In particular, the latest tests performed related to a SBLOCA with additional system failures, e.g. nitrogen entering the primary system. In the case of a SBLOCA, it is the goal of the operator to put the plant in a condition where the decay heat can be removed first using the low pressure emergency core cooling system and then the residual heat removal system. The experimental investigation presented assumed the following beyond-design-basis accident conditions: 0.5% break in a cold leg, 2 of 4 steam generators (SGs) isolated on the secondary side (feedwater- and steam line-valves closed), filled with steam on the primary side, cooldown of the primary system using the remaining two steam generators, high pressure injection system only in the two loops with intact steam generators, if possible no operator actions to reach the conditions for residual heat removal system activation. Furthermore, it was postulated that 2 of the 4 hot leg accumulators had a reduced initial water inventory (increased nitrogen inventory), allowing nitrogen to enter the primary system at a pressure of 15 bar and nearly preventing the heat transfer in the SGs ({open_quotes}passivating{close_quotes} U-tubes). Due to this the heat transfer regime in the intact steam generators changed remarkably. The primary system showed self-regulating system effects and heat transfer improved again (reflux-condenser mode in the U-tube inlet region).

  3. Vibration behavior of PWR reactor internals Model experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assedo, R.; Dubourg, M.; Livolant, M.; Epstein, A.

    1975-01-01

    In the late 1971, the CEA and FRAMATOME decided to undertake a comprehensive joint program of studying the vibration behavior of PWR internals of the 900 MWe, 50 cycle, 3 loop reactor series being built by FRAMATOME in France. The PWR reactor internals are submitted to several sources of excitation during normal operation. Two main sources of excitation may effect the internals behavior: the large flow turbulences which could generate various instabilities such as: vortex shedding: the pump pressure fluctuations which could generate acoustic noise in the circuit at frequencies corresponding to shaft speed frequencies or blade passing frequencies, and their respective harmonics. The flow induced vibrations are of complex nature and the approach selected, for this comprehensive program, is semi-empirical and based on both theoretical analysis and experiments on a reduced scale model and full scale internals. The experimental support of this program consists of: the SAFRAN test loop which consists of an hydroelastic similitude of a 1/8 scale model of a PWR; harmonic vibration tests in air performed on full scale reactor internals in the manufacturing shop; the GENNEVILLIERS facilities which is a full flow test facility of primary pump; the measurements carried out during start up on the Tihange reactor. This program will be completed in April 1975. The results of this program, the originality of which consists of studying separately the effects of random excitations and acoustic noises, on the internals behavior, and by establishing a comparison between experiments and analysis, will bring a major contribution for explaining the complex vibration phenomena occurring in a PWR

  4. Instrument failure monitoring in nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of monitoring dynamic systems for instrument failures were developed and evaluated. In particular, application of these methods to nuclear power plant components is addressed. For a linear system, statistical tests on the innovations sequence of a Kalman filter driven by all system measurements provides a failure detection decision and identifies any failed sensor. This sequence (in an unfailed system) is zero-mean with calculable covariance; hence, any major deviation from these properties is assumed to be due to an instrument failure. Once a failure is identified, the failed instrument is replaced with an optimal estimate of the measured parameter. This failure accommodation is accomplished using optimally combined data from a bank of accommodation Kalman filters (one for each sensor), each driven by a single measurement. Using such a sensor replacement allows continued system operation under failed conditions and provides a system operator with information otherwise unavailable. To demonstrate monitor performance, a liner failure monitor was developed for the pressurizer in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor plant. LOFT is a small-scale pressurized water reactor (PWR) research facility located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. A linear, third-order model of the pressurizer dynamics was developed from first principles and validated. Using data from the LOFT L6 test series, numerous actual and simulated water level, pressure, and temperature sensor failures were employed to illustrate monitor capabilities. Failure monitor design was applied to nonlinear dynamic systems by replacing all monitor linear Kalman filters with extended Kalman filters. A nonlinear failure monitor was derived for LOFT reactor instrumentation. A sixth-order reactor model, including descriptions of reactor kinetics, fuel rod heat transfer, and core coolant dynamics, was obtained and verified with test data

  5. Discontinuous finite element formulation for bodies of revolution with application in the prevention of fragile fracture in pressure vessel of PWR reactors; Formulacao de elementos finitos descontinuos para corpos de revolucao com aplicacao na prevencao de fratura fragil em vaso de pressao de reatores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez Alvarez, Gustavo

    1999-08-15

    In this work, a hybrid formulation is established for bodies of revolution, based on the equation of Fourier series for the discontinuous finite element method, analogous to the one that exists in the classical finite element method. Furthermore, a methodology to analyse the prevention of fragile fracture in pressure vessel of pressurized water reactors is presented. The results obtained suggest that careful analysis must be made for non symmetric refrigeration. (author)

  6. Physics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, A.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this lecture is to demonstrate typical problems and solutions encountered in the design and operation of PWR power plants. The examples selected for illustration refer to PWR's of KWU design and to results of KWU design methods. In order to understand the physics of a power reactor it is necessary to have some knowledge of the structure and design of the power plant system of which the reactor is a part. It is therefore assumed that the reader is familiar with the design of the more important components and systems of a PWR, such as fuel assemblies, control assemblies, core lay-out, reactor coolant system, instrumentation. (author)

  7. Aging effects in PWR power plants components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a contribution to the study of aging process of components in commercial plants of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The analysis is made through application of the Fault Trees Method, Monte Carlo Method and Fussell-Vesely Importance Measure. The approach of the study of aging in nuclear power plants, besides giving attention to the economic factors involved directly with the extent of their operational life, also provide significant data on security issues. The latest case involving process of life extension of a PWR could be seen in Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant through investing of $27 million for the installation of a new reactor lid. The corrective action has generated an estimated operating life extension of Angra I in twenty years, offering great economy compared with building cost of a new plant and anterior decommissioning, if it had reached the time operating limit of forty years. The Extension of the operating life of a nuclear power plant must be accompanied by a special attention to the components of the systems and their aging process. After the application of the methodology (aging analysis of the injection system of the containment spray) proposed in this work, it can be seen that 'the increase in the rate of component failure, due the aging process, generates the increase in the general unavailability of the system that containing these basic components'. The final results obtained were as expected and may contribute to the maintenance policy, preventing premature aging process in Nuclear Plant Systems. (author)

  8. MELCOR/VISOR PWR desktop simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With, Anka de; Wakker, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, there is a need for a learning support and training tool for nuclear engineers, utilities and students in order to broaden their understanding of advanced nuclear plant characteristics, dynamics, transients and safety features. Nuclear system analysis codes like ASTEC, RELAP5, RETRAN and MELCOR provide calculation results of and visualization tools can be used to graphically represent these results. However, for an efficient education and training a more interactive tool such as a simulator is needed. The simulator connects the graphical tool with the calculation tool in an interactive manner. A small number of desktop simulators exist [1-3]. The existing simulators are capable of representing different types of power plants and various accident conditions. However, they were found to be too general to be used as a reliable plant-specific accident analysis or training tool. A desktop simulator of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been created under contract of the Dutch nuclear regulatory body (KFD). The desktop simulator is a software package that provides a close to real simulation of the Dutch nuclear power plant Borssele (KCB) and is used for training of the accident response. The simulator includes the majority of the power plant systems, necessary for the successful simulation of the KCB plant during normal operation, malfunctions and accident situations, and it has been successfully validated against the results of the safety evaluations from the KCB safety report. (orig.)

  9. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Raphael M.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira, E-mail: rmdias@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Since FRAPCON-3 series was rolled out, many improvements have been implanted in fuel performance codes, based on most recent literature, to promote better predictions against current data. Much of this advances include: improving fuel gas release prediction, hydrogen pickup model, cladding corrosion, and many others. An example of those modifications has been new cladding materials has added into hydrogen pickup model to support M5™, ZIRLO™, and ZIRLO™ optimized family under pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions. Recently some research have been made over USNRC's steady-state fuel performance code, assessments against FUMEX-III's data have concluded that FRAPCON provides best-estimate calculation of fuel performance. Face of this, a study is required to summarize all those modifications and new implementations, as well as to compare this result against FRAPCON's older version, scrutinizing FRAPCON-3 series documentation to understand the real goal and literature base of any improvements. We have concluded that FRAPCON's latest modifications are based on strong literature review. Those modifications were tested against most recent data to assure these results will be the best evaluation as possible. Many improvements have been made to allow USNRC to have an audit tool with the last improvements. (author)

  10. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Raphael M.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Since FRAPCON-3 series was rolled out, many improvements have been implanted in fuel performance codes, based on most recent literature, to promote better predictions against current data. Much of this advances include: improving fuel gas release prediction, hydrogen pickup model, cladding corrosion, and many others. An example of those modifications has been new cladding materials has added into hydrogen pickup model to support M5™, ZIRLO™, and ZIRLO™ optimized family under pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions. Recently some research have been made over USNRC's steady-state fuel performance code, assessments against FUMEX-III's data have concluded that FRAPCON provides best-estimate calculation of fuel performance. Face of this, a study is required to summarize all those modifications and new implementations, as well as to compare this result against FRAPCON's older version, scrutinizing FRAPCON-3 series documentation to understand the real goal and literature base of any improvements. We have concluded that FRAPCON's latest modifications are based on strong literature review. Those modifications were tested against most recent data to assure these results will be the best evaluation as possible. Many improvements have been made to allow USNRC to have an audit tool with the last improvements. (author)

  11. Vertical Drop Of 21-PWR Waste Package On Unyielding Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic; A. Scheider; S.M. Bennett

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) Waste Package (WP) subjected to the 2-m vertical drop on an unyielding surface at three different temperatures. The scope of this calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities in two different WP components. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for that design only

  12. Explicit treatment of spectral history effects in PWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral history effects in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are a consequence of spatially distributed and/or time-dependent quantities such as power, moderator temperature, soluble boron concentration, control rod position, etc., defining open-quotes operating conditions.close quotes Operating conditions, global and local, affect neutron spectrum and isotopic reaction rates and thus the evolution of the fuel composition. Any effect that hardens the neutron spectrum, such as elevated temperature or high soluble boron concentration, will increase the fuel conversion ratio and result in more reactive fuel. This paper describes history effects for an 18-month equilibruim cycle of an ABB CE system 80 PWR

  13. Fatigue crack growth analysis of a 450 PWR - lateral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taupin, P.; Flamand, F.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue Crack Growth analysis of a 5 mm deep surface crack in the crotch region of a 45 0 Lateral (12 inch diameter) was performed on a 3-Loop 900 MWe PWR Plant under Normal and upset loading conditions. Stress Intensity factors were computed using the weight-function technique. The latter were obtained for a polynomial stress distribution at the corner of the lateral under contract with the Pressure Vessel Research Committee of the WRC. The study shows that after 40 years of normal operation the size of the end of life crack is limited to about 25 mm for the chosen lateral with a thickness of 300 mm

  14. Transfer of chemicals in PWR systems: secondary side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, O.

    1978-01-01

    Transfer of chemicals in the secondary side of pressurized water reactor systems with recirculating and once-through steam generators is considered. Chemical data on water, steam and deposit chemistry of twenty-six operating units are given and major physical-chemical processes and differences between the two systems and between fossil and PWR systems are discussed. It is concluded that the limited available data show the average water and steam chemistry to be within recommended limits, but large variations of impurity concentrations and corrosion problems encountered indicate that our knowledge of the system chemistry and chemical thermodynamics, system design, sampling, analysis and operation need improvement. (author)

  15. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented

  16. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented. 6 references, 4 figures

  17. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables

  18. PWR standardization: The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    After a short historical review of the French PWR programme with 45000 MWe in operation and 15000 MWe under construction, the paper first develops the objectives and limits of the standardizatoin policy. Implementation of standardization is described through successive reactor series and feedback of experience, together with its impact on safety and on codes and standards. Present benefits of standardization range from low engineering costs to low backfitting costs, via higher quality, reduction in construction times and start-up schedules and improved training of operators. The future of the French programme into the 1990's is again with an advanced standardized series, the N4-1400 MW plant. There is no doubt that the very positive experience with standardization is relevant to any country trying to achieve self-reliance in the nuclear power field. (author)

  19. VALIDATION OF SIMBAT-PWR USING STANDARD CODE OF COBRA-EN ON REACTOR TRANSIENT CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Darwis Isnaini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The validation of Pressurized Water Reactor typed Nuclear Power Plant simulator developed by BATAN (SIMBAT-PWR using standard code of COBRA-EN on reactor transient condition has been done. The development of SIMBAT-PWR has accomplished several neutronics and thermal-hydraulic calculation modules. Therefore, the validation of the simulator is needed, especially in transient reactor operation condition. The research purpose is for characterizing the thermal-hydraulic parameters of PWR1000 core, which be able to be applied or as a comparison in developing the SIMBAT-PWR. The validation involves the calculation of the thermal-hydraulic parameters using COBRA-EN code. Furthermore, the calculation schemes are based on COBRA-EN with fixed material properties and dynamic properties that calculated by MATPRO subroutine (COBRA-EN+MATPRO for reactor condition of startup, power rise and power fluctuation from nominal to over power. The comparison of the temperature distribution at nominal 100% power shows that the fuel centerline temperature calculated by SIMBAT-PWR has 8.76% higher result than COBRA-EN result and 7.70% lower result than COBRA-EN+MATPRO. In general, SIMBAT-PWR calculation results on fuel temperature distribution are mostly between COBRA-EN and COBRA-EN+MATPRO results. The deviations of the fuel centerline, fuel surface, inner and outer cladding as well as coolant bulk temperature in the SIMBAT-PWR and the COBRA-EN calculation, are due to the value difference of the gap heat transfer coefficient and the cladding thermal conductivity.

  20. Modeling and diagnostic techniques applicable to the analysis of pressure noise in pressurized water reactors and pressure-sensing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullens, J.A.; Thie, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Pressure noise data from a PWR are interpreted by means of a computer-implemented model. The model's parameters, namely hydraulic impedances and noise sources, are either calculated or deduced from fits to data. Its accuracy is encouraging and raises the possibility of diagnostic assistance for nuclear plant monitoring. A number of specific applications of pressure noise in the primary system of a PWR and in a pressure sensing system are suggested

  1. Mathematical modelling of plant transients in the PWR for simulator purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartel, K.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter presents the results of the testing of anticipated and abnormal plant transients in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) of the type WWER 440 by means of the numerical simulation of 32 different, stationary and nonstationary, operational regimes. Topics considered include the formation of the PWR mathematical model, the physical approximation of the reactor core, the structure of the reactor core model, a mathematical approximation of the reactor model, the selection of numerical methods, and a computerized simulation system. The necessity of a PWR simulator in Czechoslovakia is justified by the present status and the outlook for the further development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power complex

  2. Operating experience with an on-line vibration control system for PWR main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, J.; Stegemann, D.; Vortriede, A.

    1996-01-01

    The main circulation pumps are key components of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, because the availability of the main circulation pumps has a direct influence on the availability and electrical output of the entire plant. The on-line automatic vibration control system ASMAS was developed for early failure detection during the normal operation of the main circulation pumps in order to avoid unexpected outages and to establish the possibility of preventive maintenance of the pumps. This system is permanently and successfully operating in three German 1300 MW el NPP's with PWR and has been successfully tested in a 350 MW el NPP with a PWR. (orig.)

  3. Operating experience with an on-line vibration control system for PWR main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, J.; Stegemann, D.; Vortriede, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main circulation pumps are key components of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors (PWRs), because the availability of the main circulation pumps has a direct influence on the availability and electrical output of the entire plant. The on-line automatic vibration control system ASMAS was developed for early failure detection during the normal operation of the main circulation pumps in order to avoid unexpected outages and to establish the possibility of preventive maintenance of the pumps. This system is permanently and successfully operating in three German 1300 MW e1 NPP's with PWR and has been successfully tested in a 350 MW e1 NPP with a PWR. (orig.)

  4. Prevention and mitigation of steam-generator water-hammer events in PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.; Anderson, N.

    1982-11-01

    Water hammer in nuclear power plants is an unresolved safety issue under study at the NRC (USI A-1). One of the identified safety concerns is steam generator water hammer (SGWH) in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) plants. This report presents a summary of: (1) the causes of SGWH; (2) various fixes employed to prevent or mitigate SGWH; and (3) the nature and status of modifications that have been made at each operating PWR plant. The NRC staff considers that the issue of SGWH in top feedring designs has been technically resolved. This report does not address technical findings relevant to water hammer in preheat type steam generators. 10 figures, 2 tables

  5. Experiments on natural circulation during PWR severe accidents and their analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Stewart, W.A.; Sha, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Buoyancy-induced natural circulation flows will occur during the early-part of PWR high pressure accident scenarios. These flows affect several key parameters; in particular, the course of such accidents will most probably change due to local failures occurring in the primary coolant system (CS) before substantial core degradation. Natural circulation flow patterns were measured in a one-seventh scale PWR PCS facility at Westinghouse RandD laboratories. The measured flow and temperature distributions are report in this paper. The experiments were analyzed with the COMMIX code and good agreement was obtained between data and calculations. 10 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Nonlinear Fuzzy Model Predictive Control for a PWR Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjie Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable power and temperature control in pressurized water reactor (PWR nuclear power plant is necessary to guarantee high efficiency and plant safety. Since the nuclear plants are quite nonlinear, the paper presents nonlinear fuzzy model predictive control (MPC, by incorporating the realistic constraints, to realize the plant optimization. T-S fuzzy modeling on nuclear power plant is utilized to approximate the nonlinear plant, based on which the nonlinear MPC controller is devised via parallel distributed compensation (PDC scheme in order to solve the nonlinear constraint optimization problem. Improved performance compared to the traditional PID controller for a TMI-type PWR is obtained in the simulation.

  7. On-line analysis of ETA and organic acids in secondary systems of PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurashina, Masahiko; Uzawa, Hideo; Utagawa, Koya; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    To reduce the iron concentration in the secondary water of plants with pressurized water reactors (PWRs), ethanolamine (ETA) is used as an alkalizing agent in the secondary cycle. An on-line ion chromatography (IC) monitoring system for monitoring concentrations of ETA and anions of organic acids was developed, its performance was evaluated, and verification tests were conducted at an actual PWR plant. It was demonstrated that the concentration of both ETA and anions of organic acids may be successfully monitored by IC in PWR secondary cycle streams alkalized by ETA. (orig.)

  8. Babcock and Wilcox advanced PWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulynych, G.E.; Lemon, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Babcock and Wilcox 600 MWe PWR design is discussed. Main features of the new B-600 design are improvements in reactor system configuration, glandless coolant pumps, safety features, core design and steam generators

  9. Hydrogen production in a PWR during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information on hydrogen generation during LOCA in French 900 MW PWR power plants. The design basis accident is taken into account as well as more severe accidents assuming failure of emergency systems

  10. PWR cold-leg small break loca with faulty HPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumamaru, H.; Kukita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a 1/48 volumetrically-scaled model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). At the LSTF are performed cold-leg small-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests with faulty high pressure injection (HPI) system for break areas from 0.5% to 10% and an intentional primary system depressurization test following a small-break LOCA test. A simple prediction model is proposed for prediction of times of major events. Test data and calculations show that intentional primary system depressurization with use of the pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) is effective for break areas of approximately 0.5% or less, is unnecessary for breaks of 5% or more, and is insufficient for intermediate break areas to maintain adequate core cooling. (author)

  11. A comparison of in-vessel behaviors between SFR and PWR under severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sanggil; Cho, Cheon Hwey [ACT Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Ji [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper aims to provide an easy guide for experts who know well the severe accident phenomenology of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) by comparing both reactor design concepts and in vessel behaviors under a postulated severe accident condition. This study only provides a preliminary qualitative comparison based on available literature. The PWR and SFR in-vessel design concepts and their effects under a postulate severe accident are investigated in this paper. Although this work is a preliminary study to compare the in-vessel behaviors for both PWR and SFR, it seems that there is no possibility to lead a significant core damage in the metal fuel SFR concept. In the oxide fuel SFR, there might be a chance to progress to the severe accident initiators such as the energetic reaction, flow blockage and so on.

  12. Sensitivity Verification of PWR Monitoring System Using Neuro-Expert For LOCA Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Subekti

    2009-01-01

    Sensitivity Verification of PWR Monitoring System Using Neuro-Expert For LOCA Detection. The present research was done for verification of previous developed method on Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) detection and perform simulations for knowing the sensitivity of the PWR monitoring system that applied neuro-expert method. The previous research continuing on present research, has developed and has tested the neuro-expert method for several anomaly detections in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) typed Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Neuro-expert can detect the LOCA anomaly with sensitivity of primary coolant leakage of 7 gallon/min and the conventional method could not detect the primary coolant leakage of 30 gallon/min. Neuro expert method detects significantly LOCA anomaly faster than conventional system in Surry-1 NPP as well so that the impact risk is reducible. (author)

  13. Integral type small PWR with stand-alone safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    A feasibility study is achieved on an integral type small PWR with stand-alone safety. It is designed to have the following features. (1) The coolant does not leak out at any accidental condition. (2) The fuel failure does never occur while it is supposed on the large scale PWR at the design base accident. (3) At any accidental condition the safety is secured without any support from the outside (stand-alone safety secure). (4) It has self-regulating characteristics and easy controllability. The above features can be satisfied by integrate the steam generator and CRDM in the reactor vessel while the pipe line break has to be considered on the conventional PWR. Several counter measures are planned to satisfy the above features. The economy feature is also attained by several simplifications such as (1) elimination of main coolant piping and pressurizer by the integration of primary cooling system and self-pressurizing, (2) elimination of RCP by application of natural circulating system, (3) elimination of ECCS and accumulator by application of static safety system, (4) large scale volume reduction of the container vessel by application of integrated primary cooling system, (5) elimination of boric acid treatment by deletion of chemical shim. The long operation period such as 10 years can be attained by the application of Gd fuel in one batch refueling. The construction period can be shortened by the standardizing the design and the introduction of modular component system. Furthermore the applicability of the reduced modulation core is also considered. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  14. Preliminary safety analysis of the PWR with accident-tolerant fuels during severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng; Liu, Tong; Deng, Yongjun; Huang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of severe accident scenarios for a PWR fueled with ATF system is performed. • A large-break LOCA without ECCS is analyzed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • Extended SBO cases are discussed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • The accident-tolerance of ATF system for application in PWR is illustrated. - Abstract: Experience gained in decades of nuclear safety research and previous nuclear accidents direct to the investigation of passive safety system design and accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) system which is now becoming a hot research point in the nuclear energy field. The ATF system is aimed at upgrading safety characteristics of the nuclear fuel and cladding in a reactor core where active cooling has been lost, and is preferable or comparable to the current UO 2 –Zr system when the reactor is in normal operation. By virtue of advanced materials with improved properties, the ATF system will obviously slow down the progression of accidents, allowing wider margin of time for the mitigation measures to work. Specifically, the simulation and analysis of a large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) without ECCS and extended station blackout (SBO) severe accident are performed for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) loaded with ATF candidates, to reflect the accident-tolerance of ATF

  15. LOFT instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixby, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    A description of instrumentation used in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) large break Loss-of-Coolant Experiments is presented. Emphasis is placed on hydraulic and thermal measurements in the primary system piping and components, reactor vessel, and pressure suppression system. In addition, instrumentation which is being considered for measurement of phenomena during future small break testing is discussed. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 BRE [de

  16. Line pressure effects on differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, G.G.; Evans, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of differential pressure transducers in experimental pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems was evaluated. Transient differential pressure measurements made using a simple calibration proportionality relating differential pressure to output voltage could have large measurement uncertainties. A more sophisticated calibration equation was derived to incorporate the effects of zero shifts and sensitivity shifts as pressure in the pressure sensing line changes with time. A comparison made between the original calibration proportionality equation and the derived compensation equation indicates that potential measurement uncertainties can be reduced

  17. Analysis and research of PWR instrument commissioning based on Simulink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Zhenhua; Liu Daoguang; Qiu Shaoshuai; Yang Zongwei; Feng Guangyu

    2013-01-01

    Based on Simulink platform, a mathematical model of the lead lag link, differential unit, arithmetic logic module is built. Considering the specific problems encountered in the debug field work, this model is applied in the analysis of key modules and controller and in the resolving of eddy current problems. The test process dynamic control characteristic is simulated, to analyze the trend of the actual response, and conduct the simulation study and propose the concrete solutions. The actual debugging process proved that the use of simulation technology to find the problem, optimize the control data, and adjust the control strategy is very important for the early detection of problems and to speed the test process, shorten the debug duration and increase the debug quality. (authors)

  18. Instrumentation of a Charpy-pendulum. Additional data obtained from it and its application to nuclear reactor pressure vessels surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomik, Enrique P.; Dhers, Horacio; Iorio, Antonio F.; Ciriani, Dario F.

    1999-01-01

    Charpy test gives information about a material dynamic fracture behavior. In a plain Charpy test, this information is the absorbed energy during fracture of the specimen, lateral deformation and the percentage of ductile fracture of the specimen. These parameters can then be used for the determination of the material response to a dynamic applied load, and are used at present to determine the brittle-ductile transition temperature of a material. However, there is a lot of additional information that can be obtained from a Charpy test, which is vital for the case of surveillance programs of nuclear power plants, where it is necessary to get the most available information from the specimens to be tested, because each one of them was irradiated for many years under temperature and neutronic flux conditions similar to that of the internal surface of the reactor pressure vessel, which converts these specimens in unique and very expensive ones. This additional information can be obtained from the curve that determines the evolution of the applied force to the specimen throughout the time involved in its fracture. It was possible to instrument a Charpy pendulum at a fraction of the cost necessary to buy an instrumentation package like the ones available in the market, and since the instrumentation equipment obtained is easy to transport. It has the additional advantage that can be used to instrument any other pendulum replacing only the hammer of the pendulum with a instrumented one for that pendulum. (author)

  19. A Study on Structural Strength of Irradiated Spacer Grid for PWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Y. G.; Baek, S. J.; Kim, D. S.; Yoo, B. O.; Ahn, S. B.; Chun, Y. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. J. [KEPCO NF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A fuel assembly consists of an array of fuel rods, spacer grids, guide thimbles, instrumentation tubes, and top and bottom nozzles. In PWR (Pressurized light Water Reactor) fuel assemblies, the spacer grids support the fuel rods by the friction forces between the fuel rods and springs/dimples. Under irradiation, the spacer grids supporting the fuel rods absorb vibration impacts due to the reactor coolant flow, and also bear static and dynamic loads during operation inside the nuclear reactor and transportation for spent fuel storage. Thus, it is important to understand the characteristics of deformation behavior and the change in structural strength of an irradiated spacer grid.. In the present study, the static compression test of a spacer grid was conducted to investigate the structural strength of the irradiated spacer grid in a hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) of KAERI. To evaluate the structural strength of an irradiated spacer grid, hot cell tests were carried out at IMEF of KAERI. The fuel assembly was dismantled and the irradiated spacer grid was obtained for the compression test. The apparatus for measuring the compression strength of the irradiated spacer grid was developed and installed successfully in the hot cell.

  20. Experiment of the downcomer effective water head during a reflood phase of PWR LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio; Murao, Yoshio

    1978-12-01

    The results and analysis are described of a downcomer effective water head experiment. Downcomer effective water head is the driving force to feed an emergency coolant to the core during a reflood phase of PWR LOCA. The test rig has dimensions of the full-scale height and gap. Experimental conditions are: downcomer wall temperature = 250 0 -- 300 0 C, back pressure = 1 atm, coolant temperature = 98 0 -- 100 0 C, extraction water velocity = 0 -- 2 cm/s, and gap size = 200 mm. The effective water head histories obtained by experiment were compared with those predicted from the heat release from the downcomer walls. The heat release was calculated from the temperature histories indicated by thermocouples instrumented in and on the walls during experiment. The following were revealed: (1) The relation of heat flux and superheat (q vs ΔT sub(s)) obtained in the experiment is much different from that in pool boiling. (2) The predicted effective water head is in good agreement with the experimental one after 120 sec from the initiation of coolant injection. (3) The effect of extraction water velocity is negligible. (4) The effect of initial wall temperatures is evident. (author)

  1. Reverse depletion method for PWR core reload design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1985-01-01

    Low-leakage fuel management is currently practiced in over half of all pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores. Prospects for even greater use of in-board fresh fuel loading are good as utilities seek to reduce core vessel fluence, mitigate pressurized thermal shock concerns, and extend vessel lifetime. Consequently, large numbers of burnable poison (BP) pins are being used to control the power peaking at the in-board fresh fuel positions. This has presented an additional complexity to the core reload design problem. In addition to determining the best location of each assembly in the core, the designer must concurrently determine the distribution of BP pins in the fresh fuel. A procedure was developed that utilizes the well-known Haling depletion to achieve an end-of-cycle (EOC) core state where the assembly pattern is configured in the absence of all control poison. This effectively separates the assembly assignment and BP distribution problems. Once an acceptable pattern at EOC is configured, the burnable and soluble poison required to control the power and core excess reactivity are solved for as unknown variables while depleting the cycle in reverse from the EOC exposure distribution to the beginning of cycle. The methods developed were implemented in an approved light water reactor licensing code to ensure the validity of the results obtained and provide for the maximum utility to PWR core reload design

  2. Modifications needed to operate PWR's plants in G-Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainman, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The production of electricity from PWR nuclear plants represents 44% of the total production of electricity in France for 1984, and 68% of the electricity produced by Thermal power plants (127 TWh over 187 TWh). These data show clearly that the French PWR plants do not work in ''base mode'' anymore but have to fit production with consumption, in other words to assume the frequency control. To participate permanently to the load follow and frequency control, it appeared that some improvements in the field of pressurizer level and pressure control were necessary as well as in the field of operator aids computer. It should be noted that these improvements are useful even without taking into account the constraints due to load follow and frequency control because of the mechanical stress in the CVCS piping, for instance. Some additional tests are planned to better identify this specific problem. The need of a more flexible operating mode than ones given by the initial system (black control rods), significantly reduced in 1973 due to the application of the ECCS criterion, led EDF and Framatome to develop a new operating mode (G. Mode) allowing a faster power escalation (5% PN/mn) whatever the fuel burn-up. This new operating mode improves significantly also the flexibility of operation when the frequency control is needed, and helps a lot the operators in such cases. All the 900 MWe Nuclear plants will be able to operate in ''G mode'' before the end of 1984

  3. Surface reactivity of colloidal corrosion product and alloys in PWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Gregory; Leclercq, Stephanie; Cabanas, Bruna-Martin; Delaunay, Sophie; Mansour, Carine; Berger, Gilles

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion of metallic components of water circuits of Pressurized Water Reactors generates colloidal particles. These particles are transported in the circuits, they sorb dissolved species and they can deposit on alloys in given parts of the circuits. Sorption and deposition generate several technical drawbacks in both primary and secondary circuits. According to the DLVO theory, adhesion between two surfaces is controlled by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. The latter are always attractive and does not depends on solution chemistry. On the contrary, electrostatic forces are connected to the surface charge and depend strongly on the chemical properties of the solids and on the chemistry of the solution. Depending on the relative charge of the surfaces, these forces are attractive or repulsive and can have a major effect on the deposition behavior of particles. According to the surface complexation theory, the surface charge of metallic oxides results from sorption or desorption of protons, leading to positive or negative surface sites, and thus, strongly depends on the solution pH. Dissolved species can sorb on the surface, depending on the ionic charge of these species and on the surface charge. Thus, the knowledge of the surface charge of corrosion particles and alloys, their affinity towards several ions as protons, nickel, cobalt, sulfate, or borate ions has been shown to be useful to predict the transport of the contamination in the primary circuit, or to understand the accumulation of impurities in the steam generator in the secondary circuit. At room temperature, these data can be easily measured, or found in literature. In PWR conditions (high temperature, high pressure), most of the usual protocols and commercial instruments cannot be used. For several years, collaboration between EDF R and D and CNRS has been developed to get information about the surface reactivity of iron oxides, ferrites, and alloys in such conditions. Some of the results

  4. Upgrading of PWR plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Tomonori; Sasaki, Kazunori; Nakaishi, Hirokazu.

    1989-01-01

    For the education and training of operators in electric power plants, simulators have been employed, and it is well known that their effect is great. There are operation training simulators which simulate the dynamic characteristics of plants and all the machinery and equipment that operators handle, and train the procedure of restoration at the time of abnormality in plants, education simulators which can analyze the dynamic characteristics of plants efficiently in a short time, and offer information by visualizing phenomena with three-dimensional display and others so as to be easily understandable, and forecast simulators which do the analysis forecasting plant behavior at the time of abnormality in plants, and investigate the necessity of the guide for operation procedure and the countermeasures at the time of emergency. In this explanation, the upgrading of operation training simulators which have been put already in training is discussed. The constitution of simulator system and the instructor function, the outline of PWR plant simulation models comprising thermal flow model, pump model, leak model and so on, the techniques of increasing simulator speed, and the example of analysis using the NUPAC code are reported. (K.I.)

  5. PWR secondary water chemistry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

    1977-02-01

    Several types of corrosion damage are currently chronic problems in PWR recirculating steam generators. One probable cause of damage is a local high concentration of an aggressive chemical even though only trace levels are present in feedwater. A wide variety of trace chemicals can find their way into feedwater, depending on the sources of condenser cooling water and the specific feedwater treatment. In February 1975, Nuclear Water and Waste Technology Corporation (NWT), was contracted to characterize secondary system water chemistry at five operating PWRs. Plants were selected to allow effects of cooling water chemistry and operating history on steam generator corrosion to be evaluated. Calvert Cliffs 1, Prairie Island 1 and 2, Surry 2, and Turkey Point 4 were monitored during the program. Results to date in the following areas are summarized: (1) plant chemistry variations during normal operation, transients, and shutdowns; (2) effects of condenser leakage on steam generator chemistry; (3) corrosion product transport during all phases of operation; (4) analytical prediction of chemistry in local areas from bulk water chemistry measurements; and (5) correlation of corrosion damage to chemistry variation

  6. Study of PWR reactor efficiency as a function of turbine steam extractions; Estudo da otimizacao da eficiencia de reator PWR em funcao das extracoes de vapor da turbina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Janine Gandolpho da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques; Martinez, Aquilino Senra [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this work is to optimize the extractions of the low-pressure turbine of a PWR nuclear reactor, in order to obtain the best thermodynamic cycle efficiency. We have analyzed typical data of a 1300 MW PWR reactor, operating at 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% capacities, respectively. The first stage of this study consists of generating a mathematical model capable of describing the reactor behavior and efficiency at any power level. The second stage of this study consists of to combine the generated mathematical model in an optimization computer program that optimize the extractions flow of the low-pressure turbine until it finds the optimal system efficiency. This work does not alter the nuclear facility project in any way. (author)

  7. Crack growth rate of PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethmont, M.; Doyen, J.J.; Lebey, J.

    1979-01-01

    The Aquitaine 1 program, carried out jointly by FRAMATOME and the CEA is intended to improve knowledge about cracking mechanisms in AISI 316 L austenitic stainless steel under conditions similar to those of the PWR environment (irradiation excluded). Experiments of fatigue crack growth are performed on piping elements, scale 1/4 of primary pipings, by means of internal hydraulic cyclic pressure. Interpretation of results requires a knowledge of the stress intensity factor Ksub(I) at the front of the crack. Results of a series of calculations of Ksub(I) obtained by different methods for defects of finite and infinite length (three dimensional calculations) are given in the paper. The following have been used: calculations by finite elements, calculations by weight function. Notches are machined on the test pipes, which are subjected to internal hydraulic pressure cycles, under cold conditions, to initiate a crack at the tip of the notch. They are then cycled at a frequency of 4 cycles/hour on on water demineralised loop at a temperature of 280 0 C, the pressure varying at each cycle between approximately 160 bars and 3 bars. After each test, a specimen containing the defect is taken from the pipe for micrographic analysis. For the first test the length of the longitudinal external defect is assumed infinite. The number of cycles carried out is 5880 cycles. Two defects are machined in the tube for the second test. The number of cycles carried out is N = 440. The tests are performed under hot conditions (T = 280 0 C). For the third test two defects are analysed under cold and hot conditions. The number of cycles carried out for the external defect is 7000 when hot and 90000 when cold. The number of cycles for the internal defect is 1650 when hot and 68000 when cold. In order to interpret the results, the data da/dN are plotted on a diagram versus ΔK. Comparisons are made between these results and the curves from laboratory tests

  8. A Feasibility Study on Core Cooling of Reduced-Moderation PWR for the Large Break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroyuki Yoshida; Akira Ohnuki; Hajime Akimoto

    2002-01-01

    A design study of a reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) with tight lattice core is being carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) as one candidate for future reactors. The concept is developed to achieve a conversion ratio greater than unity using the tight lattice core (volume ratio of moderator to fuel is around 0.5 and the gap spacing between the fuel rods is remarkably narrower than in a reactor currently operated). Under such tight configuration, the core thermal margin becomes smaller and should be evaluated in a normal operation and also during the reflood phase in a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) for PWR type reactors. In this study, we have performed a feasibility evaluation on core cooling of reduced moderation PWR for the LBLOCA (200% break). The evaluation was performed for the primary system after the break by the REFLA/TRAC code. The core thermal output of the reduced moderation PWR is 2900 MWt, the gap between adjacent fuel rods is 1 mm, and heavy water is used as the moderator and coolant. The present design adopts seed fuel assemblies (MOX fuel) and several blanket fuel assemblies. In the blanket fuel assemblies, power density is lower than that of the seed fuel assemblies. Then, we set a channel box to each fuel assembly in order to adjust the flow rate in each assembly, because the possibility that the coolant boils in the seed fuel assemblies is very high. The pressure vessel diameter is bigger in comparison with a current PWR and core height is smaller than the current one. The current 4-loop PWR system is used, and, however, to fit into the bigger pressure vessel volume (about 1.5 times), we set up the capacity of the accumulator (1.5 times of the current PWR). Although the maximum clad temperature reached at about 1200 K in the position of 0.6 m from the lower core support plate, it is sufficiently lower than the design criteria of the current PWR (1500 K). The core cooling of the reduced moderation

  9. Research and design of 3He pressure control loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xin; Zhang Peisheng; Tang Guoliang; Zhang Aimin; Zhang Yingchao

    2008-01-01

    In order to carry out power transient tests for PWR fuel element in China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), the research and conceptual design of 3He pressure control loop were completed. The working principle, design parameters and technological flow of the loop were described. It is seen that the a He loop can adjust the power of the tested PWR fuel element rapidly, evenly and flexibly and it is an optimal path to realize the power transient regulation for tested PWR fuel. (authors)

  10. Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) Characterization of Methane Gas Hydrate-Bearing Pressure Cores Collected from the Methane Production Test Site in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W. F.; Santamarina, J. C.; Dai, S.; Winters, W. J.; Yoneda, J.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J.; Suzuki, K.; Fujii, T.; Mason, D. H.; Bergeron, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure cores obtained at the Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, the site of the methane hydrate production test completed by the Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21) project in March 2013, were recovered from ~300 meters beneath the sea floor at close to in situ pressure. Cores were subsequently stored at ~20 MPa and ~5°C, which maintained hydrate in the cores within stability conditions. Pressure core physical properties were measured at 10 MPa and ~6°C, also within the methane hydrate stability field, using the IPTC and other Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs). Discrete IPTC measurements were carried out in strata ranging from silty sands to clayey silts within the turbidite sequences recovered in the cores. As expected, hydrate saturations were greatest in more permeable coarser-grained layers. Key results include: 1) Where hydrate saturation exceeded 40% in sandy sediments, the gas hydrate binds sediment grains within the matrix. The pressure core analyses yielded nearly in situ mechanical properties despite the absence of effective stress in the IPTC. 2) In adjacent fine-grained sediment (hydrate saturation < 15%), hydrate did not significantly bind the sediment. IPTC results in these locations were consistent with the zero effective-stress limit of comparable measurements made in PCCT devices that are designed to restore the specimen's in situ effective stress. In sand-rich intervals with high gas hydrate saturations, the measured compressional and shear wave velocities suggest that hydrate acts as a homogeneously-distributed, load-bearing member of the bulk sediment. The sands with high gas hydrate saturations were prone to fracturing (brittle failure) during insertion of the cone penetrometer and electrical conductivity probes. Authors would like to express their sincere appreciation to MH21 and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry for permitting this work to be disclosed at the 2014 Fall AGU meeting.

  11. Plutonium recycle in PWR reactors (Brazilian Nuclear Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-02-01

    An evaluation is made of the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. It starts from the calculation of a reference reactor and allows the evaluation of demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. For plutonium recycle, the concept of uranium and plutonium homogeneous mixture has been adopted, using self-produced plutonium at equilibrium, in order to get minimum neutronic perturbations in the reactor core. The refueling model studied in the reference reactor was the 'out-in' scheme with a constant number of changed fuel elements (approximately 1/3 of the core). Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5%U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the 5th operation cycle of the thermal reactors. The cumulative amount of fissile plutonium obtained by the Brazilian Nuclear Program of PWR reactors by 1991 should be sufficient for a fast breeder with the same capacity as Angra 2. For the proposed fast breeder programs, the fissile plutonium produced by thermal reactors is sufficient to supply fast breeder initial necessities. Howewer, U 3 O 8 and SWU economy with recycle is not significant when the proposed fast breeder program is considered. (Author) [pt

  12. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  13. Experimental study on reflooding in advanced tight lattice PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, K.; Kodama, J.; Teramae, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is related to the experimental study on the feasibility of core cooling by re-flooding in a large break loss of coolant accident (LOCA) for the advanced tight lattice pressurized water reactor (PWR). The tight lattice core design should be adopted to improve the conversion ratio. Major one of the key questions of such tight lattice core is the cooling capability under the re-flood condition in a large break LOCA. Forced feed bottom re-flooding experiments have been performed by use of a 4x4 triangular array rod bundle. The rod gap is 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, or 1.5 mm. The measured peak temperature is below around 1273 K even in case of 1.0/0.5 mm rod gap. And, the evaluation based on the experimental results of rod temperatures and core pressure drop also shows that the core cooling under re-flooding condition is feasible. (author)

  14. Behaviour of organic iodides under pwr accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alm, M.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the behaviour of radioactive methyl iodide under PWR loss-of-coolant conditions. The pressure relief equipment consisted of an autoclave for simulating the primary circuit and of an expansion vessel for simulating the conditions after a rupture in the reactor coolant system. After pressure relief, the composition of the CH 3 sup(127/131)I-containing steam-air mixture within the expansion vessel was analysed at 80 0 C over a period of 42 days. On the basis of the values measured and of data taken from the literature, both qualitative and quantitative assessments have been made as to the behaviour of radioactive methyl iodide in the event of loss-of-coolant accidents. (author)

  15. Simplified model of a PWR primary coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.L. de; Faya, A.J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The computer program RENUR was developed to perform a very simplified simulation of a typical PWR primary circuit. The program has mathematical models for the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor core and the pressurizer, the rest of the circuit being treated as a single volume. Heat conduction in the fuel rod is analysed by a nodal model. Average and hot channels are treated so that the bulk response of the core and DNBR can be evaluated. A Homogenenous model is employed in the pressurizer. Results are presented for a steady-state situation as well as for a loss of load transient. Agreement with the results of more elaborate computer codes is good with substantial reduction in computer costs. (author) [pt

  16. PWR reactor vessel in-service-inspection according to RSEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algarotti, Marc; Dubois, Philippe; Hernandez, Luc; Landez, Jean Paul

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear services experience Framatome ANP (an AREVA and Siemens company) has designed and constructed 86 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) around the world including the three units lately commissioned at Ling Ao in the People's Republic of China and ANGRA 2 in Brazil; the company provided general and specialized outage services supporting numerous outages. Along with the American and German subsidiaries, Framatome ANP Inc. and Framatome ANP GmbH, Framatome ANP is among the world leading nuclear services providers, having experience of over 500 PWR outages on 4 continents, with current involvement in more than 50 PWR outages per year. Framatome ANP's experience in the examinations of reactor components began in the 1970's. Since then, each unit (American, French and German companies) developed automated NDT inspection systems and carried out pre-service and ISI (In-Service Inspections) using a large range of NDT techniques to comply with each utility expectations. These techniques have been validated by the utilities and the safety authorities of the countries where they were implemented. Notably Framatome ANP is fully qualified to provide full scope ISI services to satisfy ASME Section XI requirements, through automated NDE tasks including nozzle inspections, reactor vessel head inspections, steam generator inspections, pressurizer inspections and RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) inspections. Intercontrole (Framatome ANP subsidiary dedicated in supporting ISI) is one of the leading NDT companies in the world. Its main activity is devoted to the inspection of the reactor primary circuit in French and foreign PWR Nuclear Power Plants: the reactor vessel, the steam generators, the pressurizer, the reactor internals and reactor coolant system piping. NDT methods mastered by Intercontrole range from ultrasonic testing to eddy current and gamma ray examinations, as well as dye penetrant testing, acoustic monitoring and leak testing. To comply with the high requirements of

  17. Sterilization and decontamination of medical instruments by low-pressure plasma discharges: application of Ar/O2/N2 ternary mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kylian, O; Rossi, F

    2009-01-01

    A low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge sustained in an argon-oxygen-nitrogen ternary mixture is studied in order to evaluate its properties in terms of sterilization and decontamination of surfaces of medical instruments. It is demonstrated by direct comparison with discharges operated in oxygen-nitrogen and oxygen-argon mixtures that application of an Ar/O 2 /N 2 mixture offers the possibility to combine advantageous properties of the binary mixtures, namely, the capability of an O 2 /N 2 plasma to emit intense UV radiation needed for effective inactivation of bacterial spores together with high removal rates of biological substances from Ar/O 2 discharge. Moreover, optimal conditions for both effects are obtained at a similar ternary discharge mixture composition, which is of much interest for real applications, since it offers a highly effective process desired for the safety of medical instruments.

  18. Sterilization and decontamination of medical instruments by low-pressure plasma discharges: application of Ar/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} ternary mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kylian, O [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8, 180 00 (Czech Republic); Rossi, F, E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.i [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Via E Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)

    2009-04-21

    A low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge sustained in an argon-oxygen-nitrogen ternary mixture is studied in order to evaluate its properties in terms of sterilization and decontamination of surfaces of medical instruments. It is demonstrated by direct comparison with discharges operated in oxygen-nitrogen and oxygen-argon mixtures that application of an Ar/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixture offers the possibility to combine advantageous properties of the binary mixtures, namely, the capability of an O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma to emit intense UV radiation needed for effective inactivation of bacterial spores together with high removal rates of biological substances from Ar/O{sub 2} discharge. Moreover, optimal conditions for both effects are obtained at a similar ternary discharge mixture composition, which is of much interest for real applications, since it offers a highly effective process desired for the safety of medical instruments.

  19. PWR station blackout transient simulation in the INER integral system test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T.J.; Lee, C.H.; Hong, W.T.; Chang, Y.H.

    2004-01-01

    Station blackout transient (or TMLB' scenario) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) was simulated using the INER Integral System Test Facility (IIST) which is a 1/400 volumetrically-scaled reduce-height and reduce-pressure (RHRP) simulator of a Westinghouse three-loop PWR. Long-term thermal-hydraulic responses including the secondary boil-off and the subsequent primary saturation, pressurization and core uncovery were simulated based on the assumptions of no offsite and onsite power, feedwater and operator actions. The results indicate that two-phase discharge is the major depletion mode since it covers 81.3% of the total amount of the coolant inventory loss. The primary coolant inventory has experienced significant re-distribution during a station blackout transient. The decided parameter to avoid the core overheating is not the total amount of the coolant inventory remained in the primary core cooling system but only the part of coolant left in the pressure vessel. The sequence of significant events during transient for the IIST were also compared with those of the ROSA-IV large-scale test facility (LSTF), which is a 1/48 volumetrically-scaled full-height and full-pressure (FHFP) simulator of a PWR. The comparison indicates that the sequence and timing of these events during TMLB' transient studied in the RHRP IIST facility are generally consistent with those of the FHFP LSTF. (author)

  20. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  1. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

  2. PWR-GALE, Radioactive Gaseous Release and Liquid Release from PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The PWR-GALE (Boiling Water Reactor Gaseous and Liquid Effluents) Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the release of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The calculations are based on data generated from operating reactors, field tests, laboratory tests, and plant-specific design considerations incorporated to reduce the quantity of radioactive materials that may be released to the environment. 2 - Method of solution: GALE calculates expected releases based on 1) standardized coolant activities derived from ANS Standards 18.1 Working Group recommendations, 2) release and transport mechanisms that result in the appearance of radioactive material in liquid and gaseous waste streams, 3) plant-specific design features used to reduce the quantities of radioactive materials ultimately released to the environs, and 4) information received on the operation of nuclear power plants. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The liquid release portion of GALE uses subroutines taken from the ORIGEN (CCC-217) to calculate radionuclide buildup and decay during collection, processing, and storage of liquid radwaste. Memory requirements for this part of the program are determined by the large nuclear data base accessed by these subroutines

  3. A new online software tool for pressure ulcer monitoring as an educational instrument for unified nursing assessment in clinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pokorná

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Data collection and evaluation of that data is crucial for effective quality management and naturally also for prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Data collected in a uniform manner by nurses in clinical practice could be used for further analyses. Data about pressure ulcers are collected to differing degrees of quality based on the local policy of the given health care facility and in relation to the nurse’s actual level of knowledge concerning pressure ulcer identification and use of objective scales (i.e. categorization of pressure ulcers. Therefore, we have developed software suitable for data collection which includes some educational tools to promote unified reporting of data by nurses. A description of this software and some educational and learning components of the tool is presented herein. The planned process of clinical application of the newly developed software is also briefly mentioned. The discussion is focused on the usability of the online reporting tool and possible further development of the tool.

  4. 21-PWR Waste Package Side and End Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Delabrosse

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities and initial angles between the waste package and the unyielding surface is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the area of the outer shell (OS) where the residual stress exceeds a given limit (hereafter ''damaged area''). The stress limit is defined as a fraction of the yield strength of the OS material, Alloy 22 (SB-575 N06022), at the appropriate temperature. The design of the 21-PWR waste package used in this calculation is that defined in Reference 8. However, a value of 4 mm was used for the gap between the inner shell and the OS, and the thickness of the OS was reduced by 2 mm. The sketch in Attachment I provides additional information not included in Reference 8. All obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Specialty Analyses and Waste Package Design Section. The waste package (i.e. uncanistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container) is classified as Quality Level 1

  5. 21-PWR Waste Package Side and End Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Schmitt

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities and initial angles between the waste package and the unyielding surface is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the area of the outer shell (OS) where the residual stress exceeds a given limit (hereafter ''damaged area''). The stress limit is defined as a fraction of the yield strength of the OS material, Alloy 22 (SB-575 N06022), at the appropriate temperature. The design of the 21-PWR waste package used in this calculation is that defined in Reference 8. However, a value of 4 mm was used for the gap between the inner shell and the OS, and the thickness of the OS was reduced by 2 mm. The sketch in Attachment I provides additional information not included in Reference 8. All obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Specialty Analyses and Waste Package Design Section. The waste package (i.e. uncanistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container) is classified as Quality Level 1

  6. Fracture toughness behavior of irradiated stainless steel in PWR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.; Fyfitch, S. [AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg, Pennsylvania (United States); Tang, H.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Data from available research programs were collected and evaluated by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Reliability Program (MRP) to determine the relationship between fracture toughness and neutron fluence for conditions representative of pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions. It is shown that the reduction of fracture toughness with increasing neutron dose in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and PWRs is consistent with that observed in fast reactors. The lower bound fracture toughness observed for irradiated stainless steels in PWRs is 38 MPa{radical}m (34.6 ksi{radical}in) at neutron exposures greater than 6.7 X 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1.0 MeV) or approximately 10 dpa. For such levels of fracture toughness, it is recommended that linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analyses be considered for design and operational analyses. The results from this study can be used by the nuclear industry to assess the effects of irradiation on stainless steels in PWR systems. (author)

  7. Development of MHI PWR fuel assembly with high thermal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasushi Makino; Masaya Hoshi; Masaji Mori; Hidetoshi Kido; Kazuo Ikeda

    2005-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been developing a PWR fuel assembly to meet the needs of Japanese fuel market with mainly improving its reliability such as a mechanical strength, a seismic strength and endurance. For burn-up extension of the fuel to 55 GWd/t, MHI has introduced a Zircaloy spacer grid with better neutron economics with retaining the reliability in an operating core. However, for a future power up-rating and a longer cycle operation, a higher thermal performance is required for PWR fuel assembly. To meet the needs of fuel market, MHI has developed an advanced type of Zircaloy spacer grid with a greater DNB performance while retaining the reliability of a fuel and a relatively low pressure drop. For the greater DNB performance, MHI optimized geometrical shape of mixing vane to promote a fluid mixing performance. In this report, higher DNB performance provided by the advanced Zircaloy spacer grid is presented. The results of 3D simulation for the flow behavior in 5 x 5 partial assembly, a mixing test and a water DNB test were compared between the current and the advanced spacer grids. Consequently, it was confirmed that a crossover vane enhanced a fluid mixing and the advanced spacer grid could significantly improve DNB performance compared with the current design of spacer grids. (authors)

  8. Gamma and Neutron Radiolysis in the 21-PWR Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S. Tang

    2001-05-03

    The objective of this calculation is to compute gamma and neutron dose rates in order to determine the maximum radiolytic production of nitric acid and other chemical species inside the 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) waste package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the time period between 5,000 and 100,000 years after emplacement. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the type of WP considered in this calculation. The results of this calculation will be used to evaluate nitric acid corrosion of fuel cladding from radiolysis in the 21-PWR WP. This calculation was performed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000a). AP-3.124, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. This calculation is associated with the total system performance assessment (TSPA) of which the spent fuel cladding integrity is to be evaluated.

  9. Gamma and Neutron Radiolysis in the 21-PWR Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.S. Tang

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to compute gamma and neutron dose rates in order to determine the maximum radiolytic production of nitric acid and other chemical species inside the 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) waste package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the time period between 5,000 and 100,000 years after emplacement. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the type of WP considered in this calculation. The results of this calculation will be used to evaluate nitric acid corrosion of fuel cladding from radiolysis in the 21-PWR WP. This calculation was performed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000a). AP-3.124, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. This calculation is associated with the total system performance assessment (TSPA) of which the spent fuel cladding integrity is to be evaluated

  10. Four-fluid model of PWR degraded cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the new two-dimensional, four-fluid fluid dynamics and heat transfer (FLUIDS) module of the MELPROG code. MELPROG is designed to give an integrated, mechanistic treatment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) core meltdown accidents from accident initiation to vessel melt-through. The code has a modular data storage and transfer structure, with each module providing the others with boundary conditions at each computational time step. Thus the FLUIDS module receives mass and energy source terms from the fuel pin module, the structures module, and the debris bed module, and radiation energy source terms from the radiation module. MELPROG, which models the reactor vessel, is also designed to model the vessel as a component in the TRAC/PF1 networking solution of a PWR reactor coolant system (RCS). The coupling between TRAC and MELPROG is implicit in the fluid dynamics of the reactor coolant (liquid water and steam) allowing an accurate simulation of the coupling between the vessel and the rest of the RCS during an accident. This paper deals specifically with the numerical model of fluid dynamics and heat transfer within the reactor vessel, which allows a much more realistic simulation (with less restrictive assumptions on physical behavior) of the accident than has been possible before

  11. Development and application of integrated digital I and C system in Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Integrated Digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) System has been developed and applied to non-safety grade I and C systems in the latest 5 Japanese PWR plants in 1990's. Based on the experience in these plants, the Integrated Digital I and C System will be planned to apply also to safety grade I and C systems in Advanced PWR (APWR) as the overall application of digital technology. The basic design task has been just started for APWR which is to be in commercial operation in early 2000's and under the development about various issues of safety grade digital I and C systems. On the other hand, in conventional Japanese PWR plants, digital I and C systems have been applied step by step since 1980's. For example, digital I and C systems for radio-active waste processing system have been adopted to 13 units, and dedicated digital I and C systems for Local loop control system to 8 units. The trend and status of development and application of the digital I and C systems, especially the Integrated Digital I and C System in Japanese PWR plants are presented. (5 refs., 4 figs.)

  12. Electrochemical measurements in PWR steam generators to follow crevice chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.

    1991-01-01

    In PWR steam generator crevices, the evolution of chemistry is important for the understanding of corrosion phenomena. Electrochemical measurements have been performed in high temperature simulated crevice environments in order to follow hideout processes and remedial actions (on-line addition of boric acid). Reported tests have been conducted with model boilers of AJAX facilities. Eccentric and concentric tube support plate crevices have been instrumented with platinum electrodes. Electrochemical measurements have been collected when model boiler was under nominal conditions (primary temperature: 335 deg C, secondary temperature: 280 deg C). They include Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and potential measurements: with EIS, sodium and boric acid hideouts have been detected and followed. Potential measurements have been performed in an attempt to measure crevice PH evolution

  13. Development of failed element monitoring system for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yupu; Liu Haojie

    2005-01-01

    Aiming at the existent problems of failed element monitoring system in the PWR, the detector, the spiral tube, the neutron-moderator and the shielding of neutron bas improved on in this task. These improvements decrease the backgrounds effectively, raise the work stability of the detectors and resolve the failed element error action problem which can not be resolved for the long time, and the detecting sensitivity is raise ten times. The γ-ray detector is arranged spiral with outside, so the γ-rays with shorter half-life can be detected. The structure of gross gamma detection station has improved, so the solid angle is expanded, the transmissivity of γ-rays and β-rays are increased, and the ratio of signal to background is raised. The measurement instrument has been intellectualized. This system is above criticism for the users in operation. (authors)

  14. On-line PWR RHR pump performance testing following motor and impeller replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMarzo, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    On-line maintenance and replacement of safety-related pumps requires the performance of an inservice test to determine and confirm the operational readiness of the pumps. In 1995, major maintenance was performed on two Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Residual Heat Removal (RHR) Pumps. A refurbished spare motor was overhauled with a new mechanical seal, new motor bearings and equipped with pump's 'B' impeller. The spare was installed into the 'B' train. The motor had never been run in the system before. A pump performance test was developed to verify it's operational readiness and determine the in-situ pump performance curve. Since the unit was operating, emphasis was placed on conducting a highly accurate pump performance test that would ensure that it satisfied the NSSS vendors accident analysis minimum acceptance curve. The design of the RHR System allowed testing of one train while the other was aligned for normal operation. A test flow path was established from the Refueling Water Storage Tank (RWST) through the pump (under test) and back to the RWST. This allowed staff to conduct a full flow range pump performance test. Each train was analyzed and an expression developed that included an error vector term for the TDH (ft), pressure (psig), and flow rate (gpm) using the variance error vector methodology. This method allowed the engineers to select a test instrumentation system that would yield accurate readings and minimal measurement errors, for data taken in the measurement of TDH (P,Q) versus Pump Flow Rate (Q). Test results for the 'B' Train showed performance well in excess of the minimum required. The motor that was originally in the 'B' train was similarly overhauled and equipped with 'A' pump's original impeller, re-installed in the 'A' train, and tested. Analysis of the 'A' train results indicate that the RHR pump's performance was also well in excess of the vendors requirements

  15. On-line PWR RHR pump performance testing following motor and impeller replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiMarzo, J.T.

    1996-12-01

    On-line maintenance and replacement of safety-related pumps requires the performance of an inservice test to determine and confirm the operational readiness of the pumps. In 1995, major maintenance was performed on two Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Residual Heat Removal (RHR) Pumps. A refurbished spare motor was overhauled with a new mechanical seal, new motor bearings and equipped with pump`s `B` impeller. The spare was installed into the `B` train. The motor had never been run in the system before. A pump performance test was developed to verify it`s operational readiness and determine the in-situ pump performance curve. Since the unit was operating, emphasis was placed on conducting a highly accurate pump performance test that would ensure that it satisfied the NSSS vendors accident analysis minimum acceptance curve. The design of the RHR System allowed testing of one train while the other was aligned for normal operation. A test flow path was established from the Refueling Water Storage Tank (RWST) through the pump (under test) and back to the RWST. This allowed staff to conduct a full flow range pump performance test. Each train was analyzed and an expression developed that included an error vector term for the TDH (ft), pressure (psig), and flow rate (gpm) using the variance error vector methodology. This method allowed the engineers to select a test instrumentation system that would yield accurate readings and minimal measurement errors, for data taken in the measurement of TDH (P,Q) versus Pump Flow Rate (Q). Test results for the `B` Train showed performance well in excess of the minimum required. The motor that was originally in the `B` train was similarly overhauled and equipped with `A` pump`s original impeller, re-installed in the `A` train, and tested. Analysis of the `A` train results indicate that the RHR pump`s performance was also well in excess of the vendors requirements.

  16. Pressure equalization systems in pressurized water reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven, J.; Wunderlich, F.

    1979-01-01

    For the development of a pressure reduction system in PWR fuel rods the capability of charcoal to adsorb Helium, Xenon and Krypton at temperatures of about 300 0 C was investigated. The influence of the adsorption on fuel rod internal pressure and in creep strain on the tube was evaluated in a design study. (orig.) [de

  17. Improvements to PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailloud, Jean; Monteil, Marcel.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements to pressurized water nuclear reactors are described, where the core coolant, called primary fluid, flows under the effect of a circulating pump in a primary loop between a steam generator and a pressure vessel containing the reactor core. The steam generator includes a bundle of tubes through which flows the primary fluid which exchanges calories with a secondary fluid, generally water, entering the generator as a liquid and issuing from it as steam. After expansion in turbines and recovery in a condenser, this steam is returned to the inside of the generator. Each primary fluid circulating pump is powered by a back-pressure turbine located in parallel with the high pressure section of the main turbine and hence fed with steam taken directly from the steam generator or the main steam pipe outside it [fr

  18. Improvement of pressure-vessel surveillance of a PWR-power plant of the Societe d'Energie Nucleaire Franco-Belge des Ardennes (S.E.N.A.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, A.; Lloret, R.; Riehl, R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a new dosimetry, installed inside and outside the Pressure Vessel of CHOOZ Nuclear Power Plant of the Societe d'Energie Nucleaire Franco-Belge des Ardennes (S.E.N.A.), during its 1982-83 operation cycle. The inner dosimetry deals with a simulated capsule located under the reactor plate, and includes copper, nickel, iron, niobium, copper-cobalt, neptunium and uranium dosimeters. Its aim is to qualify the information given by the existing copper dosimetry. The spectrum used with these measurements is obtained by the 1 D ANISN Code and BIP-N 2 library. The outer dosimety is the fluence determination along the outer wall of the vessel. Two tubes, equiped by neutron dosimeters, seven meters long, were fixed along the vessel. On the median plane, the results are compared to a 2 D DOT transport calculation. Preliminary results are given which improve the vessel and specimens neutronic characterisation. (Auth.)

  19. Stand-alone polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy instrument optimized for the study of catalytic processes at elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestell, John D.; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Ye, Xinyi; Nam, Chang-Yong; Stacchiola, Dario; Sadowski, Jerzy; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of a compact, "user-friendly" polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) instrument at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) of Brookhaven National Laboratory, which allows studying surfaces at pressures ranging from ultra-high vacuum to 100 Torr. Surface infrared spectroscopy is ideally suited for studying these processes as the vibrational frequencies of the IR chromophores are sensitive to the nature of the bonding environment on the surface. Relying on the surface selection rules, by modulating the polarization of incident light, it is possible to separate the contributions from the isotropic gas or solution phase, from the surface bound species. A spectral frequency range between 1000 cm-1 and 4000 cm-1 can be acquired. While typical spectra with a good signal to noise ratio can be obtained at elevated pressures of gases in ˜2 min at 4 cm-1 resolution, we have also acquired higher resolution spectra at 0.25 cm-1 with longer acquisition times. By way of verification, CO uptake on a heavily oxidized Ru(0001) sample was studied. As part of this test study, the presence of CO adsorbed on Ru bridge sites was confirmed, in agreement with previous ambient pressure X ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. In terms of instrument performance, it was also determined that the gas phase contribution from CO could be completely removed even up to pressures close to 100 Torr. A second test study demonstrated the use of the technique for studying morphological properties of a spin coated polymer on a conductive surface. Note that this is a novel application of this technique. In this experiment, the polarization of incident light was modulated manually (vs. through a photoelastic modulator). It was demonstrated, in good agreement with the literature, that the polymer chains preferentially lie parallel with the surface. This PM-IRRAS system is small, modular, and easily

  20. PWR reactors for BBR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure and functioning of the nuclear steam generator system developed by BBR and its components are described. Auxiliary systems, control and load following behaviour and fuel management are discussed and the main data of PWR given. The brochure closes with a perspective of the future of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power plant. (GL) [de

  1. Thermohydraulic calculations of PWR primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Some mathematical and numerical models from Retran computer codes aiming to simulate reactor transients, are presented. The equations used for calculating one-dimensional flow are integrated using mathematical methods from Flash code, with steam code to correlate the variables from thermodynamic state. The algorithm obtained was used for calculating a PWR reactor. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Reliability of PWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, A.A.T.; Muniz, A.A.

    1978-12-01

    Results of the analysis of factors influencing the reliability of international nuclear power plants of the PWR type are presented. The reliability factor is estimated and the probability of its having lower values than a certain specified value is discussed. (Author) [pt

  3. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  4. Secondary systems of PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, N.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary systems of a nuclear power plant comprises the steam, condensate and feedwater cycle, the steam plant auxiliary or ancillary systems and the cooling water systems. The presentation gives a general review about the main systems which show a high similarity of PWR and BWR plants. (orig./RW)

  5. Simulation model of a PWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, N.

    1987-03-01

    A simulation model of a hypothetical PWR power plant is described. A large number of disturbances and failures in plant function can be simulated. The model is written as seven modules to the modular simulation system for continuous processes DYSIM and serves also as a user example of this system. The model runs in Fortran 77 on the IBM-PC-AT. (author)

  6. Utilization of thorium in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium 235 consumption is comparatively evaluated with thorium cycle for a PWR type reactor. Modifications are only made in fuels components. U-235 consumption is pratically unchanged in both cycles. Some good results are promised to the mixed U-238/Th-232 fuel cycle in 1/1 proportion [pt

  7. Improvement of PWR reliability by corrosion prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Since first PWR in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, we have encountered the various modes of corrosion on primary and secondary side components. We have paid much efforts for resolving these corrosion problems, that is, investigating the causes of corrosion and establishing the countermeasures for these corrosion. We summarize these efforts in this article. (author)

  8. Status of developing advanced PWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yotaro

    1982-01-01

    During past eleven years since the first PWR power plant, Mihama Unit 1 of Kansai Electric Power Co., started the commercial operation in 1970, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries has endeavored to improve PWR technologies on the basis of the advice from electric power companies and the technical information to overcome difficulties in PWR power plants. Now, the main objective is to improve the overall plant performance, and the rate of operation of Japanese PWR power plants has significantly risen. The improvement of the reliability, the shortening of regular inspection period and the reduction of radioactive waste handling were attempted. In view of the satisfactory operational experience of Westinghouse type PWRs, the basic reactor concept has not been changed so far. Mitsubishi and Westinghouse reached basic agreement in August, 1981, to develop a spectral shift type large capacity reactor as the advanced PWRs for Japan. This type of PWRs hab higher degree of freedom for extended fuel cycle operation and enhances the advantage of entire fuel cycle economy, particularly the significant reduction of uranium use. The improved neutron economy is attainable by reducing neutron loss, and the core design with low power density and the economical use of plutonium are advantageous for the fuel cycle economy. (Kako, I.)

  9. An evaluation of tight - pitch PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.

    1980-01-01

    The subtask of a project carried out at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) for DOE (Department of Energy) as part of their NASAP/INFCE - related effects involving the optimization of PWR lattices in the recycle model is summarized. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Reactor analysis support package (RASP). Volume 7. PWR set-point methodology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temple, S.M.; Robbins, T.R.

    1986-09-01

    This report provides an overview of the basis and methodology requirements for determining Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) technical specifications related setpoints and focuses on development of the methodology for a reload core. Additionally, the report documents the implementation and typical methods of analysis used by PWR vendors during the 1970's to develop Protection System Trip Limits (or Limiting Safety System Settings) and Limiting Conditions for Operation. The descriptions of the typical setpoint methodologies are provided for Nuclear Steam Supply Systems as designed and supplied by Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, and Westinghouse. The description of the methods of analysis includes the discussion of the computer codes used in the setpoint methodology. Next, the report addresses the treatment of calculational and measurement uncertainties based on the extent to which such information was available for each of the three types of PWR. Finally, the major features of the setpoint methodologies are compared, and the principal effects of each particular methodology on plant operation are summarized for each of the three types of PWR

  11. Simulation of fission products behavior in severe accidents for advanced passive PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, L.L.; Huang, G.F.; Cao, X.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A fission product analysis model based on thermal hydraulic module is developed. • An assessment method for fission product release and transport is constructed. • Fission products behavior during three modes of containment response is investigated. • Source term results for the three modes of containment response are obtained. - Abstract: Fission product behavior for common Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been studied for many years, and some analytical tools have developed. However, studies specifically on the behavior of fission products related to advanced passive PWR is scarce. In the current study, design characteristics of advanced passive PWR influencing fission product behavior are investigated. An integrated fission products analysis model based on a thermal hydraulic module is developed, and the assessment method for fission products release and transport for advanced passive PWR is constructed. Three modes of containment response are simulated, including intact containment, containment bypass and containment overpressure failure. Fission products release from the core and corium, fission products transport and deposition in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), fission products transport and deposition in the containment considering fission products retention in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) and in the secondary side of steam generators (SGs) are simulated. Source term results of intact containment, containment bypass and containment overpressure failure are obtained, which can be utilized to evaluate the radiological consequences

  12. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refeat, Riham Mahmoud [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2015-12-15

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO{sub 2} fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  13. Study of PWR reactor efficiency as a function of turbine steam extractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Janine Gandolpho da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques; Martinez, Aquilino Senra

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to optimize the extractions of the low-pressure turbine of a PWR nuclear reactor, in order to obtain the best thermodynamic cycle efficiency. We have analyzed typical data of a 1300 MW PWR reactor, operating at 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% capacities, respectively. The first stage of this study consists of generating a mathematical model capable of describing the reactor behavior and efficiency at any power level. The second stage of this study consists of to combine the generated mathematical model in an optimization computer program that optimize the extractions flow of the low-pressure turbine until it finds the optimal system efficiency. This work does not alter the nuclear facility project in any way. (author)

  14. Analysis of WWER-440 and PWR RPV welds surveillance data to compare irradiation damage evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debarberis, L. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: luigi.debarberis@cec.eu.int; Acosta, B. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: beatriz.acosta-iborra@jrc.nl; Zeman, A. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sevini, F. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Ballesteros, A. [Tecnatom, Avd. Montes de Oca 1, San Sebasitan de los Reyes, E-28709 Madrid (Spain); Kryukov, A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gillemot, F. [AEKI Atomic Research Institute, Konkoly Thege M. ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Brumovsky, M. [NRI, Nuclear Research Institute, Husinec-Rez 130, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2006-04-15

    It is known that for Russian-type and Western water reactor pressure vessel steels there is a similar degradation in mechanical properties during equivalent neutron irradiation. Available surveillance results from WWER and PWR vessels are used in this article to compare irradiation damage evolution for the different reactor pressure vessel welds. The analysis is done through the semi-mechanistic model for radiation embrittlement developed by JRC-IE. Consistency analysis with BWR vessel materials and model alloys has also been performed within this study. Globally the two families of studied materials follow similar trends regarding the evolution of irradiation damage. Moreover in the high fluence range typical of operation of WWER the radiation stability of these vessels is greater than the foreseen one for PWR.

  15. The analysis of RPV fast neutron flux calculation for PWR with three-dimensional SN method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shouhai; Chen Yixue; Wang Weijin; Shi Shengchun; Lu Daogang

    2011-01-01

    Discrete ordinates (S N ) method is one of the most widely used method for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) design. As the fast development of computer CPU speed and memory capacity and consummation of three-dimensional discrete-ordinates method, it is mature for 3-D S N method to be used to engineering design for nuclear facilities. This work was done specifically for PWR model, with the results of 3-D core neutron transport calculation by 3-D core calculation, 3-D RPV fast neutron flux distribution obtain by 3-D S N method were compared with gained by 1-D and 2-D S N method and the 3-D Monte Carlo (MC) method. In this paper, the application of three-dimensional S N method in calculating RPV fast neutron flux distribution for pressurized water reactor (PWR) is presented and discussed. (authors)

  16. Investigation of modeling and simulation on a PWR power conversion system with RELAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui Gao; Yang Yanhua; Lin Meng; Yuan Minghao; Xie Zhengrui

    2007-01-01

    Based on the power conversion system of nuclear and conventional islands of Dayabay nuclear power station, this paper models the thermal-hydraulic systems for PWR by using the best-estimate program, RELAP5. To simulate the full-scope power conversion system, not only the reactor coolant system (RCP) of nuclear island, but also the main steam system (VVP), turbine steam and drain system (GPV), bypass system (GCT), feedwater system (FW), condensate extraction system (CEX), moisture separator reheater system (GSS), turbine-driven feedwater pump (APP), low-pressure and high-pressure feedwater heater systems (ABP and AHP) of conventional island are considered and modeled. A comparison between the simulated results and the actual data of reactor under full-power demonstrates a fine match for Dayabay, and also manifests the feasibility in simulating full-scope power conversion system of PWR with RELAP5. (author)

  17. Model-based fault detection and isolation of a PWR nuclear power plant using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Far, R.R.; Davilu, H.; Lucas, C.

    2008-01-01

    The proper and timely fault detection and isolation of industrial plant is of premier importance to guarantee the safe and reliable operation of industrial plants. The paper presents application of a neural networks-based scheme for fault detection and isolation, for the pressurizer of a PWR nuclear power plant. The scheme is constituted by 2 components: residual generation and fault isolation. The first component generates residuals via the discrepancy between measurements coming from the plant and a nominal model. The neutral network estimator is trained with healthy data collected from a full-scale simulator. For the second component detection thresholds are used to encode the residuals as bipolar vectors which represent fault patterns. These patterns are stored in an associative memory based on a recurrent neutral network. The proposed fault diagnosis tool is evaluated on-line via a full-scale simulator detected and isolate the main faults appearing in the pressurizer of a PWR. (orig.)

  18. Pressure optimization of an EC-QCL based cavity ring-down spectroscopy instrument for exhaled NO detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng; Han, Yanling; Li, Bincheng

    2018-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled breath has gained increasing interest in recent years mainly driven by the clinical need to monitor inflammatory status in respiratory disorders, such as asthma and other pulmonary conditions. Mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using an external cavity, widely tunable continuous-wave quantum cascade laser operating at 5.3 µm was employed for NO detection. The detection pressure was reduced in steps to improve the sensitivity, and the optimal pressure was determined to be 15 kPa based on the fitting residual analysis of measured absorption spectra. A detection limit (1σ, or one time of standard deviation) of 0.41 ppb was experimentally achieved for NO detection in human breath under the optimized condition in a total of 60 s acquisition time (2 s per data point). Diurnal measurement session was conducted for exhaled NO. The experimental results indicated that mid-infrared CRDS technique has great potential for various applications in health diagnosis.

  19. Methodology for the LABIHS PWR simulator modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaime, Guilherme D.G.; Oliveira, Mauro V., E-mail: gdjaime@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS) simulator is composed by a set of advanced hardware and software components whose goal is to simulate the main characteristics of a Pressured Water Reactor (PWR). This simulator serves for a set of purposes, such as: control room modernization projects; designing of operator aiding systems; providing technological expertise for graphical user interfaces (GUIs) designing; control rooms and interfaces evaluations considering both ergonomics and human factors aspects; interaction analysis between operators and the various systems operated by them; and human reliability analysis in scenarios considering simulated accidents and normal operation. The simulator runs in a PA-RISC architecture server (HPC3700), developed nearby 2000's, using the HP-UX operating system. All mathematical modeling components were written using the HP Fortran-77 programming language with a shared memory to exchange data from/to all simulator modules. Although this hardware/software framework has been discontinued in 2008, with costumer support ceasing in 2013, it is still used to run and operate the simulator. Due to the fact that the simulator is based on an obsolete and proprietary appliance, the laboratory is subject to efficiency and availability issues, such as: downtime caused by hardware failures; inability to run experiments on modern and well known architectures; and lack of choice of running multiple simulation instances simultaneously. This way, there is a need for a proposal and implementation of solutions so that: the simulator can be ported to the Linux operating system, running on the x86 instruction set architecture (i.e. personal computers); we can simultaneously run multiple instances of the simulator; and the operator terminals run remotely. This paper deals with the design stage of the simulator modernization, in which it is performed a thorough inspection of the hardware and software currently in operation. Our goal is to

  20. Methodology for the LABIHS PWR simulator modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaime, Guilherme D.G.; Oliveira, Mauro V., E-mail: gdjaime@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS) simulator is composed by a set of advanced hardware and software components whose goal is to simulate the main characteristics of a Pressured Water Reactor (PWR). This simulator serves for a set of purposes, such as: control room modernization projects; designing of operator aiding systems; providing technological expertise for graphical user interfaces (GUIs) designing; control rooms and interfaces evaluations considering both ergonomics and human factors aspects; interaction analysis between operators and the various systems operated by them; and human reliability analysis in scenarios considering simulated accidents and normal operation. The simulator runs in a PA-RISC architecture server (HPC3700), developed nearby 2000's, using the HP-UX operating system. All mathematical modeling components were written using the HP Fortran-77 programming language with a shared memory to exchange data from/to all simulator modules. Although this hardware/software framework has been discontinued in 2008, with costumer support ceasing in 2013, it is still used to run and operate the simulator. Due to the fact that the simulator is based on an obsolete and proprietary appliance, the laboratory is subject to efficiency and availability issues, such as: downtime caused by hardware failures; inability to run experiments on modern and well known architectures; and lack of choice of running multiple simulation instances simultaneously. This way, there is a need for a proposal and implementation of solutions so that: the simulator can be ported to the Linux operating system, running on the x86 instruction set architecture (i.e. personal computers); we can simultaneously run multiple instances of the simulator; and the operator terminals run remotely. This paper deals with the design stage of the simulator modernization, in which it is performed a thorough inspection of the hardware and software currently in operation. Our goal is to

  1. Methodology for the LABIHS PWR simulator modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaime, Guilherme D.G.; Oliveira, Mauro V.

    2011-01-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS) simulator is composed by a set of advanced hardware and software components whose goal is to simulate the main characteristics of a Pressured Water Reactor (PWR). This simulator serves for a set of purposes, such as: control room modernization projects; designing of operator aiding systems; providing technological expertise for graphical user interfaces (GUIs) designing; control rooms and interfaces evaluations considering both ergonomics and human factors aspects; interaction analysis between operators and the various systems operated by them; and human reliability analysis in scenarios considering simulated accidents and normal operation. The simulator runs in a PA-RISC architecture server (HPC3700), developed nearby 2000's, using the HP-UX operating system. All mathematical modeling components were written using the HP Fortran-77 programming language with a shared memory to exchange data from/to all simulator modules. Although this hardware/software framework has been discontinued in 2008, with costumer support ceasing in 2013, it is still used to run and operate the simulator. Due to the fact that the simulator is based on an obsolete and proprietary appliance, the laboratory is subject to efficiency and availability issues, such as: downtime caused by hardware failures; inability to run experiments on modern and well known architectures; and lack of choice of running multiple simulation instances simultaneously. This way, there is a need for a proposal and implementation of solutions so that: the simulator can be ported to the Linux operating system, running on the x86 instruction set architecture (i.e. personal computers); we can simultaneously run multiple instances of the simulator; and the operator terminals run remotely. This paper deals with the design stage of the simulator modernization, in which it is performed a thorough inspection of the hardware and software currently in operation. Our goal is to

  2. German-French PWR cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruess, F.; Vignon, D.

    1990-01-01

    In April 1989, the two leading European nuclear power plant vendors, Framatome and Siemens, signed an agreement on cooperation covering the joint development and worldwide marketing of pressurized water reactors. For this purpose a joint subsidiary, Nuclear Power International (NPI) was founded, in which equal interests are held by Framatome and Siemens. The firm has its headquarters in Paris and another sales office in Erlangen. Its main activities are the coordination of the development of a joint advanced pressurized water reactor technology and the marketing of pressurized water reactors. Until the joint technology under development has reached commercial maturity, the lines so far developed by the parent companies will continue to be distributed. (orig.) [de

  3. Characteristics of several equilibrium fuel cycles of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    This paper evaluated the influence of neutron spectrum on characteristics of several equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactor (PWR). In this study, five kinds of fuel cycles were investigated. Required uranium enrichment, required natural uranium amount, and toxicity of heavy metals (HMs) in spent fuel were presented for comparison. The results showed that the enrichment and the required amount of natural uranium decrease significantly with increasing number of confined heavy nuclides when uranium is discharged from the reactor. On the other hand, when uranium is totally confined, the enrichment becomes extremely high. The confinement of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) seems effective in reducing radio-toxicity of discharged wastes. By confining all heavy nuclides except uranium those three characteristics could be reduced considerably. For this fuel cycle the toxicity of HMs in spent fuel become nearly equal to or less than that of loaded uranium. (author)

  4. B ampersand W PWR advanced control system algorithm development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winks, R.W.; Wilson, T.L.; Amick, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses algorithm development of an Advanced Control System for the B ampersand W Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. The paper summarizes the history of the project, describes the operation of the algorithm, and presents transient results from a simulation of the plant and control system. The history discusses the steps in the development process and the roles played by the utility owners, B ampersand W Nuclear Service Company (BWNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Foxboro Company. The algorithm description is a brief overview of the features of the control system. The transient results show that operation of the algorithm in a normal power maneuvering mode and in a moderately large upset following a feedwater pump trip

  5. Experiments on the risk of sump plugging on French PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armand, Y.; Mattei, J.M.; Vicena, I.; Gubco, V.; Batalik, J.; Murani, J.; Davydov, M.; Melikhov, O.I.; Blinkov, V.N.

    2003-01-01

    The 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' has decided to perform an experimental program of studies on the risk of sump plugging in a 900 MWe pressurized water reactor (PWR). A general overview of the literature has been conducted between October 1999 and November 2000, ending by the definition of an approach methodology and the written of technical specifications. The problem identified gave rise to an European call for tenders leading to four contracts signed in november 2001. Three contracts are managed by VUEZ (Slovakia), the last by EREC (Russia). The methodology and the facilities devoted to these studies are presented in this paper, the preliminary results observed are also presented. The objectives for 2003 to finalize the program and the safety assessment are presented. (authors)

  6. Sizewell 'B' PWR pre-construction safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The Pre-Construction Safety Report (PCSR) for a PWR power station to be constructed as Sizewell 'B' is presented in 13 volumes containing 16 chapters. The PCSR has been submitted to the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate in support of the Central Electricity Generating Board's application for consent to the extension at Sizewell. It describes the design and provides the safety case for the proposed station, which comprises a 4-loop pressurized water reactor with associated generating plant and supporting auxiliary equipment. A general description of the station and its site is given. The strategy for ensuring nuclear safety is set out and the general design aspects of systems and plant outlined. The plant and systems, including their safety design bases and the fault analyses carried out for the design are described. Finally the way in which the plant will be decommissioned at the end of its useful life is outlined. (U.K.)

  7. Tritium target performance during an LBLOCA in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    In December 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a preferred strategy for acquiring a new supply of tritium. That strategy is based on pursuing the two most promising production alternatives. These alternatives include either constructing an accelerator-produced tritium system for tritium production or procuring an existing commercial light water reactor or irradiation services from such a reactor to irradiate tritium targets. This paper discusses the safety performance of a tritium target in a commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR). The current conceptual design for the light water tritium targets is quite similar, in terms of external dimensions and materials, to early designs for stainless steel clad discrete burnable absorbers used in PWRs. The tritium targets nominally consist of an annular lithium aluminate pellet wrapped in a Zircaloy-4 getter and clad with Type 316 stainless steel

  8. Measurement of mist cooling of PWR during LOCA by LDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.L.; Sheen, H.J.; Issapour, I.

    1985-01-01

    The prediction of temperature distribution and heat transfer within rod bundles during the refill and reflood phase of a LOCA (loss of coolant accident) is of critical importance for determining the location and size of blockages due to clad deformation in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Mist cooling by small droplets generated from large droplets on hitting grid spacers has been suggested as one of the most important heat transfer mechanisms which are responsible for the development of this temperature transient. The questions to be asked are whether such small droplets indeed exist and, if so, how are they related to the cooling of the fuel rods. Hereby reported is the result of a direct experimental investigation on these questions by a special laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) particle sizing technique together with temperature measurements of the rod claddings and flow in the subchannel

  9. Overview PWR-Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The ORNL Pressurized Water Reactor Blowdown Heat Transfer Program (PWR-BDHT) is a separate-effects experimental study of thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring during the first 20 sec of a hypothetical LOCA. Specific objectives include the determination, for a wide range of parameters, of time to CHF and the following variables for both pre- and post-CHF: heat fluxes, ΔT (temperature difference between pin surface and fluid), heat transfer coefficients, and local fluid properties. A summary of the most interesting results from the program obtained during the past year is presented. These results are in the area of: (1) RELAP verification, (2) electric pin calibration, (3) time to critical heat flux (CHF), (4) heat transfer coefficient comparisons, and (5) nuclear fuel pin simulation

  10. PWR-blowdown heat transfer separate effects program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    The ORNL Pressurized-Water Reactor Blowdown Heat Transfer (PWR-BDHT) Program is an experimental separate-effects study of the relations among the principal variables that can alter the rate of blowdown, the presence of flow reversal and rereversal, time delay to critical heat flux, the rate at which dryout progresses, and similar time-related functions that are important to LOCA analysis. Primary test results are obtained from the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF). Supporting experiments are carried out in several additional test loops - the Forced Convection Test Facility (FCTF), an air-water loop, a transient steam-water loop, and a low-temperature water mockup of the THTF heater rod bundle. The studies to date are described

  11. Design of large steam turbines for PWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.

    1984-01-01

    The authors review the thermodynamic cycle requirements for use with pressurized-water reactors, outline the way thermal efficiency is maximized, and discuss the special nature of the wet-steam cycle associated with turbines for this type of reactor. Machine and cycle parameters are optimized to achieve high thermal efficiency, particular attention being given to arrangements for water separation and steam reheating and to provisions for feedwater heating. Principles and details of mechanical design are considered for a range both of full-speed turbines running at 3000 rev/min on 50 Hz systems and of half-speed turbines running at 1800 rev/min on 60 Hz systems. The importance of service experience with nuclear wet-stream turbines, and its relevance to the design of modern turbines for PWR applications, is discussed. (author)

  12. SAS2H Generated Isotopic Concentrations For B and W 15X15 PWR Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.W. Davis

    1996-01-01

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to provide pressurized water reactor (PWR) isotopic composition data as a function of time for use in criticality analyses. The objectives of this evaluation are to generate burnup and decay dependant isotopic inventories and to provide these inventories in a form which can easily be utilized in subsequent criticality calculations

  13. Study of crack propagation velocity in steel tanks of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amzallac, C.; Bernard, J.L.; Slama, G.

    1983-05-01

    Description and results of a serie of tests carried out on crack propagation velocity of steels in PWR environment (pressurized high temperature water), in order to examine the effects of metallurgical parameters such as chemical composition of steel, especially sulfur and carbon content, and steel type (laminate or forged steels), effects of mechanical parameters such as loading ratio, cycle form, frequency and application mode of loads and of chemical parameters (anodal dissolution or fatigue with hydrogen) [fr

  14. Fluid-structure coupled dynamic response of PWR core barrel during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, M.W.; Zhang, Y.G.; Shi, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is engaged in the Fluid-Structure Interaction LOCA analysis of the core barrel of PWR. The analysis is performed by a multipurpose computer code SANES. The FSI inside the pressure vessel is treated by a FEM code including some structural and acoustic elements. The transient in the primary loop is solved by a two-phase flow code. Both codes are coupled one another. Some interesting conclusions are drawn. (author)

  15. Primary water chemistry improvement for radiation exposure reduction at Japanese PWR Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Eiichi [Omiya Technical Institute, Saitama-ken (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation exposure during the refueling outages at Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Plants has been gradually decreased through continuous efforts keeping the radiation dose rates at relatively low level. The improvement of primary water chemistry in respect to reduction of the radiation sources appears as one of the most important contributions to the achieved results and can be classified by the plant operation conditions as follows

  16. Dosimetry and fluence calculations on french PWR vessels comparisons between experiments and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimal, J.C.; Bourdet, L.; Guilleret, J.C.; Hedin, F.

    1988-01-01

    Fluence and damage calculations on PWR pressure vessels and irradiation test specimens are presented for two types of reactor: the franco-belgian (reactor CHOOZ) and the french reactors (CPY program). Comparisons with measurements are given for activation foils and fission detectors; most of them are about irradiation test specimen locations; comparisons are made for the Chooz plant on vessel stainless steel samplings and in the reactor pit

  17. Experiments for simulating a great leak in the primary coolant circuit of a PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebig, E.

    1977-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident is to be simulated on a high pressure test rig. The accident is initiated by an externally induced rupture of a pair of rupture-disks installed in a coolant ejection device. Several problems of simulating leaks in the primary coolant circuit of PWR type reactors are dealt with. The selection of appropriate rupture-disks for such experiments is described

  18. Thermal analysis of a one-element PWR spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, S.R.

    1979-06-01

    The transient thermal behavior of a typical one-element PWR spent fuel shipping cask, following a hypothetical accident and fire, has been simulated. The objectives of the study were to determine the transient behavior of the cask and its spent fuel primary coolant through the pressure relief system and possible fuel pin clad failure due to overheating following loss of coolant. 15 figures, 7 tables

  19. Chemical and radiochemical specifications - PWR power plants; Specifications chimiques et radiochimiques - Centrales REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutzmann, A [Electricite de France (EDF), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    1997-07-01

    Published by EDF this document gives the chemical specifications of the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear power plants. Among the chemical parameters, some have to be respected for the safety. These parameters are listed in the STE (Technical Specifications of Exploitation). The values to respect, the analysis frequencies and the time states of possible drops are noticed in this document with the motion STE under the concerned parameter. (A.L.B.)

  20. START - glass model of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marn, J.; Ramsak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of nuclear engineering in the area of process engineering the University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering has invested in procuring and erecting glass model of pressurized water reactor. This paper deals with description of the model, its capabilities, and plans for its use within nuclear engineering community of Slovenia. The model, made primarily of glass, serves three purposes: educational, professional development and research. As an example, medium break loss of coolant accident is presented in the paper. Temperatures within primary and secondary side, and pressure on primary side of reactor coolant system are followed. The characteristic points are emphasized, and commented.(author)