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Sample records for pwr fuel management

  1. Construction and utilization of linear empirical core models for PWR in-core fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    An empirical core-model construction procedure for pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core fuel management is developed that allows determining the optimal BOC k{sub {infinity}} profiles in PWRs as a single linear-programming problem and thus facilitates the overall optimization process for in-core fuel management due to algorithmic simplification and reduction in computation time. The optimal profile is defined as one that maximizes cycle burnup. The model construction scheme treats the fuel-assembly power fractions, burnup, and leakage as state variables and BOC zone enrichments as control variables. The core model consists of linear correlations between the state and control variables that describe fuel-assembly behavior in time and space. These correlations are obtained through time-dependent two-dimensional core simulations. The core model incorporates the effects of composition changes in all the enrichment control zones on a given fuel assembly and is valid at all times during the cycle for a given range of control variables. No assumption is made on the geometry of the control zones. A scatter-composition distribution, as well as annular, can be considered for model construction. The application of the methodology to a typical PWR core indicates good agreement between the model and exact simulation results.

  2. Developing and analyzing long-term fuel management strategies for an advanced Small Modular PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Afshin, E-mail: ahedayat@aeoi.org.ir

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Comprehensive introduction and supplementary concepts as a review paper. • Developing an integrated long-term fuel management strategy for a SMR. • High reliable 3-D core modeling over fuel pins against the traditional LRM. • Verifying the expert rules of large PWRs for an advanced small PWR. • Investigating large numbers of safety parameters coherently. - Abstract: In this paper, long-term fuel management (FM) strategies are introduced and analyzed for a new advanced Pressurized Light Water Reactor (PWR) type of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs). The FM strategies are developed to be safe and practical for implementation as much as possible. Safety performances, economy of fuel, and Quality Assurance (QA) of periodic equilibrium conditions are chosen as the main goals. Flattening power density distribution over fuel pins is the major method to ensure safety performance; also maximum energy output or permissible discharging burn up indicates economy of fuel fabrication costs. Burn up effects from BOC to EOC have been traced, studied, and highly visualized in both of transport lattice cell calculations and diffusion core calculations. Long-term characteristics are searched to gain periodical equilibrium characteristics. They are fissile changes, neutron spectrum, refueling pattern, fuel cycle length, core excess reactivity, average, and maximum burn up of discharged fuels, radial Power Peaking Factors (PPF), total PPF, radial and axial power distributions, batch effects, and enrichment effects for fine regulations. Traditional linear reactivity model have been successfully simulated and adapted via fine core and burn up calculations. Effects of high burnable neutron poison and soluble boron are analyzed. Different numbers of batches via different refueling patterns have been studied and visualized. Expert rules for large type PWRs have been influenced and well tested throughout accurate equilibrium core calculations.

  3. Physics of hydride fueled PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganda, Francesco

    The first part of the work presents the neutronic results of a detailed and comprehensive study of the feasibility of using hydride fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The primary hydride fuel examined is U-ZrH1.6 having 45w/o uranium: two acceptable design approaches were identified: (1) use of erbium as a burnable poison; (2) replacement of a fraction of the ZrH1.6 by thorium hydride along with addition of some IFBA. The replacement of 25 v/o of ZrH 1.6 by ThH2 along with use of IFBA was identified as the preferred design approach as it gives a slight cycle length gain whereas use of erbium burnable poison results in a cycle length penalty. The feasibility of a single recycling plutonium in PWR in the form of U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 has also been assessed. This fuel was found superior to MOX in terms of the TRU fractional transmutation---53% for U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 versus 29% for MOX---and proliferation resistance. A thorough investigation of physics characteristics of hydride fuels has been performed to understand the reasons of the trends in the reactivity coefficients. The second part of this work assessed the feasibility of multi-recycling plutonium in PWR using hydride fuel. It was found that the fertile-free hydride fuel PuH2-ZrH1.6, enables multi-recycling of Pu in PWR an unlimited number of times. This unique feature of hydride fuels is due to the incorporation of a significant fraction of the hydrogen moderator in the fuel, thereby mitigating the effect of spectrum hardening due to coolant voiding accidents. An equivalent oxide fuel PuO2-ZrO2 was investigated as well and found to enable up to 10 recycles. The feasibility of recycling Pu and all the TRU using hydride fuels were investigated as well. It was found that hydride fuels allow recycling of Pu+Np at least 6 times. If it was desired to recycle all the TRU in PWR using hydrides, the number of possible recycles is limited to 3; the limit is imposed by positive large void reactivity feedback.

  4. Advanced PWR in-core fuel management with optimized gadolinia fuel designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, H.D.; Neufert, A. [Siemens AG / Power Generation KWU, Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Erlangen (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Utilities operating LWRs require fuel assemblies and in-core fuel management service, which ensure safe, flexible and cost-effective production of electricity. With the reliability of the fuel having been always the most important requirement, advanced measures to minimize fuel cycle costs are receiving increasing attention in the light of the pressure on costs within the de-regulated power generation markets. The role of in-core fuel management in supporting the goal to minimize fuel cycle costs consists in the development of more demanding core loading strategies, i.e. in the first place more advanced low leakage loading patterns. A prerequisite for this type of loading pattern is the use of an optimized burnable absorber design. Gadolinia as integrated burnable absorber is a very effective means for limiting the critical boron concentration and power peaking factors. Siemens has accumulated extensive experience with Gd-fuel for almost 20 years with e.g. more than 5500 Gd-FA's delivered for PWRs and irradiated up to 65 MWd/kg{sub HM}. Current development efforts for optimizing Gd-fuel are focused on the reduction of the inherent penalties of today's Gd-Fa designs, i.e. reduced average FA enrichment and heavy metal content as well as residual reactivity binding. The most effective way to overcome these drawbacks is the reduction of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration to values of approximately 2 w/o, for which according to recent measurements of the heat conductivity of modern Gd-fuels the reduction of the fissile content in the Gd-rods is no longer necessary. Various feasibility studies have been performed to evaluate the consequences of low-Gd designs for both Siemens PWRs and Non-Siemens PWRs, for which more restrictive boundary conditions with respect to critical boron concentration and peaking factors have to be fulfilled. These studies as well as the first realization of an extended reactor cycle using a low Gd-Fa reload design confirm that the in

  5. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Fuel management and safety analysis-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Boh Wook; Choi, Hang Bok; Lee, Yung Wook; Cho, Jae Sun; Huh, Chang Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The reference DUPIC fuel composition was determined based on the reactor safety, thermal-hydraulics, economics, and refabrication aspects. The center pin of the reference DUPIC fuel bundle is poisoned with natural dysprosium. The worst LOCA analysis has shown that the transient power and heat deposition of the reference DUPIC core are the same as those of natural uranium CANDU core. The intra-code comparison has shown that the accuracy of DUPIC physics code system is comparable to the current CANDU core design code system. The sensitivity studies were performed for the refuelling schemes of DUPIC core and the 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme was selected as the standard refuelling scheme of the DUPIC core. The application of 4-bundle shift refuelling scheme will be studied in parallel as the auto-refuelling method is improved and the reference core parameters of the heterogeneous DUPIC core are defined. The heterogeneity effect was analyzed in a preliminary fashion using 33 fuel types and the random loading strategy. The refuelling simulation has shown that the DUPIC core satisfies the current CANDU 6 operating limits of channel and bundle power regardless of the fuel composition heterogeneity. The 33 fuel types used in the heterogeneity analysis was determined based on the initial enrichment and discharge burnup of the PWR fuel. 90 figs, 62 tabs, 63 refs. (Author).

  6. Multi level optimization of burnable poison utilization for advanced PWR fuel management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Serkan

    The objective of this study was to develop an unique methodology and a practical tool for designing burnable poison (BP) pattern for a given PWR core. Two techniques were studied in developing this tool. First, the deterministic technique called Modified Power Shape Forced Diffusion (MPSFD) method followed by a fine tuning algorithm, based on some heuristic rules, was developed to achieve this goal. Second, an efficient and a practical genetic algorithm (GA) tool was developed and applied successfully to Burnable Poisons (BPs) placement optimization problem for a reference Three Mile Island-1 (TMI-1) core. This thesis presents the step by step progress in developing such a tool. The developed deterministic method appeared to perform as expected. The GA technique produced excellent BP designs. It was discovered that the Beginning of Cycle (BOC) Kinf of a BP fuel assembly (FA) design is a good filter to eliminate invalid BP designs created during the optimization process. By eliminating all BP designs having BOC Kinf above a set limit, the computational time was greatly reduced since the evaluation process with reactor physics calculations for an invalid solution is canceled. Moreover, the GA was applied to develop the BP loading pattern to minimize the total Gadolinium (Gd) amount in the core together with the residual binding at End-of-Cycle (EOC) and to keep the maximum peak pin power during core depletion and Soluble boron concentration at BOC both less than their limit values. The number of UO2/Gd2O3 pins and Gd 2O3 concentrations for each fresh fuel location in the core are the decision variables and the total amount of the Gd in the core and maximum peak pin power during core depletion are in the fitness functions. The use of different fitness function definition and forcing the solution movement towards to desired region in the solution space accelerated the GA runs. Special emphasize is given to minimizing the residual binding to increase core lifetime as

  7. Utilization of spent PWR fuel-advanced nuclear fuel cycle of PWR/CANDU synergism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Xiao-Dong; XIE Zhong-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    High neutron economy, on line refueling and channel design result in the unsurpassed fuel cycle flexibility and variety for CANDU reactors. According to the Chinese national conditions that China has both PWR and CANDU reactors and the closed cycle policy of reprocessing the spent PWR fuel is adopted, one of the advanced nuclear fuel cycles of PWR/CANDU synergism using the reprocessed uranium of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor is proposed, which will save the uranium resource (~22.5%), increase the energy output (~41%), decrease the quantity of spent fuels to be disposed (~2/3) and lower the cost of nuclear power. Because of the inherent flexibility of nuclear fuel cycle in CANDU reactor, and the low radiation level of recycled uranium(RU), which is acceptable for CANDU reactor fuel fabrication, the transition from the natural uranium to the RU can be completed without major modification of the reactor core structure and operation mode. It can be implemented in Qinshan Phase Ⅲ CANDU reactors with little or no requirement of big investment in new design. It can be expected that the reuse of recycled uranium of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor is a feasible and desirable strategy in China.

  8. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae, E-mail: ktkim@dongguk.ac.kr

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10{sup −6} on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure.

  9. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  10. PWR fuel in Japan; The changes and trend for hereafter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokote, Mitsuhiro (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)); Kondo, Yoshiaki; Abeta, Sadaaki

    1992-07-01

    As for the PWR fuel in Japan, much efforts have been exerted aiming at the high reliability since the start of operation of Mihama No. 1 plant of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. At the beginning of 1970s, the fuel made by Westinghouse in USA was imported, and since then, the pursuit of the causes of troubles and the countermeasures and the domestic production of fuel have been carried out, and the improvement of design and the strengthening of quality control have been advanced. As the results, the occurrence of troubles decreased rapidly. As the fuel improvement for hereafter, the economical improvement by higher burnup, the saving and effective use of uranium resources as well as the increase of reliability are emphasized. The changes in the PWR fuel by Westinghouse, the course of improvement in the PWR fuel in Japan, the improvement against the troubles of the fuel, the improved design, the verification of the performance of the PWR fuel, the trend of development of the fuel such as the heightening of burnup, the saving and effective use of uranium resources, and the improved type pressurized water reactors are reported. (K.I.).

  11. Analysis of nuclear characteristics and fuel economics for PWR core with homogeneous thorium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, H. K.; Noh, J. M.; Yoo, J. W.; Song, J. S.; Kim, J. C.; Noh, T. W

    2000-12-01

    The nuclear core characteristics and economics of an once-through homogenized thorium cycle for PWR were analyzed. The lattice code, HELIOS has been qualified against BNL and B and W critical experiments and the IAEA numerical benchmark problem in advance of the core analysis. The infinite multiplication factor and the evolution of main isotopes with fuel burnup were investigated for the assessment of depletion charateristics of thorium fuel. The reactivity of thorium fuel at the beginning of irradiation is smaller than that of uranium fuel having the same inventory of {sup 235}U, but it decrease with burnup more slowly than in UO{sub 2} fuel. The gadolinia worth in thorium fuel assembly is also slightly smaller than in UO{sub 2} fuel. The inventory of {sup 233}U which is converted from {sup 232}Th is proportional to the initial mass of {sup 232}Th and is about 13kg per one tones of initial heavy metal mass. The followings are observed for thorium fuel cycle compared with UO{sub 2} cycle ; shorter cycle length, more positive MTC at EOC, more negative FTC, similar boron worth and control rod. Fuel economics of thorium cycle was analyzed by investigating the natural uranium requirements, the separative work requirements, and the cost for burnable poison rods. Even though less number of burnable poison rods are required in thorium fuel cycle, the costs for the natural uranium requirements and the separative work requirements are increased in thorium fuel cycle. So within the scope of this study, once through cycle concept, homogenized fuel concept, the same fuel management scheme as uranium cycle, the thorium fuel cycle for PWR does not have any economic incentives in preference to uranium.

  12. PWR fuel in Japan; Progress and future trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokote, Mitsuhiro (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)); Kondo, Yoshiaki; Abeta, Sadaaki (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    Twenty years ago, in the early years of the Japanese civil nuclear power programme, the fuel used was imported from Westinghouse in the USA. However, it was always intended that there would be a move towards fuel fabrication in Japan and by the end of 1993 around 10,000 Mitsubishi PWR fuel assemblies had been supplied to 21 PWRs in Japan. The highest burnup achieved so far is 46 GWd/t. Design changes to reduce abnormalities have been made, reliability is improving all the time and further improvements in burnup are being developed. This progress in PWR cores and fuel including MOX fuel in Japan is charted and future research and development is outlined. (UK).

  13. Fuel Thermal Expansion (FTHEXP). [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymann, G. A.

    1978-07-01

    A model is presented which deals with dimensional changes in LWR fuel pellets caused by changes in temperature. It is capable of dealing with any combination of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/ in solid, liquid or mixed phase states, and includes expansion due to the solid-liquid phase change. The function FTHEXP models fuel thermal expansion as a function of temperature, fraction of PuO/sub 2/, and the fraction of fuel which is molten.

  14. PWR fuel performance and burnup extension in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokote, M. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Kondo, Y.; Abeta, S.

    1996-10-01

    Japanese utilities and fuel manufacturers have expanded much of their resources and efforts to maintain a reliable supply of PWR fuel for Japan. In the early 1970s, since the level of knowledge and experience of using fuel was less than now, some problems were encountered. However, their causes were investigated and countermeasures implemented, the design improved and quality control enhanced. The results can already be seen by significantly improved performance of the PWR plants now in operation, frequency of problems was quickly reduced. Since fuel reliability has been improved, the emphasis has shifted to improving economics by increasing burnup and using uranium resources effectively. The maximum discharged burnup was previously limited to 39 GWd/t and STEP1 burnup extension to 48 GWd/t has been gradually developed, while STEP2 burnup extension to 55 GWd/t is started to be demonstrated from 1996. Because resources in Japan are scarce, a policy was selected of conserving and making effective use of these resources by recycling the uranium and plutonium recovered from reactors. Consequently, significant work is being done on the development of MOX fuel and utilization of recovered uranium. (author)

  15. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Straka, M. (Halliburton NUS, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Research has been conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin bumup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PFL/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design bumup. Using peaking factors commensurate widi actual bumups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document also contains appendices A through J of this report.

  16. Fuel Management Study on PWR Core Included of 157 Fuel Assemblies%157组燃料组件组成的堆芯燃料管理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚红

    2013-01-01

    The fuel management of the PWR reactor core reload optimization was studied with SCIENCE codes in the paper ,the PWR core consists of 157 fuel assemblies .The paper studied five strategies ,three strategies are one-year reload and the other two are 18-month reload strategies .The main results of the eight cycles for the five strategies were given ,and the results were compared with each other .In conclusion ,the power peak of the OU T-IN strategy loading pattern is lower ,and the power peak of the IN-OU T loading pattern is higher ,but all of them are satisfied with design limitation .The average discharge burnup of the quarter core strategy is the highest ,which means that the assemblies of this strategy are burned the most sufficiently , so the economic efficiency of the quarter core strategy is the best .%本文应用SCIENCE程序包对157组燃料组件组成的压水堆堆芯进行换料优化燃料管理研究,给出了3个年换料和2个18个月换料共5个设计方案,每个设计方案给出了从首循环到第8循环共8个循环的主要计算结果,并进行了分析比较。综合来看,OUT-IN装载的设计方案功率峰值偏低,IN-OUT装载的设计方案功率峰值偏高,但均在设计限值以内;1/4堆芯换料设计方案的平均卸料燃耗最深,表明其组件燃耗得最充分,经济性较好。

  17. The PWR cores management; La gestion des coeurs REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barral, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Rippert, D. [CEA Cadarache, Departement d' Etudes des Reacteurs, DER, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Johner, J. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, DRFC, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)] [and others

    2000-01-25

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  18. Mitsubishi PWR nuclear fuel with advanced design features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaua Goe, Toshiy Uki; Nuno kawa, Koi Chi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    In the last few decades, the global warming has been a big issue. As the breakthrough in this crisis, advanced operations of the water reactor such as higher burn up, longer cycle, and up rating could be effective ways. From this viewpoint, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) has developed the fuel for burn up extension, whose assembly burn-up limit is 55GWd/t(A), with the original and advanced designs such as corrosion resistant cladding material MDA, and supplied to Japanese PWR utilities. On the other hand, MHI intends to supply more advanced fuel assemblies not only to domestic market but to the global market. Actually MHI has submitted the application for standard design certification of USA . Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor on Jan. 2nd 2008. The fuel assembly for US APWR is 17x17 type with active fuel length of 14ft, characterized with three features, to {sup E}nhance Fuel Economy{sup ,} {sup E}nable Flexible Core Operation{sup ,} and to {sup I}mprove Reliability{sup .} MHI has also been conducting development activities for more advanced products, such as 70GWd/t(A) burn up limit fuel with cladding, guide thimble and spacer grid made from M-MDATM alloy that is new material with higher corrosion resistance, such as 12ft and 14ft active length fuel, such as fuel with countermeasure against grid fretting, debris fretting, and IRI. MHI will present its activities and advanced designs.

  19. In-Core Fuel Managements for PWRs: Investigation on solution for optimal utilization of PWR fuel through the use of fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Sara

    2004-04-01

    A possibility for more efficient use of the nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor is investigated. The alternative proposed here consists of the implementation of PWR fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins. This possibility is examined in comparison with the standard assembly design. The comparison is performed both in terms of single assembly performance and in the terms of nuclear reactor core performance and fuel utility. For the evaluation of the actual performance of the new assembly types, 5 operated fuel core sequences of R3 (Ringhals' third unit), for the period 1999 - 2004 (cycles 17 - 21) were examined. For every cycle, the standard fresh fuel assemblies have been identified and taken as reference cases for the study of the new type of assemblies with differently enriched uranium rods. In every cycle, assemblies with and without burnable absorber are freshly loaded into the core. The axial enrichment distribution is kept uniform, allowing for a radial (planar) enrichment level distribution only. At an assembly level, it has been observed that the implementation of the alternative enrichment configuration can lead to lower and flatter internal peaking factor distribution with respect to the uniformly enriched reference assemblies. This can be achieved by limiting the enrichment levels distribution to a rather narrow range. The highest enrichment level chosen has the greatest impact on the power distribution of the assemblies. As it increases, the enrichment level drives the internal peaking factor to greater values than in the reference assemblies. Generally, the highest enrichment level that would allow an improvement in the power performance of the assembly lies between 3.95 w/o and 4.17 w/o. The highest possible enrichment level depends on the average enrichment of the overall assembly, which is kept constant to the average enrichment of the reference assemblies. The improvements that can be obtained at this level are

  20. In-Core Fuel Managements for PWRs: Investigation on solution for optimal utilization of PWR fuel through the use of fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Sara

    2004-04-01

    A possibility for more efficient use of the nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor is investigated. The alternative proposed here consists of the implementation of PWR fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins. This possibility is examined in comparison with the standard assembly design. The comparison is performed both in terms of single assembly performance and in the terms of nuclear reactor core performance and fuel utility. For the evaluation of the actual performance of the new assembly types, 5 operated fuel core sequences of R3 (Ringhals' third unit), for the period 1999 - 2004 (cycles 17 - 21) were examined. For every cycle, the standard fresh fuel assemblies have been identified and taken as reference cases for the study of the new type of assemblies with differently enriched uranium rods. In every cycle, assemblies with and without burnable absorber are freshly loaded into the core. The axial enrichment distribution is kept uniform, allowing for a radial (planar) enrichment level distribution only. At an assembly level, it has been observed that the implementation of the alternative enrichment configuration can lead to lower and flatter internal peaking factor distribution with respect to the uniformly enriched reference assemblies. This can be achieved by limiting the enrichment levels distribution to a rather narrow range. The highest enrichment level chosen has the greatest impact on the power distribution of the assemblies. As it increases, the enrichment level drives the internal peaking factor to greater values than in the reference assemblies. Generally, the highest enrichment level that would allow an improvement in the power performance of the assembly lies between 3.95 w/o and 4.17 w/o. The highest possible enrichment level depends on the average enrichment of the overall assembly, which is kept constant to the average enrichment of the reference assemblies. The improvements that can be obtained at this level are

  1. MELCOR Modeling of Air-Cooled PWR Spent Fuel Assemblies in Water empty Fuel Pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L. E.; Lopez, C.

    2013-07-01

    The OECD Spent Fuel Project (SFP) investigated fuel degradation in case of a complete Loss-Of- Coolant-Accident in a PWR spent fuel pool. Analyses of the SFP PWR ignition tests have been conducted with the 1.86.YT.3084.SFP MELCOR version developed by SNL. The main emphasis has been placed on assessing the MELCOR predictive capability to get reasonable estimates of time-to-ignition and fire front propagation under two configurations: hot neighbor (i.e., adiabatic scenario) and cold neighbor (i.e., heat transfer to adjacent fuel assemblies). A detailed description of hypotheses and approximations adopted in the MELCOR model are provided in the paper. MELCOR results accuracy was notably different between both scenarios. The reasons are highlighted in the paper and based on the results understanding a set of remarks concerning scenarios modeling is given.

  2. DUPIC fuel fabrication using spent PWR fuels at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Yang, Myung Seung; Ko, Won Il and others

    2000-12-01

    This document contains DUPIC fuel cycle R and D activities to be carried out for 5 years beyond the scope described in the report KAERI/AR-510/98, which was attached to Joint Determination for Post-Irradiation Examination of irradiated nuclear fuel, by MOST and US Embassy in Korea, signed on April 8, 1999. This document is purposely prepared as early as possible to have ample time to review that the over-all DUPIC activities are within the scope and contents in compliance to Article 8(C) of ROK-U.S. cooperation agreement, and also maintain the current normal DUPIC project without interruption. Manufacturing Program of DUPIC Fuel in DFDF and Post Irradiation Examination of DUPIC Fuel are described in Chapter I and Chapter II, respectively. In Chapter III, safeguarding procedures in DFDF and on-going R and D on DUPIC safeguards such as development of nuclear material accounting system and development of containment/surveillance system are described in details.

  3. DUPIC fuel fabrication using spent PWR fuel at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Yang, Myung Seung; Ko, Won Il and others

    2001-09-01

    This document contains DUPIC fuel cycle R and D activities to be carried out for 5 years beyond the scope described in the report KAERI/AR-510/98, which was attached to Joint Determination for Post-Irradiation Examination of irradiated nuclear fuel, by MOST and US Embassy in Korea, signed on April 8, 1999. This document is purposely prepared as early as possible to have ample time to review that the over-all DUPIC activities are within the scope and contents in compliance to Article 8(C) of ROK-U.S. cooperation agreement, and also maintain the current normal DUPIC project without interruption. Manufacturing Program of DUPIC Fuel in DFDF and Post Irradiation Examination of DUPIC Fuel are described in Chapter I and Chapter II, respectively. In Chapter 3/4y, safeguarding procedures in DFDF and on-going R and D on DUPIC safeguards such as development of nuclear material accounting system and development of containment/surveillance system are described in details.

  4. Reactor Physics Assessment of Thick Silicon Carbide Clad PWR Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Loss of Coolant Accident LWR Light Water Reactor MOX Mixed Oxide Fuel MTC Moderator Temperature Coefficient MWd/kgIHM Megawatt days per...working only with UO2 and UO2/PuO2 mixed oxide ( MOX ) fuels. 3.1 Studsvik Core Management Software CASMO-4E and SIMULATE-3 are the primary computational

  5. Transient fuel behavior of preirradiated PWR fuels under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Toshio; Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Shiba, Koreyuki

    1992-06-01

    Since 1975, extensive studies on transient fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions have been continued in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. A new experimental program with preirradiated LWR fuel rods as test samples has recently been started. In this program, transient behavior and failure initiation have been studied with 14 × 14 type PWR fuel rods preirradiated to a burnup of 20 to 42 MWd/kgU. The test fuel rods contained in a capsule filled with the coolant water were subjected to a pulse irradiation in the NSRR to simulate a prompt power surge in an RIA. The effects of preirradiation on the transient fission gas release, pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and fuel failure were clearly observed through the transient in-core measurements and postirradiation examination.

  6. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  7. Fuel failure and fission gas release in high burnup PWR fuels under RIA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Sasajima, Hideo; Mori, Yukihide; Ishijima, Kiyomi

    1997-09-01

    To study the fuel behavior and to evaluate the fuel enthalpy threshold of fuel rod failure under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, a series of experiments using pulse irradiation capability of the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) has been performed. During the experiments with 50 MWd/kg U PWR fuel rods (HBO test series; an acronym for high burnup fuels irradiated in Ohi unit 1 reactor), significant cladding failure occurred. The energy deposition level at the instant of the fuel failure in the test is 60 cal/g fuel, and is considerably lower than those expected and pre-evaluated. The result suggests that mechanical interaction between the fuel pellets and the cladding tube with decreased integrity due to hydrogen embrittlement causes fuel failure at the low energy deposition level. After the pulse irradiation, the fuel pellets were found as fragmented debris in the coolant water, and most of these were finely fragmented. This paper describes several key observations in the NSRR experiments, which include cladding failure at the lower enthalpy level, possible post-failure events and large fission gas release.

  8. Calculation of the radionuclides in PWR spent fuel samples for SFR experiment planning.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegeli, Robert Earl

    2004-06-01

    This report documents the calculation of radionuclide content in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel samples planned for use in the Spent Fuel Ratio (SPR) Experiments at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL) to aid in experiment planning. The calculation methods using the ORIGEN2 and ORIGEN-ARP computer codes and the input modeling of the planned PWR spent fuel from the H. B. Robinson and the Surry nuclear power plants are discussed. The safety hazards for the calculated nuclide inventories in the spent fuel samples are characterized by the potential airborne dose and by the portion of the nuclear facility hazard category 2 and 3 thresholds that the experiment samples would present. In addition, the gamma ray photon energy source for the nuclide inventories is tabulated to facilitate subsequent calculation of the direct and shielded dose rates expected from the samples. The relative hazards of the high burnup 72 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU) spent fuel from H. B. Robinson and the medium burnup 36 GWd/MTU spent fuel from Surry are compared against a parametric calculation of various fuel burnups to assess the potential for higher hazard PWR fuel samples.

  9. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refeat, Riham Mahmoud [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2015-12-15

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO{sub 2} fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  10. Criticality safety and sensitivity analyses of PWR spent nuclear fuel repository facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M; Glumac, B

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo criticality safety and sensitivity calculations of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel repository facilities for the Slovenian nuclear power plant Krsko are presented. The MCNP4C code was deployed to model and assess the neutron multiplication parameters of pool-based stor

  11. Criticality safety and sensitivity analyses of PWR spent nuclear fuel repository facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M; Glumac, B

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo criticality safety and sensitivity calculations of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel repository facilities for the Slovenian nuclear power plant Krsko are presented. The MCNP4C code was deployed to model and assess the neutron multiplication parameters of pool-based stor

  12. MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

  13. US PWR steam generator management: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty, C.S. Jr. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This paper provides an overview on the status of steam generator management activities in US PWRs, and includes: (1) an overview of the impact of steam generator problems; (2) a brief discussion of historical damage trends and the current damage mechanism of most concern; (3) a discussion of the elements of {open_quotes}steam generator management{close_quotes}; and (4) a description of the approach being followed to implement a degradation-specific protocol for tubing inspection and repair. This paper was prepared in conjunction with another paper presented during the Plenary Session of this Conference, {open_quotes}Steam Generator Degradation: Current Mitigation Strategies for Controlling Corrosion{close_quotes}, and is provided as a supplement to that material.

  14. Progress and prospects of nuclear fuel development in Japan, (2). Progress and future plan of research and development on PWR fuel in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Yoshiaki; Abeta, Sadaaki; Aisu, Hideo; Teranishi, Tomoyuki

    1982-06-01

    13 years have elapsed since the first PWR plant started the operation in Japan, and at present, 11 PWR plants are in operation. During this period, much results of use and experience have been accumulated for the PWR fuel. The improvement and development of the fuel have been performed to meet the supply of the fuel sufficiently adaptable to the severe environment in Japan. In this paper, the evaluation of soundness and the improvement of reliability of PWR fuel made so far are reported, and the response of fuel side to long cycle operation and load following-up operation, which will be required in near future, is explained. The inspection of fuel has been performed at reactor sites for the purpose of sufficiently observing the irradiation behavior of fuel and detecting the points out of order. Effort has been exerted to perform various inspections thoroughly on total number of fuel and reflect the results to the improved design. Fuel leak scarcely occurred from the beginning, accordingly, improvement has been made to reduce the bending of fuel rods. The change of PWR fuel design, the evaluation of soundness and the improvement of reliability of PWR fuel, and the improvement for the future are reported.

  15. An extension of the validation of SCALE (SAS2H) isotopic predictions for PWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.; Hermann, O.W.

    1996-09-01

    Isotopic characterization of spent fuel via depletion and decay calculations is necessary for determination of source terms. Unlike fresh fuel assumptions typically used in criticality safety analysis of spent fuel configurations, burnup credit applications also rely on depletion and decay calculations to predict spent fuel composition; these isotopics are used in subsequent criticality calculations to assess the reduced worth of spent fuel. To validate the depletion codes and data, experiment is compared with predictions; such comparisons have been done in earlier ORNL work. This report describes additional independent measurements and corresponding calculations as a supplement. The current work includes measured isotopic data from 19 spent fuel samples from the Italian Trino Vercelles PWR and the US Turkey Point-3 PWR. In addition, an approach to determine biases and uncertainties between calculated and measured isotopic concentrations is discussed, together with a method to statistically combine these terms to obtain a conservative estimate of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results on combination of measured-to-calculated ratios are presented. The results described herein represent an extension to a new reactor design and spent fuel samples with enrichment as high as 3.9 wt% {sup 235}U. Consistency with the earlier work for each of two different cross-section libraries suggests that the estimated biases for each of the isotopes in the earlier work are reasonably good estimates.

  16. Application of SCALE4.4 system for burnup credit criticality analysis of PWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Sung; Ro, Seung gy; Bae, Kang mok; Shin, YoungJoon; Kim, Ik Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    An investigation on the application of burnup credit for a PWR spent fuel storage pool has been carried out with the use of the SCALE 4.4 computer code system consisting of SAS2H and CSAS6 modules in association with 44-group SCALE cross-section library. Prior to the application of the computer code system, a series of bench markings have been performed in comparison with available data. A benchmarking of the SAS2h module has been done for experimental concentration data of 54 PWR spent fuel and then correction factors with a 95% probability at a 95% confidence level have been determined on the basis of the calculated and measured concentrations of 38 nuclides. After that, the bias which might have resulted from the use of the CSAS6 module has been calculated for 46 criticality experimental data of UO{sub 2} fuel and MOX fuel assemblies. The calculation bias with one-sided tolerance limit factor (2.086) corresponding to a 95% probability at a 95% confidence level has consequently been obtained to be 0.00834. Burnup credit criticality analysis has been done for the PWR spent fuel storage pool by means of the benchmarked or validated code system. It is revealed that the minimum burnup for safe storage is 7560 MWd/tU in 5 wt% enriched fuel if both actinides and fission products in spent fuel are taken into account. However, the minimum value required seems to be 9,565 MWd/tU in the same enriched fuel provided that only the actinides are taken into consideration. (author)

  17. Siemens advance PWR fuel assemblies (HTP) and cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, R. B.; Woods, K. N. [Siemens Nuclear Power Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes the key features of the Siemens HTP (High Thermal Performance) fuel design, the current in-reactor performance of this advanced fuel assembly design, and the advanced cladding types available.

  18. Proof test on thermal and hydraulic design reliability of Japanese PWR fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Mamoru (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Inoue, Akira (Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)); Miyazaki, Keiji (Osaka Univ. (Japan)); Abeta, Sadaaki (Mitsubishi, Tokyo (Japan)); Hori, Keiichi (Mitsubishi, Hyogo (Japan)); Mukasa, Tomio; Oishi, Masao; Aoki, Toshimasa; Makihara, Yoshiaki

    1990-01-01

    A series of departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) tests for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was performed at the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center. The objective was to prove the reliability of fuel assembly design by confirming the thermal margin of heat transfer. The present method for evaluating the DNB ratio in a Japanese 17 x 17 PWR core is adequate according to the newly obtained DNB test data.

  19. Effect of transplutonium doping on approach to long-life core in uranium-fueled PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peryoga, Yoga; Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, Vladimir [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Shmelev, Anatolii [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-08-01

    The present paper advertises doping of transplutonium isotopes as an essential measure to improve proliferation-resistance properties and burnup characteristics of UOX fuel for PWR. Among them {sup 241}Am might play the decisive role of burnable absorber to reduce the initial reactivity excess while the short-lived nuclides {sup 242}Cm and {sup 244}Cm decay into even plutonium isotopes, thus increasing the extent of denaturation for primary fissile {sup 239}Pu in the course of reactor operation. The doping composition corresponds to one discharged from a current PWR. For definiteness, the case identity is ascribed to atomic percentage of {sup 241}Am, and then the other transplutonium nuclide contents follow their ratio as in the PWR discharged fuel. The case of 1 at% doping to 20% enriched uranium oxide fuel shows the potential of achieving the burnup value of 100 GWd/tHM with about 20% {sup 238}Pu fraction at the end of irradiation. Since so far, americium and curium do not require special proliferation resistance measures, their doping to UOX would assist in introducing nuclear technology in developing countries with simultaneous reduction of accumulated minor actinides stockpiles. (author)

  20. The reliability and innovation of Mitsubishi PWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeta, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Takahashi, T.; Doi, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Mitsubishi has been making continuous efforts to improve fuel reliability for many years. Although no significant issues have occurred recently, Mitsubishi has been continuing to develop further design modifications including a variety of corrective designs to eliminate debris fretting or grid fretting. Since fuel reliability has been improved to almost zero defect levels, the emphasis has changed to reducing the amount of spent fuel and improving economics by extending burnup to the next target of 55 GWd/t and to using fuel resources more effectively by MOX fuel utilization. (author).

  1. Life management plants at nuclear power plants PWR; Planes de gestion de vida en centrales nucleares PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, G.

    2014-10-01

    Since in 2009 the CSN published the Safety Instruction IS-22 (1) which established the regulatory framework the Spanish nuclear power plants must meet in regard to Life Management, most of Spanish nuclear plants began a process of convergence of their Life Management Plants to practice 10 CFR 54 (2), which is the current standard of Spanish nuclear industry for Ageing Management, either during the design lifetime of the plant, as well as for Long-Term Operation. This article describe how Life Management Plans are being implemented in Spanish PWR NPP. (Author)

  2. Axial gas flow in irradiated PWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagbjartsson, S.J.; Murdock, B.A.; Owen, D.E.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1977-09-01

    Transient and steady state axial gas flow experiments were performed on six irradiated, commercial pressurized water reactor fuel rods at ambient temperature and 533 K. Laminar flow equations, as used in the FRAP-T2 and SSYST fuel behavior codes, were used with the gas flow results to calculate effective fuel rod radial gaps. The results of these analyses were compared with measured gap sizes obtained from metallographic examination of one fuel rod. Using measured gap sizes as input, the SSYST code was used to calculate pressure drops and mass fluxes and the results were compared with the experimental gas flow data.

  3. Research on Power Ramp Testing Method for PWR Fuel Rod at Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop high performance fuel assembly for domestic nuclear power plant, it is necessary to master some fundamental test technology. So the research on the power ramp testing methods is proposed. A tentative power ramp test for short PWR fuel rod has been conducted at the heavy water research reactor (HWRR) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) in May of 2001. The in-pile test rig was placed into the central channel of the reactor . The test rig consists of pressure pipe assembly, thimble, solid neutron absorbing screen and its driving parts, etc.. The test

  4. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Jae Sul; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes the second year progress of phase II of DUPIC program which aims to verify experimentally the feasibility of direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The project is to provide the experimental facilities and technologies that are required to perform the DUPIC experiment. As an early part of the project, engineering analysis of those facilities and construction of mock-up facility are described. Another scope of the project is to assess the DUPIC fuel cycle system and facilitate international cooperation. The progresses in this scope of work made during the fiscal year are also summarized in the report. 38 figs, 44 tabs, 8 refs. (Author).

  5. Characteristic test technology for PWR fuel and its components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Chan Bock; Bang, Je Gun; Jung, Yeon Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, Sang Yoon; Kim, Kyeng Ho; Nam, Cheol; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Lee, Myung Ho; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Song, Kun Woo; Kang, Ki Won; Kim, Keon Sik; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Young Min; Yang, Jae Ho; Song, Kee Nam; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Kang, Heung Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun; In, Wang Kee; Oh, Dong Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    Characteristic tests of fuel assembly and its components being developed in the Advanced LWR Fuel Development Project supported by the mid-long term nuclear R and D program are described in this report. Performance verification of fuel and its components by the characteristic tests are essential to their development. Fuel components being developed in the Advanced LWR Fuel Development Project are zirconium alloy cladding, UO{sub 2} and burnable absorber pellets, spacer grid and top and bottom end pieces. Detailed test plans for those fuel components are described in this report, and test procedures of cladding and pellet are also described in the Appendix. Examples of the described tests are in- and out-of- pile corrosion and mechanical tests such as creep and burst tests for the cladding, in-pile capsule and ramp tests for the pellet, mechanical tests such as strength and vibration, and thermal-hydraulic tests such as pressure drop and critical heat flux for the spacer grid and top and bottom end pieces. It is expected that this report could be used as the standard reference for the performance verification tests in the development of LWR fuel and its components. 11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  6. Eddy current NDT: a suitable tool to measure oxide layer thickness in PWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Donizete A.; Silva Junior, Silverio F. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: daa@cdtn.br, e-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br; Vieira, Andre L.P.S. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB S.A.), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica de Combustivel Nuclear], e-mail: andre@inb.gov.br; Soares, Adolpho [Technotest Consultoria e Acessoria Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: adolpho@technotest.com.br

    2009-07-01

    Eddy current is a nondestructive test (NDT) widely used in industry to support integrity analysis of components and equipment. In the nuclear area it is frequently applied to inspect tubes installed in tube exchangers, such as steam generators and condensers in PWR plants, as well as turbine blades. Adequately assisted by means of robotic devices, that inspection method has been pointed as a suitable tool to perform accurate oxide layer thickness measurements in PWR fuel rods. This paper shows some theoretical aspects and physical operating principles of the inspection method, as well as test probes construction details, and the calibration reference standards fabrication processes. Furthermore, some data, experimentally obtained at INB laboratories and other technical information obtained from TECNATOM S.A. are presented, showing the accuracy and efficacy of such NDT method. (author)

  7. An Extension of the Validation of SCALE (SAS2H) Isotopic Predictions for PWR Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic characterization of spent fuel via depletion and decay calculations is necessary for determination of source terms for subsequent system analyses involving heat transfer, radiation shielding, isotopic migration, etc. Unlike fresh fuel assumptions typically employed in the criticality safety analysis of spent fuel configurations, burnup credit applications also rely on depletion and decay calculations to predict the isotopic composition of spent fuel. These isotopics are used in subsequent criticality calculations to assess the reduced worth of spent fuel. To validate the codes and data used in depletion approaches, experimental measurements are compared with numerical predictions for relevant spent fuel samples. Such comparisons have been performed in earlier work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report describes additional independent measurements and corresponding calculations, which supplement the results of the earlier work. The current work includes measured isotopic data from 19 spent fuel samples obtained from the Italian Trino Vercelles pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and the U.S. Turkey Point Unit 3 PWR. In addition, an approach to determine biases and uncertainties between calculated and measured isotopic concentrations is discussed, together with a method to statistically combine these terms to obtain a conservative estimate of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results are presented based on the combination of measured-to-calculated ratios for earlier work and the current analyses. The results described herein represent an extension to a new reactor design not included in the earlier work, and spent fuel samples with enrichment as high as 3.9 wt % {sup 235}U. Results for the current work are found to be, for the most part, consistent with the findings of the earlier work. This consistency was observed for results obtained from each of two different cross-section libraries and suggests that the estimated biases determined for

  8. PWR-2 Blanket Fuel Assembly Removal Safety Basis Criteria Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUSHORE, R.P.

    2001-01-22

    This criteria document describes the proposed format, content, and schedule for the preparation of an amendment to the Interim Safety Basis for Solid Waste Facilities (T Plant) (ISB), (HNF-SD-WM-ISB-006), and to the T Plant Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSR) (''F-SD-WM-TSR-003). The amendments to these documents are intended to authorize removal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies from the spent fuel pool in the Solid Waste Treatment Facility 221-T canyon for interim storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The amendments will include a stand-alone safety assessment as well as revisions to these safety documents as needed to reflect the changes in work scope not currently authorized to accomplish the expected end-state of the Fuel Removal Project for the 221-T Facility.

  9. San Onofre PWR Data for Code Validation of MOX Fuel Depletion Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    1999-09-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide fuel (fabricated with both uranium and plutonium isotope) discharged from reactors is of interest to the Fissile Material Disposition Program. The validation of depletion codes used to predict isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to studies concerning uranium-only fueled reactors, thus, is very important. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program was conducted to examine the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit I, during cycles 2 and 3. The data usually required as input to depletion codes, either one-dimensional or lattice codes, were taken from various sources and compiled into this report. Where data were either lacking or determined inadequate, the appropriate data were supplied from other references. The scope of the reactor operations and design data, in addition to the isotopic analyses, were considered to be of sufficient quality for depletion code validation.

  10. Demonstration of Uncertainty Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis for PWR Fuel Performance with BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Ladd, Jacob; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling; Burns, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    BISON is an advanced fuels performance code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory and is the code of choice for fuels performance by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Program. An approach to uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis with BISON was developed and a new toolkit was created. A PWR fuel rod model was developed and simulated by BISON, and uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis were performed with eighteen uncertain input parameters. The maximum fuel temperature and gap conductance were selected as the figures of merit (FOM). Pearson, Spearman, and partial correlation coefficients were considered for all of the figures of merit in sensitivity analysis.

  11. Thermal analysis of a storage cask for 24 spent PWR fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.C.; Bang, K.S.; Seo, K.S.; Kim, H.D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea); Choi, B.I.; Lee, H.Y.; Song, M.J. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to perform a thermal analysis of a spent fuel storage cask in order to predict the maximum concrete and fuel cladding temperatures. Thermal analyses have been carried out for a storage cask under normal and off-normal conditions. The environmental temperature is assumed to be 27 {open_square} under the normal condition. The off-normal condition has an environmental temperature of 40 {open_square}. An additional off-normal condition is considered as a partial blockage of the air inlet ducts. Four of the eight inlet ducts are assumed to be completely blocked. The storage cask is designed to store 24 PWR spent fuel assemblies with a burn-up of 55,000 MWD/MTU and a cooling time of 7 years. The decay heat load from the 24 PWR assemblies is 25.2 kW. Thermal analyses of ventilation system have been carried out for the determination of the optimum duct size and shape. The finite volume computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT was used for the thermal analysis. In the results of the analysis, the maximum temperatures of the fuel rod and concrete overpack were lower than the allowable values under the normal condition and off-normal conditions.

  12. Control rod ejection accident analysis for a PWR with thorium fuel loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Cruz, D.F. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, Westerduinweg 3, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the results of 3-D transient analysis of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core loaded with 100% Th-Pu MOX fuel assemblies. The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety impact of applying a full loading of this innovative fuel in PWRs of the current generation. A reactivity insertion accident scenario has been simulated using the reactor core analysis code PANTHER, used in conjunction with the lattice code WIMS. A single control rod assembly, with the highest reactivity worth, has been considered to be ejected from the core within 100 milliseconds, which may occur due to failure of the casing of the control rod driver mechanism. Analysis at both hot full power and hot zero power reactor states have been taken into account. The results were compared with those obtained for a representative PWR fuelled with UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies. In general the results obtained for both cores were comparable, with some differences associated mainly to the harder neutron spectrum observed for the Th-Pu MOX core, and to some specific core design features. The study has been performed as part of the LWR-DEPUTY project of the EURATOM 6. Framework Programme, where several aspects of novel fuels are being investigated for deep burning of plutonium in existing nuclear power plants. (authors)

  13. Identification and evaluation of PWR in-vessel severe accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukelow, J S [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Harrison, D G [Jason Associates, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morgenstern, M [Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This reports documents work performed the NRC/RES Accident Management Guidance Program to evaluate possible strategies for mitigating the consequences of PWR severe accidents. The selection and evaluation of strategies was limited to the in-vessel phase of the severe accident, i.e., after the initiation of core degradation and prior to RPV failure. A parallel project at BNL has been considering strategies applicable to the ex-vessel phase of PWR severe accidents.

  14. Development of computational methods to describe the mechanical behavior of PWR fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanninger, Andreas; Seidl, Marcus; Macian-Juan, Rafael [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the static mechanical response of PWR fuel assemblies (FAs) in the reactor core, a structural FA model is being developed using the FEM code ANSYS Mechanical. To assess the capabilities of the model, lateral deflection tests are performed for a reference FA. For this purpose we distinguish between two environments, in-laboratory and in-reactor for different burn-ups. The results are in qualitative agreement with experimental tests and show the stiffness decrease of the FAs during irradiation in the reactor core.

  15. SCALE 5.1 Predictions of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this calculation report is to document the comparison to measurement of the isotopic concentrations for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel determined with the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 5.1 (Ref. ) epletion calculation method. Specifically, the depletion computer code and the cross-section library being evaluated are the twodimensional (2-D) transport and depletion module, TRITON/NEWT,2, 3 and the 44GROUPNDF5 (Ref. 4) cross-section library, respectively, in the SCALE .1 code system.

  16. Analysis of bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel has been modeled based on measured rim width, porosity and bubble density. Using the assumption that excessive bubble pressure in the rim is inversely proportional to its radius, proportionality constant is derived as a function of average pellet burnup and bubble radius. This approach is possible because the integration of the number of Xe atoms retained in the rim bubbles, which can be calculated as a function of bubble radius, over the bubble radius gives the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles. Here the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles can be derived from the measured Xe depletion fraction in the matrix and the calculated rim thickness. Then the rim bubble pressure is obtained as a function of fuel burnup and bubble size from the proportionality constant. Therefore, the present model can provide some useful information that would be required to analyze the behavior of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel under both normal and transient operating conditions. 28 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  17. Solution of a benchmark set problems for BWR and PWR reactors with UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels using CASMO-4; Solucion de un Conjunto de Problemas Benchmark para Reactores BWR y PWR con Combustible UO{sub 2} y MOX Usando CASMO-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez F, M.A.; Valle G, E. del; Alonso V, G. [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: mike_ipn_esfm@hotmail. com

    2007-07-01

    In this work some of the results for a group of benchmark problems of light water reactors that allow to study the physics of the fuels of these reactors are presented. These benchmark problems were proposed by Akio Yamamoto and collaborators in 2002 and they include two fuel types; uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and mixed oxides (MOX). The range of problems that its cover embraces three different configurations: unitary cell for a fuel bar, fuel assemble of PWR and fuel assemble of BWR what allows to carry out an understanding analysis of the problems related with the fuel performance of new generation in light water reactors with high burnt. Also these benchmark problems help to understand the fuel administration in core of a BWR like of a PWR. The calculations were carried out with CMS (of their initials in English Core Management Software), particularly with CASMO-4 that is a code designed to carry out analysis of fuels burnt of fuel bars cells as well as fuel assemblies as much for PWR as for BWR and that it is part in turn of the CMS code. (Author)

  18. Sensitivity analysis of a PWR fuel element using zircaloy and silicon carbide claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Rochkhudson B. de; Cardoso, Fabiano; Salome, Jean A.D.; Pereira, Claubia; Fortini, Angela, E-mail: rochkhudson@ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The alloy composed of zirconium has been used effectively for over 50 years in claddings of nuclear fuel, especially for PWR type reactors. However, to increase fuel enrichment with the aim of raising the burning and maintaining the safety of nuclear plants is of great relevance the study of new materials that can replace safely and efficiently zircaloy cladding. Among several proposed material, silicon carbide (SiC) has a potential to replace zircaloy as fuel cladding material due to its high-temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity. In this paper, the goal is to expand the study with silicon carbide cladding, checking its behavior when submitted to an environment with boron, burnable poison rods, and temperature variations. Sensitivity calculation and the impact in multiplication factor to both claddings, zircaloy and silicon carbide, were performed during the burnup. The neutronic analysis was made using the SCALE 6.0 (Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation) code. (author)

  19. Burn-up credit in criticality safety of PWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Rowayda F., E-mail: Rowayda_mahmoud@yahoo.com [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Shaat, Mohamed K. [Nuclear Engineering, Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Nagy, M.E.; Agamy, S.A. [Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear and Radiation Department, Alexandria University (Egypt); Abdelrahman, Adel A. [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Designing spent fuel wet storage using WIMS-5D and MCNP-5 code. • Studying fresh and burned fuel with/out absorber like “B{sub 4}C and Ag–In–Cd” in racks. • Sub-criticality was confirmed for fresh and burned fuel under specific cases. • Studies for BU credit recommend increasing fuel burn-up to 60.0 GWD/MTU. • Those studies require new core structure materials, fuel composition and cladding. - Abstract: The criticality safety calculations were performed for a proposed design of a wet spent fuel storage pool. This pool will be used for the storage of spent fuel discharged from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR). The mathematical model based on the international validated codes, WIMS-5 and MCNP-5 were used for calculating the effective multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, for the spent fuel stored in the pool. The data library for the multi-group neutron microscopic cross-sections was used for the cell calculations. The k{sub eff} was calculated for several changes in water density, water level, assembly pitch and burn-up with different initial fuel enrichment and new types and amounts of fixed absorbers. Also, k{sub eff} was calculated for the conservative fresh fuel case. The results of the calculations confirmed that the effective multiplication factor for the spent fuel storage is sub-critical for all normal and abnormal states. The future strategy for the burn-up credit recommends increasing the fuel burn-up to a value >60.0 GWD/MTU, which requires new fuel composition and new fuel cladding material with the assessment of the effects of negative reactivity build up.

  20. Fuel utilization improvements in a once-through PWR fuel cycle. Final report on Task 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabby, D.

    1979-06-01

    In studying the position of the United States Department of Energy, Non-proliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program, this report determines the uranium saving associated with various improvement concepts applicable to a once-through fuel cycle of a standard four-loop Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor. Increased discharged fuel burnup from 33,000 to 45,000 MWD/MTM could achieve a 12% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ saving by 1990. Improved fuel management schemes combined with coastdown to 60% power, could result in U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ savings of 6%.

  1. Evaluation of Physical Characteristics of PWR Cores with Accident Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); In, Wang Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The accident tolerant fuels (ATF) considered in this work includes metallic microcell UO{sub 2} pellets and outer Cr-based alloy coating on cladding, which is being developed in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Chromium metals have been used in many fields because of its hardness and corrosion-resistance. The use of the chromium metal in nuclear fuel rod can enhance the conductivity of pellets and corrosion-resistance of cladding. The objective of this work is to study the neutronic performances and characteristics of the commercial PWR core loaded the ATF-bearing assemblies. In this work, we studied the PWR cores which are loaded with ATF assemblies to improve the safety of reactor core. The ATF rod consists of the metallic microcell UO2 pellet which includes chromium of 3.34 wt% and the outer 0.05mm thick coating of Cr-based alloy with atomic number ratio of 85:15. We performed the cycle-by-cycle reload core analysis from the cycle 8 at which the ATF fuel assemblies start to be loaded into the core. The target nuclear power plant is the Hanbit-3 nuclear power plant. From the analysis, it was found that 1) the uranium enrichment is required to be increased up to 5.20/4.70 wt% in order to satisfy a required cycle length of 480 EFPDs, 2) the cycle length for the core using ATF fuel assemblies with the same uranium enrichments as those in the reference UO{sub 2} fueled core is decreased from 480 EFPDs to 430 EFPDs.

  2. PWR-FBR with closed fuel cycle for a sustainable nuclear energy supply in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Mi

    2007-01-01

    From the thermal reactor to the fast reactor and then to the fusion reactor; this is the three-step strategy that has been decided for a sustainable nuclear energy supply in China. As the main thermal reactor type, the commercialized development phase of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been stepped up. The development of the fast reactor (FBR) is still in the early stage, marked by China experimental fast reactor (CEFR), which is currently under construction. According to the strategy study on the fast reactor development in China, its engineering development will be divided into three steps: the CEFR with a power of 65 MWt 20 Mwe; the China prototype fast reactor (CPFR) with a power of 1 500 MWt/600 Mwe; and the China demonstration fast reactor (CDFR) with a power of 2 500-3 750 MWt 1 000-1 500 Mwe. With regards to the fuel cycle, a 100 ta PWR spent fuel reprocessing pilot plant and a 500 kg/a MOX fabrication plant are under construction. A project involving the construction of an industrial reprocessing plant and an MOX fabrication plant are also under application phase.

  3. Conceptual Core Analysis of Long Life PWR Utilizing Thorium-Uranium Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouf; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-08-01

    Conceptual core analysis of long life PWR utilizing thorium-uranium based fuel has conducted. The purpose of this study is to evaluate neutronic behavior of reactor core using combined thorium and enriched uranium fuel. Based on this fuel composition, reactor core have higher conversion ratio rather than conventional fuel which could give longer operation length. This simulation performed using SRAC Code System based on library SRACLIB-JDL32. The calculation carried out for (Th-U)O2 and (Th-U)C fuel with uranium composition 30 - 40% and gadolinium (Gd2O3) as burnable poison 0,0125%. The fuel composition adjusted to obtain burn up length 10 - 15 years under thermal power 600 - 1000 MWt. The key properties such as uranium enrichment, fuel volume fraction, percentage of uranium are evaluated. Core calculation on this study adopted R-Z geometry divided by 3 region, each region have different uranium enrichment. The result show multiplication factor every burn up step for 15 years operation length, power distribution behavior, power peaking factor, and conversion ratio. The optimum core design achieved when thermal power 600 MWt, percentage of uranium 35%, U-235 enrichment 11 - 13%, with 14 years operation length, axial and radial power peaking factor about 1.5 and 1.2 respectively.

  4. Pressure loss tests for DR-BEP of fullsize 17 x 17 PWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Chun, Se Young; Chang, Seok Kyu; Won, Soon Youn; Cho, Young Rho; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyoung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the conditions, procedure and results in the pressure loss tests carried out for a double grid type debris resistance bottom end piece (DR-BEP) designed by KAERI. In this test, the pressure loss coefficients of the full size 17 x 17 PWR simulated fuel assembly with DR-BET and with standard-BEP were measured respectively, and the pressure loss coefficients of DR-BEP were compared with the coefficients of STD-BET. The test conditions fall within the ranges of loop pressure from 5.2 to 45 bar, loop temperature from 27 to 221 deg C and Reynolds number in fuel bundle from 2.17 x 10{sup 4} to 3.85 x 10{sup 5}. (Author) 5 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. French nuclear plants PWR vessel integrity assessment and life management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezdikian, G. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Production Nucleaire, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Quinot, P. [FRAMATOME, Dept. Bloc Reacteur et Boucles Primaires, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Faidy, C.; Churier-Bossennec, H. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Ingenierie et Service, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-07-01

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel life management of 56 PWR 3 loop and 4 loop reactors units was engaged by the French Utility EDF (Electricite de France) a few years ago and is yet on going on. This paper will present the work carried out within the framework of justifying why the 34 three loop reactor vessels will remain acceptable for operation for a lifetime of at least 40-years. A summary of the measures will be given. An overall review of actions will be presented describing the French approach, using important existing databases, including studies related to irradiation surveillance monitoring program and end of life fluence assessment. The last results obtained are based on generic integrity analyses for all categories of situations (normal upset emergency and faulted conditions) until the end of lifetime, postulating circumferential an radial kinds of flaw located in the stainless steel cladding or shallow sub-cladding area. The results of structural integrity analyses beginning with elastic computations and completed with three-dimensional finite element elastic plastic computations for envelope cases, are compared with code criteria for operating plants. The objective is to evaluate the margins on different parameters as RTNDT (Reference Nil Ductility Transition Temperature), toughness or crack size, to justify the global fitness for service of all these Reactor Pressure Vessels. The paper introduces EDF's maintenance strategy, related to integrity assessment, for those nuclear power plants under operation, based on NDE in-service inspection of the first thirty millimeters in the thickness of the wall and major surveillance programs of the vessels. (author)

  6. Approaches to analyze the bowing of German PWR fuel assemblies; Ansaetze zur Analyse des Biegeverhaltens deutscher DWR-Brennelemente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeke, H.; Bauer, R.; Bloemeling, F.; Lawall, R. [TUeV NORD SysTec GmbH und Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The analysis of the bowing behavior of PWR fuel elements is required in case of increased fuel element deformations that have been observed during the last years. In the contribution the following issues are discussed: fuel element properties (stiffness, constructive features), influence factors (guiding tubes, spacer), load transfer and its impact. Under consideration of external boundary conditions an evaluation scheme was developed, using analysis data (control rod drop time), friction force measurements, fuel element characteristics (fuel element deformation, bowing) and their ranking, and simulation models (fluid-structure interactions). The evaluation scheme allows the definition of appropriate measures. The suitability of the methodology was demonstrated.

  7. Criticality calculations of a generic fuel container for fuel assemblies PWR, by means of the code MCNP; Calculos de criticidad de un contenedor de combustible generico para ensambles combustibles PWR, mediante el codigo MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas E, S.; Esquivel E, J.; Ramirez S, J. R., E-mail: samuel.vargas@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The purpose of the concept of burned consideration (Burn-up credit) is determining the capacity of the calculation codes, as well as of the nuclear data associates to predict the isotopic composition and the corresponding neutrons effective multiplication factor in a generic container of spent fuel during some time of relevant storage. The present work has as objective determining this capacity of the calculation code MCNP in the prediction of the neutrons effective multiplication factor for a fuel assemblies arrangement type PWR inside a container of generic storage. The calculations are divided in two parts, the first, in the decay calculations with specified nuclide concentrations by the reference for a pressure water reactor (PWR) with enriched fuel to 4.5% and a discharge burned of 50 GW d/Mtu. The second, in criticality calculations with isotopic compositions dependent of the time for actinides and important fission products, taking 30 time steps, for two actinide groups and fission products. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of Fuel Performance Uncertainty in a PWR HFP RIA Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joosuk; Woo, Swengwoong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Sensitivity and combined uncertainty studies based on the various kinds of uncertainty sources have been carried out in a PWR hot full power (HFP) condition. - Cladding inner diameter, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel thermal expansion and peak power have induced a significant impact to the fuel enthalpy and temperature. - Cladding hoop strain was strongly affected by the uncertainty parameters of cladding inner diameter, fuel thermal expansion, EPRI-1 CHF and peak power. - Above results are valid in the given analysis condition in this paper. Thereby, the analysis conditions, for example the peak linear heat rate before RIA or peak power and FWHM etc, are changed the results will be changed also. Approved analysis methodology for licensing application in the safety analysis of reactivity initiated accident (RIA) in Korea is based on a conservative approach. But newly introduced safety criteria, described in section 4.2 of NUREG-0800, tend to reduce the margins or depending on the reactor types rod failure is predicted due to the pellet-to-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) criteria. Thereby, licensee is trying to improve the margins by utilizing a less conservative approach.

  9. Validation of the scale system for PWR spent fuel isotopic composition analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.; Bowman, S.M.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brady, M.C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The validity of the computation of pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel isotopic composition by the SCALE system depletion analysis was assessed using data presented in the report. Radiochemical measurements and SCALE/SAS2H computations of depleted fuel isotopics were compared with 19 benchmark-problem samples from Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, H. B. Robinson Unit 2, and Obrigheim PWRs. Even though not exhaustive in scope, the validation included comparison of predicted and measured concentrations for 14 actinides and 37 fission and activation products. The basic method by which the SAS2H control module applies the neutron transport treatment and point-depletion methods of SCALE functional modules (XSDRNPM-S, NITAWL-II, BONAMI, and ORIGEN-S) is described in the report. Also, the reactor fuel design data, the operating histories, and the isotopic measurements for all cases are included in detail. The underlying radiochemical assays were conducted by the Materials Characterization. Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Approved Testing Material program and by four different laboratories in Europe on samples processed at the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant.

  10. Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    in MOX fuel is generally obtained from reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuel, whereas weapons-grade plutonium is obtained from decommissioned nuclear weapons material and thus has a different plutonium (and other actinides) concentration. Using MOX fuel instead of UOX fuel has potential impacts on the neutronic performance of the nuclear fuel and the design of the nuclear fuel must take these differences into account. Each of the plutonium sources (RG and WG) has different implications on the neutronic behavior of the fuel because each contains a different blend of plutonium nuclides. The amount of heat and the number of neutrons produced from fission of plutonium nuclides is different from fission of {sup 235}U. These differences in UOX and MOX do not end at discharge of the fuel from the reactor core - the short- and long-term storage of MOX fuel may have different requirements than UOX fuel because of the different discharged fuel decay heat characteristics. The research documented in this report compares MOX and UOX fuel during storage and disposal of the fuel by comparing decay heat rates for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with and without weapons-grade (WG) and reactor-grade (RG) MOX fuel.

  11. Graphical and tabular summaries of decay characteristics for once-through PWR, LMFBR, and FFTF fuel cycle materials. [Spent fuel, high-level waste fuel can scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Liberman, M.S.; Morrison, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the results of ORIGEN2 and a newly developed code called ORMANG, graphical and summary tabular characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and fuel assembly structural material (cladding) waste are presented for a generic pressurized-water reactor (PWR), a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The characteristics include radioactivity, thermal power, and toxicity (water dilution volume). Given are graphs and summary tables containing characteristic totals and the principal nuclide contributors as well as graphs comparing the three reactors for a single material and the three materials for a single reactor.

  12. Experiment on the improvement of sinterability for dry recycling nuclear fuel pellets by using simulated spent PWR fuel of high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, S. S.; Park, G. I.; Lee, Jae W.; Cho, K. H.; Lee, D. Y.; Lee, Y. S.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.; Shin, W. C

    2004-09-01

    To study the fabrication characteristics of dry recycling nuclear fuel using spent PWR fuel with high burnup of 60,000 MWd/tU, the fission products of spent PWR fuel was analyzed by ORIGEN-2 code. Simulated spent PWR fuel pellets were fabricated by using UO{sub 2} powder added by the simulated fission products. The simulated dry-recycling-fuel pellets were fabricated by dry recycling fuel fabrication flow including 3 cycle treated OREOX(Oxidation and REduction of OXide fuel) process. A small amount of dopant such as TiO{sub 2}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Li{sub 2}O are added to increase sinterability of the OREOX treated powder. As the results of experiments, the densities of sintered pellets without dopant ranged from 10.04 to 10.34 g/cm{sup 3}(94.3 to 97.1% of T.D.), the grain size of the pellets ranged from 3 to 4 {mu}m. The sintered density of the pellets with TiO{sub 2} or Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} ranged from 10.46 to 10.32 g/cm{sup 3}(98.2 to 96.9 % of T.D.) The grain size of the pellets with TiO{sub 2}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} or Li{sub 2}O ranged from 7.3 to 12.2 {mu}m.

  13. Derivation of correction factor to be applied for calculated results of PWR fuel isotopic composition by ORIGEN2 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Murazaki, Minoru [Tokyo Nuclear Service Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Mochizuki, Hiroki [The Japan Research Institute Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    For providing conservative PWR spent fuel compositions from the view point of nuclear criticality safety, correction factors applicable for result of burnup calculation by ORIGEN2 were evaluated. Its conservativeness was verified by criticality calculations using MVP. To calculate these correction factors, analyses of spent fuel isotopic composition data were performed by ORIGEN2. Maximum or minimum value of the ratio of calculation result to experimental data was chosen as correction factor. These factors are given to each set of fuel assembly and ORIGEN2 library. They could be considered as the re-definition of recommended isotopic composition given in Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook. (author)

  14. Experience on management of CANDU spent fuel in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.-Y.; Choi, B.-I.; Yoon, J.-H.; Seo, U.-S. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Nuclear Environment Technology Inst. (KHNP/NETEC), Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    In Korea, national policy on the management of spent fuel from both PWR and CANDU reactors demands that all the spent fuel be kept within reactor site in until 2016 the time spent fuel interim storage facility might open. Based on the end of 2001, KHNP has 4 CANDU reactors in operation generating approximately 5,000 bundles of spent fuels per each unit annually. The generation, accumulation, and management of CANDU spent fuel by KHNP in Korea are reviewed. CANDU spent fuel storage technology including pool storage in fuel building, concrete silo storage, and on going project for consolidating storage adapting modular vault type MACSTOR concept are outlined. Especially current joint development of storage of CANDU spent fuel for improving land usage is addressed. The explanation of the new consolidated dry storage system includes description of the storage facility, its safety evaluations, and final implementation. Finally future movement on management of spent fuel in Korea is also briefly introduced. (author)

  15. Evaluation of fretting failures on PWR fuel by post-irradiation examinations and modeling in the DEGRAD-1 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castanheira, Myrthes; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Lucki, Georgi; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Teodoro, Celso A.; Damy, Margaret de A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: myrthes@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    One of the major recognized causes of fuel rod failures is fretting of the clad due to the entrapment of debris in a fuel rod spacer. Such debris, inadvertently dropped into the primary system during maintenance operations, includes various sizes of particles. Intermediate size particles, such as metal cuttings, electrical connectors, metal fittings, pieces of wire, and small nuts and bolts can become trapped between fuel rods in a spacer where hydraulically induced vibrations can cause fretting failure of the fuel rod. An evaluation of debris fretting failure on PWR fuel is presented. The inquiries on fuel rods failures are based on results of analysis using post-irradiation non-destructive examination. The complementary analysis includes a modeling approach by code DEGRAD-1 to characterize the degradation phenomenon after primary failure integrated in the reactor operational history. (author)

  16. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); St Clair, R.; Orr, D. [Duke Energy, 526 S. Church St, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  17. Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this topical report is to present to the NRC for review and acceptance a methodology for using burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems for PWR spent fuel transportation packages, while maintaining the criticality safety margins and related requirements of 10 CFR Part 71 and 72. The proposed methodology consists of five major steps as summarized below: (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations in SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). and (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper fuel assembly selection prior to loading. (This step is required but the details are outside the scope of this topical report.) When reviewed and accepted by the NRC, this topical report will serve as a criterion document for criticality control analysts and will provide steps for the use of actinide-only burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems. The NRC-accepted burnup credit methodology will be used by commercial SNF storage and transportation package designers. Design-specific burnup credit criticality analyses will be defined, developed, and documented in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for each specific storage or transportation package that uses burnup credit. These SARs will then be submitted to the NRC for review and approval. This topical report is expected to be referenced in a number of storage and transportation cask applications to be submitted by commercial cask and canister designers to the NRC. Therefore, NRC acceptance of this topical report will result in increased efficiency of the

  18. Benchmark of SCALE (SAS2H) isotopic predictions of depletion analyses for San Onofre PWR MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    2000-02-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, fabricated with both uranium and plutonium, after discharge from reactors is of significant interest to the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The validation of the SCALE (SAS2H) depletion code for use in the prediction of isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to previous validation studies on uranium-only fueled reactors, has corresponding significance. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program examined the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit 1, during cycles 2 and 3. Isotopic analyses of the MOX spent fuel were conducted on 13 actinides and {sup 148}Nd by either mass or alpha spectrometry. Six fuel pellet samples were taken from four different fuel pins of an irradiated MOX assembly. The measured actinide inventories from those samples has been used to benchmark SAS2H for MOX fuel applications. The average percentage differences in the code results compared with the measurement were {minus}0.9% for {sup 235}U and 5.2% for {sup 239}Pu. The differences for most of the isotopes were significantly larger than in the cases for uranium-only fueled reactors. In general, comparisons of code results with alpha spectrometer data had extreme differences, although the differences in the calculations compared with mass spectrometer analyses were not extremely larger than that of uranium-only fueled reactors. This benchmark study should be useful in estimating uncertainties of inventory, criticality and dose calculations of MOX spent fuel.

  19. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: thermal evaluation of isolated drywells containing spent fuel (1 kW PWR spent fuel assembly)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterzuber, R; Wright, J B

    1980-09-01

    A spent fuel Isolated Drywell Test was conducted at the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site. Two PWR spent fuel assemblies having a decay heat level of approximately 1.1 kW were encapsulated inside the E-MAD Hot Bay and placed in instrumented near-surface drywell storage cells. Temperatures from the two isolated drywells and the adjacent soil have been recorded throughout the 19 month Isolated Drywell Test. Canister and drywell liner temperatures reached their peak values (254{sup 0}F and 203{sup 0}F, respectively) during August 1979. Thereafter, all temperatures decreased and showed a cycling pattern which responded to seasonal atmospheric temperature changes. A computer model was utilized to predict the thermal response of the drywell. Computer predictions of the drywell temperatures and the temperatures of the surrounding soil are presented and show good agreement with the test data.

  20. A MATLAB-Linked Solver to Find Fuel Depletion in a PWR, a Suggested VVER-1000 Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Faghihi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coupled first-order IVPs are frequently used in many parts of engineering and sciences. We present a “solver” including three computer programs which were joint with the MATLAB software to solve and plot solutions of the first-order coupled stiff or nonstiff IVPs. Some applications related to IVPs are given here using our MATLAB-linked solver. Muon catalyzed fusion in a D-T mixture is considered as a first dynamical example of the coupled IVPs. Then, we have focused on the fuel depletion in a suggested PWR including poisons burnups (xenon-135 and samarium-149, plutonium isotopes production, and uranium depletion.

  1. Topical report on actinide-only burnup credit for PWR spent nuclear fuel packages. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1997-04-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package

  2. Analysis of experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies using Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Adrienne M., E-mail: alafleur@lanl.gov; Menlove, Howard O., E-mail: hmenlove@lanl.gov

    2015-05-01

    Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a new NDA technique that was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to improve existing nuclear safeguards measurements for LWR fuel assemblies. The SINRD detector consists of four fission chambers (FCs) wrapped with different absorber filters to isolate different parts of the neutron energy spectrum and one ion chamber (IC) to measure the gross gamma rate. As a result, two different techniques can be utilized using the same SINRD detector unit and hardware. These techniques are the Passive Neutron Multiplication Counter (PNMC) method and the SINRD method. The focus of the work described in this paper is the analysis of experimental measurements of fresh and spent PWR fuel assemblies that were performed at LANL and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), respectively, using the SINRD detector. The purpose of these experiments was to assess the following capabilities of the SINRD detector: 1) reproducibility of measurements to quantify systematic errors, 2) sensitivity to water gap between detector and fuel assembly, 3) sensitivity and penetrability to the removal of fuel rods from the assembly, and 4) use of PNMC/SINRD ratios to quantify neutron multiplication and/or fissile content. The results from these simulations and measurements provide valuable experimental data that directly supports safeguards research and development (R&D) efforts on the viability of passive neutron NDA techniques and detector designs for partial defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. - Highlights: • Experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent FAs were performed with SINRD. • Good agreement of MCNPX and measured results confirmed accuracy of SINRD model. • For fresh fuel, SINRD and PNMC ratios were not sensitive to water gaps of ≤5-mm. • Practical use of SINRD would be in Fork detector to reduce systematic uncertainties.

  3. Lateral hydraulic forces calculation on PWR fuel assemblies with computational fluid dynamics codes; Calculo de fuerzas laterales hidraulicas en elementos combustibles tipo PWR con codigos de dinamica de fluidos coputacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpa Masa, R.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Moreno Garcia, B.

    2016-08-01

    To be able to simulate the behavior of nuclear fuel under operating conditions, it is required to include all the representative loads, including the lateral hydraulic forces which were not included traditionally because of the difficulty of calculating them in a reliable way. Thanks to the advance in CFD codes, now it is possible to assess them. This study calculates the local lateral hydraulic forces, caused by the contraction and expansion of the flow due to the bow of the surrounding fuel assemblies, on of fuel assembly under typical operating conditions from a three loop Westinghouse PWR reactor. (Author)

  4. Design and manufacturing of non-instrumented capsule for advanced PWR fuel pellet irradiation test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Song, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This project is preparing to irradiation test of the developed large grain UO{sub 2} fuel pellet in HANARO for pursuit fuel safety and high burn-up in 'Advanced LWR Fuel Technology Development Project' as a part Nuclear Mid and Long-term R and D Program. On the basis test rod is performed the nuclei property and preliminary fuel performance analysis, test rod and non-instrumented capsule are designed and manufactured for irradiation test in HANARO. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel pellet was referred the non-instrumented capsule for an irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel in HANARO(DUPIC Rig-001) and 18-element HANARO fuel, was designed to ensure the integrity and the endurance of non-instrumented capsule during the long term(2.5 years) irradiation. To irradiate the UO{sub 2} pellets up to the burn-up 70 MWD/kgU, need the time about 60 months and ensure the integrity of non-instrumented capsule for 30 months until replace the new capsule. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule will be based to develope the non-instrumented capsule for the more long term irradiation in HANARO. 22 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  5. Calculation of source term in spent PWR fuel assemblies for dry storage and shipping cask design; Calculo de los terminos fuente de combustibles irradiados PWR para el diseno de contenedores de almacenamiento y transporte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J. L.; Lopez, J.

    1986-07-01

    Using the ORIGEN-2 Coda, the decay heat and neutron and photon sources for an irradiated PWR fuel element have been calculated. Also, parametric studies on the behaviour of the magnitudes with the burn-up, linear heat power and irradiation and cooling times were performed. Finally, a comparison between our results and other design calculations shows a good agreement and confirms the validity of the used method. (Author) 6 refs.

  6. Optimization of the distribution of bars with gadolinium oxide in reactor fuel elements PWR; Optimizacion de la distribucion de barras con oxido de gadolinio en elementos combustibles para reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgar Santa Cecilia, P. A.; Velazquez, J.; Ahnert Iglesias, C.

    2014-07-01

    In the schemes of low leakage, currently used in the majority of PWR reactors, it makes use of absorbent consumables for the effective control of the factors of peak, the critical concentration of initial boron and the moderator temperature coefficient. One of the most used absorbing is the oxide of gadolinium, which is integrated within the fuel pickup. Occurs a process of optimization of fuel elements with oxide of gadolinium, which allows for a smaller number of configurations with a low peak factor for bar. (Author)

  7. PWR-UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel criticality study: control rod effects on infinite neutron multiplication factor and spent fuel composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, R.V.; Pereira, C., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br; Silva, C.A.M.; Costa, A.L.; Veloso, M.A.F.; Oliveira, A.H. de

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A three-dimensional model of a PWR fuel were simulated. • Results using TRITON/T6-DEPL module in SCALE 6.0 and two libraries (238 and 44 groups) were compared. • Variations in the infinite neutron multiplication factor and the nuclides concentrations, both under control rod insertion effects were analysed. • Results show very good agreement with those published by OECD. -- Abstract: Deterministic and stochastic nuclear codes are software packages used to perform reactor physics calculations, especially in PWRs, the most common type of nuclear reactor currently in operation. The NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety has published a Benchmark with results obtained from simulations of PWR-UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel. The same simulations were performed at DEN/UFMG with SCALE 6.0, a modular nuclear system code developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory using two different neutron energy libraries (238 and 44 groups). The results obtained using a three-dimensional model with the T6-DEPL sequence of the TRITON module in SCALE 6.0 for spent fuel inventory and infinite neutron multiplication factor calculations show very good agreement with those published by the OECD. The main goal of this work is to validate the methodology at DEN/UFMG for future use in simulations related to Angra I, II and III Nuclear Power Plants.

  8. High-temperature compatibility between liquid metal as PWR fuel gap filler and stainless steel and high-density concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong; Jumpee, Chayanit; Jitpukdee, Manit

    2014-08-01

    In conventional nuclear fuel rods for light-water reactors, a helium-filled as-fabricated gap between the fuel and the cladding inner surface accommodates fuel swelling and cladding creep down. Because helium exhibits a very low thermal conductivity, it results in a large temperature rise in the gap. Liquid metal (LM; 1/3 weight portion each of lead, tin, and bismuth) has been proposed to be a gap filler because of its high thermal conductivity (∼100 times that of He), low melting point (∼100 °C), and lack of chemical reactivity with UO2 and water. With the presence of LM, the temperature drop across the gap is virtually eliminated and the fuel is operated at a lower temperature at the same power output, resulting in safer fuel, delayed fission gas release and prevention of massive secondary hydriding. During normal reactor operation, should an LM-bonded fuel rod failure occurs resulting in a discharge of liquid metal into the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel, it should not corrode stainless steel. An experiment was conducted to confirm that at 315 °C, LM in contact with 304 stainless steel in the PWR water chemistry environment for up to 30 days resulted in no observable corrosion. Moreover, during a hypothetical core-melt accident assuming that the liquid metal with elevated temperature between 1000 and 1600 °C is spread on a high-density concrete basement of the power plant, a small-scale experiment was performed to demonstrate that the LM-concrete interaction at 1000 °C for as long as 12 h resulted in no penetration. At 1200 °C for 5 h, the LM penetrated a distance of ∼1.3 cm, but the penetration appeared to stop. At 1400 °C the penetration rate was ∼0.7 cm/h. At 1600 °C, the penetration rate was ∼17 cm/h. No corrosion based on chemical reactions with high-density concrete occurred, and, hence, the only physical interaction between high-temperature LM and high-density concrete was from tiny cracks generated from thermal stress. Moreover

  9. Comparison of Fuel Temperature Coefficients of PWR UO{sub 2} Fuel from Monte Carlo Codes (MCNP6.1 and KENO6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-O; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As a result, there was a difference within about 300-400 pcm between keff values at each enrichment due to the difference of codes and nuclear data used in the evaluations. The FTC was changed to be less negative with the increase of uranium enrichment, and it followed the form of asymptotic curve. However, it is necessary to perform additional study for investigating what factor causes the differences more than two standard deviation (2σ) among the FTCs at partial enrichment region. The interaction probability of incident neutron with nuclear fuel is depended on the relative velocity between the neutron and the target nuclei. The Fuel Temperature Coefficient (FTC) is defined as the change of Doppler effect with respect to the change in fuel temperature without any other change such as moderator temperature, moderator density, etc. In this study, the FTCs for UO{sub 2} fuel were evaluated by using MCNP6.1 and KENO6 codes based on a Monte Carlo method. In addition, the latest neutron cross-sections (ENDF/B-VI and VII) were applied to analyze the effect of these data on the evaluation of FTC, and nuclear data used in MCNP calculations were generated from the makxsf code. An evaluation of the Doppler effect and FTC for UO{sub 2} fuel widely used in PWR was conducted using MCNP6.1 and KENO6 codes. The ENDF/B-VI and VII were also applied to analyze what effect these data has on those evaluations. All cross-sections needed for MCNP calculation were produced using makxsf code. The calculation models used in the evaluations were based on the typical PWR UO{sub 2} lattice.

  10. Analysis of the performance of fuel cells PWR with a single enrichment and radial distribution of enrichments; Analisis del desempeno de celdas combustibles PWR con un solo enriquecimiento y con distribucion radial de enriquecimientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, S.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Del Valle, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: nolosesamuel@prodigy.net.mx

    2008-07-01

    One of the main challenges in the design of fuel assemblies is the efficient use of uranium achieving burnt homogeneous of the fuel rods as well as the burnt maximum possible of the same ones to the unload. In the case of the assemblies type PWR has been decided actually for fuel assemblies with a single radial enrichment. The present work has like effect to show the because of this decision, reason why a comparison of the neutronic performance of two fuel cells takes place with the same enrichment average but one of them with radial distribution of enrichment and the other with a single enrichment equal to the average. The results shown in the present study of the behavior of the neutron flow as well as the power distribution through of assembly sustain the because of a single radial enrichment. (Author)

  11. Process development and fabrication for sphere-pac fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty, R.K.; Campbell, M.H.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium fuel rods containing sphere-pac fuel have been fabricated for in-reactor tests and demonstrations. A process for the development, qualification, and fabrication of acceptable sphere-pac fuel rods is described. Special equipment to control fuel contamination with moisture or air and the equipment layout needed for rod fabrication is described and tests for assuring the uniformity of the fuel column are discussed. Fuel retainers required for sphere-pac fuel column stability and instrumentation to measure fuel column smear density are described. Results of sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication campaigns are reviewed and recommended improvements for high throughput production are noted.

  12. Assessment of PWR fuel degradation by post-irradiation examinations and modeling in DEGRAD-1 code; Avaliacao da degradacao de combustivel PWR por exames pos-irradiacao e modelagem no codigo DEGRAD-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castanheira, Myrthes; Lucki, Georgi; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Teodoro, Celso A.; Damy, Margaret de A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: myrthes@ipen

    2005-07-01

    On the majority of the cases, the inquiries on primary failures and secondary in PWR fuel rods are based on results of analysis were made use of the non-destructive examination results (coolant activities monitoring, sipping tests, visual examination). The complementary analysis methodology proposed in this work includes a modeling approach to characterization of the physical effects of the individual chemistry mechanisms that constitute the incubation phase of degradation phenomenon after primary failure that are integrated in the reactor operational history under stationary operational regime, and normal power transients. The computational program called DEGRAD-1 was developed based on this modeling approach. The practical outcome of the program is to predict cladding regions susceptible to massive hydriding. The applications presented demonstrate the validity of proposed method and models by actual cases simulation, which (primary and secondary) defects positions were known and formation time was estimated. By using the modeling approach, a relationship between the hydrogen concentration in the gap and the inner cladding oxide thickness has been identified which, when satisfied, will induce massive hydriding. The novelty in this work is the integrated methodology, which supplements the traditional analysis methods (using data from non-destructive techniques) with mathematical models for the hydrogen evolution, oxidation and hydriding that include refined approaches and criteria for PWR fuel, and using the FRAPCON-3 fuel performance code as the basic tool. (author)

  13. Standard PWR for Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negroni, A.; Velona, F. (Ente Nazionale per l' Energia Elettrica, Rome (Italy))

    1983-03-01

    A description is given of the general design for the standard PWR which will be used in the seven to eight nuclear power stations provided for in the Italian national energy plan. Special features to meet Italian conditions include double containment and a common foundation mat for the reactor, auxiliary and fuel buildings.

  14. PETER loop. Multifunctional test facility for thermal hydraulic investigations of PWR fuel elements; PETER Loop. Multifunktionsversuchstand zur thermohydraulischen Untersuchung von DWR Brennelementen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganzmann, I.; Hille, D.; Staude, U. [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany). Materials, Fluid-Structure Interaction, Plant Life Management NTCM-G

    2009-07-01

    The reliable fuel element behavior during the complete fuel cycle is one of the fundamental prerequisites of a safe and efficient nuclear power plant operation. The fuel element behavior with respect to pressure drop and vibration impact cannot be simulated by means of fluid-structure interaction codes. Therefore it is necessary to perform tests using fuel element mock-ups (1:1). AREVA NP has constructed the test facility PETER (PWR fuel element tests in Erlangen) loop. The modular construction allows maximum flexibility for any type of fuel elements. Modern measuring instrumentation for flow, pressure and vibration characterization allows the analysis of cause and consequences of thermal hydraulic phenomena. PETER loop is the standard test facility for the qualification of dynamic fuel element behavior in flowing fluid and is used for failure mode analysis.

  15. In-plant test and evaluation of the neutron collar for verification of PWR fuel assemblies at Resende, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, H.O.; Marzo, M.A.S.; de Almeida, S.G.; de Almeida, M.C.; Moitta, L.P.M.; Conti, L.F.; de Paiva, J.R.T.

    1985-11-01

    The neutron-coincidence collar has been evaluated for the measurement of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies at the Fabrica de Elementos Combustiveis plant in Resende, Brazil. This evaluation was part of the cooperative-bilateral-safeguards technical-exchange program between the United States and Brazil. The neutron collar measures the STVU content per unit length of full fuel assemblies using neutron interrogation and coincidence counting. The STYU content is measured in the passive mode without the AmLi neutron-interrogation source. The extended evaluation took place over a period of 6 months with both scanning and single-zone measurements. The results of the tests gave a coincidence-response standard deviation of 0.7% (sigma = 1.49% for mass) for the active case and 2.5% for the passive case in 1000-s measurement times. The length measurement in the scanning mode was accurate to 0.77%. The accuracies of different calibration methods were evaluated and compared.

  16. Research on PWR Core Performance With MOX Fuel Loading%MOX燃料对压水堆堆芯性能影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小生; 靳忠敏

    2013-01-01

    Use of MOX fuel in nuclear reactors is an effective way to dispose of plutonium .A large PWR reactor core with full core loading UO 2 fuel was referenced , the reactor core physics parameters of PWR with whole and part core loading MOX fuel were calculated by using DRAGON and DONJON codes ,and the reactivity worth of control rods and boron acid solution were researched under loading MOX fuel . The results show that PWR core with MOX fuel can achieve the desired cycle length and power distribution ,but loading MOX fuel will significantly decrease the reactivity worth of control rod and boron acid solution ,moreover ,the proportion of loading MOX fuel is positive to the decrease degree of reactivity worth .%在核反应堆中使用MOX燃料是处置钚的有效方式。以大型全UO2燃料压水堆堆芯设计作为参考,使用DRAGON、DONJON程序,计算在大型压水堆中全堆芯及部分堆芯装载MOX燃料后反应堆部分物理性能指标,研究加入MOX燃料后对控制棒与硼酸溶液的反应性价值的影响。结果表明,压水堆堆芯装载各比例MOX燃料均可达到与全UO2燃料堆芯相当的循环长度,功率分布也能满足相应的安全限值要求,但采用MOX燃料会造成控制棒与硼溶液的反应性价值降低,且降低程度与MOX燃料装载比例成正相关。

  17. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Seung Dong [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3{center_dot}4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident.

  18. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, October 1977--September 1978. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1978-10-01

    This quarterly/annual report reviews and summarizes the activities performed in support of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP) during Fiscal Year 1978 with emphasis on those activities that transpired during the quarter ending September 30, 1978. Significant progress has been made in achieving the primary objectives of the program, i.e., to demonstrate commercially viable fuel concepts with improved fuel - cladding interaction (FCI) behavior. This includes out-of-reactor experiments to support the fuel concepts being evaluated, initiation of instrumented test rod experiments in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), and fabrication of the first series of demonstration rods for irradiation in the Big Rock Point Reactor (BRPR).

  19. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup; Estudo de modelos para o comportamento a altas queimas de varetas combustiveis de reatores a agua leve pressurizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-11-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  20. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports.

  1. OECD/NRC PSBT Benchmark: Investigating the CATHARE2 Capability to Predict Void Fraction in PWR Fuel Bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Del Nevo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of steam volume fraction and of the boiling crisis (either DNB or dryout occurrence is a key safety-relevant issue. Decades of experience have been built up both in experimental investigation and code development and qualification; however, there is still a large margin to improve and refine the modelling approaches. The qualification of the traditional methods (system codes can be further enhanced by validation against high-quality experimental data (e.g., including measurement of local parameters. One of these databases, related to the void fraction measurements, is the pressurized water reactor subchannel and bundle tests (PSBT conducted by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC in Japan. Selected experiments belonging to this database are used for the OECD/NRC PSBT benchmark. The activity presented in the paper is connected with the improvement of current approaches by comparing system code predictions with measured data on void production in PWR-type fuel bundles. It is aimed at contributing to the validation of the numerical models of CATHARE 2 code, particularly for the prediction of void fraction distribution both at subchannel and bundle scale, for different test bundle configurations and thermal-hydraulic conditions, both in steady-state and transient conditions.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Depletion Parameters for Heat Load Evaluation of PWR Spent Fuel Storage Pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Young; Lee, Un Chul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    As necessity of safety re-evaluation for spent fuel storage facility has emphasized after the Fukushima accident, accuracy improvement of heat load evaluation has become more important to acquire reliable thermal-hydraulic evaluation results. As groundwork, parametric and sensitivity analyses of various storage conditions for Kori Unit 4 spent fuel storage pool and spent fuel depletion parameters such as axial burnup effect, operation history, and specific heat are conducted using ORIGEN2 code. According to heat load evaluation and parametric sensitivity analyses, decay heat of last discharged fuel comprises maximum 80.42% of total heat load of storage facility and there is a negative correlation between effect of depletion parameters and cooling period. It is determined that specific heat is most influential parameter and operation history is secondly influential parameter. And decay heat of just discharged fuel is varied from 0.34 to 1.66 times of average value and decay heat of 1 year cooled fuel is varied from 0.55 to 1.37 times of average value in accordance with change of specific power. Namely depletion parameters can cause large variation in decay heat calculation of short-term cooled fuel. Therefore application of real operation data instead of user selection value is needed to improve evaluation accuracy. It is expected that these results could be used to improve accuracy of heat load assessment and evaluate uncertainty of calculated heat load.

  3. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  4. CFD - neutronic coupled calculation of a quarter of a simplified PWR fuel assembly including spacer pressure drop and turbulence enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, C.; Pellacani, F.; Macian Juan, R., E-mail: carlos.pena@ntech.mw.tum.de, E-mail: pellacani@ntech.mw.tum.de, E-mail: macian@ntech.mw.tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Ntech Lehrstuhl fuer Nukleartechnik; Chiva, S., E-mail: schiva@emc.uji.es [Universitat Jaume I, Castellon de la Plana (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica y Construccion; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R., E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@iqn.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (ISIRYM/UPV) (Spain). Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety

    2011-07-01

    been developed for calculation and synchronization purposes. The data exchange is realized by means of the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software package. In this contribution, steady-state and transient results of a quarter of PWR fuel assembly with cold water injection are presented and compared with obtained results from a RELAP5/PARCS v2.7 coupled calculation. A simplified model for the spacers has been included. A methodology has been introduced to take into account the pressure drop and the turbulence enhancement produced by the spacers. (author)

  5. Parametric Analysis of PWR Spent Fuel Depletion Parameters for Long-Term-Disposal Criticality Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1999-08-01

    Utilization of burnup credit in criticality safety analysis for long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel allows improved design efficiency and reduced cost due to the large mass of fissile material that will be present in the repository. Burnup-credit calculations are based on depletion calculations that provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents (in terms of criticality potential), followed by criticality calculations to assess the value of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k(sub)eff) for the a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of probabilistically derived events. In order to ensure that the depletion calculation is conservative, it is necessary to both qualify and quantify assumptions that can be made in depletion models.

  6. A study of solute transport of radiolysis products in crud and its effects on crud growth on PWR fuel pin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Justin H. [BNF Consulting (United States); Kim, Seung Jun, E-mail: skim@lanl.gov [Mechanical and Thermal Engineering Group (AET-1), Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Jones, Barclay G. [Department of Nuclear Plasma Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We model a 3-D numerical solute transport within crud deposit on PWR fuel pin. • Source term effect from radiolysis yield and recombination is minimal. • Lower crud porosity leads substantially higher concentration of solutes. • Thicker crud deposit generates substantially higher concentration of solutes. • High concentration of radiolysis species (H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) can be directly related to corrosion issues on fuel cladding. - Abstract: This research examines the concentration of radiolysis species (H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) over the porous crud layer using a three dimensional time dependent solute transport model. A Monte Carlo random walk technique is adopted to simulate the transport behavior of the different species with various parametric studies of source term, crud thickness, and crud porosity. Particularly, this model employs a system of coupled mass transport and chemical interactions as the source term, which makes the problem non-linear. It is demonstrated that a negligible effect on radiolysis species concentrations change due to the consideration of source term. The crud thickness and porosity effect on the concentration distributions are notably observed. In general, higher concentration starts from the intersection of the heating surface with the chimney wall from the beginning and it reaches the equilibrium state within tens of seconds. The concentration profiles of the radiolysis species H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can be directly related to corrosion issues. The direct application of this study to nuclear engineering research is to aid in the design of reactors with higher performance without experiencing an Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA), an unexpected measured shift in axial power distribution from predicted values.

  7. Development of a Safeguards Verification Method and Instrument to Detect Pin Diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S

    2008-12-24

    A novel methodology to detect diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been developed in order to address a long unsolved safeguards verification problem for international safeguards community such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The concept involves inserting tiny neutron and gamma detectors into the guide tubes of a spent fuel assembly and measuring the signals. The guide tubes form a quadrant symmetric pattern in the various PWR fuel product lines and the neutron and gamma signals from these various locations are processed to obtain a unique signature for an undisturbed fuel assembly. Signatures based on the neutron and gamma signals individually or in a combination can be developed. Removal of fuel pins from the assembly will cause the signatures to be visibly perturbed thus enabling the detection of diversion. All of the required signal processing to obtain signatures can be performed on standard laptop computers. Monte Carlo simulation studies and a set of controlled experiments with actual commercial PWR spent fuel assemblies were performed and validated this novel methodology. Based on the simulation studies and benchmarking measurements, the methodology developed promises to be a powerful and practical way to detect partial defects that constitute 10% or more of the total active fuel pins. This far exceeds the detection threshold of 50% missing pins from a spent fuel assembly, a threshold defined by the IAEA Safeguards Criteria. The methodology does not rely on any operator provided data like burnup or cooling time and does not require movement of the fuel assembly from the storage rack in the spent fuel pool. A concept was developed to build a practical field device, Partial Defect Detector (PDET), which will be completely portable and will use standard radiation measuring devices already in use at the IAEA. The use of the device will not require any information provided

  8. Experience of Areva in fuel services for PWR and BWR; Experiencia de Areva en servicios de combustible para PWR y BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, I.

    2015-07-01

    AREVA being an integrated supplier of fuel assemblies has included in its strategy to develop services and solutions to customers who desire to improve the performance and safety of their fuel. These services go beyond the simple 'after sale' services that can be expected from a fuel supplier: The portfolio of AREVA includes a wide variety of services, from scientific calculations to fuel handling services in a nuclear power plant. AREVA is committed to collaborate and to propose best-in-class solutions that really make the difference for the customer, based on 40 years of Fuel design and manufacturing experience. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of fission product worth margins in PWR spent nuclear fuel burnup credit calculations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, R.N.; Finck, P.J.; Jammes, C.; Stenberg, C.G.

    1999-02-17

    Current criticality safety calculations for the transportation of irradiated LWR fuel make the very conservative assumption that the fuel is fresh. This results in a very substantial overprediction of the actual k{sub eff} of the transportation casks; in certain cases, this decreases the amount of spent fuel which can be loaded in a cask, and increases the cost of transporting the spent fuel to the repository. Accounting for the change of reactivity due to fuel depletion is usually referred to as ''burnup credit.'' The US DOE is currently funding a program aimed at establishing an actinide only burnup credit methodology (in this case, the calculated reactivity takes into account the buildup or depletion of a limited number of actinides). This work is undergoing NRC review. While this methodology is being validated on a significant experimental basis, it implicitly relies on additional margins: in particular, the absorption of neutrons by certain actinides and by all fission products is not taken into account. This provides an important additional margin and helps guarantee that the methodology is conservative provided these neglected absorption are known with reasonable accuracy. This report establishes the accuracy of fission product absorption rate calculations: (1) the analysis of European fission product worth experiments demonstrates that fission product cross-sections available in the US provide very good predictions of fission product worth; (2) this is confirmed by a direct comparison of European and US cross section evaluations; (3) accuracy of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) fission product content predictions is established in a recent ORNL report where several SNF isotopic assays are analyzed; and (4) these data are then combined to establish in a conservative manner the fraction of the predicted total fission product absorption which can be guaranteed based on available experimental data.

  10. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of

  11. Improvement in PCI property of PWR fuel cladding by texture control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, S. (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)); Abeta, S.; Ozawa, M.; Takahashi, T.

    1993-09-01

    Effects of texture on out-of-pile Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) resistance in Zircaloy fuel cladding tube and the Pellet-Clad Interaction (PCI) property of a fuel rod using texture controlled cladding tube under power ramp conditions are described. The cladding tube with radial texture, which means that the c-axis of hcp crystal of Zr is highly concentrated in the radial direction of the tube, showed excellent performance in out-of-pile SCC tests and power ramp tests. (author).

  12. Evaluation of the fuel rod integrity in PWR reactors from the spectrometric analysis of the primary coolant; Avaliacao da integridade de varetas combustiveis em reatores PWR a partir da analise espectrometrica da agua do primario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Iara Arraes

    1999-02-15

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide a better comprehension of the phenomena involved in the transport of fission products, from the fuel rod to the coolant of a PWR reactor. To achieve this purpose, several steps were followed. Firstly, it was presented a description of the fuel elements and the main mechanisms of fuel rod failure, indicating the most important nuclides and their transport mechanisms. Secondly, taking both the kinetic and diffusion models for the transport of fission products as a basis, a simple analytical and semi-empirical model was developed. This model was also based on theoretical considerations and measurements of coolant's activity, according to internationally adopted methodologies. Several factors are considered in the modelling procedures: intrinsic factors to the reactor itself, factors which depend on the reactor's operational mode, isotope characteristic factors, and factors which depend on the type of rod failure. The model was applied for different reactor's operational parameters in the presence of failed rods. The main conclusions drawn from the analysis of the model's output are relative to the variation on the coolant's water activity with the fuel burnup, the linear operation power and the primary purification rate and to the different behaviour of iodine and noble gases. The model was saturated from a certain failure size and showed to be unable to distinguish between a single big fail and many small ones. (author)

  13. Observation of the Isotopic Evolution of PWR Fuel Using an Antineutrino Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bowden, N S; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R; Misner, A; Palmer, T

    2008-01-01

    By operating an antineutrino detector of simple design during several fuel cycles, we have observed long term changes in antineutrino flux that result from the isotopic evolution of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Measurements made with simple antineutrino detectors of this kind offer an alternative means for verifying fissile inventories at reactors, as part of IAEA and other reactor safeguards regimes.

  14. A High Fidelity Multiphysics Framework for Modeling CRUD Deposition on PWR Fuel Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Daniel John

    Corrosion products on the fuel cladding surfaces within pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies have had a significant impact on reactor operation. These types of deposits are referred to as CRUD and can lead to power shifts, as a consequence of the accumulation of solid boron phases on the fuel rod surfaces. Corrosion deposits can also lead to fuel failure resulting from localized corrosion, where the increased thermal resistance of the deposit leads to higher cladding temperatures. The prediction of these occurrences requires a comprehensive model of local thermal hydraulic and chemical processes occurring in close proximity to the cladding surface, as well as their driving factors. Such factors include the rod power distribution, coolant corrosion product concentration, as well as the feedbacks between heat transfer, fluid dynamics, chemistry, and neutronics. To correctly capture the coupled physics and corresponding feedbacks, a high fidelity framework is developed that predicts three-dimensional CRUD deposition on a rod-by-rod basis. Multiphysics boundary conditions resulting from the coupling of heat transfer, fluid dynamics, coolant chemistry, CRUD deposition, neutron transport, and nuclide transmutation inform the CRUD deposition solver. Through systematic parametric sensitivity studies of the CRUD property inputs, coupled boundary conditions, and multiphysics feedback mechanisms, the most important variables of multiphysics CRUD modeling are identified. Moreover, the modeling framework is challenged with a blind comparison of plant data to predictions by a simulation of a sub-assembly within the Seabrook nuclear plant that experienced CRUD induced fuel failures. The physics within the computational framework are loosely coupled via an operator-splitting technique. A control theory approach is adopted to determine the temporal discretization at which to execute a data transfer from one physics to another. The coupled stepsize selection is viewed as a

  15. Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic response and fuel rod thermal and mechanical deformation behavior during the power burst facility test LOC-3. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yackle, T.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the results from the LOC-3 nuclear blowdown test conducted in the Power Burst Facility is presented. The test objective was to examine fuel and cladding behavior during a postulated cold leg break accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Separate effects of rod internal pressure and the degree of irradiation were investigated in the four-rod test. Extensive cladding deformation (ballooning) and failure occurred during blowdown. The deformation of the low and high pressure rods was similar; however, the previously irradiated test rod deformed to a greater extent than a similar fresh rod exposed to identical system conditions.

  16. Uncertainty Analysis for OECD-NEA-UAM Benchmark Problem of TMI-1 PWR Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyuk; Kim, S. J.; Seo, K.W.; Hwang, D. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A quantification of code uncertainty is one of main questions that is continuously asked by the regulatory body like KINS. Utility and code developers solve the issue case by case because the general answer about this question is still opened. Under the circumference, OECD-NEA has attracted the global consensus on the uncertainty quantification through the UAM benchmark program. OECD-NEA benchmark II-2 problem is a problem on the uncertainty quantification of subchannel code. It is a problem that the uncertainty of fuel temperature and ONB location on the TMI-1 fuel assembly are estimated on the transient and steady condition. In this study, the uncertainty quantification of MATRA code is performed on the problem. Workbench platform is developed to produce the large set of inputs that is needed to estimate the uncertainty quantification on the benchmark problem. Direct Monte Carlo sampling is used to the random sampling from sample PDF. Uncertainty analysis of MATRA code on OECD-NEA benchmark problem is estimated using the developed tool and MATRA code. Uncertainty analysis on OECD-NEA benchmark II-2 problem was performed to quantify the uncertainty of MATRA code. Direct Monte Carlo sampling is used to extract 2000 random parameters. Workbench program is developed to generate input files and post process of calculation results. Uncertainty affected by input parameters was estimated on the DNBR, the cladding and the coolant temperatures.

  17. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO2 and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  18. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foad, Basma [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Kanawa-cho 1-2-4, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 914-0055 (Japan); Egypt Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, 3 Ahmad El Zomar St., Nasr City, Cairo, 11787 (Egypt); Takeda, Toshikazu [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Kanawa-cho 1-2-4, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 914-0055 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO{sub 2} and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  19. Development of self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (SINRD) to measure U-235 and Pu-239 content in a PWR spent fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, Adrienne M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to measure the {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu content in a PWR spent fuel assembly was investigated via Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. The sensitivity of SINRD is based on using the same fissile materials in the fission chambers as are present in the fuel because the effect of resonance absorption lines in the transmitted flux is amplified by the corresponding (n, f) reaction peaks in fission chamber. These simulations utilize the {sup 244}Cm spontaneous fission neutrons to self-interrogate the fuel pins. The amount of resonance absorption of these neutrons in the fuel can be measured using {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu fission chambers placed adjacent to the assembly. We used ratios of different fission chambers to reduce the sensitivity of the measurements to extraneous material present in fuel. The development of SINRD to measure the fissile content in spent fuel is of great importance to the improvement of nuclear safeguards and material accountability. Future work includes the use of this technique to measure the fissile content in FBR spent fuel and heavy metal product from reprocessing methods.

  20. Prediction of CRUD deposition on PWR fuel using a state-of-the-art CFD-based multi-physics computational tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Victor [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulv, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kendrick, Brian K. [Theoretical Division (T-1, MS B221), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Walter, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulv, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Manera, Annalisa, E-mail: manera@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulv, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Secker, Jeffrey [Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Fuel Division, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper we report about the first attempt to demonstrate and assess the ability of state-of-the-art high-fidelity computational tools to reproduce the complex patterns of CRUD deposits found on the surface of operating Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) fuel rods. A fuel assembly of the Seabrook Unit 1 PWR was selected as the test problem. During Seabrook Cycle 5, CRUD induced power shift (CIPS) and CRUD induced localized corrosion (CILC) failures were observed. Measurements of the clad oxide thickness on both failed and non-failed rods are available, together with visual observations and the results from CRUD scrapes of peripheral rods. Blind simulations were performed using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CCM+ coupled to an advanced chemistry code, MAMBA, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The blind simulations were then compared to plant data, which were released after completion of the simulations.

  1. Experimental evidence of oxygen thermo-migration in PWR UO2 fuels during power ramps using in-situ oxido-reduction indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riglet-Martial, Ch.; Sercombe, J.; Lamontagne, J.; Noirot, J.; Roure, I.; Blay, T.; Desgranges, L.

    2016-11-01

    The present study describes the in-situ electrochemical modifications which affect irradiated PWR UO2 fuels in the course of a power ramp, by means of in-situ oxido-reduction indicators such as chromium or neo-formed chemical phases. It is shown that irradiated fuels (of nominal stoichiometry close to 2.000) under temperature gradient such as that occurring during high power transients are submitted to strong oxido-reduction perturbations, owing to radial migration of oxygen from the hot center to the cold periphery of the pellet. The oxygen redistribution, similar to that encountered in Sodium Fast Reactors fuels, induces a massive reduction/precipitation of the fission products Mo, Ru, Tc and Cr (if present) in the high temperature pellet section and the formation of highly oxidized neo-formed grey phases of U4O9 type in its cold section, of lower temperature. The parameters governing the oxidation states of UO2 fuels under power ramps are finally debated from a cross-analysis of our results and other published information. The potential chemical benefits brought by oxido-reductive additives in UO2 fuel such as chromium oxide, in connection with their oxygen buffering properties, are discussed.

  2. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, G. S.; Jung, W. M.; Ku, J. H. [and others

    2004-07-01

    The advanced spent fuel management process(ACP), proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. This technology convert spent fuels into pure metal-base uranium with removing the highly heat generating materials(Cs, Sr) efficiently and reducing of the decay heat, volume, and radioactivity from spent fuel by 1/4. In the next phase(2004{approx}2006), the demonstration of this technology will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For this demonstration, the hot cell facilities of {alpha}-{gamma} type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of {beta}-{gamma} type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. In this study, the design requirements are established, and the process detail work flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell. And also, the basic and detail design of hot cell facility and process, and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell facility and process.

  3. Open and closed fuel cycle of HWR and PWR. How large is the high-level radioactive wastes repository; Ciclos de combustible abierto y cerrado con HWR y PWR. ?Cuanto mas grande es el repositorio de residuos radiactivos de alta actividad?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevilacqua, Arturo M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1996-07-01

    A conceptual analysis was carried out on the size of a high-level wastes (HLW) repository for the waste arising from once-through and closed fuel cycles with (HLW) and PWR. The mass, the activity and thermal loading was calculated with the ORIGEN2.1 computer code for the spent fuel and for the high-level liquid wastes. It was considered a minimum burnup of 7.000 MW.d/t U and 33.000 MW.d/t U for HWR and PWR respectively, cooling times of 20 and 55 years, reprocessing recovery ratios of 99% and 99.7% and a total electricity production of 81.6 GW(e).a. It was concluded that the cooling time is the most important repository size reproduction parameter for the closed cycles. On the other hand, the spent fuel mass for the once-through cycles does not depend on the cooling time what prevents repository size reduction once a cooling time of 55 years is reached. The repository size reduction in the case of HWR is larger than in the case of PWR, owing to the larger fuel mass required to produce the specific electricity amount. (author)

  4. The Source Term Calculation and Analysis of PWR Spent Fuel%压水堆乏燃料源项计算与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏卓; 邹树梁; 于涛; 谢金森

    2011-01-01

    In spent fuel reprocessing plant,the highly radioactive environment will have a certain radiation damage on monitoring equipments.Therefore,the using life of the equipments will be affected and the system reliability reduced.In this article,we use ORIGEN2 program to calculate the components of PWR fuel,and obtain a group of data about the important radionuclides in spent fuel components,such like radioactivity,photon energy spectra etc.The calculated results are accurate and credible,and it can provide initial source term data for shield design of electronic monitoring equipment in the first-side processing of spent fuel.%乏燃料后处理车间的高放射性环境会对监测设备产生一定的辐照损伤,影响其使用寿命,降低系统可靠性.本文使用ORIGEN2程序对压水堆燃料组件进行计算,得出一组乏燃料组件中重要核素的放射性活度、光子能谱等数据,计算结果准确可信,可为乏燃料首端处理中电子监测设备的屏蔽设计提供初始源项数据.

  5. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

    1992-10-15

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere.

  6. Fuel relocation as deduced from the gas flow resistance and thermal behavior of Halden Assembly IFA-430. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagbjartsson, S. J.; Appelhans, T. D.; Quapp, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship of axial gas flow and fuel temperature measurements to fuel cracking and relocation occurring during the first month of irradiation of light water reactor fuel rods is discussed. Two types of fuel rod axial gas flow tests were used to determine the effective hydraulic diameter and its change during the ramping operations. Fuel centerline and off-center measurements are compared with the results of the gas flow analysis and pretest FRAP calculations.

  7. Potential of thorium-based fuel cycle for PWR core to reduce plutonium and long-term toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Kim, Taek Kyum; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    The cross section libraries and calculation methods of the participants were inter-compared through the first stage benchmark calculation. The multiplication factor of unit cell benchmark are in good agreement, but there is significant discrepancies of 2.3 to 3.5 %k at BOC and at EOC between the calculated infinite multiplication factors of each participants for the assembly benchmark. Our results with HELIOS show a reasonable agreement with the others except the MTC value at EOC. To verify the potential of the thorium-based fuel to consume the plutonium and to reduce the radioactivity from the spent fuel, the conceptual core with ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} or MOX fuel were constructed. The composition and quantity of plutonium isotopes and the radioactivity level of spent fuel for conceptual cores were analyzed, and the neutronic characteristics of conceptual cores were also calculated. The nuclear characteristics for ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fueled core was similar to MOX fueled core, mainly due to the same seed fuel material, plutonium. For the capability of plutonium consumption, ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fuel can consume plutonium 2.1-2.4 times MOX fuel. The fraction of fissile plutonium in the spent ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fuel is more favorable in view of plutonium consumption and non-proliferation than MOX fuel. The radioactivity of spent ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium and MOX fuel batches were calculated. Since plutonium isotopes are dominant for the long-term radioactivity, ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium has almost the same level of radioactivity as in MOX fuel for a long-term perspective. (author). 22 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Nuclear spent fuel management scenarios. Status and assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufek, J.; Arzhanov, V.; Gudowski, W. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2006-06-15

    The strategy for management of spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power programme is interim storage for cooling and decay for about 30 years followed by direct disposal of the fuel in a geologic repository. In various contexts it is of interest to compare this strategy with other strategies that might be available in the future as a result of ongoing research and development. In particular partitioning and transmutation is one such strategy that is subject to considerable R and D-efforts within the European Union and in other countries with large nuclear programmes. To facilitate such comparisons for the Swedish situation, with a planned phase out of the nuclear power programme, SKB has asked the team at Royal Inst. of Technology to describe and explore some scenarios that might be applied to the Swedish programme. The results of this study are presented in this report. The following scenarios were studied by the help of a specially developed computer programme: Phase out by 2025 with direct disposal. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in BWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in PWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides in ADS. Combined LWR-MOX plus ADS. For the different scenarios nuclide inventories, waste amounts, costs, additional electricity production etc have been assessed. As a general conclusion it was found that BWR is more efficient for burning plutonium in MOX fuel than PWR. The difference is approximately 10%. Furthermore the BWR produces about 10% less americium inventory. An ADS reactor park can theoretically in an ideal case burn (transmute) 99% of the transuranium isotopes. The duration of such a scenario heavily depends on the interim time needed for cooling the spent fuel before reprocessing. Assuming 10 years for cooling of nuclear fuel from ADS, the duration will be at least 200 years under optimistic technical assumptions. The development and use of advanced pyro-processing with an interim cooling time of only

  9. Fuel Performance Characterisation under Various PWR Conditions: Description of the Annealing Test Facilities available at the LECA-STAR laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillon, Y.; Cornu, B.; Clement, S.; Ferroud-Plattet, M.P.; Malgouyres, P.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/DEC/SA3C - Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    The aim to improve LWR fuel behaviour has led Cea to improve its post-irradiation examination capacities in term of test facilities and characterization techniques in the shielded hot cells of the LECA-STAR facility, located in Cadarache Cea center. as far as the annealing test facilities are concerned, fuel qualification and improvement of knowledge require a set of furnaces which are already used or will be used. The main characteristics of these furnaces strongly depend on the experimental objectives. The aim of this paper is to review the main aspects of these specific experiments concerning: (i) fission gas release from high burn up fuel, (ii) global fission product release in severe-accident conditions and (iii) fuel microstructural changes, potential cladding failure, radionuclide source terms... under conditions representative of long term dry storage and geological disposal. (authors)

  10. Fuel management optimization based on power profile by Cellular Automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadaei, Amir Hosein, E-mail: Fadaei_amir@aut.ac.i [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnique), Hafez Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, Nader Maleki [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnique), Hafez Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedinejad, Ehsan [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Str., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadaei, Mohammad Mehdi [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Central Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Punak Square, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kia, Shabnam [Faculty of Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Punak Square, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Fuel management in PWR nuclear reactors is comprised of a collection of principles and practices required for the planning, scheduling, refueling, and safe operation of nuclear power plants to minimize the total plant and system energy costs to the extent possible. Despite remarkable advancements in optimization procedures, inherent complexities in nuclear reactor structure and strong inter-dependency among the fundamental parameters of the core make it necessary to evaluate the most efficient arrangement of the core. Several patterns have been presented so far to determine the best configuration of fuels in the reactor core by emphasis on minimizing the local power peaking factor (P{sub q}). In this research, a new strategy for optimizing the fuel arrangements in a VVER-1000 reactor core is developed while lowering the P{sub q} is considered as the main target. For this purpose, a Fuel Quality Factor, Z(r), served to depict the reactor core pattern. Mapping to ideal pattern is tracked over the optimization procedure in which the ideal pattern is prepared with considering the Z(r) constraints and their effects on flux and P{sub q} uniformity. For finding the best configuration corresponding to the desired pattern, Cellular Automata (CA) is applied as a powerful and reliable tool on optimization procedure. To obtain the Z(r) constraints, the MCNP code was used and core calculations were performed by WIMS and CITATION codes. The results are compared with the predictions of a Neural Network as a smart optimization method, and the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as a reference proposed by the designer.

  11. Space and Time Distribution of Pu Isotopes inside The First Experimental Fuel Pin Designed for PWR and Manufactured in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwardi; Setiawan, J.; Susilo, J.

    2017-01-01

    The first short fuel pin containing natural UO2 pellet in Zry4 cladding has been prepared and planned to be tested in power ramp irradiation. An irradiation test should be designed to allow an experiment can be performed safely and giving maximum results of many performance aspects of design and manufacturing. Performance analysis to the fuel specimen shows that the specimen is not match to be used for power ramp testing. Enlargement by 0.20 mm of pellet diameter has been proposed. The present work is evaluation of modified design for important aspect of isotopic Pu distribution during irradiation test, because generated Pu isotopes in natural UO2 fuel, contribute more power relative to the contribution by enriched UO2 fuel. The axial profile of neutrons flux have been chosen from both experimental measurement and model calculation. The parameters of ramp power has been obtained from statistical experiment data. A simplified and typical base-load commercial PHWR profile of LHR history has been chosen, to determine the minimum irradiation time before ramp test can be performed. The data design and Mat pro XI materials properties models have been chosen. The axial profile of neutrons flux has been accommodated by 5 slices of discrete pin. The Pu distribution of slice-4 with highest power rate has been chosen to be evaluated. The radial discretion of pellet and cladding and numerical parameter have been used the default best practice of TU. The results shows that Pu 239 increased rapidly. The maximum burn up of slice 4 at upper the median slice, it reached nearly 90% of maximum value at about 6000 h with peak of 0.8%a Pu/HM at 22000 h, which is higher than initial U 235. Each 240, 241 and 240 Pu grows slower and ends up to 0.4, 0.2 and 0.18 % respectively. This results can be used for verification of other aspect of fuel behavior in the modeling results and also can be used as guide and comparison to the future post irradiation examination for Pu isotopes distribution.

  12. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Casas, I.; de Pablo, J.

    2015-10-01

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO2 spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAPc) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  13. Construction of linear empirical core models for pressurized water reactor in-core fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, K.C.; Aldemir, T. (The Ohio State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, 206 West 18th Ave., Columbus, OH (US))

    1988-06-01

    An empirical core model construction procedure for pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core fuel management problems is presented that (a) incorporates the effect of composition changes in all the control zones in the core of a given fuel assembly, (b) is valid at all times during the cycle for a given range of control variables, (c) allows determining the optimal beginning of cycle (BOC) kappainfinity distribution as a single linear programming problem,and (d) provides flexibility in the choice of the material zones to describe core composition. Although the modeling procedure assumes zero BOC burnup, the predicted optimal kappainfinity profiles are also applicable to reload cores. In model construction, assembly power fractions and burnup increments during the cycle are regarded as the state (i.e., dependent) variables. Zone enrichments are the control (i.e., independent) variables. The model construction procedure is validated and implemented for the initial core of a PWR to determine the optimal BOC kappainfinity profiles for two three-zone scatter loading schemes. The predicted BOC kappainfinity profiles agree with the results of other investigators obtained by different modeling techniques.

  14. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Development of DUPIC fuel on manufacturing and quality control technology-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Yung Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Oxidation/reduction process was established after analysis of the effect of process parameter on the sintering behavior using SIMFUEL. Process equipment was studied more detail and some of process equipment items were designed and procured. The chemical analysing method of fission products and fissile content in DUPIC fuel was studied and the behavior and the characteristics of fission products in fuel was also done. Requirement for irradiation in HANARO was analysed to prepare performance evaluation. 100 figs, 48 tabs, 170 refs. (Author).

  15. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Development of DUPIC fuel on manufacturing and quality control technology-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Yung Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Oxidation/reduction process was established after analysis of the effect of process parameter on the sintering behavior using SIMFUEL. Process equipment was studied more detail and some of process equipment items were designed and procured. The chemical analysing method of fission products and fissile content in DUPIC fuel was studied and the behavior and the characteristics of fission products in fuel was also done. Requirement for irradiation in HANARO was analysed to prepare performance evaluation. 100 figs, 48 tabs, 170 refs. (Author).

  16. Swarm intelligence of artificial bees applied to In-Core Fuel Management Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos de Oliveira, Iona Maghali, E-mail: ioliveira@con.ufrj.br [Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68509, Zip Code 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br [Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68509, Zip Code 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > We present Artificial Bee Colony with Random Keys (ABCRK) for In-Core Fuel Management Optimization. > Its performance is examined through the optimization of a Brazilian '2-loop' PWR. > Feasibility of using ABCRK is shown against some well known population-based algorithms. > Additional advantage includes the utilization of fewer control parameters. - Abstract: Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is a relatively new member of swarm intelligence. ABC tries to simulate the intelligent behavior of real honey bees in food foraging and can be used for solving continuous optimization and multi-dimensional numeric problems. This paper introduces the Artificial Bee Colony with Random Keys (ABCRK), a modified ABC algorithm for solving combinatorial problems such as the In-Core Fuel Management Optimization (ICFMO). The ICFMO is a hard combinatorial optimization problem in Nuclear Engineering which during many years has been solved by expert knowledge. It aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. As a consequence, the operation cost decreases and money is saved. In this study, ABCRK is used for optimizing the ICFMO problem of a Brazilian '2-loop' Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and the results obtained with the proposed algorithm are compared with those obtained by Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The results show that the performance of the ABCRK algorithm is better than or similar to that of other population-based algorithms, with the advantage of employing fewer control parameters.

  17. Study of heat transfer in a eccentric fuel rods in a non stop planned shutdown of a PWR type reactor; Estudo da transferencia de calor em uma vareta combustivel excentrica, num desligamento nao planejado de um reator do tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Lava, Deise Diana; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Sampaio, Paulo Augusto Berquo de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: deisedy@gmail.com, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: sampaio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to conduct a case study in which the fuel pellets are displaced related to the center coating. Therefore, it will be addressed, first, the verification of computer code, comparing the results obtained with analytical solutions. This check is important so that, at a time later, you can use the program to know the fuel rod behavior and coolant channel.

  18. CANDU堆应用RU的PWR/CANDU联合核燃料循环的研究%Study of RU Utilization in CANDU Reactor-an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle of PWR/CANDU Synergism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍小东; 谢仲生

    2003-01-01

    对压水堆乏燃料后处理回收铀(RU)在秦山三期CANDU堆中应用的可行性和经济性进行分析.使用ORIGEN2程序,对后处理回收铀在生产后放置不同时间后核素的成份和放射性活度进行了计算.证明RU燃料元件生产的放射性水平是可以接受的.使用DRAGON/DONJON程序对应用RU的秦山三期CANDU堆的时均堆芯和瞬时堆芯校验分析表明:采用简单的2燃耗区,2、4棒束的换料方案能满足最大通道功率、最大棒束功率限制.通过放射性分析和堆芯物理分析可以看出,秦山三期CANDU堆在不改变堆芯结构及运行模式的条件下,从天然铀(NU)燃料过渡到RU燃料是可行的.通过对秦山三期CANDU堆应用RU的经济性分析,可以看出PWR/CANDU联合核燃料循环的策略既可节约铀资源(23%),提高燃料的能量输出(41%),又减少了废燃料的处置量(66%),可大大降低核电成本.

  19. External cost assessment for nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Heung [Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Won Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear power is currently the second largest power supply method in Korea and the number of nuclear power plants are planned to be increased as well. However, clear management policy for spent fuels generated from nuclear power plants has not yet been established. The back-end fuel cycle, associated with nuclear material flow after nuclear reactors is a collection of technologies designed for the spent fuel management and the spent fuel management policy is closely related with the selection of a nuclear fuel cycle. Cost is an important consideration in selection of a nuclear fuel cycle and should be determined by adding external cost to private cost. Unlike the private cost, which is a direct cost, studies on the external cost are focused on nuclear reactors and not at the nuclear fuel cycle. In this research, external cost indicators applicable to nuclear fuel cycle were derived and quantified. OT (once through), DUPIC (Direct Use of PWR SF in CANDU), PWR-MOX (PWR PUREX reprocessing), and Pyro-SFR (SFR recycling with pyroprocessing) were selected as nuclear fuel cycles which could be considered for estimating external cost in Korea. Energy supply security cost, accident risk cost, and acceptance cost were defined as external cost according to precedent and estimated after analyzing approaches which have been adopted for estimating external costs on nuclear power generation.

  20. The integrated PWR; Les REP integres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, G.M. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs

    2002-07-01

    This document presents the integrated reactors concepts by a presentation of four reactors: PIUS, SIR, IRIS and CAREM. The core conception, the operating, the safety, the economical aspects and the possible users are detailed. From the performance of the classical integrated PWR, the necessity of new innovative fuels utilization, the research of a simplified design to make easier the safety and the KWh cost decrease, a new integrated reactor is presented: SCAR 600. (A.L.B.)

  1. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod; Contribution a la modelisation du comportement mecanique des combustibles REP sous irradiation, avec en particulier le traitement de l`interaction pastille-gaine dans un crayon combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR`s operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends.

  2. 压水堆燃料棒在轴向流作用下的随机振动响应研究%Random Response Analysis of PWR Fuel Rod Effect on Axial Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄恒; 刘彤; 周跃民

    2015-01-01

    Based on random vibration theory ,the random response analysis method of PWR fuel rods under axial flow was established .The fluid force along the axial of rod was treated as a fluctuant random load ,and the mode shape method and power spectrum analysis method were used to derive the empirical formula of RMS response .This article provides a theoretical analysis method w hich does not rely on the flow induced vibration test of fuel assembly .The effects for the RMS response of fuel rods by the equivalent velocity ,turbulence intensity ,and correlation length factor were discussed .The method can meet the requirements of engineering analysis . The results show that the RMS response of fuel rods will increase with the equivalent velocity ,turbulence intensity and the correlation length factor .The response is more sensitive to the equivalent velocity and coefficient length factor changes ,and linearly with the turbulence intensity .In the operating condition of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) ,the RMS amplitude of fuel rods is about micrometers .%基于随机振动理论,建立了在轴向流作用下压水堆燃料棒随机响应的纯理论分析方法。将流体力考虑为沿燃料棒轴向位置的脉冲随机荷载,结合模态分析技术,从功率谱分析法推导出燃料棒振动均方根响应的表达式。提供了一套不依赖燃料组件流致振动实验的纯理论分析方法,重点分析了等效流速、湍流强度、相关长度系数等几个主要流场参数对结构均方根响应的影响。结果表明,本文计算模型的精度满足工程分析要求,燃料棒响应随等效流速、湍流强度和相关长度系数的增大而增大;其中响应对于等效流速和相关长度系数的变化较为敏感,而与湍流强度呈线性变化关系;在压水堆运行中的燃料棒均方根幅值约处在μm量级。

  3. Investigation of feedback on neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics from detailed online fuel behavior modeling during a boron dilution transient in a PWR with the two-way coupled code system DYN3D-TRANSURANUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, L., E-mail: lars.holt@tuev-sued.de [TÜV SÜD Energietechnik GmbH Baden-Württemberg, Gottlieb-Daimler-Str. 7, 70794 Filderstadt (Germany); Technical University München, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Rohde, U.; Kliem, S.; Baier, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden—Rossendorf, Reactor Safety Division, PO Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Seidl, M. [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Tresckowstr. 5, D-30457 Hannover (Germany); Van Uffelen, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Macián-Juan, R. [Technical University München, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • General coupling interface was developed for the fuel performance code TRANSURANUS. • With this new tool simplified fuel behavior models in codes can be replaced. • The reactor dynamics code DYN3D was coupled to TRANSURANUS at assembly level. • The feedback from detailed online fuel behavior modeling is analyzed for reactivity initiated accident (RIA). • The thermal hydraulics can be affected strongly even in fresh fuel assemblies. - Abstract: Recently the reactor dynamics code DYN3D (including an internal fuel behavior model) was coupled to the fuel performance code TRANSURANUS at assembly level. The coupled code system applies the new general TRANSURANUS coupling interface, hence it can be used for one-way or two-way coupling. In the coupling, DYN3D provides process time, time-dependent rod power and thermal hydraulics conditions to TRANSURANUS, which in case of the two-way coupling approach replaces completely the internal DYN3D fuel behavior model and transfers parameters like radial fuel temperature distribution and cladding temperature back to DYN3D. For the first time results of the coupled code system are presented for a post-critical-heat-flux heat transfer. The corresponding heat transfer regime is mostly film boiling, where the cladding temperature can rise several hundreds of degrees. The simulated boron dilution transient assumed an injection of a 36 m{sup 3} slug of under-borated coolant into a German pressurized water reactor (PWR) core initiated from a sub-critical reactor state (extreme reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions). The feedback from detailed fuel behavior modeling was found negligible on the neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics during the first power rise. In a later phase of the transient, the node injected energy can differ 25 J/g, even still around 20 J/g for nodes without film boiling. Furthermore, the thermal hydraulics can be affected strongly even in fresh fuel assemblies, where film boiling

  4. Study of a brazilian cask and its installation for PWR spent nuclear fuel dry storage; Estudo de um casco nacional e sua instalacao para armazenagem seca de combustivel nuclear queimado gerado em reatores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanato, Luiz Sergio

    2009-07-01

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is removed from the nuclear reactor after the depletion on efficiency in generating energy. After the withdrawal from the reactor core, the SNF is temporarily stored in pools at the same site of the reactor. At this time, the generated heat and the short and medium lived radioactive elements decay to levels that allow removing SNF from the pool and sending it to temporary dry storage. In that phase, the fuel needs to be safely and efficiently stored, and then, it can be retrieved in a future, or can be disposed as radioactive waste. The amount of spent fuel increases annually and, in the next years, will still increase more, because of the construction of new nuclear plants. Today, the number of new facilities back up to levels of the 1970's, since it is greater than the amount of decommissioning in old installations. As no final decision on the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle is foreseen in the near future in Brazil, either to recover the SNF or to consider it as radioactive waste, this material has to be isolated in some type of storage model existing around the world. In the present study it is shown that dry SNF storage is the best option. A national cask model for SNF as well these casks storage installation are proposed. It is a multidisciplinary study in which the engineering conceptual task was developed and may be applied to national SNF removed from the Brazilian power reactors, to be safely stored for a long time until the Brazilian authorities will decide about the site for final disposal. (author)

  5. A neutronic study of the cycle PWR-CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alberto da; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora Fortini; Fortini, Angela; Pinheiro, Ricardo Brant [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: albertomoc@terra.com.br; claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br; dora@nuclear.ufmg.br; fortini@nuclear.ufmg.br; rbp@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    The cycle PWR-CANDU was simulated using the WIMSD-5B and ORIGEN2.1 codes. It was simulated a fuel burnup of 33,000 MWd/t for UO{sub 2} with enrichment of 3.2% and a fuel extended burnup of 45,000 MWd/t for UO{sub 2} with enrichments of 3.5%, 4.0% and 5.0% in a PWR reactor. The PWR discharged fuel was submitted to the simulation of deposition for five years. After that, it was submitted to AYROX reprocessing and used to produce a fuel to CANDU reactor. Then, it was simulated the burnup in the CANDU. Parameters such as infinite medium multiplication factor, k{sub inf}, fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity, {alpha}{sub TF}, moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity, {alpha}{sub TM}, the ratio rapid flux/total flux and the isotopic composition in the begin and the end of life were evaluated. The results showed that the fuels analyzed could be used on PWR and CANDU reactors without the need of change on the design of these reactors. (author)

  6. Realistic bandwidth estimation in the theoretically predicted radionuclide inventory of PWR-UO2 spent fuel derived from reactor design and operating data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    bandwidths for all radionuclides of interest to waste management. It is however possible to perform a comprehensive verification by comparing the bandwidths obtained with other reference inventory calculations used by several countries for long-term safety assessment, spent fuel transportation and storage, or other applications This work provides realistic radionuclide bandwidths that support methods for a long-term safety analysis of final repositories as well as for the development of efficient and validated tools for the PQC of HLW disposal and for safeguard applications.

  7. Spent fuel management of Jose Cabrera NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco Zurro, J.E.; Garcia Costilla, M. [Area de Generacion - Unidad Nuclear, Gas Natural Fenosa, Avda. de San Luis, 77, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Lavara Sanz, A. [Division Nuclear, SOCOIN, P. del Club Deportivo, 1 - Edificio 5, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcon, Madrid (Spain); Martinez Abad, J.E. [Departamento de Residuos de Alta Actividad, ENRESA, C/ Emilio Vargas, 7, 28043 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    The definitive shutdown of Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant took place on 30. of April 2006. From this moment, cooperation agreements between ENRESA and GAS NATURAL FENOSA were established to reach, among others objectives, its decommissioning, 3 years after the shutdown of the reactor. In order to accomplish the Spanish nuclear regulation, a spent fuel management plan was developed. This plan determined that the fuel assemblies placed in the spent fuel pool would be managed by means of their storage in an interim installation. For this reason, an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) was built at plant site, pioneer in Spain by its characteristics of design. Different administrative authorizations from the point of view of nuclear safety as well as from the environmental were required for ISFSI licensing process. The transference and storage of spent fuel was carried out using the HI-STORM 100Z Dry Storage System, developed by HOLTEC INTERNATIONAL. This system, designed for the spent fuel storage in casks, supports abnormal and very hard accident conditions. The system has three main components: Storage Cask (HI-STORM), Transfer Cask (HI-TRAC) and Multipurpose Canister (MPC). In addition to this, the system has a specific Transport Cask (HI-STAR) for the future transport out of the Plant. More than 30 Design Modifications to the system and plant were implemented to solve structural problems and to include safety and ALARA improvements. The transfer of the spent fuel and its emplacement in the ISFSI began on January 2009 and finished on September of that year allowing starting the decommissioning process, three years and a half after Jose Cabrera NPP shutdown. (authors)

  8. 法国900MWe压水堆RPV中子辐照脆化寿命管理策略研究%Strategies for life management of French 900 MWe PWR RPV due to neutron irradiation embrittlement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万强茂; 束国刚; 王荣山; 丁辉; 任爱; 彭啸; 张琪; 雷静

    2011-01-01

    针对法国压水堆( PWR)核电站,介绍其长寿命运行计划情况,分析反应堆压力容器(RPV)辐照监督大纲和评价方法,总结已有辐照监督数据,重点论述法国实施的RPV中子辐照脆化寿命评价技术和管理策略、研发活动等,以期对我国开展RPV中子辐照脆化寿命管理提供有益的借鉴作用.%In this paper, the situation of the long-life operation plans for French PWR nuclear power plants was presented, the RPV irradiation surveillance program and its assessment approach were analyzed, and then data obtained from 180 surveillance capsules were summarized and compared with the predictive values. It specially argued for the RPV lifetime assessment techniques and management strategies concerning the neutron irradiation embrittlement, as well as R&D activities, with an aim to provide useful reference to the RPV life management of PWR NPPs in China.

  9. Characterization of Factors affecting IASCC of PWR Core Internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Won Sam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    A lot works have been performed on IASCC in BWR. Recent efforts have been devoted to investigate IASCC in PWR, but the mechanism in PWR is not fully understood yet as compared with that in BWR due to a lack of data from laboratories and fields. Therefore it is strongly needed to review and analyse recent researches of IASCC in both BWR and PWR for establishing a proactive management technology for IASCC of core internals in Korean PWRs. This work is aimed to review mainly recent technical reports on IASCC of stainless steels for core internals in PWR. For comparison, the works on IASCC in BWR were also reviewed and briefly introduced in this report.

  10. Effect of proton irradiation on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Ok; Hwang, Mi Jin; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) involves the cracking and failure of materials under irradiation environment in nuclear power plant water environment. The major factors and processes governing an IASCC are suggested by others. The IASCC of the reactor core internals due to the material degradation and the water chemistry change has been reported in high stress stainless steel components, such as fuel elements (Boiling Water Reactors) in the 1960s, a control rod in the 1970s, and a baffle former bolt in recent years of light water reactors (Pressurized Water Reactors). Many irradiated stainless steels that are resistant to inergranular cracking in 288 .deg. C argon are susceptible to IG cracking in the simulated BWR environment at the same temperature. Under the circumstances, a lot works have been performed on IASCC in BWR. Recent efforts have been devoted to investigate an IASCC in a PWR, but the mechanism in a PWR is not fully understood yet as compared with that in a BWR owing to a lack of data from laboratories and fields. Therefore, it is strongly necessary to review and analyze recent researches of an IASCC in both BWR and PWR for establishing a proactive management technology for the IASCC of core internals in Korean PWRs. The objective of this research to find IASCC behavior of proton irradiated 316 stainless steels in a high-temperature water chemistry environment. The IASCC initiation susceptibility on 1, 3, 5 DPA proton irradiated 316 austenite stainless steel was evaluated in PWR environment. SCC area ratio on the fracture surface was similar regardless of irradiation level. Total crack length on the irradiated surface increases in order of specimen 1, 3, 5 DPA. The total crack length at the side surface is a better measure in evaluating IASCC initiation susceptibility for proton-irradiated samples.

  11. Metallurgical and mechanical behaviours of PWR fuel cladding tube oxidised at high temperature; Comportements metallurqigue et mecanique des materiaux de gainage du combustible REP oxydes a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, A

    2007-12-15

    Zirconium alloys are used as cladding materials in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). As they are submitted to very extreme conditions, it is necessary to check their behaviour and especially to make sure they meet the safety criteria. They are therefore studied under typical in service-loadings but also under accidental loadings. In one of these accidental scenarios, called Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) the cladding temperature may increase above 800 C, in a steam environment, and decrease before a final quench of the cladding. During this temperature transient, the cladding is heavily oxidised, and the metallurgical changes lead to a decrease of the post quench mechanical properties. It is then necessary to correlate this drop in residual ductility to the metallurgical evolutions. This is the problem we want to address in this study: the oxidation of PWR cladding materials at high temperature in a steam environment and its consequences on post quench mechanical properties. As oxygen goes massively into the metallic part - a zirconia layer grows at the same time - during the high temperature oxidation, the claddings tubes microstructure shows three different phases that are the outer oxide layer (zirconia) and the inner metallic phases ({alpha}(O) and 'ex {beta}') - with various mechanical properties. In order to reproduce the behaviour of this multilayered material, the first part of this study consisted in creating samples with different - but homogeneous in thickness - oxygen contents, similar to those observed in the different phases of the real cladding. The study was especially focused on the {beta}-->{alpha} phase transformation upon cooling and on the resulting microstructures. A mechanism was proposed to describe this phase transformation. For instance, we conclude that for our oxygen enriched samples, the phase transformation kinetics upon cooling are ruled by the oxygen partitioning between the two allotropic phases. Then, these materials

  12. Sensitivity study for accident tolerant fuels: Property comparisons and behavior simulations in a simplified PWR to enable ATF development and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Kristina Yancey, E-mail: kristina.yancey@gmail.com; Sudderth, Laura; Brito, Ryan A.; Evans, Jordan A.; Hart, Clifford S.; Hu, Anbang; Jati, Andi; Stern, Karyn; McDeavitt, Sean M., E-mail: mcdeavitt@tamu.edu

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • This study compared four accident tolerant fuels against uranium dioxide. • Material property correlations were developed to evaluate fuel performance. • The fuels’ neutronic and thermal hydraulic behaviors were studied in the AP1000. • No fuel type performed better in all areas, but each has strengths and weaknesses. • More research is needed to build a complete model of the fuel performances. - Abstract: Since the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, there has been increased interest in developing fuels to better withstand accidents for current light water reactors. Four accident tolerant fuel candidates are uranium oxide with beryllium oxide additives, uranium oxide with silicon carbide matrix additives, uranium nitride, and uranium nitride with uranium silicide composite. The first two candidates represent near-term high performance uranium oxide with high thermal conductivity and neutron transparency, and the second two represent mid-term high-density fuels with highly beneficial thermal properties. This study seeks to understand the benefits and drawbacks of each option in place of uranium dioxide. To assess the material properties for each of the fuel types, an extensive literature review was performed for material property data. Correlations were then made to evaluate the properties during reactor operation. Neutronics and thermal hydraulics studies were also completed to determine the impact of the use of each candidate in an AP1000 reactor. In most cases, the candidate fuels performed more desirably than uranium dioxide, but no fuel type performed better in all aspects. Much more research needs to be performed to build a complete model of the fuel performances, primarily experimental data for uranium silicide. Each of the fuels studied has its own benefits and drawbacks, and the comparisons discussed in this report can be used to aid in determining the most appropriate fuel depending on the desired specifications.

  13. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  14. New cladding materials and evolution of nuclear fuel components for PWR; Nouveaux materiaux de gainage et evolution des produits de combustible REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, S. [Electricite de France (EDF), EDF Div. Combustible Nucleaire, 92 - Clamart (France); Francillon, E. [FRAMATOME ANP, Secteur Combustible, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Guillet, J.L. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Soutien Nucleaire Industriel, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents recent improvements in the field of nuclear fuels made by Framatome-ANP. The first one is the use of the M5 (trade mark) alloy for the fuel cladding and guide tubes. This alloys is composed of zirconium, niobium and oxygen, it follows an optimized industrial fabrication process, it can bear combustion rates over 70 GWd/t even in harsh conditions and is strongly resistant to corrosion. Other improvements have been made in the design of the fuel assembly structure, it concerns the lower part of the one-piece tube guide for control rods and the bi-grid device whose purpose is to hold better the fuel assembly in order to reduce the fretting wear on the lower part of fuel rods. Another improvement is the doping of fuel pellets with chromium that allows, combined with an optimized micro-structure, the reduction of the volume of the gaseous fission products released in the fuel. (A.C.)

  15. Power Flattening and Rejuvenation of PWR Spent Fuel Blanket for Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactor%功率展平的压水堆乏燃料发电包层中子学初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马续波; 陈义学; 王继亮; 王悦; 韩静茹; 陆道纲

    2011-01-01

    The hybrid fusion-fission reactor has advantages of breeding of the nuclear fuel and transmutation of the long-life nuclear waste and having inherent safety. Meanwhile, the engineering and technological demand of hybrid reactor is significantly reduced comparing with that of pure fusion reactor. A generating electricity blanket concept using the PWR spent fuel directly was proposed, which was based on ITER parameter level achieved. Different volume fractions of the fuel in blanket enabled to realize a power flattening in the fissile zone. The results show that the peak-to-average power factor becomes less than no power flattening, and the output power of the fuel zone raises more than 21. 7%. At the end of the operation, the maximum fuel enrichment is 5. 23%. The blanket is feasible from the neutronics viewpoint.%聚变裂变混合堆在增殖核燃料、嬗变长寿命核废料及固有安全性等方面具有较大优势,同时,它比纯聚变堆在工程及技术方面要求低,因此较聚变堆更易实现.本工作基于目前国际聚变实验堆(ITER)所能达到的技术水平,提出一种直接利用乏燃料进行发电的聚变裂变混合堆包层概念,利用在不同位置放置不同乏燃料体积分数的方法对燃料增殖区实现了功率展平.计算结果表明:功率展平后的包层功率不均匀系数更小,且包层中燃料区的能量输出要比不展平情况下的能量输出高约21.7%.燃料富集度到运行末期最大可达5.23%.从中子学角度初步论证了该包层的可行性.

  16. Development and experimental verification of SST-GRASS: a steady-state and transient fuel response and fission-product release code. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, J.; Seitz, M.G.; Gehl, S.M.; Kelman, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    A comprehensive fission-product release model (GRASS), based on a mechanistic understanding of fuel behavior in LWR fuel elements for a wide range of accidental overheating conditions as well as steady-state irradiations, is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Experimental support for GRASS is provided by out-of-reactor transient heating of irradiated commercial LWR fuel using a direct-electrical-heating technique. The GRASS calculations are described, benchmarked against standard theoretical treatments, and verified for steady-state irradiations. In addition, preliminary results from the direct-electrical-heating experiments are reported. Possible mechanisms for fission-gas release during transient heating of LWR fuel are discussed based on comparisons of GRASS results with experimental observations.

  17. Extended calculations of OECD/NEA phase II-C burnup credit criticality benchmark problem for PWR spent fuel transport cask by using MCNP-4B2 code and JENDL-3.2 library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroishi, Takeshi; Hoang, Anh Tuan; Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The reactivity effect of the asymmetry of axial burnup profile in burnup credit criticality safety is studied for a realistic PWR spent fuel transport cask proposed in the current OECD/NEA Phase II-C benchmark problem. The axial burnup profiles are simulated in 21 material zones based on in-core flux measurements varying from strong asymmetry to more or less no asymmetry. Criticality calculations in a 3-D model have been performed using the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B2 and the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2. Calculation conditions are determined with consideration of the axial fission source convergence. Calculations are carried out not only for cases proposed in the benchmark but also for additional cases assuming symmetric burnup profile. The actinide-only approach supposed for first domestic introduction of burnup credit into criticality evaluation is also considered in addition to the actinide plus fission product approach adopted in the benchmark. The calculated results show that k{sub eff} and the end effect increase almost linearly with increasing burnup axial offset that is defined as one of typical parameters showing the intensity of axial burnup asymmetry. The end effect is more sensitive to the asymmetry of burnup profile for the higher burnup. For an axially distributed burnup, the axial fission source distribution becomes strongly asymmetric as its peak shifts toward the top end of the fuel's active zone where the local burnup is less than that of the bottom end. The peak of fission source distribution becomes higher with the increase of either the asymmetry of burnup profile or the assembly-averaged burnup. The conservatism of the assumption of uniform axial burnup based on the actinide-only approach is estimated quantitatively in comparison with the k{sub eff} result calculated with experiment-based strongest asymmetric axial burnup profile with the actinide plus fission product approach. (author)

  18. Extended calculations of OECD/NEA phase II-C burnup credit criticality benchmark problem for PWR spent fuel transport cask by using MCNP-4B2 code and JENDL-3.2 library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroishi, Takeshi; Hoang, Anh Tuan; Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The reactivity effect of the asymmetry of axial burnup profile in burnup credit criticality safety is studied for a realistic PWR spent fuel transport cask proposed in the current OECD/NEA Phase II-C benchmark problem. The axial burnup profiles are simulated in 21 material zones based on in-core flux measurements varying from strong asymmetry to more or less no asymmetry. Criticality calculations in a 3-D model have been performed using the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B2 and the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2. Calculation conditions are determined with consideration of the axial fission source convergence. Calculations are carried out not only for cases proposed in the benchmark but also for additional cases assuming symmetric burnup profile. The actinide-only approach supposed for first domestic introduction of burnup credit into criticality evaluation is also considered in addition to the actinide plus fission product approach adopted in the benchmark. The calculated results show that k{sub eff} and the end effect increase almost linearly with increasing burnup axial offset that is defined as one of typical parameters showing the intensity of axial burnup asymmetry. The end effect is more sensitive to the asymmetry of burnup profile for the higher burnup. For an axially distributed burnup, the axial fission source distribution becomes strongly asymmetric as its peak shifts toward the top end of the fuel's active zone where the local burnup is less than that of the bottom end. The peak of fission source distribution becomes higher with the increase of either the asymmetry of burnup profile or the assembly-averaged burnup. The conservatism of the assumption of uniform axial burnup based on the actinide-only approach is estimated quantitatively in comparison with the k{sub eff} result calculated with experiment-based strongest asymmetric axial burnup profile with the actinide plus fission product approach. (author)

  19. Research on nuclear energy in the fields of fuel cycle, PWR reactors and LMFBR reactors; Recherche sur l`energie nucleaire dans les domaines du cycle du combustible des reacteurs a eau legere et des reacteurs a neutrons rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barre, B.; Camarcat, N.

    1995-12-31

    In this article we present the CEA research programs to improve the safety of the next generation of reactors, to manage the Plutonium and the wastes of the fuel cycle end and to ameliorate the competitiveness. 6 refs.

  20. A sensitivity study on DUPIC fuel composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong

    1997-01-01

    In DUPIC fuel cycle, the spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel is refabricated as a DUPIC fuel by a dry process. Because the spent PWR fuel composition depends on the initial enrichment and burnup condition of PWR fuel, the composition of a DUPIC fuel is not uniquely defined. Therefore, for the purpose of reducing the effects of such a composition heterogeneity on core performance, a composition adjustment of DUPIC fuel was studies. The composition adjustment was made in two steps: mixing two spent PWR fuel assemblies of higher and lower {sup 239}Pu contents and blending in fresh uranium with the mixed spent PWR fuels. Because the fuel and core performances depend on both the absolute amount of fissile isotopes and the ratio of major fissile isotope contents, a parametric study was performed to determine the reference compositions of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. The reference enrichments of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu were determined such that the DUPIC core performance is comparable to that of a natural uranium core with high spent PWR fuel utilization and low fuel cycle cost. Under this condition, it is possible to utilize 90% of spent PWR fuels as the DUPIC fuel formula. On average, the amounts of slightly enriched and depleted uranium used for blending correspond to 8.6% and 10.6%, respectively, of the mass of candidate spent PWR fuels. (author). 16 refs., 30 tabs., 9 figs.

  1. Continuous firefly algorithm applied to PWR core pattern enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursalehi, N., E-mail: npsalehi@yahoo.com [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Moghaddam, H.K. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Numerical results indicate the reliability of CFA for the nuclear reactor LPO. ► The major advantages of CFA are its light computational cost and fast convergence. ► Our experiments demonstrate the ability of CFA to obtain the near optimal loading pattern. -- Abstract: In this research, the new meta-heuristic optimization strategy, firefly algorithm, is developed for the nuclear reactor loading pattern optimization problem. Two main goals in reactor core fuel management optimization are maximizing the core multiplication factor (K{sub eff}) in order to extract the maximum cycle energy and minimizing the power peaking factor due to safety constraints. In this work, we define a multi-objective fitness function according to above goals for the core fuel arrangement enhancement. In order to evaluate and demonstrate the ability of continuous firefly algorithm (CFA) to find the near optimal loading pattern, we developed CFA nodal expansion code (CFANEC) for the fuel management operation. This code consists of two main modules including CFA optimization program and a developed core analysis code implementing nodal expansion method to calculate with coarse meshes by dimensions of fuel assemblies. At first, CFA is applied for the Foxholes test case with continuous variables in order to validate CFA and then for KWU PWR using a decoding strategy for discrete variables. Results indicate the efficiency and relatively fast convergence of CFA in obtaining near optimal loading pattern with respect to considered fitness function. At last, our experience with the CFA confirms that the CFA is easy to implement and reliable.

  2. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis by Integrated AHP and TOPSIS Method Using an Equilibrium Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S. R. [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, S. Y. [UNIST, Ulju (Korea, Republic of); Koc, W. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Determining whether to break away from domestic conflict surrounding nuclear power and step forward for public consensus can be identified by transparent policy making considering public acceptability. In this context, deriving the best suitable nuclear fuel cycle for Korea is the key task in current situation. Assessing nuclear fuel cycle is a multicriteria decision making problem dealing with multiple interconnected issues on efficiently using natural uranium resources, securing an environment friendliness to deal with waste, obtaining the public acceptance, ensuring peaceful uses of nuclear energy, maintaining economic competitiveness compared to other electricity sources, and assessing technical feasibility of advanced nuclear energy systems. This paper performed the integrated AHP and TOPSIS analysis on three nuclear fuel cycle options against 5 different criteria including U utilization, waste management, material attractiveness, economics, and technical feasibility. The fuel cycle options analyzed in this paper are three different fuel cycle options as follows: PWR-Once through cycle(PWR-OT), PWR-MOX cycle, Pyro- SFR cycle. These fuel cycles are most likely to be adopted in the foreseeable future. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and TOPSIS (Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution). The analyzed nuclear fuel cycle options include the once-through cycle, the PWR-MOX recycle, and the Pyro-SFR recycle.

  3. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, R. L.; Lords, L. V.; Kiser, D. M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage.

  4. Regulatory research of the PWR severe accident information needs and instrumentation availability for hydrogen control and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae-Hong; Park, Gun-Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Kang, Yun-Moon; Lee, Un-Jang; Oh, Se-Chul; Lee, Jin-Yong [Seoul Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    During the current research period, we have set forth the methodology for identification of a severe accident, developed a framework for hydrogen management decision trees, and analyzed the literature on hydrogen management and experimental data for hydrogen bum. Specifically, we have summarized me results for information needs in a severe accident obtained in the U.S. and other countries, and applied the methodology to the reference plant YGN 3 and 4 as part of severe accident management. We have also examined the existing instruments in terms of their availability and survivability during a severe accident, and identified additionally needed information needs and instruments. We have identified dominant accident sequences for me reference plant YGN 3 and 4 to construct decision trees, and extracted available data from the IPE study of the plant. Based upon the data we have performed preliminary study on the decision tree and decision node. Last, we have examined various mechanisms for hydrogen generation and reIevant experimental data to predict me amount of hydrogen generation and governing factors in me process. We have also reviewed the hydrogen generation related models in the severe accident analysis.

  5. Aspects of VVR-S spent fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garlea, C.; Garlea, I.; Grancea, I.; Olteanu, A.I.; Kelerman, C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-79617 Bucharest (Romania)

    1998-07-01

    The management of two fuel types is presented, for the period 1957-1997. The research reactor VVR-S used EK-10 and S-36 fuel supplied by the former Soviet Union. The status of the spent fuel and possible options for medium term storage are described. (author)

  6. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Material Samples: Tensile and SSRT Testing (Nonproprietary Version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.Krug, R.Shogan

    2004-09-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs requires detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel (internals) subjected to such conditions. This project studied the effects of reactor service on the mechanical and corrosion properties of samples of baffle plate, former plate, and core barrel from a decommissioned PWR.

  7. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Material Samples: Tensile and SSRT Testing (Nonproprietary Version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.Krug, R.Shogan

    2004-09-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs requires detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel (internals) subjected to such conditions. This project studied the effects of reactor service on the mechanical and corrosion properties of samples of baffle plate, former plate, and core barrel from a decommissioned PWR.

  8. 78 FR 37927 - List of Approved Spent Fuel Storage Casks: MAGNASTOR® System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the... revises authorized contents to include: pressurized water reactor (PWR) damaged fuel contained in damaged.... Tanious, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, U.S....

  9. Advanced Fuel Cell System Thermal Management for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA exploration program. An analysis of a state-of-the-art fuel cell cooling systems was done to benchmark the portion of a fuel cell system s mass that is dedicated to thermal management. Additional analysis was done to determine the key performance targets of the advanced passive thermal management technology that would substantially reduce fuel cell system mass.

  10. Study on PWR Thorium-uranium Breeding Cycle Using Uniformly Mixed Fuel Assembly%使用均匀混合型燃料组件的压水堆钍-铀增殖循环研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周明; 沈季; 于悦海; 张文杰

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the utilization rate of PWR nuclear fuel , a kind of uniformly mixed thorium-uranium assemblies which contain suitable quantity of 232 Th and 233 U were developed .Neutronics calculation and analysis show that kinf of the new assemblies decreases with the increase of burnup slowly .This property is very good for extending reactor core cycle lifetime .Unit 1 of Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plant was chosen as reference core , and thorium-uranium mixed core was formed by feeding thorium assemblies .Through corresponding analysis ,the conclusion indicates that uniformly mixed thorium-uranium assemblies suit exiting PWRs and have advantages in 235 U utilization and long cycle lifetime was obtained .%为提升压水堆燃料利用率,设计了一种包含适量232 T h和233 U的均匀混合型燃料组件。对该型燃料组件的核特性分析表明,其具备随燃耗增加 kinf下降更缓慢的特性,有利于堆芯获得更长的循环长度。以岭澳核电厂一号机组为例,对包含均匀混合型含钍燃料组件的堆芯进行了分析,结果表明,当前压水堆中采用均匀混合型含钍燃料组件是可行的,并且具备235 U利用率高、堆芯循环长度长的优势。

  11. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility.

  12. Recycling as an option of used nuclear fuel management strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Tomaz, E-mail: tomaz.zagar@gen-energija.s [GEN energija, d.o.o., Cesta 4. julija 42, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bursic, Ales; Spiler, Joze [GEN energija, d.o.o., Cesta 4. julija 42, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Kim, Dana; Chiguer, Mustapha; David, Gilles; Gillet, Philippe [AREVA, 33 rue La Fayette, 75009 Paris (France)

    2011-04-15

    The paper presents recycling as an option of used nuclear fuel management strategy with specific focus on the Slovenia. GEN energija is an independent supplier of integral and competitive electricity for Slovenia. In response to growing energy needs, GEN has conducted several feasibility and installation studies of a new nuclear power plant in Slovenia. With sustainable development, the environment, and public acceptance in mind, GEN conducted a study with AREVA concerning the options for the management of its' new plant's used nuclear fuel. After a brief reminder of global political and economic context, solutions for used nuclear fuel management using current technologies are presented in the study as well as an economic assessment of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. The paper evaluates and proposes practical solutions for mid-term issues on used nuclear fuel management strategies. Different scenarios for used nuclear fuel management are presented, where used nuclear fuel recycling (as MOX, for mixed oxide fuel, and ERU, for enriched reprocessed uranium) are considered. The study concludes that closing the nuclear fuel cycle will allow Slovenia to have a supplementary fuel supply for its new reactor via recycling, while reducing the radiotoxicity, thermal output, and volume of its wastes for final disposal, reducing uncertainties, gaining public acceptance, and allowing time for capitalization on investments for final disposal.

  13. Validation of gadolinium burnout using PWR benchmark specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oettingen, Mikołaj, E-mail: moettin@agh.edu.pl; Cetnar, Jerzy, E-mail: cetnar@mail.ftj.agh.edu.pl

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present methodology for validation of gadolinium burnout in PWR. • We model 17 × 17 PWR fuel assembly using MCB code. • We demonstrate C/E ratios of measured and calculated concentrations of Gd isotopes. • The C/E for Gd154, Gd156, Gd157, Gd158 and Gd160 shows good agreement of ±10%. • The C/E for Gd152 and Gd155 shows poor agreement below ±10%. - Abstract: The paper presents comparative analysis of measured and calculated concentrations of gadolinium isotopes in spent nuclear fuel from the Japanese Ohi-2 PWR. The irradiation of the 17 × 17 fuel assembly containing pure uranium and gadolinia bearing fuel pins was numerically reconstructed using the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code – MCB. The reference concentrations of gadolinium isotopes were measured in early 1990s at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. It seems that the measured concentrations were never used for validation of gadolinium burnout. In our study we fill this gap and assess quality of both: applied numerical methodology and experimental data. Additionally we show time evolutions of infinite neutron multiplication factor K{sub inf}, FIMA burnup, U235 and Gd155–Gd158. Gadolinium-based materials are commonly used in thermal reactors as burnable absorbers due to large neutron absorption cross-section of Gd155 and Gd157.

  14. Development of advanced mixed oxide fuels for plutonium management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, S.; Beard, C.; Buksa, J.; Butt, D.; Chidester, K.; Havrilla, G.; Ramsey, K.

    1997-06-01

    A number of advanced Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel forms are currently being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory that have the potential to be effective plutonium management tools. Evolutionary Mixed Oxide (EMOX) fuel is a slight perturbation on standard MOX fuel, but achieves greater plutonium destruction rates by employing a fractional nonfertile component. A pure nonfertile fuel is also being studied. Initial calculations show that the fuel can be utilized in existing light water reactors and tailored to address different plutonium management goals (i.e., stabilization or reduction of plutonium inventories residing in spent nuclear fuel). In parallel, experiments are being performed to determine the feasibility of fabrication of such fuels. Initial EMOX pellets have successfully been fabricated using weapons-grade plutonium.

  15. PEM fuel cells thermal and water management fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yun; Cho, Sung Chan

    2014-01-01

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells convert chemical energy in hydrogen into electrical energy with water as the only by-product. Thus, PEM fuel cells hold great promise to reduce both pollutant emissions and dependency on fossil fuels, especially for transportation-passenger cars, utility vehicles, and buses-and small-scale stationary and portable power generators. But one of the greatest challenges to realizing the high efficiency and zero emissions potential of PEM fuel cells technology is heat and water management. This book provides an introduction to the essential concepts for effective thermal and water management in PEM fuel cells and an assessment on the current status of fundamental research in this field. The book offers you: An overview of current energy and environmental challenges and their imperatives for the development of renewable energy resources, including discussion of the role of PEM fuel cells in addressing these issues; Reviews of basic principles pertaining to PEM fuel cel...

  16. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 13: Strategies for managing fuels and visual quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    The public's acceptance of forest management practices, including fuels reduction, is heavily based on how forests look. Fuels managers can improve their chances of success by considering aesthetics when making management decisions. This fact sheet reviews a three-part general strategy for managing fuels and visual quality: planning, implementation, and monitoring...

  18. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design. Development of advanced PWR core neutronics analysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyo; Kim, Seung Cho; Kim, Taek Kyum; Cho, Jin Young; Lee, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Jung Hun; Jung, Gu Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    The neutronics design system of the advanced PWR consists of (i) hexagonal cell and fuel assembly code for generation of homogenized few-group cross sections and (ii) global core neutronics analysis code for computations of steady-state pin-wise or assembly-wise core power distribution, core reactivity with fuel burnup, control rod worth and reactivity coefficients, transient core power, etc.. The major research target of the first year is to establish the numerical method and solution of multi-group diffusion equations for neutronics code development. Specifically, the following studies are planned; (i) Formulation of various numerical methods such as finite element method(FEM), analytical nodal method(ANM), analytic function expansion nodal(AFEN) method, polynomial expansion nodal(PEN) method that can be applicable for the hexagonal core geometry. (ii) Comparative evaluation of the numerical effectiveness of these methods based on numerical solutions to various hexagonal core neutronics benchmark problems. Results are follows: (i) Formulation of numerical solutions to multi-group diffusion equations based on numerical methods. (ii) Numerical computations by above methods for the hexagonal neutronics benchmark problems such as -VVER-1000 Problem Without Reflector -VVER-440 Problem I With Reflector -Modified IAEA PWR Problem Without Reflector -Modified IAEA PWR Problem With Reflector -ANL Large Heavy Water Reactor Problem -Small HTGR Problem -VVER-440 Problem II With Reactor (iii) Comparative evaluation on the numerical effectiveness of various numerical methods. (iv) Development of HEXFEM code, a multi-dimensional hexagonal core neutronics analysis code based on FEM. In the target year of this research, the spatial neutronics analysis code for hexagonal core geometry(called NEMSNAP-H temporarily) will be completed. Combination of NEMSNAP-H with hexagonal cell and assembly code will then equip us with hexagonal core neutronics design system. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Evaluation of alternative descriptions of PWR cladding corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quecedo, M.; Serna, J. J.; Weiner, R. A.; Kersting, P. J.

    1999-05-15

    A statistical procedure has been used to evaluate several alternative descriptions of pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding corrosion behavior, using an extensive database of Improved (low tin) Zr-4 cladding corrosion measurements from fuel irradiated in commercial PWRs. The in-reactor corrosion enhancement factors considered in the model development are based on a comprehensive review of the current literature for PWR cladding corrosion phenomenology and models. In addition, because prediction of PWR cladding corrosion behavior is very sensitive to the values used for the oxide surface temperatures, several models for the forced convection and sub-cooled nucleate boiling (SNB) coolant heat transfer under PWR conditions have also been evaluated. This evaluation determined that the choice of the forced convection heat transfer has the greatest impact on the ability to fit the data. In addition, the SNB heat transfer model used must account for a continuous transition from forced convection conditions to fully developed SNB conditions. With these choices for the heat transfer models, the evaluation determined that the significant in-reactor corrosion enhancement factors are related to the formation of a hydride rim at the cladding outer diameter, the coolant lithium concentration, and the fast neutron fluence (author) (ml)

  20. Progress of the DUPIC Fuel Compatibility Analysis (IV) - Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ryu, Ho Jin; Roh, Gyu Hong; Jeong, Chang Joon; Park, Chang Je; Song, Kee Chan; Lee, Jung Won

    2005-10-15

    This study describes the mechanical compatibility of the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel, when it is loaded into a CANDU reactor. The mechanical compatibility can be assessed for the fuel management, primary heat transport system, fuel channel, and the fuel handling system in the reactor core by both the experimental and analytic methods. Because the physical dimensions of the DUPIC fuel bundle adopt the CANDU flexible (CANFLEX) fuel bundle design which has already been demonstrated for a commercial use in CANDU reactors, the experimental compatibility analyses focused on the generation of material property data and the irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel, which are used for the computational analysis. The intermediate results of the mechanical compatibility analysis have shown that the integrity of the DUPIC fuel is mostly maintained under the high power and high burnup conditions even though some material properties like the thermal conductivity is a little lower compared to the uranium fuel. However it is required to slightly change the current DUPIC fuel design to accommodate the high internal pressure of the fuel element. It is also strongly recommended to perform more irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel to accumulate a database for the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance in the CANDU reactor.

  1. Development of Advanced Spent Fuel Management Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chung Seok; Choi, I. K.; Kwon, S. G. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    As a part of research efforts to develop an advanced spent fuel management process, this project focused on the electrochemical reduction technology which can replace the original Li reduction technology of ANL, and we have successfully built a 20 kgHM/batch scale demonstration system. The performance tests of the system in the ACPF hot cell showed more than a 99% reduction yield of SIMFUEL, a current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} and a current efficiency of 80%. For an optimization of the process, the prevention of a voltage drop in an integrated cathode, a minimization of the anodic effect and an improvement of the hot cell operability by a modulation and simplization of the unit apparatuses were achieved. Basic research using a bench-scale system was also carried out by focusing on a measurement of the electrochemical reduction rate of the surrogates, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism, collecting data on the partition coefficients of the major nuclides, quantitative measurement of mass transfer rates and diffusion coefficients of oxygen and metal ions in molten salts. When compared to the PYROX process of INL, the electrochemical reduction system developed in this project has comparative advantages in its application of a flexible reaction mechanism, relatively short reaction times and increased process yields.

  2. Plutonium thermal utilization in PWR in Mihama No. 1 plant; Course of verification project with small number of specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokote, Mitsuhiro (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)); Kondo, Yoshiaki; Shimada, Shouichirou; Abeta, Sadaaki

    1992-05-01

    On December 20, 1991, the use of four MOX fuels charged in Mihama No. 1 plant for three cycles ended, which is the verification project with small number of specimens on the plutonium thermal utilization in PWRs in Japan. There was not any symptom of showing abnormality in the safety of the core and the soundness of the fuel during the use. In this report, the verification project and the results are explained. In spent fuel, reusable fission substances such as Pu-239 and Pu-241 produced from U-235 and U-238 are contained. By recycling and effectively utilizing them, resources are protected and the effect to environment is reduced, the energy security in Japan with poor resources can be heightened, and waste management becomes proper. The course of the plutonium thermal utilization in PWR project in Mihama No. 1 plant, the design of MOX fuel and the core, the manufacture of MOX fuel in USA and its transport to Japan, the preservation, practical use and operation management of MOX fuel, the charging of MOX fuel in Mihama No. 1 plant and the use, and the plan of the plutonium thermal utilization in PWRs for hereafter are reported. (K.I.).

  3. An analytical model for the prediction of fluid-elastic forces in a rod bundle subjected to axial flow: theory, experimental validation and application to PWR fuel assemblies; Calcul des forces fluidelastiques dans les faisceaux de tubes sous ecoulement axial: theorie, validation, application aux assemblages combustibles des REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaud, F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France)

    1997-12-31

    A model predicting the fluid-elastic forces in a bundle of circular cylinders subjected to axial flow is presented in this paper. Whereas previously published models were limited to circular flow channel, the present one allows to take a rectangular flow external boundary into account. For that purpose, an original approach is derived from the standard method of images. This model will eventually be used to predict the fluid-structure coupling between the flow of primary coolant and a fuel assemblies in PWR nuclear reactors. It is indeed of major importance since the flow is shown to induce quite high damping and could therefore mitigate the incidence of an external load like a seismic excitation on the dynamics of the assemblies. The proposed model is validated on two cases from the literature but still needs further comparisons with the experiments being currently carried out on the EDF set-up. The flow has been shown to induce an approximate 12% damping on a PWR fuel assembly, at nominal reactor conditions. The possible grid effect on the fluid-structure coupling has been neglected so far but will soon be investigated at EDF. (author). 16 refs.

  4. Monitoring instrumentation spent fuel management program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary monitoring system methodologies are identified as an input to the risk assessment of spent fuel management. Conceptual approaches to instrumentation for surveillance of canister position and orientation, vault deformation, spent fuel dissolution, temperature, and health physics conditions are presented. In future studies, the resolution, reliability, and uncertainty associated with these monitoring system methodologies will be evaluated.

  5. Management of spent fuel; Gestion del combustible irradiado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrampes Blanch, J.

    2015-07-01

    The management of irradiated fuel has become one of the materials that more time and resources deals within their responsibilities that also cover other areas such as the design of the new cycles, supply of fresh fuel, tracking operation cycles and strategies of power changes. (Author)

  6. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: HLW management in France, by Michel Debes, EDF, France; Breakthroughs from future reactors, by Jacques Bouchard, CEA, France; 'MOX for peace' a reality, by Jean-Pierre Bariteau, AREVA Group, France; Swedish spent fuel and radwaste, by Per H. Grahn and Marie Skogsberg, SKB, Sweden; ENC2005 concluding remarks, by Larry Foulke, 'Nuclear Technology Matters'; Fuel crud formation and behavior, by Charles Turk, Entergy; and, Plant profile: major vote of confidence for NP, by Martti Katka, TVO, Finland.

  7. PWR Cross Section Libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, Carolyn [Texas A& M University; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    New pressurized water reactor (PWR) cross-section libraries were generated for use with the ORIGEN-ARP depletion sequence in the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. These libraries are based on ENDF/B-VII nuclear data and were generated using the two-dimensional depletion sequence, TRITON/NEWT, in SCALE 6.1. The libraries contain multiple burnup-dependent cross-sections for seven PWR fuel designs, with enrichments ranging from 1.5 to 6 wt% 235U. The burnup range has been extended from the 72 GWd/MTU used in previous versions of the libraries to 90 GWd/MTU. Validation of the libraries using radiochemical assay measurements and decay heat measurements for PWR spent fuel showed good agreement between calculated and experimental data. Verification against detailed TRITON simulations for the considered assembly designs showed that depletion calculations performed in ORIGEN-ARP with the pre-generated libraries provide similar results as obtained with direct TRITON depletion, while greatly reducing the computation time.

  8. Assessment of PWR plutonium burners for nuclear energy centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, A J; Shapiro, N L

    1976-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the performance and safety characteristics of PWR plutonium burners, to identify modifications to current PWR designs to enhance plutonium utilization, to study the problems of deploying plutonium burners at Nuclear Energy Centers, and to assess current industrial capability of the design and licensing of such reactors. A plutonium burner is defined to be a reactor which utilizes plutonium as the sole fissile addition to the natural or depleted uranium which comprises the greater part of the fuel mass. The results of the study and the design analyses performed during the development of C-E's System 80 plant indicate that the use of suitably designed plutonium burners at Nuclear Energy Centers is technically feasible.

  9. Evaluation and demonstration of methods for improved fuel utilization. Fort Calhoun Poolside Inspection Programs: end-of-cycles 4 and 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaVake, J.C.; Smith, G.P.

    1980-08-01

    The purpose of this program is to demonstrate two techniques for improving fuel utilization in current Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): (1) more efficient fuel management, and (2) high burnup. These improvements are being demonstrated in the Fort Calhoun reactor, a 1420 Mwt PWR. A more efficient fuel management scheme called SAVFUEL (Shimmed And Very Flexible Uranium Element Loading), will be demonstrated which reduces neutron leakage and is expected to reduce uranium requirements. Another part of the demonstration program will increase the fuel burnup of the current 14 x 14 fuel design to further reduce uranium requirements. The program is a joint Department of Energy (DOE), Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) and Combustion Engineering (C-E) endeavor and is part of a national effort to improve uranium utilization in light water reactors.

  10. Irradiation and lithium presence influence on the crystallographic nature of zirconia in the framework of PWR zircaloy 4 fuel cladding corrosion study; Influence de l'irradiation et de la presence du lithium sur la nature cristallographique de la zircone dans le cadre de l'etude de la corrosion du zircaloy 4 en milieu reacteur a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, C

    1999-07-01

    The-increasing deterioration of the initially protective zirconia layer is one of the hypotheses which can explain the impairment with time of PWR fuel cladding corrosion. This deterioration could be worsened by irradiation or lithium presence in the oxidizing medium. The aim of this thesis was to underline the influence of those two parameters on zirconia crystallographic nature. We first studied the impact of ionic irradiation on pure, powdery, monoclinic zirconia and oxidation formed zirconia, mainly with X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy. The high or low energy particles used (Kr{sup n+-}, Ar{sup n+}) respectively favored electronic or atomic defaults production. The crystallographic analyses showed that these irradiation have a significant effect on zirconia by inducing nucleation or growth of tetragonal phase. The extent depends on sample nature and particles energy. In all cases, phase transformation is correlated with crystalline parameters, grain size and especially micro-stress changes. The results are consistent with those obtained with 1 to 5 cycles PWR claddings. Therefore, the corrosion acceleration observed in reactor can partly be explained by the stress fields appearance under irradiation, which is particularly detrimental to zirconia layer cohesion. Last, we have underlined that the presence of considerable amounts of lithium in the oxidizing medium ((> 700 ppm) induces the disappearance of the tetragonal zirconia located at the metal/oxide interface and the appearance of a porosity of the dense under layer, which looses its protectiveness. (author)

  11. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: New plants with high safety and availability, by Bill Poirier, Westinghouse Electric Company; Increased reliability and competitiveness, by Russell E. Stachowski, GE Energy, Nuclear; Fuel for long-term supply of nuclear power, by Kumiaki Moriya, Hitachi, Ltd., Japan; Super high burnup fuel, By Noboru Itagaki and Tamotsu Murata, Nuclear Fuel Industries LTD., Japan; Zero fuel failures by 2010, by Tom Patten, AREVA NP Inc.; Decommissioning opportunities in the UK, by David Brown and William Thorn, US Department of Commerce; Industry's three challenges, by Dale E. Klein, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and, A step ahead of the current ABWR's, compiled by Claire Zurek, GE Energy.

  12. Fessenheim: 30 years of nuclear fuel operation; Fessenheim: 30 ans d'exploitation du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, G. [Centrale de Fessenheim, EDF, 68 - Dessenheim (France)

    2008-03-15

    Fessenheim units 1 and 2 are the first two 900 MW PWR put into operation in France (1977). This article reviews 30 years of change, optimization and feedback experience from Fessenheim, concerning: -) fuel assemblies (particularly the design of some components like grids, ends and guide tubes), -) the reload fuel management (to get a higher unloading burn-up), -) the refueling machine and tools (heavy modifications to reduce the human factor), and -) work organization (work shifts and staff training). (A.C.)

  13. A study on the radioactive waste management for DUPIC fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, H. S.; Park, J. J.; Kim, J. H.; Cho, Y. H.; Shin, J. M.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. G.; Park, S. D.; Suh, M. Y.; Sohn, S. C.; Song, B. C.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Jo, K. S.; Jee, K. Y.; Jee, C. S.; Han, S. H.

    1997-09-01

    Part 1: The characteristics if the radioactive wastes coming from the DUPIC fuel manufacturing process were analyzed and evaluated. The gross {alpha}-activity and {alpha}-, {gamma}-spectrum of irradiated zircaloy specimens form KORI unit 1 were analyzed. In order to develop the trapping media of radioactive ruthenium oxides, trapping behavior of volatilized ruthenium oxides on various metal oxides or carbonates was analyzed. Fly ash was selected as a trapping materials for gaseous cesium. And reaction characteristics of CsNO{sub 3} and CsI with fly ash have been investigated. Also, trapping material were performed to test fly ash filter for removal of gaseous cesium under the air and hydrogen atmosphere. The applicability of fly ash to the vitrification of the spent filter was analyzed in the aspects of predictability, leachability. Good quality of Borosilicate glass was formed using Cesium spent filter. Offgas treatment system of DUPIC fuel manufacturing facility was designed and constructed in order to trap of gaseous radioactive waste from 100 batch of OREOXA furnace (the capacity : 500 g/batch). Part II: To develop chemical analysis techniques necessary for understanding chemical properties of the highly radioactive materials related to the development of DUPIC fuel cycle technology, the following basic studies were performed : dissolution of SIMFUEL (simulated fuel), determination of uranium by potentiometry and UV/Vis absorption spectrophotometry, separation of PWR spent fuel, group separation of fission products from uranium, individual separation for analysis of actinides, determination of free acid in a artificial dissolved solution of PWR spent fuel, group separation of fission products form uranium, individual separation of Sm from a mixed rare earth elements and measurement of its isotopes by TI-mass spectrometry, and characteristics of detectors in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) suitable for analysis of trace fission

  14. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  15. FLUOLE-2: An Experiment for PWR Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiollay Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FLUOLE-2 is a benchmark-type experiment dedicated to 900 and 1450 MWe PWR vessels surveillance dosimetry. This two-year program started in 2014 and will end in 2015. It will provide precise experimental data for the validation of the neutron spectrum propagation calculation from core to vessel. It is composed of a square core surrounded by a stainless steel baffe and internals: PWR barrel is simulated by steel structures leading to different steel-water slides; two steel components stand for a surveillance capsule holder and for a part of the pressure vessel. Measurement locations are available on the whole experimental structure. The experimental knowledge of core sources will be obtained by integral gamma scanning measurements directly on fuel pins. Reaction rates measured by calibrated fission chambers and a large set of dosimeters will give information on the neutron energy and spatial distributions. Due to the low level neutron flux of EOLE ZPR a special, high efficiency, calibrated gamma spectrometry device will be used for some dosimeters, allowing to measure an activity as low as 7. 10−2 Bq per sample. 103mRh activities will be measured on an absolute calibrated X spectrometry device. FLUOLE-2 experiment goal is to usefully complete the current experimental benchmarks database used for the validation of neutron calculation codes. This two-year program completes the initial FLUOLE program held in 2006–2007 in a geometry representative of 1300 MWe PWR.

  16. FLUOLE-2: An Experiment for PWR Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiollay, Nicolas; Di Salvo, Jacques; Sandrin, Charlotte; Soldevila, Michel; Bourganel, Stéphane; Fausser, Clément; Destouches, Christophe; Blaise, Patrick; Domergue, Christophe; Philibert, Hervé; Bonora, Jonathan; Gruel, Adrien; Geslot, Benoit; Lamirand, Vincent; Pepino, Alexandra; Roche, Alain; Méplan, Olivier; Ramdhane, Mourad

    2016-02-01

    FLUOLE-2 is a benchmark-type experiment dedicated to 900 and 1450 MWe PWR vessels surveillance dosimetry. This two-year program started in 2014 and will end in 2015. It will provide precise experimental data for the validation of the neutron spectrum propagation calculation from core to vessel. It is composed of a square core surrounded by a stainless steel baffe and internals: PWR barrel is simulated by steel structures leading to different steel-water slides; two steel components stand for a surveillance capsule holder and for a part of the pressure vessel. Measurement locations are available on the whole experimental structure. The experimental knowledge of core sources will be obtained by integral gamma scanning measurements directly on fuel pins. Reaction rates measured by calibrated fission chambers and a large set of dosimeters will give information on the neutron energy and spatial distributions. Due to the low level neutron flux of EOLE ZPR a special, high efficiency, calibrated gamma spectrometry device will be used for some dosimeters, allowing to measure an activity as low as 7. 10-2 Bq per sample. 103mRh activities will be measured on an absolute calibrated X spectrometry device. FLUOLE-2 experiment goal is to usefully complete the current experimental benchmarks database used for the validation of neutron calculation codes. This two-year program completes the initial FLUOLE program held in 2006-2007 in a geometry representative of 1300 MWe PWR.

  17. Actinides transmutation - a comparison of results for PWR benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, Luiz H. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: luizhenu@ieav.cta.br

    2009-07-01

    The physical aspects involved in the Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) of minor actinides (MA) and fission products (FP) generated by reactors PWR are of great interest in the nuclear industry. Besides these the reduction in the storage of radioactive wastes are related with the acceptability of the nuclear electric power. From the several concepts for partitioning and transmutation suggested in literature, one of them involves PWR reactors to burn the fuel containing plutonium and minor actinides reprocessed of UO{sub 2} used in previous stages. In this work are presented the results of the calculations of a benchmark in P and T carried with WIMSD5B program using its new cross sections library generated from the ENDF-B-VII and the comparison with the results published in literature by other calculations. For comparison, was used the benchmark transmutation concept based in a typical PWR cell and the analyzed results were the k{infinity} and the atomic density of the isotopes Np-239, Pu-241, Pu-242 and Am-242m, as function of burnup considering discharge of 50 GWd/tHM. (author)

  18. Multiobjective fuel management optimization for self-fuel-providing LMFBR using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshinsky, Vladimir G.; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-Okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Toshinsky, Georgy I. [State Scientific Center, Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1999-06-01

    One of the conceptual options under consideration for the future of nuclear power is the long-term development without fuel reprocessing. This concept is based on a reactor that requires no plutonium reprocessing for itself, and provides high efficiency of natural uranium utilization, so called Self-Fuel-Providing LMFBR (SFPR). Several design considerations were previously given to this reactor type which, however, suffer from some problems connected with insufficient power flattening, large reactivity swings during burnup cycles, and peak fuel burnup being significantly higher than recent technology experience, which is about 18% for U-10 wt%Zr metallic fuel to be considered. Yet, the mentioned core parameters demonstrate high sensitivity to the fuel management strategy selected for the reactor. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a practical tool for the improvement of the core characteristics by fuel management optimization, which is based on advanced optimization techniques such as Genetic Algorithms (GA). The calculation results obtained by a simplified reactor model can serve as estimates of achievable values for mentioned core parameters, which are necessary to make decisions at the preliminary optimization stage.

  19. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong Zhaopeng, E-mail: zzhong@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. > Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. > New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. > Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}360 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  20. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Document Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, M.D.; Harizison, G.L.; Rice, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    The SNF Project Document Management Plan identifies and describes the currently available systems and processes for implementing and maintaining an effective document control and records management program. This program governs the methods by which documents are generated, released, distributed, maintained current, retired, and ultimately disposed.

  1. Flight management concepts development for fuel conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Morello, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that increased airspace congestion will produce increased flight delay unless advanced flight management concepts are developed to compensate. It has been estimated that a 5 percent reduction in delay is approximately equivalent, in terms of direct operating costs, to a 5 percent reduction in drag. The present investigation regarding the development of the required flight management concepts is organized into three sections, related to background, current research, and future effort. In the background section, a summary is provided of past technical effort concerning flight management. The second section is concerned with on-going efforts to integrate flight management with ground-based flight planning, and with an advanced concepts simulator to test the new developments. In the third section, attention is given to research concerning airborne flight management integration with other flight functions.

  2. Development of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates that could conduct the heat, provide a sufficiently uniform temperature heat sink for each cell of the fuel cell stack, and be substantially lighter than the conventional thermal management approach. Tests were run with different materials to evaluate the design approach to a heat exchanger that could interface with the edges of the passive cooling plates. Measurements were made during fuel cell operation to determine the temperature of individual cooling plates and also to determine the temperature uniformity from one cooling plate to another.

  3. Equipment for the management of spent fuels and radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, C. C. F.; Carter, C. C.; Doubt, H. A. [GEC Alsthom Engineering System Ltd., Leicester (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-15

    UK experience over the last thirty years with the design and implementation of equipment for the management of spent fuels and radioactive wastes has ranged from remote handling, through encapsulation and containerisation, to the medium-term storage of heat-producing fuels and wastes in the dry state. The design principles involved in handling, transporting and storing hazardous materials safely and reliably, while ensuring biological shielding, containment and cooling of radioactive materials, are common to the various kinds of equipment presented in this paper, even though the individual requirements may be very different. The UK nuclear programme over the last thirty years has encouraged the development of extensive expertise in the engineering of equipment for the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste. This expertise can be applied with benefit to the Korean nuclear programme.

  4. State of the art report: Underwater examination techniques for spent nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Yong Bum

    1997-06-01

    In these days, much efforts are being put to increase the final discharge burnup of PWR fuels. Therefore, the necessity of the inspection of irradiated nuclear fuels assembly during the the refueling outage is greatly increased to evaluate the safe operation and soundness of fuel assemblies in their next cycles in core, and apply the results for safe operation and effective core management. The necessity to evaluate the irradiation performance of indigenous nuclear fuels pushes the relative researchers to the development of on-site fuel inspection techniques and devices which can perform the underwater inspection and measurement of irradiated nuclear fuels during refueling outage. To ensure the technologies, the status of in situ underwater fuel inspection techniques and equipment were investigated and reviewed. Those information provides the fuel inspection capability to evaluate and certificate the performance and integrity of nuclear fuels which leads to the safe operation of NPP. (author). 49 refs., 52 figs

  5. Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) / Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS Evaluation of Risk-Informed Margins Management Strategies for a Representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) toolkit and methodology are proposed for investigating nuclear power plant core, fuels design and safety analysis, including postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. This toolkit, under an integrated evaluation model framework, is name LOCA toolkit for the US (LOTUS). This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermal hydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results.

  6. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs.

  7. Aviation Management Perception of Biofuel as an Alternative Fuel Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marticek, Michael

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore lived experiences and perceptions from a population of 75 aviation managers in various locations in Pennsylvania about the use of aviation biofuel and how it will impact the aviation industry. The primary research question for this study focused on the impact of biofuel on the airline industry and how management believes biofuel can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel. Grounded in the conceptual framework of sustainability, interview data collected from 27 airline and fueling leaders were analyzed for like terms, coded, and reduced to 3 themes. Data were organized and prioritized based on frequency of mention. The findings represented themes of (a) flight planning tools, (b) production, and (c) costs that are associated with aviation fuel. The results confirmed findings addressed in the literature review, specifically that aviation biofuel will transform the airline industry through lower cost and production. These findings have broad applicability for all management personnel in the aviation industry. Implications for social change and improved business environments could be realized with a cleaner environment, reduced fuel emissions, and improved air quality.

  8. Integrating fire behavior models and geospatial analysis for wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan A. Ager; Nicole M. Vaillant; Mark A. Finney

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning on federal lands in the US are complex problems that require state-of-the-art fire behavior modeling and intensive geospatial analyses. Fuel management is a particularly complicated process where the benefits and potential impacts of fuel treatments must be demonstrated in the context of land management goals...

  9. 78 FR 13315 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Wyoming; Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest; Wyoming; Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project AGENCY... the Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project. The analysis will evaluate and disclose the effects of... Snake Fuels Management Project was previously scoped and anyalyzed through an environmental assessment...

  10. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2008-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A global solution for clients, by Yves Linz, AREVA NP; A safer, secure and economical plant, by Andy White, GE Hitachi Nuclear; Robust global prospects, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited; Development of NPPs in China, by Chen Changbing and Li Huiqiang, Huazhong University of Science and Technology; Yucca Mountain update; and, A class of its own, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear. The Industry Innovation articles in this issue are: Fuel assembly inspection program, by Jim Lemons, Tennessee Valley Authority; and, Improved in-core fuel shuffle for reduced refueling duration, by James Tusar, Exelon Nuclear.

  11. The DUPIC fuel development program in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M. S.; Park, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    This study describes the DUPIC fuel development program in KAERI as follows; Burning spent PWR fuel again in CANDU by DUPIC, Compatibility with existing CANDU system, Feasibility of DUPIC fuel fabrication, Waste reduction, Safeguard ability, Economics of DUPIC fuel cycle, The DUPIC fuel development program, and International prospective. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Wildfire exposure and fuel management on western US national forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Alan A; Day, Michelle A; McHugh, Charles W; Short, Karen; Gilbertson-Day, Julie; Finney, Mark A; Calkin, David E

    2014-12-01

    Substantial investments in fuel management activities on national forests in the western US are part of a national strategy to reduce human and ecological losses from catastrophic wildfire and create fire resilient landscapes. Prioritizing these investments within and among national forests remains a challenge, partly because a comprehensive assessment that establishes the current wildfire risk and exposure does not exist, making it difficult to identify national priorities and target specific areas for fuel management. To gain a broader understanding of wildfire exposure in the national forest system, we analyzed an array of simulated and empirical data on wildfire activity and fuel treatment investments on the 82 western US national forests. We first summarized recent fire data to examine variation among the Forests in ignition frequency and burned area in relation to investments in fuel reduction treatments. We then used simulation modeling to analyze fine-scale spatial variation in burn probability and intensity. We also estimated the probability of a mega-fire event on each of the Forests, and the transmission of fires ignited on national forests to the surrounding urban interface. The analysis showed a good correspondence between recent area burned and predictions from the simulation models. The modeling also illustrated the magnitude of the variation in both burn probability and intensity among and within Forests. Simulated burn probabilities in most instances were lower than historical, reflecting fire exclusion on many national forests. Simulated wildfire transmission from national forests to the urban interface was highly variable among the Forests. We discuss how the results of the study can be used to prioritize investments in hazardous fuel reduction within a comprehensive multi-scale risk management framework.

  13. Use of plutonium in PWR-type reactors; Utilisation du plutonium dans les REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthet, A. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Direction de l' Equipement

    1999-04-01

    The plutonium is used, as fuel, in the pressurized water reactors. It does not exist in nature; butit is fabricated in the reactor by neutrons capture. The MOX (Mixed Oxides) is its usual name. A part is consumed by the fission, the remainder is found in the used fuel released from the reactor. The paper deals with the plutonium specificities, the research and development programs about this fuel. The technical specifications of the PWR recycling the plutonium are also included (radiation protection, reactor fueling). (A.L.B.)

  14. Analysis of Water Management in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional, steady-state, isothermal water-management model for a complete proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was developed. The model includes the transport in the diffusion layer and the proton exchange membrane (PEM) with a pseudo-homogeneous model for the cathode catalyst layer. The predicted fuel cell performance with variable cathode porosities compares well with experimental results. The model is then used to investigate the effects of some structural parameters, such as the rib size, the interdigitated flow field, and various operating conditions including the gas flow rate, the cell temperature and pressure, humidification, and the relative humidity at the inlet. Water management is best achieved by tuning the anode operating conditions.

  15. Design of demonstration facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, W. M.; Koo, J. H.; Jeo, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Lee, E. P.; Baek, S. R.; Lee, K. I.; You, K. S.; Park, S. W. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process(ACP) was proposed and developed for effective management of the PWR spent fuel. The detail plan was established for demonstration and verification of the ACP, and an existing hot cell will be modified as {alpha}-{gamma} type hot cell. In this study, the process mechanical flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell, and the detail design of hot cell including the auxiliary facility and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell system. And then, this results will be utilized for hot cell refurbishment and license.

  16. Integrated maritime bunker management with stochastic fuel prices and new emission regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Yewen; Stein W. Wallace; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Maritime bunker management (MBM) controls the procurement and consumption of the fuels used on board and therefore manages one of the most important cost drivers in the shipping industry. At the operational level, a shipping company needs to manage its fuel consumption by making optimal routing and speed decisions for each voyage. But since fuel prices are highly volatile, a shipping company sometimes also needs to do tactical fuel hedging in the forward market to control risk and cost volati...

  17. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  18. Safety aspects of dry spent fuel storage and spent fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botsch, Wolfgang; Smalian, Silva; Hinterding, Peter [TUV NORD EnSys Hannover, GmbH and Co. KG, Hanover (Germany); Volzke, Holger; Wolff, Dietmar; Kasparek, Eva-Maria [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    As with the storage of all radioactive materials, the storage of spent nuclear fuel (SF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) must conform to safety requirements. Safety aspects like safe enclosure of radioactive materials, safe removal of decay heat, nuclear criticality safety and avoidance of unnecessary radiation exposure must be achieved throughout the storage period. The implementation of these safety requirements can be achieved by dry storage of SF and HLW in casks as well as in other systems such as dry vault storage systems or spent fuel pools, where the latter is neither a dry nor a passive system. After the events of Fukushima, the advantages of passively and inherently safe dry storage systems have become more obvious. TUV and BAM, who work as independent experts for the competent authorities, present the licensing process for sites and casks and inform about spent nuclear fuel management and issues concerning dry storage of spent nuclear fuel, based on their long experience in these fields. All safety relevant issues like safe enclosure, shielding, removal of the decay heat or behavior of cask and building under accident conditions are checked and validated with state-of-the-art methods and computer codes before the license approval. It is shown how dry storage systems can ensure the compliance with the mentioned safety criteria over a long storage period. Exemplarily, the process of licensing, erection and operation of selected German dry storage facilities is presented. (authors)

  19. PSA LEVEL 3 DAN IMPLEMENTASINYA PADA KAJIAN KESELAMATAN PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pande Made Udiyani

    2015-03-01

    series of calculations performed are: calculate the source terms of the core damaged, modeling of meteorological conditions and environmental site, exposure pathway modeling, analysis of radionuclide dispersion and transport phenomena in the environment, radionuclide deposition analysis, analysis of radiation dose, protection & mitigation analysis, and risk analysis. The assessment uses a series of subsystems on PC Cosyma software. The results prove that the safety assessment using Level 3 PSA methodology is very effective and comprehensive estimate the impact, consenquences, risks, nuclear emergency preparedness, and the reactor accident management especially for severe accidents or beyond design basis accidents of nuclear power plants. The results of the assessment can be used as a feedback to safety assessment of Level 1 PSA and Level 2 PSA. Keywords: Level 3 PSA, accident, PWR

  20. Challenges facing air management for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.B. [Department of Energy (United States); Sutton, R. [Argonne National Lab. (United States); Wagner, F.W. [Energetics Incorporated (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. automotive industry are working cooperatively under the auspices of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) to develop a six-passenger automobile that can achieve up to 80 mpg. while meeting customer needs and all safety and emission requirements. These partners are continuing to invest heavily in the research and development of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells as a clean and efficient energy conversion system for the PNGV. A critical challenge facing fuel cell systems for the PNGV is the development of efficient, compact, cost-effective air management systems. The U.S. Department of Energy has been exploring several compressor/expander options for pressurized fuel cell systems, including scroll, toroidal intersecting vane, turbine, twin screw, and piston technologies. Each of these technologies has strengths and weaknesses regarding efficiency, pressure ratio over turndown, size and weight, and cost. This paper will present data from the U.S. Department of Energy's research and development efforts on air management systems and will discusses recent program developments resulting from an independent peer review evaluation. (author)

  1. Proceedings of spent fuel management technology workshop, 1997. 11. 13 - 11. 14, Taejon, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This proceedings cover the advanced spent fuel process technology, the development of a test facility for spent fuel management and remote handling technology, and the characteristics test technology. Fifteen papers are submitted.

  2. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Bradley, D.J.; Fletcher, J.F.; Konzek, G.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Mitchell, S.J.; Molton, P.M.; Nightingale, R.E.

    1991-04-01

    Since 1976, the International Program Support Office (IPSO) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has collected and compiled publicly available information concerning foreign and international radioactive waste management programs. This National Briefing Summaries is a printout of an electronic database that has been compiled and is maintained by the IPSO staff. The database contains current information concerning the radioactive waste management programs (with supporting information on nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle) of most of the nations (except eastern European countries) that now have or are contemplating nuclear power, and of the multinational agencies that are active in radioactive waste management. Information in this document is included for three additional countries (China, Mexico, and USSR) compared to the prior issue. The database and this document were developed in response to needs of the US Department of Energy.

  3. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

    1988-12-01

    The National Briefing Summaries is a compilation of publicly available information concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management strategies and programs of 21 nations, including the United States and three international agencies that have publicized their activities in this field. It presents available highlight information with references that may be used by the reader for additional information. The information in this document is compiled primarily for use by the US Department of Energy and other US federal agencies and their contractors to provide summary information on radioactive waste management activities in other countries. This document provides an awareness to managers and technical staff of what is occurring in other countries with regard to strategies, activities, and facilities. The information may be useful in program planning to improve and benefit United States' programs through foreign information exchange. Benefits to foreign exchange may be derived through a number of exchange activities.

  4. Relative importance of fuel management, ignition management and weather for area burned: Evidence from five landscape-fire-succession models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey J. Cary; Mike D. Flannigan; Robert E. Keane; Ross A. Bradstock; Ian D. Davies; James M. Lenihan; Chao Li; Kimberley A. Logan; Russell A. Parsons

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of five landscape fire models (CAFE, FIRESCAPE, LAMOS(HS), LANDSUM and SEMLAND) was compared in a standardised modelling experiment. The importance of fuel management approach, fuel management effort, ignition management effort and weather in determining variation in area burned and number of edge pixels burned (a measure of potential impact on assets...

  5. Degradation of fastener in reactor internal of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Chung, M. K.; Han, C. H

    2000-03-01

    Main component degraded in reactor internal structure of PWR is fastener such as bolts, stud, cap screw, and pins. The failure of these components may damage nuclear fuel and limits the operation of nuclear reactor. In foreign reactors operated more than 10 years, an increasing number of incidents of degraded thread fasteners have been reported. The degradation of these components impair the integrity of reactor internal structure and limit the life extension of nuclear power plant. To solve the problem of fastener failure, the incidents of failure and main mechanisms should be investigated. the purpose of this state-of-the -art report is to investigate the failure incidents and mechanisms of fastener in foreign and domestic PWR and make a guide to select a proper materials. There is no intent to describe each event in detail in this report. This report covers the failures of fastener and damage mechanisms reported by the licensees of operating nuclear power plants and the applications of plants constructed after 1964. This information is derived from pertinent licensee event report, reportable occurrence reports, operating reactor event memoranda, failure analysis reports, and other relevant documents. (author)

  6. NEPA implementation: The Department of Energy`s program to manage spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) in its management of spent nuclear fuel. The DOE strategy is to address the short-term safety concerns about existing spent nuclear fuel, to study alternatives for interim storage, and to develop a long-range program to manage spent nuclear fuel. This paper discusses the NEPA process, the environmental impact statements for specific sites as well as the overall program, the inventory of DOE spent nuclear fuel, the alternatives for managing the fuel, and the schedule for implementing the program.

  7. PWR simplified fuel element simulation using calculation trailer ANSYS CFX and PARCS including pressure drop and turbulence in the spacer; Simulacion de un elemento combustible PWR simplicificado mediante el calculo acoplado ANSYS CFX y PARCS incluyendo caida de presion y turbulencia en el espaciador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Monferrer, C.; Chiva, S.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Pellacani, F.; Macian-Juan, R.

    2012-07-01

    With the recent development of a new computational tool for calculations of nuclear reactors based on the coupling between the PARCS neutron transport code and computational fluid dynamics commercial code (CFD) ANSYS CFX opens new possibilities in the fuel element design that contributes to a better understanding and a better simulation of the processes of heat transfer and specific phenomena of fluid dynamics as the {sup c}rossflow{sup .}.

  8. Design of an experiment to measure the decay heat of an irradiated PWR fuel: MERCI experiment; Conception d'une experience de mesure de la puissance residuelle d'un combustible irradie: l'experience MERCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourganel, St

    2002-11-01

    After a reactor shutdown, a significant quantity of energy known as 'decay heat' continues to be generated from the irradiated fuel. This heat source is due to the disintegration energy of fission products and actinides. Decay heat determination of an irradiated fuel is of the utmost importance for safety analysis as the design cooling systems, spent fuel transport, or handling. Furthermore, the uncertainty on decay heat has a straight economic impact. The unloading fuel spent time is an example. The purpose of MERCI experiment (irradiated fuel decay heat measurement) consists in qualifying computer codes, particularly the DARWIN code system developed by the CEA in relation to industrial organizations, as EDF, FRAMATOME and COGEMA. To achieve this goal, a UOX fuel is irradiated in the vicinity of the OSIRIS research reactor, and then the decay heat is measured by using a calorimeter. The objective is to reduce the decay heat uncertainties from 8% to 3 or 4% at short cooling times. A full simulation on computer of the MERCI experiment has been achieved: fuel irradiation analysis is performed using transport code TRIPOLI4 and evolution code DARWIN/PEPIN2, and heat transfer with CASTEM2000 code. The results obtained are used for the design of this experiment. Moreover, we propose a calibration procedure decreasing the influence of uncertainty measurements and an interpretation method of the experimental results and evaluation of associated uncertainties. (author)

  9. Social science informing forest management — bringing new knowledge to fuels managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela Jakes

    2007-01-01

    To improve access, interpretability, and use of the full body of research, a pilot project was initiated by the USDA Forest Service to synthesize relevant scientific information and develop publications and decision support tools that managers can use to inform fuels treatment plans. This article provides an overview of the work of the Social Science Core Team. Team...

  10. Fuel management optimization in pressure water reactors with hexagonal geometry using hill climbing method; Optimizacion de la gestion de combustible en reactores de agua a presion con geometria hexagonal usando el metodo escalador de colina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres Diaz, J.; Quintero, Ruben; Melian, Manuel [Centro de Investigaciones Tecnologicas, Nucleares y Ambientales, La Habana (Cuba). E-mail: jadiaz@ctn.isctn.edu.cu; Rosete, Alejandro [Centro de Estudios de Ingenieria de Sistemas (CEIS), La Habana (Cuba). E-mail: rosete@ceis.ispjae.edu.cu

    2000-07-01

    In this work the general-purpose optimization method, Hill Climbing, was applied to the Fuel Management Optimization problem in PWR reactors, WWER type. They were carried out a series of experiments in order to study the performance of Hill Climbing. It was proven two starting point for initialize the search: a reload configuration by project and a reload configuration generated with the application of a minimal knowledge of the problem. It was also studied the effect of imposing constraints based on the physics of the reactor in order to reduce the number of possible solutions to be generated. The operator used in Hill Climbing was defined as a binary exchange of fuel assemblies. For the simulation of each generated configuration, the tridimensional simulator program SPPS-1 was used. It was formulated an objective function with power peaking constraint to guide the search. As results, a methodology ws proposed for the In-core Fuel Management Optimization in hexagonal geometry, and the feasibility of the application of the Hill Climbing to this type of problem was demonstrated. (author)

  11. Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles: Resources for Fleet Managers (Clean Cities) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, A.

    2011-04-01

    A discussion of the tools and resources on the Clean Cities, Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center, and the FuelEconomy.gov Web sites that can help vehicle fleet managers make informed decisions about implementing strategies to reduce gasoline and diesel fuel use.

  12. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  13. Design and in-core fuel management of reload fuel elements for reactors made by other manufacturers. Auslegung und Einsatzplanung von Nachlade-Brennelementen fuer Reaktoren anderer Hersteller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufert, A.; Urban, P.

    1990-12-01

    By the end of 1990 Siemens had performed fuel element designs and in-core fuel management for 94 operating cycles in 27 pressurized and boiling water reactors of other manufacturers. Together with the client different fuel element designs are developed and proof is furnished of the reactor physics compatibility of different fuel elements from various producers, and of plant safety. (DG).

  14. Analyses of PWR boron dilution consequences with the Arrotta code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanson, E.; Cheng, H.W.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-03-01

    During the past few years, major attention has been paid to analyzing the issue of reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs), of which the boron dilution event is of very special interest to the countries having pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in their nuclear power delivery systems. The scenario considered is that if an inadvertent accumulation of boron free water in one loop during reactor startup operations of a PWR and the inadvertent startup of the reactor coolant pump (RCP) in the loop. This could then lead to a rapid boron dilution in the core, which can in turn give rise to a power excursion. This report is devoted to studying the potential physical and thermal hydraulic consequences of a slug of diluted coolant entering the core after one RCP start under a couple of postulated cases. The severity of the consequences of such a scenario is primarily determined by the amount of positive reactivity insertion, and they are also related to the reactivity insertion rate. Therefore, in the report, detailed calculations and analyses have been carried out from case to case by using the well-known space-time kinetics code, ARROTTA. As a result, the spatial distribution for nodal power, fuel enthalpy, fuel temperature and clad outside temperature as well as the change in core reactivity, total core power and peak fuel temperature can be provided. In general, the maximum fuel enthalpy, peak fuel temperature, and clad outside temperature, for all the cases considered in the report, do not exceed their respective routine safety limitations because of the strong Doppler effect and moderator temperature feedback, except if the safety limitations on fuel enthalpy addition for high burnup fuel are drastically reduced.

  15. Preliminary concepts: coordinated safeguards for materials management in a thorium--uranium fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This report addresses preliminary concepts for coordinated safeguards materials management in a typical generic thorium--uranium-fueled light-water reactor (LWR) fuels reprocessing plant. The reference facility is designed to recover thorium and uranium from first-generation (denatured /sup 235/U) startup fuels, first-recycle and equilibrium (denatured /sup 233/U) thorium--uranium LWR fuels, and to recover the plutonium generated in the /sup 238/U denaturant as well. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Neutron noise measurements on Bugey 2 PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, J.; Romy, D.; Spadi, J.C.; Assedo, R.; Castello, G.

    1982-01-01

    Following Bugey 2 PWR hot functional tests, dimension measurements of internals hold down spring led to suspect that vibration levels could change with time. Neutron noise measurements runs during the first cycle enabled describing vibration behaviour of internals. Comparisons with previous analytical and experimental results gained on the Safran model as well as on similar reactors were also made.

  17. Towards implementation of spent nuclear fuel management in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eero, Patrakka

    2007-07-01

    The final disposal of spent fuel from the Finnish nuclear power plants will be implemented by Posiva Oy, a company owned jointly by the two nuclear power producers Fortum Oyj and Teollisuuden Voima Oy. Preparations for nuclear waste management were started already in the 1970s. Potential sites for the disposal of spent fuel were screened in the 1980s, followed by detailed site investigations in the 1990s. In May 2001, the Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision-in-Principle that was a prerequisite for the selection of Olkiluoto as the site of the final disposal facility. The disposal project has progressed to the next stage -- constructing an underground characterization facility, known as ONKALO, at Olkiluoto, which has also been designed to serve as an access route to the repository when constructed. Work on the entire final disposal project is progressing so that disposal can commence in 2020. ONKALO will be used to obtain further information for the repository design, and it will also enable final disposal technology to be tested under actual conditions. Once ONKALO has been completed, work will start on building the encapsulation plant and final disposal repository in the 2010s. (auth)

  18. International trade and waste and fuel management issue, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2009-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Innovative financing and workforce planning, by Donna Jacobs, Entergy Nuclear; Nuclear power - a long-term need, by John C. Devine, Gerald Goldsmith and Michael DeLallo, WorleyParsons; Importance of loan guarantee program, by Donald Hintz; EPC contracts for new plants, by Dave Barry, Shaw Power Group; GNEP and fuel recycling, by Alan Hanson, AREVA NC Inc.; Safe and reliable reactor, by Kiyoshi Yamauchi, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.; Safe, small and simple reactors, by Yoshi Sakashita, Toshiba Corporation; Nuclear power in Thailand, by Tatchai Sumitra, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology; and, Nuclear power in Vietnam, by Tran Huu Phat, Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission. The Industry Innovation article this issue is Rectifying axial-offset-anomaly problems, by Don Adams, Tennessee Valley Authority. The Plant Profile article is Star of Stars Excellence, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.

  19. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  20. New results from the NSRR experiments with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Mori, Yukihide [Japan Atomic Research Institute, Toaki, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Results obtained in the NSRR power burst experiments with irradiated PWR fuel rods with fuel burnup up to 50 MWd/kgU are described and discussed in this paper. Data concerning test method, test fuel rod, pulse irradiation, transient records during the pulse and post irradiation examination are described, and interpretations and discussions on fission gas release and fuel pellet fragmentation are presented. During the pulse-irradiation experiment with 50 MWd/kgU PWR fuel rod, the fuel rod failed at considerably low energy deposition level, and large amount of fission gas release and fragmentation of fuel pellets were observed.

  1. Spent fuel characteristics & disposal considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oversby, V.M.

    1996-06-01

    The fuel used in commercial nuclear power reactors is uranium, generally in the form of an oxide. The gas-cooled reactors developed in England use metallic uranium enclosed in a thin layer of Magnox. Since this fuel must be processed into a more stable form before disposal, we will not consider the characteristics of the Magnox spent fuel. The vast majority of the remaining power reactors in the world use uranium dioxide pellets in Zircaloy cladding as the fuel material. Reactors that are fueled with uranium dioxide generally use water as the moderator. If ordinary water is used, the reactors are called Light Water Reactors (LWR), while if water enriched in the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is used, the reactors are called Heavy Water reactors. The LWRs can be either pressurized reactors (PWR) or boiling water reactors (BWR). Both of these reactor types use uranium that has been enriched in the 235 isotope to about 3.5 to 4% total abundance. There may be minor differences in the details of the spent fuel characteristics for PWRs and BWRs, but for simplicity we will not consider these second-order effects. The Canadian designed reactor (CANDU) that is moderated by heavy water uses natural uranium without enrichment of the 235 isotope as the fuel. These reactors run at higher linear power density than LWRs and produce spent fuel with lower total burn-up than LWRs. Where these difference are important with respect to spent fuel management, we will discuss them. Otherwise, we will concentrate on spent fuel from LWRs.

  2. PWR ENDF/B-VII cross-section libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M Univ., 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States); Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    New pressurized water reactor (PWR) cross-section libraries were generated for use with the ORIGEN-ARP depletion sequence in the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. These libraries are based on ENDF/B-VII nuclear data and were generated using the two-dimensional depletion sequence, TRITON/NEWT, in SCALE 6.1. The libraries contain multiple burnup-dependent cross-sections for seven PWR fuel designs, with enrichments ranging from 1.5 to 6 wt% {sup 235}U. The burnup range has been extended from the 72 GWd/MTU used in previous versions of the libraries to 90 GWd/MTU. Validation of the libraries using radiochemical assay measurements and decay heat measurements for PWR spent fuel showed good agreement between calculated and experimental data. Verification against detailed TRITON simulations for the considered assembly designs showed that depletion calculations performed in ORIGEN-ARP with the pre-generated libraries provide similar results as obtained with direct TRITON depletion, while greatly reducing the computation time. (authors)

  3. A highly heterogeneous 3D PWR core benchmark: deterministic and Monte Carlo method comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaboulay, J.-C.; Damian, F.; Douce, S.; Lopez, F.; Guenaut, C.; Aggery, A.; Poinot-Salanon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Physical analyses of the LWR potential performances with regards to the fuel utilization require an important part of the work dedicated to the validation of the deterministic models used for theses analyses. Advances in both codes and computer technology give the opportunity to perform the validation of these models on complex 3D core configurations closed to the physical situations encountered (both steady-state and transient configurations). In this paper, we used the Monte Carlo Transport code TRIPOLI-4®; to describe a whole 3D large-scale and highly-heterogeneous LWR core. The aim of this study is to validate the deterministic CRONOS2 code to Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®; in a relevant PWR core configuration. As a consequence, a 3D pin by pin model with a consistent number of volumes (4.3 millions) and media (around 23,000) is established to precisely characterize the core at equilibrium cycle, namely using a refined burn-up and moderator density maps. The configuration selected for this analysis is a very heterogeneous PWR high conversion core with fissile (MOX fuel) and fertile zones (depleted uranium). Furthermore, a tight pitch lattice is selcted (to increase conversion of 238U in 239Pu) that leads to harder neutron spectrum compared to standard PWR assembly. In these conditions two main subjects will be discussed: the Monte Carlo variance calculation and the assessment of the diffusion operator with two energy groups for the core calculation.

  4. Masters Study in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Kanchan [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2014-12-08

    There are currently three key drivers for the US energy sector a) increasing energy demand and b) environmental stewardship in energy production for sustainability and c) general public and governmental desire for domestic resources. These drivers are also true for energy nation globally. As a result, this sector is rapidly diversifying to alternate sources that would supplement or replace fossil fuels. These changes have created a need for a highly trained workforce with a the understanding of both conventional and emerging energy resources and technology to lead and facilitate the reinvention of the US energy production, rational deployment of alternate energy technologies based on scientific and business criteria while invigorating the overall economy. In addition, the current trends focus on the the need of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) graduate education to move beyond academia and be more responsive to the workforce needs of businesses and the industry. The SIUC PSM in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management (AEFM) program was developed in response to the industries stated need for employees who combine technical competencies and workforce skills similar to all PSM degree programs. The SIUC AEFM program was designed to provide the STEM graduates with advanced technical training in energy resources and technology while simultaneously equipping them with the business management skills required by professional employers in the energy sector. Technical training include core skills in energy resources, technology and management for both conventional and emerging energy technologies. Business skills training include financial, personnel and project management. A capstone internship is also built into the program to train students such that they are acclimatized to the real world scenarios in research laboratories, in energy companies and in government agencies. The current curriculum in the SIUC AEFM will help fill the need for training both recent

  5. Risk and Cooperation: Managing Hazardous Fuel in Mixed Ownership Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, A. Paige; Charnley, Susan

    2012-06-01

    Managing natural processes at the landscape scale to promote forest health is important, especially in the case of wildfire, where the ability of a landowner to protect his or her individual parcel is constrained by conditions on neighboring ownerships. However, management at a landscape scale is also challenging because it requires cooperation on plans and actions that cross ownership boundaries. Cooperation depends on people's beliefs and norms about reciprocity and perceptions of the risks and benefits of interacting with others. Using logistic regression tests on mail survey data and qualitative analysis of interviews with landowners, we examined the relationship between perceived wildfire risk and cooperation in the management of hazardous fuel by nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) owners in fire-prone landscapes of eastern Oregon. We found that NIPF owners who perceived a risk of wildfire to their properties, and perceived that conditions on nearby public forestlands contributed to this risk, were more likely to have cooperated with public agencies in the past to reduce fire risk than owners who did not perceive a risk of wildfire to their properties. Wildfire risk perception was not associated with past cooperation among NIPF owners. The greater social barriers to private-private cooperation than to private-public cooperation, and perceptions of more hazardous conditions on public compared with private forestlands may explain this difference. Owners expressed a strong willingness to cooperate with others in future cross-boundary efforts to reduce fire risk, however. We explore barriers to cooperative forest management across ownerships, and identify models of cooperation that hold potential for future collective action to reduce wildfire risk.

  6. An Integrated Model for Identifying Linkages Between the Management of Fuel Treatments, Fire and Ecosystem Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, R. R.; Anderson, S.; Moritz, M.; Plantinga, A.; Tague, C.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation fuel treatments (e.g. thinning, prescribed burning) are a frequent tool for managing fire-prone landscapes. However, predicting how fuel treatments may affect future wildfire risk and associated ecosystem services, such as forest water availability and streamflow, remains a challenge. This challenge is in part due to the large range of conditions under which fuel treatments may be implemented, as response is likely to vary with species type, rates of vegetation regrowth, meteorological conditions and physiographic properties of the treated site. It is also due to insufficient understanding of how social factors such as political pressure, public demands and economic constraints affect fuel management decisions. To examine the feedbacks between ecological and social dimensions of fuel treatments, we present an integrated model that links a biophysical model that simulates vegetation and hydrology (RHESSys), a fire spread model (WMFire) and an empirical fuel treatment model that accounts for agency decision-making. We use this model to investigate how management decisions affect landscape fuel loads, which in turn affect fire severity and ecosystem services, which feedback to management decisions on fuel treatments. We hypothesize that this latter effect will be driven by salience theory, which predicts that fuel treatments are more likely to occur following major wildfire events. The integrated model provides a flexible framework for answering novel questions about fuel treatments that span social and ecological domains, areas that have previously been treated separately.

  7. SPENT FUEL MANAGEMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P; Robert Sindelar, R; Richard Deible, R

    2007-11-03

    Spent nuclear fuels are received from reactor sites around the world and are being stored in the L-Basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The predominant fuel types are research reactor fuel with aluminum-alloy cladding and aluminum-based fuel. Other fuel materials include stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding with uranium oxide fuel. Chemistry control and corrosion surveillance programs have been established and upgraded since the early 1990's to minimize corrosion degradation of the aluminum cladding materials, so as to maintain fuel integrity and minimize personnel exposure from radioactivity in the basin water. Recent activities have been initiated to support additional decades of wet storage which include fuel inspection and corrosion testing to evaluate the effects of specific water impurity species on corrosion attack.

  8. Environmental Justice, Place and Nuclear Fuel Waste Management in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Richard G. [Univ. of Guelph (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Murphy, Brenda L. [Wilfrid Launer Univ., Brantford (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the basis of a Nuclear Fuel Waste management strategy for Canada, taking into account the unique legal tenets (Aboriginal rights; federal - provincial jurisdiction) and the orientation that the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has taken to date. The focus of the paper are grounded in notions of environmental justice. Bullard's definition provides a useful guideline: 'the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, colour, national origin or income with respect to the development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies'. The overriding concern is to work towards a process that is inclusive and just. Prior to developing a specific strategy to site a NFW disposal facility, we maintain that the NWMO needs to first address three fundamental issues: Expand its mandate to include the future of nuclear energy in Canada; Provide an inclusive role for First Nations (Aboriginal people) in all stages of the process; Adhere to the requirement of specifying an economic region and deal more overtly with the transportation of NF.

  9. Performance evaluation of PSO and GA in PWR core loading pattern optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoshahval, F., E-mail: f_khoshahval@sbu.ac.i [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Velenjak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Minuchehr, H. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Velenjak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A., E-mail: a-zolfaghari@sbu.ac.i [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Velenjak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: The performance of both GA and PSO methods in optimizing of a PWR core are adequate. It seems GA arrives to its final parameter value in a fewer generation than the PSO. The computation time for GA is higher than PSO. The GA-2 and PSO-CFA algorithms perform better in comparison to GA-1 and PSO-IWA. - Abstract: The efficient operation and fuel management of PWRs are of utmost importance. Recently, genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) techniques have attracted considerable attention among various modern heuristic optimization techniques. GA is a powerful optimization technique, based upon the principles of natural selection and species evolution. GA is finding popularity as design tools because of its versatility, intuitiveness and ability to solve highly non-linear, mixed integer optimization problems. PSO refers to a relatively new family of algorithms and is mainly inspired by social behavior patterns of organisms that live within large group. This study addresses the application and performance comparison of PSO and GA optimization methods for nuclear fuel loading pattern problem. Flattening of power inside the reactor core of Bushehr nuclear power plant (WWER-1000 type) is chosen as an objective function to prove the validity of algorithms. In addition the performance of both optimization techniques in terms of convergence rate and computational time is compared. It is found that, from an evolutionary point of view, the performance of both GA and PSO is quite adequate. But, GA seems to arrive at its final parameter value in a fewer generations than the PSO. It is also noticed that, the computation time for implemented GA in this work is too high in comparison to PSO.

  10. NODAL3 Sensitivity Analysis for NEACRP 3D LWR Core Transient Benchmark (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surian Pinem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of sensitivity analysis of the multidimension, multigroup neutron diffusion NODAL3 code for the NEACRP 3D LWR core transient benchmarks (PWR. The code input parameters covered in the sensitivity analysis are the radial and axial node sizes (the number of radial node per fuel assembly and the number of axial layers, heat conduction node size in the fuel pellet and cladding, and the maximum time step. The output parameters considered in this analysis followed the above-mentioned core transient benchmarks, that is, power peak, time of power peak, power, averaged Doppler temperature, maximum fuel centerline temperature, and coolant outlet temperature at the end of simulation (5 s. The sensitivity analysis results showed that the radial node size and maximum time step give a significant effect on the transient parameters, especially the time of power peak, for the HZP and HFP conditions. The number of ring divisions for fuel pellet and cladding gives negligible effect on the transient solutions. For productive work of the PWR transient analysis, based on the present sensitivity analysis results, we recommend NODAL3 users to use 2×2 radial nodes per assembly, 1×18 axial layers per assembly, the maximum time step of 10 ms, and 9 and 1 ring divisions for fuel pellet and cladding, respectively.

  11. Integrated hedging and network planning for container shipping's bunker fuel management

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyu Wang; Chee-Chong Teo

    2013-01-01

    Bunker fuel costs could account for 50–60 per cent of a ship's total operating cost in times of high fuel prices. The volatility of the bunker market over recent years has contributed to significant instability of cash flows for shipping lines. In this study, we consider two of the bunker fuel risk management measures employed by container shipping companies to reduce bunker fuel price risk – re-planning of network configuration and financial hedging of bunker fuel prices. The current industr...

  12. Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

    2007-09-07

    Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential

  13. Integrated data management system for radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Ho [Korea Power Engineering Co., Inc., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    An integrated data management system for the safe management of radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea is developed to collect basic information, provide the framework for national regulation, and improve national competition and efficiency in the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. This system can also provide public access to information such as a statistical graphs and integrated data from various waste generators to meet increased public needs and interests. So through the system, the five principles (independence, openness, clearance, efficiency and reliance) of safety regulation can be realized, and public understanding and reliance on the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management can be promoted by providing reliable information, it can ensure an openness within the international nuclear community and efficiently support international agreements among contracting parties by operating safe and efficient management of spent fuel and radioactive waste (IAEA joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management), the system can compensate for the imperfections in safe regulation of radioactive waste and spent fuel management related to waste generation, storage and disposal, and make it possible to holistic control and finally re-organize the basic framework of KINS's intermediate and long term research organization and trends, regarding waste management policy is to integrate safe management and unit safe disposal. For this objectives, benchmark study was performed on similar data base system worldwide and data specification with major input/output data during the first phase of this project.

  14. Integrating Fire Behavior Models and Geospatial Analysis for Wildland Fire Risk Assessment and Fuel Management Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan A. Ager

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning on federal lands in the US are complex problems that require state-of-the-art fire behavior modeling and intensive geospatial analyses. Fuel management is a particularly complicated process where the benefits and potential impacts of fuel treatments must be demonstrated in the context of land management goals and public expectations. A number of fire behavior metrics, including fire spread, intensity, likelihood, and ecological risk must be analyzed for multiple treatment alternatives. The effect of treatments on wildfire impacts must be considered at multiple scales. The process is complicated by the lack of data integration among fire behavior models, and weak linkages to geographic information systems, corporate data, and desktop office software. This paper describes our efforts to build a streamlined fuel management planning and risk assessment framework, and an integrated system of tools for designing and testing fuel treatment programs on fire-prone wildlands.

  15. Licos, a fuel performance code for innovative fuel elements or experimental devices design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.helfer@cea.fr; Bejaoui, Syriac, E-mail: syriac.bejaoui@cea.fr; Michel, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.michel@cea.fr

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The Licos fuel performance code is introduced. • Advanced features, such as dependency algorithm and kriging are described. • First results on three dimensional modelling of the SFR fuel pin are given. • Application to the DIAMINO design computations is discussed. - Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the Licos fuel performance code which has been developed for several years within the platform pleiades, co-developed by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and its industrial partners Électricité de France (EDF) and AREVA. CEA engineers have been using Licos to back multidimensional thermo-mechanical studies on innovative fuel elements design and experimental device pre-and post-irradiation computations. Studies made with Licos thus encompass a wide range of situations, including most nuclear systems used or studied in France in recent years (PWR, SFR or GFR), normal and off-normal operating conditions, and a large selection of materials (either for fuel, absorber, coolant and cladding). The aim of this paper is to give some insights about some innovative features in the design of Licos (dependency management, kriging, mfront, etc.). We also present two studies that demonstrate the flexibility of this code. The first one shows how Licos can be combined with the Germinal monodimensional fuel performance code to demonstrate the interest of a three dimensional modelling of the fuel relocation phenomenon in the Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin. The second one describes how Licos was used to model the DIAMINO experiment.

  16. Shielding design for PWR in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, G.; Charransol; Le Dieu de Ville, A.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1983-05-01

    Shielding calculation scheme used in France for PWR is presented here for 900 MWe and 1300 MWe plants built by EDF the French utility giving electricity. Neutron dose rate at areas accessible by personnel during the reactor operation is calculated and compared with the measurements which were carried out in 900 MWe units up to now. Measurements on the first French 1300 MWe reactor are foreseen at the end of 1983.

  17. Design of the Ancillary Equipment for Spent Fuel Transport of PWR Nuclear Power Plant%压水堆核电站乏燃料运输辅助设备设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瓮松峰

    2012-01-01

    In order to load and unload spent fuel assemblies safely in NPP, the ancillary equipment for spent fuel transport used to perform fluid transfer activities such as water feeding, air charging, and cask drying and heat rejection. This paper introduces the requirements, the scheme and the principle of the ancillary equipment, which adopts centralized-control and modular design, and have the performances such as higher work efficiency, higher safety, less radioactive substance accumulation and friendly man-machine conversation.%乏燃料运输辅助设备是用于对乏燃料运输容器进行充水排气、充气排水、充气风干的设备,并可对已装载乏燃料组件的容器进行充水冷却,实现乏燃料组件的安全装卸.本文介绍乏燃料运输辅助设备的功能要求、设计方案和工作原理.设备采用模块化设计和集中控制,具有工作效率高、结构简单、安全性高、不易积聚放射性物质和人-机交互友好的特点.

  18. Energy management strategy based on fuzzy logic for a fuel cell hybrid bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dawei; Jin, Zhenhua; Lu, Qingchun

    Fuel cell vehicles, as a substitute for internal-combustion-engine vehicles, have become a research hotspot for most automobile manufacturers all over the world. Fuel cell systems have disadvantages, such as high cost, slow response and no regenerative energy recovery during braking; hybridization can be a solution to these drawbacks. This paper presents a fuel cell hybrid bus which is equipped with a fuel cell system and two energy storage devices, i.e., a battery and an ultracapacitor. An energy management strategy based on fuzzy logic, which is employed to control the power flow of the vehicular power train, is described. This strategy is capable of determining the desired output power of the fuel cell system, battery and ultracapacitor according to the propulsion power and recuperated braking power. Some tests to verify the strategy were developed, and the results of the tests show the effectiveness of the proposed energy management strategy and the good performance of the fuel cell hybrid bus.

  19. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lata

    1996-09-26

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  20. Summary of non-US national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Kelman, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Brief program overviews of fuel cycle, spent fuel, and waste management activities in the following countries are provided: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, German Federal Republic, India, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Pakistan, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, USSR, and the United Kingdom. International nonproliferation activities, multilateral agreements and projects, and the international agencies specifically involved in the nuclear fuel cycle are also described.

  1. Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle with Hybrid Power Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Figure 1 depicts a hybrid electric utility vehicle that is powered by hydrogenburning proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells operating in conjunction with a metal hydride hydrogen-storage unit. Unlike conventional hybrid electric vehicles, this vehicle utilizes ultracapacitors, rather than batteries, for storing electric energy. This vehicle is a product of continuing efforts to develop the technological discipline known as hybrid power management (HPM), which is oriented toward integration of diverse electric energy-generating, energy-storing, and energy- consuming devices in optimal configurations. Instances of HPM were reported in five prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, though not explicitly labeled as HPM in the first three articles: "Ultracapacitors Store Energy in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle" (LEW-16876), Vol. 24, No. 4 (April 2000), page 63; "Photovoltaic Power Station With Ultracapacitors for Storage" (LEW- 17177), Vol. 27, No. 8 (August 2003), page 38; "Flasher Powered by Photovoltaic Cells and Ultracapacitors" (LEW-17246), Vol. 27, No. 10 (October 2003), page 37; "Hybrid Power Management" (LEW-17520), Vol. 29, No. 12 (December 2005), page 35; and "Ultracapacitor-Powered Cordless Drill" (LEW-18116-1), Vol. 31, No. 8 (August 2007), page 34. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: The use of ultracapacitors as energy- storage devices lies at the heart of HPM. An ultracapacitor is an electrochemical energy-storage device, but unlike in a conventional rechargeable electrochemical cell or battery, chemical reactions do not take place during operation. Instead, energy is stored electrostatically at an electrode/electrolyte interface. The capacitance per unit volume of an ultracapacitor is much greater than that of a conventional capacitor because its electrodes have much greater surface area per unit volume and the separation between the electrodes is much smaller.

  2. Revised uranium--plutonium cycle PWR and BWR models for the ORIGEN computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A. G.; Bjerke, M. A.; Morrison, G. W.; Petrie, L. M.

    1978-09-01

    Reactor physics calculations and literature searches have been conducted, leading to the creation of revised enriched-uranium and enriched-uranium/mixed-oxide-fueled PWR and BWR reactor models for the ORIGEN computer code. These ORIGEN reactor models are based on cross sections that have been taken directly from the reactor physics codes and eliminate the need to make adjustments in uncorrected cross sections in order to obtain correct depletion results. Revised values of the ORIGEN flux parameters THERM, RES, and FAST were calculated along with new parameters related to the activation of fuel-assembly structural materials not located in the active fuel zone. Recommended fuel and structural material masses and compositions are presented. A summary of the new ORIGEN reactor models is given.

  3. Activity transport models for PWR primary circuits; PWR-ydinvoimalaitoksen primaeaeripiirin aktiivisuuskulkeutumismallit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, V.; Rosenberg, R. [VTT Chemical Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1995-03-01

    The corrosion products activated in the primary circuit form a major source of occupational radiation dose in the PWR reactors. Transport of corrosion activity is a complex process including chemistry, reactor physics, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. All the mechanisms involved are not known and there is no comprehensive theory for the process, so experimental test loops and plant data are very important in research efforts. Several activity transport modelling attempts have been made to improve the water chemistry control and to minimise corrosion in PWR`s. In this research report some of these models are reviewed with special emphasis on models designed for Soviet VVER type reactors. (51 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.).

  4. CFD Simulation of a fall accident of a fuel element in pool This project aims at calculating the speed ratio of impact-fall height for a PWR fuel element falling freely in the fuel pool; Simulacion CFD de un accidente de caida de un elemento combustible en piscina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro Garcia, B.; Corpa Masa, R.; Jimenez-Reja, C.

    2014-07-01

    It is intended to provide a methodology of analysis more realistic this accident.que referred to in calculations of the license that requires fuel catastrophic break regardless of the height of the fall, with the consequent release of inventory analysers. Accidents that occurred in the past indicate that this hypothesis could be too conservative. (Author)

  5. Introduction-2nd Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: The fire environment-innovations, management, and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Cook; Bret W. Butler

    2007-01-01

    The 2nd Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: Fire Environment -- Innovations, Management and Policy was held in Destin, FL, March 26-30, 2007. Following on the success of the 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference, this conference was initiated in response to the needs of the National Wildfire Coordinating Group -- Fire Environment Working Team.

  6. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  7. Advanced methods for the study of PWR cores; Les methodes d'etudes avancees pour les coeurs de REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M.; Salvatores, St.; Ferrier, A. [Electricite de France (EDF), Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires, 92 - Courbevoie (France); Pelet, J.; Nicaise, N.; Pouliquen, J.Y.; Foret, F. [FRAMATOME ANP, 92 - Paris La Defence (France); Chauliac, C. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Johner, J. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Cohen, Ch

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers the transparencies presented at the 6. technical session of the French nuclear energy society (SFEN) in October 2003. The transparencies of the annual meeting are presented in the introductive part: 1 - status of the French nuclear park: nuclear energy results, management of an exceptional climatic situation: the heat wave of summer 2003 and the power generation (J.C. Barral); 2 - status of the research on controlled thermonuclear fusion (J. Johner). Then follows the technical session about the advanced methods for the study of PWR reactor cores: 1 - the evolution approach of study methodologies (M. Lambert, J. Pelet); 2 - the point of view of the nuclear safety authority (D. Brenot); 3 - the improved decoupled methodology for the steam pipe rupture (S. Salvatores, J.Y. Pouliquen); 4 - the MIR method for the pellet-clad interaction (renovated IPG methodology) (E. Baud, C. Royere); 5 - the improved fuel management (IFM) studies for Koeberg (C. Cohen); 6 - principle of the methods of accident study implemented for the European pressurized reactor (EPR) (F. Foret, A. Ferrier); 7 - accident studies with the EPR, steam pipe rupture (N. Nicaise, S. Salvatores); 8 - the co-development platform, a new generation of software tools for the new methodologies (C. Chauliac). (J.S.)

  8. CONTROLLING AS A MECHANISM TO INCREASE THE EFFICIENCY OF MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISES OF FUEL-ENERGY COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ostashkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibility of application of controlling as mechanism of increasing the efficiency of management of enterprises of fuel- energy complex. The research was conducted on the materials of the JSC «Gazprom».

  9. Thermal management for a Mach 5 cruise aircraft using endothermic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petley, Dennis H.; Jones, Stuart C.

    1990-01-01

    The present thermal management system for a carrier-based Mach 5 cruise-capable aircraft whose propulsion system does not entail cryogenic fuels is predicated on the use of the catalytic endothermic reaction of a petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuel as the heat sink for engine cooling. The insulation of engine flowpath surfaces reduces cooling requirements. The primary elements of this closed-cycle cooling system are a fuel preheater, a catalytic fuel reactor, and engine wall-cooling panels; a silicone-based liquid polymer is used as the coolant. Structural, weight, and thermal analysis results are presented for each of the primary components.

  10. Power Management Optimization of an Experimental Fuel Cell/Battery/Supercapacitor Hybrid System

    OpenAIRE

    Farouk Odeim; Jürgen Roes; Angelika Heinzel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental fuel cell/battery/supercapacitor hybrid system is investigated in terms of modeling and power management design and optimization. The power management strategy is designed based on the role that should be played by each component of the hybrid power source. The supercapacitor is responsible for the peak power demands. The battery assists the supercapacitor in fulfilling the transient power demand by controlling its state-of-energy, whereas the fuel cell system, ...

  11. Research on Measuring Technology for In-pile Fuel Element Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The tested fuel assembly for In-pile test for PWR fuel element with instrumentation consisted of 4instrumented fuel elements and total 12 sets of transducers. Double claddings are adopted to raise fueltemperature. Two fuel elements each have 2 thermocouples for measuring separately the fuel centerlinetemperature and the cladding surface temperature. The other two elements have membrane type oressure

  12. Fuel Management Strategies for a Possible Future LEU Core of a TRIGA Mark II Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R.; Villa, M.; Steinhauser, G.; Boeck, H. [Vienna University of Technology-Atominstitut (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    The Vienna University of Technology/Atominstitut (VUT/ATI) operates a TRIGA Mark II research reactor. It is operated with a completely mixed core of three different types of fuel. Due to the US fuel return program, the ATI have to return its High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel latest by 2019. As an alternate, the Low Enrich Uranium (LEU) fuel is under consideration. The detailed results of the core conversion study are presented at the RRFM 2011 conference. This paper describes the burn up calculations of the new fuel to predict the future burn up behavior and core life time. It also develops an effective and optimized fuel management strategy for a possible future operation of the TRIGA Mark II with a LEU core. This work is performed by the combination of MCNP5 and diffusion based neutronics code TRIGLAV. (author)

  13. Fuzzy energy management for hybrid fuel cell/battery systems for more electric aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcau, Jenica-Ileana; Dinca, Liviu; Grigorie, Teodor Lucian; Tudosie, Alexandru-Nicolae

    2017-06-01

    In this paper is presented the simulation and analysis of a Fuzzy Energy Management for Hybrid Fuel cell/Battery Systems used for More Electric Aircraft. The fuel cell hybrid system contains of fuel cell, lithium-ion batteries along with associated dc to dc boost converters. In this configuration the battery has a dc to dc converter, because it is an active in the system. The energy management scheme includes the rule based fuzzy logic strategy. This scheme has a faster response to load change and is more robust to measurement imprecisions. Simulation will be provided using Matlab/Simulink based models. Simulation results are given to show the overall system performance.

  14. Intelligent Power Management of hybrid Wind/ Fuel Cell/ Energy Storage Power Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hajizadeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an intelligent power management strategy for hybrid wind/ fuel cell/ energy storage power generation system. The dynamic models of wind turbine, fuel cell and energy storage have been used for simulation of hybrid power system. In order to design power flow control strategy, a fuzzy logic control has been implemented to manage the power between power sources. The optimal operation of the hybrid power system is a main goal of designing power management strategy. The hybrid power system is simulated in MATLAB/ SIMIULINK environment and different operating conditions have been considered to evaluate the response of power management strategy.

  15. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING ROK SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL MANAGEMENT OPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHAIM BRAUN

    2013-08-01

    Pyroprocessing is but an enabling technology on the path leading to fissile material recycling and burning in future SFRs. In this regard we discuss two SFR options under development in the U.S.: the Super Prism and the Travelling Wave Reactor (TWR. We note that the U.S. is further along in reactor development than the ROK. The ROK though has acquired more experience, recently in investigating fuel recycling options for SFRs. We thus call for two complementary joint R&D project to be conducted by U.S. and ROK scientists. One leading to the development of a demonstration centralized away-from-reactors spent fuel storage facility. The other involve further R&D on a combined SFR-fuel cycle complex based on the reactor and fuel cycle options discussed in the paper.

  16. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  17. Cavern/Vault Disposal Concepts and Thermal Calculations for Direct Disposal of 37-PWR Size DPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clayton, Daniel James [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report provides two sets of calculations not presented in previous reports on the technical feasibility of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal directly in dual-purpose canisters (DPCs): 1) thermal calculations for reference disposal concepts using larger 37-PWR size DPC-based waste packages, and 2) analysis and thermal calculations for underground vault-type storage and eventual disposal of DPCs. The reader is referred to the earlier reports (Hardin et al. 2011, 2012, 2013; Hardin and Voegele 2013) for contextual information on DPC direct disposal alternatives.

  18. Direct reuse of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Nader M.A., E-mail: mnader73@yahoo.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new design for the PWR assemblies for direct use of spent fuel was proposed. • The PWR spent fuel will be transferred directly (after a certain cooling time) to CANDU reactors. • The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of CANDU fuel bundles (7 or 8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. • MCNPX is used for the calculations that showed that the burnup can be increased by about 25%. • Acceptable linear heat generation rate in hot rods and improved Pu proliferation resistance. - Abstract: In this paper we proposed a new design for the PWR fuel assembly for direct use of the PWR spent fuel without processing. The PWR spent fuel will be transferred directly (after a certain cooling time) to CANDU reactors which preferably built in the same site to avoid the problem of transportations. The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of CANDU fuel bundles (7 or 8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. Each tube has the same inner diameter of that of CANDU pressure tube. The spaces between the tubes contain low enriched UO{sub 2} fuel rods and guide tubes. MCNPX code is used for the simulation and calculation of the burnup of the proposed assembly. The bundles after the discharge from the PWR with their materials inventories are burned in a CANDU cell after a certain decay time. The results were compared with reference results and the impact of this new design on the uranium utilization improvement and on the proliferation resistance of plutonium is discussed. The effect of this new design on the power peaking, moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity and CANDU coolant void reactivity are discussed as well.

  19. Geographic variation in social acceptability of wildland fuels management in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunson, M.; Schindler, Bruce A.

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary natural resource management requires consideration of the social acceptability of management practices and conditions. Agencies wishing to measure, respond to, and influence social acceptability must understand the nuances of public perception regarding controversial issues. This study explores social acceptability judgments about one such issue: reduction of wildland fuel hazards on federal lands in the western United States. Citizens were surveyed in four locations where fire has been a significant ecological disturbance agent and public land agencies propose to reduce wildland fuel levels and wildfire hazards via prescribed burning, thinning, brush removal, and/or livestock grazing. Respondents in different locations differed in their knowledge about fire and fuel issues as well in their acceptability judgments. Differences are associated with location-specific social and environmental factors as well as individual beliefs. Results argue against using a??one-size-fits-alla?? policies or information strategies about fuels management.

  20. Integrated data management system for radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Taek [Korea Power Engineering Co., Inc., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-15

    An integrated data management system for the safe management of radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea is developed to collect basic information, provide the framework for national regulation and improve national competition and efficiency in the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. This system can also provide public access to information such as a statistical graphs and integrated data from various waste generators to meet increased public needs and interests. Through the system, the five principles(independence, openness, clearance, efficiency and reliance) of safety regulation can be realized and public understanding and reliance on the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management can be promoted. By providing reliable information and openness within the international nuclear community can be ensured and efficient support of international agreements among contracting parties can be ensured. By operating safe and efficient management of spent fuel and radioactive waste (IAEA joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management), the system can compensate for the imperfections in safe regulation of radioactive waste and spent fuel management related to waste generation, storage and disposal, and make it possible for holistic control and reorganization of the basic framework of KINS's intermediate and long term research organization and trends, regarding waste management policy so as to integrate safe management and unit safe disposal. To meet this objectives, design of the database system structure and the study of input/output data validation and verification methodology was performed during the second phase of this project.

  1. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Rho, G. H.; Park, J. W. [and others

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The phase 1 study of this project includes the feasibility analysis on applicability of the current core design method, the feasibility analysis on operation of the DUPIC fuel core, the compatibility analysis on individual reactor system, the sensitivity analysis on the fuel composition, and the economic analysis on DUPIC fuel cycle. The results of the validation calculations have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of core simulations have shown that both natural uranium and DUPIC fuel cores are almost the same from the viewpoint of the operational performance. For individual reactor system including reactively devices, the functional requirements of each system are satisfied in general. However, because of the pronounced power flattening in the DUPIC core, the radiation damage on the critical components increases, which should be investigated more in the future. The DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity dose not to impose any serious effect on the reactor operation if the fuel composition is adjusted. The economics analysis has been performed through conceptual design studies on the DUPIC fuel fabrication, fuel handling in a plant, and spent fuel disposal, which has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable to the once-trough fuel cycle considering uncertainties associated with unit costs of the fuel cycle components. The results of Phase 1 study have shown that it is feasible to use the DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors without major changes in hardware. However further studies are required to confirm the safety of the reactor under accident condition.

  2. AECL/U.S. INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Carmack; Randy Fielding; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer

    2005-08-01

    This report documents the first milestone of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) U.S./Euratom Joint Proposal 1.8 entitled “Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Light-Water Reactors.” The milestone represents the assessment and preliminary study of a variety of fuels that hold promise as transmutation and minor actinide burning fuel compositions for light-water reactors. The most promising fuels of interest to the participants on this INERI program have been selected for further study. These fuel compositions are discussed in this report.

  3. Fuel management of the HTR-10 including the equilibrium state and the running-in phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yongwei E-mail: maoc@te.tsinghua.edu.cn; Luo Zhengpei; Jing Xingqing; Wu Zongxin

    2002-10-01

    The mode of fuel management of the HTR-10 was studied, including the simulation of the fuel shuffling process and the measurement of the burnup of a fuel element. The prior consideration was the design of the equilibrium state. Based on this the fuel loading of the initial core and the fuel shuffling mode from the initial core through the running-in phase into the equilibrium state were studied. The code system VSOP was used for the physical layout of the HTR-10 at the equilibrium state and in the running-in phase. For the equilibrium state, in order to lessen the difference between the peak and the average burnup, 5-fuel-passage-through-the-core was chosen for the fuel management. The average burnup of the spent fuel for the equilibrium core is 80000 MWd t{sup -1}, and the peak value of it is less than 100000 MWd t{sup -1} when the burnup of the recycled fuel element is under 72000 MWd t{sup -1}. The mixture of fuel element and graphite element was used for the initial core loading, the volume fractions of the fuel and the graphite elements were 0.57 and 0.43, respectively. During the running-in phase, the volume fraction of graphite will decrease with the fresh fuel elements being loaded from the top of the core and the graphite elements discharged from the bottom of the core. The fuel shuffling mode is similar to that of the equilibrium state. The burnup limit of recycled fuel element is also 72000 MWd t{sup -1} and the peak burnup is less than 100000 MWd t{sup -1}. Finally the core will be full of fuel elements with a certain profile of burnup and reaches the equilibrium state. According to the characteristics of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor, a calibrating method of concentration of {sup 137}Cs was proposed for the measurement of fuel burnup.

  4. Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells using integrated electroosmotic pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buie, Cullen R.; Posner, Jonathan D.; Fabian, Tibor; Cha, Suk-Won; Kim, Daejoong; Prinz, Fritz B.; Eaton, John K.; Santiago, Juan G.

    Recent experimental and numerical investigations on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) emphasize water management as a critical factor in the design of robust, high efficiency systems. Although various water management strategies have been proposed, water is still typically removed by pumping air into cathode channels at flow rates significantly higher than required by fuel cell stoichiometry. Such methods are thermodynamically unfavorable and constrain cathode flow channel design. We have developed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with integrated planar electroosmotic (EO) pumping structures that actively remove liquid water from cathode flow channels. EO pumps can relieve cathode design barriers and facilitate efficient water management in fuel cells. EO pumps have no moving parts, scale appropriately with fuel cells, operate across a wide range of conditions, and consume a small fraction of fuel cell power. We demonstrate and quantify the efficacy of EO water pumping using controlled experiments in a single channel cathode flow structure. Our results show that, under certain operating conditions, removing water from the cathode using integrated EO pumping structures improves fuel cell performance and stability. The application of EO pumps for liquid water removal from PEMFC cathodes extends their operational range and reduces air flow rates.

  5. Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells using integrated electroosmotic pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buie, Cullen R.; Posner, Jonathan D.; Fabian, Tibor; Cha, Suk-Won; Kim, Daejoong; Prinz, Fritz B.; Eaton, John K.; Santiago, Juan G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2006-10-20

    Recent experimental and numerical investigations on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) emphasize water management as a critical factor in the design of robust, high efficiency systems. Although various water management strategies have been proposed, water is still typically removed by pumping air into cathode channels at flow rates significantly higher than required by fuel cell stoichiometry. Such methods are thermodynamically unfavorable and constrain cathode flow channel design. We have developed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with integrated planar electroosmotic (EO) pumping structures that actively remove liquid water from cathode flow channels. EO pumps can relieve cathode design barriers and facilitate efficient water management in fuel cells. EO pumps have no moving parts, scale appropriately with fuel cells, operate across a wide range of conditions, and consume a small fraction of fuel cell power. We demonstrate and quantify the efficacy of EO water pumping using controlled experiments in a single channel cathode flow structure. Our results show that, under certain operating conditions, removing water from the cathode using integrated EO pumping structures improves fuel cell performance and stability. The application of EO pumps for liquid water removal from PEMFC cathodes extends their operational range and reduces air flow rates. (author)

  6. Metallography and Microanalysis of Qinshan PhaseⅠ NPP Spent Fuel Rods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN; Jin; BIAN; Wei; GUO; Li-na; GUO; Yi-fan; CHU; Feng-min; LIANG; Zheng-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Qinshan PhaseⅠNPP is a first domestic commercial PWR and its fuel rods and fuel assembly were designed and manufactured by China.In order to assess the irradiation properties of the fuel rods,8spent fuel rods which were drew out from 3fuel assemblies were transferred to CIAE hot cells for post irradiation examination(PIE)in 2014.The cladding material of the fuel

  7. Globalisation of the nuclear fuel cycle - impact of developments on fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durpel, L. van den; Bertel, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 92 - Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear energy will have to cope more and more with a rapid changing environment due to economic competitive pressure and the deregulatory progress. In current economic environment, utilities will have to focus strongly on the reduction of their total generation costs, covering the fuel cycle costs, which are only partly under their control. Developments in the fuel cycle will be in the short-term rather evolutionary addressing the current needs of utilities. However, within the context of sustainable development and more and more inclusion of externalities in energy generation costs, more performing developments in the fuel cycle could become important and feasible. A life-cycle design approach of the fuel cycle will be requested in order to cover all factors in order to decrease significantly the nuclear energy generation cost to complete with other alternative fuels in the long-term. This paper will report on some of the trends one could distinguish in the fuel cycle with emphasis on cost reduction. OECD/NEA is currently conducting a study on the fuel cycle aiming to assess current and future nuclear fuel cycles according to the potential for further improvement of the full added-value chain of these cycles from a mainly technological and economic perspective including environmental and social considerations. (orig.) [German] Die Kernenergie wird sich mehr und mehr in einem Umfeld behaupten muessen, das durch schnelle Veraenderungen auf Grund des Wettbewerbsdrucks in der Wirtschaft und des Liberalisierungsprozesses gekennzeichnet ist. Im heutigen Wirtschaftsumfeld muessen sich die Energieversorgungsunternehmen hauptsaechlich auf die Senkung ihrer Stromerzeugungs-Gesamtkosten konzentrieren. Darunter fallen auch die Brennstoffkreislaufkosten, die sie nur zum Teil beeinflussen koennen. Kurzfristig gesehen, duerften die Entwicklungen im Brennstoffkreislauf eher evolutionaer verlaufen und den jeweiligen Beduerfnissen der EVUs entsprechen. Im Zusammenhang mit einer

  8. Sustainable Forest Management Support Based on the Spatial Distribution of Fuels for Fire Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Germán Flores Garnica; Juan de Dios Benavides Solorio; David Arturo Moreno Gonzalez

    2006-01-01

    Fire behavior simulation is based mainly on the fuel model-concept. However, there are great difficulties to develop the corresponding maps, therefore it is suggested the generation of four fuel maps (1-hour, 10-hours, 100-hours and alive). These maps will allow a better definition of the spatial variation of forest fuels, even within a zone classified as a given fuel...

  9. In-core fuel management for pebble-bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milian Perez, Daniel; Rodriguez Garcia, Lorena; Garcia Hernandez, Carlos; Milian Lorenzo, Daniel, E-mail: dperez@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: dmilian@instec.cu [Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences, Havana (Cuba); Velasco, Abanades, E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Department of Simulation of Thermo Energy Systems, Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper a calculation procedure to reduce the power peak in the core of a Very High Temperature pebble bed Reactor is presented. This procedure combines the fuel depletion and the neutronic behavior of the fuel in the reactor core, modeling once-through-then-out cycles as well as cycles in which pebbles are recirculated through the core an arbitrary number of times, obtaining the asymptotic fuel-loading pattern. The procedure consists in several coupled computational codes, which are used iteratively until convergence is reached. The utilization of the MCNPX 2.6e, as one of these computational codes, is validated through the calculation of benchmarks announced by IAEA (IAEA-TECDOC-1249, 2001). To complete the verification of the calculation procedure a base case described in (Annals of Nuclear Energy 29 (2002) 1345-1364), was performed. The procedure has been applied to a model of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (200 MW) design. (author)

  10. Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.K. Scheider

    2001-04-26

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for that design only. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 11) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.

  11. Integrating fuel treatment into ecosystem management: A proposed project planning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith D. Stockmann; Kevin D. Hyde; J. Greg Jones; Dan R. Loeffler; Robin P. Silverstein

    2010-01-01

    Concern over increased wildland fire threats on public lands throughout the western United States makes fuel reduction activities the primary driver of many management projects. This single-issue focus recalls a management planning process practiced frequently in recent decades - a least-harm approach where the primary objective is first addressed and then plans are...

  12. Community views of fuels management: are national forest local recreation users more supportive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Vogt; Greg Winter; Sarah McCaffrey

    2007-01-01

    Significant advances in social science-based wildfire research have occurred in the past five years. Managers, policy makers, and researchers have worked to better understand the perspectives of homeowners, residents, tourists, and recreationists on fire and fuels management and how to better involve them in the planning process. This research examines how the...

  13. Thoria-based nuclear fuels thermophysical and thermodynamic properties, fabrication, reprocessing, and waste management

    CERN Document Server

    Bharadwaj, S R

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art on thermophysical and thermochemical properties, fabrication methodologies, irradiation behaviours, fuel reprocessing procedures, and aspects of waste management for oxide fuels in general and for thoria-based fuels in particular. The book covers all the essential features involved in the development of and working with nuclear technology. With the help of key databases, many of which were created by the authors, information is presented in the form of tables, figures, schematic diagrams and flow sheets, and photographs. This information will be useful for scientists and engineers working in the nuclear field, particularly for design and simulation, and for establishing the technology. One special feature is the inclusion of the latest information on thoria-based fuels, especially on the use of thorium in power generation, as it has less proliferation potential for nuclear weapons. Given its natural abundance, thorium offers a future alternative to uranium fuels in nuc...

  14. The conceptual analysis of MBA and KMP for advanced spent fuel management process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Yoon; Ko, Won Il; Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Ho Dong; Koo, Dae Seo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    This report describes the concept of dry reprocessing of molten salt which is proposed as nuclear fuel cycle with nuclear proliferation resistance. These basic researches in Japan, U. S., Russia are in progress, and Republic of Korea is performing basic research of metallic conversion fabrication of molten salt of uranium dioxide fuels through nuclear research project. In this report, we have performed conceptual analysis and establishment of MBA and KMP for nuclear material safeguards in order to accomplish metallic conversion research of molten salt of uranium dioxide fuels. This report will contribute to the implementation of nuclear material safeguards of advanced spent fuel management process, and also the usage of basic data of nuclear material safeguards for spent fuel recycling process of native country. 11 refs., 17 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  15. PWR circuit contamination assessment tool. Use of OSCAR code for engineering studies at EDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benfarah Moez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal operation of PWR generates corrosion and wear products in the primary circuit which are activated in the core and constitute the major source of the radiation field. In addition, cases of fuel failure and alpha emitter dissemination in the coolant system could represent a significant radiological risk. Radiation field and alpha risks are the main constraints to carry out maintenance and to handle effluents. To minimize these risks and constraints, it is essential to understand the behavior of corrosion products and actinides and to carry out the appropriate measurements in PWR circuits and loop experiments. As a matter of fact, it is more than necessary to develop and use a reactor contamination assessment code in order to take into account the chemical and physical mechanisms in different situations in operating reactors or at design stage. OSCAR code has actually been developed and used for this aim. It is presented in this paper, as well as its use in the engineering studies at EDF. To begin with, the code structure is described, including the physical, chemical and transport phenomena considered for the simulation of the mechanisms regarding PWR contamination. Then, the use of OSCAR is illustrated with two examples from our engineering studies. The first example of OSCAR engineering studies is linked to the behavior of the activated corrosion products. The selected example carefully explores the impact of the restart conditions following a reactor mid-cycle shutdown on circuit contamination. The second example of OSCAR use concerns fission products and disseminated fissile material behavior in the primary coolant. This example is a parametric study of the correlation between the quantity of disseminated fuel and the variation of Iodine 134 in the primary coolant.

  16. Criticality safety aspects of spent fuel arrays from emerging nuclear fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaou, G. [University of Thrace, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Laboratory of Nuclear Technology, Kimmerria Campus, 67100 Xanthi (Greece)

    2010-07-01

    Emerging nuclear fuel cycles: fuels with Pu or minor actinides (MA) for their self-generated recycling or transmutation in PWR or FR {yields} reduction of radiotoxicity of HLW. The aim of work is to assess criticality (k{sub {infinity}}) of arrays of spent nuclear fuels from these emerging fuel cycles. Procedures: Calculations of - k{sub {infinity}}, using MCNP5 based on fresh and spent fuel compositions (infinite arrays), - spent fuel compositions using ORIGEN. Fuels considered: - commercial PWR-UO{sub 2} (R1) and -MOX (R2), [45 GWd/t] and fast reactor [100 GWd/t] (R3), - PWR self-generated Pu recycling (S1) and MA recycling (S2), FR self-generated MA recycling (S3), FR with 2% {sup 237}Np for transmutation purposes (T). Results: k{sub {infinity}} based on fresh and spent fuel compositions is shown. Fuels are clustered in two distinct families: - fast reactor fuels, - thermal reactor fuels; k{sub {infinity}} decreases when calculated on the basis of actinide and fission product inventory. In conclusions: - Emerging fuels considered resemble their corresponding commercial fuels; - k{sub {infinity}} decreases in all cases when calculated on the basis of spent fuel compositions (reactivity worth {approx}-20%{Delta}k/k), hence improving the effectiveness of packaging. (author)

  17. Air management system for automotive fuel cells; Luftversorgungssystem fuer Fahrzeugbrennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauder, K.; Temming, J. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Fluidenergiemaschinen

    2001-07-01

    Fuel cells have attained a predominant position in the development of alternative automotive drives during the last few years. The Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC), preferred for automotive applications, requires compressed air for maximum efficiency. In most prototypes this is provided by twin-screw compressors. The article introduces the different types of fuel cells, and the system and requirements of mobile applications of fuel cells. The advantages and development potential of screw compressors are described. Furthermore concepts of a compressor-expander module based on screw machines are presented and discussed. (orig.) [German] Bei der Entwicklung alternativer Fahrzeugantriebe hat die Brennstoffzelle in den letzten Jahren eine vorherrschende Stellung eingenommen. Die Polymer-Elektrolyt-Membran Brennstoffzelle, PEMFC, die fuer automotive Anwendungen bevorzugt verwendet wird, benoetigt fuer einen optimalen Wirkungsgrad eine Druckluftversorgung. Als Compressor kommt derzeit insbesondere der Schraubenlader bzw. -compressor in verschiedenen Prototypenfahrzeugen zum Einsatz. Der Beitrag behandelt zunaechst die unterschiedlichen Brennstoffzellentypen, den Systemaufbau und die Anforderungen an die mobile Anwendung der Brennstoffzelle. Fuer diesen speziellen Anwendungsfall werden Vorteile und Entwicklungsmoeglichkeiten der Schraubenmaschine dargelegt. Davon ausgehend finden sich Konzepte zum Aufbau eines Compressor-Expander-Moduls (CEM) auf Basis der Schraubenmaschinen. (orig.)

  18. Study of safety relief valve operation under ATWS conditions. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutmacher, E.S.; Nesmith, B.J.; Brukiewa, J.B.

    1979-06-25

    A literature survey and analysis project has been performed to determine if recent (since mid-1975) data has been reported which could influence the current approach to predicting PWR relief valve capacity under ATWS conditions. This study was conducted by the Energy Technology Engineering Center for NRC. Results indicate that the current relief valve capacity model tends to predict less capacity than actually obtains; however, no experimental verification at PWR ATWS conditions was found. Other project objectives were to establish the availability of methods for evaluating reaction forces and back pressure effects on relief valve capacity, and to determine if facilities exist which are capable of testing PWR relief valves at ATWS conditions.

  19. Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-04-14

    The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel 20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some Americium/Curium Targets stored at SRS. Alternatives considered in this EIS encompass a range of new packaging, new processing, and conventional processing technologies, as well as the No Action Alternative. A preferred alternative is identified in which DOE would prepare about 97% by volume (about 60% by mass) of the aluminum-based fuel for disposition using a melt and dilute treatment process. The remaining 3% by volume (about 40% by mass) would be managed using chemical separation. Impacts are assessed primarily in the areas of water resources, air resources, public and worker health, waste management, socioeconomic, and cumulative impacts.

  20. Managing probe applications effectively? The process of pre-commercial fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, H.L. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    There has been a high degree of uncertainty regarding market adoption of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technologies, making it challenging for fuel cell firms to determine which markets to pursue at which point in time. Probes, such as prototypes, demonstrations and field trials, are market experiments conducted by fuel cell firms and industry that are central to the commercialization of fuel cell technology. However, demonstration projects are extremely resource and time intensive, and outcomes are uncertain. This paper reviewed innovation management literature on the characteristics of the technology application process. Case study research of four fuel cell firms were discussed in terms of probe objectives and outcomes. An analysis of probe application patterns over time was also presented. Several fuel cell projects were also analyzed in terms of motivations and lessons learned. The paper focused on young independent fuel cell developers that had limited resources to allocate and waste resources on ineffective probe applications. The findings complement prior research that have found probe applications a valuable tool for learning, stimulating market demand and network formation. The paper made several recommendations regarding the main objectives of the fuel cell project, to set realistic goals and align expectations between consortia members. In addition, it was found that a short term demonstration project may appear to be an attractive application, but a project with a longer term vision and a commercial value proposition was more likely to attract stakeholders. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Comparative study of the contribution of various PWR spacer grid components to hydrodynamic and wall pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Saptarshi, E-mail: saptarshi.bhattacharjee@outlook.com [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) – Cadarache, DEN/DTN/STCP/LHC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Mécanique, Modélisation et Procédés Propres (M2P2), UMR7340 CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Centrale Marseille, 13451 Marseille Cedex (France); Ricciardi, Guillaume [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) – Cadarache, DEN/DTN/STCP/LHC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Viazzo, Stéphane [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Modélisation et Procédés Propres (M2P2), UMR7340 CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Centrale Marseille, 13451 Marseille Cedex (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Complex geometry inside a PWR fuel assembly is simulated using simplified 3D models. • Structured meshes are generated as far as possible. • Fluctuating hydrodynamic and wall pressure field are analyzed using LES. • Comparative studies between square spacer grid, circular spacer grid and mixing vanes are presented. • Simulations are compared with experimental data. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibrations in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core can cause fretting wear in fuel rods. These vibrations can compromise safety of a nuclear reactor. So, it is necessary to know the random fluctuating forces acting on the rods which cause these vibrations. In this paper, simplified 3D models like square spacer grid, circular spacer grid and symmetric mixing vanes have been used inside an annular pipe. Hydrodynamic and wall pressure characteristics are evaluated using large eddy simulations (LES). Structured meshes are generated as far as possible. Simulations are compared with an experiment. Results show that the grid and vanes have a combined effect: grid accelerates the flow whereas the vanes contribute to the swirl structures. Spectral analysis of the simulations illustrate vortex shedding phenomenon in the wake of spacer grids. This initial study opens up interesting perspectives towards improving the modeling strategy and understanding the complex phenomenon inside a PWR core.

  2. On applicability of plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in naval PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir, E-mail: luciano.ondir@gmail.com; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Given emissions restrictions, nuclear propulsion may be an alternative. • Plate and shell heat exchangers (PSHE) are a mature technology on market. • PSHE are compact and could be used as steam generators. • Preliminary calculations to obtain a PWR for a large container ship are performed. • Results suggest PSHE improve overall compactness and cost. - Abstract: The pressure on reduction of gas emissions is going to raise the price of fossil fuels and an alternative to fossil fuels is nuclear energy. Naval reactors have some differences from stationary PWR because they have limitations on volume and weight, requiring compact solutions. On the other hand, a source of problems in naval reactors across history is the steam generation function. In order to reduce nuclear containment footprint, it is desirable to employ integral designs, which, however, poses complications and design constraints for recirculation type steam generators, being interesting to employ once through steam generators, whose historic at Babcock and Wilcox is better than recirculation steam generators. Plate and shell heat exchangers are a mature technology made available by many suppliers which allows heat exchange at high temperature and pressure. This work investigates the feasibility of the use of an array of welded plate heat exchangers of a material approved by ASME for pressure barrier (Ti-3Al-2.5V) in a hypothetical naval reactor. It was found it is feasible from thermal-hydraulic point of view and presents advantages over other steam generator designs.

  3. Fuel Consumption Management in the Transportation Sector in Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dastjerdi, Aliasghar M.; Araghi, Bahar Namaki

    2011-01-01

    Energy consumption in the transportation sector in Iran is significantly higher than global norms and standards which caused some issues including wasting national resources, deteriorating air quality, GHG emissions etc. The major purpose of this paper is to introduce practical policies, strategies...... and technologies to reduce liquid fuel consumption known as a dominant source of energy in transport sector in Iran. Since, the road subsector has the major share in consuming liquid fuel amongst others, more attention is given to the methods for reducing consumption in this subsector. The relating policies...... and actions were classified by optimization measures according to four separate categories as follows; “Optimization of Supply of Transportation Services”, “Optimization of Transport Demand”, “Optimization of Energy Consumption” and “Optimization of Car Manufacturing”....

  4. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

  5. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Ross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mixed oxide (MOX fuel of plutonium in depleted uranium, within the enhanced CANDU-6 (EC-6 reactor. This work proposes an alternative heterogeneous fuel concept based on the same reactor and CANFLEX fuel bundle, with eight large-diameter fuel elements loaded with natural thorium oxide and 35 small-diameter fuel elements loaded with a MOX of plutonium and reprocessed uranium stocks from UK MAGNOX and AGR reactors. Indicative neutronic calculations suggest that such a fuel would be neutronically feasible. A similar MOX may alternatively be fabricated from reprocessed <5% enriched light water reactor fuel, such as the fuel of the AREVA EPR reactor, to consume newly produced plutonium from reprocessing, similar to the DUPIC (direct use of PWR fuel in CANDU process.

  6. Comparative analysis between measured and calculated concentrations of major actinides using destructive assay data from Ohi-2 PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oettingen Mikołaj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we assess the accuracy of the Monte Carlo continuous energy burnup code (MCB in predicting final concentrations of major actinides in the spent nuclear fuel from commercial PWR. The Ohi-2 PWR irradiation experiment was chosen for the numerical reconstruction due to the availability of the final concentrations for eleven major actinides including five uranium isotopes (U-232, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238 and six plutonium isotopes (Pu-236, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242. The main results were presented as a calculated-to-experimental ratio (C/E for measured and calculated final actinide concentrations. The good agreement in the range of ±5% was obtained for 78% C/E factors (43 out of 55. The MCB modeling shows significant improvement compared with the results of previous studies conducted on the Ohi-2 experiment, which proves the reliability and accuracy of the developed methodology.

  7. Zebra: An advanced PWR lattice code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, L.; Wu, H.; Zheng, Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi' an, ShannXi, 710049 (China)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of an advanced PWR lattice code ZEBRA developed at NECP laboratory in Xi'an Jiaotong Univ.. The multi-group cross-section library is generated from the ENDF/B-VII library by NJOY and the 361-group SHEM structure is employed. The resonance calculation module is developed based on sub-group method. The transport solver is Auto-MOC code, which is a self-developed code based on the Method of Characteristic and the customization of AutoCAD software. The whole code is well organized in a modular software structure. Some numerical results during the validation of the code demonstrate that this code has a good precision and a high efficiency. (authors)

  8. Degraded core analysis for the PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1987-10-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the probability and consequences of degraded core accidents for the PWR. The article is based on a paper which was presented by the author to the Sizewell-B public inquiry. Degraded core accidents are examined with respect to:- the initiating events, safety plant failure, and processes with a bearing on containment failure. Accident types and frequencies are discussed, as well as the dispersion of radionuclides. Accident risks, i.e. individual and societal risks in degraded core accidents are assessed from:- the amount of radionuclides released, the weather, the population distribution, and the accident frequencies. Uncertainties in the assessment of degraded core accidents are also summarized. (U.K.).

  9. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  10. An information management system for a spent nuclear fuel interim storage facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, Robert J.; Chiu, Hsien-Lang (Taiwan Power Co., Taipei, 10016 Taiwan); Giles, Todd; Horak, Karl Emanuel; Jow, Hong-Nian (Jow International, Kirkland, WA)

    2010-12-01

    We describe an integrated information management system for an independent spent fuel dry-storage installation (ISFSI) that can provide for (1) secure and authenticated data collection, (2) data analysis, (3) dissemination of information to appropriate stakeholders via a secure network, and (4) increased public confidence and support of the facility licensing and operation through increased transparency. This information management system is part of a collaborative project between Sandia National Laboratories, Taiwan Power Co., and the Fuel Cycle Materials Administration of Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council, which is investigating how to implement this concept.

  11. Management concepts and safety applications for nuclear fuel facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisner, H.; Scotti, R.S. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Delicate, W.S. [KEVRIC Co., Inc., Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This report presents an overview of effectiveness of management control of safety. It reviews several modern management control theories as well as the general functions of management and relates them to safety issues at the corporate and at the process safety management (PSM) program level. Following these discussions, structured technique for assessing management of the safety function is suggested. Seven modern management control theories are summarized, including business process reengineering, the learning organization, capability maturity, total quality management, quality assurance and control, reliability centered maintenance, and industrial process safety. Each of these theories is examined for-its principal characteristics and implications for safety management. The five general management functions of planning, organizing, directing, monitoring, and integrating, which together provide control over all company operations, are discussed. Under the broad categories of Safety Culture, Leadership and Commitment, and Operating Excellence, key corporate safety elements and their subelements are examined. The three categories under which PSM program-level safety issues are described are Technology, Personnel, and Facilities.

  12. Modeling and energy management control design for a fuel cell hybrid passenger bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kyle; Guezennec, Yann; Onori, Simona

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling and supervisory energy management design of a hybrid fuel cell/battery-powered passenger bus. With growing concerns about petroleum usage and greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector, finding alternative methods for vehicle propulsion is necessary. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems are viable possibilities for energy converters due to their high efficiencies and zero emissions. It has been shown that the benefits of PEM fuel cell systems can be greatly improved through hybridization. In this work, the challenge of developing an on-board energy management strategy with near-optimal performance is addressed by a two-step process. First, an optimal control based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle (PMP) is implemented to find the global optimal solution which minimizes fuel consumption, for different drive cycles, with and without grade. The optimal solutions are analyzed in order to aid in development of a practical controller suitable for on-board implementation, in the form of an Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) regulator. Simulation results show that the ARMA controller is capable of achieving fuel economy within 3% of the PMP controller while being able to limit the transient demand on the fuel cell system.

  13. CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denney, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

  14. Environmental survey of the reprocessing and waste management portions of the LWR fuel cycle: a task force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, W.P.; Miraglia, F.J. Jr. (eds.)

    1976-10-01

    This Supplement deals with the reprocessing and waste management portions of the nuclear fuel cycle for uranium-fueled reactors. The scope of the report is limited to the illumination of fuel reprocessing and waste management activities, and examination of the environmental impacts caused by these activities on a per-reactor basis. The approach is to select one realistic reprocessing and waste management system and to treat it in enough depth to illuminate the issues involved, the technology available, and the relationships of these to the nuclear fuel cycle in general and its environmental impacts.

  15. Study of the distribution of hydrogen in a PWR containment with CFD codes; Estudio de la distribucion de hidrogeno en una contencion PWR con codigos CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, G.; Martinez, R. M.; Fernandez, K.; Morato, D. J.; Bocanegra Melian, R.; Mena, L.; Queral, C.

    2014-07-01

    During the development of a severe accident in a PWR reactor can be generated, large quantities of hydrogen by the oxidation of metals present in the nucleus, mainly the zirconium fuel pods. This hydrogen, along with steam and other gases, can be released to the atmosphere of contention by a leak or break in the primary circuit and achieving conditions in which combustion may occur. Combustion causes thermal and pressure loads that can damage the security systems and the integrity of the containment building, last barrier of confinement of radioactive materials. The main condition that defines the characteristics of the combustion is the concentration of species, detailed knowledge of the distribution of hydrogen is very important to correctly predict the possible damage to the containment in the event that there is combustion. (Author)

  16. Optimization of thermal efficiency of nuclear central power like as PWR; Otimizacao da eficiencia termica de uma usina nuclear do tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapa, Nelbia da Silva

    2005-10-15

    The main purpose of this work is the definition of operational conditions for the steam and power conservation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant in order to increase its system thermal efficiency without changing any component, based on the optimization of operational parameters of the plant. The thermal efficiency is calculated by a thermal balance program, based on conservation equations for homogeneous modeling. The circuit coefficients are estimated by an optimization tool, allowing a more realistic thermal balance for the plans under analysis, as well as others parameters necessary to some component models. With the operational parameter optimization, it is possible to get a level of thermal efficiency that increase capital gain, due to a better relationship between the electricity production and the amount of fuel used, without any need to change components plant. (author)

  17. Spent nuclear fuel project systems engineering management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Womack, J.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-19

    The purpose of this document is to describe the systems engineering approach and methods that will be integrated with established WHC engineering practices. The methodology promotes and ensures sound management of the SNF Project. The scope of the document encompasses the efforts needed to manage the WHC implementation of systems engineering on the SNF Project including risk management process, design authority/design agent concept, and documentation responsibilities. This implementation applies to, and is tailored to the needs of the SNF Project and all its Subprojects, including all current and future Subprojects.

  18. Scoping Study Investigating PWR Instrumentation during a Severe Accident Scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J. L. [Rempe and Associates, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knudson, D. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lutz, R. J. [Lutz Nuclear Safety Consultant, LLC, Asheville, NC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The accidents at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) and Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 nuclear power plants demonstrate the critical importance of accurate, relevant, and timely information on the status of reactor systems during a severe accident. These events also highlight the critical importance of understanding and focusing on the key elements of system status information in an environment where operators may be overwhelmed with superfluous and sometimes conflicting data. While progress in these areas has been made since TMI-2, the events at Fukushima suggests that there may still be a potential need to ensure that critical plant information is available to plant operators. Recognizing the significant technical and economic challenges associated with plant modifications, it is important to focus on instrumentation that can address these information critical needs. As part of a program initiated by the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a scoping effort was initiated to assess critical information needs identified for severe accident management and mitigation in commercial Light Water Reactors (LWRs), to quantify the environment instruments monitoring this data would have to survive, and to identify gaps where predicted environments exceed instrumentation qualification envelop (QE) limits. Results from the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) scoping evaluations are documented in this report. The PWR evaluations were limited in this scoping evaluation to quantifying the environmental conditions for an unmitigated Short-Term Station BlackOut (STSBO) sequence in one unit at the Surry nuclear power station. Results were obtained using the MELCOR models developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-sponsored State of the Art Consequence Assessment (SOARCA) program project. Results from this scoping evaluation indicate that some instrumentation identified to provide critical information would be exposed to conditions that

  19. Analysis of radwaste material management options for experimental DUPIC fuel fabrication process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Yang, M. S.; Kim, K. H.; Shin, J. M.; Lee, H. S.; Ko, W. I.; Lee, J. W.; Yim, S. P.; Hong, D. H.; Lee, J. Y.; Baik, S. Y.; Song, W. S.; Yoo, B. O.; Lee, E. P.; Kang, I. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    This report is desirable to review management options in advance for radioactive waste generated from manufacturing experiment of DUPIC nuclear fuel as well as residual nuclear material and dismantled equipment. This report was written for helping researchers working in related facilities to DUPIC project understanding management of DUPIC radioactive waste as well as fellows in DUPIC project. Also, it will be used as basic material to prove transparency and safeguardability of DUPIC fuel cycle. In order to meet these purposes, this report includes basic experiment plan for manufacturing DUPIC nuclear fuel, outlines for DUPIC manufacturing facility and equipment, arising source and estimated amount of radioactive waste, waste classification and packing, transport cask, transport procedures. 15 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  20. Management of spent nuclear fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    On June 1, 1995, DOE issued a Record of Decision [60 Federal Register 28680] for the Department-wide management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); regionalized storage of SNF by fuel type was selected as the preferred alternative. The proposed action evaluated in this environmental assessment is the management of SNF on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to implement this preferred alternative of regional storage. SNF would be retrieved from storage, transferred to a hot cell if segregation by fuel type and/or repackaging is required, loaded into casks, and shipped to off-site storage. The proposed action would also include construction and operation of a dry cask SNF storage facility on ORR, in case of inadequate SNF storage. Action is needed to enable DOE to continue operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which generates SNF. This report addresses environmental impacts.

  1. Management of spent nuclear fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    On June 1, 1995, DOE issued a Record of Decision [60 Federal Register 28680] for the Department-wide management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); regionalized storage of SNF by fuel type was selected as the preferred alternative. The proposed action evaluated in this environmental assessment is the management of SNF on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to implement this preferred alternative of regional storage. SNF would be retrieved from storage, transferred to a hot cell if segregation by fuel type and/or repackaging is required, loaded into casks, and shipped to off-site storage. The proposed action would also include construction and operation of a dry cask SNF storage facility on ORR, in case of inadequate SNF storage. Action is needed to enable DOE to continue operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which generates SNF. This report addresses environmental impacts.

  2. Water Management Membrane for Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of an improved water management membrane for a static vapor feed electrolyzer that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This improved membrane...

  3. USFWS R1 Fire Management Hazardous Fuels Treatment Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The shapefile was created by Molly Cox, a contract worker with ApTech, Inc. in the fall and winter of 2010 and 2011. National Wildlife Refuge Fire Management staff...

  4. Evaluation of the presence of a burnable absorber in an assembly 3x3 type PWR; Evaluacion de la presencia de un absorbedor quemable en un ensamble 3x3 tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez F, M. A.; Del Valle G, E.; Alonso V, G. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico)]. e-mail: mike_ipn_esfm@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In the present work the effect is evaluated that causes the presence of a burnable absorber in an adjustment of rods of 3x3 of a fuel assembly type PWR using CASMO-4 code, when comparing the infinite multiplication factor and some average cross sections by means of codes MCNP-4A, CASMO-3 and HELIOS. For this evaluation two cases are evaluated: first consists of an adjustment of rods of 3x3 full completely of fuel and the second consists of a central rod full with a burnable absorber type wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) and the remaining full fuel rods. In both cases the enrichment of the fissile isotopes is varied, for two types of fuel, MOX degree armament and UO{sub 2}. (Author)

  5. Fuel management strategy for the new equilibrium silicide core design of RSG GAS (MPR-30)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Liem Peng; Arbie, Bakri; Sembiring, T.M. [National Atomic Energy Agency (Batan), Center for Multipurpose Reactor, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1997-07-01

    The design procedure and fuel management strategy were proposed for converting the oxide core of RSG GAS (MPR-30) to the new equilibrium silicide core using higher uranium loading. The obtained silicide core gave significant extension of the core cycle length and thus increasing the reactor availability and utilisation. (author)

  6. Fuel management strategy for the new equilibrium silicide core design of RSG GAS (MPR-30)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Liem Peng; Arbie, Bakri; Sembiring, T.M. [National Atomic Energy Agency (Batan), Center for Multipurpose Reactor, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1997-07-01

    The design procedure and fuel management strategy were proposed for converting the oxide core of RSG GAS (MPR-30) to the new equilibrium silicide core using higher uranium loading. The obtained silicide core gave significant extension of the core cycle length and thus increasing the reactor availability and utilisation. (author) 4 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  7. Chapter 13: Effects of fuel and vegetation management activities on nonnative invasive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erik J. Martinson; Molly E. Hunter; Jonathan P. Freeman; Philip N. Omi

    2008-01-01

    Twentieth century land use and management practices have increased the vertical and horizontal continuity of fuels over expansive landscapes. Thus the likelihood of large, severe wildfires has increased, especially in forest types that previously experienced more frequent, less severe fire (Allen and others 2002). Disturbances such as fire may promote nonnative plant...

  8. Information to be requested from the NSSS vendor for fuel management capability for BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.; Esteban, A.; Gomez, M.; Leira, G.; Martinez, R.; Serrano, J.

    1975-07-01

    A set of the nuclear, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical parameters necessary according to the design of BWRs, is listed. This parameters are necessary to perform the fuel elements management and design, and it must be supplied by the Reactor Manufacturer to the Utility. (Author) 18 refs.

  9. A fuel management study and cycle nuclear design for PW reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J. M.; Corella, M. R.

    1975-07-01

    A reference reactor was chosen to do a general study involving Fuel Management Evaluations of several cycles, and Design Calculations of cycles already performed, according to a calculation scheme set up in the Reactor Technology Division of the J.E.N., using some computer codes acquired to foreign sources and other ones developed in the J.E.N. (Author) 5 refs.

  10. A Review of Water Management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    At present, despite the great advances in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology over the past two decades through intensive research and development activities, their large-scale commercialization is still hampered by their higher materials cost and lower reliability and durability. In this review, water management is given special consideration. Water management is of vital importance to achieve maximum performance and durability from PEMFCs. On the one hand, to maintain ...

  11. Development code for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input on the MCNPX for neutronic calculation in PWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartini, Entin, E-mail: entin@batan.go.id; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan, E-mail: entin@batan.go.id [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    This research was carried out on the development of code for uncertainty analysis is based on a statistical approach for assessing the uncertainty input parameters. In the butn-up calculation of fuel, uncertainty analysis performed for input parameters fuel density, coolant density and fuel temperature. This calculation is performed during irradiation using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport. The Uncertainty method based on the probabilities density function. Development code is made in python script to do coupling with MCNPX for criticality and burn-up calculations. Simulation is done by modeling the geometry of PWR terrace, with MCNPX on the power 54 MW with fuel type UO2 pellets. The calculation is done by using the data library continuous energy cross-sections ENDF / B-VI. MCNPX requires nuclear data in ACE format. Development of interfaces for obtaining nuclear data in the form of ACE format of ENDF through special process NJOY calculation to temperature changes in a certain range.

  12. Development code for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input on the MCNPX for neutronic calculation in PWR core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan

    2014-09-01

    This research was carried out on the development of code for uncertainty analysis is based on a statistical approach for assessing the uncertainty input parameters. In the butn-up calculation of fuel, uncertainty analysis performed for input parameters fuel density, coolant density and fuel temperature. This calculation is performed during irradiation using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport. The Uncertainty method based on the probabilities density function. Development code is made in python script to do coupling with MCNPX for criticality and burn-up calculations. Simulation is done by modeling the geometry of PWR terrace, with MCNPX on the power 54 MW with fuel type UO2 pellets. The calculation is done by using the data library continuous energy cross-sections ENDF / B-VI. MCNPX requires nuclear data in ACE format. Development of interfaces for obtaining nuclear data in the form of ACE format of ENDF through special process NJOY calculation to temperature changes in a certain range.

  13. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

  14. Reactor-based management of used nuclear fuel: assessment of major options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Phillip J; Wigeland, Roald A; Hill, Robert N

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the current status of the ongoing Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program in the U.S. Department of Energy that is investigating the potential for using the processing and recycling of used nuclear fuel to improve radioactive waste management, including used fuel. A key element of the strategies is to use nuclear reactors for further irradiation of recovered chemical elements to transmute certain long-lived highly-radioactive isotopes into less hazardous isotopes. Both thermal and fast neutron spectrum reactors are being studied as part of integrated nuclear energy systems where separations, transmutation, and disposal are considered. Radiotoxicity is being used as one of the metrics for estimating the hazard of used fuel and the processing of wastes resulting from separations and recycle-fuel fabrication. Decay heat from the used fuel and/or wastes destined for disposal is used as a metric for use of a geologic repository. Results to date indicate that the most promising options appear to be those using fast reactors in a repeated recycle mode to limit buildup of higher actinides, since the transuranic elements are a key contributor to the radiotoxicity and decay heat. Using such an approach, there could be much lower environmental impact from the high-level waste as compared to direct disposal of the used fuel, but there would likely be greater generation of low-level wastes that will also require disposal. An additional potential waste management benefit is having the ability to tailor waste forms and contents to one or more targeted disposal environments (i.e., to be able to put waste in environments best-suited for the waste contents and forms).

  15. Wildland fire and fuel management: principles for effective communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Toman; Bruce Shindler

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss four principles identified through recent research for effective citizen-agency communication and examine their use in accomplishing fire management objectives. Principles include the following: (1) effective communication is a product of effective planning; (2) both unidirectional (one-way) and interactive approaches are part of successful...

  16. The Verification of Coupled Neutronics Thermal-Hydraulics Code NODAL3 in the PWR Rod Ejection Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surian Pinem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled neutronics thermal-hydraulics code NODAL3 has been developed based on the few-group neutron diffusion equation in 3-dimensional geometry for typical PWR static and transient analyses. The spatial variables are treated by using a polynomial nodal method while for the neutron dynamic solver the adiabatic and improved quasistatic methods are adopted. In this paper we report the benchmark calculation results of the code against the OECD/NEA CRP PWR rod ejection cases. The objective of this work is to determine the accuracy of NODAL3 code in analysing the reactivity initiated accident due to the control rod ejection. The NEACRP PWR rod ejection cases are chosen since many organizations participated in the NEA project using various methods as well as approximations, so that, in addition to the reference solutions, the calculation results of NODAL3 code can also be compared to other codes’ results. The transient parameters to be verified are time of power peak, power peak, final power, final average Doppler temperature, maximum fuel temperature, and final coolant temperature. The results of NODAL3 code agree well with the PHANTHER reference solutions in 1993 and 1997 (revised. Comparison with other validated codes, DYN3D/R and ANCK, shows also a satisfactory agreement.

  17. ENERGY MANAGEMENT OF PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS USING FUEL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian MIRON

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy generators show an accelerated growth both in terms of production wise, as well as in research fields. Focusing only on photovoltaic panels, the generated energy has the disadvantage of being strongly oscillatory in evolution. The classical solution is to create a network between photovoltaic farms spanning on large distances, in order to share the total energy before sending it to the clients. A solution that was recently proposed is going to use hydrogen in order to store the energy surplus. Fuel Cells (FCs represent energy generators whose energy vector is usually hydrogen. These have already started the transition from the laboratory context towards commercialization. Due to their high energy density, as well as their theoretical infinite storage capacity through hydrogen, configurations based on electrolyzers and FCs are seen as high potential storage systems, both for vehicle and for stationary applications. Therefore, a study on such distributed control systems is of high importance. This paper analyses the existing solutions, with emphasis on a particular case where a supervisory system is developed and tested in a specialised simulation software.

  18. Managing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, The Big Picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett W Carlsen

    2010-07-01

    The nuclear industry, at least in the United States, has failed to deliver on its promise of cheap, abundant energy. After pioneering the science and application and becoming a primary exporter of nuclear technologies, domestic use of nuclear power fell out-of-favor with the public and has been relatively stagnant for several decades. Recently, renewed interest has generated optimism and talk of a nuclear renaissance characterized by a new generation of safe, clean nuclear plants in this country. But, as illustrated by recent policy shifts regarding closure of the fuel cycle and geologic disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, significant hurdles have yet to be overcome. Using the principles of system dynamics, this paper will take a holistic look at the nuclear industry and the interactions between the key players to explore both the intended and unintended consequences of efforts to address the issues that have impeded the growth of the industry and also to illustrate aspects which must be effectively addressed if the renaissance of our industry is to be achieved and sustained.

  19. Fuel Cell Thermal Management Through Conductive Cooling Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Burke, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis was performed to evaluate the concept of utilizing conductive cooling plates to remove heat from a fuel cell stack, as opposed to a conventional internal cooling loop. The potential advantages of this type of cooling system are reduced stack complexity and weight and increased reliability through the reduction of the number of internal fluid seals. The conductive cooling plates would extract heat from the stack transferring it to an external coolant loop. The analysis was performed to determine the required thickness of these plates. The analysis was based on an energy balance between the thermal energy produced within the stack and the heat removal from the cooling plates. To accomplish the energy balance, the heat flow into and along the plates to the cooling fluid was modeled. Results were generated for various numbers of cells being cooled by a single cooling plate. The results provided cooling plate thickness, mass, and operating temperature of the plates. It was determined that utilizing high-conductivity pyrolitic graphite cooling plates can provide a specific cooling capacity (W/kg) equivalent to or potentially greater than a conventional internal cooling loop system.

  20. Vulnerability of a partially flooded PWR reactor cavity to a steam explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizelj, Leon [' Jozef Stefan' Institute Jamova 39, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: leon.cizelj@ijs.si; Koncar, Bostjan [' Jozef Stefan' Institute Jamova 39, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Leskovar, Matjaz [' Jozef Stefan' Institute Jamova 39, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-08-15

    When the hot molten core comes into contact with the water in the reactor cavity a steam explosion may occur. A steam explosion is a fuel coolant interaction process where the heat transfer from the melt to water is so intense and rapid that the timescale for heat transfer is shorter than the timescale for pressure relief. This can lead to the formation of shock waves and later, during the expansion of the water vapour, to production of missiles that may endanger surrounding structures. The purpose of the performed analysis is to provide an estimation of the expected pressure loadings on the typical PWR cavity structures during a steam explosion, and to make an assessment of the vulnerabilities of the typical PWR cavity structures to steam explosions. To achieve this, the fit-for-purpose steam explosion model is proposed, followed by comprehensive and reasonably conservative analyses of two typical ex-vessel steam explosion cases differing in the steam explosion energy conversion ratio. In particular, the vulnerability of the surrounding reinforced concrete walls to damage has been sought in both cases.

  1. A multi-objective shuffled frog leaping algorithm for in-core fuel management optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshi, S. Safaei; Zolfaghari, A.; Mirvakili, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    The efficient operation and in-core fuel management of PWRs are of utmost importance. In the present work, a core reload optimization using Shuffled Frog Leaping (SFL) algorithm is addressed and mapped on nuclear fuel loading pattern optimization. SFL is one of the latest meta-heuristic optimization algorithms which is used for solving the discrete optimization problems and inspired from social behavior of frogs. The algorithm initiates the search from an initial population and carries forward to draw out an optimum result. This algorithm employs the use of memetic evolution by exchanging ideas between the members of the population in each local search. The local search of SFL is similar to particle swarm optimization (PSO) and applying shuffling process accomplishes the information exchange between several local searches to obtain an overall optimum result. To evaluate the proposed technique, Shekel's Foxholes and a VVER-1000 reactor are used as test cases to illustrate performance of SFL. Among numerous neutronic and thermal-hydraulic objectives necessary for a fuel management problem to reach an overall optimum, this paper deals with two neutronic objectives, i.e., maximizing effective multiplication factor and flattening power distribution in the core, to evaluate the capability of applying SFL algorithm for a fuel management problem. The results, convergence rate and reliability of the method are quite promising and show the potential and efficiency of the technique for other optimization applications in the nuclear engineering field.

  2. Continual Energy Management System of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current research status in energy management of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell hybrid power electric vehicles are first described in this paper, and then build the PEMFC/ lithium-ion battery/ ultra-capacitor hybrid system model. The paper analysis the key factors of the continuous power available in PEM fuel cell hybrid power electric vehicle and hybrid power system working status under different driving modes. In the end this paper gives the working flow chart of the hybrid power system and concludes the three items of the system performance analysis.

  3. Coupled Thermal and Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte FuelCells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2006-11-01

    Thermal and water management are intricately coupled in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells. In this paper, we simulate fuel-cell performance and account for nonisothermal phenomena. The transport of water due to a temperature gradient and its associated effects on performance are described, with the increase of reactant dilution by the water-vapor partial pressure being the most dominant. In addition, simulations are undergone to find the optimum operating temperature and maximum power density as a function of external heat-transfer coefficient. The shape of the optimization curves and the magnitudes of the nonisothermal phenomena are also detailed and explained.

  4. Conceptual study on advanced PWR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Young; Chang, M. H.; Yu, K. J.; Lee, D. J.; Cho, B. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Kim, J. P.; Park, C. T.; Seo, J. K.; Kang, H. S.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. W.; Kim, Y. H.

    1997-07-01

    In this study, the adoptable essential technologies and reference design concept of the advanced reactor were developed and related basic experiments were performed. (1) Once-through Helical Steam Generator: a performance analysis computer code for heli-coiled steam generator was developed for thermal sizing of steam generator and determination of thermal-hydraulic parameters. (2) Self-pressurizing pressurizer : a performance analysis computer code for cold pressurizer was developed. (3) Control rod drive mechanism for fine control : type and function were surveyed. (4) CHF in passive PWR condition : development of the prediction model bundle CHF by introducing the correction factor from the data base. (5) Passive cooling concepts for concrete containment systems: development of the PCCS heat transfer coefficient. (6) Steam injector concepts: analysis and experiment were conducted. (7) Fluidic diode concepts : analysis and experiment were conducted. (8) Wet thermal insulator : tests for thin steel layers and assessment of materials. (9) Passive residual heat removal system : a performance analysis computer code for PRHRS was developed and the conformance to EPRI requirement was checked. (author). 18 refs., 55 tabs., 137 figs.

  5. Seismic qualification of PWR plant auxiliary feedwater systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, S.C.; Tsai, N.C.

    1983-08-01

    The NRC Standard Review Plan specifies that the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is a safeguard system that functions in the event of a Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) to remove the decay heat via the steam generator. Only recently licensed PWR plants have an AFW system designed to the current Standard Review Plan specifications. The NRC devised the Multiplant Action Plan C-14 in order to make a survey of the seismic capability of the AFW systems of operating PWR plants. The purpose of this survey is to enable the NRC to make decisions regarding the need of requiring the licensees to upgrade the AFW systems to an SSE level of seismic capability. To implement the first phase of the C-14 plan, the NRC issued a Generic Letter (GL) 81-14 to all operating PWR licensees requesting information on the seismic capability of their AFW systems. This report summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's efforts to assist the NRC in evaluating the status of seismic qualification of the AFW systems in 40 PWR plants, by reviewing the licensees' responses to GL 81-14.

  6. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Project. Management plan (Deliverable No. 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-05-31

    This Project Management Plan establishes the organization and procedures by which the Memphis Medium-Btu Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant will be managed and defines the responsibilities and functions of project participants. This plan should not be construed as modifying contract provisions or documents in any way. It applies mainly to Phase I activities; the conceptual design and development of the demonstration plant. Plans for Phases II and III will be prepared before these phases are initiated. This management plan is intended to be a working document to be revised as the needs of the project dictate. The looseleaf format will facilitate changes by making it possible to add and remove pages.

  7. Thermal-Hydraulic Research Review and Cooperation Outcome for Light Water Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Lee, Chan; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chi Young [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The fuel assembly for pressurized water reactor (PWR) consists of fuel rod bundle, spacer grid and bottom/top end fittings. The cooling water in high pressure and temperature is introduced in lower plenum of reactor core and directed to upper plenum through the subchannel which is formed between the fuel rods. The main thermalhydraulic performance parameters for the PWR fuel are pressure drop and critical heat flux in normal operating condition, and quenching time in accident condition. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an advanced PWR fuel, dual-cooled annular fuel and accident tolerant fuel for the enhancement of fuel performance and the localization. For the key thermal-hydraulic technology development of PWR fuel, the KAERI LWR fuel team has conducted the experiments for pressure drop, turbulent flow mixing and heat transfer, critical heat flux(CHF) and quenching. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was also performed to predict flow and heat transfer in fuel assembly including the spent fuel assembly in dry cask for interim repository. In addition, the research cooperation with university and nuclear fuel company was also carried out to develop a basic thermalhydraulic technology and the commercialization.

  8. Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

  9. Optimizing energy management of decentralized photovoltaic. Fuel cell - direct storage - power supply units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocklisch, Thilo; Schufft, Wolfgang; Bocklisch, Steffen [Chemnitz Univ. of Technology (TUC) (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a new optimizing energy management concept for decentralized power supply units. Main goal is the coordinated utilization of dynamically controllable combined-heat-and-power-plants (e.g. fuel cell cogeneration plants) and electrochemical direct storages (e.g. future electric car batteries) for the active balancing of fluctuating renewable energy generation (e.g. building integrated photovoltaics) and fluctuation electricity consumption. The self-utilization and partial storage of renewable energy helps to stabilize the grid in a ''bottom-up'' approach. The new energy mangement concept features a three-layer control structure, which aims for the optimization of the power flows, minimizing the fuel consumption and the dynamic stress imposed onto the fuel cell. (orig.)

  10. The safety analysis and thermohydraulic methodologies for the power updating analyses in Spanish PWR plants; Methodologias de diseno termohidraulico y de analisis de seguridad en los aumentos de potencia de centrales PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salesa, F.

    2014-02-01

    This article describes the Safety Analysis and Thermohydraulic methodologies used by ENUSA for the Power Updating analyses in Spanish PWR plants of Westinghouse design: Design tools have been developed over the first cycles resulting new correlations of DNB, fitted to the new fuel assemblies, new DNBR calculation methodology and other improvements in the design areas. Using these methodologies, the available margins between design and limit values are wider. These new margins have allowed to accomplish the design criteria under the new power updating operational conditions. (Author)

  11. Supply chain management applications for forest fuel procurement. Cost or benefit?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, J.; Roeser, D. (Finnish Forest Research Inst., Joensuu Research Unit (Finland)), email: johannes.windisch@metla.fi; Sikanen, L.; Gritten, D. (Univ. of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Science, Joensuu (Finland))

    2010-07-01

    It is commonly agreed that logistics is very demanding in forest fuel business. Even though logistics and supply chain management (SCM) tools already have found their way into forestry business, for example, in roundwood operations, they are not yet very widespread in the field of forest fuel procurement. The present study investigates if modern supply chain management applications are capable of increasing the profitability of forest fuel procurement operations. Since margins are low, decreasing the provision costs could boost wood-based bioenergy business. The study is based on the investigation of two Finnish forest owners associations (FOA) involved in forest fuel procurement using a modern SCM tool. The investigation is done by cost-benefit analysis (CBA) using the net present value (NPV) methodology to determine the profitability. According to the estimates made by the staff, which are based on data such as work time records and delivery notes from before and after introduction of the new system, in both FOAs, the benefits far outweigh the costs over a considered timespan of ten years. However, the amount of the NPV varied significantly. For FOA1, with an annual chip production of 150 000 loose m3, the NPV is 212 739 euro, while for FOA2, with an annual chip production of 37 000 loose m3, the NPV is 969 841 euro. Even if the NPV of FOA2 seems to be very high, the profitability of SCM tools in forest fuel procurement is clearly demonstrated. Additionally, the results indicate that a considerable cost saving potential in forest fuel procurement is attainable through improving work flows and thus reduce the work input. (orig.)

  12. A safety and regulatory assessment of generic BWR and PWR permanently shutdown nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, R.J.; Davis, R.E.; Grove, E.J.; Azarm, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The long-term availability of less expensive power and the increasing plant modification and maintenance costs have caused some utilities to re-examine the economics of nuclear power. As a result, several utilities have opted to permanently shutdown their plants. Each licensee of these permanently shutdown (PSD) plants has submitted plant-specific exemption requests for those regulations that they believe are no longer applicable to their facility. This report presents a regulatory assessment for generic BWR and PWR plants that have permanently ceased operation in support of NRC rulemaking activities in this area. After the reactor vessel is defueled, the traditional accident sequences that dominate the operating plant risk are no longer applicable. The remaining source of public risk is associated with the accidents that involve the spent fuel. Previous studies have indicated that complete spent fuel pool drainage is an accident of potential concern. Certain combinations of spent fuel storage configurations and decay times, could cause freshly discharged fuel assemblies to self heat to a temperature where the self sustained oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding may cause cladding failure. This study has defined four spent fuel configurations which encompass all of the anticipated spent fuel characteristics and storage modes following permanent shutdown. A representative accident sequence was chosen for each configuration. Consequence analyses were performed using these sequences to estimate onsite and boundary doses, population doses and economic costs. A list of candidate regulations was identified from a screening of 10 CFR Parts 0 to 199. The continued applicability of each regulation was assessed within the context of each spent fuel storage configuration and the results of the consequence analyses.

  13. The advanced main control console for next japanese PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, A. [Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc., Sapporo (Japan); Ito, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nuclear Energy Systems Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan); Yokoyama, M. [Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Energy and Industrial Systems Center, Kobe (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of the improvement of main control room designing in a nuclear power plant is to reduce operators' workload and potential human errors by offering a better working environment where operators can maximize their abilities. In order to satisfy such requirements, the design of main control board applied to Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type nuclear power plant has been continuously modified and improved. the Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Utilities (Electric Power Companies) and Mitsubishi Group have developed an advanced main control board (console) reflecting on the study of human factors, as well as using a state of the art electronics technology. In this report, we would like to introduce the configuration and features of the Advanced Main Control Console for the practical application to the next generation PWR type nuclear power plants including TOMARI No.3 Unit of Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc. (author)

  14. Surrogate fuel assembly multi-axis shaker tests to simulate normal conditions of rail and truck transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, Greg John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grey, Carissa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelhardt, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This report describes the third set of tests (the “DCLa shaker tests”) of an instrumented surrogate PWR fuel assembly. The purpose of this set of tests was to measure strains and accelerations on Zircaloy-4 fuel rods when the PWR assembly was subjected to rail and truck loadings simulating normal conditions of transport when affixed to a multi-axis shaker. This is the first set of tests of the assembly simulating rail normal conditions of transport.

  15. German Spent Nuclear Fuel Legacy: Characteristics and High-Level Waste Management Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schwenk-Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Germany is phasing-out the utilization of nuclear energy until 2022. Currently, nine light water reactors of originally nineteen are still connected to the grid. All power plants generate high-level nuclear waste like spent uranium or mixed uranium-plutonium dioxide fuel which has to be properly managed. Moreover, vitrified high-level waste containing minor actinides, fission products, and traces of plutonium reprocessing loses produced by reprocessing facilities has to be disposed of. In the paper, the assessments of German spent fuel legacy (heavy metal content and the nuclide composition of this inventory have been done. The methodology used applies advanced nuclear fuel cycle simulation techniques in order to reproduce the operation of the German nuclear power plants from 1969 till 2022. NFCSim code developed by LANL was adopted for this purpose. It was estimated that ~10,300 tonnes of unreprocessed nuclear spent fuel will be generated until the shut-down of the ultimate German reactor. This inventory will contain ~131 tonnes of plutonium, ~21 tonnes of minor actinides, and 440 tonnes of fission products. Apart from this, ca.215 tonnes of vitrified HLW will be present. As fission products and transuranium elements remain radioactive from 104 to 106 years, the characteristics of spent fuel legacy over this period are estimated, and their impacts on decay storage and final repository are discussed.

  16. Comparison of selected foreign plans and practices for spent fuel and high-level waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Hazelton, R.F.; Bradley, D.J.

    1990-04-01

    This report describes the major parameters for management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes in selected foreign countries as of December 1989 and compares them with those in the United States. The foreign countries included in this study are Belgium, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All the countries are planning for disposal of spent fuel and/or high-level wastes in deep geologic repositories. Most countries (except Canada and Sweden) plan to reprocess their spent fuel and vitrify the resultant high-level liquid wastes; in comparison, the US plans direct disposal of spent fuel. The US is planning to use a container for spent fuel as the primary engineered barrier. The US has the most developed repository concept and has one of the earliest scheduled repository startup dates. The repository environment presently being considered in the US is unique, being located in tuff above the water table. The US also has the most prescriptive regulations and performance requirements for the repository system and its components. 135 refs., 8 tabs.

  17. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project: Sample Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, Amanda J.; Pereira, Mario M.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2013-01-01

    This sample management plan provides guidelines for sectioning, preparation, acceptance criteria, analytical path, and end-of-life disposal for the fuel element segments utilized in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project. The Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is tasked with analysis of irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples to support the GTRI conversion program. Sample analysis may include optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fuel-surface interface analysis, gas pycnometry (density) measurements, laser flash analysis (LFA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis with mass spectroscopy (TG /DTA-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP), alpha spectroscopy, and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS). The project will utilize existing Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) operating, technical, and administrative procedures for sample receipt, processing, and analyses. Test instructions (TIs), which are documents used to provide specific details regarding the implementation of an existing RPL approved technical or operational procedure, will also be used to communicate to staff project specific parameters requested by the Principal Investigator (PI). TIs will be developed, reviewed, and issued in accordance with the latest revision of the RPL-PLN-700, RPL Operations Plan. Additionally, the PI must approve all project test instructions and red-line changes to test instructions.

  18. Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

    1984-07-01

    Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories.

  19. Smart Energy Management and Control for Fuel Cell Based Micro-Grid Connected Neighborhoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

    2006-03-15

    the most appropriate means of implementing micro-grids and the costs and processes involved with their extended operation. With the development and availability of fuel cell based stand-alone power plants, an electrical mini-grid, encompassing several connected residential neighborhoods, has become a viable concept. A primary objective of this project is to define the parameters of an economically efficient fuel cell based mini-grid. Since pure hydrogen is not economically available in sufficient quantities at the present time, the use of reforming technology to produce and store excess hydrogen will also be investigated. From a broader perspective, the factors that bear upon the feasibility of fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhoods are similar to those pertaining to the electrification of a small town with a localized power generating station containing several conventional generating units. In the conventional case, the town or locality would also be connected to the larger grid system of the utility company. Therefore, in the case of the fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhoods, this option should also be available. The objectives of this research project are: To demonstrate that smart energy management of a fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhood can be efficient and cost-effective;To define the most economical micro-grid configuration; and, To determine how residential micro-grid connected fuel cell(s) can contribute to America's hydrogen energy future.

  20. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Unit Nuclear Energy, Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboorm, J.E.; De Leege, P.F.A. (International Reactor Institute IRI, University of Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands)); Van de Voet, J.; Verhagen, F.C.M. (KEMA NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1992-01-01

    In order to carry out reliable reactor core calculations for a boiled water reactor (BWR) or a pressurized water reactor (PWR) first reactivity calculations have to be carried out for which several calculation programs are available. The purpose of the title project is to exchange experiences to improve the knowledge of this reactivity calculations. In a large number of institutes reactivity calculations of PWR and BWR pin cells were executed by means of available computer codes. Results are compared. It is concluded that the variations in the calculated results are problem dependent. Part of the results is satisfactory. However, further research is necessary.

  1. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  2. Leak before break application in French PWR plants under operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faidy, C. [EDF SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-01

    Practical applications of the leak-before break concept are presently limited in French Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) compared to Fast Breeder Reactors. Neithertheless, different fracture mechanic demonstrations have been done on different primary, auxiliary and secondary PWR piping systems based on similar requirements that the American NUREG 1061 specifications. The consequences of the success in different demonstrations are still in discussion to be included in the global safety assessment of the plants, such as the consequences on in-service inspections, leak detection systems, support optimization,.... A large research and development program, realized in different co-operative agreements, completes the general approach.

  3. Advanced ion exchange resins for PWR condensate polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, B. [Rohm and Haas Co. (United States); Tsuzuki, S. [Rohm and Haas Co. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The severe chemical and mechanical requirements of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) condensate polishing plant (CPP) present a major challenge to the design of ion exchange resins. This paper describes the development and initial operating experience of improved cation and anion exchange resins that were specifically designed to meet PWR CPP needs. Although this paper focuses specifically on the ion exchange resins and their role in plant performance, it is also recognized and acknowledged that excellent mechanical design and operation of the CPP system are equally essential to obtaining good results. (authors)

  4. Management Of Hanford KW Basin Knockout Pot Sludge As Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. E. [CH2M HIll Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Evans, K. M. [AREVA, Avignon (France)

    2012-10-22

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) and AREVA Federal Services, LLC (AFS) have been working collaboratively to develop and deploy technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 10S-K West Reactor Fuel Storage Basin on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, WA, USA. Two disposal paths exist for the different types of sludge found in the K West (KW) Basin. One path is to be managed as Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) with eventual disposal at an SNF at a yet to be licensed repository. The second path will be disposed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. This paper describes the systems developed and executed by the Knockout Pot (KOP) Disposition Subproject for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as SNF, (i.e., KOP material).

  5. Criticality coefficient calculation for a small PWR using Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trombetta, Debora M.; Su, Jian, E-mail: dtrombetta@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chirayath, Sunil S., E-mail: sunilsc@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, TX (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Computational models of reactors are increasingly used to predict nuclear reactor physics parameters responsible for reactivity changes which could lead to accidents and losses. In this work, preliminary results for criticality coefficient calculation using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX were presented for a small PWR. The computational modeling developed consists of the core with fuel elements, radial reflectors, and control rods inside a pressure vessel. Three different geometries were simulated, a single fuel pin, a fuel assembly and the core, with the aim to compare the criticality coefficients among themselves.The criticality coefficients calculated were: Doppler Temperature Coefficient, Coolant Temperature Coefficient, Coolant Void Coefficient, Power Coefficient, and Control Rod Worth. The coefficient values calculated by the MCNP code were compared with literature results, showing good agreement with reference data, which validate the computational model developed and allow it to be used to perform more complex studies. Criticality Coefficient values for the three simulations done had little discrepancy for almost all coefficients investigated, the only exception was the Power Coefficient. Preliminary results presented show that simple modelling as a fuel assembly can describe changes at almost all the criticality coefficients, avoiding the need of a complex core simulation. (author)

  6. Irradiation Effects Test Series: Test IE-2. Test results report. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, C. M.; Croucher, D. W.; Ploger, S. A.; Mehner, A. S.

    1977-08-01

    The report describes the results of a test using four 0.97-m long PWR-type fuel rods with differences in diametral gap and cladding irradiation. The objective of this test was to provide information about the effects of these differences on fuel rod behavior during quasi-equilibrium and film boiling operation. The fuel rods were subjected to a series of preconditioning power cycles of less than 30 kW/m. Rod powers were then increased to 68 kW/m at a coolant mass flux of 4900 kg/s-m/sup 2/. After one hour at 68 kW/m, a power-cooling-mismatch sequence was initiated by a flow reduction at constant power. At a flow of 2550 kg/s-m/sup 2/, the onset of film boiling occurred on one rod, Rod IE-011. An additional flow reduction to 2245 kg/s-m/sup 2/ caused the onset of film boiling on the remaining three rods. Data are presented on the behavior of fuel rods during quasiequilibrium and during film boiling operation. The effects of initial gap size, cladding irradiation, rod power cycling, a rapid power increase, and sustained film boiling are discussed. These discussions are based on measured test data, preliminary postirradiation examination results, and comparisons of results with FRAP-T3 computer model calculations.

  7. Effect of Weld Properties on the Crush Strength of the PWR Spacer Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-nam Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties in a weld zone are different from those in the base material because of different microstructures. A spacer grid in PWR fuel is a structural component with an interconnected and welded array of slotted grid straps. Previous research on the strength analyses of the spacer grid was performed using base material properties owing to a lack of mechanical properties in the weld zone. In this study, based on the mechanical properties in the weld zone of the spacer grid recently obtained by an instrumented indentation technique, the strength analyses considering the mechanical properties in the weld zone were performed, and the analysis results were compared with the previous research.

  8. Spent Fuel and Waste Management Activities for Cleanout of the 105 F Fuel Storage Basin at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, M. R.; Rodovsky, T. J.; Day, R. S.

    2002-02-25

    Clean-out of the F Reactor fuel storage basin (FSB) by the Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) is an element of the FSB decontamination and decommissioning and is required to complete interim safe storage (ISS) of the F Reactor. Following reactor shutdown and in preparation for a deactivation layaway action in 1970, the water level in the F Reactor FSB was reduced to approximately 0.6 m (2 ft) over the floor. Basin components and other miscellaneous items were left or placed in the FSB. The item placement was performed with a sense of finality, and no attempt was made to place the items in an orderly manner. The F Reactor FSB was then filled to grade level with 6 m (20 ft) of local surface material (essentially a fine sand). The reactor FSB backfill cleanout involves the potential removal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that may have been left in the basin unintentionally. Based on previous cleanout of four water-filled FSBs with similar designs (i.e., the B, C, D, and DR FSBs in the 1980s), it was estimated that up to five SNF elements could be discovered in the F Reactor FSB (1). In reality, a total of 10 SNF elements have been found in the first 25% of the F Reactor FSB excavation. This paper discusses the technical and programmatic challenges of performing this decommissioning effort with some of the controls needed for SNF management. The paper also highlights how many various technologies were married into a complete package to address the issue at hand and show how no one tool could be used to complete the job; but by combining the use of multiple tools, progress is being made.

  9. Power Management Optimization of an Experimental Fuel Cell/Battery/Supercapacitor Hybrid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farouk Odeim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental fuel cell/battery/supercapacitor hybrid system is investigated in terms of modeling and power management design and optimization. The power management strategy is designed based on the role that should be played by each component of the hybrid power source. The supercapacitor is responsible for the peak power demands. The battery assists the supercapacitor in fulfilling the transient power demand by controlling its state-of-energy, whereas the fuel cell system, with its slow dynamics, controls the state-of-charge of the battery. The parameters of the power management strategy are optimized by a genetic algorithm and Pareto front analysis in a framework of multi-objective optimization, taking into account the hydrogen consumption, the battery loading and the acceleration performance. The optimization results are validated on a test bench composed of a fuel cell system (1.2 kW, 26 V, lithium polymer battery (30 Ah, 37 V, and a supercapacitor (167 F, 48 V.

  10. ROSA-V large scale test facility (LSTF) system description for the third and fourth simulated fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hideo; Ohtsu, Iwao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    The Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a full-height and 1/48 volumetrically scaled test facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) for system integral experiments simulating the thermal-hydraulic responses at full-pressure conditions of a 1100 MWe-class pressurized water reactor (PWR) during small break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) and other transients. The LSTF can also simulate well a next-generation type PWR such as the AP600 reactor. In the fifth phase of the Rig-of-Safety Assessment (ROSA-V) Program, eighty nine experiments have been conducted at the LSTF with the third simulated fuel assembly until June 2001, and five experiments have been conducted with the newly-installed fourth simulated fuel assembly until December 2002. In the ROSA-V program, various system integral experiments have been conducted to certify effectiveness of both accident management (AM) measures in beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs) and improved safety systems in the next-generation reactors. In addition, various separate-effect tests have been conducted to verify and develop computer codes and analytical models to predict non-homogeneous and multi-dimensional phenomena such as heat transfer across the steam generator U-tubes under the presence of non-condensable gases in both current and next-generation reactors. This report presents detailed information of the LSTF system with the third and fourth simulated fuel assemblies for the aid of experiment planning and analyses of experiment results. (author)

  11. AECL/US INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors -- Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Carmack; Randy D. Lee; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer; Michael Todosow; Holly B. Hamilton; Juan Nino; Simon Philpot; James Tulenko

    2005-06-01

    potential advantage for more efficient destruction of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) relative to MOX fuel. Greater efficiency in plutonium reduction results in greater flexibility in managing plutonium inventories and in developing strategies for disposition of MA, as well as a potential for fuel cycle cost savings. Because fabrication of plutonium-bearing (and MA-bearing) fuel is expensive relative to UO{sub 2} in terms of both capital and production, cost benefit can be realized through a reduction in the number of plutonium-bearing elements required for a given burn rate. In addition, the choice of matrix material may be manipulated either to facilitate fuel recycling or to make plutonium recovery extremely difficult. In addition to plutonium/actinide management, an inert matrix fuel having high thermal conductivity may have operational and safety benefits; lower fuel temperatures could be used to increase operating and safety margins, uprate reactor power, or a combination of both. The CANDU reactor offers flexibility in plutonium management and MA burning by virtue of online refueling, a simple bundle design, and good neutron economy. A full core of inert matrix fuel containing either plutonium or a plutonium-actinide mix can be utilized, with plutonium destruction efficiencies greater than 90%, and high (>60%) actinide destruction efficiencies. The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) could allow additional possibilities in the design of an IMF bundle, since the tighter lattice pitch and light-water coolant reduce or eliminate the need to suppress coolant void reactivity, allowing the center region of the bundle to include additional fissile material and to improve actinide burning. The ACR would provide flexibility for management of plutonium and MA from the existing LWR fleet, and would be complementary to the AFCI program in the U.S. Many of the fundamental principles concerning the use of IMF are nearly identical in LWRs and the ACR, including fuel

  12. An analysis of the technical status of high level radioactive waste and spent fuel management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, T.; Miller, C.; Bullard, E.; Campbell, R.; Chockie, A.; Divita, E.; Douthitt, C.; Edelson, E.; Lees, L.

    1977-01-01

    The technical status of the old U.S. mailine program for high level radioactive nuclear waste management, and the newly-developing program for disposal of unreprocessed spent fuel was assessed. The method of long term containment for both of these waste forms is considered to be deep geologic isolation in bedded salt. Each major component of both waste management systems is analyzed in terms of its scientific feasibility, technical achievability and engineering achievability. The resulting matrix leads to a systematic identification of major unresolved technical or scientific questions and/or gaps in these programs.

  13. Energy management of fuel cell/solar cell/supercapacitor hybrid power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thounthong, Phatiphat; Sethakul, Panarit [Department of Teacher Training in Electrical Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology North Bangkok, 1518, Piboolsongkram Road, Bangsue, Bangkok 10800 (Thailand); Chunkag, Viboon [Department of Electrical Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology North Bangkok, 1518, Piboolsongkram Road, Bangsue, Bangkok 10800 (Thailand); Sikkabut, Suwat [Thai-French Innovation Institute, King Mongkut' s University of Technology North Bangkok, 1518, Piboolsongkram Road, Bangsue, Bangkok 10800 (Thailand); Pierfederici, Serge; Davat, Bernard [Groupe de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nancy (GREEN: UMR 7037), Nancy Universite, INPL-ENSEM, 2, Avenue de la Foret de Haye, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, Lorraine 54516 (France)

    2011-01-01

    This study presents an original control algorithm for a hybrid energy system with a renewable energy source, namely, a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and a photovoltaic (PV) array. A single storage device, i.e., a supercapacitor (ultracapacitor) module, is in the proposed structure. The main weak point of fuel cells (FCs) is slow dynamics because the power slope is limited to prevent fuel starvation problems, improve performance and increase lifetime. The very fast power response and high specific power of a supercapacitor complements the slower power output of the main source to produce the compatibility and performance characteristics needed in a load. The energy in the system is balanced by d.c.-bus energy regulation (or indirect voltage regulation). A supercapacitor module functions by supplying energy to regulate the d.c.-bus energy. The fuel cell, as a slow dynamic source in this system, supplies energy to the supercapacitor module in order to keep it charged. The photovoltaic array assists the fuel cell during daytime. To verify the proposed principle, a hardware system is realized with analog circuits for the fuel cell, solar cell and supercapacitor current control loops, and with numerical calculation (dSPACE) for the energy control loops. Experimental results with small-scale devices, namely, a PEMFC (1200 W, 46 A) manufactured by the Ballard Power System Company, a photovoltaic array (800 W, 31 A) manufactured by the Ekarat Solar Company and a supercapacitor module (100 F, 32 V) manufactured by the Maxwell Technologies Company, illustrate the excellent energy-management scheme during load cycles. (author)

  14. Power management systems for sediment microbial fuel cells in high power and continuous power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Conrad Koble

    The objective of this dissertation was to develop power management systems (PMS) for sediment microbial fuel cells (SFMCs) for high power and continuous applications. The first part of this dissertation covers a new method for testing the performance of SMFCs. This device called the microbial fuel cell tester was developed to automatically test power generation of PMS. The second part focuses on a PMS capable of delivering high power in burst mode. This means that for a small amount of time a large amount of power up to 2.5 Watts can be delivered from a SMFC only generating mW level power. The third part is aimed at developing a multi-potentiostat laboratory tool that measures the performance at fixed cell potentials of microbial fuel cells so that I can optimize them for use with the PMS. This tool is capable of controlling the anode potential or cathode potential and measuring current of six separate SMFCs simultaneously. By operating multiple potentiostats, I was able to run experiments that find ideal operating conditions for the sediment microbial fuel cells, and also I can optimize the power management system for these conditions. The fourth part of the dissertation is targeting a PMS that was able to operate a sensor continuously which was powered by an SMFC. In pervious applications involving SMFCs, the PMS operated in batch mode. In this PMS, the firmware on the submersible ultrasonic receiver (SUR) was modified for use with my PMS. This integration of PMS and SUR allowed for the continuous operation of the SUR without using a battery. Finally, the last part of the dissertation recommends a scale-up power management system to overcome the linearity scale up issue of SMFCs as future work. Concluding remarks are also added to summarize the goal and focus of this dissertation.

  15. A review of water management in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, M.; Wei, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China)

    2009-07-01

    At present, despite the great advances in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology over the past two decades through intensive research and development activities, their large-scale commercialization is still hampered by their higher materials cost and lower reliability and durability. In this review, water management is given special consideration. Water management is of vital importance to achieve maximum performance and durability from PEMFCs. On the one hand, to maintain good proton conductivity, the relative humidity of inlet gases is typically held at a large value to ensure that the membrane remains fully hydrated. On the other hand, the pores of the catalyst layer and the gas diffusion layer are frequently flooded by excessive liquid water, resulting in a higher mass transport resistance. Thus, a subtle equilibrium has to be maintained between membrane drying and liquid water flooding to prevent fuel cell degradation and guarantee a high performance level, which is the essential problem of water management. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art studies of water management, including the experimental methods and modeling and simulation for the characterization of water management and the water management strategies. As one important aspect of water management, water flooding has been extensively studied during the last two decades. Herein, the causes, detection, effects on cell performance and mitigation strategies of water flooding are overviewed in detail. In the end of the paper the emphasis is given to: (i) the delicate equilibrium of membrane drying vs. water flooding in water management; (ii) determining which phenomenon is principally responsible for the deterioration of the PEMFC performance, the flooding of the porous electrode or the gas channels in the bipolar plate, and (iii) what measures should be taken to prevent water flooding from happening in PEMFCs. (author)

  16. A Review of Water Management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidong Wei

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, despite the great advances in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC technology over the past two decades through intensive research and development activities, their large-scale commercialization is still hampered by their higher materials cost and lower reliability and durability. In this review, water management is given special consideration. Water management is of vital importance to achieve maximum performance and durability from PEMFCs. On the one hand, to maintain good proton conductivity, the relative humidity of inlet gases is typically held at a large value to ensure that the membrane remains fully hydrated. On the other hand, the pores of the catalyst layer (CL and the gas diffusion layer (GDL are frequently flooded by excessive liquid water, resulting in a higher mass transport resistance. Thus, a subtle equilibrium has to be maintained between membrane drying and liquid water flooding to prevent fuel cell degradation and guarantee a high performance level, which is the essential problem of water management. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art studies of water management, including the experimental methods and modeling and simulation for the characterization of water management and the water management strategies. As one important aspect of water management, water flooding has been extensively studied during the last two decades. Herein, the causes, detection, effects on cell performance and mitigation strategies of water flooding are overviewed in detail. In the end of the paper the emphasis is given to: (i the delicate equilibrium of membrane drying vs. water flooding in water management; (ii determining which phenomenon is principally responsible for the deterioration of the PEMFC performance, the flooding of the porous electrode or the gas channels in the bipolar plate, and (iii what measures should be taken to prevent water flooding from happening in PEMFCs.

  17. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs.

  18. Studies of a small PWR for onsite industrial power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepper, O.H.; Smith, W.R.

    1977-04-19

    Information on the use of a 300 to 400 MW(t) PWR type reactor for industrial applications is presented concerning the potential market, reliability considerations, reactor plant description, construction techniques, comparison between nuclear and fossil-fired process steam costs, alternative fossil-fired steam supplies, and industrial application.

  19. PACTEL and PWR PACTEL Test Facilities for Versatile LWR Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virpi Kouhia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes construction and experimental research activities with two test facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL. The PACTEL facility, comprising of reactor pressure vessel parts, three loops with horizontal steam generators, a pressurizer, and emergency core cooling systems, was designed to model the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of VVER-440-type reactors. The facility has been utilized in miscellaneous applications and experiments, for example, in the OECD International Standard Problem ISP-33. PACTEL has been upgraded and modified on a case-by-case basis. The latest facility configuration, the PWR PACTEL facility, was constructed for research activities associated with the EPR-type reactor. A significant design basis is to utilize certain parts of PACTEL, and at the same time, to focus on a proper construction of two new loops and vertical steam generators with an extensive instrumentation. The PWR PACTEL benchmark exercise was launched in 2010 with a small break loss-of-coolant accident test as the chosen transient. Both facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL, are maintained fully operational side by side.

  20. Water equilibria and management using a two-volume model of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Amey Y.; Stefanopoulou, Anna G.; Sun, Jing

    In this paper, we introduce a modified interpretation of the water activity presented in Springer et al. [T.E. Springer, T.A. Zawodzinski, S. Gottesfeld, Polymer electrolyte fuel cell model, J. Electrochem. Soc. 138 (8) (1991) 2334-2342]. The modification directly affects the membrane water transport between the anode and the cathode (two electrodes) of the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell in the presence of liquid water inside the stack. The modification permits calibration of a zero-dimensional isothermal model to predict the flooding and drying conditions in the two electrodes observed at various current levels [D. Spernjak, S. Advani, A.K. Prasad, Experimental investigation of liquid water formation and transport in a transparent single-serpentine PEM fuel cell, in: Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology (FUELCELL2006-97271), June 2006]. Using this model the equilibria of the lumped water mass in the two electrodes are analyzed at various flow conditions of the stack to determine stable and unstable (liquid water growth) operating conditions. Two case studies of water management through modification of cathode inlet humidification and anode water removal are then evaluated using this model. The desired anode water removal and the desired cathode inlet humidification are specified based upon (i) the water balance requirements, (ii) the desired conditions in the electrodes, and (iii) the maximum membrane transport at those conditions.

  1. Energy Management Strategies based on efficiency map for Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feroldi, Diego; Serra, Maria; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (CSIC-UPC), C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The addition of a fast auxiliary power source like a supercapacitor bank in fuel cell-based vehicles has a great potential because permits a significant reduction of the hydrogen consumption and an improvement of the vehicle efficiency. The Energy Management Strategies, commanding the power split between the power sources in the hybrid arrangement to fulfil the power requirement, perform a fundamental role to achieve this objective. In this work, three strategies based on the knowledge of the fuel cell efficiency map are proposed. These strategies are attractive due to the relative simplicity of the real time implementation and the good performance. The strategies are tested both in a simulation environment and in an experimental setup using a 1.2-kW PEM fuel cell. The results, in terms of hydrogen consumption, are compared with an optimal case, which is assessed trough an advantageous technique also introduced in this work and with a pure fuel cell vehicle as well. This comparative reveals high efficiency and good performance, allowing to save up to 26% of hydrogen in urban scenarios. (author)

  2. Economic Evaluation on the MOX Fuel in the Closed Fuel Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youqi Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed oxide (MOX fuel is one of the most important fuels for the advanced reactors in the future. It is flexible to be applied either in the thermal reactor like pressurized water reactor (PWR or in the fast reactor (FR. This paper compares the two approaches from the view of fuel cost. Two features are involved. (1 The cost of electricity (COE is investigated based on the simulation of realistic operation of a practical PWR power plant and a typical fast breeder reactor design. (2 A new economic analysis model is established, considering the discount rate and the revenue of the reprocessed plutonium besides the traditional costs in the processes of fuel cycle. The sensitivity of COE to the changing parameters is also analyzed. The results show that, in the closed fuel cycle, the fuel cost of applying MOX fuels in the FBR is about 25% lower than that in the PWR at the current operating and fuel cycle level.

  3. Methodology for the LABIHS PWR simulator modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaime, Guilherme D.G.; Oliveira, Mauro V., E-mail: gdjaime@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS) simulator is composed by a set of advanced hardware and software components whose goal is to simulate the main characteristics of a Pressured Water Reactor (PWR). This simulator serves for a set of purposes, such as: control room modernization projects; designing of operator aiding systems; providing technological expertise for graphical user interfaces (GUIs) designing; control rooms and interfaces evaluations considering both ergonomics and human factors aspects; interaction analysis between operators and the various systems operated by them; and human reliability analysis in scenarios considering simulated accidents and normal operation. The simulator runs in a PA-RISC architecture server (HPC3700), developed nearby 2000's, using the HP-UX operating system. All mathematical modeling components were written using the HP Fortran-77 programming language with a shared memory to exchange data from/to all simulator modules. Although this hardware/software framework has been discontinued in 2008, with costumer support ceasing in 2013, it is still used to run and operate the simulator. Due to the fact that the simulator is based on an obsolete and proprietary appliance, the laboratory is subject to efficiency and availability issues, such as: downtime caused by hardware failures; inability to run experiments on modern and well known architectures; and lack of choice of running multiple simulation instances simultaneously. This way, there is a need for a proposal and implementation of solutions so that: the simulator can be ported to the Linux operating system, running on the x86 instruction set architecture (i.e. personal computers); we can simultaneously run multiple instances of the simulator; and the operator terminals run remotely. This paper deals with the design stage of the simulator modernization, in which it is performed a thorough inspection of the hardware and software currently in operation. Our goal is to

  4. Distributed energy resources management using plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as a fuel-shifting demand response resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morais, Hugo; Sousa, Tiago; Soares, J.

    2015-01-01

    In the smart grids context, distributed energy resources management plays an important role in the power systems' operation. Battery electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles should be important resources in the future distribution networks operation. Therefore, it is important...... to develop adequate methodologies to schedule the electric vehicles' charge and discharge processes, avoiding network congestions and providing ancillary services.This paper proposes the participation of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in fuel shifting demand response programs. Two services are proposed......, namely the fuel shifting and the fuel discharging. The fuel shifting program consists in replacing the electric energy by fossil fuels in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles daily trips, and the fuel discharge program consists in use of their internal combustion engine to generate electricity injecting...

  5. The methodology of variable management of propellant fuel consumption by jet-propulsion engines of a spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, V. S.

    2012-12-01

    Traditionally, management of propellant fuel consumption on board of a spacecraft is only associated with the operation of jet-propulsion engines (JPE) that are actuator devices of motion control systems (MCS). The efficiency of propellant fuel consumption depends not only on the operation of the MCS, but also, to one extent or another, on all systems functioning on board of a spacecraft, and on processes that occur in them and involve conversion of variable management of propellant fuel consumption by JPEs as a constituent part of the control of the complex process of spacecraft flight.

  6. Basic Design of a LWR Fuel Compatibility Test Facility (PLUTO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Hwan; Chun, Se Young; Kim, Bok Deuk; Park, Jong Kuk; Chun, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Oh, Dong Seok

    2009-04-15

    KAERI is performing a project for developing a compatibility test facility and the relevant technology for an LWR fuel assembly. It includes the compatibility test and the long term wear test for dual fuel assemblies, and the pressure drop test, uplift force test, flow-induced vibration test, damping test, and the debris filtering capability test for a single fuel assembly. This compatibility test facility of the fuel assemblies is named PLUTO from Performance Test Facility for Fuel Assembly Hydraulics and Vibrations. The PLUTO will be basically constructed for a PWR fuel assembly, and it will be considered to test for the fuel assemblies of other reactors.

  7. Gas-cooled reactor programs. Fuel-management positioning and accounting module: FUELMANG Version V1. 11, September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medlin, T.W.; Hill, K.L.; Johnson, G.L.; Jones, J.E.; Vondy, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents the code module FUELMANG for fuel management of a reactor. This code may be used to position fuel during the calculation of a reactor history, maintain a mass balance history of the fuel movement, and calculate the unit fuel cycle component of the electrical generation cost. In addition to handling fixed feed fuel without recycle, provision has been made for fuel recycle with various options applied to the recycled fuel. A continuous fueling option is also available with the code. A major edit produced by the code is a detailed summary of the mass balance history of the reactor and a fuel cost analysis of that mass balance history. This code is incorporated in the system containing the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code for routine use. Fuel movement according to prescribed instructions is performed without the access of additional user input data during the calculation of a reactor operating history. Local application has been primarily for analysis of the performance of gas-cooled thermal reactor core concepts.

  8. Waste biomass toward hydrogen fuel supply chain management for electricity: Malaysia perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Izatul Husna; Ibrahim, Jafni Azhan; Othman, Abdul Aziz

    2016-08-01

    Green energy is becoming an important aspect of every country in the world toward energy security by reducing dependence on fossil fuel import and enhancing better life quality by living in the healthy environment. This conceptual paper is an approach toward determining physical flow's characteristic of waste wood biomass in high scale plantation toward producing gas fuel for electricity using gasification technique. The scope of this study is supply chain management of syngas fuel from wood waste biomass using direct gasification conversion technology. Literature review on energy security, Malaysia's energy mix, Biomass SCM and technology. This paper uses the theoretical framework of a model of transportation (Lumsden, 2006) and the function of the terminal (Hulten, 1997) for research purpose. To incorporate biomass unique properties, Biomass Element Life Cycle Analysis (BELCA) which is a novel technique develop to understand the behaviour of biomass supply. Theoretical framework used to answer the research questions are Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) framework and Sustainable strategy development in supply chain management framework

  9. An Energy Management System of a Fuel Cell/Battery Hybrid Boat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingang Han

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available All-electric ships are now a standard offering for energy/propulsion systems in boats. In this context, integrating fuel cells (FCs as power sources in hybrid energy systems can be an interesting solution because of their high efficiency and low emission. The energy management strategy for different power sources has a great influence on the fuel consumption, dynamic performance and service life of these power sources. This paper presents a hybrid FC/battery power system for a low power boat. The hybrid system consists of the association of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC and battery bank. The mathematical models for the components of the hybrid system are presented. These models are implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. Simulations allow analyzing the dynamic performance and power allocation according to a typical driving cycle. In this system, an efficient energy management system (EMS based on operation states is proposed. This EMS strategy determines the operating point of each component of the system in order to maximize the system efficiency. Simulation results validate the adequacy of the hybrid power system and the proposed EMS for real ship driving cycles.

  10. Online energy management strategy of fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles based on data fusion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daming; Al-Durra, Ahmed; Gao, Fei; Ravey, Alexandre; Matraji, Imad; Godoy Simões, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    Energy management strategy plays a key role for Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles (FCHEVs), it directly affects the efficiency and performance of energy storages in FCHEVs. For example, by using a suitable energy distribution controller, the fuel cell system can be maintained in a high efficiency region and thus saving hydrogen consumption. In this paper, an energy management strategy for online driving cycles is proposed based on a combination of the parameters from three offline optimized fuzzy logic controllers using data fusion approach. The fuzzy logic controllers are respectively optimized for three typical driving scenarios: highway, suburban and city in offline. To classify patterns of online driving cycles, a Probabilistic Support Vector Machine (PSVM) is used to provide probabilistic classification results. Based on the classification results of the online driving cycle, the parameters of each offline optimized fuzzy logic controllers are then fused using Dempster-Shafer (DS) evidence theory, in order to calculate the final parameters for the online fuzzy logic controller. Three experimental validations using Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) platform with different-sized FCHEVs have been performed. Experimental comparison results show that, the proposed PSVM-DS based online controller can achieve a relatively stable operation and a higher efficiency of fuel cell system in real driving cycles.

  11. Effects of overstory composition and prescribed fire on fuel loading across a heterogeneous managed landscape in the southeastern USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    In the southeastern USA, land use history, forest management and natural geomorphic features have created heterogeneous fuel loads. This apparent temporal and spatial variation in fuel loads make it difficult to reliably assess potential fire behavior from remotely sensed canopy variables to determine risk and to prescribe treatments. We examined this variation by exploring the relationships between overstory forest vegetation attributes, recent fire history, and selected surface fuel components across an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape. Measurements of dead and live vegetation components of surface fuels were obtained from 624 permanent plots, or about 1 plot per 100 ha of forest cover. Within forest vegetation groups, we modeled the relationship between individual surface fuel components and overstory stand age, basal area, site quality and recent fire history, then stochastically predicted fuel loads across the landscape using the same linkage variables. The fraction of the plot variation, i.e., R2, explained by predictive models for individual fuel components ranged from 0.05 to 0.66 for dead fuels and 0.03 to 0.97 for live fuels in pine dominated vegetation groups. Stand age and basal area were generally more important than recent fire history for predicting fuel loads. Mapped fuel loads using these regressor variables showed a very heterogeneous landscape even at the scale of a few square kilometers. The mapped patterns corresponded to stand based forest management disturbances that are reflected in age, basal area, and fire history. Recent fire history was significant in explaining variation in litter and duff biomass. Stand basal area was positively and consistently related to dead fuel biomass in most groups and was present in many predictive equations. Patterns in live fuel biomass were related to recent fire history, but the patterns were not consistent among forest vegetation groups. Age and basal area were related to live fuels in a complex manner that

  12. Foreign travel report: Visits to UK, Belgium, Germany, and France to benchmark European spent fuel and waste management technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    The ICPP WINCO Spent Fuel and Waste Management Development Program recently was funded by DOE-EM to develop new technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels, sodium-bearing liquid waste, and calcine to a form suitable for disposal. European organizations are heavily involved, in some cases on an industrial scale in areas of waste management, including spent fuel disposal and HLW vitrification. The purpose of this trip was to acquire first-hand European efforts in handling of spent reactor fuel and nuclear waste management, including their processing and technical capabilities as well as their future planning. Even though some differences exist in European and U.S. DOE waste compositions and regulations, many aspects of the European technologies may be applicable to the U.S. efforts, and several areas offer potential for technical collaboration.

  13. Design, Modeling and Energy Management of a PEM Fuel Cell / Supercapacitor Hybrid Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahib Andari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns the study and the modeling of hybrid Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM Fuel Cell electric vehicle. In fact, the paper deals with the model description of the powertrain which includes two energy sources: a PEM Fuel Cell as a primary source and a supercapacitor as a secondary source. The architecture is two degrees of freedom permitting a stability of the DC bus voltage. The hybridation of primary source with an energy storage system can improve vehicle dynamic response during transients and hydrogen consumption. The proposed energy management algorithm allows us to have a minimum hydrogen consumption. This algorithm is based on supercapacitor state of charge (SOC control and acceleration/deceleration phases making possible braking energy recovery. The proposed model is simulated and tested using Matlab/Simulink software allowing rapid transitions between sources. The obtained results with the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC cycle demonstrate a 22% gain in hydrogen consumption.

  14. The development of technical database of advanced spent fuel management process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Byeon, Kee Hoh; Song, Dae Yong; Park, Seong Won; Shin, Young Jun

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the technical database system to provide useful information to researchers who study on the back end nuclear fuel cycle. Technical database of advanced spent fuel management process was developed for a prototype system in 1997. In 1998, this database system is improved into multi-user systems and appended special database which is composed of thermochemical formation data and reaction data. In this report, the detailed specification of our system design is described and the operating methods are illustrated as a user's manual. Also, expanding current system, or interfacing between this system and other system, this report is very useful as a reference. (Author). 10 refs., 18 tabs., 46 fig.

  15. A nuclear heuristic for application to metaheuristics in-core fuel management optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneses, Anderson Alvarenga de Moura, E-mail: ameneses@lmp.ufrj.b [COPPE/Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Engineering Program; Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence (IDSIA), Manno-Lugano, TI (Switzerland); Gambardella, Luca Maria, E-mail: luca@idsia.c [Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence (IDSIA), Manno-Lugano, TI (Switzerland); Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.b [COPPE/Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Engineering Program

    2009-07-01

    The In-Core Fuel Management Optimization (ICFMO) is a well-known problem of nuclear engineering whose features are complexity, high number of feasible solutions, and a complex evaluation process with high computational cost, thus it is prohibitive to have a great number of evaluations during an optimization process. Heuristics are criteria or principles for deciding which among several alternative courses of action are more effective with respect to some goal. In this paper, we propose a new approach for the use of relational heuristics for the search in the ICFMO. The Heuristic is based on the reactivity of the fuel assemblies and their position into the reactor core. It was applied to random search, resulting in less computational effort concerning the number of evaluations of loading patterns during the search. The experiments demonstrate that it is possible to achieve results comparable to results in the literature, for future application to metaheuristics in the ICFMO. (author)

  16. Fuel Crime Conceptualization through Specialization of Ontology for Investigation Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulka, Jolanta

    We undertook the task of building the conceptual model of a particular economic offense, called "a fuel crime". This model is thought of as a part of a larger conceptualization, which comprises consensual semantics underlying the knowledge base of a system, aimed at supporting the teamwork of investigators of economic crimes. Because such a knowledge-based system represents a perspective on economic crimes, it should be carefully modeled. This can be done with the help of an expressive enough ontology. To achieve our goal we use the constructive descriptions and situations (c.DnS) design pattern, which enables us to construct an extensible, layered ontology in a top-down manner: c.DnS top layer is specialized by the reference ontology for investigation management system, that in turn, is specialized by the ontology of the fuel crime.

  17. A sensitivity study on neutronic properties of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A sensitivity study has been done to determine the composition of DUPIC fuel from the viewpoint of neutronics fuel design. The spent PWR fuel compositions were generated and fissile contents adjusted by blending fresh uranium after mixing two spent PWR fuel assemblies. The {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U enrichments of DUPIC fuel were adjusted by controlling the amount of fresh uranium feed and the ratio of slightly enriched and depleted uranium in the feed uranium. Based on the material balance calculation, it is recommended that DUPIC fuel composition be such that spent PWR fuel utilization is more than 90%. A sensitivity study on the temperature reactivity coefficient of DUPIC fuel and shown that it is desirable to increase the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U contents to reduce both the fuel and coolant temperature coefficients. On the other hand, refueling simulations of the DUPIC core have shown that the channel power peaking factor, which is a measure of the reactor trip margin, increases with the total fissile content. Considering these neutronic characteristics of the DUPIC fuel, it is recommended to have enrichments of 0.45 and 1.00 wt% for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U, respectively. 3 refs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  18. Assessment of subcriticality during PWR-type reactor refueling; Evaluation de la sous-criticite lors des operations de chargement d'un reacteur nucleaire REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdier, A

    2005-04-15

    During the core loading period of a PWR, any fuel assembly misplacements may significantly reduce the existing criticality margin. The Dampierre 4-18 event showed the present monitoring based on the variations of the outside-core detector counting rate cannot detect such misplacements. In order to circumvent that, a more detailed analysis of the available signal was done. We particularly focused on the neutronic noise analysis methods such as MSM (modified source multiplication), MSA (amplified source multiplication), Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman-{alpha} methods. The experimental part of our work was dedicated to the application of those methods to a research reactor. Finally, our results showed that those methods cannot be used with the present PWR instrumentation. Various detector positions were then studied using Monte Carlo calculations capable of following the neutron origin. Our results showed that the present technology does not allow us to use any solution based on neutron detection for monitoring core loading. (author)

  19. Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard R; Shea, Dan; Ottmar, Roger

    2006-03-15

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-41. pp 351-366. Abstract—The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy Nuclear Defense Facility and a National Environmental Research Park located in the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Prescribed burning is conducted on 15,000 to 20,000 ac annually. We modifi ed standard forest inventory methods to incorporate a complete assessment of fuel components on 622 plots, assessing coarse woody debris, ladder fuels, and the litter and duff layers. Because of deficiencies in south-wide data on litter-duff bulk densities, which are the fuels most often consumed in prescribed fires, we developed new bulk density relationships. Total surface fuel loading across the landscape ranged from 0.8 to 48.7 tons/ac. The variables basal area, stand age, and site index were important in accounting for variability in ladder fuel, coarse woody debris, and litter-duff for pine types. For a given pine stand condition, litter-duff loading decreased in direct proportion to the number of burns in the preceding thirty years. Ladder fuels for loblolly and longleaf increased in direct proportion to the years since the last prescribed burn. The pattern of fuel loading on the SRS reflects stand dynamics, stand management and fire management. It is suggested that the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program can easily modify sampling protocols to incorporate collection of fuels data.

  20. RELAP-7 Level 2 Milestone Report: Demonstration of a Steady State Single Phase PWR Simulation with RELAP-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Andrs; Ray Berry; Derek Gaston; Richard Martineau; John Peterson; Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou

    2012-05-01

    evolve with time. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application. MOOSE (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) is a framework for solving computational engineering problems in a well-planned, managed, and coordinated way. By leveraging millions of lines of open source software packages, such as PETSC (a nonlinear solver developed at Argonne National Laboratory) and LibMesh (a Finite Element Analysis package developed at University of Texas), MOOSE significantly reduces the expense and time required to develop new applications. Numerical integration methods and mesh management for parallel computation are provided by MOOSE. Therefore RELAP-7 code developers only need to focus on physics and user experiences. By using the MOOSE development environment, RELAP-7 code is developed by following the same modern software design paradigms used for other MOOSE development efforts. There are currently over 20 different MOOSE based applications ranging from 3-D transient neutron transport, detailed 3-D transient fuel performance analysis, to long-term material aging. Multi-physics and multiple dimensional analyses capabilities can be obtained by coupling RELAP-7 and other MOOSE based applications and by leveraging with capabilities developed by other DOE programs. This allows restricting the focus of RELAP-7 to systems analysis-type simulations and gives priority to retain and significantly extend RELAP5's capabilities.

  1. ANALISIS SENSITIVITAS TURBULENSI ALIRAN PADA KANAL BAHAN BAKAR PWR BERBASIS CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endiah Puji Hastuti

    2015-04-01

    yang sangat lama dan membutuhkan memori yang besar. Kata kunci: aliran turbulen, kanal PWR, CFD, tunak, transien   Coolant flow turbulence on heat transfer process serves to enhance the heat transfer coefficient, likewise flow in the fuel sub channel. Computational fluid dynamic program, FLUENT is a computational program based on finite element, that is able to predict and analyze the dynamics of fluid flow phenomena, accurately. CFD calculation program is selected in this study because of its accurately and it also can provide good visualization. Purpose of this research was to understand the characteristics of heat transfer, mass and momentum of the fuel rod to the coolant visually on: the temperature field, pressure field, and the kinetic energy field, as a function of the flow dynamics within fuel channel, on steady state and transient condition. Analysis of flow dynamics in the fuel channel base on CFD was done by using the PWR sample data with reactor power of 1000 MWe on 17x17 array of fuel. To examine the sensitivity of the flow equation in accordance with the model of turbulent flow on fuel channel, the turbulence equation model of k-omega (Ƙ-ω, k-epsilon (Ƙ-ε, and Reynold stress model (RSM for steady state was used, while for transient turbulence model DES and LES are applied. In the sensitivity analysis of turbulent flow, hexahedral mesh model of three cell geometry each are 0.5 mm, 0.2 mm and 0.15 mm, was selected. The analysis shows that there are similar results of turbulen model Ƙ-ε and Ƙ-ω standard, on steady state analysis. Comparing with Dittus Boelter criteria for Nusselt number, the Reynolds stress model (RSM is recommended. Sensitivity analysis of mesh geometry between cell size 0.5 mm, 0.2 mm and 0.15 mm, indicating that the cell size of 0.5 mm was sufficient. Developed flow already reached on DES and LES model, however only for short time (3 seconds for transient condition. LES model need very long computation time and big memory

  2. Nonproliferation impacts assessment for the management of the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    On May 13, 1996, the US established a new, 10-year policy to accept and manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the US. The goal of this policy is to reduce civilian commerce in weapons-usable highly enriched uranium (HEU), thereby reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. Two key disposition options under consideration for managing this fuel include conventional reprocessing and new treatment and packaging technologies. The Record of Decision specified that, while evaluating the reprocessing option, ``DOE will commission or conduct an independent study of the nonproliferation and other (e.g., cost and timing) implications of chemical separation of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors.`` DOE`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation conducted this study consistent with the aforementioned Record of Decision. This report addresses the nonproliferation implications of the technologies under consideration for managing aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site. Because the same technology options are being considered for the foreign research reactor and the other aluminum-based spent nuclear fuels discussed in Section ES.1, this report addresses the nonproliferation implications of managing all the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, not just the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. The combination of the environmental impact information contained in the draft EIS, public comment in response to the draft EIS, and the nonproliferation information contained in this report will enable the Department to make a sound decision regarding how to manage all aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  3. Improve Design of Fuel Shear for Fast Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Wei; OUYANG; Ying-gen; LI; Wei-min

    2012-01-01

    <正>Due to the deeper burnup and higher fuel swelling, fast reactor metal fuel rod using 316 stainless steel cladding, replacing the traditional zirconia cladding. The diameter of fuel rod of fast reactor is much longer than that of PWR, and the cladding of stainless steel has better ductility than zirconia cladding. Using the existing shear still will cause several aspects of problem: 1) Longer diameter of rod leads to

  4. Development of a spent fuel management technology research and test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. W.; Noh, S. K.; Lee, J. S. and others

    1997-12-01

    This study was intended to develop concept for a pilot-scale remote operation facility for longer term management of spent fuel and therefrom to provide technical requirement for later basic design of the facility. Main scope of work for the study was to revise the past (1990) conceptual design in functions, scale, hot cell layout, etc. based on user requirements. Technical reference was made to the PKA facility in Germany, through collaboration with appropriate partner, to elaborate the design and requirements. A simulator of the conceptual design was also developed by use of virtual reality technique by 3-D computer graphics for equipment and building. (author). 18 tabs., 39 figs

  5. Fuel management strategy for the compact core design of RSG GAS (MPR-30)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sembiring, T.M.; Liem, P.H.; Tukiran, S. [National Nuclear Energy Agency (Batan), PUSPIPTEK-Serpong Tangerang (Indonesia)

    2000-07-01

    The rearrangement of the core configuration of the RSG GAS reactor to obtain a compact core is in progress. A fuel management strategy is proposed for the equilibrium compact core of this reactor by reducing the number of in-core irradiation positions. The reduced irradiation positions are based on the activities during 12 years operation. The obtained compact core gives significant extension of the operation cycle length so that the reactor availability and utilization can be enhanced. The equilibrium compact silicide core obtained met the imposed design constraints and safety requirements. (author)

  6. Development of core fuel management code system for WWER-type reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a core fuel management program for hexagonal pressurized water type WWER reactors (CFMHEX) has been developed, which is based on advanced three-dimensional nodal method and integrated with thermal hydraulic code to realize the coupling of neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. In CFMHEX, all these feedback effects such as burnup, power distribution, moderator density, and control rod insertion are considered. The verification and validation of the code system have been examined through the IAEA WWER-1000-type Kalinin NPP benchmark problem. The numerical results are in good agreement with measurements and are close to those of other international institutes.

  7. Thirteenth annual report of the Technical Advisory Committee on the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-15

    This report details activities since the last reporting period by the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC). The emphasis of the work in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) has been on the writing of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the associated set of the primary reference document as well as supporting documents. These are in preparation for submission to the Environmental Assessment Review Panel who will lead the national evaluation of the disposal concept under the auspices of the Federal Environmental Assessment Review Office (FEARO).

  8. Methodology of on-line prediction and fuel management of the modular pebble-bed high-temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, X.; Fu, L.; Yanhua, Z.; Fubing, C.; Jian, Z.; Jiong, G., E-mail: xiabing@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua Univ., Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET), Beijing (China)

    2014-07-01

    The modular pebble-bed high-temperature reactors (PB-HTRs), featured by the inherent safety and modular design concept, are considered as one of the promising candidates for the nuclear system of next generation. The characteristics of on-line successive fueling, as well as the features of small excess reactivity and lack of reactivity control methods, make the fuel management and operation of PB-HTRs coupled tightly with each other. The on-line fuel management of PB-HTRs needs the capability of on-line prediction for future operation scenarios based on the combination of several tightly coupled key parameters of the reactor core, including the power level of reactor core, the unloading speed and loading ratio of fuel/dummy pebbles, and the control rod positions. The methodology of on-line prediction is proposed, and then verified by the model of the HTR-10, a small test modular PB-HTR with nominal power of 10 MW. For different combinations, the prediction sequences are calculated by using the computer code system of VSOP for both equilibrium state and running-in phase, especially the latter. The prediction results are analyzed by using a series of data processing based on the polynomial interpolation to determine the optimized parameters for fuel management and core operation of next step. The verification of methodology on the HTR-10 model demonstrates the feasibility of the on-line prediction and fuel management of modular PH-HTRs. (author)

  9. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2008-07-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  10. Recent Progress on the DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Technology at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung-Won Lee; Ho-Jin Ryu; Geun-Il Park; Kee-Chan Song [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-ku, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Since 1991, KAERI has been developing the DUPIC fuel cycle technology. The concept of a direct use of spent PWR fuel in Candu reactors (DUPIC) is based on a dry processing method to re-fabricate Candu fuel from spent PWR fuel without any intentional separation of the fissile materials and fission products. A DUPIC fuel pellet was successfully fabricated and the DUPIC fuel element fabrication processes were qualified on the basis of a Quality Assurance program. Consequently, the DUPIC fuel fabrication technology was verified and demonstrated on a laboratory-scale. Recently, the fuel discharge burn-up of PWRs has been extended to reduce the amount of spent fuel and the fuel cycle costs. Considering this trend of extending the fuel burn-up in PWRs, the DUPIC fuel fabrication technology should be improved to process high burn-up spent fuels. Particularly the release behavior of cesium from the pellet prepared with a high burn-up spent fuel was assessed. an improved DUPIC fuel fabrication technology was experimentally established with a fuel burn-up of 65,000 MWd/tU. (authors)

  11. Fuel utilization improvement in PWRs using the denatured /sup 233/U-Th cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.M.; Schwenk, G.A.; Toops, E.C.; Yotinen, V.O.

    1980-06-01

    A number of changes in PWR core design and/or operating strategy were evaluated to assess the fuel utilization improvement achievable by their implementation in a PWR using thorium-based fuel and operating in a recycle mode. The reference PWR for this study was identical to the B and W Standard Plant except that the fuel pellets were of denatured (/sup 233/U//sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/. An initial scoping study identified the three most promising improvement concepts as (1) a very tight lattice, (2) thorium blankets, and (3) ThO/sub 2/ rods placed in available guide tubes. A conceptual core design incorporating these changes was then developed, and the fuel utilization of this modified design was compared with that of the reference case.

  12. Vision and framework for technical and management support to facilitate foreign spent fuel storage and geologic disposal in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsey, W G; Jardine, L J; Smith, C F

    1999-07-01

    This ''Technical and Management Support'' program would facilitate the transfer of spent fuel from commercial power plants in Taiwan to a storage and geologic repository site near Krasnoyarsk, Russia. This program resolves issues of disposition of Taiwan spent fuel (including US origin fuel) and provides revenue for Russia to develop an integrated spent fuel storage and radioactive waste management system including a geologic repository. LLNL has ongoing contracts and collaborations with all the principal parties and is uniquely positioned to facilitate the development of such a program. A three-phase approach over 20 years is proposed: namely, an initial feasibility investigation followed by an engineering development phase, and then implementation.

  13. Revised CDM baseline study on fuel use and manure management at household level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buysman, E.; Bryan, S.; Pino, M.

    2010-05-15

    This report presents the revised study of the original CDM baseline study conducted in 2006. The original study was conducted under the authority of the National Biogas Program (NBP), to study the potential GHG mitigation resulting from the adoption of domestic biodigesters. In the beginning of June 2006, a survey amongst 300 randomly selected households with the technical potential for a biodigester was conducted in the NBP's 6-targeted provinces (Kampong Cham, Svay Rieng, Prey Veng, Kampong Speu, Takeo and Kandal) in southeast Cambodia. The revised baseline study includes two additional provinces, Kampot and Kampong Chhnang. The survey showed that a significant proportion of the households have no access to basic sanitation and often have health problems. They consume mainly wood as cooking fuel and the majority use inefficient cooking stoves. The main lighting fuel is kerosene. The GHG emissions were calculated for each type of Animal Waste Management System (AWMS) and the baseline fuel consumption. The main methodology used is the GS-VER biodigester methodology and the IPCC 2006 guidelines to ex-ante estimate baseline, project and the emission reductions. The GHG emission from wood burning is only considered when it originates from a non-renewable source. The NRB analysis determined a NRB share of 70.7% for both collected and purchased wood. Total GHG emission is calculated by combining AWMS and wood fuels emissions. The annual baseline and project emission was estimated to be respectively 5.38 tCO2eq and 0.46 tCO2eq per average household, the emission reductions (ER) are therefore 4.92 tCO2eq/household/year.

  14. Commercial radioactive waste management system feasibility with the universal canister concept. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morissette, R.P.; Schneringer, P.E.; Lane, R.K.; Moore, R.L.; Young, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    A Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) was initiated by DOE to solicit from industry new and novel ideas for improvements in the nuclear waste management system. GA Technologies Inc. was contracted to study a system utilizing a universal canister which could be loaded at the reactor and used throughout the waste management system. The proposed canister was developed with the objective of meeting the mission requirements with maximum flexibility and at minimum cost. Canister criteria were selected from a thorough analysis of the spent fuel inventory, and canister concepts were evaluated along with the shipping and storage casks to determine the maximum payload. Engineering analyses were performed on various cask/canister combinations. One important criterion was the interchangeability of the canisters between truck and rail cask systems. A canister was selected which could hold three PWR intact fuel elements or up to eight consolidated PWR fuel elements. One canister could be shipped in an overweight truck cask or six in a rail cask. Economic analysis showed a cost savings of the reference system under consideration at that time.

  15. A concept of PWR using plate and shell heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: luciano.ondir@gmail.com, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In previous work it was verified the physical possibility of using plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in a PWR for merchant ships. This work studies the possibility of using GESMEX commercial of the shelf plate and shell heat exchanger of series XPS. It was found it is feasible for this type of heat exchanger to meet operational and accidental requirements for steam generation in PWR. Additionally, it is proposed an arrangement of such heat exchangers inside the reactor pressure vessel. Such arrangement may avoid ANSI/ANS51.1 nuclear class I requirements on those heat exchangers because they are contained in the reactor coolant pressure barrier and play no role in accidental scenarios. Additionally, those plates work under compression, preventing the risk of rupture. Being considered non-nuclear safety, having a modular architecture and working under compression may turn such architectural choice a must to meet safety objectives with improved economics. (author)

  16. Control of corrosion product transport in PWR secondary cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawochka, S.G.; Pearl, W.L. [NWT Corp., San Josa, CA (United States); Passell, T.O.; Welty, C.S. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Transport of corrosion products to PWR steam generators by the feedwater leads to sludge buildup on the tubesheets and fouling of tube-to-tube support crevices. In these regions, chemical impurities concentrate and accelerate tubing corrosion. Deposit buildup on the tubes also can lead to power generation limitations and necessitate chemical cleaning. Extensive corrosion product transport data for PWR secondary cycles has been developed employing integrating sampling techniques which facilitate identification of major corrosion product sources and assessments of the effectiveness of various control options. Plant data currently are available for assessing the impact of factors such as pH, pH control additive, materials of construction, blowdown, condensate treatment, and high temperature drains and feedwater filtration.

  17. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on the PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs.; 9 figs.; 30 tabs.

  18. Study on thermal-hydraulics during a PWR reflood phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tadashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    In-core thermal-hydraulics during a PWR reflood phase following a large-break LOCA are quite unique in comparison with two-phase flow which has been studied widely in previous researches, because the geometry of the flow path is complicated (bundle geometry) and water is at extremely low superficial velocity and almost under stagnant condition. Hence, some phenomena realized during a PWR reflood phase are not understood enough and appropriate analytical models have not been developed, although they are important in a viewpoint of reactor safety evaluation. Therefore, author investigated some phenomena specified as important issues for quantitative prediction, i.e. (1) void fraction in a bundle during a PWR reflood phase, (2) effect of radial core power profile on reflood behavior, (3) effect of combined emergency core coolant injection on reflood behavior, and (4) the core separation into two thermal-hydraulically different regions and the in-core flow circulation behavior observed during a combined injection PWR reflood phase. Further, author made analytical models for these specified issues, and succeeded to predict reflood behaviors at representative types of PWRs, i.e.cold leg injection PWRs and Combined injection PWRs, in good accuracy. Above results were incorporated into REFLA code which is developed at JAERI, and they improved accuracy in prediction and enlarged applicability of the code. In the present study, models were intended to be utilized in a practical use, and hence these models are simplified ones. However, physical understanding on the specified issues in the present study is basic and principal for reflood behavior, and then it is considered to be used in a future advanced code development and improvement. (author). 110 refs.

  19. PWR core stablity aganst xenon-induced spatial power oscillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H.J.; Han, K.I. (Korea Advanced Energy Research Inst., Seoul (Republic of Korea))

    1982-06-01

    Stability of a PWR core against xenon-induced axial power oscillation is studied using one-dimensional xenon transient analysis code, DD1D, that has been developed and verified at KAERI. Analyzed by DD1D utilizing the Kori Unit 1 design and operating data is the sensitivity of axial stability in a PWR core to the changes in core physical parameters including core power level, moderator temperature coefficient, core inlet temperature, doppler power coefficient and core average burnup. Through the sensitivity study the Kori Unit 1 core is found to be stable against axial xenon oscillation at the beginning of cycle 1. But, it becomes less stable as burnup progresses, and unstable at the end of cycle. Such a decrease in stability is mainly due to combined effect of changes in axial power distribution, moderator temperature coefficient and doppler power coefficient as core burnup progresses. It is concluded from the stability analysis of the Kori Unit 1 core that design of a large PWR with high power density and increased dimension can not avoid xenon-induced axial power instabilites to some extents, especially at the end of cycle.

  20. The Decay of Communism: Managing Spent Nuclear Fuel in the Soviet Union, 1937-1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegselius, Per (History of Science and Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: perho@kth.se

    2010-09-15

    The historical evolution of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) decision-making in Western Europe and North America is already fairly well-known. For the former socialist countries of Eastern Europe, and in particular the Soviet Union, we know less. There have recently been several good studies of Soviet nuclear power history (e.g. Schmid 2004, 2006, Josephson 2005), but none of them has gone into any depth when it comes to SNF, but rather focused on nuclear power reactors, public acceptance, the role of the media, etc. There are also several good overviews available that problematize the radioactive legacy of the Soviet Union, including the SNF and waste issue, but these studies do not address the historical dynamics and evolution of SNF management over a longer period of time; in other words, they fail to explain how and why the present state of affairs have actually come into being. The aim of this paper is to provide historical insight into the dynamics of SNF decision-making in the Soviet Union, from the origins of nuclear engineering in the 1930s to the collapse of the country in 1991. The nuclear fuel system can be described as a large technical system with a variety of interrelated components. The system is 'large' both because it involves key links between geographically disperse activities, and because it involves a variety of technologies, organizations and people that influence the dynamics and evolution of the system. Soviet SNF history is of particular interest in this context, with a nuclear fuel system that was the most complex in the world. The USSR was a pioneer within nuclear power and developed a variety of reactor designs and technologies for uranium mining, conversion and enrichment, as well as for transport, treatment, storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It explored both military and civil uses of the atom, and an enormous amount of people and organizations were involved in realizing highly ambitious nuclear programmes. The USSR is

  1. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  2. PWR composite materials use. A particular case of safety-related service water pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pays, M.F.; Le Courtois, T

    1997-11-01

    This paper shows the present and future uses of composite materials in French nuclear and fossil-fuel power plants. Electricite de France has decided to install composite materials in service water piping in its future nuclear power plant (PWR) at Civaux (West of France) and for the firs time in France, in safety-related applications. A wide range of studies has been performed about the durability, the control and damage mechanisms of those materials under service conditions among an ongoing Research and Development project. The main results are presented under the following headlines: selection of basic materials and manufacturing processes; aging processes (mechanical behavior during `lifetime`); design rules; non destructive examination during manufacturing process and during operation. The studies have been focused on epoxy pipings. The importance of strong quality insurance policy requirements are outlined. A study of the use of composite pipes in power plants (hydraulic, fossil fuel, and nuclear) in France and around the world (USA, Japan, Western Europe) are presented whether it be safety related or non safety-related applications. The different technical solutions for materials and manufacturing processes are presented and an economic comparison is made between steel and composite pipes. (author) 2 refs.

  3. Alloy 690 in PWR type reactors; Aleaciones base niquel en condiciones de primario de los reactores tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Serrano, M.

    2005-07-01

    Alloy 690, used as replacement of Alloy 600 for vessel head penetration (VHP) nozzles in PWR, coexists in the primary loop with other components of Alloy 600. Alloy 690 shows an excellent resistance to primary water stress corrosion cracking, while Alloy 600 is very susceptible to this degradation mechanisms. This article analyse comparatively the PWSCC behaviour of both Ni-based alloys and associated weld metals 52/152 and 82/182. (Author)

  4. Applicability of 3D Monte Carlo simulations for local values calculations in a PWR core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Franck; Cochet, Bertrand; Jinaphanh, Alexis; Jacquet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    As technical support of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN has been developing the MORET Monte Carlo code for many years in the framework of criticality safety assessment and is now working to extend its application to reactor physics. For that purpose, beside the validation for criticality safety (more than 2000 benchmarks from the ICSBEP Handbook have been modeled and analyzed), a complementary validation phase for reactor physics has been started, with benchmarks from IRPHEP Handbook and others. In particular, to evaluate the applicability of MORET and other Monte Carlo codes for local flux or power density calculations in large power reactors, it has been decided to contribute to the "Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark" (hosted by OECD/NEA). The aim of this benchmark is to monitor, in forthcoming decades, the performance progress of detailed Monte Carlo full core calculations. More precisely, it measures their advancement towards achieving high statistical accuracy in reasonable computation time for local power at fuel pellet level. A full PWR reactor core is modeled to compute local power densities for more than 6 million fuel regions. This paper presents results obtained at IRSN for this benchmark with MORET and comparisons with MCNP. The number of fuel elements is so large that source convergence as well as statistical convergence issues could cause large errors in local tallies, especially in peripheral zones. Various sampling or tracking methods have been implemented in MORET, and their operational effects on such a complex case have been studied. Beyond convergence issues, to compute local values in so many fuel regions could cause prohibitive slowing down of neutron tracking. To avoid this, energy grid unification and tallies preparation before tracking have been implemented, tested and proved to be successful. In this particular case, IRSN obtained promising results with MORET compared to MCNP, in terms of local power densities, standard

  5. Radiative heat transfer modelling in a PWR severe accident sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magali Zabiego; Florian Fichot [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - BP 3 - 13115 Saint-paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pablo Rubiolo [Westinghouse Science and Technology - 1344 Beulah Road - Pittsburgh - PA 15235 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The present study is devoted to the estimation of the radiative heat transfers during a severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor. In such a situation, the residual nuclear power released by the fuel rods can not be evacuated and heats up the core. As a result, the cylindrical rods and the structures initially composing the core undergo a degradation process: swelling, breaking or melting of the rods and structures and eventual collapse to form a heap of fragments called a debris bed. As the solid matrix loses its original shape, the core geometry continuously evolves from standing, regularly-spaced cylinders to a non-homogeneous system including deformed remaining rods and structures and debris particles. To predict this type of sequence, the ICARE/CATHARE software [1] is developed by IRSN. Since the temperatures can reach values greater than 3000 K, it was of major interest to provide the code with an accurate radiative transfer model usable whatever the geometry of the system. Considering the size of a reactor core compared to the mean penetration length of radiation, the core can be seen as an optically thick medium. This observation led us to use the diffusion approximation to treat the radiation propagation. In this approach, the radiative flux is calculated in a way similar to thermal conduction: q{sub r} = [K{sub e}].{nabla}T where [K{sub e}] is the equivalent conductivity tensor of the system accounting for thermal and radiative transfer. An homogenization technique is applied to estimate the equivalent conductivity. Given the temperature level, the radiative contribution to the equivalent conductivity tensor quickly becomes dominant. This model was described earlier in [2] in which it was shown that an equivalent conductivity can be continuously calculated in the system when the geometry evolves from standing regular cylinder rods to swollen or broken ones, surrounded or not by a film of liquid materials, to

  6. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management technology development program plan: 1994 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until April 1992, the major activity of the ICPP was the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium and the management of the resulting high-level wastes (HLW). In 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the continued safe management and disposition of SNF and radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste), 3,800 cubic meters of calcine waste, and 289 metric tons heavy metal of SNF are in inventory at the ICPP. Disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will be properly stored and prepared for final disposal in accordance with regulatory drivers. This Plan presents a brief summary of each of the major elements of the SF&WMTDP; identifies key program assumptions and their bases; and outlines the key activities and decisions that must be completed to identify, develop, demonstrate, and implement a process(es) that will properly prepare the SNF and radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP for safe and efficient interim storage and final disposal.

  7. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  8. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  9. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  10. DUPIC fuel fabrication in shielded facilities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.W.; Kim, W.K.; Kim, S.S.; Yang, M.S.; Park, H.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusong-ku, Taejon City (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The DUPIC(Direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) fuel cycle is to directly refabricate the CANDU fuel from spent PWR fuel materials by thermal and mechanical processes without wet reprocessing process. The concept was proposed and termed DUPIC in joint research program between the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and the US Departments of State in 1992. The DUPIC fuel cycle has many advantages over direct disposal or wet reprocessing and MOX fuel cycle in terms of proliferation resistance, reduction of spent fuel accumulation and uranium resource utilization, etc. Since the material in the DUPIC fuel fabrication process is highly radioactive due to no separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products, which is an intrinsic characteristic of the DUPIC process, all fabrication and characterization processes should be performed remotely in highly shielded hot cell facilities. KAERI has developed the remote fuel fabrication equipment and has successfully completed the installation of them in the shielded facilities, called DFDF (DUPIC Fuel Development Facility), at KAERI in early 2000. Based on the fuel fabrication technologies, including powder treatment, pelletizing and laser welding, KAERI has successfully fabricated DUPIC fuel pellets and elements with various design specifications to evaluate the performance of DUPIC fuel through irradiation tests at the HANARO research reactor. This paper describes KAERI's progress in DUPIC fuel fabrication. (author)

  11. Spent fuel management - two alternatives at the FiR 1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenhaara, S.E.J. [Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), FIN-02044 VTT Espoo (Finland)

    2001-07-01

    The FiR 1 -reactor, a 250 kW Triga reactor, has been in operation since 1962. The reactor with its subsystems has experienced a large renovation work in 1996-97. The main purpose of the upgrading was to install the new Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) irradiation facility. The BNCT work dominates the current utilization of the reactor: four days per week for BNCT purposes and only one day per week for neutron activation analysis and isotope production. The Council of State (government) granted for the reactor a new operating license for twelve years starting from the beginning of the year 2000. There is however a special condition in the new license. We have to achieve a binding agreement between our Research Centre and the domestic Nuclear Power Plant Companies about the possibility to use the final disposal facility of the Nuclear Power Plants for our spent fuel, if we want to continue the reactor operation beyond the year 2006. In addition to the choosing of one of the spent fuel management alternatives the future of the reactor will also depend strongly on the development of the BNCT irradiations. If the number of patients per year increases fast enough and the irradiations of the patients will be economically justified, the operation of the reactor will continue independently of the closing of the USDOE alternative in 2006. Otherwise, if the number of patients will be low, the funding of the reactor will be probably stopped and the reactor will be shut down. (author)

  12. Mathematical modeling and simulation of thermal management in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirfazli, Amir; Asghari, Saeed; Koosha, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    The narrow range of operating temperature and small temperature differences between the stack and the ambient have made the fuel cell thermal management as one of the key factors that influence the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks. In the present study, an analytical model is developed to investigate coolant flow and temperature distributions within a PEMFC stack. The model consists of a coolant flow distribution submodel and a thermal submodel for determination of coolant mass flow distribution between different cooling flow fields of the stack and the temperature distribution within the stack, respectively. The coolant mass flow rate and the temperature distributions in stacks with U and Z configurations are compared with each other using the developed model. The test results of two 65-cells stacks are presented to verify the simulation. The results indicate that the Z configuration results in more uniform temperature distribution than the U configuration in low values of the manifold cross sectional area. However, the Z configuration cannot be applied in the stacks with very small manifold sizes. A parametric analysis is also conducted to assess the effects of some parameters on the temperature distribution in a stack.

  13. Energy management strategy for fuel cell-supercapacitor hybrid vehicles based on prediction of energy demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignano, Mauro G.; Costa-Castelló, Ramon; Roda, Vicente; Nigro, Norberto M.; Junco, Sergio; Feroldi, Diego

    2017-08-01

    Offering high efficiency and producing zero emissions Fuel Cells (FCs) represent an excellent alternative to internal combustion engines for powering vehicles to alleviate the growing pollution in urban environments. Due to inherent limitations of FCs which lead to slow transient response, FC-based vehicles incorporate an energy storage system to cover the fast power variations. This paper considers a FC/supercapacitor platform that configures a hard constrained powertrain providing an adverse scenario for the energy management strategy (EMS) in terms of fuel economy and drivability. Focusing on palliating this problem, this paper presents a novel EMS based on the estimation of short-term future energy demand and aiming at maintaining the state of energy of the supercapacitor between two limits, which are computed online. Such limits are designed to prevent active constraint situations of both FC and supercapacitor, avoiding the use of friction brakes and situations of non-power compliance in a short future horizon. Simulation and experimentation in a case study corresponding to a hybrid electric bus show improvements on hydrogen consumption and power compliance compared to the widely reported Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy. Also, the comparison with the optimal strategy via Dynamic Programming shows a room for improvement to the real-time strategies.

  14. Recommendations for the nuclear fuel management in Mexico; Recomendaciones para la gestion del combustible nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, R.F. [FI-UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work some observations about the economic and strategic importance of the nuclear fuel management of a nucleo electric power station are presented, especially of the fuel management outside of the reactor core or supply function. We know that the economic competitiveness of the nucleo electric generation in fact resides in its low cost of fuel, in comparison with other alternative energy generation sources. Notwithstanding, frequently it is not given to this function the importance that should to have. The objective of this work is to focus again the mission of this activity, at view of the evolution and the peculiarities of the international markets of the nuclear fuel cycle. Equally a brief exhibition of the markets is made, from the uranium supply until the post- irradiation phase. In the case of the pre-irradiation phase we are in front of a market that the buyers dominate and that seemingly it will not present bigger problems in the next years, however situations exist like the decrease of the existent uranium inventories and the lack opening of new mines that can change the panorama. In relation with the post-irradiation phase, is necessary to study the strategies followed by other countries as the one uranium and plutonium recycled. As I have observed that the reality of that this passing in these markets and the practice of the fuel management, sometimes do not go of the hand, I have looked for to contribute some ideas and suggestions, on as going adapting this important function. (Author)

  15. Comparison of Different Fuel Temperature Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weddig, Beatrice

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve the performance of the core calculation system used in Ringhals for in-core fuel management. It has been observed that, whereas the codes yield results that are in good agreement with measurements when the core operates at full nominal power, this agreement deteriorates noticeably when the reactor is running at reduced power. This deficiency of the code system was observed by comparing the calculated and measured boron concentrations in the moderator of the PWR. From the neutronic point of view, the difference between full power and reduced power in the same core is the different temperature of the fuel and the moderator. Whereas the coolant temperature can be measured and is thus relatively well known, the fuel temperature is only inferred from the moderator temperature as well as neutron physics and heat transfer calculations. The most likely reason for the above mentioned discrepancy is therefore the uncertainty of the fuel temperature at low power, and hence the incorrect calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity feedback through the so called Doppler effect. To obtain the fuel temperature at low power, usually some semi-empirical relations, sometimes called correlations, are used. The above-mentioned inaccuracy of the core calculation procedures can thus be tracked down to the insufficiency of these correlations. Therefore, the suggestion is that the above mentioned deficiency of the core calculation codes can be eliminated or reduced if the fuel temperature correlations are improved. An improved model, called the 30% model, is implemented in SIMULATE-3, the core calculation code used at Ringhals. The accuracy of the 30% model was compared to that of the present model by considering a number of cases, where measured values of the boron concentration at low power were available, and comparing them with calculated values using both the present and the new model. It was found that on the whole, the new fuel temperature

  16. EPRI PWR Safety and Relief Valve Test Program: test condition justification report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosler, J.

    1982-12-01

    In response to NUREG 0737, Item II.D.1.A requirements, several safety and relief valve designs were tested by EPRI under PWR utility sponsorship. Justification that the inlet fluid conditions under which these valve designs were tested are representative of those expected in participating domestic PWR units during FSAR, Extended High Pressure Injection, and Cold Overpressurization events is presented.

  17. Numerical study of water management in the air flow channel of a PEM fuel cell cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Peng; Lai, Ming-Chia [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2007-01-10

    The water management in the air flow channel of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cathode is numerically investigated using the FLUENT software package. By enabling the volume of fraction (VOF) model, the air-water two-phase flow can be simulated under different operating conditions. The effects of channel surface hydrophilicity, channel geometry, and air inlet velocity on water behavior, water content inside the channel, and two-phase pressure drop are discussed in detail. The results of the quasi-steady-state simulations show that: (1) the hydrophilicity of reactant flow channel surface is critical for water management in order to facilitate water transport along channel surfaces or edges; (2) hydrophilic surfaces also increase pressure drop due to liquid water spreading; (3) a sharp corner channel design could benefit water management because it facilitates water accumulation and provides paths for water transport along channel surface opposite to gas diffusion layer; (4) the two-phase pressure drop inside the air flow channel increases almost linearly with increasing air inlet velocity. (author)

  18. Dynamic water management of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using intermittent RH control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussaini, I. S.; Wang, C. Y.

    A novel method of water management of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells using intermittent humidification is presented in this study. The goal is to maintain the membrane close to full humidification, while eliminating channel flooding. The entire cycle is divided into four stages: saturation and de-saturation of the gas diffusion layer followed by de-hydration and hydration of membrane. By controlling the duration of dry and humid flows, it is shown that the cell voltage can be maintained within a narrow band. The technique is applied on experimental test cells using both plain and hydrophobic materials for the gas diffusion layer and an improvement in performance as compared to steady humidification is demonstrated. Duration of dry and humid flows is determined experimentally for several operating conditions.

  19. Conceptual design report for the spent fuel management technology research and test (SMATER) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.W.; Ro, S.G.; Lee, J.S.; Min, D.K.; Shin, Y.J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    This study was intended to develop concept for a pilot-scale remote operation facility for longer term management of spent fuel and therefrom to provide technical requirement for later basic design of the facility. Main scope of work for the study was to revise the past (1990) conceptual design in functions, scale, hot cell layout etc. based on user requirements. Technical reference was made to the PKA facility in Germany, through collaboration with appropriate partner, to elaborate the design and requirements. The study was focused on establishing design criteria and conceptual design of the SMATER facility. The results of this study should be an essential and useful basis upon optimization for further work to basic design of the facility. (author). 17 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Management of radioactive waste gases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Volume I. Comparison of alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.G.; Prout, W.E.; Buckner, J.T.; Buckner, M.R.

    1980-12-01

    Alternatives were compared for collection and fixation of radioactive waste gases released during normal operation of the nuclear fuel cycle, and for transportation and storage/disposal of the resulting waste forms. The study used a numerical rating scheme to evaluate and compare the alternatives for krypton-85, iodine-129, and carbon-14; whereas a subjective evaluation, based on published reports and engineering judgement, was made for transportation and storage/disposal options. Based on these evaluations, certain alternatives are recommended for an integrated scheme for waste management of each of the subject waste gases. Phase II of this project, which is concerned with the development of performance criteria for the waste forms associated with the subject gases, will be completed by the end of 1980. This work will be documented as Volume II of this report.

  1. Dynamic water management of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using intermittent RH control

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, I.S.

    2010-06-01

    A novel method of water management of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells using intermittent humidification is presented in this study. The goal is to maintain the membrane close to full humidification, while eliminating channel flooding. The entire cycle is divided into four stages: saturation and de-saturation of the gas diffusion layer followed by de-hydration and hydration of membrane. By controlling the duration of dry and humid flows, it is shown that the cell voltage can be maintained within a narrow band. The technique is applied on experimental test cells using both plain and hydrophobic materials for the gas diffusion layer and an improvement in performance as compared to steady humidification is demonstrated. Duration of dry and humid flows is determined experimentally for several operating conditions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  3. Spent fuel, plutonium and nuclear waste: long-term management; Le combustible use et le plutonium en tant que dechets nucleaires: gestion a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, G

    1998-11-01

    Different options for the management of nuclear waste arising from the nuclear fuel cycle are discussed. Special emphasis is on reprocessing followed by geological disposal, geological disposal of reprocessing waste, direct geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, long term storage. Particular emphasis is on the management of plutonium including recycling, immobilisation and disposal, partitioning and transmutation.

  4. Adding fuel to the fire: the impacts of non-native grass invasion on fire management at a regional scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha A Setterfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Widespread invasion by non-native plants has resulted in substantial change in fire-fuel characteristics and fire-behaviour in many of the world's ecosystems, with a subsequent increase in the risk of fire damage to human life, property and the environment. Models used by fire management agencies to assess fire risk are dependent on accurate assessments of fuel characteristics but there is little evidence that they have been modified to reflect landscape-scale invasions. There is also a paucity of information documenting other changes in fire management activities that have occurred to mitigate changed fire regimes. This represents an important limitation in information for both fire and weed risk management. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook an aerial survey to estimate changes to landscape fuel loads in northern Australia resulting from invasion by Andropogon gayanus (gamba grass. Fuel load within the most densely invaded area had increased from 6 to 10 t ha(-1 in the past two decades. Assessment of the effect of calculating the Grassland Fire Danger Index (GFDI for the 2008 and 2009 fire seasons demonstrated that an increase from 6 to 10 t ha(-1 resulted in an increase from five to 38 days with fire risk in the 'severe' category in 2008 and from 11 to 67 days in 2009. The season of severe fire weather increased by six weeks. Our assessment of the effect of increased fuel load on fire management practices showed that fire management costs in the region have increased markedly (∼9 times in the past decade due primarily to A. gayanus invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrated the high economic cost of mitigating fire impacts of an invasive grass. This study demonstrates the need to quantify direct and indirect invasion costs to assess the risk of further invasion and to appropriately fund fire and weed management strategies.

  5. PWR safety and relief valve test program. Valve selection/juftification report. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-12-01

    NUREG 0578 required that full-scale testing be performed on pressurizer safety valves and relief valves representative of those in use or planned for use in PWR plants. To obtain valve performance data for the entire population of PWR plant valves, nine safety valves and ten relief valves were selected as a fully representative set of test valves. Justification that the selected valves represent all PWR plant valves was provided by each safety and relief valve manufacturer. Both the valve selection and justification work was performed as part of the PWR Safety and Relief Valve Test Program conducted by EPRI on behalf of the PWR utilities in response to the recommendations of NUREG 0578 and the requirements of the NRC. Results of the Safety and Relief Valve Selection and Justification effort is documented in this report.

  6. Life Cycle of Petroleum Biodegradation Metabolite Plumes, and Implications for Risk Management at Fuel Release Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemo, Dawn A; O'Reilly, Kirk T; Mohler, Rachel E; Magaw, Renae I; Espino Devine, Catalina; Ahn, Sungwoo; Tiwary, Asheesh K

    2016-09-14

    This paper summarizes the results of a 5-y research study of the nature and toxicity of petroleum biodegradation metabolites in groundwater at fuel release sites that are quantified as diesel-range "Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons" (TPH; also known as TPHd, diesel-range organics (DRO), etc.), unless a silica gel cleanup (SGC) step is used on the sample extract prior to the TPH analysis. This issue is important for site risk management in regulatory jurisdictions that use TPH as a metric; the presence of these metabolites may preclude site closure even if all other factors can be considered "low-risk." Previous work has shown that up to 100% of the extractable organics in groundwater at petroleum release sites can be biodegradation metabolites. The metabolites can be separated from the hydrocarbons by incorporating an SGC step; however, regulatory agency acceptance of SGC has been inconsistent because of questions about the nature and toxicity of the metabolites. The present study was conducted to answer these specific questions. Groundwater samples collected from source and downgradient wells at fuel release sites were extracted and subjected to targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nontargeted two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) analyses, and the metabolites identified in each sample were classified according to molecular structural classes and assigned an oral reference dose (RfD)-based toxicity ranking. Our work demonstrates that the metabolites identified in groundwater at biodegrading fuel release sites are in classes ranked as low toxicity to humans and are not expected to pose significant risk to human health. The identified metabolites naturally attenuate in a predictable manner, with an overall trend to an increasingly higher proportion of organic acids and esters, and a lower human toxicity profile, and a life cycle that is consistent with the low-risk natural attenuation paradigm adopted

  7. Effects of Climate and Fuels Management on Wildfire Occurrence, Size, Severity and Emissions in the Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerling, A. L.; Fites, J. A.; Keyser, A.

    2015-12-01

    Annual wildfire burned area in federally managed Sierra Nevada forests has increased by more than 10,000 ha per decade since the early 1970s. At the same time, recent years have seen some extremely large fires compared to the historical record, with significant areas of moderate to high severity fire (e.g., McNally 2002, Rim 2013, King 2014 fires). Changes to fuels and fire regimes due to fire suppression and land use, as well as warming temperatures and the occurrence of drought, are thought to be significant factors contributing to increased risks of large, severe fires in Sierra Nevada forests. Over 70% of the vegetated area in federally managed forests in the Sierra Nevada is classified as having altered fuels and fire regimes, while average annual temperature in the Sierra Nevada has been above the long term mean for all but four years in the past two decades. As climate is expected to continue warming for decades to come, we explored fuels management scenarios as the primary tools available to modify risks of large, severe wildfires. We developed experimental statistical models of fire occurrence, fire size, and high severity burned area, to explore the interaction between climate and altered fuels conditions. These models were applied to historical climate conditions, a sample of future climate projections, and to both current fuels conditions and a range of scenarios for fuels treatments. Emissions from wildfires were estimated using the Fire Inventory from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Our models project that average annual burned area in the Sierra Nevada will more than double by mid-century. Similarly, particulate and other pollution emissions from Sierra Nevada wildfires are projected to more than double, even if future fire severity does not change. Fuels treatment scenarios significantly reduced simulated future burned area and emissions below untreated projections. High severity burned area responded to both climate and fuels

  8. Powertrain management in sports cars in order to reduce fuel consumption; Antriebsmanagement bei Sportfahrzeugen zur Reduzierung des Kraftstoffverbrauchs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, L.; Kerkau, M.; Bofinger, G.; Mueller, S.; Meier, R.; Neusser, H.J. [Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Weissach (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In current sports car development - where fuel efficiency has always played a predominant role - one of the central targets is the reduction of fuel consumption. In order to maximize the benefits of improved fuel economy it is necessary to consistently optimize many of the known parameters and have them controlled by a corresponding Powertrain Management System. This presentation explains Porsche's layout philosophy and outlines the technologies used to implement a Powertrain Management specifically designed for application in sports cars. This Powertrain Management System coordinates the chosen technologies and combines them into an efficient drive system. The driver is given the possibility of making his choice between a regular program and a sports option. Further, this presentation describes a Thermal Management System meant to optimize engine warm-up as well as the part-load and full-load modes while giving consideration to the specific requirements of sports car operation. It also deals in great detail with the inherent potential of an idle stop system and its integration into the car, which is rather complicated. In addition, this paper looks into adaptive shift strategies for automatic transmissions with the aim of automatically selecting performance-oriented shift points tuned for optimum fuel consumption values. (orig.)

  9. Management of spent fuel in France. The Hague, the French ATC; Gestion de combustible irradiado en Francia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Beceiro, A.; Gago, J. A.

    2010-07-01

    Commercial nuclear reactors installed in France generate annually about 1150 tons of spent fuel. For the proper management of this waste the Gallic country has devoted many resources to research. The temporary storage facility for reprocessing of the Hague is one of the major facilities in this area. (Author)

  10. Study of the distribution of hydrogen in a PWR containment with CFD codes; Estudio de la distribucion de hidrogeno en una contencion PWR con codigos CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, G.; Matias, R.; Fernandez, K.; Justo, D.; Bocanegra, R.; Mena, L.; Queral, C.

    2015-07-01

    During a severe accident in a PWR, the hydrogen generated may be distributed in the containment atmosphere and reach the combustion conditions that can cause the containment failure. In this research project, a preliminary study has been done about the capacities of ANSYS Fluent 15.0 and GOTHIC 8.0 to tri dimensional distribution of the hydrogen in a PWR containment during a severe accident. (Author)

  11. Perspectives on the closed fuel cycle Implications for high-level waste matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Jean-Marie; Quang, Richard Do; Masson, Hervé; Lieven, Thierry; Ferry, Cécile; Poinssot, Christophe; Debes, Michel; Delbecq, Jean-Michel

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear energy accounts for 80% of electricity production in France, generating approximately 1150 t of spent fuel for an electrical output of 420 TWh. Based on a reprocessing-conditioning-recycling strategy, the orientations taken by Électricité de France (EDF) for the mid-term and the far-future are to keep the fleet performances at the highest level, and to maintain the nuclear option fully open by the replacement of present pressurized water reactor (PWR) by new light water reactor (LWR), such as the evolutionary pressurized reactor (EPR) and future Generation IV designs. Adaptations of waste materials to new requirements will come with these orientations in order to meet long-term energy sustainability. In particular, waste materials and spent fuels are expected to meet increased requirements in comparison with the present situation. So the treatment of higher burn-up UO2 spent fuel and MOX fuel requires determining the performances of glass and other matrices according to several criteria: chemical 'digestibility' (i.e. capacity of glass to incorporate fission products and minor actinides without loss of quality), resistance to alpha self-irradiation, residual power in view of disposal. Considering the long-term evolution of spent MOX fuel in storage, the helium production, the influence of irradiation damages accumulation and the evolution of the microstructure of the fuel pellet need to be known, as well as for the future fuels. Further, the eventual transmutation of minor actinides in fast neutron reactors (FR) of Generation IV, if its interest in optimising high-level waste management is proven, may also raise new challenges about the materials and fuel design. Some major questions in terms of waste materials and spent fuel are discussed in this paper.

  12. PWR FLECHT SEASET 163-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task data report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse report No. 13, August-October 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftus, M J; Hochreiter, L E; McGuire, M F; Valkovic, M M

    1983-10-01

    This report presents data from the 163-Rod Bundle Blow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Systems Effects and Separate Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The task consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. These tests were designed to determine effects of flow blockage and flow bypass on reflooding behavior and to aid in the assessment of computational models in predicting the reflooding behavior of flow blockage in rod bundle arrays.

  13. Study on the requirement for the fuel test loop performance in the HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Hark Rho

    2000-06-01

    The requirement of the FTL (Fuel Test Loop) performance were investigated to reaffirm the technical feasibility of the FTL facility which is in consideration to install at the HANARO. LH hole in the reflector region and OR3 in the outer core region are considered as candidate sites for the IPS (In-Pile Section) for the analysis purpose. The achievable linear power at test fuel pin(s) and neutron flux levels at the cladding are analyzed in the IPS, which accommodates CANDU or PWR test fuel. The enrichment of test fuels is assumed as natural uranium for CANDU and 3.5% or 5% for PWR. The test fuel configuration is bundle or 7-pin in LH hole but 1-pin in OR site. For the CANDU test fuel, the target linear power of 60kW/m can not be achieved for all cases. For the PWR test fuel, the target linear power of 40kW/m is obtained at fuels located in the direction of the core for only the case of 5% bundle irradiation. From a sensitivity study, the linear power at test fuel is expected to increase at least 30% of the present results if the core bumup effect, optimization of the ratio of fuel-to-moderator number density, etc., are considered in the detail design. Thus, the linear power for PWR fuel is expected to reach the target value, and that for CANDU fuel will reach the target value if enriched fuel is used. The fast neutron flux at the test fuel cladding is estimated for most cases to be lower than one-third of the target value of 10{sup 1}4 n/cm{sup 2}-sec and expected not to reach the target value.

  14. A study on thimble plug removal for PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong Soo; Lee, Chang Sup; Lee, Jae Yong; Jun, Hwang Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic effects of removing the RCC guide thimble plugs are evaluated for 8 Westinghouse type PWR plants in Korea as a part of feasibility study: core outlet loss coefficient, thimble bypass flow, and best estimate flow. It is resulted that the best estimate thimble bypass flow increases about by 2% and the best estimate flow increases approximately by 1.2%. The resulting DNBR penalties can be covered with the current DNBR margin. Accident analyses are also investigated that the dropped rod transient is shown to be limiting and relatively sensitive to bypass flow variation. 8 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  15. Vertical Drop Of 21-Pwr Waste Package On Unyielding Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Mastilovic; A. Scheider; S.M. Bennett

    2001-01-29

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) Waste Package (WP) subjected to the 2-m vertical drop on an unyielding surface at three different temperatures. The scope of this calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities in two different WP components. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for that design only.

  16. Estimating probable flaw distributions in PWR steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, J.A.; Turner, A.P.L. [Dominion Engineering, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes methods for estimating the number and size distributions of flaws of various types in PWR steam generator tubes. These estimates are needed when calculating the probable primary to secondary leakage through steam generator tubes under postulated accidents such as severe core accidents and steam line breaks. The paper describes methods for two types of predictions: (1) the numbers of tubes with detectable flaws of various types as a function of time, and (2) the distributions in size of these flaws. Results are provided for hypothetical severely affected, moderately affected and lightly affected units. Discussion is provided regarding uncertainties and assumptions in the data and analyses.

  17. Integral Test Facility PKL: Experimental PWR Accident Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Investigations of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of pressurized water reactors under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility at AREVA NP in Erlangen, Germany for many years. The PKL facility models the entire primary side and significant parts of the secondary side of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at a height scale of 1 : 1. Volumes, power ratings and mass flows are scaled with a ratio of 1 : 145. The experimental facility consists of 4 primary loops with circul...

  18. Assessment of the uncertainties of MULTICELL calculations by the OECD NEA UAM PWR pin cell burnup benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kereszturi, Andras [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Centre for Energy Research; Panka, Istvan

    2015-09-15

    Defining precisely the burnup of the nuclear fuel is important from the point of view of core design calculations, safety analyses, criticality calculations (e.g. burnup credit calculations), etc. This paper deals with the uncertainties of MULTICELL calculations obtained by the solution of the OECD NEA UAM PWR pin cell burnup benchmark. In this assessment Monte-Carlo type statistical analyses are applied and the energy dependent covariance matrices of the cross-sections are taken into account. Additionally, the impact of the uncertainties of the fission yields is also considered. The target quantities are the burnup dependent uncertainties of the infinite multiplication factor, the two-group cross-sections, the reaction rates and the number densities of some isotopes up to the burnup of 60 MWd/kgU. In the paper the burnup dependent tendencies of the corresponding uncertainties and their sources are analyzed.

  19. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  20. A practical algorithm for optimal operation management of distribution network including fuel cell power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, Taher; Meymand, Hamed Zeinoddini; Nayeripour, Majid [Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran)

    2010-08-15

    Fuel cell power plants (FCPPs) have been taken into a great deal of consideration in recent years. The continuing growth of the power demand together with environmental constraints is increasing interest to use FCPPs in power system. Since FCPPs are usually connected to distribution network, the effect of FCPPs on distribution network is more than other sections of power system. One of the most important issues in distribution networks is optimal operation management (OOM) which can be affected by FCPPs. This paper proposes a new approach for optimal operation management of distribution networks including FCCPs. In the article, we consider the total electrical energy losses, the total electrical energy cost and the total emission as the objective functions which should be minimized. Whereas the optimal operation in distribution networks has a nonlinear mixed integer optimization problem, the optimal solution could be obtained through an evolutionary method. We use a new evolutionary algorithm based on Fuzzy Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (FAPSO) to solve the optimal operation problem and compare this method with Genetic Algorithm (GA), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), Differential Evolution (DE), Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) and Tabu Search (TS) over two distribution test feeders. (author)

  1. Spent fuel composition database system on WWW. SFCOMPO on WWW Ver.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hiroki [Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Suyama, Kenya; Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    'SFCOMPO on WWW Ver.2' is an advanced version of 'SFCOMPO on WWW' ('Spent Fuel Composition Database System on WWW') released in 1997. This new version has a function of database management by an introduced relational database software 'PostgreSQL' and has various searching methods. All of the data required for the calculation of isotopic composition is available from the web site of this system. This report describes the outline of this system and the searching method using Internet. In addition, the isotopic composition data and the reactor data of the 14 LWRs (7 PWR and 7 BWR) registered in this system are described. (author)

  2. Managing plutonium in Britain. Current options[Mixed oxide nuclear fuels; Nuclear weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This is the report of a two day meeting to discuss issues arising from the reprocessing of plutonium and production of mixed oxide nuclear fuels in Britain. It was held at Charney Manor, near Oxford, on June 25 and 26, 1998, and was attended by 35 participants, including government officials, scientists, policy analysts, representatives of interested NGO's, journalists, a Member of Parliament, and visiting representatives from the US and Irish governments. The topic of managing plutonium has been a consistent thread within ORG's work, and was the subject of one of our previous reports, CDR 12. This particular seminar arose out of discussions earlier in the year between Dr. Frank Barnaby and the Rt. Hon. Michael Meacher MP, Minister for the Environment. With important decisions about the management of plutonium in Britain pending, ORG undertook to hold a seminar at which all aspects of the subject could be aired. A number of on-going events formed the background to this initiative. The first was British Nuclear Fuels' [BNFL] application to the Environment Agency to commission a mixed oxide fuel [MOX] plant at Sellafield. The second was BNFL's application to vary radioactive discharge limits at Sellafield. Thirdly, a House of Lords Select Committee was in process of taking evidence, on the disposal of radioactive waste. Fourthly, the Royal Society, in a recent report entitled Management of Separated Plutonium, recommended that 'the Government should commission a comprehensive review... of the options for the management of plutonium'. Four formal presentations were made to the meeting, on the subjects of Britain's plutonium policy, commercial prospects for plutonium use, problems of plutonium accountancy, and the danger of nuclear terrorism, by experts from outside the nuclear industry. It was hoped that the industry's viewpoint would also be heard, and BNFL were invited to present a paper, but declined on the grounds that they

  3. Progress of the RIA experiments with high burnup fuels and their evaluation in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishijima, Kiyomi; Fuketa, Toyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    Recent results obtained in the NSRR power burst experiments with high burnup PWR fuel rods are described and discussed in this paper. Data concerning test condition, transient records during pulse irradiation and post irradiation examination are described. Another high burnup PWR fuel rod failed in the test HBO-5 at the slightly higher energy deposition than that in the test HBO-1. The failure mechanism of the test HBO-5 is the same as that of the test HBO-1, that is, hydride-assisted PCMI. Some influence of the thermocouples welding on the failure behavior of the HBO-5 rod was observed.

  4. Optimizing energy management of fuel cell-direct storage-hybrid systems; Optimierendes Energiemanagement von Brennstoffzelle-Direktspeicher-Hybridsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocklisch, Thilo

    2010-03-29

    The dissertation presents a new optimizing energy management concept for fuel cell-direct storage-hybrid systems. Initially, the characteristics of specific energy time series are investigated on the basis of real measurement data. A new concept for the multi-scale analysis, modelling and prediction of fluctuating photovoltaic supply and electric load demand profiles is developed. The second part of the dissertation starts with a discussion of the benefits of and the basic coupling and control principles for fuel cell-direct storage-hybrid systems. The typical characteristics of a PEM-fuel cell, a metal hydride hydrogen storage, a lithium-ion battery and a supercap unit are presented. A new modular DC/DC-converter is described. Results from experimental and theoretical investigations of the individual components and the overall hybrid system are discussed. New practicable models for the voltage-current-curve, the state of charge behaviour and the conversion losses are presented. The third part of the dissertation explains the new energy management concept. The optimization of power flows is achieved by a control-oriented approach, employing a) the primary control of bus voltage and fuel cell current, b) the secondary control to limit fuel cell current gradient and operating range and to perform direct storage charge control, and c) the system control to optimally adjust secondary control parameters aiming for a reduction of dynamic fuel cell stress and hydrogen consumption. Results from simulations and experimental investigations demonstrate the benefits and high capabilities of the new optimizing energy management concept. Examples of stationary and portable applications conclude the dissertation. (orig.)

  5. Quality Model and Artificial Intelligence Base Fuel Ratio Management with Applications to Automotive Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Piran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, manage the Internal Combustion (IC engine modeling and a multi-input-multi-output artificial intelligence baseline chattering free sliding mode methodology scheme is developed with guaranteed stability to simultaneously control fuel ratios to desired levels under various air flow disturbances by regulating the mass flow rates of engine PFI and DI injection systems. Modeling of an entire IC engine is a very important and complicated process because engines are nonlinear, multi inputs-multi outputs and time variant. One purpose of accurate modeling is to save development costs of real engines and minimizing the risks of damaging an engine when validating controller designs. Nevertheless, developing a small model, for specific controller design purposes, can be done and then validated on a larger, more complicated model. Analytical dynamic nonlinear modeling of internal combustion engine is carried out using elegant Euler-Lagrange method compromising accuracy and complexity. A baseline estimator with varying parameter gain is designed with guaranteed stability to allow implementation of the proposed state feedback sliding mode methodology into a MATLAB simulation environment, where the sliding mode strategy is implemented into a model engine control module (“software”. To estimate the dynamic model of IC engine fuzzy inference engine is applied to baseline sliding mode methodology. The fuzzy inference baseline sliding methodology performance was compared with a well-tuned baseline multi-loop PID controller through MATLAB simulations and showed improvements, where MATLAB simulations were conducted to validate the feasibility of utilizing the developed controller and state estimator for automotive engines. The proposed tracking method is designed to optimally track the desired FR by minimizing the error between the trapped in-cylinder mass and the product of the desired FR and fuel mass over a given time interval.

  6. Local flow management/profile descent algorithm. Fuel-efficient, time-controlled profiles for the NASA TSRV airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, J. L.; Izumi, K. H.; Markham, C. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Thompson, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Local Flow Management/Profile Descent (LFM/PD) algorithm designed for the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle program is described. The algorithm provides fuel-efficient altitude and airspeed profiles consistent with ATC restrictions in a time-based metering environment over a fixed ground track. The model design constraints include accommodation of both published profile descent procedures and unpublished profile descents, incorporation of fuel efficiency as a flight profile criterion, operation within the performance capabilities of the Boeing 737-100 airplane with JT8D-7 engines, and conformity to standard air traffic navigation and control procedures. Holding and path stretching capabilities are included for long delay situations.

  7. Thermal and water management of low temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell in fork-lift truck power system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud; Rabbani, Raja Abid

    2013-01-01

    A general zero-dimensional Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) model has been developed for forklift truck application. The balance of plant (BOP) comprises of a compressor, an air humidifier, a set of heat exchangers and a recirculation pump. Water and thermal management of the fuel cell...... voltage when membrane is fully hydrated otherwise it causes a drastic voltage drop in the stack. Furthermore, by substituting liquid water with water-ethylene glycol mixture of 50%, the mass flow of coolant increases by about 32-33% in the inner loop and 60-65% in the outer loop for all ranges of current...

  8. New instrumentation of reactor water level for PWR; Nueva Instrumentacion de nivel de agua del reactor para PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, S.

    2005-07-01

    Today, many PWR reactors are equipped with a reactor water level instrumentation system based on different measurement methods. Due to obsolescence issues, FRAMATOME ANP started to develop and quality a new water level measurement system using heated und unheated thermocouple measurements. the measuring principle is based on the fact that the heat transfer in water is considerably higher than in steam. The electronic cabinet for signal processing is based on a proven technology already developed, qualified and installed by FRAMATOME ANP in several NPPs. It is equipped with and advanced temperature measuring transducer for acquisition and processing of thermocouple signals. (Author)

  9. Multirecycling of Plutonium from LMFBR Blanket in Standard PWRs Loaded with MOX Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    It is now well-known that, from a physics standpoint, Pu, or even TRU (i.e. Pu+M.A.), originating from LEU fuel irradiated in PWRs can be multirecycled also in PWRs using MOX fuel. However, the degradation of the isotopic composition during irradiation necessitates using enriched U in conjunction with the MOX fuel either homogeneously or heterogeneously to maintain the Pu (or TRU) content at a level allowing safe operation of the reactor, i.e. below about 10%. The study is related to another possible utilization of the excess Pu produced in the blanket of a LMFBR, namely in a PWR(MOX). In this case the more Pu is bred in the LMFBR, the more PWR(MOX) it can sustain. The important difference between the Pu coming from the blanket of a LMFBR and that coming from a PWR(LEU) is its isotopic composition. The first one contains about 95% of fissile isotopes whereas the second one contains only about 65% of fissile isotopes. As it will be shown later, this difference allows the PWR fed by Pu from the LMFBR blanket to operate with natural U instead of enriched U when it is fed by Pu from PWR(LEU)

  10. Development of an MCNP-tally based burnup code and validation through PWR benchmark exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Bakkari, B. [ERSN-LMR, Department of physics, Faculty of Sciences P.O.Box 2121, Tetuan (Morocco)], E-mail: bakkari@gmail.com; El Bardouni, T.; Merroun, O.; El Younoussi, Ch.; Boulaich, Y. [ERSN-LMR, Department of physics, Faculty of Sciences P.O.Box 2121, Tetuan (Morocco); Chakir, E. [EPTN-LPMR, Faculty of Sciences Kenitra (Morocco)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the capabilities of a newly developed burnup code called BUCAL1. The code provides the full capabilities of the Monte Carlo code MCNP5, through the use of the MCNP tally information. BUCAL1 uses the fourth order Runge Kutta method with the predictor-corrector approach as the integration method to determine the fuel composition at a desired burnup step. Validation of BUCAL1 was done by code vs. code comparison. Results of two different kinds of codes are employed. The first one is CASMO-4, a deterministic multi-group two-dimensional transport code. The second kind is MCODE and MOCUP, a link MCNP-ORIGEN codes. These codes use different burnup algorithms to solve the depletion equations system. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared for two PWR uranium and thorium benchmark exercises at cold (300 K) and hot (900 K) conditions, respectively. The eigenvalue comparison between BUCAL1 and the aforementioned two kinds of codes shows a good prediction of the systems'k-inf values during the entire burnup history, and the maximum difference is within 2%. The differences between the BUCAL1 isotope concentrations and the predictions of CASMO-4, MCODE and MOCUP are generally better, and only for a few sets of isotopes these differences exceed 10%.

  11. VERA Core Simulator Methodology for PWR Cycle Depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochunas, Brendan [University of Michigan; Collins, Benjamin S [ORNL; Jabaay, Daniel [University of Michigan; Kim, Kang Seog [ORNL; Graham, Aaron [University of Michigan; Stimpson, Shane [University of Michigan; Wieselquist, William A [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Palmtag, Scott [Core Physics, Inc.; Downar, Thomas [University of Michigan; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed and implemented in MPACT for performing high-fidelity pressurized water reactor (PWR) multi-cycle core physics calculations. MPACT is being developed primarily for application within the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) as one of the main components of the VERA Core Simulator, the others being COBRA-TF and ORIGEN. The methods summarized in this paper include a methodology for performing resonance self-shielding and computing macroscopic cross sections, 2-D/1-D transport, nuclide depletion, thermal-hydraulic feedback, and other supporting methods. These methods represent a minimal set needed to simulate high-fidelity models of a realistic nuclear reactor. Results demonstrating this are presented from the simulation of a realistic model of the first cycle of Watts Bar Unit 1. The simulation, which approximates the cycle operation, is observed to be within 50 ppm boron (ppmB) reactivity for all simulated points in the cycle and approximately 15 ppmB for a consistent statepoint. The verification and validation of the PWR cycle depletion capability in MPACT is the focus of two companion papers.

  12. SCOR 1000: an economic and innovative conceptual design PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, G.M.; Chenaud, M.S. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/DER/SESI), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs; Tourniaire, B. [CEA Grenoble (DEN/DTN/SE2T/LPTM), 38 (France)

    2007-07-01

    Within the framework of innovative reactors studies, the Cea proposes the SCOR design (Simple COmpact Reactor) based on most of the advantages of innovative reactors. All main components are integrated in the vessel: the pressurizer, the canned pumps, the control rod mechanics of the driving system (CMD), and the dedicated heat exchangers of the passive heat removal system. The only steam generator is located above the vessel instead of the upper head. This design is featured by its compactness and by a large suppression or simplification of auxiliary systems. The first design with a 600 MWe shows its competitiveness with regard to the large loop-type PWR. To reduce the cost investment by the law sized effect, we examine the possibility of increasing the power of the reactor, while keeping the safety advantages of the medium sized SCOR. The electrical power of the new design is 1000 MWe. SCOR-1000 operates at much lower primary circuit pressure than standard PWRs (93 bars instead of the usual 155 bars), and the power density is lower (80 MW/m3 instead of 100 for the present PWRs). The reactivity is controlled by the CMD and by the burnable poison, without soluble boron. With the same safety advantages of the medium-sized SCOR, the cost reduction of the investment and of cost production could reach 18% with regard to the loop-type PWR. (authors)

  13. PWR reactor vessel in-service-inspection according to RSEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algarotti, Marc; Dubois, Philippe; Hernandez, Luc; Landez, Jean Paul [Intercontrole, 13, rue du Capricorne - SILIC 433, 94583 Rungis - Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear services experience Framatome ANP (an AREVA and Siemens company) has designed and constructed 86 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) around the world including the three units lately commissioned at Ling Ao in the People's Republic of China and ANGRA 2 in Brazil; the company provided general and specialized outage services supporting numerous outages. Along with the American and German subsidiaries, Framatome ANP Inc. and Framatome ANP GmbH, Framatome ANP is among the world leading nuclear services providers, having experience of over 500 PWR outages on 4 continents, with current involvement in more than 50 PWR outages per year. Framatome ANP's experience in the examinations of reactor components began in the 1970's. Since then, each unit (American, French and German companies) developed automated NDT inspection systems and carried out pre-service and ISI (In-Service Inspections) using a large range of NDT techniques to comply with each utility expectations. These techniques have been validated by the utilities and the safety authorities of the countries where they were implemented. Notably Framatome ANP is fully qualified to provide full scope ISI services to satisfy ASME Section XI requirements, through automated NDE tasks including nozzle inspections, reactor vessel head inspections, steam generator inspections, pressurizer inspections and RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) inspections. Intercontrole (Framatome ANP subsidiary dedicated in supporting ISI) is one of the leading NDT companies in the world. Its main activity is devoted to the inspection of the reactor primary circuit in French and foreign PWR Nuclear Power Plants: the reactor vessel, the steam generators, the pressurizer, the reactor internals and reactor coolant system piping. NDT methods mastered by Intercontrole range from ultrasonic testing to eddy current and gamma ray examinations, as well as dye penetrant testing, acoustic monitoring and leak testing. To comply with the high

  14. Plutonium rock-like fuel LWR nuclear characteristics and transient behavior in accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Anoda, Yoshinari; Takano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yamaguchi, Chouichi; Sugo, Yukihiro

    1998-03-01

    For the disposition of excess plutonium, rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel systems based on zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) or thoria (ThO{sub 2}) have been studied. Safety analysis of ROX fueled PWR showed it is necessary to increase Doppler reactivity coefficient and to reduce power peaking factor of zirconia type ROX (Zr-ROX) fueled core. For these improvements, Zr-ROX fuel composition was modified by considering additives of ThO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2} or Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and reducing Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. As a result of the modification, comparable, transient behavior to UO{sub 2} fuel PWR was obtained with UO{sub 2}-Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} added Zr-ROX fuel, while the plutonium transmutation capability is slightly reduced. (author)

  15. Example Calculations of In{sub v}essel Steam Explosions for a Prototypical PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Hong, Seong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, the sample calculation for the in{sub v}essel steam explosions were done by using the MC3D code. The evaluation of the computational code had been done against TROI experiments and the code had been adapted to a PWR ex{sub v}essel steam explosion calculations. MC3D is a code for the calculation of different types of multiphase multi-component flows. It has been built with the fuel-coolant interaction calculations in mind. It is, however, able to calculate very different situations and has a rather wide field of potential applications. MC3D is a set of two fuel-coolant interaction codes with a common numeric solver, one for the premixing phase and one for the explosion phase. In general, the steam explosion simulation with MC3D is being carried out in two steps. In the first step, the distributions of the melt, water, and vapor phases at steam explosion triggering are being calculated with the premixing module. These premixing simulation results present the input for the second step when the escalation and propagation of the steam explosion through the premixture are being calculated with the explosion module. The MC3D premixing model is a six-field application in which the melt is described by three fields. The first one is called 'continuous' and can describe many situations as, e.g., a jet or the melt lying on the bottom of a vessel. The second field corresponds to the droplets issued from the jet fragmentation. This field describes the discontinuous state of the fuel. The third field is optional and describes the fuel fragments issuing from drop fine fragmentation. The remaining three fields are the water, the vapor, and a noncondensable gas. The drop surface area is modeled with a standard interfacial area transport equation. In the explosion model, the continuous phase is not present and only the two fields related to the dispersed fuel are considered

  16. Gas/Water and Heat Management of PEM-Based Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Systems for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Ye, Fang; Guo, Hang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells were successfully utilized in the field of space applications to provide electric energy and potable water in human-rated space mission since the 1960s. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) based fuel cells, which provide high power/energy densities, were reconsidered as a promising space power equipment for future space exploration. PEM-based water electrolyzers were employed to provide life support for crews or as major components of regenerative fuel cells for energy storage. Gas/water and heat are some of the key challenges in PEM-based fuel cells and electrolytic cells, especially when applied to space scenarios. In the past decades, efforts related to gas/water and thermal control have been reported to effectively improve cell performance, stability lifespan, and reduce mass, volume and costs of those space cell systems. This study aimed to present a primary review of research on gas/water and waste thermal management for PEM-based electrochemical cell systems applied to future space explorations. In the fuel cell system, technologies related to reactant supplement, gas humidification, water removal and active/passive water separation were summarized in detail. Experimental studies were discussed to provide a direct understanding of the effect of the gas-liquid two-phase flow on product removal and mass transfer for PEM-based fuel cell operating in a short-term microgravity environment. In the electrolyzer system, several active and static passive phaseseparation methods based on diverse water supplement approaches were discussed. A summary of two advanced passive thermal management approaches, which are available for various sizes of space cell stacks, was specifically provided

  17. Gas/Water and Heat Management of PEM-Based Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Systems for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Ye, Fang; Guo, Hang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells were successfully utilized in the field of space applications to provide electric energy and potable water in human-rated space mission since the 1960s. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) based fuel cells, which provide high power/energy densities, were reconsidered as a promising space power equipment for future space exploration. PEM-based water electrolyzers were employed to provide life support for crews or as major components of regenerative fuel cells for energy storage. Gas/water and heat are some of the key challenges in PEM-based fuel cells and electrolytic cells, especially when applied to space scenarios. In the past decades, efforts related to gas/water and thermal control have been reported to effectively improve cell performance, stability lifespan, and reduce mass, volume and costs of those space cell systems. This study aimed to present a primary review of research on gas/water and waste thermal management for PEM-based electrochemical cell systems applied to future space explorations. In the fuel cell system, technologies related to reactant supplement, gas humidification, water removal and active/passive water separation were summarized in detail. Experimental studies were discussed to provide a direct understanding of the effect of the gas-liquid two-phase flow on product removal and mass transfer for PEM-based fuel cell operating in a short-term microgravity environment. In the electrolyzer system, several active and static passive phaseseparation methods based on diverse water supplement approaches were discussed. A summary of two advanced passive thermal management approaches, which are available for various sizes of space cell stacks, was specifically provided

  18. Fuel cycle management by the electric enterprises and spanish nuclear Power plants; Gestion del ciclo de combustible por las empresas electricas y centrales nucleares espanolas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celma, E. M.; Gonzalez, C.; Lopez, J. V.; Melara, J.; Lopez, L.; Martinez, J. C.; Culbras, F.; Blanco, J.; Francia, L.

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Group reports to the Technology Committee of the UNESA Nuclear Energy Committee, and is constituted by representatives of both the Spanish Utilities and the Nuclear Power Plants. The Group addresses the nuclear plant common issues in relation to the operation and management of the nuclear fuel in their different stages of the Fuel Cycle. The article reviews the activities developed by the Group in the Front-End, mainly in the monitoring of international programs that define criteria to improve the Fuel Reliability and in the establishment of common bases for the implementation of changes in the regulation applying the nuclear fuel. Concerning the Back-End the Group focuses on those activities of coordination with third parties related to the management of used fuel. (Author)

  19. Characterization of PWR vessel steel tearing under severe accident condition temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheron, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.matheron@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chapuliot, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.chapuliot@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nicolas, Laetitia, E-mail: laetitia.nicolas@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Mecanique des Structures Industrielles Durables, UMR CNRS-EDF 2832, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92141 Clamart (France); Koundy, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.koundy@irsn.fr [IRSN-DSR, Service d' evaluation des Accidents Graves et des Rejets radioactifs B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Caroli, Cataldo, E-mail: cataldo.caroli@irsn.fr [IRSN-DSR, Service d' evaluation des Accidents Graves et des Rejets radioactifs B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterized French PWR vessel steel tearing resistance at high temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tearing tests on Compact Tension (CT) specimens were carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The variability of tearing properties with PWR vessels specifications was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a tearing criterion (energy parameter Gfr) at high temperatures. - Abstract: In the event of a severe core meltdown accident in a pressurised water reactor (PWR), core material can relocate into the lower head of the vessel resulting in significant thermal and pressure loads being imposed on the vessel. In the event of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure there is the possibility of core material being released towards the containment. On the basis of the loading conditions and the temperature distribution, the determination of the mode, timing, and size of lower head failure is of prime importance in the assessment of core melt accidents. This is because they define the initial conditions for ex-vessel events such as core/basemat interactions, fuel/coolant interactions, and direct containment heating. When lower head failure occurs (i) the understanding of the mechanism of lower head creep deformation; (ii) breach stability and its kinetic of propagation leading to the failure; (iii) and developing predictive modelling capabilities to better assess the consequences of ex-vessel processes, are of equal importance. The objective of this paper is to present an original characterization programme of vessel steel tearing properties by carrying out high temperature tearing tests on Compact Tension (CT) specimens. The influence of metallurgical composition on the kinetics of tearing is investigated as previous work on different RPV steels has shown a possible loss of ductility at high temperatures depending on the initial chemical composition of the vessel material. Small changes in the composition can lead

  20. VERA-CS Modeling and Simulation of PWR Main Steam Line Break Core Response to DNB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K [ORNL; Sung, Yixing [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township; Kucukboyaci, Vefa [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township; Xu, Yiban [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township; Cao, Liping [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications core simulator (VERA-CS) being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) includes coupled neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel temperature components with an isotopic depletion capability. The neutronics capability employed is based on MPACT, a three-dimensional (3-D) whole core transport code. The thermal-hydraulics and fuel temperature models are provided by the COBRA-TF (CTF) subchannel code. As part of the CASL development program, the VERA-CS (MPACT/CTF) code system was applied to model and simulate reactor core response with respect to departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) at the limiting time step of a postulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) main steamline break (MSLB) event initiated at the hot zero power (HZP), either with offsite power available and the reactor coolant pumps in operation (high-flow case) or without offsite power where the reactor core is cooled through natural circulation (low-flow case). The VERA-CS simulation was based on core boundary conditions from the RETRAN-02 system transient calculations and STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) core inlet distribution calculations. The evaluation indicated that the VERA-CS code system is capable of modeling and simulating quasi-steady state reactor core response under the steamline break (SLB) accident condition, the results are insensitive to uncertainties in the inlet flow distributions from the CFD simulations, and the high-flow case is more DNB limiting than the low-flow case.

  1. Non-destructive Testing Dummy Nuclear Fuel Rods by Neutron Radiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; Guo-hai; HAN; Song-bai; HE; Lin-feng; WANG; Yu; WANG; Hong-li; LIU; Yun-tao; CHEN; Dong-feng

    2013-01-01

    As a unique non-destructive testing technique,neutron radiography can be used to measure nuclear fuel rods with radioactivity.The images of the dummy nuclear fuel rods were obtained at the CARR.Through imaging analysis methods,the structure defections,the hydrogen accumulation in the cladding and the 235U enrichment of the pellet were studied and analyzed.Experiences for non-destructive testing real PWR nuclear fuel rods by NR

  2. Experiment data report IFA-226 postirradiation examination. [PWR, BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagger, C.; Carlsen, H.; Domanus, J.; Hougaard, H.; Larsen, E.; Larsen, N.

    1977-09-01

    IFA-226 contained twelve, mixed plutonium-uranium oxide fuel rods arranged in two, six-rod clusters. The assembly was designed to study fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, fuel thermal response, and fission gas release as a function of fuel density, initial fuel-to-cladding gap, rod power, and burnup. Data were obtained from fuel rod centerline thermocouples, fission gas pressure transducers, and cladding elongation sensors. Results of both nondestructive and destructive examinations are presented. The PIE indicated that one fuel rod failed during service as a result of internal hydriding of the end plug. Circumferential cladding ridges resulting from fuel-cladding interaction were present on all of the rods, with the largest ridges present on the rod with the smallest initial fuel-to-cladding gap. No incipient fuel rod failures were detected.

  3. NDE to Manage Atmospheric SCC in Canisters for Dry Storage of Spent Fuel: An Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pardini, Allan F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cuta, Judith M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qiao, Hong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doctor, Steven R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This report documents efforts to assess representative horizontal (Transuclear NUHOMS®) and vertical (Holtec HI-STORM) storage systems for the implementation of non-destructive examination (NDE) methods or techniques to manage atmospheric stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in canisters for dry storage of used nuclear fuel. The assessment is conducted by assessing accessibility and deployment, environmental compatibility, and applicability of NDE methods. A recommendation of this assessment is to focus on bulk ultrasonic and eddy current techniques for direct canister monitoring of atmospheric SCC. This assessment also highlights canister regions that may be most vulnerable to atmospheric SCC to guide the use of bulk ultrasonic and eddy current examinations. An assessment of accessibility also identifies canister regions that are easiest and more difficult to access through the ventilation paths of the concrete shielding modules. A conceivable sampling strategy for canister inspections is to sample only the easiest to access portions of vulnerable regions. There are aspects to performing an NDE inspection of dry canister storage system (DCSS) canisters for atmospheric SCC that have not been addressed in previous performance studies. These aspects provide the basis for recommendations of future efforts to determine the capability and performance of eddy current and bulk ultrasonic examinations for atmospheric SCC in DCSS canisters. Finally, other important areas of investigation are identified including the development of instrumented surveillance specimens to identify when conditions are conducive for atmospheric SCC, characterization of atmospheric SCC morphology, and an assessment of air flow patterns over canister surfaces and their influence on chloride deposition.

  4. Development of decommissioning management system for nuclear fuel cycle facilities (DECMAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichirou; Ishijima, Noboru; Tanimoto, Ken-ichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    In making a plan of decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities, it is important to optimize the plan on the standpoint of a few viewpoints, that is, the amount of working days, workers, radioactive waste, exposure dose of worker, and cost (they are called evaluation indexes). In the midst of decommissioning, the decommissioning plan would be modified suitably to optimize the evaluation indexes adjusting to progress of the decommissioning. The decommissioning management code (DECMAN), that is support system on computer, has been developed to assist the decommissioning planning. The system calculates the evaluation indexes quantitatively. The system consists of three fundamental codes, facility information database code, technical know-how database code and index evaluation code, they are composed using Oracle' database and 'G2' expert system. The functions of the system are as follows. (1) Facility information database code. Information of decommissioning facility and its rooms, machines and pipes in the code. (2) Technical know-how database code. Technical Information of tools to use in decommissioning work, cutting, dose measure, and decontamination are there. (3) Index evaluation code. User build decommissioning program using above two database codes. The code evaluates five indexes, the amount of working days, workers, radioactive waste, exposure dose of worker, and cost, on planning decommissioning program. Results of calculation are shown in table, chart, and etc. (author)

  5. A spontaneous and passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yun-Ju; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Pan, Chin; Luo, Shih-Jin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2007-05-01

    This paper introduces a passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell to exhale CO2 gas and to gather and transport water and methanol residue during operation. It passively employs condensation, temperature gradient, surface tension gradient and droplet coalescence to accumulate liquid, separate liquid and gas, and transport droplets without the need of external power. CO2 gas can be breathed out through hydrophobic micro holes with the assistance of buoyancy force while water/methanol vapor is condensing into droplets, coalescing with smaller droplets and is transported toward a cooler and more hydrophilic waste tank through wettability gradient. The wettability gradient is prepared by diffusion-controlled silanization with a gradient from 117° to 28° and is radial toward the outer boundary, which can drive droplets down to 1 µl with a speed of up to 20 mm s-1. With the assistance of coalescence along with the wettability gradient, the condensed water droplets can reach a double speed of 40 mm s-1. The maximum water removal rate of the PWMD can approach 6.134 µl s-1 cm-2, which is at least one order of magnitude higher than the demand of a standard µDMFC with power generation ability of 100 mW cm-2.

  6. Temperature and Humidity Sensor Powered by an Individual Microbial Fuel Cell in a Power Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are of increasing interest as bioelectrochemical systems for decomposing organic materials and converting chemical energy into electricity. The main challenge for this technology is that the low power and voltage of the devices restricts the use of MFCs in practical applications. In this paper, a power management system (PMS is developed to store the energy and export an increased voltage. The designed PMS successfully increases the low voltage generated by an individual MFC to a high potential of 5 V, capable of driving a wireless temperature and humidity sensor based on nRF24L01 data transmission modules. With the PMS, MFCs can intermittently power the sensor for data transmission to a remote receiver. It is concluded that even an individual MFC can supply the energy required to power the sensor and telemetry system with the designed PMS. The presented PMS can be widely used for unmanned environmental monitoring such as wild rivers, lakes, and adjacent water areas, and offers promise for further advances in MFC technology.

  7. Expert System analysis of non-fuel assembly hardware and spent fuel disassembly hardware: Its generation and recommended disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Douglas Alan [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Almost all of the effort being expended on radioactive waste disposal in the United States is being focused on the disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, with little consideration for other areas that will have to be disposed of in the same facilities. one area of radioactive waste that has not been addressed adequately because it is considered a secondary part of the waste issue is the disposal of the various Non-Fuel Bearing Components of the reactor core. These hardware components fall somewhat arbitrarily into two categories: Non-Fuel Assembly (NFA) hardware and Spent Fuel Disassembly (SFD) hardware. This work provides a detailed examination of the generation and disposal of NFA hardware and SFD hardware by the nuclear utilities of the United States as it relates to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. All available sources of data on NFA and SFD hardware are analyzed with particular emphasis given to the Characteristics Data Base developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the characterization work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Rochester Gas & Electric. An Expert System developed as a portion of this work is used to assist in the prediction of quantities of NFA hardware and SFD hardware that will be generated by the United States` utilities. Finally, the hardware waste management practices of the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Sweden, and Japan are studied for possible application to the disposal of domestic hardware wastes. As a result of this work, a general classification scheme for NFA and SFD hardware was developed. Only NFA and SFD hardware constructed of zircaloy and experiencing a burnup of less than 70,000 MWD/MTIHM and PWR control rods constructed of stainless steel are considered Low-Level Waste. All other hardware is classified as Greater-ThanClass-C waste.

  8. Integrated functional modeling method for NPP plant DiD risk monitor and its application for conventional PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Zhijian [Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2014-08-15

    The development of a new risk monitor system is introduced in this paper, which can be applied not only to severe accident prevention in daily operation but also to serve as to mitigate the radiological hazard just after severe accident happens and long term management of post-severe accident consequences. The summary of the fundamental method is summarized on how to configure the Plant Defense in-Depth (Did) Risk Monitor by object-oriented software system based on functional modeling approach. Following the authors??preceding preliminary study for AP1000, the way of realizing the proposed method of configuring the plant Did risk monitor was investigated for a safety-enhanced Japanese PWR design to meet with the tight anti-severe accident requirements set by national regulation in Japan after Fukushima Daiichi accident. The result of this example practice of the presented preliminary study for Japanese PWR was for the level 4 of the Did in case of beyond design basis accident, that is, loss of all AC power + RCP seal LOCA, against the former case of AP1000 for level 3 Did in case of large LOCA.

  9. Long-Term Station Blackout Accident Analyses of a PWR with RELAP5/MOD3.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Prošek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress tests performed in Europe after accident at Fukushima Daiichi also required evaluation of the consequences of loss of safety functions due to station blackout (SBO. Long-term SBO in a pressurized water reactor (PWR leads to severe accident sequences, assuming that existing plant means (systems, equipment, and procedures are used for accident mitigation. Therefore the main objective was to study the accident management strategies for SBO scenarios (with different reactor coolant pumps (RCPs leaks assumed to delay the time before core uncovers and significantly heats up. The most important strategies assumed were primary side depressurization and additional makeup water to reactor coolant system (RCS. For simulations of long term SBO scenarios, including early stages of severe accident sequences, the best estimate RELAP5/MOD3.3 and the verified input model of Krško two-loop PWR were used. The results suggest that for the expected magnitude of RCPs seal leak, the core uncovery during the first seven days could be prevented by using the turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater pump and manually depressurizing the RCS through the secondary side. For larger RCPs seal leaks, in general this is not the case. Nevertheless, the core uncovery can be significantly delayed by increasing RCS depressurization.

  10. Managing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Policy Implications of Expanding Global Access to Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    with uranium to make mixed-oxide ( MOX ) fuel, in which the 239Pu largely substitutes for 235U. Two French reprocessing plants at La Hague can each...and France also have older plants to reprocess gas-cooled reactor fuel, and India has a 275-ton plant.53 About 200 metric tons of MOX fuel is used...to make MOX fuel for today’s nuclear power plants are modest. Existing commercial light water reactors use ordinary water to slow down, or “moderate

  11. Interface tracking simulations of bubbly flows in PWR relevant geometries