WorldWideScience

Sample records for putting local people

  1. Putting 'Local' Back into Public Wifi Hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    Public Wifi hotspots in cafes and public places are based on wireless local area network technology (WLAN). In contrast to the common understanding of connecting directly to the internet when connecting to a Wifi hotspot, we are proposing to bring the original notion of connecting to a local netw...

  2. Social-Ecological Guilds: Putting People into Marine Historical Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna M. Shackeroff

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine historical ecology provides historic insights into past ocean ecosystems that are crucial to effectively confronting the declining health and resilience in marine ecosystems. A more 'peopled' approach to marine historical ecology is necessary, given the heightened emphasis on human dimensions in marine management. This study examined the historical ecology of Hawaiian coral reef ecosystems through oral histories of diverse ocean experts, representing six traditional, local, and scientific knowledge systems. Based on 61 in-depth interviews with these ocean experts, historical trends, abundance, and distribution over 80 years and a 50-mile region for 271 species emerged. Analyzing trends by ecological guild, e.g., herbivores, proved inappropriate to these data; rather, based on qualitative analyses, five distinct trends encompassing nearly all species emerged in what we term "social-ecological guilds." Ocean expert's observations of change were surprisingly consistent, regardless of their knowledge system, whereas perceptions of change varied widely. The historical picture was far broader and richer when the contributions of six knowledge systems were incorporated, compared to that of any one alone. Social-ecological guilds also matter critically from a management perspective, because understanding how experts from a multiplicity of perspectives observe, interpret, and respond to ecological change can help managers anticipate responses to management activities and perhaps to design better management strategies.

  3. Cyber-Physical Human Systems: Putting People in the Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowe, Sulayman K; Zettsu, Koji; Simmon, Eric; de Vaulx, Frederic; Bojanova, Irena

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines the challenge to understand how to integrate people into a new generation of cyber-physical-human systems (CPHSs) and proposes a human service capability description model to help.

  4. Putting people on the map through an approach that integrates social data in conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanson, Sheri L; Mascia, Michael B

    2014-10-01

    Conservation planning is integral to strategic and effective operations of conservation organizations. Drawing upon biological sciences, conservation planning has historically made limited use of social data. We offer an approach for integrating data on social well-being into conservation planning that captures and places into context the spatial patterns and trends in human needs and capacities. This hierarchical approach provides a nested framework for characterizing and mapping data on social well-being in 5 domains: economic well-being, health, political empowerment, education, and culture. These 5 domains each have multiple attributes; each attribute may be characterized by one or more indicators. Through existing or novel data that display spatial and temporal heterogeneity in social well-being, conservation scientists, planners, and decision makers may measure, benchmark, map, and integrate these data within conservation planning processes. Selecting indicators and integrating these data into conservation planning is an iterative, participatory process tailored to the local context and planning goals. Social well-being data complement biophysical and threat-oriented social data within conservation planning processes to inform decisions regarding where and how to conserve biodiversity, provide a structure for exploring socioecological relationships, and to foster adaptive management. Building upon existing conservation planning methods and insights from multiple disciplines, this approach to putting people on the map can readily merge with current planning practices to facilitate more rigorous decision making.

  5. Climate Wrongs and Human Rights. Putting people at the heart of climate-change policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raworth, K. (ed.) (and others)

    2008-09-15

    In failing to tackle climate change with urgency, rich countries are effectively violating the human rights of millions of the world's poorest people. Continued excessive greenhouse-gas emissions primarily from industrialised nations are - with scientific certainty - creating floods, droughts, hurricanes, sea-level rise, and seasonal unpredictability. The result is failed harvests, disappearing islands, destroyed homes, water scarcity, and deepening health crises, which are undermining millions of peoples' rights to life, security, food, water, health, shelter, and culture. Such rights violations could never truly be remedied in courts of law. Human-rights principles must be put at the heart of international climate-change policy making now, in order to stop this irreversible damage to humanity's future.

  6. Reframing HIV care: putting people at the centre of antiretroviral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Chris; Rosenblum, Scott; Hellmann, Nicholas; Holmes, Charles; Wilkinson, Lynne; Biot, Marc; Bygrave, Helen; Hoos, David; Garnett, Geoff

    2015-04-01

    The delivery of HIV care in the initial rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment was based on existing clinic-based models, which are common in highly resourced settings and largely undifferentiated for individual needs. A new framework for treatment based on variable intensities of care tailored to the specific needs of different groups of individuals across the cascade of care is proposed here. Service intensity is characterised by four delivery components: (i) types of services delivered, (ii) location of service delivery, (iii) provider of health services and (iv) frequency of health services. How these components are developed into a service delivery framework will vary across countries and populations, with the intention being to improve acceptability and care outcomes. The goal of getting more people on treatment before they become ill will necessitate innovative models of delivering both testing and care. As HIV programmes expand treatment eligibility, many people entering care will not be 'patients' but healthy, active and productive members of society. To take the framework to scale, it will be important to: (i) define which individuals can be served by an alternative delivery framework; (ii) strengthen health systems that support decentralisation, integration and task shifting; (iii) make the supply chain more robust; and (iv) invest in data systems for patient tracking and for programme monitoring and evaluation. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Putting people first: re-thinking the role of technology in augmentative and alternative communication intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Janice; McNaughton, David

    2013-12-01

    Current technologies provide individuals with complex communication needs with a powerful array of communication, information, organization, and social networking options. However, there is the danger that the excitement over these new devices will result in a misplaced focus on the technology, to the neglect of what must be the central focus - the people with complex communication needs who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). In order to truly harness the power of technology, rehabilitation and educational professionals must ensure that AAC intervention is driven, not by the devices, but rather by the communication needs of the individual. Furthermore, those involved in AAC research and development activities must ensure that the design of AAC technologies is driven by an understanding of motor, sensory, cognitive, and linguistic processing, in order to minimize learning demands and maximize communication power for individuals with complex communication needs across the life span.

  8. Reframing HIV care: putting people at the centre of antiretroviral delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Chris; Rosenblum, Scott; Hellmann, Nicholas; Holmes, Charles; Wilkinson, Lynne; Biot, Marc; Bygrave, Helen; Hoos, David; Garnett, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of HIV care in the initial rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment was based on existing clinic-based models, which are common in highly resourced settings and largely undifferentiated for individual needs. A new framework for treatment based on variable intensities of care tailored to the specific needs of different groups of individuals across the cascade of care is proposed here. Service intensity is characterised by four delivery components: (i) types of services delivered, (ii) location of service delivery, (iii) provider of health services and (iv) frequency of health services. How these components are developed into a service delivery framework will vary across countries and populations, with the intention being to improve acceptability and care outcomes. The goal of getting more people on treatment before they become ill will necessitate innovative models of delivering both testing and care. As HIV programmes expand treatment eligibility, many people entering care will not be ‘patients’ but healthy, active and productive members of society 1. To take the framework to scale, it will be important to: (i) define which individuals can be served by an alternative delivery framework; (ii) strengthen health systems that support decentralisation, integration and task shifting; (iii) make the supply chain more robust; and (iv) invest in data systems for patient tracking and for programme monitoring and evaluation. La délivrance des soins du VIH dans le déploiement initial rapide des soins et du traitement du VIH a été basée sur des modèles existants dans les cliniques, qui sont courants dans les régions bénéficiant d’importantes ressources et largement indifférenciées pour les besoins individuels. Un nouveau cadre est proposé ici pour le traitement basé selon les intensités variables de soins, adaptés aux besoins spécifiques des différents groupes de personnes à travers la cascade de soins. L’intensité des services est caract

  9. Home accidents amongst elderly people: A locality study in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Gilhooly, M; Banks, P.; Barrett, W.; Wales, A.; Caldwell, S.; Macdonald, C.(Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom); Dunleavy, K

    2007-01-01

    Aim The aim of this locality study was to collect information on reported and unreported accidents amongst elderly people living in one locality in Scotland. Method Postal Survey- A postal questionnaire was sent to 3,757 men and women aged 65+ years living in one locality. The questionnaire asked respondents to indicate how many accidents they had experienced in the past twelve months, plus to indicate type and location. Information was gathered on living arrangements, ethnicity,...

  10. Broadcasting towards Local: Digital local broadcasting put to the test of Midi-Pyrénées (In French)

    OpenAIRE

    Simoulin, Vincent; Audrey VERGNES (LEREPS-GRES)

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the difficulties the digital local broadcasting is presently meeting to stand out. Through the study of the audio-visual field in Midi-Pyrénées, it shows that these ones are not only of commercial or technical kind, but are also linked to the lack of a true local governance in this area. However, the analysis also point to a relative blossoming of the local channels, of which some have succeeded in developing either national or even international partnerships, or bonds w...

  11. Cabriology: Putting Digital Collections in the Local Flow at Bruges Public Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Calis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cabrio, the Aquabrowser implementation at the Bruges Public Library, is more than a catalogue makeover. Rich, variable, flashy and truly inspirational, its open structure tackles several strategic issues related to a changing network environment. Digital collections are merged with the catalogue to become part of a hybrid library mediation model. Cabrio focuses on local dynamics and existing participation, which are key features of public libraries, in order to challenge and redefine library perceptions and services.

  12. Putting chronic disease on the map: building GIS capacity in state and local health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Casper, Michele; Tootoo, Joshua; Schieb, Linda

    2013-06-20

    Techniques based on geographic information systems (GIS) have been widely adopted and applied in the fields of infectious disease and environmental epidemiology; their use in chronic disease programs is relatively new. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention is collaborating with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors and the University of Michigan to provide health departments with capacity to integrate GIS into daily operations, which support priorities for surveillance and prevention of chronic diseases. So far, 19 state and 7 local health departments participated in this project. On the basis of these participants' experiences, we describe our training strategy and identify high-impact GIS skills that can be mastered and applied over a short time in support of chronic disease surveillance. We also describe the web-based resources in the Chronic Disease GIS Exchange that were produced on the basis of this training and are available to anyone interested in GIS and chronic disease (www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/maps/GISX). GIS offers diverse sets of tools that promise increased productivity for chronic disease staff of state and local health departments.

  13. It Comes from the People: Community Development and Local Theology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsdale, Mary Ann; And Others

    The closing of local mines and factories collapsed the economic and social structure of Ivanhoe, Virginia, a small rural town once considered a dying community. This book is a case study that tells how the people of Ivanhoe organized to revitalize their town. It documents the community development process--a process that included hard work, a…

  14. Forest-people interfaces: from local creativity to global concern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Arts; S. van Bommel; M. Ros-Tonen; G. Verschoor

    2012-01-01

    This book takes the reader on a journey through four major themes that have dominated research on the people-forest interface since the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) published its Forestry for Rural Development paper and launched its Programme on Forestry for Local Community Development

  15. Water Security at Local Government Level: What do People Think?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meissner, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Meissner_2016.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2853 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Meissner_2016.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Water Security at Local... Government Level: What do People Think? By Dr. Richard Meissner Integrated Water Assessment Group Natural Resources and the Environment Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Presented at the Sustainable Water Seminar 2016, CSIR ICC, 2...

  16. Proprioceptive Localization Deficits in People With Cerebellar Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Heidi M; Therrien, Amanda S; Bastian, Amy J

    2017-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that an important function of the cerebellum is predicting the state of the body during movement. Yet, the extent of cerebellar involvement in perception of limb state (i.e., proprioception, specifically limb position sense) has yet to be determined. Here, we investigated whether patients with cerebellar damage have deficits when trying to locate their hand in space (i.e., proprioceptive localization), which is highly important for everyday movements. By comparing performance during passive robot-controlled and active self-made multi-joint movements, we were able to determine that some cerebellar patients show improved precision during active movement (i.e., active benefit), comparable to controls, whereas other patients have reduced active benefit. Importantly, the differences in patient performance are not explained by patient diagnosis or clinical ratings of impairment. Furthermore, a subsequent experiment confirmed that active deficits in proprioceptive localization occur during both single-joint and multi-joint movements. As such, it is unlikely that localization deficits can be explained by the multi-joint coordination deficits occurring after cerebellar damage. Our results suggest that cerebellar damage may cause varied impairments to different elements of proprioceptive sense. It follows that proprioceptive localization should be adequately accounted for in clinical testing and rehabilitation of people with cerebellar damage.

  17. People, Places, Power: Medicaid Concentration and Local Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michener, Jamila D

    2017-10-01

    The geographic concentration of disadvantage is a key mechanism of inequity. In the United States, the spatial patterning of disadvantage renders it more than the sum of its individual parts and disproportionately harms economically and racially marginalized Americans. This article focuses specifically on the political effects of Medicaid beneficiaries being concentrated in particular locales. After offering a framework for conceptualizing the community-wide consequences of such policy concentration, I analyze aggregate multiyear data to examine the effect of Medicaid density on county-level voter turnout and local organizational strength. I find that, as the proportion of county residents enrolled in Medicaid increases, the prevalence of civic and political membership associations declines and aggregate rates of voting decrease. These results suggest that, if grassroots political action is to be part of a strategy to achieve health equity, policy makers and local organizations must make efforts to counteract the sometimes demobilizing "place-based" political effects of "people-based" policies such as Medicaid. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  18. Meeting the healthcare needs of transgender people within the armed forces: putting UK military policy into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, Dean; New, Chris; Coetzee, Rik; Bickerstaffe, Paul

    2016-12-01

    To explain how the healthcare needs of transgender personnel are met within the United Kingdom Armed Forces. It may be that when transgender people disclose their gender preference that they are at increased risk of social exclusion. The United Kingdom Armed Forces has an inclusive organisational policy for the recruitment and management of transgender personnel. This is a position paper about how the healthcare needs of transgender military personnel are met by the United Kingdom Armed Forces. United Kingdom Armed Forces policy was placed into context by reviewing current research, discussing medical terminology and describing the policy. This was followed by an account of how UK AF policy is applied in practice. Where armed forces had an inclusive policy for the management of transgender personnel, there seemed to be little cause for secrecy and zero tolerance of discrimination when compared to nations where this was not the case. Medical terminology has changed to reflect a more inclusive, less stigmatising use of language. The United Kingdom Armed Forces policy has been described as progressive and inclusive. The application of this policy in practice may be dependent upon strong leadership and training. The wider United Kingdom Armed Forces seems capable of adopting a pragmatic and flexible approach to meeting the healthcare needs of transgender personnel. The United Kingdom Armed Forces value diversity within their workforce and have a progressive, inclusive policy for the recruitment and management of transgender personnel. When supporting a transgender military person, healthcare professionals, civilian organisations and military line managers should consider referring to United Kingdom Armed Forces policy as early as possible. Other military and uniformed services may wish to examine the United Kingdom Armed Forces exemplar in order to consider the applicability within their own organisational setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Local Wisdom of Osing People in Conserving Water Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumarmi Sumarmi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Each tribe in Indonesia has certain local wisdom to conserve their environment, including managing water resources. The purpose of this research is to identify the local wisdom of Osing people in conserving water resources in Kemiren, Glagah Sub-District, Banyuwangi. This research uses descriptive qualitative method. The data are taken through interview, observation and documentation. The local wisdom of Osing people in managing water resources involves knowledge, values, moral and ethics, and norms, which are applied in forms of suggestions, rules and sanctions, and also old sayings as a guideline for them to behave and act in maintaining, keeping and conserving Mbah Buyut Citi water spring. To keep a constant flow of water debit, they protect trees and plants around the spring (belik, both belik lanang and belik wadon. In maintaining this local culture, the older generations pass on the values, moral, ethics, and norms including Islamic norms (most of them are Moslem as the guidelines on how to behave and act in practicing the traditions and instincts for respecting the environment to their family, neighbours, relatives and children-grandchildren.Masing-masing suku di Indonesia memiliki kearifan lokal tertentu untuk melestarikan lingkungan mereka, termasuk kearifan untuk mengelola sumber daya air. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengidentifikasi kearifan lokal masyarakat Osing dalam melestarikan sumber daya air di Kemiren, Kecamatan Glagah, Banyuwangi. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode deskriptif kualitatif. Data diambil melalui wawancara, observasi dan dokumentasi. Kearifan lokal masyarakat Osing dalam mengelola sumber daya air meliputi pengetahuan, nilai-nilai, moral dan etika, dan norma-norma yang diterapkan dalam bentuk saran, aturan dan sanksi, serta kata-kata bijak sebagai pedoman bagi mereka untuk bersikap dan bertindak dalam menjaga, menjaga dan melestarikan mata air Mbah Buyut Citi. Untuk menjaga aliran konstan debit air

  20. Local People, Nature Conservation, and Tourism in Northeastern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Tolvanen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The opinions and perceptions of local communities are central issues in the sustainable management of conservation areas. During 2002 and 2003, we studied the opinions of local people about nature conservation and the development of tourism to investigate whether these opinions were influenced by socioeconomic and demographic factors. Data were collected via a survey of local residents in six areas with different histories of land use, land ownership, conservation, and tourism development. We classified respondents by cluster analysis into three different groups according to their opinions about nature conservation and tourism development: (1 sympathetic to nature conservation, but quite neutral to tourism development (57.7%; (2 critical of nature conservation, but quite neutral to tourism development (30.5%; and (3 quite neutral to nature conservation, but critical of tourism development (11.8%. The most important factors for classification were residential area, age, level of education, primary occupation, indigenousness, frequency of contact with tourists through work, and effects of nature conservation on household economy. On the other hand, gender, level of income, land ownership, land donation for conservation, and income from tourism did not affect opinions concerning nature conservation and tourism development. Almost equal proportions of residents living in close proximity to conservation areas in Kuusamo had positive and negative opinions about nature conservation. Residents living in close proximity to conservation areas regarded conservation as something that might reduce employment and incomes. On the other hand, a greater proportion of residents living near tourist resorts and farther from conservation areas had positive opinions about and perceptions of nature conservation and tourism development. Based on the proportional division of all respondents into the three groups, there may be a coexistent relationship between nature

  1. Classrooms That Put People First

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, John

    2016-01-01

    Teacher John Hayward believes no classroom can advance far academically unless the teacher has first guided the class to become a community. With a focus on the first days and weeks of school, the author shares strategies any teacher can use to help everyone in the room learn about one another and to show students that he or she will be a…

  2. Assessing the options for local government to use legal approaches to combat obesity in the UK: putting theory into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C; Cowburn, G; Foster, C

    2011-08-01

    The law is recognized as a powerful tool to address some of the structural determinants of chronic disease, including 'obesogenic' environments which are a major factor in the increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide. However, it is often local - as opposed to national - government that has responsibility for an environment, including the built environment, and their role in reducing obesity using law remains relatively unexplored. With the English government shifting emphasis for improvement of public health from central to local government, this paper reviews the potential for regulatory action by local government to reduce obesity. We took a novel approach to assess the evidence and to identify legal options for implementation by local government: conducting reviews of literature, media reports and case law. Our results provide a clear rational for regulatory intervention that encourages a real choice of behaviour. They highlight strategic legal areas for reduction of obesity through restriction of traffic and promotion of active travel, promotion of access to healthy food and construction of a sustainable and active environment. Importantly, we identify current legal mechanisms for adoption by UK local government including the use of planning, licensing and transport legislation to develop local obesity prevention policy.

  3. Other Indicia of Animus Against LGBT People by State and Local

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad; Mallory, Christy; Hunter, Nan D.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, we draw from the 50 state reports to provide a sample of comments made by state legislators, governors, judges, and other state and local policy makers and officials which show animus toward LGBT people. Such statements likely both deter LGBT people from seeking state and local government employment and cause them to be closeted if they are employed by public agencies. In addition, these statements often serve as indicia of why laws extending legal protections to LGBT people ...

  4. Local people's understanding of risk from civil nuclear power in the Chinese context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiang

    2014-04-01

    This paper analyses how people understand civil nuclear risk in the local context in China. The findings of the paper are based on six months of fieldwork research on a potential inland nuclear power project in Dapu townland in 2007 and 2008. Understanding varies greatly depending on local context, with economic, geographic and social factors influencing the way people view risks and benefits. I argue that when local people do not have enough 'scientific knowledge' to understand risk from nuclear power, they can still use their experience of everyday life to reflect rationally on the risks and benefits that they face. I conclude that when local people trust in nuclear technology and 'the government', and are unaware of nuclear risk it is partly because of their over-dependence on institutions and experts. However, despite their lack of agency, local people rationally calculate risk and benefit in accordance with their social identity and geographical location.

  5. Putting Place on the Menu: The Negotiation of Locality in UK Food Tourism, from Production to Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a case study of tourism in the Lake District and Exmoor to explore the relationship between "local food" and sustainable rural tourism in the UK. Drawing on qualitative interviews with tourists, food producers and cafe, pub and restaurant owners, I use an approach based upon the commodity chain to trace the shifts in the…

  6. Putting Place on the Menu: The Negotiation of Locality in UK Food Tourism, from Production to Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a case study of tourism in the Lake District and Exmoor to explore the relationship between "local food" and sustainable rural tourism in the UK. Drawing on qualitative interviews with tourists, food producers and cafe, pub and restaurant owners, I use an approach based upon the commodity chain to trace the shifts in the…

  7. When global conservation meets local livelihoods: People and parks in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Schelhas; Max J. Pfeffer

    2010-01-01

    National park and related forest conservation efforts tend to emanate from core areas of the world and are often imposed on rural people living on forest fringes in the least developed regions of lesser developed countries. We address the social and cultural processes that ensue when center-originating conservation meets local people with their resource-dependent...

  8. Putting Motor Resonance in Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Perceiving another person's actions changes the spatial perspective people use to describe objects in a scene, possibly because seeing human action induces people to map the actions, including their spatial context, to their own body and motor representations [Lozano, S. C., Hard, B. M., & Tversky, B. (2007). Putting action in perspective.…

  9. Local people's attitudes towards conservation and wildlife tourism around Sariska Tiger Reserve, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaya Sekhar, Nagothu

    2003-12-01

    Conservationists in the recent years view local peoples' support for protected areas management as an important element of biodiversity conservation. This is often linked to the direct benefits, which local communities get from the protected areas. These benefits could be in the form of biomass resources, park funds diverted to local villages by state agencies and revenue from wildlife tourism. There are a very few studies which have attempted to study the direct relationship between benefits from wildlife tourism and local support for conservation. In India, wildlife tourism is restricted, and mostly controlled by state and private agencies. Wildlife conservation policy does not view tourism in protected areas as a source of revenue for the local communities. The present study examines the local people's attitudes towards wildlife tourism and the impact of benefits from tourism on the local support for Sariska Tiger Reserve (STR), India. STR is a flagship for tourism where protected areas are increasingly being visited and where local support for wildlife tourism has not been studied adequately. Results indicate that two-thirds of the respondents were positive towards tourism and support for conservation. The respondents were aware that more tourism benefits are possible from a well-conserved protected area. There appears to be correlation between benefits obtained by local people from wildlife tourism and other sources, and support for protected area existence, suggesting that benefits impact people's attitudes towards conservation. Some of the main problems are the unequal distribution of tourism benefits, lack of locals' involvement in tourism and development. There is a need to clearly address these issues, so that protected areas may get the support of local people, which may lead to sustainable development.

  10. Empowering Local People through Community-based Resource Monitoring: a Comparison of Brazil and Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Batista. Fernandes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological resource monitoring systems are implemented in many countries and often depend on the participation of local people. It has been suggested that these systems empower local participants while promoting conservation. We reviewed three wildlife monitoring systems in indigenous lands and sustainable development reserves in Brazilian Amazonia and one in Namibian Caprivi conservancies, analyzing the strategies adopted and conditions that facilitated local empowerment, as well as potential impacts on conservation. This provided insights into potential avenues to strengthen empowerment outcomes of monitoring systems in Latin America and Africa. We assessed four dimensions of empowerment at individual and community scales: psychological, social, economic, and political. The conditions that facilitated local empowerment included the value of natural resources, rights to trade and manage resources, political organization of communities, and collaboration by stakeholders. The wide range of strategies to empower local people included intensifying local participation, linking them to local education, feeding information back to communities, purposefully selecting participants, paying for monitoring services, marketing monitored resources, and inserting local people into broader politics. Although communities were socially and politically empowered, the monitoring systems more often promoted individual empowerment. Marketing of natural resources promoted higher economic empowerment in conservancies in Namibia, whereas information dissemination was better in Brazil because of integrated education programs. We suggest that practitioners take advantage of local facilitating conditions to enhance the empowerment of communities, bearing in mind that increasing autonomy to make management decisions may not agree with international conservation goals. Our comparative analysis of cases in Latin America and Africa allows for a greater understanding of the

  11. Perception and attitudes of local people concerning ecosystem services of culturally protected forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, H.; Ouyang, Z.; Zheng, H.; Bluemling, B.

    2013-01-01

    Culturally protected forests (CPFs) can be defined as forest areas preserved and managed by local people on the basis of traditional cultural practices and beliefs, and these forests have been maintained for decades or even centuries without much disturbance or change. Most of them are natural

  12. A People-Localization Method for Multi-Robot Systems First Approach for Guiding-Tours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Martinez-Garcia

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Throughout this article we present a methodology to localize multiple people in a group by a multi-robot system (MRS. The aim of the MRS is to conduct people through hallways in indoors as a guided-tour service task. However, further than guidance process, we detail a method for humans' localization by sharing distributed sensor data arising from the team of robots instrumented with stereo vision. The robustness of the method is presented, and by matching the real environment against the computed results, error in human localization is showed as well. As a first approach of the entire MRS goal, this paper explains from a task approach the way for environment ranging, spatial noise filtering, distributed sensor data fusion and clustering based segmentation. Likewise, through the paper experimental results are shown to verify the feasibility of the method.

  13. Ethnobotanical study of antifertility medicinal plants used by the local people in Kathiyavadi village, Vellore District, Tamilnadu, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K Sathiyaraj; A Sivaraj; T Thirumalai; B Senthilkumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: An ethnobotanical study was undertaken to collect information from local people about the use of contraceptive medicinal plants in Kathiyavadi Village. Methods: Kathiyavadi Village was surveyed through interviewing of randomly selected 321 participants using semi-structured questionnaire and regular field visits. Results: The investigations revealed that there are about 25 species of medicinal plants which were used by local peoples. Conclusions:The study revealed that the local peoples are using folklore medicinal plants for contraceptive purpose. This survey is mostly useful for rural area of local people.

  14. A Chloroplast-Localized Rubredoxin Family Protein Gene from Puccinellia tenuiflora (PutRUB Increases NaCl and NaHCO3 Tolerance by Decreasing H2O2 Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rubredoxin is one of the simplest iron–sulfur (Fe–S proteins. It is found primarily in strict anaerobic bacteria and acts as a mediator of electron transfer participation in different biochemical reactions. The PutRUB gene encoding a chloroplast-localized rubredoxin family protein was screened from a yeast full-length cDNA library of Puccinellia tenuiflora under NaCl and NaHCO3 stress. We found that PutRUB expression was induced by abiotic stresses such as NaCl, NaHCO3, CuCl2 and H2O2. These findings suggested that PutRUB might be involved in plant responses to adversity. In order to study the function of this gene, we analyzed the phenotypic and physiological characteristics of PutRUB transgenic plants treated with NaCl and NaHCO3. The results showed that PutRUB overexpression inhibited H2O2 accumulation, and enhanced transgenic plant adaptability to NaCl and NaHCO3 stresses. This indicated PutRUB might be involved in maintaining normal electron transfer to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation.

  15. Ethnobotanical Study of Anti-diabetic medicinal plants used by the local people in Javadhu hills Tamilnadu, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TThirumalai; Beverly C David; KSathiyaraj; BSenthilkumar; E David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To conduct an ethnobotanical survey and to collect information from local people of Javadhu hills about the use of traditional medicinal plants diabetes treatment. Methods:Javadhu hills were surveyed through interviewing randomly selected 312 local participants using semi-structured questionnaire and regular field visits. Results: The investigations revealed that about 40 traditional plant species and their local names with parts used for the treatment were recorded by the local people of Javadhu hills. Conclusions: The study led to the abundant knowledge of wealth of traditional medicinal plants that are being used for the diabetes treatment by the local people of Javadhu hills.

  16. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    they're going to bring their mates. We also do workshops, poetry readings and experiments in laboratories; for example you can amplify your own DNA, or look at the science of food, or go to the TV studio and make a programme about something you are interested in. So what are your future plans? At the moment I'm thrilled about what I am doing here at @Bristol. I am getting local scientists to release their stories with us, stories that we think might have a big impact on the media, and also be relevant to people. For instance, we did a big story on the effect of passive smoking on fertility. We helped get the story into the media, then we get scientists to meet the public and so if people are worried about passive smoking they could come and meet the scientists and talk about the results as well as try some activities. For the future I would like to involve the public in debates about science because I think it is perhaps the most important thing that we need to do in science communication. There are so many issues that deeply affect society and it seems critical to me that we don't just leave it to politicians and scientists; but we need to get the public involved in the debates. So would you try and get the scientists involved as well? Oh yes, absolutely. For example, we did a questionnaire and asked members of the public about various science issues. The outcomes were sent back to the scientists at Bristol University and they've considered these in their ethics committee decisions about, for instance, who should receive donor eggs. I think excluding the scientists would be insane but the important thing is that the scientists hear what the public think and vice versa. That it is not just one group in isolation trying to make decisions. Moving towards the future - do you think that there are opportunities for others to follow your career path? Yes - there are lots of opportunities and lots of interesting things to do. But also, more and more people are trying to get

  17. Facilitating access to sports for people in poverty? A study on local social sports policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Vandermeerschen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SAMENVATTING Mensen in armoede toegang bieden tot sport? Een studie naar lokaal sociaal sportbeleid Onderzoek heeft aangetoond dat armoede een impact heeft op de kansen voor sportdeelname. Mensen in armoede participeren minder in sport in vergelijking met mensen die gemakkelijk(er rondkomen. Op Vlaams beleidsniveau werden initiatieven genomen om lokale besturen aan te moedigen tot het promoten en faciliteren van sportdeelname voor mensen in armoede. Het is echter nog onduidelijk in welke mate dit ingang vond op lokaal niveau. In deze studie wordt onderzocht in welke mate lokale sportdiensten momenteel initiatieven nemen om sportdeelname bij mensen in armoede te faciliteren, met welke moeilijkheden sportdiensten worden geconfronteerd om dit doel te bereiken, en in welke mate lokaal sociaal sportbeleid tot stand komt door middel van samenwerkingsverbanden tussen de sportsector enerzijds, en de sociale sector anderzijds. De data zijn afkomstig van het Vlaamse Sportdiensten Panel (2014. De resultaten geven onder meer aan dat de publieke sportsector en de sociale sector nog in grote mate twee “gescheiden” werelden zijn. Het blijkt een uitdaging om de afstand tussen beiden te overbruggen. Aanbevelingen voor verder onderzoek en voor de ontwikkeling van een sociaal sportbeleid worden aangereikt. ABSTRACTFacilitating access to sports for people in poverty? A study on local social sports policy Research has shown that living in poverty affects the opportunities for engaging in practicing sports. People in poverty participate less in sports than people who have no (or fewer difficulties making ends meet. At the Flemish policy level, initiatives have been undertaken to ensure that more local sports authorities promote and facilitate participation in sports for people in poverty. However, it remains unclear how these concerns are being translated at the local level. In this study, we investigate the extent to which local sports authorities are currently

  18. A survey of local health promotion initiatives for older people in Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Nefyn H

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the demographic profile of the UK changes, policy makers and practitioners have to respond to health challenges presented by a progressively ageing population. The health promotion plan for older people, aged over 50 years, in Wales included eight key areas: physical activity, healthy eating, home safety and warmth, emotional health, health protection, smoking, alcohol and sexual health. The aim of this study was to describe the extent, content and regional variation of existing health promotion initiatives for older people in Wales, provided by statutory, voluntary and private sector agencies. Method A questionnaire was sent to senior health promotion specialists employed in the 22 local authority areas in Wales to ascertain details of all projects promoting health and wellbeing in the eight key areas where the priority population was aged over 50, or the majority of users were older people. Additional information was sought from project leads and websites. Results Eighteen questionnaires were returned; not all were fully completed. Four areas did not return a questionnaire. Additional information was obtained from internet searches but this mainly concerned national initiatives rather than local projects. In all, 120 projects were included, 11 were throughout Wales. Best provision was for physical activity, with 3 national and 42 local initiatives, but local provision was patchy. Healthy eating, and home safety and warmth had far fewer initiatives, as did health protection, which comprised two national immunisation campaigns. Smoking and alcohol misuse were poorly provided for, and there was no provision for older people's sexual health. Evaluation arrangements were poorly described. Half of those who responded identified unmet training needs. Conclusion The reasons for patchy provision of services were not clear. Increased efforts to improve the coverage of interventions known to be effective should be made. Rigorous

  19. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    microscopes, chemical analyses etc. The NHM has big labs—like a university—in the basement. I write papers, give talks... For the public galleries of the NHM my group provides expert input to exhibitions-when the meteorite pavilion was recently refurbished we suggested a layout, wrote text and selected samples, but this was then 'edited' by the exhibition designers. I'm also working on a new website with virtual meteorite specimens. As an expert on Martian meteorites I often get interviewed by the media: for example, I am on a new Channel 4 programme called Destination Mars. I have also just finished a general interest book—it's called Search for Life; the NHM have just published it (in March). And do you get to go to exciting places? As a researcher I go to conferences I am just off to the States this week. I went to Antarctica ten years ago meteorite collecting and I am hoping to go to Australia this year. It is good fun but they really do need an expert who can recognise a meteorite. I'll be going to the Nullarbor region of Australia for 2 3 weeks depending on the weather if it's too green there is too much grass, so you can't see the meteorites. How do you find people respond to meteorites? People love touching rocks from outer space, especially primary school children. You can see how they are burnt on the outside. When you feel the weight of them it really brings it home: iron meteorites are heavy! They'll often say 'Wow, it fell from the sky' as they glance upwards, half expecting another one to come crashing through the ceiling. Everyone finds it amazing that a solid object has come as if from nowhere. And they are so old. They can't believe how old they are. We want to know where we come from. There is always lots of media coverage about what is happening in the sky (eclipses and the like). It's there and it's a bit of a mystery. If we can get to grips with how our planets and how our own Sun formed it can put us in the picture as to where we have come from and

  20. Create the "careful, meticulous, elegant" Nursing Culture and Putting the Serving People Spirit into Practice%打造“三精”护理文化 践行为人民服务精神

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐凤; 王玉梅

    2012-01-01

    中国人民解放军第二○八医院坚持“服务部队,服务人民”的建院宗旨,坚持“姓军为兵、服务人民”的办院方向,紧紧围绕“精细化护理”的服务理念,积极打造“精心、精细、精美”的“三精”护理文化,通过转变思想观念、改变护理模式、规范护理管理行为;完善管理制度、加强职业培训;创造温馨环境、融入人文关怀等措施.在实际行动中践行“为人民服务”精神.%The No. 208 Hospital of PLA always adheres to the purpose of "servicing troops and servicing people" , adheres to the direction of "name army for the soldiers, service for the people" and has been tightly around the service concept of "meticulous care" , and actively created the "careful, meticulous, elegant" nursing culture. Through changing the ideas and nursing mode, standardizing nursing management behavior, perfecting management system and strengthening professional training, creating the warm environment with the humanistic care and so on to put the serving people spirit into practice.

  1. Community Forestry as Perceived by Local People Around Cross River National Park, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezebilo, Eugene E.

    2012-01-01

    The prior identification of local people's preferences for conservation-development projects will help gear nature-conservation strategies toward the needs of different groups of local people. This will help policy-makers in designing a more acceptable and effective conservation strategy. This article reports a study of local perceptions of a community forestry project that aims to help improve the design as well as local acceptance of the project. The data originated from personal interviews conducted in communities around Okwangwo Division of the Cross River National Park in southeast Nigeria and were analysed using ordered logit and binary logit models. The results showed that >50% of the respondents were satisfied with the community forestry project. The respondents' perceptions were mainly influenced by education, age, gender, and willingness to contribute money to tourism as well as the contributions of cocoa, banana, and afang ( Gnetum africanum) to the respondents' income. The results from this study have important implications for nature conservation in Nigeria and potentially other conservation contexts across the developing world.

  2. Facilitators for travelling with local public transport among people with mild cognitive limitations after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Agneta; Månsson Lexell, Eva

    2017-01-24

    Previous research of how people with stroke manage public transport has mainly focused on barriers due to physical limitations whereas the influence of cognitive limitations is scarce. There is also a lack of knowledge of facilitators that can help to overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to describe facilitators for travelling with public transport, e.g. local buses, among people with mild cognitive limitations after stroke. A multiple case study research design was used, where quantitative and qualitative data were utilized, and analysed according to a mixed methods design. The case descriptions reveal how people with mild cognitive limitations after stroke manage their trips but constantly have to be prepared to solve problems to unexpected events. Personal characteristics and other individual strategies together with support and solutions from society were important facilitators for travelling with bus. This study takes a new approach by specifically describing facilitators for travelling with public transport among people with mild cognitive limitations after stroke. To facilitate participation in society for this particular traveller group, occupational therapists have an important role when new technology and interventions that target bus travels, and other modes of transport are developed.

  3. Local level epidemiological analysis of TB in people from a high incidence country of birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massey Peter D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The setting for this analysis is the low tuberculosis (TB incidence state of New South Wales (NSW, Australia. Local level analysis of TB epidemiology in people from high incidence countries-of-birth (HIC in a low incidence setting has not been conducted in Australia and has not been widely reported. Local level analysis could inform measures such as active case finding and targeted earlier diagnosis. The aim of this study was to use a novel approach to identify local areas in an Australian state that have higher TB rates given the local areas’ country of birth profiles. Methods TB notification data for the three year period 2006–2008 were analysed by grouping the population into those from a high-incidence country-of-birth and the remainder. Results During the study period there were 1401 notified TB cases in the state of NSW. Of these TB cases 76.5% were born in a high-incidence country. The annualised TB notification rate for the high-incidence country-of-birth group was 61.2/100,000 population and for the remainder of the population was 1.8/100,000. Of the 152 Local Government Areas (LGA in NSW, nine had higher and four had lower TB notification rates in their high-incidence country-of-birth populations when compared with the high-incidence country-of-birth population for the rest of NSW. The nine areas had a higher proportion of the population with a country of birth where TB notification rates are >100/100,000. Those notified with TB in the nine areas also had a shorter length of stay in Australia than the rest of the state. The areas with higher TB notification rates were all in the capital city, Sydney. Among LGAs with higher TB notification rates, four had higher rates in both people with a high-incidence country of birth and people not born in a high-incidence country. The age distribution of the HIC population was similar across all areas, and the highest differential in TB rates across areas was in the 5–19

  4. Determining the Arterial Blood Pressure of People Living in Yesilyurt Local Healthcare Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyza Dereli

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Whereas the prevalance of arterial blood pressure which was a chronical health problem was 20%-25% among 30 year-old people, them showing an increase in aging, the percentage went as high as 50% in 60’s and later ages. What was that worrisome was that despite the high prevalance, only half of these received treathment. This is study was descriptively and cross-sectionally planned to determine whether the people asking their tensions to be measured in and around the Yesilyurt local healthcare office region. METHODS: The environment of the research consisted of 1400 people over 35 age and registered Yesilyurt Local healthcare Office and the whole of the environment were included in this sample. The study was conducted over 340 voluntaries. The data was collected by a questionnaire of 14 questions containing socio-demografic features and by measuring the arterial blood pressure, height and weight of the individuals. In the evaluation of the data, chi-square test was used and the level of significantly was accepted as 0.05. RESULTS: In this study, the rate of high sistolic blood pressure was found to be 21.47% and the rate of high diastolic blood pressure to be 8.23%. It was determined that age and body mass index varrieties were effective on sistolic hipertension. It was also found that in their behaviors of the use of hypertensive medicine, of regular arterial pressure controls and of having the hypertesion diagnosis significant differnces varied statistically on both sistolic and diastolic blood pressure people having. CONCLUSION: In order to improve the health, informative information abouth hypertension was provided for the participants for too days consisting of 4 sessions. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(1.000: 53-58

  5. Put numbers on the sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2014-01-01

    exposure of humans, to the local impacts associated with physical transformation of land and extraction of water. Chemicals can cause toxic impacts to humans and ecosystems on all scales. All these impacts need to be quantified if we want to put numbers on sustainability. The life cycle perspective...... on products and systems and the coverage of all relevant environmental impacts are combined in Life cycle assessment (LCA) which is introduced in the talk as the tool to put numbers on environmental sustainability. The basics of LCA are introduced, current applications are presented and a discussion of its...

  6. Young People's More Permissive Views About Marijuana: Local Impact of State Laws or National Trend?

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, LA; Jacobs, LM; Spetz, J

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether state medical marijuana laws "send the wrong message," that is, have a local influence on the views of young people about the risks of using marijuana.We performed multilevel, serial, cross-sectional analyses on 10 annual waves of the US National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2004-2013) nationally and for states with marijuana laws using individual- and state-level controls.Living in medical marijuana states was associated with more permissive views regarding marijuana a...

  7. How a Stressed Local Public System Copes With People in Psychiatric Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Rebecca; La, Elizabeth Holdsworth; Morrissey, Joseph; Hall, Marissa; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Blouin, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    In order to bolster the public mental health safety net, we must first understand how these systems function on a day-to-day basis. This study explored how individual attributes and organizational interdependencies within one predominantly urban US county affected responses to individuals’ needs during psychiatric crises. We interviewed clinicians and managers within the crisis response network about people at immediate risk of psychiatric hospitalization, what had happened to them during their crises, and factors affecting services provided (N = 94 individuals and 9 agencies). Social network diagrams depicted patterns of referrals between agencies. Iterative coding of interview transcripts was used to contextualize the social network findings. Often, agencies saw crises through to resolution. However, providers also limited the types of people they served, leaving many people in crisis in limbo. This study illustrates how attributes of individuals with mental illness, service providers and their interactions, and state and federal policies intersect to shape the trajectories of individuals during psychiatric crises. Understanding both the structures of current local systems and their contexts may support continued evolution toward a more humane and robust safety net for some of our society’s most vulnerable members. PMID:23065371

  8. Are Local People Conservationists? Analysis of Transition Dynamics from Agroforests to Monoculture Plantations in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Levang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cash crops are developing in the once forested areas of Indonesia in parallel with market and economic improvements. Perennial crops such as coffee, cocoa, and rubber were first planted in estates by private or public companies. Local people then integrated these crops into their farming systems, often through the planting of agroforests, that is, intercropping the new cash crop with upland rice and food crops. The crop was generally mixed with fruit trees, timber, and other useful plants. A geographic specialization occurred, driven by biophysical constraints and market opportunities, with expansion of cocoa in Sulawesi, coffee in Lampung, and natural rubber in eastern Sumatra. However, during the past three decades, these agroforests have increasingly been converted into more productive monoculture plantations. A common trajectory can be observed in agricultural landscapes dominated by a perennial cash crop: from ladang to agroforests, and then to monoculture plantations. This process combines agricultural expansion at the expense of natural forests and specialization of the land cover at the expense of biodiversity and wildlife habitats. We determined the main drivers of agricultural expansion and intensification in three regions of Indonesia based on perception surveys and land use profitability analysis. When the national and international contexts clearly influence farmers' decisions, local people appear very responsive to economic opportunities. They do not hesitate to change their livelihood system if it can increase their income. Their cultural or sentimental attachment to the forest is not sufficient to prevent forest conversion.

  9. The alternative choices of masticatory customs by local people in Wasur National Park, Merauke, Papua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI SUSIARTI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The flora diversity and the interesting customs in East Indonesia, particularly in Papua, have not been explored intensively. This study encountered the relationship between traditional customs and usage of plant species by the local people in Wasur National Park Area, Merauke sub-district, Merauke district. One of them was masticatory. It has been well known by Indonesians in most parts of Indonesia, including societies in Wasur National Park. The major societies live in Wasur National Park are Kanum, Morori and Marind. Besides gambir (Uncaria gambir Roxburgh and sirih (Piper betle L., the young fruit of betel nut (Areca catechu L. is usually consumed it as masticatory materials, by man and women. Several plant species, usually used alternative choices by Kanum, Morori and Marind were openg (Exocarpus latifolius R.Br.; Santalaceae, tawal (Celastraceae, sambiwal (Erythroxylum ecarinatum Burck; Erythroxylaceae, ntuo (Cryptocaria nitida R.A.Philippi; Lauraceae and agya (Endiandra montana C.T. White; Lauraceae.

  10. Achieving ecological restoration by working with local people: a Chinese scholar seeks win-win paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heran Zheng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental degradation and poverty are linked, and this means that conservation and poverty reduction must be tackled together. However, finding a successful integrated strategy has been an elusive goal. We describe the career of a Chinese scholar, Shixiong Cao, whose persistent efforts to find and follow win-win paths have led to ecological restoration accompanied by long-term benefits for local residents. Cao's story illustrates how development that combines environmental and economic perspectives can both help people to escape the poverty trap and restore degraded environments. His experience demonstrates that when environmental managers find solutions that can mitigate or eliminate poverty through the development of green enterprises, they can combine them with environmental restoration efforts to produce long-term sustainable solutions. In this paper, we share Cao's 28 years of experience because we believe that his scientific and practical spirit, and his belief that it is necessary to work directly with the people affected by environmental projects, will inspire other scholars and practitioners to achieve similar successes.

  11. Assessing Local People's Knowledge of the Endangered Cuban Solenodon (Solenodon cubanus) in Alejandro de Humboldt National Park, Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Echenique-Díaz, Lázaro M.; OHDACHI, Satoshi; Kita, Masaki; Begué-Quiala, Gerardo; Páez, Rafael Borroto; Labañino, Jorge L. Delgado; Díez, Jorgelino Gámez; HOSON, Osamu; SAITO, Chiemi

    2014-01-01

    Assessing local people's knowledge of endangered species is important not only for the planning and implementation of environmental education programs, but also to address community-based conservation issues and guarantee an effective engagement of local residents in conservation efforts. A questionnaire-based study conducted in Alejandro de Humboldt National Park assessed local people’s knowledge of the endangered Cuban Solenodon (Solenodon cubanus). From this it was found that although chil...

  12. Combating Corruption and Building a Clean Government in Universities Based on the Idea of Putting People First and Administrating for the People%以人为本执政为民理念下的高校反腐倡廉建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管小敏; 程华云

    2011-01-01

    Thoroughly applying the idea of putting people first in administration is an inevitable requirement tor strengthening efforts to promote clean government and combating corruption at present and during the coming period. From the perspective of Stakeholders Theory, this article defines the stakeholder in combating corruption and build- ing a clean government, and also explores why combating corruption and building a clean government in university should follow the idea of putting people first in administration and how it is enacted.%深入贯彻落实以人为本、执政为民理念,是当前和今后一个时期加强反腐倡廉建设的必然要求。文章拟从利益相关者理论的视角,界定高校反腐倡廉的利益相关者,思考高校反腐倡廉为什么要以人为本执政为民以及如何体现以人为本执政为民。

  13. Fuel poverty and the health of older people: the role of local climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R; Blane, D

    2013-09-01

    Fuel poverty is a risk factor for ill-health, particularly among older people. We hypothesized that both the risk of fuel poverty and the strength of its detrimental effects on health would be increased in areas of colder and wetter climate. Individual data on respiratory health, hypertension, depressive symptoms and self-rated health were derived from the 2008/09 wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Climate data for 89 English counties and unitary authorities were obtained from the UK Met Office. Multilevel regression models (n = 7160) were used to test (i) the association between local climate and fuel poverty risk, and (ii) the association between local climate and the effect of fuel poverty on health (adjusted for age, gender, height, smoking status and household income). Individual risk of fuel poverty varied across counties. However, this variation was not explained by differences in climate. Fuel poverty was significantly related to worse health for two of the outcomes (respiratory health and depressive symptoms). However, there was no significant effect of climate on fuel poverty's association with these outcomes. Although there is regional variation in England in both the risk of fuel poverty and its effects on health, this variation is not explained by differences in rainfall and winter temperatures.

  14. Emancipation or Neo-Colonisation? Global Gender Mainstreaming Policies, Swedish Gender Equality Politics and Local Negotiations about Putting Gender into Education Reforms in the Lao People's Democratic Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfver, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    This article reflects on gender mainstreaming policies post Beijing and their impact on development cooperation and relations between the Global North and Global South. The analysis is based on an examination of gender equality politics in Sweden, their connection with an interpretation of gender mainstreaming and the application of this approach…

  15. Emancipation or Neo-Colonisation? Global Gender Mainstreaming Policies, Swedish Gender Equality Politics and Local Negotiations about Putting Gender into Education Reforms in the Lao People's Democratic Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfver, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    This article reflects on gender mainstreaming policies post Beijing and their impact on development cooperation and relations between the Global North and Global South. The analysis is based on an examination of gender equality politics in Sweden, their connection with an interpretation of gender mainstreaming and the application of this approach…

  16. Power to the people : Local community initiatives and the transition to sustainable energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, Tineke; Scholtens, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The transition towards renewable and sustainable energy is being accompanied by a transformation of communities and neighbourhoods. This transition may have huge ramifications throughout society. Many cities, towns and villages are putting together ambitious visions about how to achieve 100%

  17. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    the war Hoyle returned to Cambridge, but kept in close contact with his collaborators. Fred Hoyle was a canny and media-savvy scientist, 40 years before such things were recognized. Martin Rees said after his death '[He] also had other dimensions to his career, his inventiveness and skill as a communicator'. It is hard to realize now the impact that Hoyle's broadcasts had in post-war Britain. His programmes for the BBC on The Nature of the Universe won greater audiences than such unlikely rivals as Bertrand Russell and Tommy Handley. Even today many people recall how they were affected by listening to these broadcasts. Hoyle used one of his broadcasts to ridicule the hot explosion theory. He referred to the idea of a 'big bang as fanciful'. Unfortunately the name stuck, much to Hoyle's chagrin. In the 1950s Hoyle began a fruitful collaboration with Willy Fowler of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Hoyle was interested in the origin of the chemical elements. Hans Bethe, Charles Critchfield and Karl-Frederich von Weizsäcker had calculated in 1939 how stars could turn protons into helium nuclei by nuclear fusion. Part of the Vela supernova remmant, the debris left after the type of massive explosion in which Hoyle predicted that heavy nuclei were formed. (© Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Anglo-Australian Observatory.) Building on earlier collaboration with Ed Saltpeter, Hoyle used data supplied by Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge and, working with Fowler, began to piece together how the elements were formed. By looking at very large stars near the end of their lives and examining their chemical composition, they noticed that the abundances of elements almost exactly corresponded to those with a low nuclear capture cross section. Hoyle argued that all of the elements in our bodies had been formed in stars that had been and gone before our solar system had even formed. In their classic paper the elements are produced by three basic methods. The

  18. Sustainability and Local People's Participation in Coastal Aquaculture: Regional Differences and Historical Experiences in Sri Lanka and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, Daniel A.

    2007-11-01

    This article discusses environmental sustainability in aquaculture and its contribution to poverty alleviation, based on field studies in Sri Lanka and the Philippines. The aquaculture practices studied are the monoculture of the black tiger prawn ( Penneaus monodon) and milkfish ( Chanos chanos) and the polyculture of the two species together with the mud crab ( Scylla serrata). Factors affecting economic viability, social equity and environmental impacts in aquaculture are discussed and used to illuminate local and regional differences between aquaculture in Sri Lanka and the Philippines. Findings indicate that the most significant difference is the level of participation by local people (i.e., people originating ≤10 km away from the farm location). In the Philippines, 84 % of the people involved in aquaculture are locals, whereas in Sri Lanka, 55% are outsiders. Whether differences between the two areas can be explained by analyzing regional conditions, which might have resulted in different aquaculture practices, is discussed. In Sri Lanka, semi-intensive shrimp monoculture is currently the most common practice, whereas in the Philippines, extensive shrimp/fish polyculture is more common. Previous studies, as well as fieldwork, indicate that extensive culture practices reduce environmental impacts and benefit local people more. Sustainability in aquaculture is, however, also dependent on the extent of mangrove conversion into ponds. As such, extensive and locally owned farms do not necessarily result in an all but sustainable situation. Keeping this in mind, it is discussed if extensive polyculture practices might result in a more sustainable aquaculture, both environmentally and socioeconomically.

  19. [Lead exposure of people living in a lead high exposure area from local diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; He, Liping; Huang, Xiao; He, Junshan

    2011-11-01

    To study the lead exposure of people living in a lead high exposure area from local diet, and to assess its health risks. Thirty five subjects were selected by random from a mining area and another 30 subjects were selected from a non-polluted area. The exposure of lead was estimated by the content of lead in drinking water and vegetables, and health risks was estimated by the levels of lead in blood and urine. The content of lead in drinking water and vegetables in the mining area was 20.6 microg/L and 1.61mg/kg (geometric mean) respectively, which were higher than that in the unpolluted area (6.0 microg/L and 0.56 mg/kg, geometric mean) (P area from diet was 16.88 microg/kg and 16.09 microg/kg respectively, which was higher than that in the unpolluted area (P 0.05). Blood lead and urine lead of inhabitants in the mining-area were higher than those in the unpolluted area. The health risks for male and female inhabitants in the mining area were 4.73 and 4.51. The health risks of lead exposure caused by diet (drinking water and food) were relatively high in the mining area.

  20. Put Your Hands Together

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-03-24

    In this podcast, learn how to help stop the spread of infection and stay healthy. It's easy when you 'Put Your Hands Together.'.  Created: 3/24/2011 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID) and National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 3/24/2011.

  1. Effects of locality based community hospital care on independence in older people needing rehabilitation: randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John; Young, John; Forster, Anne; Mallinder, Karen; Bogle, Sue; Lowson, Karin; Small, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects on independence in older people needing rehabilitation in a locality based community hospital compared with care on a ward for elderly people in a district general hospital. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Care in a community hospital and district general hospital in Bradford, England. Participants 220 patients needing rehabilitation after an acute illness that required hospital admission. Interventions Patients were randomly allocated to a locality based community hospital or to remain within a department for the care of elderly people in a district general hospital. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were Nottingham extended activities of daily living scale and general health questionnaire 28 (carer). Secondary outcomes were activities of daily living (Barthel index), Nottingham health profile, hospital anxiety and depression scale, mortality, destination after discharge, satisfaction with services, carer strain index, and carer's satisfaction with services. Results The median length of stay was 15 days for both the community hospital and the district general hospital groups (interquartile range: community hospital 9-25 days; district general hospital 9-24 days). Independence at six months was greater in the community hospital group (adjusted mean difference 5.30, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 9.96). Results for the secondary outcome measures, including care satisfaction and measures of carer burden, were similar for both groups. Conclusions Care in a locality based community hospital is associated with greater independence for older people than care in wards for elderly people in a district general hospital. PMID:15994660

  2. Use of Non Wood Forest Products by local people bordering the "Parc National Kaboré Tambi", Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belem, Bassirou; Nacoulma, Blandine Marie Ivette; Gbangou, Roland

    2007-01-01

    In the French-speaking countries of Africa, strategies of conservation, inherited from thecolonial time, exclude the bordering people in the management of the national parks plant resources. Today, policies and legislation try to reconcile forest conservation and development by associating local...... this issue in the case of the "Parc National Kaboré Tambi" in Burkina Faso, byproposing a combination of ethno-botanical surveys and botanical inventories. The article analyses the importance of the park plant species, identify the constraints faced by local people to harvest the park plant products, analyse...... the park vegetation structure and assess the degree of regeneration of the main useful species. The surveys reveal that bordering people consider the park as their granary, their pharmacy, their pasture, their place of religious worship, and the source of the strength of their territory. They harvest...

  3. Bayesian fusion of ceiling mounted camera and laser range finder on a mobile robot for people detection and localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, N.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Robust people detection and localization is a prerequisite for many applications where service robots interact with humans. Future robots will not be stand-alone any more but will operate in smart environments that are equipped with sensor systems for context awareness and activity recognition. This

  4. Putting Action in Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  5. Coral Reefs and People in a High-CO2 World: Where Can Science Make a Difference to People?

    OpenAIRE

    Pendleton, Linwood; Comte, Adrien; Langdon, Chris; Ekstrom, Julia A.; Sarah R Cooley; Suatoni, Lisa; Beck, Michael W.; Brander, Luke M.; Burke, Lauretta; Cinner, Josh E.; Doherty, Carolyn; Edwards, Peter E.T.; Gledhill, Dwight; Jiang, Li-Qing; van Hooidonk, Ruben J.

    2016-01-01

    Reefs and People at Risk Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere put shallow, warm-water coral reef ecosystems, and the people who depend upon them at risk from two key global environmental stresses: 1) elevated sea surface temperature (that can cause coral bleaching and related mortality), and 2) ocean acidification. These global stressors: cannot be avoided by local management, compound local stressors, and hasten the loss of ecosystem services. Impacts to people will be most ...

  6. Power to the People: Local community initiatives and the transition to sustainable energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, Tineke; Scholtens, Lambertus

    2015-01-01

    The transition towards renewable and sustainable energy is being accompanied by a transformation of communities and neighbourhoods. This transition may have huge ramifications throughout society. Many cities, towns and villages are putting together ambitious visions about how to achieve 100% sustain

  7. Power to the people : Local community initiatives and the transition to sustainable energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, Tineke; Scholtens, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The transition towards renewable and sustainable energy is being accompanied by a transformation of communities and neighbourhoods. This transition may have huge ramifications throughout society. Many cities, towns and villages are putting together ambitious visions about how to achieve 100% sustain

  8. Sustainability and local people's participation in coastal aquaculture: regional differences and historical experiences in Sri Lanka and the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, Daniel A

    2007-11-01

    This article discusses environmental sustainability in aquaculture and its contribution to poverty alleviation, based on field studies in Sri Lanka and the Philippines. The aquaculture practices studied are the monoculture of the black tiger prawn (Penneaus monodon) and milkfish (Chanos chanos) and the polyculture of the two species together with the mud crab (Scylla serrata). Factors affecting economic viability, social equity and environmental impacts in aquaculture are discussed and used to illuminate local and regional differences between aquaculture in Sri Lanka and the Philippines. Findings indicate that the most significant difference is the level of participation by local people (i.e., people originating Sustainability in aquaculture is, however, also dependent on the extent of mangrove conversion into ponds. As such, extensive and locally owned farms do not necessarily result in an all but sustainable situation. Keeping this in mind, it is discussed if extensive polyculture practices might result in a more sustainable aquaculture, both environmentally and socioeconomically.

  9. Personas, people and participation–challenges from the trenches of local government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Christiansen, Ellen Tove; Nyvang, Tom

    2012-01-01

    In the early days of digital technology development, design was done 'for', 'with' or 'by' the users based on the assumption that users were real people. Today 'users' have become a component in mass-market production and are seen as 'customers', rather than people. Still designers need to address...

  10. Assessment Of Current State And Impact Of REDD On Livelihood Of Local People In Rungwe District Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrick Ojija

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A climate change mitigation mechanism Reducing Emission from Deforestation and forest Degradation REDD is anticipated to affect livelihoods of forest dependent communities. This study was conducted to establish this impact on livelihoods of local people in Rungwe District Tanzania. Data were collected through questionnaires group discussions and interviews from three villages Syukula Ilolo and Kibisi. Results showed that households annual income and crop production are higher after REDD implementation. The older respondents 40 years old considered REDD to be important for forest management compared to younger generation 40 years old p0.05. Similarly the older respondents considered wood forest products such as fuelwood charcoal timber and poles to be reduced. There was a widespread awareness about REDDs objectives among household respondents. Therefore REDD proponents should implement alternative sources of livelihoods to help local people improve their income and reduce dependence on the forest resources and eventually decrease deforestation and forest degradation.

  11. Environmental challenges to the mangrove wetlands of North Malabar (Kerala, India: Their sustainable development and influence on local people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaleel K. M.

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands, including mangroves, perform several functions such as inundation control, and protection from erosion, storm, floods and tidal damage, and generate goods and products such as fish and forest resources. These functions are of fundamental importance for society. The present study aims to identify the challenges of the mangrove wetlands of north Malabar, their uses and socio-economic influence on local people, and the value of ecosystem services, and to suggest the way forward for sustainable development.

  12. Are You Putting Me On?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王花枝

    2003-01-01

    There are a number of phrases built on the word “put”, such as put by, put for, put across, put over and so forth. The expression“putting one on”is among them. You tell a person something that he finds difficult to believe, and he may look at you closely and ask:“Are you putting me on?”He does-n蒺t think you are serious. Perhaps, you are joking with him, teasing him, try-ing to test his reaction(反应).The expression “putting one on”is closest to the phrase “to put one over on a person”, meaning to trick, to de...

  13. Poor People in Poor Places: Local Opportunity Structures and Household Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Individualist and structuralist perspectives on poverty were integrated by examining the relationship between "people poverty" and "place poverty" in nonmetropolitan and metropolitan areas, using a multilevel framework. Both household compositional factors (including education) and contextual factors contributed to the nonmetro-metro difference in…

  14. Ecotourism in Lawachara National Park in Bangladesh: Perceptions of Local People and Co-management Officials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elands, B.H.M.; Islam, W.; Duim, van der V.R.

    2015-01-01

    Tourism is one of the fastest growing industries of the world. Tourism in India is expanding faster and generates colossal foreign exchange. The tourism industry employs a large number of people, both skilled and unskilled. The tourism industry promotes national integration and international underst

  15. Birding for and with People: Integrating Local Participation in Avian Monitoring Programs within High Biodiversity Areas in Southern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Berlanga

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biological monitoring is a powerful tool for understanding ecological patterns and processes, implementing sound management practices, and determining wildlife conservation strategies. In Mexico, regional long-term bird monitoring has been undertaken only over the last decade. Two comprehensive programs have incorporated bird monitoring as the main tool for assessing the impact of human productive activities on birds and habitats at local and regional levels: the Integrated Ecosystem Management (IEM and the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor Mexico (CBMM. These programs are implemented in supremely important biodiverse regions in the southern and southeastern states of Mexico. Bird monitoring activities are based on the recruitment and participation of local people linked to sustainable productive projects promoted by the CBMM or IEM. Through a series of training workshops delivered by specialists, local monitors receive equipment and coordinate to become part of a large monitoring network that facilitates regional covertures. This data currently being obtained by local people will enable the mid- and long-term assessment of the impacts of sustainable human productive activities on birds and biodiversity. Community-based bird monitoring programs are a promising opportunity for enhancing scientific knowledge, improving sustainable practices, and supporting wildlife conservation in areas of high biodiversity.

  16. Why local people did not present a problem in the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, Japan though people accused in the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, M.

    2016-12-01

    Risk communication is a big issues among seismologists after the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake all over the world. A lot of people remember 7 researchers as "L'Aquila 7" were accused in Italy. Seismologists said it is impossible to predict an earthquake by science technology today and join more outreach activities. "In a subsequent inquiry of the handling of the disaster, seven members of the Italian National Commission for the Forecast and Prevention of Major Risks were accused of giving "inexact, incomplete and contradictory" information about the danger of the tremors prior to the main quake. On 22 October 2012, six scientists and one ex-government official were convicted of multiple manslaughter for downplaying the likelihood of a major earthquake six days before it took place. They were each sentenced to six years' imprisonment (Wikipedia)". Finally 6 scientists are not guilty. The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake hit Kyushu, Japan in April. They are very similar seismological situations between the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake and the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. The foreshock was Mj6.5 and Mw6.2 in 14 April 2016. The main shock was Mj7.3 and Mw7.0. Japan Metrological Agency (JMA) misleaded foreshock as mainshock before main shock occured. 41 people died by the main shock in Japan. However local people did not accused scientists in Japan. It has been less big earhquakes around 100 years in Kumamoto. Poeple was not so matured that they treated earthquake information in Kyushu, Japan. How are there differences between Japan and Italy? We learn about outreach activities for sciencits from this case.

  17. Cerebral lateralization of global-local processing in left- and right-handed people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mohammad Ali; Taghavi, Mohammad Reza; Zoughi, Mohammad Reza

    2005-06-01

    Cerebral lateralization of global-local processing of 70 left-handed and 70 right-handed students was compared using a computerized global-local task in a half-visual field paradigm. Analysis showed that left-handed individuals were slower than right-handed individuals in processing Globally Directed stimuli presented to the left visual field (right hemisphere). In addition, left-handed individuals showed smaller local superiority in the left hemisphere to the right-handed individuals. These findings are more consistent with Levy's prediction of spatial inferiority of left-handed individuals than Geschwind and Galaburda's or Annett's hypotheses.

  18. The Impact of Putting Mubarak on Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On August 3,2011,83-year-old former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was put on trial,lying on a hospital bed an iron cage in a Cairo courtroom. Zhang Zhongxiang,Deputy Director of the Department of the West Asian and African Studies at the Shanghai Institutes for International Studies,believes that the Mubarak trial will not only aggravate conflict among Egyptian people, but also complicate the regional tensions and

  19. People First

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Around mid-January, when the whole nation was looking forward to celebrating China's traditional Spring Festival, local people's congresses and people's political consultative conferences were busy holding their annual sessions. And in March, the National People's Congress (NPC) and the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) will hold their annual sessions.

  20. The incidence of mobility restrictions among elderly people in two Nordic localities. A five-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakari-Rantala, Ritva; Avlund, Kirsten; Frändin, Kerstin;

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of limitations in self-reported mobility as well as the decline in measured walking speed and stair-mounting ability over five years among men and women aged 75 at baseline in two Nordic localities. Another purpose was to analyze the relation......The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of limitations in self-reported mobility as well as the decline in measured walking speed and stair-mounting ability over five years among men and women aged 75 at baseline in two Nordic localities. Another purpose was to analyze...... in self-reported mobility as well. However, the relationship between different methods of measurement was not straightforward. This indicates that multiple approaches are needed to obtain thorough knowledge about mobility and its decline among elderly people....

  1. A portable mid-range localization system using infrared LEDs for visually impaired people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suhyeon; Choi, In-Mook; Kim, Sang-Soo; Kim, Sung-Mok

    2014-11-01

    A versatile indoor/outdoor pedestrian guidance system with good mobility is necessary in order to aid visually impaired pedestrians in indoor and outdoor environments. In this paper, distance estimation methods for portable wireless localization systems are verified. Two systems of a fixed active beacon and a receiver using an ultrasound time-of-flight method and a differential infrared intensity method are proposed. The infrared localization system was appropriate for the goal of this study. It was possible to use the infrared intensity method to generate a uniform signal field that exceeded 30 m. Valid distance estimations which were within 30 m of coverage indoors and within 20 m of coverage outdoors were made. Also, a pocket-sized receiver which can be adapted to a smartphone was found to be suitable for use as a portable device.

  2. Perceptions of Local People Regarding Istanbul as a European Capital of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billur Somer

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Istanbul has been declared the European Capital of Culture in 2010, due to its past as the cradle of many civilizations and host to various cultures. Today, Istanbul still includes a variety of cultures, ethnic backgrounds, religions and socio-cultural levels. People with different origins, languages, beliefs and traditions are living together in the city. As Istanbul has received in recent years large numbers of migrants from other parts of Turkey, the gap between the lifestyles of residents has widened. Therefore, this research aims to determine the perceptions of Istanbul’s inhabitants, who have highly diversified identities and lifestyles, regarding the city as a European Capital of Culture. A scale to measure the construct of European Capital of Culture is also proposed.

  3. Power To The People? The Impact of the Localism Act 2011 on Environmental Justice in England

    OpenAIRE

    Bodman, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The Localism Act 2011 is a wide-ranging piece of legislation which is part of the current government’s drive towards creating ‘the Big Society’. Part 6 of that Act concerns changes to the planning system and represents a radical departure from the system that has developed over the last 60 years. Amongst other changes, it abolishes Regional Spatial Strategies and introduces Neighbourhood Planning. These changes will affect the way that decisions about the distribution of desirable and undesir...

  4. PEOPLE'S PERCEPTION ON HOUSEHOLD SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN OJO LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA, IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O. Longe ، O. O. Longe ، E. F. Ukpebor

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The current work examined the structure of household waste management system, collection and disposal within the context of a wider research on integrated solid waste management in households. A sample of 30 households from eleven selected residential areas with a focus group of 60 respondents in Ojo Local Government Area, Lagos State, Nigeria was used. The selected residential areas were divided into high, middle and low socio-economic strata. The research examined a range of environmental behaviours, attitude and perception of respondents on household solid waste management. The results established waste management behaviours among the respondents on solid waste management system, services, patronage of services and cost recovery methods. Public opinion and perception on solid waste management system is characterized with irregularity and inefficient collection system; with poor monitoring of the private waste service providers by the local authority. Willingness to pay for waste management services provided by the private service providers, the Private Sector Participation operators is higher among the middle and high income socio-economic groups than in the low income group. However, with the application of sustainable environmental education greater success ratio could be achieved. Level of patronage of solid waste management services is high across the three socio-economic groups but patronage is shared among the two operating service providers (formal and informal. The Private Sector Participation has the highest patronage level with 64.6% severity index while the informal sector (Cart pushers have only 48.7% severity index both percentages translate to the agreed and neutral perception opinion ranges respectively. The paper advocates for improved solid waste management system through proper monitoring of the services of the Private Sector Participation operators by the Local Government Area for improved service efficiency. Finally the

  5. Papua’s threatened forests: conflict of interest government versus local indigenous people

    OpenAIRE

    "HIDAYAT, Herman; YAMAMOTO, Sota

    2014-01-01

     The main threats of Papua’s forests include increases in logging (both legal and illegal), oil palm plantations, and mining. This study examined local community perceptions of forestlands, highlighting the rising crisis of illegal logging, and government perception of forestlands, emphasizing the problems of the expansion of oil palm plantations and the increase in mining activity (Freeport Grasberg Company and Tablasupa Nickel Mining Company). “Political ecology,” which high...

  6. 小议put on

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟晓迪

    2011-01-01

    put on可以表达多种含义,现将其主要用法总结如下。 1.穿上;戴上。例如:Nancy put on her coat and went out 南希穿上大衣出去了。 2.涂;抹;擦。例如:Lucy was putting on her makeup in front of the mirror.

  7. Participating in REDD+ Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (PMRV: Opportunities for Local People?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Boissière

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessing forest changes is the baseline requirement for successful forest management. Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV are three essential components for achieving such assessments. Community participation in resource monitoring and management is increasingly seen as a scientifically efficient, cost-effective, and equitable way to employ such practices, particularly in the context of REDD+. We developed a multidisciplinary approach to study the feasibility of Participatory MRV (PMRV across three sites along a forest degradation gradient in Indonesia. We looked at both the local and national level needs of MRV. Our approach combines: (1 social research focusing on the enabling conditions for local participation in MRV; (2 governance analyses of existing MRV systems in forestry and health; and (3 remote sensing work comparing overlaps and gaps between satellite imagery and local assessments of forest changes. We considered in our approach the possible multiple benefits of PMRV (carbon mitigation, biodiversity conservation, livelihood security. Our study helped to identify the multiple stakeholders (communities, NGOs and governments and what the levels of governance should be to make PMRV design and implementation feasible and sustainable.

  8. “The Scum of the Earth”? Foreign People Smugglers and Their Local Counterparts in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Missbach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2008, the number of asylum seekers and refugees trying to reach Australia from Indonesia by boat has increased. With many of them hailing from conflict-ridden countries such as Afghanistan, Iraq and Sri Lanka, most entered Indonesia with short-term tourist visas or fraudulent papers or no documents at all. It is widely known that a significant number of these ‘irregular’ migrants pay various types of brokers (often labelled, accurately or otherwise, ‘human smugglers’ at least at one stage – either to enter the country or to escape it. As a non-signatory to the UN Refugee Convention, Indonesia does not permit local integration. While a substantial part of these migrants are detained in the 13 immigration detention centres scattered around the archipelago, many roam freely, looking for opportunities for onward migration. Due to the restrictive border protection arrangements between Australia and Indonesia and a number of bilateral intelligence measures for deterring ‘unwanted’ migrants, human smugglers have been gradually forced to adapt strategies, routes and prices. According to much of the available data, most human smugglers are not Indonesians but foreigners who have been lingering in Indonesia for many years. This article demonstrates, moreover, that these foreigners depend upon local contacts to successfully carry out their risky business. Most often, the Indonesian counterparts are solely facilitators or handymen, but in a number of cases Indonesian authorities have also been involved in this highly lucrative business.

  9. Use of forest products by the local people of the Salonga National Park in the Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Mbenga Ibesoa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article attempted to define a compromise making it possible the satisfaction of the material needs of the populations living within the National park of Salonga while ensuring the conservation of long-term forest resources. The management of the forests requires deepened knowledge of the resources and the participation of the local communities, which are the better, informed on of the forest resources. The implementing of a policy on sustainable forest management would be possible by a better integration and participation of the local populations. A survey was carried out in four villages of the National park of Salonga. The results of the investigation show clearly a positive attitude of the rural populations with regard to the forest resources. The diversity of the needs for the population corresponds to the choice of the products and services of the forest. Overall, the potential of the park’s forests is superior in comparison with the needs of the population. The exploitation of the forest products is vast and is included in the category of a system of an economy of collection.

  10. Successfully Changing the Landscape of Information Distribution: Extension Food Website Reaches People Locally and Globally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Henneman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the Food website was to develop Internet-based content that was relevant and reached the general public and multiplier groups, such as educators, health professionals, and media outlets. The purpose of this paper was to examine whether a multi-modal approach to information delivery through increases in and changes to content, electronic mailing list creation, and social media posting impacted user access, traffic channels, and referrals from 2010 to 2014. When comparing 2010-2011 versus 2013-2014, there was a 150% increase in total pageviews, 197% increase in unique pageviews, and a 39% increase in average time spent on a page. Since 2010, the website had over 5.2 million total pageviews, 3.1 million sessions, and 2.6 million users. In 2014, top social media referrals included Pinterest, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. Age of visitors ranged from 18 to 65+, with 45% being 18-34 years old. Approximately 70% were female. Visitors came from 229 countries/territories and 18,237 different cities. The website connects Nebraska and the world to the exciting food research and information generated at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and is playing an increasingly important role in shaping the future of food in the local and global community.

  11. An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by local people in the lowlands of Konta Special Woreda, southern nations, nationalities and peoples regional state, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldemariam Zemede

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research was carried out in Konta Special Woreda (District; it is a remote area with lack of infrastructure like road to make any research activities in the area. Therefore, this research was conducted to investigate medicinal plants of the Konta people and to document the local knowledge before environmental and cultural changes deplete the resources. Methods The information was collected between October 2006 and February 2007. Interview-based field study constituted the main data collection method in which the gathering, preparation, use, previous and current status and cultivation practices were systematically investigated. The abundance, taxonomic diversity and distribution of medicinal plants were studied using ecological approach. Results A total of 120 species, grouped within 100 genera and 47 families that are used in traditional medical practices were identified and studied. The Fabaceae and Lamiaceae were the most commonly reported medicinal plants with 16 (13.3% and 14 (12% species, respectively. 25.4% of the total medicinal plants are collected from homegardens and the rest (74.6% are collected from wild habitats. Of the total number of medicinal plants, 108 species (90% were used to treat human ailments, 6 (5% for livestock diseases and the remaining 6 (5% were used to treat both human and livestock health problems. The major threats to medicinal plants reported include harvesting medicinal plants for firewood (24.8% followed by fire (22.3% and construction (19%. Of the four plant communities identified in the wild, more medicinal plant species (34 were found in community type-4 (Hyparrhenia cymbaria-Erythrina abyssinica community, which accounted for 61.8%. Conclusion Konta Special Woreda is an important area for medicinal plants and associated local knowledge; the natural vegetation being the most important reservoir for the majority of the medicinal plants. Environmental and cultural changes are in the process

  12. 日本高龄者护理理念的提出及其新视点%Putting forward the concept of health care for older people in Japan and its new viewpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴霞

    2015-01-01

    由于经济发展水平的不断提高,健康自立并充满活力的高龄者也在不断的增加。因此,能否充分地对高龄者进行护理就成为衡量社会进步一种标准。护理不仅是对身体的护理,还包括精神护理、心理护理、社会护理等全方位的护理行为。对日本的护理理念的提出过程及新视点进行了研究,希望能为我国的高龄者护理提供政策性的参考,以应对中国高龄化社会所带来的挑战。%Due to the continuous improvement of the level of economic development,health and vigor of the elderly are constantly increasing. Therefore,the ability to care for the elderly has become a standard of social progress.. Nursing is not only the physical care,but also mental care,psychological care,social care and other nursing behavior. Of Japanese nursing concept put forward process and a new viewpoint was studied,the hope for China's elderly care provides policy reference. To deal with China's aging society brings challenges.

  13. A spatial framework for targeting urban planning for pollinators and people with local stakeholders: A route to healthy, blossoming communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Chloe C; van der Jagt, Alexander P N; Barbour, Shelley; Smith, Mike; Moseley, Darren

    2017-10-01

    Pollinators such as bees and hoverflies are essential components of an urban ecosystem, supporting and contributing to the biodiversity, functioning, resilience and visual amenity of green infrastructure. Their urban habitats also deliver health and well-being benefits to society, by providing important opportunities for accessing nature nearby to the homes of a growing majority of people living in towns and cities. However, many pollinator species are in decline, and the loss, degradation and fragmentation of natural habitats are some of the key drivers of this change. Urban planners and other practitioners need evidence to carefully prioritise where they focus their resources to provide and maintain a high quality, multifunctional green infrastructure network that supports pollinators and people. We provide a modelling framework to inform green infrastructure planning as a nature based solution with social and ecological benefits. We show how habitat suitability models (HSM) incorporating remote sensed vegetation data can provide important information on the influence of urban landcover composition and spatial configuration on species distributions across cities. Using Edinburgh, Scotland, as a case study city, we demonstrate this approach for bumble bees and hoverflies, providing high resolution predictive maps that identify pollinator habitat hotspots and pinch points across the city. By combining this spatial HSM output with health deprivation data, we highlight 'win-win' opportunity areas in most need of improved green infrastructure to support pollinator habitat quality and connectivity, as well as societal health and well-being. In addition, in collaboration with municipal planners, local stakeholders, and partners from a local greenspace learning alliance, we identified opportunities for citizen engagement activities to encourage interest in wildlife gardening as part of a 'pollinator pledge'. We conclude that this quantitative, spatially explicit and

  14. Convergent Validity of the PUTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Cathérine Brandt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Premonitory urges are a cardinal feature in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Severity of premonitory urges can be assessed with the Premonitory Urge for Tic Disorders Scale (PUTS. However, convergent validity of the measure has been difficult to assess due to the lack of other urge measures.We investigated the relationship between average real-time urge intensity assessed by an in-house developed real-time urge monitor, measuring urge intensity continuously for 5mins on a visual analogue scale, and general urge intensity assessed by the PUTS in 22 adult Tourette patients (mean age 29.8+/- 10.3; 19 male. Additionally, underlying factors of premonitory urges assessed by the PUTS were investigated in the adult sample using factor analysis and were replicated in 40 children and adolescents diagnosed with Tourette syndrome (mean age 12.05 +/- 2.83 SD, 31 male.Cronbach’s alpha for the PUTS10 was acceptable (α = .79 in the adult sample. Convergent validity between average real-time urge intensity scores (as assessed with the real-time urge monitor and the 10-item version of the PUTS (r = .64 and the 9-item version of the PUTS (r = .66 was good. A factor analysis including the 10 items of the PUTS and average real-time urge intensity scores revealed three factors. One factor included the average real-time urge intensity score and appeared to measure urge intensity, while the other two factors can be assumed to reflect the (sensory quality of urges and subjective control, respectively. The factor structure of the 10 PUTS items alone was replicated in a sample of children and adolescents.The results indicate that convergent validity between the PUTS and the real-time urge assessment monitor is good. Furthermore, the results suggest that the PUTS might assess more than one dimension of urges and it may be worthwhile developing different sub-scales of the PUTS assessing premonitory urges in terms of intensity and quality, as well as subjectively

  15. International land deals, local people's livelihood, and environment nexus (How to create win-win land deals in Ethiopia?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklemariam Gebremeskel, Dereje; Witlox, Frank; Azadi, Hossein; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Following the global raise in demand for food and biofuel production, transnational companies are acquiring large scale agricultural land in developing countries such as Ethiopia. Considering land as one of the factors to be outsourced for development, the government of Ethiopia is supplying millions of hectares of land to transnational companies in the form of longterm lease. Many of the companies which engage in large scale land acquisition are of Indian, Chinese, Ethiopian diaspora, German, Malaysian, Italian, British, Dutch, Turkish, and Saudi-Arabian origin. The boom in the acquisition of farm land in the country has sparked an all-rounded debate among civil society groups, international institutions, nongovernmental organizations and independent development experts. The common reflections concerning the land deals in Ethiopia and elsewhere contain much rhetoric and hype which lack analysis of the real situation "on the ground" giving different connotations such as 'land grabbing', 'agricultural outsourcing', 'neo-colonialism', 'agrarian colonialism', and 'land underdevelopment'. However, deforestation, soil degradation, marginalization of local indigenous communities, and minimally unfair gains from investment by the host country are among the real points of concern arising out of the long term land lease contracts. Scientific evidence is lacking concerning the pragmatic impacts of large scale agricultural land acquisitions by transnational companies upon the natural environment (forest and land), local peoples' livelihood, and the contacting parties (the host country and the companies). The major objective of this study is to investigate the impacts in the context of Ethiopia, orienting to reinvent win-win land use models which constitute sustainable land use, local peoples' livelihood and the company-host country interests. To achieve this overall objective, the study employs a number of methods and methodologies constituting both qualitative and

  16. The incidence of mobility restrictions among elderly people in two Nordic localities. A five-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakari-Rantala, Ritva; Avlund, Kirsten; Frändin, Kerstin; Era, Pertti

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of limitations in self-reported mobility as well as the decline in measured walking speed and stair-mounting ability over five years among men and women aged 75 at baseline in two Nordic localities. Another purpose was to analyze the relationship and its consistency over time between self-reports and performance-based measures in the decline of mobility. Identical Interviews and performance tests were carried out in Jyäskylä, Finland (N=244) and Glostrup, Denmark (N=275) at baseline and five years later. The subjects were asked about their ability to manage with transferring from chair or bed, walking indoors and outdoors and climbing stairs. The occurrence of new limitations in these tasks was analyzed among those who did not report limitations in the same task at baseline. Maximal walking speed and step-mounting height were measured in the laboratory. The decline in walking speed below 1.2 m/s and stair-mounting height below 30 cm was analyzed among those whose results were, initially, above these limits. Most frequently, new limitations occurred in walking outdoors and in climbing stairs (44-60%). Walking speed and stair-mounting ability deteriorated below the thresholds mentioned in 4-36% of the participants, depending on gender and locality. There were only minor differences between the two Nordic localities in the decline in mobility functions. A substantial proportion of those whose performance had declined had developed limitations in self-reported mobility as well. However, the relationship between different methods of measurement was not straightforward. This indicates that multiple approaches are needed to obtain thorough knowledge about mobility and its decline among elderly people.

  17. Being Forest Peoples: Globalizing Local Sustainability? Habiter la forêt : peut-on globaliser la sustainabilité locale ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lye Tuck-Po

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional discussions of sustainable development are often biased by technical and managerial considerations. In the current search for sustainability, we look for models of sustainability and seek to render them more transparent to scientific testing and investigation. The problem, however, is that the terms of the investigation are laid down by the external paradigm; thus, even if we find local models of sustainability, we may not be able to recognize them—or we misconstrue them. The epistemology of the Batek of Malaysia suggests that an ontological approach may be a powerful local paradigm. The Batek interpret environmental disasters as indicators of the superhuman beings’ displeasure with the human world. The onus for maintaining stability is on the forest people, for if they do not heed the messages from the superhuman beings, they endanger their own lives. However, a cosmological interpretation of this sort is not easily translatable into the practical concerns of resource management.Les débats conventionnels sur le développement durable sont souvent biaisés par des considérations de technique et de gestion. Notre démarche actuelle consiste à rechercher des modèles de sustainabilité et à tenter de les rendre mieux à même d’être scientifiquement testés et étudiés. Pourtant, les termes de l’étude sont fixés par le paradigme externe; ainsi, si nous pouvons trouver des modèles locaux de sustainabilité, nous pourrions bien ne pas les reconnaître, ou encore les interpréter de travers. L’épistémologie des Batek de Malaysia indique qu’une approche ontologique peut se révéler un solide paradigme local. Les Batek interprètent les catastrophes naturelles comme des témoignages du mécontentement des êtres surnaturels envers le monde des hommes. Il incombe donc aux Batek de maintenir la sustainabilité, car ils mettraient en danger leur propre vie en ignorant les messages des êtres surnaturels. Cependant, une

  18. LOCAL GENIUS AS SOCIO-CULTURAL CAPITAL FOR EMPOWERING THE BAJO ETHNIC PEOPLE RESIDING AT THE COASTAL AREA OF BUNGIN PERMAI VILLAGE, SOUTH EAST SULAWESI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Ode Ali Basri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this dissertation the local genius as socio-cultural capital for empowering theBajo ethnic people residing at the costal area of Bungin Permai Village, TinanggeaDistrict, South Konawe Regency, South Sulawesi Province is discussed. The Bajo ethnicpeople have a set of local genius within their socio-cultural system which is reflected intheir belief, tradition and custom and is used as the reference for conceiving andexplaining the objective and essence of life and the world. However, such local geniushas not functioned optimally yet as they are still marginalized.This research is focused on (1 what forms of local genius serve as the sociocultural capital for empowering the Bajo ethnic group residing at the coastal area?; (2how the local genius is developed to empower the Bajo ethnic people residing at thecoastal area?; and (3 what factors which may support and obstruct the local genius usedas the socio cultural capital for empowering the Bajo ethnic people residing at the coastalarea? Qualitative method is employed in this study with the approach of cultural studies.The theories used are the post colonial theory, structural theory, generative theory,hegemony theory and semiotic theory. The techniques used for collecting the data neededare participative observation, in-depth interview, library research, and focus groupdiscussion. The data obtained are analytically and descriptively processed and arepresented in the forms of narration, tables and visual illustration.The results of the study show that the Bajo ethnic people residing at BunginPermai Village have a set of local genius which may be potentially used as the sociocultural capital for empowering their community such as (1 indigenous skills andknowledge; (2 working culture; and (3 local organizations. The development of theindigenous skills and knowledge (pengetahuan dan ketrampilan asli; hereon abbreviatedto PKA and the revitalization of their local organizations may be used as the

  19. Putting Emotional Intelligence To Work

    CERN Document Server

    Ryback, David

    2012-01-01

    Putting Emotional Intelligence to Work offers a new paradigm of communication for the 21st-century workplace. Beginning with the thoughts of communication pioneer Carl Rogers, this book covers the origins and history of emotional intelligence, why it is essential at this point in the changing marketplace, how to delegate and negotiate more effectively, and how to change yourself to become a more effective player. An EQ (Emotional Quotient) survey helps you determine where you are on the scale of executive intelligence. Putting Emotional Intelligence to Work leaves you with a greater understand

  20. PEOPLE & POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Thai Premier Under Fire Central Bangkok buzzed with discontent March 14. Tens of thousands of protestors marched from the city's royal plaza down toward the office of Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, where they held an all-night rally and put the seat of government under virtual siege. Organizers claimed that close to 200,000 people joined the protest demanding the resignation of Thaksin. The demonstration was one of the largest since corruption charges were levied

  1. Heating being put into service

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The SMB-SE group would like to inform you that, the central heating will start this year, on Monday 3 October 2016, and will be progressively and depending on the weather forecast put into service throughout. All buildings will have heating within the following few days. Thank you for your understanding. The CERN heating team SMB-SE

  2. Putting Pow into Art Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Jay; Packer, Todd

    2004-01-01

    How would you like to put some "Pow!" into your art instruction? A lesson in comic books--history, design, story, and production--can make your classes come alive. The authors present a new approach to using comics to build artistic skills and involve students in art appreciation. Why Comics? Many art teachers have students who say, "I hate art!"…

  3. Putting food on the table

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candel, J.J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Putting food on the table: the European Union governance of the wicked problem of food security Jeroen Candel Food security concerns and arguments have made a revival in European Union (EU) governance since the 2007-8 and 2010 global food price crises. This renaissa

  4. Models of inter professional working for older people living at home: a survey and review of the local strategies of english health and social care statutory organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Claire

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most services provided by health and social care organisations for older people living at home rely on interprofessional working (IPW. Although there is research investigating what supports and inhibits how professionals work together, less is known about how different service models deliver care to older people and how effectiveness is measured. The aim of this study was to describe how IPW for older people living at home is delivered, enacted and evaluated in England. Method An online survey of health and social care managers across England directly involved in providing services to older people, and a review of local strategies for older people services produced by primary care organisations and local government adult services organisations in England. Results The online survey achieved a 31% response rate and search strategies identified 50 local strategies that addressed IPW for older people living at home across health and social care organisations. IPW definitions varied, but there was an internal consistency of language informed by budgeting and organisation specific definitions of IPW. Community Services for Older People, Intermediate Care and Re-enablement (rehabilitation Teams were the services most frequently identified as involving IPW. Other IPW services identified were problem or disease specific and reflected issues highlighted in local strategies. There was limited agreement about what interventions or strategies supported the process of IPW. Older people and their carers were not reported to be involved in the evaluation of the services they received and it was unclear how organisations and managers judged the effectiveness of IPW, particularly for services that had an open-ended commitment to the care of older people. Conclusion Health and social care organisations and their managers recognise the value and importance of IPW. There is a theoretical literature on what supports IPW and what it can achieve

  5. Use of Non Wood Forest Products by local people bordering the “Parc National Kaboré Tambi”, Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gausset, Quentin

    2008-01-01

    In the French-speaking countries of Africa, strategies of conservation, inherited from the colonial time, exclude the bordering people in the management of the national parks plant resources. Today, policies and legislation try to reconcile forest conservation and development by associating local...... this issue in the case of the “Parc National Kaboré Tambi” in Burkina Faso, by proposing a combination of ethno-botanical surveys and botanical inventories. The article analyses the importance of the park plant species, identify the constraints faced by local people to harvest the park plant products......, analyse the park vegetation structure and assess the degree of regeneration of the main useful species. The surveys reveal that bordering people consider the park as their granary, their pharmacy, their pasture, their place of religious worship, and the source of the strength of their territory...

  6. Putting people in the picture. Parks for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, J

    1992-01-01

    The 4th World Congress on Parks and Protected Areas held in Caracas attracted over 1700 participants. Protected areas of all kinds, e.g., national parks, game reserves, World Heritage sites, and marine parks, are under human pressure from armies, or tourists, migrants, and developers. 5 million sq km have been added to the present total of 6.5 million sq km of protected areas since 1970 and nearly 2 million sq km since 1982. There are almost 8500 sites on the UN list covering an area larger than India. In India, however, only 21 of the 52 national parks have been formally legalized. In the Caribbean only 1/3 of the protected areas are achieving their objectives, and in Norway and New Zealand powerful forces justify the logging of the remnants of ancient forests. Another example is the 15,000 sq km Serengeti World Heritage site in Tanzania and the adjoining Ngoro Ngoro biosphere reserve. The Serengeti is an island in a sea of human settlements with agricultural encroachments, poaching, cattle rustling, and tourism. Founded just over a century ago, the 308,000 hectare Yosemite National Park in the central Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, received 820,000 tourists in 1950 and has grown to 3.5 million. The human species is exerting its influence through rapid human population growth (projected to soar from 5.3 billion in 1990 to 10-12 billion a century from now), through escalating resource demand, (especially in the wealthier countries with threatened changes in global climate and sea level), and through severe pressure of poverty in less developed countries which result in habitat transformations and losses of biological diversity. Unless the global alliance called the World Conservation Strategy was formed at the Rio summit some countries could face increased mortality as a result of environmental stress.

  7. Putting food on the table

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Putting food on the table: the European Union governance of the wicked problem of food security Jeroen Candel Food security concerns and arguments have made a revival in European Union (EU) governance since the 2007-8 and 2010 global food price crises. This renaissance of food security has been accompanied by increasing awareness among scholars and policymakers about high degrees of complexity, uncertainty, controversy, and cross-scale dynamics surrounding food security as well as consequent ...

  8. Putting dental mercury pollution into perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D W

    2004-08-28

    This paper deals with the issue of amalgam waste from dental offices. The aim is to put into perspective the very small contribution of dental mercury to the overall volume of mercury discharged into the environment each year. While the amount discharged from dental offices is very small compared to other sources, the amount discharged into the environment from amalgam fillings in people's mouths is estimated as less than 2% of the amount from dental offices. At least 50% of mercury in the environment comes from natural sources. The major source of man-made mercury pollution is the industrial burning of fossil fuels. It is important to distinguish between inorganic mercury and organic mercury in terms of the impact on the health of the population.

  9. Strategy for Developing Local Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofjan Iskandar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Chicken industry in Indonesia offer jobs for people in the village areas . The balance in development industry of selected and local chicken has to be anticipated as there has been threat of reducing importation of grand parent stock of selected chicken due to global avian influenza . In the mean time, high appreciation to the local chicken has been shown by the existence of local chicken farms in the size of business scale . For local chicken business, the government has been built programs, projects, and infrastructures, although the programs and projects were dropped scattered in to several institutions, which were end up with less significant impact to the people. Therefore, it is the time that the government should put more efforts to integrate various sources . focusing in enhancing local chicken industry .

  10. Putting Portugal on the Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ferrão

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues the need to “put Portugal on the map” in a double sense: in a prospective way, in order to place the country on the required map(s, something which entails strategic vision and capacity for action; and in an analytical way – to enable us to understand Portugal from the map(s it is part of, which presupposes a capacity to analyse and understand the current state of affairs. By drawing inspiration from the polymorphic vision on the spatialities of contemporary societies and economies defended by Jessop, Brenner and Jones (2008, we propose the creation of a unifying reference framework to “put Portugal on the map”, using a combination of five elements: territory as a geographic location; territory as a unit of reference of the nation-state; places; geographic scales; and networks. The polymorphic nature of the spatialities that characterize, or should characterize, Portugal’s place in the world reflects several, and even contradictory, ethical values, interests, preferences, and options. Accordingly, the supported polymorphic spatialities ought to stir up controversy based on knowledge and arguments that are solid from a theoretical and empirical stance, and should make explicit the objectives and values they are based on.

  11. The role of social resource of indigenous people in local ecological resource management in China: A preliminary case in Zhangye, Northwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Social resources of indigenous people are valuable wealth, including the social norms, the relational network, belief, attitude as well as the social system which is accumulated from generation to generation. Those social resources are very important for local ecological resource management, which can help diffuseness and communion of skills and traditional conservation techniques for conserving and restoring the ecological sites. Social capital is one indicator of social resources, which is accepted widely. In order to investigate the role of social resources of indigenous people in local ecological resource management, the authors studied the relation between social capital of indigenous people and local ecological resource management, taking Zhangye City as an exam-ple. In this paper, social capital of indigenous people is quantified by constructing social capital index, composed of structural so-cial capital and cognitive social capital; local ecological resource management is quantified by constructing "Grain for Green Pro-ject" performance index. Based on correlation analysis approach and logistic regression analysis approach, the authors analyzed the relation between social capital and "Grain for Green Project" performance index, as well as the relations between "Grain for Green Project" performance index and other factors such as per capita net income, medical treatment and so on. Results showed that the correlation between social capital and "Grain for Green Project" performance index was positive, the coefficient was 0.761, with P<0.01. An increase of 1 unit in social capital is associated with an increase of 1.550 units in "Grain for Green Project" per-formance. With factor, such as faction, per capita net income, medical treatment, increasing 1 unit, the "Grain for Green Project" performance index will increase 3.912, 1.039 and 1.005 units, respectively.

  12. Putting culture in the curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairanen, Raija; Richardson, Eileen; Kelly, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale for and the method of designing a framework for a European curriculum to promote intercultural competence in health care students. The background relating to the migration of people into and across Europe is cited as the factor driving the ne...

  13. Putting Pep in Your Step

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    If you get up early and visit any of Beijing’s parks, you’re likely to see people of all ages engaged in some form of exercise. Yuyuantan Park, in the western part of the city, is one of the biggest parks and always a hive of activity.

  14. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  15. Prioritization of strategies for protected area management with local people using the hybrid SWOT-AHP analysis: the case of Kakum conservation area, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Foli Fiagbomeh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of protected areas towards conservation and protection of biodiversity cannot be over emphasized. Likewise, the dependence of local communities on forest and natural resources cannot be overlooked. Hence for the long term viability of forest reserves and wildlife protected area, the relationship of local people living close to these areas are of key importance if conflict of use can be mitigated. Admittedly, decision-making with respect to forest resource use and protection are complex due to the multiple interests of the major stakeholders. Stakeholder involvement in the planning, management and policy analysis can help resolve conflicts, and increase the commitment of local people to support conservation of protected areas. In this paper, we employ the SWOT-AHP methodology, with the aid of the Priority Estimation Tool (PriEsT, to evaluate and prioritize three management strategies for the Kakum conservation area in Ghana, as a means to facilitate conservation while ensuring benefits to local people. Considering the management objectives of the conservation area, seventeen SWOT sub-factors were identified and used in rating the three alternative management strategies. Among the strength sub-factors, enforcement of protection regulations (S4 is the most important. Similarly, limited funds for patrolling and outreach programs (W3, local people’s interest in alternative livelihood (O4 and the presence of illegal activities (T3 are the most important weakness, opportunity and threat sub-factors respectively. The management strategy “institute village committees to support monitoring and protection of resources” (A1 has the highest priority rating, indicating that management authorities must pay more attention to collaborative management. We propose that to improve on protected area management in Ghana, more management strategy studies must be conducted. However, these studies may apply the fuzzy AHP technique since it is

  16. Tackling the NEETs Problem: Supporting Local Authorities in Reducing Young People Not in Employment, Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ3), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Too many young people between the ages of 16 and 19 find themselves in the category which is usually referred to as NEET (not in employment, education or training). Research shows that disengagement at this age is disastrous in personal terms; causes problems in the community in the form of nuisance and crime; leads to long-term costs in increased…

  17. Relationships between Local Patterns of Religious Practice and Young People's Attitudes to the Religiosity of Their Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipgrave, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This contribution reports research into young people's attitudes to religion and religious diversity in secondary schools across the UK. The data indicate that students' respect for the religiosity of their peers, or their lack of it, is due less to the influence of classroom RE (multi-faith or otherwise) than to the experience of religion in the…

  18. Putting science on the agenda

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The job of CERN Director-General comes with a lot of responsibility, and that’s particularly true today. We’re living through a period of unique circumstances for science. Positive indicators, such as a renewal of interest in physical sciences at the University level and unprecedented public interest in the LHC, are aligning with storm clouds in the form of a prolonged economic crisis that will put downward pressure on everyone’s budgets.   That means that science has to make its voice heard if it’s to preserve support, and if it wants to be in a position to play the role it must in navigating the major societal challenges of our time. For that reason, I have been a fairly rare sight at CERN of late. Last week, I was in Davos for the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum. It was my second time at Davos, and I used the opportunity to argue that science should be more closely linked to the political thread of the meeting. I think my argument was he...

  19. Putting the World Together Again

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海洋

    2004-01-01

    Reviewing Professor Anthony Walker's Merit and the Millennium:Routine and Crisis in the Ritual Lives of the Lahu People,Hindustan Publishing Corporation,New Delhi,2003,738 pages of text (with 7 maps and 44figures) plus 74p.Of over 100 plates,31 p.of Lahu,Chinese and Tai glossaries. 71 p.of bibliography Of cited works in Western and East Asian languanges,and 64p.of index.It is a giant book over 1000 pages.

  20. Sustainability Evaluation of the Grain for Green Project: From Local People's Responses to Ecological Effectiveness in Wolong Nature Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Ying; Chen, Li-Ding; Lu, Yi-He; Fu, Bo-Jie

    2007-07-01

    This article examines the sustainability of the Grain for Green Project in the Wolong Nature Reserve. Pertinent data were collected through a questionnaire survey and a spatial analysis of reforested lands. The study results identified four critical issues that may influence the sustainability of the project in the study area. The first issue is concerned with the project’s impacts on local sustenance. Because local grain consumption depends greatly on compensation awarded by the project, the potential for sustainability of the project is compromised. The second issue is that the project causes negative effects on local incomes in the Wolong Nature Reserve, which may undermine local economic prospects. The third issue is that the project failed to deliver suitable habitat for the giant panda, although two of the suitability requirements that deal with landform features were met. Lastly, the project neglects great differences among geographical areas in the country, providing the same compensation and length of compensation period to all participants. Appropriate compensation mechanisms should be established and adapted to local economic, environmental, and social conditions. In managing nature reserves and moving toward sustainability, ensuring all aspects of local socioeconomic and ecological/environmental issues are properly addressed is a real challenge. Based on our study, some recommendations for improving sustainability of the project are given.

  1. Putting Technology Into Youth Mental Health Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice E. Montague

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although young people aged 16 to 25 are particularly susceptible to mental ill-health, they are difficult to engage in ongoing treatment. Meanwhile, young people are more engaged with digital technologies than ever before, with the Internet and mobile technologies reaching ubiquity in young lives. Despite this, it is unclear from the literature how young people’s high technology use may be harnessed for the better management of youth mental health problems in face-to-face treatment. To explore young people’s opinions on how technology can be used for treatment engagement and as a complement to mental health treatment, a total of 21 participants aged 16 to 25 years were consulted in two focus groups. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis, with consensus coding by two independent raters. Participants were positive about the integration of technology into youth mental health practice, but indicated that identifying the client’s preferred technology was the most reliable means of engagement. They reported already using technology as an informal complement to treatment, and asserted that formal technology integration must have a clear benefit to treatment while not replacing face-to-face time. Technology use to provide support beyond discharge and between sessions was suggested as a useful means for continuity of care and to prevent relapse. While various technologies were described as engaging, easy-to-access, informative, and empowering, their benefits are not yet being harnessed in youth health services to their full potential. More research is required to better understand how to best put technology into youth mental health practice.

  2. The diet of the Indian Flying Fox Pteropus giganteus (Brünnich. 1782 (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae in Myanmar - conflicts with local people?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sein Sein Win

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The diet of Pteropus giganteus from three roosts in Mandalay Region, central Myanmar was investigated for over two years by examining feeding remains in and around two villages.  It consists of 24 species of fruits, six species of flowers and three of leaves.  Of these, 13 species of fruits are eaten by the local people, three of which are also marketed.  Two are used in traditional medicine and one for stuffing pillows. Most dietary plants are native, mangoes are seasonally superabundant and are eaten in large numbers.  Interviews revealed no evidence of conflict between bats and villagers. 

  3. Volunteers supporting older people in formal care settings in England: personal and local factors influencing prevalence and type of participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Shereen; Manthorpe, Jill

    2014-12-01

    In the UK context of financial austerity and the promotion of the social responsibility through the concept of the "Big Society," volunteers are becoming a more important part of the labor workforce. This is particularly so in the long-term care (LTC) sector, where both shortages of staff and demands for support are particularly high. This article investigate the levels and profile of contribution of volunteers in the LTC sector using a large national data set, National Minimum Data Set for Social Care, linked to local area levels of rurality and socio-economic status. The analysis shows that volunteer activity in formal care services varies between sectors and service types, with no strong relationship between local area deprivation, unemployment levels, and levels of volunteering. However, some significant association was found with level of rurality. The contribution of volunteers is most evident in provision of counseling, support, advocacy, and advice.

  4. Introduction strategies put to the test: Local adaptation versus heterosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, P.; Sonderen, E..; Ouborg, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    Plant biodiversity has declined seriously because of both habitat deterioration and habitat fragmentation. As a result, many species have been forced into small, fragmented, and isolated populations and are believed to suffer from higher extinction risks. Genetic reinforcement and the establishment

  5. Tourism's collapse puts Gambian women at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, M S

    1995-06-01

    Despite efforts of the Gambian government, which established a ministry in 1981 that would tackle gender issues, improve women's health, and promote empowerment, women are underrepresented in government and business, and 84% are illiterate. Child mortality is among the highest in Africa; 134 children per 1000 die before their fifth birthday. In the mid-1980s austerity measures adopted by the World Bank and IMF left the ministry without funds. Rice and vegetable production, the main source of income for women, fell in the 1990s. In 1994, paddy production dropped 23% from the previous year; this was due to a lack of technical and financial assistance. The collapse of tourism with Capt. Yahya Jammeh's seizure of power has put prostitutes catering to tourists out of work, but women who have lost jobs in the hotel industry may be pushed into local prostitution to survive. The impact of this on the HIV/AIDS epidemic is unclear. Although Gambia is one of the world's most aid-dependent countries (more than a quarter of the GNP before the coup), corruption and mismanagement in the nongovernmental sector is widespread. The director of the Women in Development Programme, a $15m World Bank project, was forced to resign over allegations of fraud. The political process sidelines women; only village chiefs, who are traditionally men, are allowed to vote when new heads are elected.

  6. The people ´s peace processes: Local resitance processes and the development of "zone of peace" in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Rojas

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es el de exponer el caso de tres municipios Colombianos Mogotes (Santander; Samaniego y San Pablo (Nariño quienes declararon sus comunidades como zonas de paz. Al ilustrar el proceso, desarrollo, obstáculos y problemas al establecer una zona de paz, el artículo espera desarrollar los siguientes temas: 1 Resistencia local a la violencia: el desarrollo de la noción de “neutralidad activa”; 2 El proceso de desarme de la “maquinaria de guerra”: procesos de recuperación de espacios de paz. La tesis principal de este artículo es que las Zonas de Paz contribuyen al cambio en procesos de identidad, específicamente aquellos cambios relacionados con la noción del saberse “víctima del conflicto”. Por ende, las Zonas de Paz aportan al tránsito de una perspectiva centrada en la victimización a una noción de empoderamiento en el cual las comunidades locales más afectadas por la violencia en Colombia pueden ellas mismas contribuir a forjar las condiciones para la resolución y la reconciliación de los conflictos en sus propios términos.

  7. Relationship between localization of gold mining areas and hair mercury levels in people from Bolivar, north of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesús; Caballero-Gallardo, Karina; Marrugo Negrete, Jose; Negrete-Marrugo, José

    2011-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a heavy metal that, once in the environment, is bioaccumulated and biomagnified through food chain impacting ecosystems. The aim of this study was to evaluate total Hg (T-Hg) concentrations in individuals along Cauca and Magdalena Rivers in Colombia, where most gold mining activities take place. A total of 1,328 hair samples were collected and analyzed for T-Hg using atomic absorption spectroscopy. T-Hg concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 20.14 μg/g. Greatest levels were detected in La Raya (5.27 ± 0.32 μg/g), Achi (2.44 ± 0.22 μg/g), and Montecristo (2.20 ± 0.20 μg/g), places that are located near gold mines. Concentrations decreased with the distance from main mining areas. Only 0.75% of the individuals had T-Hg levels above 10 μg/g. Men had significantly higher T-Hg levels than women, and correlation analysis revealed moderately weak but significant relationships between T-Hg and weight (R = 0.111, P mining, monitoring, and educational programs are necessary to protect health of people living near Colombian rivers.

  8. 以人为本推进陕西地方政府转型%Promote Local Government Transformation as the People-centred in Shaanxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任瑞升

    2011-01-01

    转型是经济社会发展到一定程度必经的阶段和过程。近年来,随着经济全球化、市场一体化,地方政府转型已成为当今世界的潮流。为适应我国发展的整体形势和陕西经济社会发展的现实需要,陕西加快了地方政府转型。推进全省各级政府科学合理转型,更好地促进地方经济社会全面、协调、持续、快速发展,实现富民强省的目标,陕西应从实际出发,坚持以人为本,向服务、民主、法治、责任、高效型政府转变。%The transformation is a stage and process which economic community will meet in a certain degree.In recent years,the economic globalization and market intergration,the local government transformation has become nowadays flows of the world.In order to adapt to development requests,we must speed up a local government transformation,promote scientific and reasonable transformation for all levels government,with development requirements and economic social development in Shaanxi,and accelerate local economy developing overall,continuously.To carry out a great goal making people rich,we have to adhere to the people-centred concept according to Shaanxi reality,thus forming effective government transformation in the following aspects,service,democracy,rule of law,and responsibility.

  9. National preventive plan: putting stewardship into practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Federici

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the WHO-European region Tallin-Charter, Stewardship (S is on the health agenda of many European countries and in particular of those involved in the devolution of powers, as is the case of Italy. Many observers agree that, in such cases, both the configuration and the application of state authority in the health sector should be realigned so as to achieve desired policy objectives.We present an experience of what could be meant by S in practice, applied to the field of planning preventive interventions.The Italian National Preventive Plan 2010-2012 is a comprehensive Plan dealing with many areas of prevention. For all these areas, the main health objectives, the specific regional goals and the intervention - called “central" actions- that the Ministry of Health (MoH is in charge of carrying out in order to support regional preventive programs, are stated in this Plan. In order to carry out its task, the MoH has referred to the model of stewardship and has reconsidered its role. Therefore, the MoH has matched the sub-functions of S according to the model outlined by Travis et al, and the prior actions that have been proposed by local and national governments, as the main aspects of how to deal with the governance of prevention. Overall, we experienced that the S framework is a suitable and helpful tool to tackle what the challenge of national planning, in the scenario of devolution, is. In doing so, we have learnt some practical lessons about the running of the system and about how to plan according to stewardship, in particular.Among these, given that the steward’s most specific responsibility in planning is to assure stewardship, a sound capacity building is needed as a cornerstone in evolving the culture of the NHS. Furthermore, in order to put this effectively into practice, the Steward must be able to measure S functions, and putting in practice a S model needs international comparison and cultural growth....

  10. Ocular Dominance and Handedness in Golf Putting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Kristine; Guillon, Michel; Naroo, Shehzad A

    2015-10-01

    In golf, the impact of eye-hand dominance on putting performance has long been debated. Eye-hand dominance is thought to impact how golfers judge the alignment of the ball with the target and the club with the ball, as well as how golfers visualize the line of the putt when making decisions about the force needed to hit the ball. Previous studies have all measured ocular dominance in primary gaze only, despite golfers spending a significant amount of their time in a putting stance (bent at the hips, head tilted down). Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess ocular dominance in both primary gaze (aligning the ball with the target) and putting gaze (addressing the ball and aligning the club). This study investigated measuring pointing ocular dominance in both primary and putting gaze positions on 31 golfers (14 amateur, 7 club professionals, and 10 top professionals). All players were right-handed golfers, although one reported having no hand dominance and one reported being strongly left hand dominant. The results showed that (1) primary and putting gaze ocular dominances are not equal, nor are they predictive of each other; (2) the magnitude of putting ocular dominance is significantly less than the magnitude of primary gaze ocular dominance; (3) ocular dominance is not correlated with handedness in either primary or putting gaze; and (4) eye-hand dominance is not associated with increased putting skill, although ocular dominance may be associated with increased putting success. It is important that coaches assess golfers' ocular dominance in both primary and putting gaze positions to ensure they have the most accurate information upon which to base their vision strategy decisions.

  11. Dioscorea spp. (A Wild Edible Tuber): A Study on Its Ethnopharmacological Potential and Traditional Use by the Local People of Similipal Biosphere Reserve, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeet; Das, Gitishree; Shin, Han-Seung; Patra, Jayanta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A number of wild crops remain unexplored in this world and among them some have excellent medicinal and nutritional properties. India is a harbor of biodiversity in general and phytodiversity in particular. The plant diversity is distributed from the Western Ghats to Eastern Ghats, along with the North-Eastern region and from the Greater Himalayas to the plain of Ganga. Among these distributed floral regions of the country, the Eastern Ghats are important due to their rich floral diversity. The forests of Odisha form a major part of Eastern Ghats in general and the Similipal Biosphere Reserve (SBR) in particular. The SBR is inhabited by many local communities. The food and medicinal habits of these communities are not fully explored even today. They are dependent on the forests of SBR for their food and medicine. Among their collections from forests, root and tuberous plants play a significant role. The local communities of SBR use about 89 types of tuberous plants for various purposes. Dioscorea is one such tuber, having maximum use among the local of SBR. However, less documentation and no specific reports are available on the food and medicinal values of the species available in this part of the World. Dioscorea species, popularly known as Yam worldwide and as Ban Aalu in Odisha, India, is a prime staple medicinal-food substitute for the majority of rural and local people of the state of India. Of the 13 Dioscorea species available in SBR, 10 species are known to be bitter in taste and unpalatable when taken raw. Since less documentation is available on the Dioscorea species of SBR and their traditional uses, the present study was focused on the ethnobotany, nutritional and pharmacological values of these species along its nutraceutical importance.

  12. Teen Safety: Putting an End to Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Teen Safety: Putting An End to Bullying Page Content Article Body The outbreak of school ... that has been allowed to go virtually unchecked: bullying. It turns out that many of these adolescent ...

  13. Putting New Laboratory Tests Into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Putting New Laboratory Tests into Practice Share this page: Was this ... of articles that describe how different types of laboratory tests are developed, validated, and made available for ...

  14. Pentalogy for Translation Strategies of Chinese Diet with Local Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓蕾

    2014-01-01

    The culture of Chinese diet with a long history is extensive and profound.Its distinctive regionality shows different cultural tastes and connotations to people from all over the world. The cultural implication of Chinese diet with local characteristics has been passed down and promoted from generation to generation, receiving the attention and acclaim from foreign guests.The purpose as to make foreign people learn more about Chinese diet is in need of translator’s reasonable and appropriate translation.But the varied translated versions about Chinese diet with local characteristics revealed many inadequacies which are worth reflecting, studying, and putting forward more complete translation strategies.

  15. Pentalogy for Translation Strategies of Chinese Diet with Local Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓蕾

    2014-01-01

    The culture of Chinese diet with a long history is extensive and profound.Its distinctive regionality shows different cultural tastes and connotations to people from all over the world.The cultural implication of Chinese diet with local characteristics has been passed down and promoted from generation to generation, receiving the attention and acclaim from foreign guests.The purpose as to make foreign people learn more about Chinese diet is in need of translator’s reasonable and appropriate translation.But the varied translated versions about Chinese diet with local characteristics revealed many inadequacies which are worth reflecting, studying, and putting forward more complete translation strategies.

  16. Trust is other people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckner, Naemi; Werner, Katharina; Subasi, Özge

    , the Internet is often experienced as a place of anonymity, and people are scared of the ’figurative creep’ lurking behind every dark corner. This view on online environments can be a reason for potential sharers not to use sharing platforms. To explore how people view such issues, we conducted an open...... concerning the interaction with strangers through the platform. Putting trust in an online sharing community seems to be the biggest obstacle that influences whether people draw away rather than move closer together and start collaborating in the sharing community. Here, we report on the main issues...

  17. Utilisation of priority traditional medicinal plants and local people's knowledge on their conservation status in arid lands of Kenya (Mwingi District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njoroge Grace N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mwingi District lies within the Kenyan Arid and Semiarid lands (ASALs in Eastern Province. Although some ethnobotanical surveys have been undertaken in some arid and semiarid areas of Kenya, limited studies have documented priority medicinal plants as well as local people's awareness of conservation needs of these plants. This study sought to establish the priority traditional medicinal plants used for human, livestock healthcare, and those used for protecting stored grains against pest infestation in Mwingi district. Further, the status of knowledge among the local people on the threat and conservation status of important medicinal species was documented. This study identified 18 species which were regarded as priority traditional medicinal plants for human health. In terms of priority, 8 were classified as moderate, 6 high, while 4 were ranked highest priority species. These four species are Albizia amara (Roxb. Boiv. (Mimosacaeae, Aloe secundiflora (Engl. (Aloaceae, Acalypha fruticosa Forssk. (Euphorbiaceae and Salvadora persica L. (Salvadoraceae. In regard to medicinal plants used for ethnoveterinary purposes, eleven species were identified while seven species were reported as being important for obtaining natural products or concoctions used for stored grain preservation especially against weevils. The data obtained revealed that there were new records of priority medicinal plants which had not been documented as priority species in the past. Results on conservation status of these plants showed that more than 80% of the respondents were unaware that wild medicinal plants were declining, and, consequently, few of them have any domesticated species. Some of the species that have been conserved on farm or deliberately allowed to persist when wild habitats are converted into agricultural lands include: Croton megalocarpus Hutch., Aloe secundiflora, Azadirachta indica A. Juss., Warburgia ugandensis Sprague, Ricinus communis L. and

  18. DYNAMICS OF LOCAL ISLAM: FATWA OF MUHAMMAD BASIUNI IMRAN, THE GRAND IMAM OF SAMBAS, ON THE FRIDAY PRAYER ATTENDED BY FEWER THAN FORTY PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamka Siregar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an analitical work based on local Islam dynamic of Sambas society in the era of Sambas Sultanate. The work attempts to promote intellectual heritages such as the book of Cahaya Suluh, which could at least give us an idea that in a process of setting certain rules or istinbat, there is a need for flexibility. As can be observed from the whole argument built in this book, the process is completely flexible, not merely following one school of thought. As indicated in this paper, especially in the discussion of his thought, Muhammad Basiuni Imran used various references for his propositions. Although he was an advocate of the school of Syafi’i, he was still open to the other schools of thought. As a matter of fact, in the case of Friday prayer, his position was different from the school of thought he supported. He took that position because he considered the socio cultural conditions of Sambas at the time. Intellectual spirit shown by the Grand Imam of Sambas should continue to be emulated and expanded. It is a way to avoid the ‘blind’ taqlid against a certain school of thought, as such attitude can narrow human intelligence and reasoning which will eventually lead to collision with local reality that sometimes contains values that do not contradict with religion. In addition, the approach to the interpretation of law should look at its socio-cultural and historical background as this will keep the law strong and sustainable. In this way, Islam will be easily accepted without having to impose foreign culture on local people. Keywords: Dynamic, Islam, Sambas, Grand Imam, Muhammad Basuni Imran

  19. Emergency department mental health presentations by people born in refugee source countries: an epidemiological logistic regression study in a Medicare Local region in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Joanne C; Cheng, I-Hao; Russell, Grant; Szwarc, Josef; Braitberg, George; Peek, Anne; Meadows, Graham

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if people born in refugee source countries are disproportionately represented among those receiving a diagnosis of mental illness within emergency departments (EDs). The setting was the Cities of Greater Dandenong and Casey, the resettlement region for one-twelfth of Australia's refugees. An epidemiological, secondary data analysis compared mental illness diagnoses received in EDs by refugee and non-refugee populations. Data was the Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset in the 2008-09 financial year. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression created predictive models for mental illness using five variables: age, sex, refugee background, interpreter use and preferred language. Collinearity, model fit and model stability were examined. Multivariate analysis showed age and sex to be the only significant risk factors for mental illness diagnosis in EDs. 'Refugee status', 'interpreter use' and 'preferred language' were not associatedwith a mental health diagnosis following risk adjustment forthe effects ofage and sex. The disappearance ofthe univariate association after adjustment for age and sex is a salutary lesson for Medicare Locals and other health planners regarding the importance of adjusting analyses of health service data for demographic characteristics.

  20. Development of a locally sustainable functional food for people living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa: laboratory testing and sensory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tienen, A; Hullegie, Y M; Hummelen, R; Hemsworth, J; Changalucha, J; Reid, G

    2011-09-01

    The use of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and micronutrients has been associated with a preserved immune function among people living with HIV. However, use of these products in the developing world remains limited due to the lack of facilities for production. We describe the development of a yogurt with L. rhamnosus GR-1 at >7×10(7) colony forming units fortified with locally grown Moringa oleifera leaves at 20% of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin A. The product was made by preparing a thin paste of Moringa which was then incubated with 4% probiotic and 2% yogurt mother culture in milk for 6 hours. The addition of M. oleifera enhanced the survival of probiotic bacteria in yogurt during the shelf life period at 5 °C (P=0.02), but had no effect on probiotic survival at 21 °C. While the sensory characteristics of probiotic and non-probiotic supplemented Moringa yogurts were indistinguishable, the addition of Moringa reduced consumer acceptance compared to regular yogurt.

  1. Putting Opportunism in the Back Seat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai; Weber, Libby

    2013-01-01

    TCE and its applications in management research put more emphasis on opportunism than on bounded rationality. By augmenting the bounded rationality assumption to include interpretive limitations, we show that there are sources of costly conflict that are not rooted in opportunism. Moreover, we show...

  2. Multicultural Education Course Put into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Eun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which two teachers who have previously taken a multicultural education course put into practice multicultural teaching in a first grade afterschool program. Banks' five dimensions of multicultural education are used as the theoretical framework for analyzing past research on multicultural education courses and for…

  3. "Big Bang" project put off to 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Evans, Robert

    2007-01-01

    "First tests in a scientific project aimed at solving myteries of the universe and the "Big Bang" that created it have been put off from November to late April or early May next year, an official said on Wednesday" (1/2 page)

  4. DIST/AVC Out-Put Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Gene L.

    The first stage of development of a management information system for DIST/AVC (Division of Instructional Technology/Audio-Visual Center) is the definition of out-put units. Some constraints on the definition of output units are: 1) they should reflect goals of the organization, 2) they should reflect organizational structure and procedures, and…

  5. Put It Back in the Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A little boy and his grandfather are raking (用耙子耙) leaves in the yard.The little boy finds an earthworm (蚯蚓) trying to get back into its hole.He says,"Grandpa,I bet I can put that worm back in that hole."

  6. Quanwei Copper Processing Base Put Into Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>Quanwei (Tongling) Copper Co.,Ltd’s copper processing base in Tongling of Anhui Province has been put into operation at the end of De- cember last year. It is reported that the copper processing project, invested by Zhengwei (Shenzhen) Technology

  7. Putting Consistent Theories Together in Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应明生

    1995-01-01

    The problem of putting consistent theories together in institutions is discussed.A general necessary condition for consistency of the resulting theory is carried out,and some sufficient conditions are given for diagrams of theories in which shapes are tree bundles or directed graphs.Moreover,some transformations from complicated cases to simple ones are established.

  8. 'You get out what you put in'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Chris O'Connor trained at the Nightingale School of Nursing at St Thomas' Hospital in London, qualifying as a mental health nurse in 1993. He worked in acute psychiatry, and learning disabilities and older people's services, before becoming head of nursing practice for a London mental health trust. His current role is nurse consultant for dementia and older people at East Surrey Hospital.

  9. Putting the social into commodity chains: what motivates smallholders to opt for inclusion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, Joy; Narayanaswamy, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the concept of sustainable development has put greater emphasis on economic activities that are socially and environmentally responsible. The social dimension of sustainable development reflects increasing interest in integrating poor people into global supply chains. This article b

  10. An invisible wall put up by ghosts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>When I was a child, my grandmother would often tell me ghost stories. One of them was about an invisible wall that had been put up by ghosts.It was a winter night that was getting darker and darker, colder and colder. A lone farmer was driving his horse and cart along a country path. As he was getting close to his village, he could see the cemetery with the myriad tombs on both sides

  11. Putting the Critical Back in Critical Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    CRITICAL BACK IN CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE by Bradford C. Mason December 2015 Thesis Advisor: Rudolph P. Darken Second Reader: Thomas Mackin...COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PUTTING THE CRITICAL BACK IN CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Bradford C. Mason...12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) In the context of national critical infrastructure security and resilience doctrine

  12. Sex and Prevention Concerns for Positive People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with any comments or concerns. February 17, 2011 Sex and prevention concerns for positive people Facebook Twitter ... partner, and vice versa. The reality of safer sex You put yourself at risk for infections through ...

  13. Sex and Prevention Concerns for Positive People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with any comments or concerns. February 17, 2011 Sex and prevention concerns for positive people Facebook Twitter ... partner, and vice versa. The reality of safer sex You put yourself at risk for infections through ...

  14. Coral Reefs and People in a High-CO2 World: Where Can Science Make a Difference to People?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pendleton, Linwood; Comte, Adrien; Langdon, Chris; Ekstrom, Julia A; Cooley, Sarah R; Suatoni, Lisa; Beck, Michael W; Brander, Luke M; Burke, Lauretta; Cinner, Josh E; Doherty, Carolyn; Edwards, Peter E. T; Gledhill, Dwight; Jiang, Li-Qing; van Hooidonk, Ruben J; Teh, Louise; Waldbusser, George G; Ritter, Jessica

    2016-01-01

      Reefs and People at Risk Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere put shallow, warm-water coral reef ecosystems, and the people who depend upon them at risk from two key global environmental stresses: 1...

  15. PUTTING RURAL POLICY ON THE FRONT BURNER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A "new countryside" is not a new concept. In 1956, the Chinese Government set a goal of restructuring rural areas, hut that was not specified in its work agenda. In early 2006, the Central Government released its first major document of the year, which calls the construction of a "new socialist countryside" the foremost task facing China in the 2006-10 period. Why did the government put the goal on its agenda this year?Chen Xiwen, Deputy Director of the Office of the Central Financial Work Leading Group,...

  16. Putting matters on the triangle-hinge models

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Umeda, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper [arXiv:1503.08812] a new class of models generating three-dimensional random volumes are introduced, where the Boltzmann weight of each configuration is given by the product of values assigned to the triangles and the hinges. These triangle-hinge models are characterized by semisimple associative algebras, and the set of possible diagrams can be reduced such that only and all of the three-dimensional manifolds with tetrahedral decompositions are generated. In this letter, we give a general prescription to put matters on the models. We show that the degrees of freedom representing matter fields can be assigned to simplices of any dimensions (tetrahedra, triangles, edges and vertices) in such a way that they have local interactions. Simple examples include the Ising model, the q-state Potts models and the RSOS models coupled to three-dimensional quantum gravity. We also show that the three-dimensional colored tensor models can be obtained by putting specific matters on both tetrahedra and tria...

  17. Managing coherence via put/get windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A [Ridgefield, CT; Chen, Dong [Croton on Hudson, NY; Coteus, Paul W [Yorktown Heights, NY; Gara, Alan G [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Hoenicke, Dirk [Ossining, NY; Ohmacht, Martin [Yorktown Heights, NY

    2012-02-21

    A method and apparatus for managing coherence between two processors of a two processor node of a multi-processor computer system. Generally the present invention relates to a software algorithm that simplifies and significantly speeds the management of cache coherence in a message passing parallel computer, and to hardware apparatus that assists this cache coherence algorithm. The software algorithm uses the opening and closing of put/get windows to coordinate the activated required to achieve cache coherence. The hardware apparatus may be an extension to the hardware address decode, that creates, in the physical memory address space of the node, an area of virtual memory that (a) does not actually exist, and (b) is therefore able to respond instantly to read and write requests from the processing elements.

  18. Managing coherence via put/get windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    2011-01-11

    A method and apparatus for managing coherence between two processors of a two processor node of a multi-processor computer system. Generally the present invention relates to a software algorithm that simplifies and significantly speeds the management of cache coherence in a message passing parallel computer, and to hardware apparatus that assists this cache coherence algorithm. The software algorithm uses the opening and closing of put/get windows to coordinate the activated required to achieve cache coherence. The hardware apparatus may be an extension to the hardware address decode, that creates, in the physical memory address space of the node, an area of virtual memory that (a) does not actually exist, and (b) is therefore able to respond instantly to read and write requests from the processing elements.

  19. Understanding "people" people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy; Waldroop, James

    2004-06-01

    Nearly all areas of business--not just sales and human resources--call for interpersonal savvy. Relational know-how comprises a greater variety of aptitudes than many executives think. Some people can "talk a dog off a meat truck," as the saying goes. Others are great at resolving interpersonal conflicts. Some have a knack for translating high-level concepts for the masses. And others thrive when they're managing a team. Since people do their best work when it most closely matches their interests, the authors contend, managers can increase productivity by taking into account employees' relational interests and skills when making personnel choices and project assignments. After analyzing psychological tests of more than 7,000 business professionals, the authors have identified four dimensions of relational work: influence, interpersonal facilitation, relational creativity, and team leadership. This article explains each one and offers practical advice to managers--how to build a well-balanced team, for instance, and how to gauge the relational skills of potential employees during interviews. To determine whether a job candidate excels in, say, relational creativity, ask her to describe her favorite advertising campaign, slogan, or image and tell you why she finds it to be so effective. Understanding these four dimensions will help you get optimal performance from your employees, appropriately reward their work, and assist them in setting career goals. It will also help you make better choices when it comes to your own career development. To get started, try the authors' free online assessment tool, which will measure both your orientation toward relational work in general and your interest level in each of its four dimensions.

  20. Technological Implementation of Renewable Energy in Rural-Isolated Areas and Small-Medium Islands in Indonesia: Problem Mapping And Preliminary Surveys of Total People Participation in a Local Wind Pump Water Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Ahmad

    2007-10-01

    This article discusses a formulation of problem mapping and preliminary surveys of total people participation in a local wind pump (LWP) water supply in term of technological implementation of renewable energy (RE) in rural-isolated areas and small-medium islands in Indonesia. The formulation was constructed in order to enhance and to promote the local product of RE across Indonesia. It was also addressed to accommodate local potencies, barriers and opportunities into a priority map. Moreover, it was designed into five aspects such as (1) local technology of the RE: a case of pilot project of the LWP; (2) environmental-cultural aspects related to global issues of energy-renewable energy; (3) potencies and barriers corresponding to local, national, regional and international contents; (4) education and training and (5) gender participation. To focus the formulation, serial preliminary surveys were conducted in five major areas, namely: (1) survey on support and barrier factors of the aspects; (2) strategic planning model, a concept A-B-G which stands for Academician-Business people-Government; (3) survey on background based knowledge on energy conservation; (4) survey on gender participation in energy conservation and (5) survey on local stakeholder involvement. Throughout the surveys, it has been notified that the concept needs to be developed to any level of its component since its elements were identified in tolerance values such as high potency value of the LWP development (95%); a strong potency of rural area application (88%); a medium background of energy, energy conservation (EC) identified in a range of 56%-72%, sufficient support from local stakeholders and gender participation.

  1. Locally Based Research and Development Units as Knowledge Brokers and Change Facilitators in Health and Social Care of Older People in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Monica Elisabeth; Hansson, Johan; Garvare, Rickard; Andersson-Bäck, Monica

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the role of locally based research and development units (R&Ds) focusing on health and social services. Nearly 300 local R&Ds are funded by the Swedish government with the intention to facilitate knowledge transfer and development of high quality and effective health and social care organisations. Based on…

  2. Development of a locally sustainable functional food for people living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa: Laboratory testing and sensory evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Tienen; Y. Hullegie; R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); J. Changalucha (John); G. Reid (Gregor)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe use of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and micronutrients has been associated with a preserved immune function among people living with HIV. However, use of these products in the developing world remains limited due to the lack of facilities for production. We describe the development o

  3. Development of a locally sustainable functional food for people living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa: Laboratory testing and sensory evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Tienen; Y. Hullegie; R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); J. Changalucha (John); G. Reid (Gregor)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe use of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and micronutrients has been associated with a preserved immune function among people living with HIV. However, use of these products in the developing world remains limited due to the lack of facilities for production. We describe the development

  4. The Global, the National, and the Local: Forces in the Development of Education for Indigenous Peoples--the Case of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the contributions and failures of four educational programs for indigenous peoples in Peru: (1) Summer Institute of Linguistics; (2) Puno Bilingual Education Programme; (3) Upper Napo Bilingual Intercultural Education Project; and (4) a teacher training institute operated by Peruvian natives. While well-meaning, these programs suffer…

  5. Putting a Lid on Costly SOEs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN XINZHEN

    2010-01-01

    @@ More than 30,000 state-owned enterprises (SOEs) operate in China,of which 129 are supervised by the Central Government.The others fall under the jurisdiction of local governments.Based on 2009 performance announcements issued by the enterprises and figures released by the State-Owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission of the State Council (SASAC),about 15 percent of central SOEs and 28 percent of local SOEs are expected to lose money within the year.

  6. Diabetes care tool puts kids in control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-07-08

    The nursing team in the children’s diabetes service at Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust has developed an app and website to help children and young people with type 1 diabetes manage the condition. The initiative focuses on using social media to increase peer support. The team were runners up in the 2015 Nursing Standard Excellence in Diabetes Specialist Nursing Award, sponsored by Sanofi Diabetes.

  7. Putting to a bigger hole: Golf performance relates to perceived size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Jessica K.; Linkenauger, Sally A.; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    When engaged in a skilled behaviour such as occurs in sports, people's perceptions relate optical information to their performance. In current research we demonstrate the effects of performance on size perception in golfers. We found golfers who played better judged the hole to be bigger than golfers who did not play as well (Study 1). In follow-up laboratory experiments, participants putted on a golf mat from a location near or far from the hole then judged the size of the hole. Participants who putted from the near location perceived the hole to be bigger than participants who putted from the far location. Our results demonstrate that perception is influenced by the perceiver's current ability to act effectively in the environment. PMID:18567258

  8. Should You Put Sunscreen on Infants? Not Usually

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Should You Put Sunscreen on Infants? Not Usually Share Tweet Linkedin ... month-old baby is there, too. Should you put sunscreen on her? Not usually, according to Hari ...

  9. What Are the Factors That Put a Pregnancy at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources and Publications What are the factors that put a pregnancy at risk? Skip sharing on social ... hearing problems. 7 Cigarette smoking. Smoking during pregnancy puts the fetus at risk for preterm birth, certain ...

  10. Researchers Put Embryo Development 'On Hold' in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162187.html Researchers Put Embryo Development 'On Hold' in Mice Putting stem cells ... were able to halt development of early mouse embryos for up to a month in the lab ...

  11. Using routinely collected data to evaluate a leaflet campaign to increase the presentation of people with memory problems to general practice: a locality based controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Chan

    2010-09-01

    Conclusions During a leaflet campaign the recording and management ofmemory problems increased. However, there was greater improvement in the control locality. This study demonstrates the importance of including a control group and the strengths of routine primary care data.

  12. Putting in place the LHC computing organization

    CERN Multimedia

    Akesson, T

    2001-01-01

    Following the CERN review of computing, the ball is in the able hands of the CERN directorate to translate the review recommendations into the implementation of a LHC computing organization. From the ATLAS point of view it is rather clear what is needed: A credible set-up that can get into place the total computing infrastructure to match ATLAS global computing requirements, and not just at CERN. The next six months will demonstrate if CERN is on a good track to get operational an organization that can tackle this global challenge. CERN put forward to the 15th of June Council a paper that invites comments on a LHC Computing Grid Project as part of the CERN base program. In particular, it asked for new resources, of 25+25 MCHF, for CERN to build the CERN-part of a prototype that should be matched to the need of the experiments for the forthcoming data challenges. The intention of CERN now is to discuss with member-states in July to establish a sufficient resource-base to get approval at the September Commit...

  13. ASEAN-China Free Trade Area and the Competitiveness of Local Industries: A Case Study of Major Industries in the Lao People's Democratic Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Leebouapao, Leebeer; INSISIENMAY, Sthabandith; Vanthana NOLINTHA

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an evaluation of the impact of the ASEAN-China Free Trade Agreement (ACFTA) on industries in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). In general, the paper finds that price competitiveness in the three industries under review falls substantially if tariffs are completely removed. However, the degree of impact varies substantially across industries. In the wood processing and cement industries, of which the latter benefits from import substitution policies, competiti...

  14. Renewable Resources – a Way of Putting an End to Environmental Pollution and an Inexhaustible Asset

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Bumbac

    2009-01-01

    Being “green” is not anymore just a problem of trendy or only for people with special ideas. “Green” became a global issue, involving governments, international organisations, regional authorities. Renewable resources are becoming more and more important, especially in countries where the dependence of imported fuels is high. The climate change put a huge pressure on carbon emmissions and endorsed programmes which take into consideration alternative resources. The European Union is the mo...

  15. Putting Physical Activity on the Policy Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Catherine B.; Mutrie, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline why physical activity policy is important in terms of promoting population based increases in physical activity. The promotion of physical activity through public policy happens globally and nationally, however to be successful it should also happen at state and local levels. We outline the rationale for the…

  16. Putting Physical Activity on the Policy Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Catherine B.; Mutrie, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline why physical activity policy is important in terms of promoting population based increases in physical activity. The promotion of physical activity through public policy happens globally and nationally, however to be successful it should also happen at state and local levels. We outline the rationale for the…

  17. Little Artists put on a Big Display

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It has become a regular appointment for CERN people: the exhibition of naive and beautiful works made by young artists from the CERN nursery school. Physicists? Pianists? Teachers? They still don't know what they will be... some of them can hardly speak. But one thing's for sure CERN gives them the chance to discover and express their artistic aptitudes. And once a year they can proudly show their works to all CERN people. We are talking about children from le nursery school run by the CERN Staff Association, who are the creators of amazing works currently on display in the Main Building. To prepare for this very important appointment each class of young artists from 2 to 6 years old, have been hard at work for several months. Des élèves du Jardin d'enfants de 5 ans devant l'une de leurs oeuvres, un dinosaure en carton. Working together to express themselves in creative activities, such as drawing, pottery, music, musical movement, games, arts, and craftwork, children from all over the...

  18. Putting Harry Potter on the couch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Colman

    2006-10-01

    This article will explore J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter (2004) literary series from a psychoanalytical perspective. The author draws out the main themes of the Harry Potter stories to see if they can be employed clinically to assist in psychotherapeutic work with children and adolescents. The article begins by discussing Bettelheim's (1976) extensive work on children's fairytales and their therapeutic value, moving on to discuss Rustin and Rustin's (2005) more recent insights into narrative therapy and children's fiction. A clinical example is given of how the storylines were implemented to enhance a psychotherapeutic group process for adolescents. The author hopes to illustrate the power of symbolism and metaphor in the Harry Potter storylines and elucidate why these books may appeal to young people with mental health difficulties.

  19. 略论人民银行在地方政府债券管理中的作用%Effect of People's Bank of China on Local Treasury Bonds Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琛

    2012-01-01

    本文从我国地方政府债券管理中存在的主要问题入手,认为人民银行参与地方政府债券管理的既必要,且可行,同时指出其具体管理举措,主要包括:参与制度建设、明确管理职责、提升管理水平.%Starting from the main problems in local treasury bonds management, this paper thinks that it is necessary and feasible that the People's Bank of China participates in the local treasury bonds management. At the same time, it points out its specific management measures, mainly including: participating in the system construction, clearing management responsibility, and improving the management level.

  20. 从三老到民望%From Sanlao to Minwang: the role of rural aged people in local moral education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟发松

    2011-01-01

    Sanlao(local officials taken by the aged people) played an important role in negotiation and communication between the local society and the state.However,the Sanlao system ended in the Han Dynasty.Then,Minwang and Xiangwang(the respectable local leaders elected by the public),Qilao,Shelao and Xianglao,etc.within the system of the families of power and influence still maintained some features of Sanlao system.%三老曾在两汉的地方社会与国家之间,发挥重要的缓冲、沟通作用,但作为制度化的三老却及汉而终。不过在魏晋南北朝隋唐时期,门阀体制下的民望、乡望,以及保留了三老某些特点的耆老、社老、乡老等乡村老人层,仍在一定程度上发挥着这类作用。以邑义为代表的信仰结合,在此期地方社会生活中居有极其重要的地位,乡村老人层亦在其中发挥着作用。

  1. Value for money: putting the patient first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Robert; Mayer, Joseph; Adams, Owen

    2009-01-01

    Canadians spend more on healthcare than people in most other countries. We are fifth in the OECD in terms of health spending per capita, and eighth out of 28 countries in terms of health spending as a percentage of GDP. Given these facts, it is appropriate to discuss the issue of value for money in healthcare. In their paper, McGrail et al. present four challenges to improving value for money in Canadian healthcare: a lack of analysis of the hospital sector; the need to learn from rate variation analysis; the slow uptake of the electronic health record (EHR); and the need to measure health outcomes. Our paper addresses each of these points, but also proposes that a broader outlook is needed to come to grips with this question. It is essential to go beyond supply-side cost control, and also take into account the needs of the patient. Moreover, we need to look beyond our borders to learn how other countries have been able to evolve universal publicly funded health systems without long waiting times.

  2. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  3. Planning a multi-site, complex intervention for homeless people with mental illness: the relationships between the national team and local sites in Canada's At Home/Chez Soi project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Geoffrey; Macnaughton, Eric; Goering, Paula; Dudley, Michael; O'Campo, Patricia; Patterson, Michelle; Piat, Myra; Prévost, Natasha; Strehlau, Verena; Vallée, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    This research focused on the relationships between a national team and five project sites across Canada in planning a complex, community intervention for homeless people with mental illness called At Home/Chez Soi, which is based on the Housing First model. The research addressed two questions: (a) what are the challenges in planning? and (b) what factors that helped or hindered moving project planning forward? Using qualitative methods, 149 national, provincial, and local stakeholders participated in key informant or focus group interviews. We found that planning entails not only intervention and research tasks, but also relational processes that occur within an ecology of time, local context, and values. More specifically, the relationships between the national team and the project sites can be conceptualized as a collaborative process in which national and local partners bring different agendas to the planning process and must therefore listen to, negotiate, discuss, and compromise with one another. A collaborative process that involves power-sharing and having project coordinators at each site helped to bridge the differences between these two stakeholder groups, to find common ground, and to accomplish planning tasks within a compressed time frame. While local context and culture pushed towards unique adaptations of Housing First, the principles of the Housing First model provided a foundation for a common approach across sites and interventions. The implications of the findings for future planning and research of multi-site, complex, community interventions are noted.

  4. Putting the scientist in science education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, J.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A personal account is given of some of the ways scientists could get involved in science education at the local level. Being employed at a National Laboratory such as Argonne presents a myriad of opportunities and programs involving the educational community. There have been basically, three areas of involvement at present, through our Division of Educational Programs (DEP), through initiatives presented, in conjunction with the Argonne Chapter of Sigma Xi and a volunteer effort with the Museum of Science and Industry of Chicago, Scientists, and School Program. Some descriptions of these efforts will be outlined from a personal perspective, and hopefully a measure of the impact gained by the scientists` involvement in the education process.

  5. Putting Problems Behind You Helps Physical Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merritt; McKinney; 金月湖

    2001-01-01

    “圆满人生”只是一种祈盼和祝愿。自古人生谁无痛?本文作者是一位美国人,他列举了以下人生痛苦:such as the death of a close friend or relative, rape, incest(乱伦),a home fire or a painful break-up,这里所列仅人生痛苦之一隅而已。但是,你如何对待这些人生之苦?是铭记于心,并时时“重温”,使之成为open memories?还是彻底封存,置于脑后,使之成为closed memories?读罢本文,你也许会幡然醒悟。因为open memories有如下罪状: Students who had open memories of traumatic events scored lower on questionnaires measuring self-confidence than students with closed memories of traumatic events or students who had never experienced trauma. Students with open memories also reported more trips to the doctor. 常读此类文章,我的辨证思维也会有所长进。比如,文中的这句写地何等好啊: But bringing closure to a past event does not necessarily mean that you have to be brutally honest with yourself. Beike said that people often remember events somewhat differently than how they actually happened.】

  6. People and society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukkel, W.; Hommes, M.

    2009-01-01

    practiceOrganic agriculture has excellent opportunities to create strong links between the environment it operates in, the people who live there and local nature and landscape. The Dutch organic sector aspires to strengthen these links and it is already well on its way. Together with researchers and

  7. Effect of Putting Grip on Eye and Head Movements During the Golf Putting Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George K. Hung

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to determine the effect of three different putting grips (conventional, cross-hand, and one-handed on variations in eye and head movements during the putting stroke. Seven volunteer novice players, ranging in age from 21 to 22 years, participated in the study. During each experimental session, the subject stood on a specially designed platform covered with artificial turf and putted golf balls towards a standard golf hole. The three different types of grips were tested at two distances: 3 and 9 ft. For each condition, 20 putts were attempted. For each putt, data were recorded over a 3-s interval at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Eye movements were recorded using a helmet-mounted eye movement monitor. Head rotation about an imaginary axis through the top of the head and its center-of-rotation was measured by means of a potentiometer mounted on a fixed frame and coupled to the helmet. Putter-head motion was measured using a linear array of infrared phototransistors embedded in the platform. The standard deviation (STD, relative to the initial level was calculated for eye and head movements over the duration of the putt (i.e., from the beginning of the backstroke, through the forward stroke, to impact. The averaged STD for the attempted putts was calculated for each subject. Then, the averaged STDs and other data for the seven subjects were statistically compared across the three grip conditions. The STD of eye movements were greater (p < 0.1 for conventional than cross-hand (9 ft and one-handed (3 and 9 ft grips. Also, the STD of head movements were greater (p < 0.1; 3 ft for conventional than cross-hand and one-handed grips. Vestibulo-ocular responses associated with head rotations could be observed in many 9 ft and some 3 ft putts. The duration of the putt was significantly longer (p < 0.05; 3 and 9 ft for the one-handed than conventional and cross-hand grips. Finally, performance, or percentage putts made, was

  8. Comparative abundance and population structure of sympatric Afrotropical tortoises in six rainforest areas: the differential effects of ``traditional veneration'' and of ``subsistence hunting'' by local people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, Luca

    2003-07-01

    Hinge-back tortoises are actively hunted by human populations in sub-Saharan Africa, and are currently threatened in wide areas of their ranges. The wide wetlands and moist rainforests of the Niger Delta (southeastern Nigeria, west Africa) house three sympatric species of hinge-back tortoises: Kinixys erosa, K. homeana, and K. belliana nogueyi. These tortoises are subjected to strong hunting pressure for several reasons (mainly domestic consumption), but in a few places in Bayelsa and Rivers States (eastern axis of the Niger Delta), they are traditionally venerated as "holy animals" bringing happiness. These few places may represent ideal laboratories for monitoring the effects of hundreds of years of "traditional conservation" on the wild populations of a tropical reptile. Here, I compare the apparent abundance, sex ratio, body sizes, microhabitats, and seasonal occurrence of free-ranging Kinixys populations inhabiting three of these "traditional sanctuaries" with the same ecological aspects of conspecifics from three neighbouring areas where the tortoises are actively hunted. K. homeana was the most common species at all sites, followed by K. erosa, whereas K. belliana was extremely rare. Adult sex ratio did not depart significantly from equality both in K. erosa and in K. homeana, and was not influenced by locality or by type of "management" (veneration or harvesting). The frequency of juveniles of K. homeana was significantly higher in areas with traditional veneration than in areas of harvesting, but the same pattern was not observed in K. erosa. There was a significant decrease in terms of the number of observed specimens between areas of traditional protection and areas of usual harvesting in all species, and this trend was more obvious in K. homeana than in K. erosa. The ratio "number of observed erosa/number of observed homeana" was not dependent on the presence of traditional veneration. Mean body sizes were not different in harvest areas and in

  9. Putting Supply Chain Management (SCM) Theory into Practice: the Role and Importance of the People Dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a number of supply chain management (SCM) issues: SCM’s “Big Idea” – integration Divergence of Theory and Practice - the limitations of “hard-wiring” The “Human Chain” The Way Forward – asking the right question?

  10. Roles of Data Stewardship: The people who put the theory into practice. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    To understand something very complex like the Earth system it is helpful to have a model that sketches the major components of the system and their interactions. This helps us to understand the relative importance of those components and their behavior. The same is true, when considering a complex social enterprise such as data stewardship. It is helpful to have a model or a metaphor that allows us to conceive of the entire enterprise, the key players, and their interactions. In the spirit that 'all models are wrong, but some are useful,' this presentation explores several models of data stewardship and how different conceptions of the enterprise define different roles for the participants--be they researchers or data practitioners. The goal is to illustrate how consideration of multiple theories or models of data stewardship can help us better define the actual practice necessary to ensure well-preserved and useful data.

  11. Marketing: Putting People in the Process. White House Conference on Library and Information Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, Anthony

    Noting that some public, school, law, academic, and special libraries have adopted marketing as a management tool, this paper begins by discussing marketing principles as defined by the American Marketing Association (AMA). Librarians are advised to center their marketing activities around what is known as the "4 P's" of marketing:…

  12. Putting Supply Chain Management (SCM) Theory into Practice: the Role and Importance of the People Dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a number of supply chain management (SCM) issues: SCM’s “Big Idea” – integration Divergence of Theory and Practice - the limitations of “hard-wiring” The “Human Chain” The Way Forward – asking the right question?

  13. Putting people first: A primary health care success in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlassoff Carol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The World Health Report, 2008, contains a global review of primary health care on the 30th anniversary of the Declaration of Alma-Ata. The period covered by the study reported on here corresponds with that of the Report, allowing for a comparison of achievements and challenges in one primary health care centre vis-a-vis the WHO standards. Materials and Methods: This study uses qualitative and quantitative data from a rural primary care facility in Western Maharashtra, collected over three decades. It analyzes the four groups of reforms defined by WHO in the context of the achievements and challenges of the study facility. Results: According to the WHO Report, health systems in developing countries have not responded adequately to people′s needs. However, our in-depth observations revealed substantial progress in several areas, including in family planning, safe deliveries, immunization and health promotion. Satisfaction with services in the study area was high. Conclusion: Adequate primary health care is possible, even when all recommended WHO reforms are not fully in place.

  14. Holistic health promotion: putting the art into nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sally

    2007-05-01

    The role of the arts in health care and health promotion is enjoying belated attention as a way of promoting people's mental health and well-being. Canterbury Christ Church University offers a course which examines how nurses can use the arts to enhance the health care experience for both staff and patients. The Holistic Health Promotion course is compulsory for all final year pre-registration Bachelor degree students in Adult and Child Nursing. The content and process of the course are described, and the findings from the evaluation data are discussed. Through the use of autobiographical literature, active learning in the classroom, visiting speakers and visits within the local community, the course provides a positive learning experience for many students and broadens their perceptions of how to carry out mental, emotional and spiritual health promotion.

  15. Coral Reefs and People in a High-CO2 World: Where Can Science Make a Difference to People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Linwood; Comte, Adrien; Langdon, Chris; Ekstrom, Julia A; Cooley, Sarah R; Suatoni, Lisa; Beck, Michael W; Brander, Luke M; Burke, Lauretta; Cinner, Josh E; Doherty, Carolyn; Edwards, Peter E T; Gledhill, Dwight; Jiang, Li-Qing; van Hooidonk, Ruben J; Teh, Louise; Waldbusser, George G; Ritter, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere put shallow, warm-water coral reef ecosystems, and the people who depend upon them at risk from two key global environmental stresses: 1) elevated sea surface temperature (that can cause coral bleaching and related mortality), and 2) ocean acidification. These global stressors: cannot be avoided by local management, compound local stressors, and hasten the loss of ecosystem services. Impacts to people will be most grave where a) human dependence on coral reef ecosystems is high, b) sea surface temperature reaches critical levels soonest, and c) ocean acidification levels are most severe. Where these elements align, swift action will be needed to protect people's lives and livelihoods, but such action must be informed by data and science. Designing policies to offset potential harm to coral reef ecosystems and people requires a better understanding of where CO2-related global environmental stresses could cause the most severe impacts. Mapping indicators has been proposed as a way of combining natural and social science data to identify policy actions even when the needed science is relatively nascent. To identify where people are at risk and where more science is needed, we map indicators of biological, physical and social science factors to understand how human dependence on coral reef ecosystems will be affected by globally-driven threats to corals expected in a high-CO2 world. Western Mexico, Micronesia, Indonesia and parts of Australia have high human dependence and will likely face severe combined threats. As a region, Southeast Asia is particularly at risk. Many of the countries most dependent upon coral reef ecosystems are places for which we have the least robust data on ocean acidification. These areas require new data and interdisciplinary scientific research to help coral reef-dependent human communities better prepare for a high CO2 world.

  16. Coral Reefs and People in a High-CO2 World: Where Can Science Make a Difference to People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Chris; Ekstrom, Julia A.; Cooley, Sarah R.; Suatoni, Lisa; Beck, Michael W.; Brander, Luke M.; Burke, Lauretta; Cinner, Josh E.; Doherty, Carolyn; Edwards, Peter E. T.; Gledhill, Dwight; Jiang, Li-Qing; van Hooidonk, Ruben J.; Teh, Louise; Waldbusser, George G.; Ritter, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Reefs and People at Risk Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere put shallow, warm-water coral reef ecosystems, and the people who depend upon them at risk from two key global environmental stresses: 1) elevated sea surface temperature (that can cause coral bleaching and related mortality), and 2) ocean acidification. These global stressors: cannot be avoided by local management, compound local stressors, and hasten the loss of ecosystem services. Impacts to people will be most grave where a) human dependence on coral reef ecosystems is high, b) sea surface temperature reaches critical levels soonest, and c) ocean acidification levels are most severe. Where these elements align, swift action will be needed to protect people’s lives and livelihoods, but such action must be informed by data and science. An Indicator Approach Designing policies to offset potential harm to coral reef ecosystems and people requires a better understanding of where CO2-related global environmental stresses could cause the most severe impacts. Mapping indicators has been proposed as a way of combining natural and social science data to identify policy actions even when the needed science is relatively nascent. To identify where people are at risk and where more science is needed, we map indicators of biological, physical and social science factors to understand how human dependence on coral reef ecosystems will be affected by globally-driven threats to corals expected in a high-CO2 world. Western Mexico, Micronesia, Indonesia and parts of Australia have high human dependence and will likely face severe combined threats. As a region, Southeast Asia is particularly at risk. Many of the countries most dependent upon coral reef ecosystems are places for which we have the least robust data on ocean acidification. These areas require new data and interdisciplinary scientific research to help coral reef-dependent human communities better prepare for a high CO2 world. PMID:27828972

  17. 300,000-tonnage Crude Oil Dock Put into Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Aproject of Jointly establishing 300,000-tonnage crude oil dock of Tianjin Port has been put into operations, thanks to its outut grid successfully connected with oil pipeline of Sinopec Tanggu reservior.

  18. Linerboard Machine in Hebei Yongxing Paper Put into Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ The construction of 6# linerboard machine (PM6) with annual output of 400,000 tons in Yongxing Paper, located in Luannan City, Hebei Province has completed and the machine was put into production in August 2009.

  19. Risky Drinking Can Put a Chill on Your Summer Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Your Summer Fun Print version Risky Drinking Can Put a Chill on Your Summer Fun Summer ... adults involve the use of alcohol. 1 Swimmers can get in over their heads. Alcohol impairs judgment ...

  20. Zhongxian-Wuhan Natural Gas Put into Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The 1375-kilometer Zhongxian-Wuhan natural gas pipeline was put into operation on November 16 after five years of construction, starting to supply natural gas for commercial users in Central China's Hubei Province one month ahead of schedule.

  1. People's Olympics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ It is the moment the city takes on its young and beautiful look.It is the moment the people do everything to surprise the world.It is the momcnt the whole country hold the breath.The 29th Olympic Games is approaching in Beijing.

  2. Parasites, Plants, and People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marion; Moore, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Anthelminthic resistance is acknowledged worldwide and is a major problem in Aotearoa New Zealand, thus alternative parasite management strategies are imperative. One Health is an initiative linking animal, human, and environmental health. Parasites, plants, and people illustrate the possibilities of providing diverse diets for stock thereby lowering parasite burdens, improving the cultural wellbeing of a local community, and protecting the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Research on Continuous Operation of the Railway by Considering the Value of the Local Railway in Nagano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Tatsuo; Wakui, Katsuaki; Koyama, Ken

    After revision of the Railway Business Act in 2000, the abolition of the local railway has increased in Japan. However, continuing activities by people living along local line has been focussed in recent years. Moreover, a lot of local railway's business are obtaining the subsidy from the municipality where railway route is located. When the government puts out the grant to the company, it is necessary to have the accountability for the peoples. This research is focused on the value of the local railways for residents are measured, and an economical value of that is estimate by using the Contingent Valuation Method. As for the route for analysis in Nagano, Bessho-line(Ueda), Yashiro-line(Nagano) and Kamikohchi-line(Matsumoto) were chosen. Moreover, policies of each municipality to these routes are evaluated by using these values.

  4. Locals Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Hastings-King

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A locals collection is a set of parameters that are used to delimit data-mining operations. This piece uses a collection of locals from around Essex Massachusetts to shape and delimit an interrogation of post-reality in contemporary America. It explores the notion of crisis, the possibility of a crisis of empire that may or may not emerge in a media-space that does not allow crisis of empire to be mentioned and relations this maybe-crisis to the various levels of economic dysfunction that have become evident since late 2008. But mostly this piece explores ways in which particular stories about particular people do and do not link/link to these larger-scale narratives. This is the first of a potential series of locals collections that will mine the American post-real.

  5. PEOPLE & POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Rocking the 'Cross-Strait' Boat Just as people thought that crossstrait tensions couldn't get any more testy amid Taiwan leader Chen Shui-bian's efforts to hinder the development of cross-strait ties between the mainland and the island, they did when Chen stumbled upon a new secession drive. Chen announced February 27 his decision to terminate the "National Unification Council" and scrap the

  6. PEOPLE & POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Held Hostage by Politicized Pandas Giant pandas became the preferred option when the Communist Party of China, on behalf of the people on China's mainland, considered sending a gift of goodwill to Taiwan during former Kuomintang Chairman Lien Chan's 2005 cross-strait visit. But Taiwan leader Chen Shui-bian said his authorities would rather not give the pandas permission to enter the island, citing

  7. PEOPLE & POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Innovated In China Deng Zhonghan, the 37-year-old co-founder and CEO of Beijing-based chips manufacturer Vimicro Corporation, walked away with top honors in an annual selection of business people of the year sponsored by national broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV). Deng's pocketing of the prestigious honors in China's business world came as no surprise since his company's breakthroughs in developing chips with proprietary intellectual property in China perfectly matches the key selection criteri...

  8. On studying religion, media and the young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Maskulin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper charts a unique and important phase of media use and meaning-making processes among young people during the first decade of twenty-first century. The rapid changes in media content and consumption have brought about a transformation which impacts on forms of religion and spirituality for young people. In this article I review four studies on the field of religion and the media. Key concepts of the construction of individuality and the narrative of personal biographies are found in all of them. The role of Evangelical Christianity and the core narrative of the apocalypse, as well as the clear polarities of good and evil are analysed in two of the studies which give a description of the global and transnational dimension, while the other two put more emphasis on the local, cultural and historical dimensions. The significance of the transnational character of religious narratives, the media and popular culture is analysed in reference to a long period of ethnographical inquiry and detailed documentations of the cultural discourses associated with musical subcultures as well as the locality and new media conventions approach in the studies of existential and religious expressions in the mediated environment.

  9. Constructing Sexual Identities: People with Intellectual Disability Talking about Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi-Lane, Claire; Callus, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presented research undertaken in collaboration with a self-advocacy group using inclusive research methods and puts forward the views of people with intellectual disability on the topics of sexuality and relationships. The paper presents the perceptions of sexuality of the people with intellectual disability and how these are influenced…

  10. Application of Compound Options in the Evaluation of American Puts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Antonio Rincon

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a numerical method is developed to determine the value of a put, based in the solution of Black and Scholes (1973 for European option and on Richardson extrapolation that calculates the limit of an options sequence, whose time intervals tend to zero. In the beginning of the 70s, Black and Scholes (1973 and Merton (1973 they had developed partial differential equation, whose solution it determines the value of an European option. The boundary condition will go to determine the type of option (purchase or sale. Values for the put are calculated, priced and compared with methods of the numerical integration and the binomial approach.

  11. PEOPLE & POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Reformer Honored Qiu He, the 51-year-old Party chief of Kunming, cap-ital city of southwest China’s Yunnan Province, has been honored for his pioneering efforts to promote the reform of local governance and social programs.

  12. China's Largest Oil Storage Tanks Put into Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Two 125,000-cubic-meter and 90-meter-diameter crude storage tanks, currently largest ones in China,have been constructed and put into service at Sinopec's Maoming Petrochemical Harbor Company in Southeast China's Guangdong Province in recent time.

  13. An on-line gasoline blending system put into production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Anew system for online gasoline blending, which was developed by researchers from the CAS Institute of Automation (CASIA), has been put into production at China Petrochemical Corporation (SINOPEC) and PetroChina Corporation. It is expected to thoroughly renovate the technology in this regard and achieve maximal economic benefits in oil production stage.

  14. Bounds for the American perpetual put on a stock index

    OpenAIRE

    Paulsen, V.

    2001-01-01

    Let us consider n stocks with dependent price processes each following a geometric Brownian motion. We want to investigate the American perpetual put on an index of those stocks. We will provide inner and outer boundaries for its early exercise region by using a decomposition technique for optimal stopping.

  15. Putting Disability Studies to Work in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penketh, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Putting disability studies to work in art education suggests a form of action or industry, a creative opportunity for something to be done, recognising the relationship between theory and practice. Drawing on discourse analysis, this article offers an initial theoretical discussion of some of the ways in which disability is revealed and created…

  16. Banshan Gas-Fired Turbine Generator Set Put into Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ No.1 generator set of Banshan gas-fired power generation project, which is the first 9 FA heavy-duty gas turbine generator set in China that has drawn much attention, was successfully put into operation and merged into power grid at 21:30 in June 2, three months ahead of schedule.

  17. PEOPLE & POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    From Princess to Iron Lady As South Koreans went to the polls to elect local government and council leaders on the last day of May, the strongest support was given to the main opposition Grand National Party (GNP), whose victory shakes up the political landscape one year ahead of the next presidential race. According to the National Election Commission, the GNP secured 12 out of 16 regional top posts, including the mayoral races in Seoul, Busan, Incheon and Daegu.

  18. Local organochlorine pesticide concentrations in soil put into a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenzuli, Louise; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2016-10-01

    In this work, agricultural and background soil concentrations of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, HCB, α-, β- and γ-HCH from 1993 to 2012 were collected from 73 peer-reviewed publications, and analysed statistically. For the period 2003-2012 and for all chemicals, the mean concentration in agricultural soil is significantly higher than the concentration in background soil. In addition to the statistical analysis, concentrations of p,p'-DDT and α-HCH in soils were calculated with a global environmental fate and transport model. A decrease in the mean soil concentration from the first decade to the second was observed with the model, but this decrease is not visible in the measured concentrations, which could result from ongoing use of p,p'-DDT and α-HCH Furthermore, modelled background soil concentrations are generally lower than measurements. This implies that background soil may have received p,p'-DDT and α-HCH through additional routes not described by the model such as spray drift.

  19. Aggression Replacement Training: Putting Theory and Research to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollin, Clive R.

    2003-01-01

    There are many problems posed by aggressive youth, the harm to victims and the loss of young people into the criminal justice system and penal confinement. Aggression Replacement Training (ART) was developed by Arnold Goldstein and his colleagues as a means of working with aggressive young people to help them learn new, prosocial ways of behaving.…

  20. Domestic abuse in the Archers: putting the storyline into context

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The eked out tale of the abusive relationship between the Titcheners in the long running BBC Radio 4 soap, The Archers, culminated on Sunday evening with a knife attack by the long suffering Helen on her psychologically controlling husband Rob. Here, Jennifer Brown puts the storyline in context, offering a forensic psychology perspective and outlining the frequency of similar cases in the UK alongside the recent legal provisions to legislate against such behaviour.

  1. 'Cloak' and 'Wholeness'– iconicity of the lexemes 'telo' and 'put'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašić Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the lexemes telo and put arrives to the conclusion that the original iconicity of the lexeme telo “body” (<*tel- “a flat surface, a plank” represents the formation of the amorphous, unformed substance under a pressure, compressing, or division (a cutting off or separation and refers to the earth or tree as a form of matter. Put/plot (people as an enlarged family, through the concept of the religious community which establishes itself through eating of the body and drinking of the divine blood, and the mythic accounts of the creation of the cosmos by way of the dismemberment of the divine body, or by way of elemental catastrophes caused by the waywardness of single individuals.

  2. Relationship between the development of ethnic tourism and the protection for regional culture: a case study of Tuwa people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Haixia

    2007-01-01

    The innocent Tuwa people live in Kanas Lake, a world famous national reserve in northern Xinjiang.With the rapid development of tourism today, Tuwa people are finally involved in tourism industry. The development of tourism is a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it boosts the revival of Tuwa culture, provides a large number of employment opportunities and cross-cultural exchanges, and improves material welfare for Tuwa people. On the other hand,some disadvantages have also resulted from tourism development, such as the unauthentic exhibition of Tuwa culture, limited tourists, Tuwa group interaction, and limited material improvementfor the Tuwa, etc. This paper takes Tuwa people as a case, illustrates the types, characteristics and the conditions for the development of Tuwa culture, explores the advantages and disadvantages resulting from the development of folk-custom tourism industry and then puts forwards recommendations on the protection for local cultures as follows: (1) attach great importance to Tuwa culture in the tourism development of Kanas Lake Visitor Attraction; (2) construct the aboriginal village with the consciousness of protection; (3)remove the Tuwa village; (4) consummate the management mode and let Tuwa people really benefit from tourism; (5) restrict the grazing in the scenic spots and protect natural grassland; (6) promote Tuwa peopl's ability of self-supervision and self-management; (7) exhibit Tuwa culture authentically.

  3. The Face We Put On: Carl Jung for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Robert P.

    1994-01-01

    Examines Carl Jung's concept of the "persona" (his term for the masks people wear). Notes how teachers use personae and suggests ways to restore the energy that teachers lose when hiding inside their personae. (SR)

  4. Putting Cognitive Science behind a Statistics Teacher's Intuition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karrie A.; Jones, Jennifer L.; Vermette, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in cognitive science have led to an enriched understanding of how people learn. Using a framework presented by Willingham, this article examines instructional best practice from the perspective of conceptual understanding and its implications on statistics education.

  5. 76 FR 31851 - Safety Zone; Put-in-Bay Fireworks, Fox's the Dock Pier; South Bass Island, Put-in-Bay, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Put-in-Bay Fireworks, Fox's the Dock Pier; South Bass Island, Put-in-Bay, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The..., Put-in-Bay, Ohio. This Zone is intended to restrict vessels from portions of Lake Erie for the...

  6. Problems of Revenue Generation in Local Government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every local jurisdiction has its unique economic, social and physical ... Therefore, the concept of local government is to bring governance closer to the people ... for Local Governments to be able to perform these functions creditably, they need ...

  7. 27 CFR 6.152 - Practices which put retailer independence at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Practices which put... which put retailer independence at risk. The practices specified in this section put retailer... practices that put retailer independence at risk. (a) The act by an industry member of resetting stock on...

  8. Putting Information First Luciano Floridi and the Philosophy of Information

    CERN Document Server

    Allo, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Putting Information First focuses on Luciano Floridi's contributions to the philosophy of information. Respected scholars stimulate the debate on the most distinctive and controversial views he defended, and present the philosophy of information as a specific way of doing philosophy.Contains eight essays by leading scholars, a reply by Luciano Floridi, and an epilogue by Terrell W. BynumExplains the importance of philosophy of information as a specific way of doing philosophyFocuses directly on the work of Luciano Floridi in the area of philosophy of information, but also connects to contempor

  9. Can operations put the MPS into an unsafe state?

    CERN Document Server

    Ponce, L

    2011-01-01

    During the 2010 run, the MPS have been additionally stressed by the commissioning of operational procedures and systems tests. As requested by the MPS external review committee, human factors have to be further minimized and discipline reinforced when increasing the stored beam energies towards and beyond the 2010 target of 30 MJ. This talk will present a synthesis of the Evian discussion on MPS and human factors, with an emphasis on the tools and procedures to be put in place for the 2011 run in order to ensure the machine safety during standard beam operation and after periods of machine developments or technical stops.

  10. The Land Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Revaluation of Papua Special Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Pelupessy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of Special Autonomy for Papua is to resolve the source of the problem in Papua, especially concerning the rights of indigenous peoples. Normatively, the background of local autonomy for Papua is affirmed in Act No. 21 of 2001 on Papua Special Autonomy. The results shows that the recognition and protection of the land rights of indigenous peoples have been set clearly in the national legal system, such as Agrarian Law, Forest Law, as well as in Mineral and Coal Mining Law. However, recognition and protection of indigenous peoples’ rights to land in various legal products is still ambivalent. The essence of protection of indigenous peoples’ rights to land is also clearly regulated in Act No. 21 of 2001 and Perdasus No. 23 of 2008 has put customary law community on ownership of communal land is not the object of development, especially in the field of investment. The customary right and indigenous land which is the property and become an authority on indigenous peoples must be recognized by the government and regional and national communities about its presence. Therefore, the government should strive to protect the customary right through regulation of the Ministry of Agrarian and Land Agency and other laws related to the issue of customary rights, customary lands, indigenous peoples and their authority.

  11. Putting judging situations into situational judgment tests: evidence from intercultural multimedia SJTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockstuhl, Thomas; Ang, Soon; Ng, Kok-Yee; Lievens, Filip; Van Dyne, Linn

    2015-03-01

    Although the term situational judgment test (SJT) implies judging situations, existing SJTs focus more on judging the effectiveness of different response options (i.e., response judgment) and less on how people perceive and interpret situations (i.e., situational judgment). We expand the traditional SJT paradigm and propose that adding explicit assessments of situational judgment to SJTs will provide incremental information beyond that provided by response judgment. We test this hypothesis across 4 studies using intercultural multimedia SJTs. Study 1 uses verbal protocol analysis to discover the situational judgments people make when responding to SJT items. Study 2 shows situational judgment predicts time-lagged, peer-rated task performance and interpersonal citizenship among undergraduate seniors over and above response judgment and other established predictors. Study 3 shows providing situational judgment did not affect the predictive validity of response judgment. Study 4 replicates Study 2 in a working adult sample. We discuss implications for SJT theory as well as the practical implications of putting judging situations back into SJTs.

  12. Transfer of mechanical energy during the shot put.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażkiewicz, Michalina; Łysoń, Barbara; Chmielewski, Adam; Wit, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse transfer of mechanical energy between body segments during the glide shot put. A group of eight elite throwers from the Polish National Team was analysed in the study. Motion analysis of each throw was recorded using an optoelectronic Vicon system composed of nine infrared camcorders and Kistler force plates. The power and energy were computed for the phase of final acceleration of the glide shot put. The data were normalized with respect to time using the algorithm of the fifth order spline and their values were interpolated with respect to the percentage of total time, assuming that the time of the final weight acceleration movement was different for each putter. Statistically significant transfer was found in the study group between the following segments: Right Knee - Right Hip (p = 0.0035), Left Hip - Torso (p = 0.0201), Torso - Right Shoulder (p = 0.0122) and Right Elbow - Right Wrist (p = 0.0001). Furthermore, the results of cluster analysis showed that the kinetic chain used during the final shot acceleration movement had two different models. Differences between the groups were revealed mainly in the energy generated by the hips and trunk.

  13. Conventional flow curves of liquid cast iron put on spheroidization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Borowiecki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigation was to confirm the hypothesis that the conventional flow curves of liquid cast iron put on sferoidization determined from the rod fluidity test are comparable to flow curves of liquids in environmental temperature. Moreover has been identified, that conventional flow curves for this liquid cast iron are similar to generalized non- Newtonian liquids curves.For rods with the diameters 3-8 mm there are three various curves:1 – the flow curve of liquid cast iron put on spheroidization overheated about 80 K resemble a shape adequately to a curve of densified liquid with shearing. This phenomenon can be caused by high overcooled and creation of crystallization nuclei;2 – metal alloys overheated about 180 K resemble a shape adequately to Newtonian liquid;3 – metal alloys overheated about 210 K resemble a shape of curve adequately to dispersed liquid with shearing. This phenomenon probably depends on influence of gas which creates on boundary of metal-sand mould.

  14. Transfer of mechanical energy during the shot put

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażkiewicz Michalina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse transfer of mechanical energy between body segments during the glide shot put. A group of eight elite throwers from the Polish National Team was analysed in the study. Motion analysis of each throw was recorded using an optoelectronic Vicon system composed of nine infrared camcorders and Kistler force plates. The power and energy were computed for the phase of final acceleration of the glide shot put. The data were normalized with respect to time using the algorithm of the fifth order spline and their values were interpolated with respect to the percentage of total time, assuming that the time of the final weight acceleration movement was different for each putter. Statistically significant transfer was found in the study group between the following segments: Right Knee – Right Hip (p = 0.0035, Left Hip - Torso (p = 0.0201, Torso – Right Shoulder (p = 0.0122 and Right Elbow – Right Wrist (p = 0.0001. Furthermore, the results of cluster analysis showed that the kinetic chain used during the final shot acceleration movement had two different models. Differences between the groups were revealed mainly in the energy generated by the hips and trunk.

  15. Character Development: Putting It into Practice in Admissions and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The most important knowledge and skills a college education should develop in young people are those underlying good character, such as integrity, responsibility, work ethic, intellectual curiosity, mental flexibility, and wisdom. When leaders fail, most frequently it is because of issues of character, not lack of knowledge or intellectual…

  16. Migration and trafficking: putting human rights into action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas Win Myint

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Across Myanmar people are on the move, both inside thecountry and across its borders, either pushed by necessity orpulled by the prospect of a brighter future. For many, thesehopes are at least partially fulfilled. For some, however, thismigration brings them face-to-face with exploitation, abuse,disease and even death.

  17. Branding: Putting a Little Dent in the Universe!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkweather, Kendall N.

    2011-01-01

    Technology and engineering education is destined to become the most important subject in future education. This is inevitable when people live in a society that needs and uses technology at the pace seen today. Branding is personal, involves a commitment, and requires dedication to a belief and the enthusiasm to work in a logical manner to gain…

  18. Put Power into Your Presentations: Using Presentation Software Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safransky, Robert J.; Burmeister, Marsha L.

    2009-01-01

    Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple Keynote, and OpenOffice Impress are relatively common tools in the classroom and in the boardroom these days. What makes presentation software so popular? As the Chinese proverb declares, a picture is worth a thousand words. People like visual presentations. Presentation software can make even a dull subject come to…

  19. "Our Aim Is to Put Learners in the Driving Seat"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John

    2010-01-01

    When some people think of post-18 education, they only perceive real merit in the traditional university route. The central role that further education (FE) plays in the economy and society is often overlooked and undervalued. In truth, FE for adults, whether in a college, at work, or an informal evening class, not only has the power to improve…

  20. Branding: Putting a Little Dent in the Universe!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkweather, Kendall N.

    2011-01-01

    Technology and engineering education is destined to become the most important subject in future education. This is inevitable when people live in a society that needs and uses technology at the pace seen today. Branding is personal, involves a commitment, and requires dedication to a belief and the enthusiasm to work in a logical manner to gain…

  1. Little People of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information. World Dwarf Games 2017 Welcome to Little People of America Little People of America (LPA) is a nonprofit organization that provides support and information to people of short stature and their families. LPA is ...

  2. Local Community Detection Using Link Similarity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Jun Wu; Han Huang; Zhi-Feng Hao; Feng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Exploring local community structure is an appealing problem that has drawn much recent attention in the area of social network analysis.As the complete information of network is often difficult to obtain,such as networks of web pages,research papers and Facebook users,people can only detect community structure from a certain source vertex with limited knowledge of the entire graph.The existing approaches do well in measuring the community quality,but they are largely dependent on source vertex and putting too strict policy in agglomerating new vertices.Moreover,they have predefined parameters which are difficult to obtain.This paper proposes a method to find local community structure by analyzing link similarity between the community and the vertex.Inspired by the fact that elements in the same community are more likely to share common links,we explore community structure heuristically by giving priority to vertices which have a high link similarity with the community.A three-phase process is also used for the sake of improving quality of community structure.Experimental results prove that our method performs effectively not only in computer-generated graphs but also in real-world graphs.

  3. Medical Education and Curriculum Reform: Putting Reform Proposals in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kam Yin Chan, MD, MB.BS, MHA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to elaborate criteria by which the principles of curriculum reform can be judged. To this end, the paper presents an overview of standard critiques of medical education and examines the ways medical curriculum reforms have responded to these critiques. The paper then sets out our assessment of these curriculum reforms along three parameters: pedagogy, educational context, and knowledge status. Following on from this evaluation of recent curriculum reforms, the paper puts forward four criteria with which to gauge the adequacy medical curriculum reform. These criteria enable us to question the extent to which new curricula incorporate methods and approaches for ensuring that its substance: overcomes the traditional opposition between clinical and resource dimensions of care; emphasizes that the clinical work needs to be systematized in so far as that it feasible; promotes multi-disciplinary team work, and balances clinical autonomy with accountability to non-clinical stakeholders.

  4. Putting the child at the center of inter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Ida

    2016-01-01

    coordinate their children's everyday lives, but in the case of children in out-of-home care, the responsibility of care is distributed between several professionals and institutions. Research often recommends that inter-professional cooperation should put the child at the centre and be more child focused....... But what does that mean? The paper investigates theoretical understandings of ‘child centredness’ in inter-professional cooperation. It also includes an empirical example taken from a research project that followed four children in their everyday lives in two residential homes in Denmark. The research...... explored how professionals work together across contexts in order to support children to take part in school and leisure-time activities. The overall reasoning leads to the point that for children in out-of-home care, the possibility of exercising personal agency in their everyday life constitutes...

  5. Climate-smart conservation: putting adaption principles into practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Bruce A.; Glick, Patty; Edelson, Naomi; Staudt, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Climate change already is having significant impacts on the nation’s species and ecosystems, and these effects are projected to increase considerably over time. As a result, climate change is now a primary lens through which conservation and natural resource management must be viewed. How should we prepare for and respond to the impacts of climate change on wildlife and their habitats? What should we be doing differently in light of these climatic shifts, and what actions continue to make sense? Climate-Smart Conservation: Putting Adaptation Principles into Practice offers guidance for designing and carrying out conservation in the face of a rapidly changing climate. Addressing the growing threats brought about or accentuated by rapid climate change requires a fundamental shift in the practice of natural resource management and conservation. Traditionally, conservationists have focused their efforts on protecting and managing systems to maintain their current state, or to restore degraded systems back to a historical state regarded as more desirable. Conservation planners and practitioners will need to adopt forward-looking goals and implement strategies specifically designed to prepare for and adjust to current and future climatic changes, and the associated impacts on natural systems and human communities—an emerging discipline known as climate change adaptation. The field of climate change adaptation is still in its infancy. Although there is increasing attention focused on the subject, much of the guidance developed to date has been general in nature, concentrating on high-level principles rather than specific actions. It is against this backdrop that this guide was prepared as a means for helping put adaptation principles into practice, and for moving adaptation from planning to action.

  6. Putting houses in place: rebuilding communities in post-tsunami Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwanpura, Kanchana N

    2009-07-01

    This paper interrogates the social and political geographies of resettlement and reconstruction of temporary and permanent shelters, which are fundamental to rebuilding tsunami-affected communities. War and ethnic cleavages are an endemic feature of Sri Lanka's social polity, and uneven development processes in the country are clearly visible. This paper draws attention to these spaces of inequality by drawing on in-depth interviews and participant observation carried out in Eastern and Southern Sri Lanka. It argues that communities' concerns and anxieties regarding displacement and resettlement have tended to be articulated against prevailing fault lines of war and inequality. This is the backdrop against which communities negotiated the recovery process. My fieldwork shows that it is critical to understand that disaster and development relief are ingrained within context specificities. Relief efforts therefore need to recognise that the process of 'putting houses in place' should be embedded within local social relations.

  7. Natural Protected Areas and Rural/Local Development: A Sustainable Strategy in Remote Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pallares-Blanch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The value and resources of the landscape and heritage of the Pyrenees, conserved in Natural Conservation Areas, have not been included in local social/economic development. The necessary policies and transverse working methods have not taken on board the benefits of these natural, protected areas on local, economic development. In some parts of the Pyrenees like Alt Urgell county the process of naturbanisation is just beginning. There is a great opportunity to put the brakes on uncontrolled urban development. At the same time, the potential to exploit the heritage and resources of the Pyrenees still exists. Therefore, the research defences that Natural Reserved Areas can act as a driving force to articulate a quality label of landscape, heritage and territory in peripheral areas like West Catalan Pyrenees. At the same time, by through promotion of Natural Reserved Areas a multi-organisational project of local development can be build. In the framework of rural-urban dynamics in a global context, the paper explains how the values of landscape and heritage in the mountain areas can be an opportunity to put into practice integrated territorial policies applying transversal methodologies among actors, institutions and private sector. At the same time, local development projects would priories young people and women support as one of the sector more likely to innovate and to maintain social and human capital in peripheral areas. A cooperation and collaboration practices are needed to create new economic activities with the participation of local actors. This paper puts forward suggestions for action to be taken.

  8. 'It puts life in us and we feel big'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchinson, Eleanor; Chandler, Clare; Clarke, Siân

    2015-01-01

    This paper is an analysis of the social interaction between drug sellers, their clients and local health care workers within a medical trial that introduced rapid diagnostic tests for malaria into private sector drug shops in Mukono District, Uganda. It locates the introduction of a new technology...... to test blood and a system of referral within the context of local concerns about the choice and evaluation of treatment; and the socially legitimated statuses, roles and hierarchies within the local health care system. Based on the multi-layered interpretation of 21 focus group discussions, we describe...... reflect their situation within the health care system. The clients and patients welcomed the local availability of new diagnostic technology and the apparent involvement of the government in securing good quality health services for them from providers with often uncertain credentials. The drug shop...

  9. The Localization Characteristic of the Idea and Mission of Private Universities in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jixuan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea and mission of college and university are always assuming a fluxion accompanied with social upheaval. The Chinese private universities' idea and mission take on local characteristic: “As the foundation of a nation, education should meet the needs of social development, should take the responsibility of practical application and take service for the community”, “Education should place people first, attach great importance to the improvement of the students' individual quality and put heavy emphasis on the service quality”, which have become the important content of the faith of Chinese private universities; “To strengthen the internationalization and to open running college”, which is the new direction of faith of Chinese private universities. It became those private universities’ bounden duty to translate normal human resources into quality human capital. So, those private universities have the responsibilities and missions to construct human resources powerful nation, to popular higher education with high standard satisfied by people.

  10. Yaogan 8 And Hope 1 Have Been Put Into Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong He

    2009-01-01

    @@ ALM-4C launch vehicle lifted off from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center at 10:31 on December 15, sending the Yaogan 8 satellite and a piggybacked small satellite, Hope 1, into their predetermined sun-synchronous orbit.This is the 121st flight of LM series launch vehicle and the last one of China's space launch missions in 2009. Hope 1 will be used for the country's young people to experience aerospace science and technology.

  11. Putting Down Roots: A Graphical Exploration of Community Attachment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Andee

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the relationships that individuals have with their communities. This work was prepared as part of the ASA Data Expo '13 sponsored by the Graphics Section and the Computing Section, using data provided by the Knight Foundation Soul of the Community survey. The Knight Foundation in cooperation with Gallup surveyed 43,000 people over three years in 26 communities across the United States with the intention of understanding the association between community attributes and the degree of attachment people feel towards their community. These include the different facets of both urban and rural communities, the impact of quality education, and the trend in the perceived economic conditions of a community over time. The goal of our work is to facilitate understanding of why people feel attachment to their communities through the use of an interactive and web-based visualization. We will explain the development and use of web-based interactive graphics, including an overview of the R package S...

  12. The exercise of deaf people in the employment market

    OpenAIRE

    Wodziková, Petra

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with people who are hearing impaired and their possibilities of employment. Having a hearing disability puts this group at much higher risk of unemployment. The theoretical section of this paper is focused on the possible causes of this phenomenon.

  13. Municipal Local Economic Development and the Multiplier effect: Piloting a Community Enterprise Identification Method in South Africa and Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucienne Heideman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Local Economic Development (LED is a contested concept in southern Africa, and has become synonymous with delivery of generic job-creation projects, often grant-dependent and unsustainable. Municipal LED has followed this pattern in South Africa since 1994, with little lasting success. Each local economy is unique, and has its own problems and opportunities. The ’Plugging the Leaks’ method recognizes that communities themselves know best how money enters and exits their area. By asking people to analyse their local economy as a 'leaky bucket', the method puts control back in the hands of local people, rather than external experts, and allows them to analyse their own local economy to identify gaps and opportunities for enterprise. By better networking and working collectively to improve their local economy, local communities are able to re-circulate cash internally. This circulation of cash is explained as the local multiplier effect in the workshops. A pilot process of running ‘Plugging the Leaks’ workshops in low income communities in South Africa and Namibia revealed that spending choices in these communities are severely limited in a context where there is no effective welfare state. Therefore, empowerment with this method came from the discovery of collective action and networking, rather than from individual spending choices. Local start-up business tends to be limited to survivalist and copy-cat one-person ventures, and are a last resort when formal employment is absent. In this context collective enterprise offers the necessary empowerment for people to attempt financially sustainable ventures that respond to a gap in the local economy. The pilot project is attempting to show that municipal LED staff can play the role of facilitator for initiating the enterprise-identification process and further mobilise state enterprise support agencies around the locus of LED, without crossing the line between facilitation and implementation

  14. Invest in adolescents and young people: it pays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This year’s Women Deliver conference made a strong call for investing in the health and development of adolescents and young people. It highlighted the unique problems faced by adolescent girls and young women–some of the most vulnerable and neglected individuals in the world–and stressed the importance of addressing their needs and rights, not only for their individual benefit, but also to achieve global goals such as reducing maternal mortality and HIV infection. In response to an invitation from the editors of Reproductive Health, we-the sixteen coauthors of this commentary–put together key themes that reverberated throughout the conference, on the health and development needs of adolescents and young people, and promising solutions to meet them. 1. Investing in adolescents and young people is crucial for ensuring health, creating prosperity and fulfilling human rights. 2. Gender inequality contributes to many health and social problems. Adolescent girls and boys, and their families and communities, should be challenged and supported to change inequitable gender norms. – Child marriage utterly disempowers girls. It is one of the most devastating manifestations of gender discrimination. – Negative social and cultural attitudes towards menstruation constrain the lives of millions of girls. This may well establish the foundation for lifelong discomfort felt by girls about their bodies and reticence in seeking help when problems arise. 3. Adolescents need comprehensive, accurate and developmentally appropriate sexuality education. This will provide the bedrock for attitude formation and decision making. 4. Adolescent-centered health services can prevent sexual and reproductive health problems and detect and treat them if and when they occur. 5. National governments have the authority and the responsibility to address social and cultural barriers to the provision of sexual and reproductive health education and services for adolescents and young people

  15. Young People and E-Safety: The Results of the 2015 London Grid for Learning E-Safety Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wespieser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This report looks at the online activities of London's young people. The report highlights that children and young people use technology to have fun, study and communicate with others. Most children and young people have positive experiences online. On the whole they are sensible online and do not put themselves "at risk". However, the…

  16. 19 CFR 10.605 - Goods classifiable as goods put up in sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Goods classifiable as goods put up in sets. 10.605... put up in sets. Notwithstanding the specific rules set forth in General Note 29(n), HTSUS, goods classifiable as goods put up in sets for retail sale as provided for in General Rule of Interpretation 3,...

  17. The Effects of Multisensory Imagery in Conjunction with Physical Movement Rehearsal on Golf Putting Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploszay, A. J.; Gentner, Noah B.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Wrisberg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    A multiple-baseline design was used to evaluate the effects of a pre-shot putting routine on the putting performance of four NCAA Division I golfers. The routine involved a combination of multisensory imagery and simulated putting movements. Results suggested that the intervention was effective for some participants. Discussion focuses on…

  18. The Effects of Multisensory Imagery in Conjunction with Physical Movement Rehearsal on Golf Putting Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploszay, A. J.; Gentner, Noah B.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Wrisberg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    A multiple-baseline design was used to evaluate the effects of a pre-shot putting routine on the putting performance of four NCAA Division I golfers. The routine involved a combination of multisensory imagery and simulated putting movements. Results suggested that the intervention was effective for some participants. Discussion focuses on…

  19. David Duke, running for governor, proposes tattooing people with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-19

    Former Ku Klux Klan leader, David Duke, planning a second run for governor of Louisiana, said he would curb the AIDS epidemic by tattooing people who are infected with HIV. His suggestion is to put indelible, glow-in-the-dark tattoos on the genitals of people infected with HIV. According to Duke, it may sound very draconian but it would not demean people. He also believes that tattooing would be legal because courts have a history of supporting the quarantining and institutionalizing of people with infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. Duke said Cuba has had some success in using quarantines to reduce HIV infection, but he does not think it would work in the United States because it would cost too much. According to Duke, many people who get HIV from irresponsible behavior do not tell their partners that they have AIDS--these people are mad at the world and engage in dangerous behaviors even more.

  20. Households facing constraints. Fuel poverty put into context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, Ute [ISG Business School, Paris (France); Meier, Helena [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Energiewirtschaftliches Inst.

    2014-02-15

    The present paper discusses the concept of fuel poverty taking into account the arbitrages made by households when they are facing economic constraints. Fuel poverty is still lacking a common definition throughout Europe: while the UK and France have (different) official definitions, there is still no definition in a country like Germany, or at the European level. Where definitions exist, they often consider that fuel poor households have high energy needs. The possibility of being fuel poor even without having high energy needs and the various arbitrage possibilities of households - i.e. to under-spend and use too little energy - are not systematically discussed. Our paper tries to fill that gap by putting fuel poverty into the larger context of constraints faced by households. Based on a graphical analysis, it shows that different situations of fuel poverty might occur. It results in the identification of two distinct fuel poverty problems: an ''energy inequality'' problem, reflected by the fact that some households pay disproportionately high energy bills, and an ''energy affordability'' problem that can affect a larger share of the population. It finally explores the two types of fuel poverty for European countries and discusses policy implications.

  1. Putting flexible animal prospection into context: escaping the theoretical box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osvath, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The debate on non-human future-oriented cognition has long revolved around the question whether such cognition at all occurs. Closer inspection reveals just how much cognition in general-down to its simplest forms-is geared toward predicting the future in a bid to maintain homeostasis and fend off entropy. Over the course of life's existence on Earth, evolution and natural selection have, through a series of evolutionary arms races, gotten increasingly good at achieving this. Prospection has reached its current pinnacle based partly on a system for episodic cognition that-as research increasingly is showing-is not limited principally to human beings. Nevertheless, and despite some notable recent defections, many researchers remain convinced of the merits of the Bischof-Köhler Hypothesis with its claim that no species other than human beings is able to anticipate future needs or otherwise live in anything other than the immediate present moment. What might, at first, appear to be empirical disputes turn out to reveal largely unquestioned theoretical divides. Without due care, one risks setting out conditions for 'true' future orientation that are irrelevant for describing human cognition. In sorting out the theoretical and terminological muddle framing contemporary debate, this article makes a plea for moving beyond past dogmas while putting animal prospection research into the context of evolution and contemporary cognitive science. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Skilful Practice in the Zhuangzi: Putting the Narratives in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan VÁVRA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Zhuangzi, like many other early Chinese texts, is a composite work consisting of relatively short textual units. Despite its composite nature, the Zhuangzi is often approached as a philosophical work, which (at least in part or parts can be viewed as philosophically coherent. As a result, the Zhuangzi as a whole (or several wholes is usually taken (at least implicitly as the context in which all the textual units are read and understood. In contrast, this paper explores alternative ways to establish context for individual textual units in the Zhuangzi. The famous short narratives about skilful practice (often introducing the idea of perfect craftsmanship are taken as an example, and the possible contexts are examined along two lines of inquiry: 1 the narratives are read within their immediate context of the textual unit; 2 the vocabulary used in the narratives is checked against other textual units in the Zhuangzi where the vocabulary appears. The paper argues that diverse contexts can be established for seemingly similar narratives. The narratives about skilful practice are viewed as a literary device that can be used in various contexts for various purposes. The paper thus demonstrates that the received Zhuangzi can be read as a process of putting shared narratives and terms in contexts and using them for different ends. The paper concludes by suggesting that the proposed reading highlights and retains meanings that are necessarily obscured by any reading that establishes the whole Zhuangzi as the primary context.

  3. Putting Qumran, Jesus and his movement into relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eben Scheffler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available After referring briefly to the fantasies regarding the origins of Christianity as elicited by the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947 (Dupont-Sommer, Allegro, Thiering, the purpose of the contribution is to put the Jesus movement into relief in the context of first-century Judaism. The identity of the Qumranites is argued to be Essene scribes. The identity, ideology and practices of the latter are compared with those of Jesus of Nazareth and the movement he elicited using the following rubrics: (1 Jesus, the teacher of righteousness and the powers that be; (2 asceticism versus itinerary charismaticism; (3 caring versus lack of caring for the sick, poor and marginalised; (4 elitist priests and scribes versus lower-class peasants; (5 the interpretation of the law; (6 religious and daily practices (baptism, ritual meal, sacrifice, prayer, community of possessions, scribal activity; (7 religious views or ideology (kingdom of God, the new covenant, light and darkness, politics. The result is a picture of Jesus (with his focus on human suffering in sharp relief versus Qumran and facets of the early church.

  4. Putting science at the heart of European policy

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    One year ago, the incoming European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker shocked the scientific world by scrapping the post of Chief Scientific Advisor. This week, the Commission made amends by launching a well-considered Scientific Advisory Mechanism (SAM) that not only puts science back at the heart of policy, but does so in a much more structured and robust way than conferring such responsibility on a single individual.     The SAM has two independent strands: an advisory group of seven scientists, and funding through the Horizon 2020 programme for national academies and learned societies to network and collaborate on policy issues. Both are backed up by a secretariat at Commission headquarters in Brussels. When Mr Juncker scrapped the role of Chief Scientific Advisor, it was against a backdrop of sometimes vitriolic attacks on the incumbent, Anne Glover, due to her outspoken views on GMOs. Mr Juncker’s move was seen by some as simply giving in to a powerful lob...

  5. Don’t put your family at risk

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    How easy is it to fall into the trap of cyber-criminals? Get one’s online banking password stolen? Lose photos to third parties? It's easier than you think. One single click to open a malicious attachment or a malicious web page is sufficient to put your family at risk.   Sometimes adversaries even call you in order to get their malicious job done. Once their malware is installed on your home computer, it records all your activity, monitors your online banking activities, steals your passwords, activates your computer’s microphone and camera, and sends all that data back to the adversary. This person can now do whatever they want: take money from your bank account, order books with your Amazon password, deface your Facebook profiles, send strange messages to your peers, or post the captured images of your daughter in front of the computer on dodgy web sites. Not only can you lose (lots of!) money, but having strange messages sent on your b...

  6. Case studies in control putting theory to work

    CERN Document Server

    Juričić, Đani

    2013-01-01

    Case Studies in Control presents a framework to facilitate the use of advanced control concepts in real systems based on two decades of research and over 150 successful applications for industrial end-users from various backgrounds. In successive parts the text approaches the problem of putting the theory to work from both ends, theoretical and practical. The first part begins with a stress on solid control theory and the shaping of that theory to solve particular instances of practical problems. It emphasizes the need to establish by experiment whether a model-derived solution will perform properly in reality. The second part focuses on real industrial applications based on the needs and requirements of end-users. Here, the engineering approach is dominant but with theoretical input of varying degree depending on the particular process involved. Following the illustrations of the progress that can be made from either extreme of the well-known theory–practice divide, the text proceeds to a third part relate...

  7. Methodological Issues in Documentary Ethnography: A Renewed Call for Putting Cameras in the Hands of the People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesca, Robert

    The participatory method of image production holds enormous potential for communication and journalism scholars operating out of a critical/cultural framework. The methodological potentials of mechanical reproduction were evident in the 1930s, when Walter Benjamin contributed three enduring concepts: questioning the art/document dichotomy; placing…

  8. Putting School in Its Place: A Narrative Analysis of the Educational Memories of Late Adult and Elder People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Poveda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes narratives regard­ing educational experiences and memories of a group of adult and elder Spaniards. Data was gathered through life history interviews, most often by participant's grandchildren. Schooling is exam­ined as a life-transition from a life-span perspec­tive. While the participants of the study attended for­mal education under very different socio-histor­ical and political conditions, a number of shared patterns emerge in the data. First, participants on average spent little time in schools, yet overall would have liked to continue their education. Both the reasons to leave school and the curriculum in schools are organized around gender categories. Second, the implications of early school with­drawal are contextualized in the rural context in which participants grew up and which provided adult social roles and occupations that were only partially connected to formal education. Third, par­tici­pants show an orientation towards instrumental and school skills, which are also acquired and expanded in out-of-school contexts. The findings are discussed in relation to general theories of development in later life and situated in historical context. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0401389

  9. The Concepts of "Putting People First" and "Regarding Harmony as the Fundamentality" under the Framework of Cultural Diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Xiaowen

    2011-01-01

    @@ Human civilization is cur rently undergoing another important turn.Following the economic globalization,cultural globalization has become an inevitable trend. Traditional Christian civilization and Islamic civilization insisy monotheism and universalism.

  10. Huangshan Women Developing Local Tourism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    AN old saying goes: "Living by the mountain, eat from the mountain; living by the sea, eat from the sea." In Huangshan City, Anhui Province, tourism departments have become places of great interest for many local young people. According to rough statistics, in Tunxi alone—where the municipal government is located—over 10,000 people make their

  11. Local youth policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Gilsing

    1999-01-01

    Original title: Lokaal jeugdbeleid. Local authorities have been given an important role in youth policy in the Netherlands. They are expected to develop preventive youth policy to increase the opportunities of young people and prevent them dropping out from society. At the request of the Ministry o

  12. Could Speaking for the People Often Mean Lying to the People? Populism and the Problem of Truth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş DRAGOMAN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments in Romanian politics have raised a series of questions related to the special relationship between populists and the people. How could one explain that populists are no longer popular? One explanation put forward here is that politics, and especially populism, bear a moral component that affects the political system, in that populists turn democracy into what Sartori would label as “demolatry”. This means that populists keep speaking for the people, but with no real attention paid to the people, and finally, with a total despise for the real people. This changing context, with the populist leader challenging the established power system by mobilising dissatisfied citizens only to accommodate and successfully integrate the power structures previously challenged, and the subsequent moves against the real people, is exemplified for the period between 2008 and 2012, when the populists consolidated in power and were finally and ironically challenged by the people.

  13. Oxygen Reactivity of PutA from Helicobacter Species and Proline-Linked Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Navasona; Becker, Donald F.

    2006-01-01

    Proline is converted to glutamate in two successive steps by the proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme in gram-negative bacteria. PutA contains a proline dehydrogenase domain that catalyzes the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidation of proline to Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) and a P5C dehydrogenase domain that catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of P5C to glutamate. Here, we characterize PutA from Helicobacter hepaticus (PutAHh) and Helicobacter pylori (PutAHp) to pro...

  14. Issues for the future. Putting the jigsaw together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Oxfam's efforts to support organizations working with disabled people in Bosnia highlight the necessity of taking into account other forms of disadvantage that increase vulnerability, such as gender, when planning interventions. When Oxfam began working in Bosnia in 1993, disability was widely perceived as a medical rather than a social development issue. An Oxfam-inspired inter-Association project set up the Lotos Resource Center to create badly needed joint social space and office space for vocational training. Realizing that it was difficult to reach women with disabilities, Oxfam representatives made home visits to encourage women to participate in activities. Oxfam also actively co-opted women to join the steering committee. This work gave Oxfam a better understanding of the fact that a diversity of needs exists for disabled men and women, for able-bodied women caring for disabled partners, and for women caring for disabled children. Lessons learned include 1) people with disabilities are not homogeneous in their needs; 2) it is essential to take positive action to involve disabled women; 3) gender and disability analysis must be inclusive and must consider different sources of marginalization or else marginalization will be reinforced; and 4) a basic rights approach provides a clear framework to understand dimensions of disadvantage within households.

  15. Indigenous people's detection of rapid ecological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Shankar; Lauer, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    When sudden catastrophic events occur, it becomes critical for coastal communities to detect and respond to environmental transformations because failure to do so may undermine overall ecosystem resilience and threaten people's livelihoods. We therefore asked how capable of detecting rapid ecological change following massive environmental disruptions local, indigenous people are. We assessed the direction and periodicity of experimental learning of people in the Western Solomon Islands after a tsunami in 2007. We compared the results of marine science surveys with local ecological knowledge of the benthos across 3 affected villages and 3 periods before and after the tsunami. We sought to determine how people recognize biophysical changes in the environment before and after catastrophic events such as earthquakes and tsunamis and whether people have the ability to detect ecological changes over short time scales or need longer time scales to recognize changes. Indigenous people were able to detect changes in the benthos over time. Detection levels differed between marine science surveys and local ecological knowledge sources over time, but overall patterns of statistically significant detection of change were evident for various habitats. Our findings have implications for marine conservation, coastal management policies, and disaster-relief efforts because when people are able to detect ecological changes, this, in turn, affects how they exploit and manage their marine resources. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Putting Personal Knowledge Management under the Macroscope of Informing Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schmitt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces a novel Personal Knowledge Management (PKM concept and prototype system. The system’s objective is to aid life-long-learning, resourcefulness, creativity, and teamwork of individuals throughout their academic and professional life and as contributors and beneficiaries of organizational and societal performance. Such a scope offers appealing and viable opportunities for stakeholders in the educational, professional, and developmental context. To further validate the underlying PKM application design, the systems thinking techniques of the transdiscipline of Informing Science (IS are employed. By applying Cohen’s IS-Framework, Leavitt’s Diamond Model, the IS-Meta Approach, and Gill’s and Murphy’s Three Dimensions of Design Task Complexity, the more specific KM models and methodologies central to the PKMS concept are aligned, introduced, and visualized. The extent of this introduction offers an essential overview, which can be deepened and broadened by using the cited URL and DOI links pointing to the available resources of the author’s prior publications. The paper emphasizes the differences of the proposed meme-based PKM System compared to its traditional organizational document-centric counterparts as well as its inherent complementing synergies. As a result, it shows how the system is closing in on Vannevar Bush’s still unfulfilled vison of the ‘Memex’, an as-close-as-it-gets imaginary ancestor celebrating its 70th anniversary as an inspiring idea never realized. It also addresses the scenario recently put forward by Levy which foresees a decentralizing revolution of knowledge management that gives more power and autonomy to individuals and self-organized groups. Accordingly, it also touches on the PKM potential in terms of Kuhn’s Scientific Revolutions and Disruptive Innovations.

  17. Putting the learner in the spotlight – Future directions for English teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne P A Swan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper asserts that English teachers’ understanding of their professionalism enables them to ‘put the learner in the spotlight’ through their highly-developed awareness of local contexts of English use. Changing attitudes to English language teacher identity include a revaluation of the’ native-non-native speaker’ dichotomy which is fast becoming irrelevant as teachers assert new identities based on factors such as professional beliefs about their teaching, understanding their students’ needs and understanding the role of English in their contexts. In a globalising world, these aspects no longer require ‘so-called’ native speaker skills, such as pronunciation and knowledge of ‘English’ culture. In fact, dwelling at length on the issues surrounding native and non-native speaker teacher identity tends to cloud understanding of what qualities English teachers need. Interviews with multilingual teachers of English, working in a variety of countries, have revealed an understanding of the diminishing importance of the ‘native speaker’ and the concomitant growth in the confidence of the multilingual teacher. This confidence has been acquired through depth of linguistic knowledge, through observance of other cultures, and through resistance to the encroachment of English by finding a place for the language which satisfies the needs of multilingual users without requiring subservience. In discovering these strengths of multilingual teachers, I show how stepping outside the boundaries of one’s own limited environment allows English language teachers, wherever they come from, to develop a truly enlightened international professionalism which puts learners firmly in the spotlight.

  18. Functional analysis of OsPUT1, a rice polyamine uptake transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulangi, Vaishali; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Aouida, Mustapha; Ramotar, Dindial; Morris, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Polyamines are nitrogenous compounds found in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells and absolutely essential for cell viability. In plants, they regulate several growth and developmental processes and the levels of polyamines are also correlated with the plant responses to various biotic and abiotic stresses. In plant cells, polyamines are synthesized in plastids and cytosol. This biosynthetic compartmentation indicates that the specific transporters are essential to transport polyamines between the cellular compartments. In the present study, a phylogenetic analysis was used to identify candidate polyamine transporters in rice. A full-length cDNA rice clone AK068055 was heterologously expressed in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae spermidine uptake mutant, agp2∆. Radiological uptake and competitive inhibition studies with putrescine indicated that rice gene encodes a protein that functioned as a spermidine-preferential transporter. In competition experiments with several amino acids at 25-fold higher levels than spermidine, only methionine, asparagine, and glutamine were effective in reducing uptake of spermidine to 60% of control rates. Based on those observations, this rice gene was named polyamine uptake transporter 1 (OsPUT1). Tissue-specific expression of OsPUT1 by semiquantitative RT-PCR showed that the gene was expressed in all tissues except seeds and roots. Transient expression assays in onion epidermal cells and rice protoplasts failed to localize to a cellular compartment. The characterization of the first plant polyamine transporter sets the stage for a systems approach that can be used to build a model to fully define how the biosynthesis, degradation, and transport of polyamines in plants mediate developmental and biotic responses.

  19. Valuing people: health visiting and people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Scott; Berry, Liz

    2006-02-01

    People with a learning disability have spent decades being excluded from mainstream society and remain almost invisible in our communities, workplaces and in family life. As a result, the health of people with a learning disability is significantly poorer than that of the general population. Despite the many reports and policy recommendations about how to improve the situation, little has been done to address the social exclusion of this group, and their health and wellbeing continue to decline. In a joint effort to challenge exclusion and address the agenda of 'Valuing People: A New Strategy for Learning Disability for the 21st Century', Warrington Primary Care Trust and Five Boroughs Partnership NHS Trust joined forces at a practical level. Two health visitors have developed a comprehensive programme of socially inclusive health care aimed at engaging people with learning disabilities more fully in their health care and their choices in leading healthy lives. The paper discusses Access All Areas--a comprehensive programme using a public health model of health care where people with learning disabilities are being supported to make healthy choices and, often for the first time, given information in accessible formats to support those choices. Led by health visitors, staff from all agencies involved in the care and support of people with learning disabilities are being trained and engaged in order to raise the standards across organisations and prioritise the health and wellbeing of this marginalised group. Health visitors are leading locally in the implementation of both health improvement and long-term condition strategies.

  20. Does communication help people coordinate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Joveski, Zlatko; Yu, Sixie

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have consistently demonstrated that collective performance in a variety of tasks can be significantly improved by allowing communication. We present the results of the first experiment systematically investigating the value of communication in networked consensus. The goal of all tasks in our experiments is for subjects to reach global consensus, even though nodes can only observe choices of their immediate neighbors. Unlike previous networked consensus tasks, our experiments allow subjects to communicate either with their immediate neighbors (locally) or with the entire network (globally). Moreover, we consider treatments in which essentially arbitrary messages can be sent, as well as those in which only one type of message is allowed, informing others about a node's local state. We find that local communication adds minimal value: fraction of games solved is essentially identical to treatments with no communication. Ability to communicate globally, in contrast, offers a significant performance improvement. In addition, we find that constraining people to only exchange messages about local state is significantly better than unconstrained communication. We observe that individual behavior is qualitatively consistent across settings: people clearly react to messages they receive in all communication settings. However, we find that messages received in local communication treatments are relatively uninformative, whereas global communication offers substantial information advantage. Exploring mixed communication settings, in which only a subset of agents are global communicators, we find that a significant number of global communicators is needed for performance to approach success when everyone communicates globally. However, global communicators have a significant advantage: a small tightly connected minority of globally communicating nodes can successfully steer outcomes towards their preferences, although this can be

  1. Does communication help people coordinate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have consistently demonstrated that collective performance in a variety of tasks can be significantly improved by allowing communication. We present the results of the first experiment systematically investigating the value of communication in networked consensus. The goal of all tasks in our experiments is for subjects to reach global consensus, even though nodes can only observe choices of their immediate neighbors. Unlike previous networked consensus tasks, our experiments allow subjects to communicate either with their immediate neighbors (locally) or with the entire network (globally). Moreover, we consider treatments in which essentially arbitrary messages can be sent, as well as those in which only one type of message is allowed, informing others about a node’s local state. We find that local communication adds minimal value: fraction of games solved is essentially identical to treatments with no communication. Ability to communicate globally, in contrast, offers a significant performance improvement. In addition, we find that constraining people to only exchange messages about local state is significantly better than unconstrained communication. We observe that individual behavior is qualitatively consistent across settings: people clearly react to messages they receive in all communication settings. However, we find that messages received in local communication treatments are relatively uninformative, whereas global communication offers substantial information advantage. Exploring mixed communication settings, in which only a subset of agents are global communicators, we find that a significant number of global communicators is needed for performance to approach success when everyone communicates globally. However, global communicators have a significant advantage: a small tightly connected minority of globally communicating nodes can successfully steer outcomes towards their preferences, although this can be

  2. New Wedding Customs of the Li People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENNIFER; LIM

    1998-01-01

    HISTORICALLY, Hainan Island has been the land of the Li people. It was only during the Western Han Dynasty (206 B.C.-A.D.25), when the centralizedgovernment established two prefectures here caned Zhuya and Dan’er, that the Han people began to come southward to this remote island. So when anthropologists study the history and local customs of Hainan, the earliest information concerns the development of the Li nationality. There is a museum which provides clues to this history, the

  3. Putting culture in the curriculum: a European project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairanen, Raija; Richardson, Eileen; Kelly, Hélène; Bergknut, Eva; Koskinen, Liisa; Lundberg, Pranee; Muir, Nita; Olt, Helen; De Vlieger, Lily

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale for and the method of designing a framework for a European curriculum to promote intercultural competence in health care students. The background relating to the migration of people into and across Europe is cited as the factor driving the need for such a project. The project group emerged from the European organisation known as COHEHRE (Consortium of Higher Education Institutes in Health and Rehabilitation in Europe). Composed of a group of nurse educators from 5 European countries it charts the process which led them to create a curriculum framework. The completed work is available in the form of a CD-ROM. The paper describes the steps taken to reach the project outcomes over 4 years. The methods of dissemination of the project outcomes are included. The discussion considers the journey of the group towards the outcomes of the project and identifies the need to discover how effective the framework is in achieving the aims of the group. In conclusion it articulates the hope that this work will improve the care which is shown to all recipients of health care whatever their cultural background.

  4. Signaling Pathway Puts the Break on Fat Cell Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ormond A. MacDougald

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is approaching epidemic proportions in the western industrialized world, and is also becoming a major problem among young people in eastern and developing countries [1,2,3]. Unfortunately, excess fat or adipose tissue is associated with a wide array of health problems, including increased incidence of type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sleep apnea, and skeletomuscular problems [4,5,6]. Obesity is the second leading cause of death from “unnecessary” causes in the U.S. (after smoking, and costs individuals and society billions of dollars worldwide to treat. Despite common wisdom that “one just needs to eat less and exercise more” and a multi-billion-dollar diet industry, epidemiological data indicate that the incidence of obesity will continue to rise. This alarming trend is, in part, due to the unprecedented availability of energy-dense foods and an increasingly sedentary lifestyle. These environmental factors may be complicated in some individuals by an unfavorable genetic predisposition. Pharmaceutical companies lead active research programs to identify drugs that target weight control centers in the body and which may help individuals control their weight; however, no satisfactory magic bullet to fight obesity has yet come through the pipeline [7,8].

  5. GIS Application Management for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongkaw, Sasalak

    2017-08-01

    This research aimed to develop and design Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for facilitating disabled people by presenting some useful disabled information on the Google Map. The map could provide information about disabled types of people such as blind, deaf and physical movement. This research employed the Multiview 2 theory and method to plan and find out the problems in real world situation. This research used many designing data structure methods such as Data Flow Diagram, and ER-Diagram. The research focused into two parts: server site and client site which included the interface for Web-based application. The clear information of disable people on the map was useful for facilitating disabled people to find some useful information. In addition, it provided specialized data for company and government officers for managing and planning local facilities for disabled people in the cities. The disable could access the system through the Internet access at any time by using mobile or portable devices.

  6. Facilitating Description and Selection of Learning Paths: the learning path specification put to the test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, José

    2008-01-01

    Jansen, J. (2008). Facilitating Description and Selection of Learning Paths: the learning path specification put to the test. Presentation at the Otec Colloquium. April, 2008, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  7. The science of golf putting a complete guide for researchers, players and coaches

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Gonçalo

    2015-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explores the motor performance and biomechanics of golf putting, providing methodologies, studies and approaches to this concept. Presenting outcomes of research published over the past six years, it offers guidelines from a scientifically oriented perspective, and employs new technologies and mathematical methods to assess golf putting. The chapters cover aspects such as pendulum-like motion in sports, setting up the experimental design, and performance metrics for putting variables. Paving the way for an improved understanding of what leads to failure and success in golf putting, this book offers an invaluable reference source for sports scientists, engineers and mathematicians, as well as golfers.

  8. Facilitating Description and Selection of Learning Paths: the learning path specification put to the test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, José

    2008-01-01

    Jansen, J. (2008). Facilitating Description and Selection of Learning Paths: the learning path specification put to the test. Presentation at the Otec Colloquium. April, 2008, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  9. Putting a Face to a Name: Visualising Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Mackie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, I focus on a text which attempts to deal with human rights issues in an accessible media format, Kälin, Müller and Wyttenbach’s book, The Face of Human Rights. I am interested in this text as an attempt to translate between different modes of communicating about human rights, which we might call the academic mode, the bureaucratic mode, the activist mode and the popular media mode. There are significant gaps between the academic debates on human rights, the actual language and protocols of the bodies devoted to ensuring the achievement of basic human rights, the language of activists, and the ways in which these issues are discussed in the media. These issues are compounded in a transnational frame where people must find ways of communicating across differences of language and culture. These problems of communicating across difference are inherent to the contemporary machinery of the international human rights system, where global institutions of governance are implicated in the claims of individuals who are located in diverse national contexts. Several commentators have noted the importance of narrative in human rights advocacy, while others have explored the role of art. I am interested in analysing narrative and representational strategies, from a consciousness that texts work not only through vocabulary and propositional content, but also through discursive positioning. It is necessary to look at the structure of texts, the contents of texts, and the narrative strategies and discursive frameworks which inform them. Similar points can be made about photography, which must be analysed in terms of the specific representational possibilities of visual culture.

  10. Historic Drought puts the Brakes on Earthflows in Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G. L.; Roering, J. J.; Mackey, B.; Handwerger, A.; Schmidt, D. A.; Guillod, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and predicting landslide response to climate change are significant challenges for Earth scientists, with landslides killing at least 5000 people each year around the world and costing 17% of the annual losses from all natural disasters. Much research on landslide response to climate surrounds their response to extreme rainfall events and melting permafrost, both of which are predicted to increase with climate change. However, landslide response to drought, also predicted to increase, remains largely unexplored. Further research on landslide response to drought as a climatic forcing event is needed to better understand the variable response of landslides, and more generally, geomorphic and hydrologic processes to climate change. California's ongoing drought reached historic proportions in 2015 with widespread consequences on the state's resources. We assessed the drought's impact on 98 deep-seated, slow-moving landslides in Northern California. We used a novel combination of aerial photograph analysis, satellite interferometry, and satellite pixel tracking to measure earthflow velocities spanning 1944-2015 for comparison with the Palmer Drought Severity Index, a proxy for soil moisture and pore pressure. We find that earthflow velocities reached a historical low in the extreme 2012-2015 drought, though their deceleration began at the turn of the century in response to a longer-term moisture deficit. Significantly, our analysis implies depth-dependent sensitivity of earthflows to climate forcing, with thicker earthflows reflecting longer-term climate trends and thinner earthflows exhibiting less systematic velocity variations. These findings have implications for our understanding of mechanical-hydrologic controls on earthflow movement as well as for predicting the response of slow-moving landslides to climate change.

  11. The Role and Importance of Local Economic Development in Urban Development: A Case of Harare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Mandisvika

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed the role and importance of Local Economic Development as a means of enhancing urban development paying particular attention to the regulators of Local Economic Development in Harare. Local Economic Development is a process which encourages partners from the community, public sector, private sector and non-governmental sectors to work collectively to create better conditions for economic growth and employment generation with the aim of improving the locality economic future and the quality of life for all citizens. The study was premised on the theory of competitive advantage which puts up that prosperity and wealth creation is determined by microeconomic factors and that prosperity means increasing the standards of living for the local people and ultimately their quality of life. Primary data for the research was gathered through observation and key informant interviews. Data on key stakeholders understanding on the concept of Local Economic Development, how it is being practised and how the current regulatory framework enhance or impinge on local people’s participation in Local Economic Development was collected. Secondary data was also collected from Harare’s 2014 budget, census and existing forward plans. The study revealed that the practice of Local Economic Development in Harare is biased towards the setting aside of land zoned for industrial and commercial uses and implementation of development control parameters. Small to Medium Enterprises and the informal sector have also been identified as the major forms of Local Economic Development that citizens are involved in. However, the study revealed that proper policy frameworks which guide practice of Local Economic Development initiatives were missing

  12. People-Centered Language Recommendations for Sleep Research Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuoco, Rebecca

    2017-03-06

    The growing embrace of patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) in sleep medicine is a significant step forward for the field. In engaging and incorporating the unique perspectives of people with sleep disorders, PCOR enhances the relevance of findings and facilitates the uptake of research into practice. While centering research design around what matters most to people with sleep disorders is critical, research communication must be similarly people-centered. One approach is using "people-centered language" in both professional and public communications. People-centered language is rooted in sociolinguistic research demonstrating that language both reflects and shapes attitudes. People-centered language puts people first, is precise and neutral, and respects autonomy. By adhering to the language guidelines described in this article, sleep researchers will better serve the field's most important stakeholders.The sleep medicine community is increasingly recognizing the importance of patient-centered outcomes and partnerships in research. In step with these initiatives, sleep researchers should use thoughtful and purposeful language in both professional and public communication. Such language should be people-centered, respecting the humanity and dignity of people who participate in research and people with sleep disorders generally.Beyond a matter of political correctness, people-centered language is grounded in sociolinguistic principles positing that language significantly shapes ideological preconceptions. In other words, language not only reflects attitudes, it also affects them. Language choices in medical research communication can thus unintentionally perpetuate stereotypes and negative attitudes about people with the studied conditions. Since many people with sleep disorders face stigma, language is indeed a consequential consideration for sleep researchers. Language also shapes perceptions of research and can either discourage or empower people to

  13. Putting social impact assessment to the test as a method for implementing responsible tourism practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCombes, Lucy, E-mail: l.mccombes@leedsbeckett.ac.uk [International Centre for Research in Events, Tourism and Hospitality (ICRETH), Leeds Beckett University, Headingley Campus, Macaulay Hall 103, Leeds LS6 3QS (United Kingdom); Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: frank.vanclay@rug.nl [Professor of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, PO Box 800, 9700AV Groningen (Netherlands); Evers, Yvette, E-mail: y.evers@tft-earth.org [The Forest Trust, Chemin de Chantavril 2, 1260 Nyon (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    The discourse on the social impacts of tourism needs to shift from the current descriptive critique of tourism to considering what can be done in actual practice to embed the management of tourism's social impacts into the existing planning, product development and operational processes of tourism businesses. A pragmatic approach for designing research methodologies, social management systems and initial actions, which is shaped by the real world operational constraints and existing systems used in the tourism industry, is needed. Our pilot study with a small Bulgarian travel company put social impact assessment (SIA) to the test to see if it could provide this desired approach and assist in implementing responsible tourism development practice, especially in small tourism businesses. Our findings showed that our adapted SIA method has value as a practical method for embedding a responsible tourism approach. While there were some challenges, SIA proved to be effective in assisting the staff of our test case tourism business to better understand their social impacts on their local communities and to identify actions to take. - Highlights: • Pragmatic approach is needed for the responsible management of social impacts of tourism. • Our adapted Social impact Assessment (SIA) method has value as a practical method. • SIA can be embedded into tourism businesses existing ‘ways of doing things’. • We identified challenges and ways to improve our method to better suit small tourism business context.

  14. Natural Capital - putting a value on geological sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Lesley

    2017-04-01

    Natural Capital is a mechanism through which a value can be placed on nature allowing it to be considered alongside other assets. When the Government of the United Kingdom produced a Natural Environment White Paper (The Natural Choice: securing the value of nature) in 2012 there was no direct mention of geosites, geoheritage or geodiversity. One ambition of the Natural Environment White Paper was to stop environmental degradation and to rebuild natural capital and to value it. Whilst landscapes are mentioned in the paper geodiversity is not directly and this has been problematic for funding and recognition within the UK. Natural Capital is being used as the basis for many of the environmental reviews therefore it is essential that geodiversity can be included within this. The Natural Capital Committee defines natural capital as 'those elements of the natural environment which provide valuable goods and services to people'. In the main, these goods and services are related to ecology/biodiversity rather than to the full range of natural capital. Specifically, the values associated with abiotic nature (geodiversity) are frequently undervalued or ignored. The English Geodiversity Forum have been producing case studies as to how this might be done for different locations and this paper will present the work of this and how a value can be attributed to geodiversity. For example links to tourism and recreation within areas such as the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site and the Black Country proposed Geopark are easy to place a value on but it is more difficult with educational, scientific sites. Using an ecosystems services and biodiversity analogies this paper presents a framework that can be adopted for evaluation of geological sites. Defra (2015) The state of natural capital: protecting and improving natural capital for prosperity and wellbeing. Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs, 73 pages https://www

  15. PEOPLE/POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Troubled Chairman Wan Long,Board Chairman of Shuanghui Group,one of China’s largest meat processors,has been put under the spotlight because of an additive scandal exposed by the media on March 15.It was reported Jiyuan Shuanghui Food Co.Ltd.,

  16. Inmunoterapia local Local immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lasa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La inmunoterapia específica, junto con la evitación del alergeno y el tratamiento sintomático, forma parte del tratamiento de la patología alérgica. La modalidad más antigua, más conocida y mejor estudiada es la inmunoterapia subcutánea (ITSC, cuya eficacia tanto a corto como a largo plazo, ha sido ampliamente demostrada en numerosos estudios. Sin embargo, a pesar de haberse demostrado segura, no está exenta de efectos adversos y precisa ser administrada bajo supervisión de personal médico. Esto ha animado a buscar nuevas vías de administración de eficacia similar, con un buen perfil de seguridad, y de buena cumplimentación por parte del paciente. De las distintas alternativas estudiadas la más relevante es la inmunoterapia sublingual (ITSL. En ésta, se administra el antígeno en forma de gotas debajo de la lengua. Existen diferentes pautas de administración en función del alergeno implicado. La dosis óptima de tratamiento está aún sin determinar, hallándose en este momento en un rango amplio de dosis respecto a la inmunoterapia subcutánea. Su mecanismo de acción es poco conocido aunque en diversos estudios se han observado cambios inmunológicos. La ITSL ha mostrado un buen perfil de seguridad con escasos efectos secundarios, habitualmente de carácter local. Asimismo se han realizado distintos ensayos clínicos en los que se ha demostrado su eficacia en el tratamiento de la alergia respiratoria tanto en niños como en adultos. Por ello, aunque aún existen datos sin resolver respecto a esta vía de administración de inmunoterapia, ha sido propuesta por la OMS como una alternativa válida a la ITSC.Specific immunotherapy, together with avoidance of the allergen and symptomatic treatment, forms part of the treatment of allergic pathology. The oldest, best known and most studied form is subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT, whose efficacy, both in the short and the long term, has been widely demonstrated in numerous studies

  17. Documenting localities

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Richard J

    1996-01-01

    Now in paperback! Documenting Localities is the first effort to summarize the past decade of renewed discussion about archival appraisal theory and methodology and to provide a practical guide for the documentation of localities.This book discusses the continuing importance of the locality in American historical research and archival practice, traditional methods archivists have used to document localities, and case studies in documenting localities. These chapters draw on a wide range of writings from archivists, historians, material culture specialists, historic preservationists

  18. Education for rural people

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one out of six people in the world is suffering from hunger and illiteracy. This book was developed to assist policy makers dealing with rural poverty, food insecurity and education challenges confronting rural people. It seeks to address the correlation between education, training, empowerment and food security, mainly through a number of examples from all over the world. It is about strengthening the capacity of rural people to achieve food security. It identifies different dimension...

  19. People in the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方岩

    2004-01-01

    “When in Rome, do as the Romans do.”is a famous saying about customs. But what exactly do the Romans and other people do that is so different? Where do women wear tings in their noses to show they are married, for example? Where do people greet each other with a bow rather than a handshake? Here are some other ways people behave and beautify themselves around the world.

  20. Peoples Perception About Ethnocentrism in BIH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Salkanović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer ethnocentrism comes up as tendency to purchase domestic products instead of foreign once. This kind of behavior can be directly linked to every country’s prosperity. Ethnocentric consumers, purchasing domestic products, see as their own contribution to economic, social and political development. Purpose of this study is to analyze consumer perceptions about local products consumption and its effects on community-building in BiH. It also explored the potential to expand local markets for local food and products. Sources of local food products include (but may not be limited to farmers markets, and grocers who carry local foods. A descriptive research methodology was used for this study. As the survey instrument questionnaire is used to collect data from local community. 320 responses were further analyzed with SPSS program, using descriptive statistics. Final outcome give detailed picture of local products consumption by learning about the expectations of consumers and understanding the kinds of contributions that local products make to the community. Results showed that consumers in BiH are showing ethnocentric behavior while purchasing products, respondents generally perceive domestic products to be of good quality but while purchasing they are putting quality in front of domestically produced products.

  1. PHYSICAL LOAD RELATED TO HIGHWAY-DRIVING AMONG DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi IKEDA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Driving environments have been designed basically for travel by physically and mentally unimpaired people. On the other hand, sufficient, special considerations are not given to the vehicles driven by disabled people. In order to examine the ergonomic driving load put on both disabled and physically unimpaired people while they are on highways, the driving conditions and the muscle-stress of disabled people were evaluated on the approach to curves. Also the influence of acceleration-and-deceleration and centrifugal force on vehicles were evaluated in straight, split and inter-flows of traffic. The subjects of this study consisted of 5 physically unimpaired people and 10 disabled people who required auxiliaries for their vehicles due to handicaps of their lower limbs or to both upper and lower limbs. The study was conducted on the loop line of the Hanshin Expressway in Osaka, Japan. As a result of measuring the accelerated velocity of vehicles in motion and electromyograms of drivers of the vehicles, it was found that the driving load of disabled people is heavier than that of physically unimpaired people. It was also found that certain driving conditions are different for disabled people to travel at high speed.

  2. 43 CFR 2.84 - What information must I put in my Touhy Request?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What information must I put in my Touhy Request? 2.84 Section 2.84 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND... Responsibilities of Requesters § 2.84 What information must I put in my Touhy Request? Your Touhy Request must:...

  3. 47 CFR 95.408 - (CB Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (CB Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna? 95.408 Section 95.408 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL....408 (CB Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna? (a) Antenna means the radiating system...

  4. Muscular power, neuromuscular activation, and performance in shot put athletes at preseason and at competition period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriazis, Thomas A; Terzis, Gerasimos; Boudolos, Konstantinos; Georgiadis, Georgios

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in shot put performance, muscular power, and neuromuscular activation of the lower extremities, between the preseason and the competition period, in skilled shot put athletes using the rotational technique. Shot put performance was assessed at the start of the pre-season period as well as after 12 weeks, at the competition period, in nine shot putters. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the right vastus lateralis muscle was recorded during all shot put trials. Maximum squat strength (1RM) and mechanical parameters during the countermovement jump (CMJ) on a force platform were also determined at pre-season and at competition period. Shot put performance increased 4.7% (p put performance was significantly related with muscular power and takeoff velocity during the CMJ, at competition period (r = 0.66, p put performance. These results suggest that muscular power of the lower extremities is a better predictor of rotational shot put performance than absolute muscular strength in skilled athletes, at least during the competition period.

  5. 41 CFR 102-33.105 - What special requirements must we put into our CAS contracts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What special requirements must we put into our CAS contracts? 102-33.105 Section 102-33.105 Public Contracts and Property... to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.105 What special requirements must we put into our...

  6. 14 CFR 11.43 - What information must I put in my written comments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What information must I put in my written comments? 11.43 Section 11.43 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... information must I put in my written comments? (a) Your written comments must be in English and must...

  7. 36 CFR 1012.5 - What information must I put in my Touhy Request?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What information must I put in my Touhy Request? 1012.5 Section 1012.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST LEGAL... information must I put in my Touhy Request? Your Touhy Request must: (a) Identify the employee or record;...

  8. Relation of eye dominance with performance and subjective ratings in golf putting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yoshio; Lee, Mi-Sook

    2005-06-01

    Previous research has discussed the interaction of hand preference, eye dominance, and sport performance. In this study, the relation of eye dominance with performance and subjective ratings in golf putting was investigated. 47 right-handed Japanese students from a college of physical education putted 10 balls to a drawn circle 3 m away, each under right-handed and left-handed stance conditions. Putting performance was measured by the number of successful putts. After putting in each condition, they rated subjective visibility and feelings of hitting. Analyses indicated that right-eyed subjects had significantly better performance using the right-handed stance than the left-handed stance, whereas left-eyed subjects showed the opposite. Most subjective ratings were more positive with right-handed stance for both right-eyed and left-eyed subjects. These findings suggest that eye dominance could have some influence on putting performance of Japanese novice golfers.

  9. Conflict-induced displacement and involuntary resettlement in Colombia: putting Cernea's IRLR model to the test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggah, H C

    2000-09-01

    This paper tests Cernea's (1997) impoverishment risks and livelihood reconstruction (IRLR) model in cases of conflict-induced displacement (CID). In applying the model to a situation involving internal conflict, the article illustrates the particular problems encountered by internally displaced people (IDPs) and policymakers charged to respond to them. The article searches for local interpretations of CID and resettlement through a comparative profile of two IDP settlements in Colombia: one urban, the other rural. It concludes that the IRLR model, when contextualised, provides a useful tool to identify and categorise risks of impoverishment and resettlement priorities. At the same time, however, the article demonstrates that the model insufficiently captures the root causes or causality of CID.

  10. Bridging the Gap between Senior Citizens and Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannacone, George; Skelly, Joan

    1985-01-01

    This article describes a school district's programs that build relationships between the schools and the local senior citizens, including a grandparent program, developmental seminars, and a prom for senior citizens put on by the students. Also described are some keys to making such programs work, and the benefits. (DCS)

  11. Putting Roman Dams in Context: a Virtual Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, M. J.; Du Vernay, J. P.; Mcleod, J. B.

    2017-08-01

    innovative perspective on a long time studied monument. In this paper it will be explored how deploying recent computer technologies to the Roman dam at Consuegra can advance our understanding of the history of local and regional landscape change and the technology of water management. In summer 2016, the dam has been documented with terrestrial laser scanning with two FARO Focus 3D x330 and aerial photogrammetry image capturing with a DJI Phantom 4 drone. Data was processed in various 3D software applications to generate 3D representations of the dam including 3D point clouds, animations, and meshed models.

  12. Activities for Older People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Along with the improvement of the standard of living and medical care the lifespan of people in China has increased greatly in the 1990s. There are more older people living in Shanghai, Beijing and Tianjin than in the rest of the country. The government and

  13. Psychodrama with Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Lynette; Robinson, Luther D.

    1971-01-01

    Observations based on psychodrama with deaf people, relating to interaction between people and the communication process, are made. How role training skills, which involve some of the skills of psychodrama, can be applied by professionals in vocational and social learning situations is illustrated. (KW)

  14. Can Noise Kill People?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲娣

    2007-01-01

    Someone is singing next door,but you feel unhappy because her singing is just making a noise.We know that too much noise makes people feel terrible. Scientists are still trying to find out more about noise,but already it is known that a noise of over 85 decibels can make some people tired and anxious.

  15. Managing & Developing People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, Gill, Ed.

    This book presents ideas about and approaches to human resource management (HRM) in British further education (FE) colleges. Introductory material includes author biographies and a preface (Brain) on human resource issues in FE. "Investors in People" (Chambers) considers how working toward recognition as an Investor in People (a British…

  16. Research with Arctic peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, H Sally; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2006-01-01

    Arctic peoples are spread over eight countries and comprise 3.74 million residents, of whom 9% are indigenous. The Arctic countries include Canada, Finland, Greenland (Denmark), Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the United States. Although Arctic peoples are very diverse, there are a variety of...

  17. The livelihood of People and Responsibility: the Contribution of Shaanxi Gentry in the Local Social Assistance in Qing Dynasty%士责与民生:清代关中士绅与地方社会救济

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨银权

    2012-01-01

    居于乡村社会的士绅将地方社会救济视为自己的职责。他们不仅捐助灾荒、战乱,而且救济婚丧等一切地方事务。在参与方式上,他们或襄助官府救助,或以个人力量直接救助灾民。但总体上看,士绅对乡民的救助力度远远小于官方的赈恤。从时效性来看,士绅的救助因为减少了官府的申报等中间环节,无疑效果更为积极。最后,在清朝后期,士绅对地方社会的救助远远多于清前期,这也与中后期国家财政紧张密切相关。%The gentry regarded the local social assistance as their duties. They not only help the poor, and fight for famine and the wars, but also sponsored the weddings and the funeral affairs, and so on. As for the way, they sometimes help the officials rescue the poor, or rescue in their only ability. All in all, their rescue is far less than the official, but from the perspective of timeliness, for reducing the number of intermediate links such as declaring for the officials, the effect is more obvious and quickly. At last, they rescue the poor was more often in the late of Qing dynasty than in the early of Qing dynasty, which is much related to the cash - strapped condition in the middle and late periods of Qing dynasty.

  18. An exercise prescription primer for people with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Robert; Happell, Brenda M

    2013-08-01

    A substantial body of evidence supports the value of exercise in the treatment of people with depression. The guidelines for exercise prescription, however, are limited, and based on those developed for healthy populations. This article explores the evidence for exercise in the treatment of depression and the role mental health nurses may play in the delivery of this information. A model of exercise prescription is put forward based on the available evidence and taking into account the challenges faced by mental health nurses and people with depression.

  19. Local architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Local architecture refers to structures built in the countryside,such as temples,memorial halls,residences, stores,pavilions, bridges,decorated archways, and wells. Because these structures were all built by focal craftsmen and villagers in the traditional local style, they are generally called local architecture.

  20. The Procedure of Putting a Park under Protection Using the Sv. Jakov Park in Opatija as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koraljka Vahtar-Jurković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the procedure of putting valuable town parks under protection in the category of monuments of park architecture, according to the Law on protection of nature. Besides the procedure itself, the aim is to present the expert documents as the foundation for the procedure using the Sv. Jakov Park in Opatija as an example. Since this is the first park to put under protection according to the new Law, and since this is the result of several years of scientific research, this example can be used for the future protection of parks in our country. The scientific methods used here were the method of analysis and synthesis, historical method, method of proof, case study method and method of induction and deduction. Analysis of data from the Registry of protected natural heritage at the Ministry of Culture showed that no historical parks were protected at that time in the category of the monuments of park architecture according to the new Law on protection of nature. The method of analysis also identified the phases of procedure of protection and the need for cooperation of various experts – architects-urbanists, agronomists, biologists and jurists and also various local, county and republic institutions. Using the historical method, we collected information on the historical development, characteristics and value of the Sv. Jakov Park, and using the method of proof, we established that it was not protected. The case study method was used to examine the procedure of putting the Sv. Jakov Park under protection, and the method of induction and deduction showed that this particular example of protection, based on scientifi c research, should become a model for similar procedures in the Republic of Croatia.

  1. The Procedure of Putting a Park under Protection Using the Sv. Jakov Park in Opatija as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koraljka Vahtar-Jurković

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the procedure of putting valuable town parks under protection in the category of monuments of park architecture, according to the Law on protection of nature. Besides the procedure itself, the aim is to present the expert documents as the foundation for the procedure using the Sv. Jakov Park in Opatija as an example. Since this is the first park to put under protection according to the new Law, and since this is the result of several years of scientific research, this example can be used for the future protection of parks in our country. The scientific methods used here were the method of analysis and synthesis, historical method, method of proof, case study method and method of induction and deduction. Analysis of data from the Registry of protected natural heritage at the Ministry of Culture showed that no historical parks were protected at that time in the category of the monuments of park architecture according to the new Law on protection of nature. The method of analysis also identified the phases of procedure of protection and the need for cooperation of various experts – architects-urbanists, agronomists, biologists and jurists and also various local, county and republic institutions. Using the historical method, we collected information on the historical development, characteristics and value of the Sv. Jakov Park, and using the method of proof, we established that it was not protected. The case study method was used to examine the procedure of putting the Sv. Jakov Park under protection, and the method of induction and deduction showed that this particular example of protection, based on scientifi c research, should become a model for similar procedures in the Republic of Croatia.

  2. Acute effects of countermovement jumping and sprinting on shot put performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Karampatsos, Giorgos; Kyriazis, Thomas; Kavouras, Stavros A; Georgiadis, Giorgos

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of countermovement jumping and sprinting on shot put performance in experienced shot putters. Ten shot putters (best performance 13.16-20.36 m) participated in the study. After a standard warm-up including jogging, stretching, and 4-6 submaximal puts, they performed 3 shot put attempts with maximum effort, separated with 1.5-minute interval. Three minutes later, they performed 3 maximal consecutive countermovement jumps (CMJs). Immediately after jumping, they performed 3 shot put attempts with maximum effort, separated with a 1.5-minute interval. One week later, they carried out a similar protocol, at similar external conditions, but they performed a bout of 20-m sprinting instead of the CMJs, to potentiate shot put performance. Muscular strength (1 repetition maximum in squat, snatch, bench press, incline bench press) and body composition (dual x-ray absorptiometry) were measured during the same training period (±10 days from the jumping and sprinting protocols). Shot put performance was significantly increased after the CMJs (15.45 ± 2.36 vs. 15.85 ± 2.41 m, p = 0.0003). Similarly, shot put performance was significantly increased after sprinting (15.34 ± 2.41 vs. 15.90 ± 2.46 m, p = 0.0007). The increase in performance after sprinting was significantly higher compared with the increase after jumping (2.64 ± 1.59 vs. 3.74 ± 1.88%, p = 0.02). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that a standard warm-up protocol followed by 3 maximal bouts of shot put and either 3 consecutive countermovement jumps or a bout of 20-m sprinting induce an acute increase in shot put performance in experienced shot putters.

  3. Pulmonary Localization Revealing Wegener's Granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Mlika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wegener's granulomatosis (WG is the most frequent antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA–associated vasculitis. It affects mainly the upper airways, lungs, and kidneys. Two forms are identified: systemic and limited. We describe three cases of limited WG diagnosed during a 7-year period. Our aim is to report three localized forms of WG and to put emphasis on the necessity of differentiating localized from systemic forms because of their different prognoses and manner of management. Our study contained two men and one woman with a mean age of 43 years. All our patients were symptomatic and presented with nonspecific respiratory signs. The cANCA were positive in all patients. The imaging findings consisted of cavitary masses. The diagnosis was based on surgical lung biopsy in all cases. All patients were put on cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. Only one patient presented with renal complications after a 2-year follow-up period. The two other patients did not present complications after, respectively, 1 month and 1 year of follow-up. These case reports put emphasis on a rare form of WG, the limited form. The low number of patients, due to the rarity of this disease, does not allow us to delineate the characteristics and the differences between this form and the systemic form, but we highlight the necessity of future investigations in order to explore the pathogenesis, therapeutic, and prognosis differences between these two subsets.

  4. A digital local studies collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Resman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Local studies and local studies departments reflect the entire spectrum of knowledge within the local community. Transition to the new digital environment means just continuing the basic functions of local studies collections: acquisition, cataloguing and preservation of materials in different formats on different media. The background of each digital library is the technical architecture of system that enables interaction between the user and the library, saving digital material and building a platform for searching and indexing digital objects. Using advanced ICT requests from librarians, designers of digital local studies collections a reflection about traditional roles. A digital local studies collection with new technology enlarges local boarders, local contents become more and more interesting for a wider sphere of people. In collecting of local materials a collaboration with archives and museums, with academic community, with community groups and with individuals comes in forefront. Digital local studies collections with their contents support local diversity, lifelong learning and social inclusion. The crucial elements of a digital local studies collection are attractive local contents with fast and simple access from one place – a portal. In the digital age public libraries become managers of knowledge also by establishing digital local studies collections.

  5. People on the move.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Many people live away from their homes and communities. Worldwide, about 125 million people are migrant workers, immigrants, or refugees in search of education, employment, or safety, making them vulnerable to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. Some practical approaches to HIV prevention with people on the move are delineated. These include: 1) the project in Niger describing its work with migrant peer educators; 2) a national program improving health services; 3) a program in India providing STI treatment and health information for truck drivers; 4) a South African HIV program, which includes activities within communities; and 5) HIV prevention programs for refugees in Tanzania and Mozambique.

  6. An Investigation and Analysis of the Status Quo of the Old People's Physical Exercise in Haikou City%海口市老年人体育锻炼的现状调查与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈猛醒; 金德阳

    2012-01-01

    In this study, literature review and mathematical statistics are used to investigate and analyze the status quo of the old people participating in physical exercise in Haikou city. The results show that the status quo of old people' s physical exercise is influenced by such factors as politics, economic and cultural levels in the local areas. This paper also puts forward some suggestions according to the status quo and characteristics of their physical exercise.%对海口市老年人参与体育锻炼的现状进行了调查分析.研究结果表明,老年人体育开展状况受其所在地区政治、经济和文化发展水平等多方面因素的影响,本研究同时针对其体育锻炼的现状和特点,提出建议.

  7. Monocular indoor localization techniques for smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollósi Gergely

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade huge research work has been put to the indoor visual localization of personal smartphones. Considering the available sensor capabilities monocular odometry provides promising solution, even reecting requirements of augmented reality applications. This paper is aimed to give an overview of state-of-the-art results regarding monocular visual localization. For this purpose essential basics of computer vision are presented and the most promising solutions are reviewed.

  8. Causality, Non-Locality and Negative Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Forcella, Davide; Carminati, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    The importance of spatial non-locality in the description of negative refraction in electromagnetic materials has been put forward recently. We develop a theory of negative refraction in homogeneous and isotropic media, based on first principles, and that includes non-locality in its full generality. The theory shows that both dissipation and spatial non-locality are necessary conditions for the existence of negative refraction. It also provides a sufficient condition in materials with weak spatial non-locality. These fundamental results should have broad implications in the theoretical and practical analyses of negative refraction of electromagnetic and other kinds of waves.

  9. People's practices: Exploring contestation, counter-development, and rural livelihoods. Cases from Muktinagar, Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, H.

    2000-01-01

    People's Practices: Exploring contestation, Counter - development, and rural livelihoodsThe central problems explored in the thesis concern the vulnerability of disadvantaged local people, especially women, and their agency; development discourses and counter-development processes; livelihood strate

  10. Do People "Pop Out"?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mayer, Katja M; Vuong, Quoc C; Thornton, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    ...? In the current paper we tested whether people in natural scenes attract attention and "pop out" or, alternatively, are at least searched for more efficiently than targets of another category (machines...

  11. Organizing homeless people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    People who are homeless belong to some of the most vulnerable, dispersed and disorganized groups in welfare societies. Yet in 2001, a national interest organization of homeless people was formed for the first time in Denmark. This article identifies the processes that facilitated the formation...... of the organization. It focuses on the importance of ideological and institutional conditions and changes, and it stresses the importance of alliances between progressive actors in the field and in the political-administrative system, in addition to the presence of dedicated activists among people who are or have...... been homeless. The analysis may thus serve as a case of inspiration for activists and professionals who want to improve homeless people's opportunities for participation in other national settings....

  12. PEOPLE/POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Lifetime Achievement Laureate Sun Jiadong, a senior Chinese expert in carrier rocket and satellite technology, received a Lifetime Achievement Award as part of the 2010 CCTV Economic People of the Year program.

  13. OFDA People-Trak

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — People-Trak HRIS is a workforce management tool. It will provide tracking and management tools for recruiting, training, contact info, performance, travel monitoring...

  14. From CERN people to the world

    CERN Multimedia

    Sophie Louise Hetherton

    2014-01-01

    Created by filmmaker Liz Mermin, a new YouTube series puts the spotlight on CERN people. This set of short films offers new insight into the daily lives of CERN physicists.   The new online video series, CERN people, takes you behind the headlines of some of the biggest physics breakthroughs of our time, capturing the invention and discovery in the lives of CERN’s scientists. “CERN offered a fascinating blend of people from so many different backgrounds combined with exciting and groundbreaking physics,” says filmmaker Liz Mermin. “So, my aim was to show the real-life characters – the ones that stay up all night analysing data and tweaking the code for the experiments – and communicate their passion for particle physics.” The films give a first-hand experience of what it’s like day-to-day at CERN by showing the ups and downs of working at the frontier of modern science. For the participants, it was an excellent opport...

  15. Psychiatric Assessment and Follow-up of Young People after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    often are suspicious of services and as a result do not open up to talk about their .... the young people following discharge and liaise with the local. CAMHS team .... dynamics, coping vulnerabilities, life-time psychopathology, cognitions, and ...

  16. CHINA'S LARGEST OIL & GAS MIXED-TRANSMISSION PROJECT PUT INTO OPERATION IN KAZAKSTAN SUCCESSFULLY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The largest oil & gas mixed-transmission project in China's petroleum industry had been put into operation in Kazakstan successfully, which indicates that CNPC has entered the leading list in oil & gas mixed-transmission technology in the world.

  17. Putting the Nation on a Path for Climate Resilience and Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putting current data in a historical context, NOAA publishes the monthly State of the Climate Report that includes analyses of the Nation's recent climate conditions, their unusualness, and their rank within long‐term trends.

  18. IMPROVING THE STUDENTS’ EFL WRITING ABILITY THROUGH “PUT YOURSELF IN THE PICTURE” STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Lukman Syafii

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This Action research was intended to improve the students’ EFL writing ability through “Put Yourself in the Picture” strategy. This research involved 33 first year managemen major of students A of Muhammadiyah University of Ponorogo in the academic year 2015/2016. This research was conducted in two cycles by following the procedures of the action research, namely, planning, implementing, observing, and reflecting. Each cycle of the research encompassed three meetings. The data of the research were gathered through observation checklists, field notes, questionnaire, and portfolio. The findings of research showed that “Put Yourself in the Picture” strategy has proven effectively to improve the student’ writing ability. The improvement could be seen from the increase of the students’ average writing score. Besides, “Put Yourself in the Picture” strategy can increase the students’ participation during the process of writing. Key words: “Put Yourself in the Picture” strategy, writing ability

  19. YANGPU WORLD PETROLEUM BARTER TRADE CENTER PUT INTO OPERATION IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wenge

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recently, the first petroleum barter trade market in the world has been put into operation in success, which becomes to the third petroleum trade mode in parallel with petroleum future trade and spot trade.

  20. Policing Transgender People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Miles-Johnson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Police policy documents often articulate strategies and approaches that police organizations want to implement in their efforts to break down barriers with minority groups. However, most police policy documents are written for police audiences and not for members of the public. Police policy documents serve as a reflection of the aspirations of the agency and not necessarily the practice of the officers. Differential policing has been a salient experience for members of transgender communities because, as individuals who express gender in ways that deviate from the norm, they have experienced numerous documented cases of police mismanaged practice. In Australia, achieving police reform in the area of policing of diverse community groups has been difficult as new initiatives implemented to educate police officers about diverse groups such as transgender communities are scarce. My study sought to analyze a police policy document to assess how one police agency’s policy aspires to shape police contact/experiences with transgender people and how this document might shape intergroup identity differences between transgender people and the police. It is argued that the policy document will negatively affect police perceptions of transgender people and may enhance adverse perceptions of intergroup difference between police and transgender people. I also argue that using this document to achieve police reform in the area of policing of transgender people will be problematic as the policy document lacks substantial procedural guidelines regarding interaction with transgender people and may not favorably constrain discretionary police power.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF POST ACTIVATION POTENTIATION ON SHOT PUT PERFORMANCE OF COLLEGIATE THROWERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Lawrence W; Bellar, David; Craig, Bruce; Gilreath, Erin; Cappos, Scott; Thrasher, Ashley

    2013-08-12

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the acute effects of heavy and light implements on subsequent overhead back (OHB) shot put performance with a competition weight shot put. The present investigation was designed test the efficacy of heavy implements for potentiating subsequent OHB performance. Participants included 41 athletes (20.9±1.18yrs.) from two NCAA Division I schools in the Midwestern United States (n=23 male, n=18 female). Mean distance for OHB throw with a competition shot put was examined post treatment (control, light shot put warm up, heavy shot put warm up) via Repeated Measures ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni corrected post hoc analysis. Responses post-treatment on the 10 cm Visual Analogue Fatigue Scale (VAS) were examined via repeated measures ANOVA and demonstrated a significant main effect for treatment on VAS fatigue (F=16.463, p=0.001). The heavy shot put warm-up resulted in the greatest mean performance over the course of the three attempts (14.39m±1.82) followed by the light shot put warm up (14.18m±1.68) and the control (14.15m±1.70). Results of the repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated a significant main effect for treatment in regard to average distance (F=6.276, p=0.003). Post hoc testing suggested that the heavy shot put warm-up resulted in significantly better mean OHB performance than either the light shot put warm-up (t=2.983, p=0.0048, ES=0.472, Power=0.901) or the control shot put warm-up (t=3.349, p=0.0018, ES=0.513, Power= 0.939). Subsequent analysis examined the relationship between reported fatigue accrued during the overweight shot put warm-up and the change in performance on the OHB throw when compared to the control condition. Analysis revealed that subjects who reported higher levels of VAS fatigue did not perform as well after the overweight treatment (p=0.0274).

  2. Influence of Postactivation Potentiation on Shot Put Performance of Collegiate Throwers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Lawrence W; Bellar, David M; Craig, Bruce W; Gilreath, Erin L; Cappos, Scott A; Thrasher, Ashley B

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the acute effects of heavy and light implements on subsequent overhead back (OHB) shot put performance with a competition weight shot put. This investigation was designed to test the efficacy of heavy implements for potentiating subsequent OHB performance. Participants included 41 athletes (20.9 ± 1.18 years.) from 2 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I schools in the Midwestern United States (n = 23 male and n = 18 female). Mean distance for OHB throw with a competition shot put was examined after treatment (control, light shot put warm-up, and heavy shot put warm-up) through repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc Bonferroni-corrected post hoc analysis. Responses after treatment on the 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) fatigue were examined through repeated-measures ANOVA and demonstrated a significant main effect for treatment on VAS fatigue (F = 16.463; p = 0.001). The heavy shot put warm-up resulted in the greatest mean performance over the course of the 3 attempts (14.39 ± 1.82 m) followed by the light shot put warm-up (14.18 ± 1.68 m) and the control (14.15 ± 1.70 m). Results of the repeated-measures ANOVA demonstrated a significant main effect for treatment in regard to average distance (F = 6.276; p = 0.003). Post hoc testing suggested that the heavy shot put warm-up resulted in significantly better mean OHB performance than either the light shot put warm-up (t = 2.983; p = 0.0048; ES = 0.472; power = 0.901) or the control shot put warm-up (t = 3.349; p = 0.0018; effect size [ES] = 0.513; power = 0.939). Subsequent analysis examined the relationship between reported fatigue accrued during the overweight shot put warm-up and the change in performance on the OHB throw when compared to the control condition. Analysis revealed that subjects who reported higher levels of VAS fatigue did not perform as well after the overweight treatment (p = 0.0274).

  3. World-class PTA Project of BP Put into Production in Zhuhai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ The first-phase project of Zhuhai BP Chemical Co Ltd - the 350,000-ton PTA production facility - was put into production on September 9 in Zhuhai,Guangdong Province. The letter of intent for this project was signed in 1989, but construction did not start until October 2000. The first phase project,which draws an investment of US$360million, was completed and put into commissioning in January this year.

  4. Young People's and Parent's Perceptions of Managed Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Christopher; Hallam, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The current research aimed to increase understanding of the experiences of young people and their parents of managed moves, what contributed to success and the nature of the challenges experienced. The study was conducted in one English Local Authority, where five young people and their parents were interviewed. Five superordinate themes emerged…

  5. Local Helioseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizon Laurent

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the current status of local helioseismology, covering both theoretical and observational results. After a brief introduction to solar oscillations and wave propagation through inhomogeneous media, we describe the main techniques of local helioseismology: Fourier-Hankel decomposition, ring-diagram analysis, time-distance helioseismology, helioseismic holography, and direct modeling. We discuss local helioseismology of large-scale flows, the solar-cycle dependence of these flows, perturbations associated with regions of magnetic activity, and solar supergranulation.

  6. Possible involvement of put A gene in Helicobacter pylori colonization in the stomach and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Inatsu, Sakiko; Mizote, Tomoko; Nagata, Yoko; Aoyama, Kazue; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Nagata, Kumiko

    2008-02-01

    H. pylori is a gram-negative bacterium associated with gastric inflammation and peptic ulcer and considered a risk factor for gastric cancer in its natural habitat. However, the energy metabolism of H. pylori in the stomach remains to be clarified. H. pylori shows rather high respiratory activity with L-proline and significantly large amounts of L-proline are present in the gastric juice from H. pylori infected patients. We constructed a disrupted mutant of the put A gene, which encodes the proline utilization A (Put A) flavin-linked enzyme, in order to examine the role of put A in the gastric colonization of H. pylori. The put A disrupted mutant, DeltaputA, was constructed by inserting a chloramphenicol resistant gene into put A. DeltaputA did not show respiratory activity using L-proline and could not incorporate L-proline into cells. DeltaputA also did not show motility in response to amino acids and did not display the swarming activity observed with the wild-type. DeltaputA had lost its ability to colonize the stomach of nude mice, an ability possessed by the wild-type. These findings indicate that put A may play an important role in H. pylori colonization on the gastric mucus layer.

  7. 8 HABITS OF INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Travis Bradberry

    2017-01-01

    .... It's a labour of love that influential people pursue behind the scenes, every single day. And while what people are influenced by changes with the season, the unique habits of influential people remain constant...

  8. Local food:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundbo, Donna Isabella Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been more focus on food in general and local food in particular. But what is local food? And what are the perceptions of this concept according to theory and to providers and consumers of local food? This article first summarises and compares three different theoretical...... as expressed by a group of Danish providers and consumers is empirically investigated through interviews, observation and surveys. From this, qualitative and quantitative data are generated, the analysis of which shows how varied perceptions of local food are. The elements of which the perceptions consist...... are identified and then categorised according to whether they pertain to the food product itself or the production methods and facilities and whether they describe physical or social properties of local food. From this a model with four categories is developed. It is found that properties of the product are more...

  9. FINANCING OF LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT AND IMPORTANCE OF E-GOVERNMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF EFFECTIVE TAXATION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    STEVANOVIĆ Mirjana; MARKOVIĆ Marija; VUJIČIĆ Slađana

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to put an emphasis on learning property tax and local municipal taxes as an important source of financing the local self-government in Serbia with reference to the European Charter, as well...

  10. Desempleo y justicia local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elster, Jon

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Jon Elster presents a set of criteria of local justice that regulate dismissals. In situations where work is limited and companies adopt means of employment redundancy, the decision of dismissing certain workers —when this one tries not to be arbitrary— can be based on local criteria of fairness like merit, efficiency, age or other analysed in this work. So, after defining the concept of local justice and presenting some examples, the paper focuses on the importance of the work to organize and structure the life of people. Unemployment has serious consequences for the persons who suffer it and the author advises that it is necessary to subordinate dismissals to criteria of local justice.

    En este artículo se presentan una serie de criterios de justicia local para regular los despidos. En situaciones en las que el trabajo es escaso y las empresas adoptan medidas de regulación de empleo, la decisión de despedir a unos trabajadores o a otros se puede basar, cuando se intenta que no sea arbitraria, en criterios locales de equidad como el mérito, la eficacia, la edad u otros que se analizan en este trabajo. Así, tras definir el concepto de justicia local y presentar algunos ejemplos, el artículo se centra en la importancia del trabajo para organizar y estructurar la vida de la gente. Las graves consecuencias que tiene, por ello, el desempleo para quien lo sufre, aconseja que los despidos se sometan a criterios de justicia local.

  11. Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The LEPC data set contains over 3000 listings, as of 2008, for name and location data identifying Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs). LEPCs are people...

  12. Measurements of weak localization of graphene in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvall, N.; Shivayogimath, Abhay; Yurgens, A.

    2015-01-01

    Weak localization in graphene is studied in inhomogeneous magnetic fields. To generate the inhomogeneous field, a thin film of type-II superconducting niobium is put in close proximity to graphene. A deviation from the ordinary quadratic weak localization behavior is observed at low fields. We...

  13. Why Don't People Evacuate When Nature Threatens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K. J.; Broad, K.; Meyer, R.; Orlove, B. S.

    2011-12-01

    Why do so many Southern Californians fail to evacuate when warned that winter storms have critically raised the risk of a debris flow in their neighborhoods? Have they perhaps not seen or heeded news coverage of past debris flow events? Are they unaware that recent fires made the hillsides above them more prone to gravity-driven processes? Do they think they can wait to start their cars until they can actually see the flow coming? Or have they merely experienced too many "false alarms" in past years, and no longer put much stock in the judgment of public officials or the ability of scientists to judge debris flow risk? In preparation for a simulation study that will place decision makers in a virtual house in the California foothills during a winter storm event, we explore the reasons that people do and do not evacuate in the face of potential debris flows. Working in collaboration with the USGS Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project for Southern California, we are surveying hundreds of local residents, from debris-flow prone areas and from elsewhere in the state, to establish their baseline knowledge (and misconceptions) about, attitudes toward, information use regarding, and experience with debris flows. Initial interviews with residents of recently hit neighborhoods give qualitative data suggesting that false-alarm effects and underestimation of risk are driving factors; these surveys will provide quantitative evidence to extend those findings. We will discuss the results of this survey in the context of a comprehensive body of psychology research that seeks to explain why people frequently appear to ignore or discount hazard warnings: neglecting to insure their homes and crops (Kunreuther, 1984), failing to evacuate in the face of storms and fires (Baker, 1991; Packham, 1995), and (barring a recent, vivid event) showing little support for measures that would manage or mitigate future hazards (Kunreuther, 2006a, 2006b; Weber, 2006). We will also consider the

  14. 78 FR 53677 - Safety Zone; Battle of Lake Erie Fireworks, Lake Erie, Put-In-Bay, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ..., Put-In- Bay, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing temporary safety zone in the waters of Lake Erie, Put-In-Bay, Ohio. This zone is intended to... the launching of fireworks in the vicinity of Put-In-Bay, OH on September 1, 2013. The Captain of...

  15. 78 FR 53675 - Safety Zone; Lake Erie Heritage Foundation, Battle of Lake Erie Reenactment; Lake Erie, Put-in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Lake Erie Reenactment; Lake Erie, Put-in-Bay, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... vicinity of Put-In-Bay, OH. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Erie during Battle of Lake Erie Reenactment near Put-In-Bay. This temporary safety zone is necessary...

  16. Random Versus Blocked Practice to Enhance Mental Representation in Golf Putting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Davoud; Taheri, HamidReza; Saberi Kakhki, Alireza

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in mental representation from either random or blocked practice when engaged in golf putting. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to random practice, blocked practice, and no-practice groups. First, we measured novice golfers' initial mental representation levels and required them to perform 18 putting trials as a pre-test. We then asked random and blocked groups to practice in accordance with their group assignment for six consecutive days (10 blocks each day, 18 trials each). A week after the last practice session, we re-measured all participants' final mental representation levels and required them to perform 18 putting trials to evaluate learning retention through practice. While those engaged in the random practice method putted more poorly during acquisition (i.e., practice) than those in blocked practice, the random practice group experienced more accurate retention during the final putting trials, and they showed a more structured mental representation than those in blocked practice, one that was more similar to that of skilled golfers. These results support the acquisition of a rich mental representation through random versus blocked practice.

  17. Towards a Viable Local Government Structure in Nigeria:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.P._Ezekiel & D.O_Oriakhogba

    local government structure under the Nigerian constitutional framework with a .... socialization and participation of the people of the locality in the governance of ... 22 R. M. Bird, and E. Slack, Urban Finance in Canada, John Wiley and Sons, ...

  18. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps, to...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  19. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps, to...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  20. People's Theatre in Amerika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Karen Malpede

    A history of the people's theatre movement in this country from the early 1920s to the early 1970s, this book deals with the structural and thematic connections between the radical theatre of the twenties and thirties and current work of such revolutionary theatres as the Living Theatre, Open Theatre, Bread and Puppet Theatre, El Teatro Campesino,…

  1. Serving the People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The civil service is still popular but not as much as it once was chinese people in recent years have shown an increased interest in finding a "red-collar job," a widespread Internet term nowadays meaning a public service job.

  2. HIV among Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Transgender People Format: Select One PDF [227K] ...

  3. PEOPLE/POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Honored Artist Tan Jing, China’s well-known singer, was honored as one of the 2011 China Cultural figures, a prize jointly conferred by the Chinese Culture Promotion Society and Phoenix TV in Hong Kong. Set up in 2009, the title is for honoring outstanding people in preserving

  4. People's Theatre in Amerika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Karen Malpede

    A history of the people's theatre movement in this country from the early 1920s to the early 1970s, this book deals with the structural and thematic connections between the radical theatre of the twenties and thirties and current work of such revolutionary theatres as the Living Theatre, Open Theatre, Bread and Puppet Theatre, El Teatro Campesino,…

  5. Drugs and Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fully developed. As a result, the brains of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs include Amphetamines Anabolic ... better to prevent drug abuse in the first place. NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

  6. Serving the People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chinese people in recent years have shown an increased ,interest in finding a "red-collar job, a widespread Internet term nowadays meaning a public service job. Official figures show the number of applicants for the national civil servant examination, which selects candidates for government departments, has surged from 87,000 in 2003 to 1.44 million in 2009.

  7. The peopling of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The peopling of Greenland has a complex history shaped by population migrations, isolation and genetic drift. The Greenlanders present a genetic heritage with components of European and Inuit groups; previous studies using uniparentally inherited markers in Greenlanders have reported evidence of ...

  8. Local Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Schlenker

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic approach posits that a presupposition must be satisfied in its local context. But how is a local context derived from the global one? Extant dynamic analyses must specify in the lexical entry of any operator what its 'Context Change Potential' is, and for this very reason they fail to be sufficiently explanatory. To circumvent the problem, we revise two assumptions of the dynamic approach: we take the update process to be derivative from a classical, non-dynamic semantics -- which obviates the need for dynamic lexical entries; and we deny that a local context encodes what the speech act participants 'take for granted.' Instead, we take the local context of an expression E in a sentence S to be the smallest domain that one may restrict attention to when assessing E without jeopardizing the truth conditions of S. To match the results of dynamic semantics, local contexts must be computed incrementally, using only information about the expressions that precede E. This version of the theory can be shown to be nearly equivalent to the dynamic theory of Heim 1983 -- but unlike the latter, it is entirely predictive. We also suggest that local contexts can, at some cost, be computed symmetrically, taking into account information about all of S (except E; this leads to gradient predictions, whose assessment is left for future research. doi:10.3765/sp.2.3 BibTeX info

  9. Challenges faced by visually disabled people in use of medicines, self-adopted coping strategies and medicine-related mishaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeraratne, Chamari L; Opatha, Sharmika T; Rosa, Chamith T

    2012-01-01

    Difficulties faced by visually disabled people when using medicines, self-adopted coping strategies, and medicine-related mishaps have been under-explored locally and internationally. The objective of this study was to gain insight regarding this long-neglected issue. A descriptive cross-sectional study, using an interviewer administered questionnaire on 63 visually disabled adults was carried out at a vocational training centre and a school for visually disabled students in Sri Lanka. Among 63 participants, 71% wanted to be independent in medicine use and 79% in spite of difficulties had self-administered medicines. They had difficulty in locating medicines (25.39%), identifying medicines and medicine containers (17.46%), and administering liquid medications (25.39%). These difficulties led to inaccurate dosing (14.28%), missed doses (39.68%), and discontinuation of treatment prematurely (28.57%). Self-adopted coping strategies to overcome these difficulties included using different sized and shaped containers, tying medicines to the attire, and dipping their finger into a measuring cup while measuring liquid medicines. Mishaps related to medicines such as taking vinegar instead of gripe mixture and, putting ear drops into eyes were disclosed. There were many challenges for visually disabled people in taking medicines and some self-adopted coping strategies were inadequate to overcome these.

  10. The role of community conversations in facilitating local HIV competence: case study from rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine; Nhamo, Mercy; Scott, Kerry; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Skovdal, Morten; Gregson, Simon

    2013-04-17

    This paper examines the potential for community conversations to strengthen positive responses to HIV in resource-poor environments. Community conversations are an intervention method through which local people work with a facilitator to collectively identify local strengths and challenges and brainstorm potential strategies for solving local problems. We conducted 18 community conversations (with six groups at three points in time) with a total of 77 participants in rural Zimbabwe (20% HIV positive). Participants were invited to reflect on how they were responding to the challenges of HIV, both as individuals and in community groups, and to think of ways to better support openness about HIV, kindness towards people living with HIV and greater community uptake of HIV prevention and treatment. Community conversations contributed to local HIV competence through (1) enabling participants to brainstorm concrete action plans for responding to HIV, (2) providing a forum to develop a sense of common purpose in relation to implementing these, (3) encouraging and challenging participants to overcome fear, denial and passivity, (4) providing an opportunity for participants to move from seeing themselves as passive recipients of information to active problem solvers, and (5) reducing silence and stigma surrounding HIV. Our discussion cautions that community conversations, while holding great potential to help communities recognize their potential strengths and capacities for responding more effectively to HIV, are not a magic bullet. Poverty, poor harvests and political instability frustrated and limited many participants' efforts to put their plans into action. On the other hand, support from outside the community, in this case the increasing availability of antiretroviral treatment, played a vital role in enabling communities to challenge stigma and envision new, more positive, ways of responding to the epidemic.

  11. Monsters are people too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J; Foulsham, T; Kingstone, A

    2013-02-23

    Animals, including dogs, dolphins, monkeys and man, follow gaze. What mediates this bias towards the eyes? One hypothesis is that primates possess a distinct neural module that is uniquely tuned for the eyes of others. An alternative explanation is that configural face processing drives fixations to the middle of peoples' faces, which is where the eyes happen to be located. We distinguish between these two accounts. Observers were presented with images of people, non-human creatures with eyes in the middle of their faces (`humanoids') or creatures with eyes positioned elsewhere (`monsters'). There was a profound and significant bias towards looking early and often at the eyes of humans and humanoids and also, critically, at the eyes of monsters. These findings demonstrate that the eyes, and not the middle of the head, are being targeted by the oculomotor system.

  12. Localized shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Daniel A; Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, $W_{x_{n}}(t_{n}) ... W_{x_1}(t_1)$, where $W_x(t) = e^{-iHt} W_x e^{iHt}$. Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in $t$. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  13. Art for the People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Low-price performance tickets a big hit with Beijing’s budget conscious concert goers It was eight o’clock on the morning of January 1,one and a half hours be- fore standing tickets for the National Grand Theater were to go on sale for that night’s New Year Concert and al- ready a crowd of more than 500 people milled around outside the venue’s ticket office. Despite the sub-zero temperatures

  14. Technology for helping people

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    The first THE Port hackathon problem-solving workshop was held at CERN from 31 October to 2 November in the framework of the 60th anniversary celebrations. The aim of the event was to develop technological projects that can help to solve the day-to-day needs of people living in areas of the planet that experience conflicts or natural disasters.   Collage of shots from THE Port hackathon. Credit: THE Port association The event was dedicated to humanitarian and social topics inspired by members of non-governmental organisations‬. “There is plenty of room for technology to help in humanitarian fields. That’s why we came up with the idea of bringing people together to work on these topics,” explains Ines Knäpper, Project Manager of THE Port hackathon. “We started six months ago setting up THE Port association.* The success of the event was only possible because of the joint effort of a team of roughly twenty people. They were inspired by the aim...

  15. Do People "Pop Out"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Katja M; Vuong, Quoc C; Thornton, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    The human body is a highly familiar and socially very important object. Does this mean that the human body has a special status with respect to visual attention? In the current paper we tested whether people in natural scenes attract attention and "pop out" or, alternatively, are at least searched for more efficiently than targets of another category (machines). Observers in our study searched a visual array for dynamic or static scenes containing humans amidst scenes containing machines and vice versa. The arrays consisted of 2, 4, 6 or 8 scenes arranged in a circular array, with targets being present or absent. Search times increased with set size for dynamic and static human and machine targets, arguing against pop out. However, search for human targets was more efficient than for machine targets as indicated by shallower search slopes for human targets. Eye tracking further revealed that observers made more first fixations to human than to machine targets and that their on-target fixation durations were shorter for human compared to machine targets. In summary, our results suggest that searching for people in natural scenes is more efficient than searching for other categories even though people do not pop out.

  16. Do People "Pop Out"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M Mayer

    Full Text Available The human body is a highly familiar and socially very important object. Does this mean that the human body has a special status with respect to visual attention? In the current paper we tested whether people in natural scenes attract attention and "pop out" or, alternatively, are at least searched for more efficiently than targets of another category (machines. Observers in our study searched a visual array for dynamic or static scenes containing humans amidst scenes containing machines and vice versa. The arrays consisted of 2, 4, 6 or 8 scenes arranged in a circular array, with targets being present or absent. Search times increased with set size for dynamic and static human and machine targets, arguing against pop out. However, search for human targets was more efficient than for machine targets as indicated by shallower search slopes for human targets. Eye tracking further revealed that observers made more first fixations to human than to machine targets and that their on-target fixation durations were shorter for human compared to machine targets. In summary, our results suggest that searching for people in natural scenes is more efficient than searching for other categories even though people do not pop out.

  17. Assessing Knowledge and Perceptions Related to Preventive Methods and Treatment of Malaria in the Local Endemic Area of Trujillo, Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campodonico, Joanna; Sevilla-Martir, Javier; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo; Kochhar, Komal

    2015-01-01

    Malaria in Honduras is endemic and accounts for 40% of the total cases in Central America. Our goal was to assess knowledge of preventive methods and current treatment of malaria among the affected community of Trujillo, Honduras. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 71 individuals. Most respondents had a good understanding about common malaria symptoms but not about the complications associated with severe cases. More important, we found that less than 20% of the respondents recognized indoor residual sprays and insecticide-treated nets as effective preventive measures, which are the most efficient preventive methods. Our study highlights the perceptions the people of Trujillo have about malaria. From our observations, we put forward recommendations to implement a comprehensive campaign to educate the Trujillo population about malaria preventive methods and to recruit local and international efforts to distribute insecticide-treated nets.

  18. "Putting My Man Face on": A Grounded Theory of College Men's Gender Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Keith E.; Jones, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    The theory that emerged from this constructivist grounded theory study of 10 college men's experiences depicts their gender identity as developed through constant interaction with society's expectations of them as men. In order to try to meet these perceived expectations, participants described putting on a performance that was like wearing a mask…

  19. Hankook Tire Puts into Production in Chongqing Liangjiang New Area in September

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Ning

    2012-01-01

    The third factory of Hankook will be put into operation in Yufu Industrial Park, Liangjiang New Area, Chongqing early next month. With total investment of USD 950 million, the factory will produce 11.5 million units of tires annually upon total completion of the construction.

  20. Pricing Perpetual American Put Option in theMixed Fractional Brownian Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Under the assumption of the underlying asset is driven by the mixed fractional Brownian motion, we obtain the mixed fractionalBlack-Scholes partial differential equation by fractional Ito formula, and the pricing formula of perpetual American put option bythis partial differential equation theory.

  1. Putting Organizational Unlearning into Practice: A Few Steps for the Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This summary piece aims to provide a clear connection for leaders, managers or even individuals as they endeavor to put organizational unlearning into practice inside their organization. The author attempts to simplify the details from the diverse articles within this issue only with the aim of helping build an easier method for practical…

  2. Don't Get Rode Hard and Put Away Wet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Back in the old days, some folks reckoned an equine was just a disposable tool to get their jobs done. They might ride a horse hard, so it was sweaty, panting, and broken down. When done they would throw it out to pasture without proper grooming. This is probably the origin of the expression to "get rode hard and put away wet." As…

  3. Guangxi Shanglin Aluminum Plant cross-regional technical upgrade project(phase 1)put into operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>The project(Phase 1)of cross-regional techni- cal upgrade of the aluminum plant of Guangxi Shanglin Nannan Industrial Co.was completed and put into operation on June 8,2007.The plant is a cross-regional technical upgrade pro- ject of Nanning Aluminum Plant,featuring the integration of coal,electricity and aluminum.

  4. Muscle activation sequencing of leg muscles during linear glide shot putting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Róisín M; Conway, Richard; Harrison, Andrew J

    2017-11-01

    In the shot put, the athlete's muscles are responsible for generating the impulses to move the athlete and project the shot into the air. Information on phasic muscle activity is lacking for the glide shot put event and therefore important technical information for coaches is not currently available. This study provides an electromyography (EMG) analysis of the muscle activity of the legs during shot put. Fifteen right-handed Irish national level shot putters performed six maximum effort throws using the glide shot put technique. EMG records of eight bilateral lower limb muscles (rectus femoris, biceps femoris, medial- and lateral-gastrocnemius) were obtained during trials. Analysis using smooth EMG linear envelopes revealed patterns of muscle activity across the phases of the throw and compare men and women performers. The results showed that the preferred leg rectus femoris, the preferred leg biceps femoris and the non-preferred leg biceps femoris play important roles in the glide technique, with the total duration of high volumes of activity between 34 and 53% of the throw cycle. A comprehensive understanding of movement and muscle activation patterns for coaches could be helpful to facilitate optimal technique throughout each of the key phases of the event.

  5. Access to data and material for research: Putting empirical evidence into perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, V.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to put into critical perspective the empirical findings on secrecy and withholding in research. In other words, by taking existing empirical literature into account, it is intended that a crucial question is answered: Is secrecy and withholding in research harmful or innoc

  6. Don't Put Off Weight-Loss Surgery Till You're Heavier

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_167433.html Don't Put Off Weight-Loss Surgery Till You're Heavier Best results seen ... 2017 WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Having weight-loss surgery before you become severely obese tends to ...

  7. The Culture Paper Projects in Yueyang Paper all Put into Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ The first production line, PM10 of the 400,000 tons culture paper project in Yueyang Paper Co., Ltd. successfully started up on August 18,2009, and the second line, PM9, successfully started up on October 13, 2009. Therefore, both paper lines of this project have started up and been put into production successfully.

  8. For Kids, Regular Exercise Seems to Put Depression on the Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163445.html For Kids, Regular Exercise Seems to Put Depression on the Run Finding could be significant because ... said. The study didn't prove that regular exercise caused depression risk to drop. The study is published in ...

  9. Lurking on the Internet: A Small-Group Assignment that Puts a Human Face on Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Joseph; Judge, Abigail M.; Wiss, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Lurking on the Internet aims to put a human face on psychopathology for the abnormal psychology course. Student groups are assigned major diagnostic categories and instructed to search the Internet for discussion forums, individual blogs, or YouTube videos where affected individuals discuss their symptoms and lives. After discussing the ethics of…

  10. Putting It All Together: Guiding Principles for Quality After-School Programs Serving Preteens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Rachel A.; Goldsmith, Julie; Arbreton, Amy J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Successfully navigating early adolescence depends, in large part, on the availability of safe and engaging activities and supportive relationships with adults, yet many preteens have limited access to positive supports and opportunities such as high-quality after-school programs that could put them on a path to success. Funders, policymakers and…

  11. Putting Text Complexity in Context: Refocusing on Comprehension of Complex Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Sheila W.; Wixson, Karen K.; Pearson, P. David

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts have prompted enormous attention to issues of text complexity. The purpose of this article is to put text complexity in perspective by moving from a primary focus on the text itself to a focus on the comprehension of complex text. We argue that a focus on comprehension is at the heart of…

  12. Health promotion in sexual health 2: how to put theory into practice and empower clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jayne

    This is the second in a two-part unit on health promotion in sexual health. Part 1 outlined various theories and models on the issue. This part examines the factors that contribute towards successful health promotion, such as an effective communication style. It outlines how nurses can put health-promotion theory, competencies and guidance into practice.

  13. Foliar fertilization–induced injury and recovery of a creeping bentgrass putting green

    Science.gov (United States)

    The experimental objective was to evaluate early-response of putting green (PG) canopy quality parameters and rates of growth and nutrient use to rate and/or type of foliarly-applied nitrogen (N) fertilizer. In 2010, two independent fertility trials were conducted on a sand-based creeping bentgrass ...

  14. Don't Get Rode Hard and Put Away Wet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Back in the old days, some folks reckoned an equine was just a disposable tool to get their jobs done. They might ride a horse hard, so it was sweaty, panting, and broken down. When done they would throw it out to pasture without proper grooming. This is probably the origin of the expression to "get rode hard and put away wet." As…

  15. Scientists May Have Put Their Names on Papers Written by Drug Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how academic scientists appear to have put their names on papers that are actually ghostwritten by for-profit companies and then published in medical journals. Some of the scientists accused of doing so deny any wrongdoing, but journal editors are already outlining measures to prevent future breaches of academic integrity.…

  16. Putting Organizational Unlearning into Practice: A Few Steps for the Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This summary piece aims to provide a clear connection for leaders, managers or even individuals as they endeavor to put organizational unlearning into practice inside their organization. The author attempts to simplify the details from the diverse articles within this issue only with the aim of helping build an easier method for practical…

  17. Local language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monique Turkenburg

    2002-01-01

    Original title: Taal lokaal. Children of immigrants living in the Netherlands have for years had the opportunity to receive lessons in their mother tongue at primary school. Since 1998 this has been referred to as minority language teaching (OALT in Dutch), and has been the responsibility of local

  18. How do people live in the Anthropocene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Libby

    2016-04-01

    While geologists have focused their efforts on which changes in the strata might constitute a functional shift out of the present epoch, environmental humanities scholars, museums and creative artists have taken up the Anthropocene as a concept raising new moral and practical dilemmas. A central concern is with how people adapt and live creatively in a world that is functioning beyond the physical planetary boundaries defined by the Holocene. This paper will provide an overview of the lively scholarly and popular debates on the question of what it means, ethically, to be human in an Age of Humans. Major questions include the question of who are 'we' in the Anthropocene, and how the conditions of the putative new epoch will affect 'more-than-human-others'. Creative and justice activist responses to the Anthropocene typically distinguish among humans, focusing not on the causes, but rather on concerns of the people on the receiving end of global change (for example, the Small Islands Developing States (SIDS) group of 39+8). Some are concerned about the collateral effects of technological 'fixes' for energy transformations and climate, and others about economic shifts and market-based incentives. As a historian of ideas, I explore the multiple paths by which people have come to the Anthropocene concept, and the uses to which it has already been put, even before a final decision is made on its formal status. The Anthropocene already arouses anxiety about 'the future'. One big idea that is shared across activists and scholars (and not just those in the humanities) is the question of enabling hopeful responses. A diversity of creative projects for living in the Anthropocene, which can contribute to coping with the stress of accelerating global change, is essential to this.

  19. Globalisation And Local Indigenous Education In Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Leanne

    2004-11-01

    Globalisation is often viewed as a threat to cultural and linguistic diversity and therefore is a central concern of educational practices and policy. The present study challenges this common view by demonstrating that local communities can use global means to support and enhance their specific practices and policies. An historical exploration of education policy in Mexico reveals that there has been a continuing struggle by indigenous peoples to maintain locally relevant modes of teaching. Indigenous peoples have increasingly used technology to maintain their languages and local cultural practices. Such accentuation of the local in a global context is exemplified by the people of Chiapas: They live in subsistence-type communities, yet their recent education movements and appeals to international solidarity (such as in the Zapatista rebellion) have employed computer-aided technologies.

  20. SMEs Development Strategy for Competitive and Sustainable Typical Local Snacks of Banten Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawarni Hasibuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs for snacks in Indonesia currently has a good growth rate on one hand; but on the other hand, its level of competition is also quite high.  Growth in sales volume of the Indonesian snack industry, both in modern and traditional markets in 2012, was recorded at 10-15 percent far beyond the growth of other manufacturing industries.  However, the level of competition in the snack industry is also relatively high. Business people in the snacks sector do not only compete with fellow local business people but also with imported products, both legal and illegal.  Currently, Banten Province is indeed not known as a culinary destination with a variety of distinctively local foods. The growth  of the food industry in Banten Province is not as rapid as other manufacturing industries. However, in Banten, some types of food produced in small and medium scales (SMEs are also known.  Therefore, efforts to develop and empower typical local snack SMEs in Banten Province needs to be conducted to be able to increase its competitiveness in facing the globalization era and the ASEAN free market in 2015.  The purpose of this reseach is to map the performance profile of Banten typical local snack SMEs and to provide recommendation on SME development strategies for competitive and sustainable Banten typical local snacks.  The research method used combines the descriptive research method, IPA (Importance Performance Analysis, and SWOT analysis.  The performance level measurement for Banten typical local snack SMEs is based on stakeholder perceptions on the condition of the existing 16 attributes compared to the perception on the development expectation of each of these attributes.  Results of SWOT matrix mapping puts  the products of Banten typical local snack SMEs in quadran II.  The strategy prioritized is the quality attribute maintenance strategy for superior products, as well as product diversification to expand market share

  1. People and Places. Teacher's Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Priscilla H., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews teachers' resources related to people and places. Most of these focus on the identification of geographic locations and historical biographies of famous individuals or groups of people. Includes discussions of reference works, audio cassettes, activity kits, and fiction. (MJP)

  2. Local Linearizability

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Andreas; Henzinger, Thomas A.; Holzer, Andreas; Kirsch, Christoph M.; Lippautz, Michael; Payer, Hannes; Sezgin, Ali; Sokolova, Ana; Veith, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The semantics of concurrent data structures is usually given by a sequential specification and a consistency condition. Linearizability is the most popular consistency condition due to its simplicity and general applicability. Nevertheless, for applications that do not require all guarantees offered by linearizability, recent research has focused on improving performance and scalability of concurrent data structures by relaxing their semantics. In this paper, we present local linearizability,...

  3. PEOPLE/POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Olympic Chief Backs China Jacques Rogge,President of the International Olympic Committee (IOC),has found the recipe for successful engagement with China."You don’t obtain anything in China with a loud voice,"Rogge told British newspaper Financial Times on April 26,and said "respectful,quiet but firm" dis- cussion was the way to get things done.According to the IOC chief,a big mistake of people in the West is that they want to impose their views on others. Rogge called on the West,which he said had only

  4. Charles Dickens' old people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, D C; Charles, L A

    Charles Dickens, rare among authors of any period, presented a host of elderly and old characters in his novels and stories. More than 120 such characters were identified, distributed among four levels of involvement (protagonist to minor role) and six categories of behavior (warm and sympathetic to villainous and threatening). The two-thirds male, one-third female characters tended to be concentrated at the minor, rather than major, levels of involvement in plots, but they represented a great range of behavior. Dickens' old people were fully engaged in life and society and were not age-stereotyped.

  5. 修正的局部稳定性因子%MODIFIED LOCAL STABILITY FACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the past,stability evaluation of engineering rockmass is often based on the distribution of stress and deformation in engineering rockmass. Some scholars have put forward the concept of local stability factor of rockmass and its calculating method. But its condition is too harsh. The concept of is put forward and its formula is deduced based on the rockmass mechanics principle and strength criteria. The modified local stability factor has been used to evaluate the stability of surrounding rockmass of tunnel.

  6. Smart Home and Erderly People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrej Strašifták; Dušan Mudrončík; Michal Eliáš

    2013-01-01

    ... benefits..The use of Smart Homes to support independent living refers here to the possibility of designing an intelligent monitoring system that can detect when an undesirable situation may be developing (e.g., hazard, security threat, etc). Although all people can be involved in such undesirable situations, elderly people and people with health p...

  7. Mobilizing and Managing Social Capital: On Roles and Responsibilities of Local Facilitators in Territorial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Markus; Kirchengast, Christoph; Petit, Sandrine; Magnani, Natalia; Mieville-Ott, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the difficulties and challenges in mobilizing and managing social capital in concrete local and territorial directed rural development project activities. The main focus is put on the roles of local facilitators working with farmers and other local stakeholders during project implementation. The EU 5th framework project IMALP…

  8. 41 CFR 102-75.55 - What does the term “Not being put to optimum use” mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does the term âNot being put to optimum useâ mean? 102-75.55 Section 102-75.55 Public Contracts and Property Management... “Not being put to optimum use” mean? Not being put to optimum use means an entire property or...

  9. PEOPLE/POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cleared of CrimeZhao Zuohai, who spent almost 10 years in jail for alleged murder, has been acquitted after the alleged victim returned home in central China’s Henan Province, according to the local Higher People’s Court on May 8.

  10. PEOPLE/POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    lron-Handed Official Wang Lijun,former Director of the Chongqing Municipal Public Security Bureau,was voted in as vicemayor of Chongqing Municipality at the 24th Session of the Third Standing Committee of Chongqing Municipal People’s Congress,the local legislature,

  11. Parks, People and Places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Julie Frøik

    This thesis suggests, by applying a ‘place’ perspective, that involving users in operational management of green spaces holds potentials for enhancing ‘place attachment’ of urban inhabitants. As this can also build their commitment to decision making on their local living environment, green space...

  12. PEOPLE/POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Tibet’s New Leaders Padma Choling was elected chairman of the government of southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region on January 15. His predecessor, Qiangba Puncog, was elected head of the Tibet Regional People’s Congress, the local legislative body, on the same day, replacing Legqog who, at 66, has reached

  13. Peopling Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Biehl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The field of Global Health brings together a vastly diverse array of actors working to address pressing health issues worldwide with unprecedented financial and technological resources and informed by various agendas. While Global Health initiatives are booming and displacing earlier framings of the field (such as tropical medicine or international health, critical analyses of the social, political, and economic processes associated with this expanding field — an “open source anarchy” on the ground — are still few and far between. In this essay, we contend that, among the powerful players of Global Health, the supposed beneficiaries of interventions are generally lost from view and appear as having little to say or nothing to contribute. We make the case for a more comprehensive and people-centered approach and demonstrate the crucial role of ethnography as an empirical lantern in Global Health. By shifting the emphasis from diseases to people and environments, and from trickle-down access to equality, we have the opportunity to set a humane agenda that both realistically confronts challenges and expands our vision of the future of global communities.

  14. Shielding: people and shelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krissdottir, M.; Simon, J.

    1977-01-01

    Housing is something that protects and defends. This book explores the ways in which humans have sought to defend themselves against physical dangers and to protect themselves against the imagined evils of the natural world by means of the shelters built. The book examines briefly the shelters built in ancient times, and shows how several basic types recurred in different ages and at different times. Following this there is a brief survey of the kinds of shelters built by the native peoples of Canada, depending on their environment--climate, the natural materials on hand--and the culture and life-style of each people. The next chapter explores the psychology of human beings, and how shelters should satisfy not only physical needs but psychological needs as well--the need for companionship and yet for privacy, space for children to play and community centers for adults to meet. The second half of the book looks at the dilemmas of housing today, and at various attempts around the world and in Canada to solve the problems--garden cities in England, the famous community of Tapiola in Finland, the technological innovations of Disneyland, new housing suburbs in Canada. There is a discussion of the problems of urban renewal, of overcoming the high cost of home-ownership--condominiums, cooperatives, owner-built homes, and the disadvantages of trailers--and of overcoming the energy crisis by building ecological houses.

  15. When CERN goes out to meet people

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    2014-01-01

    Giving lectures about high-energy physics and particle accelerators to the public is an activity that several people from CERN enjoy and pursue all around the globe. Sometimes, this happens on the moose and pony trails, as Pauline Gagnon recounts…   CERN is really a unique place and people want to hear more about what we do. With the internet, people are keeping abreast of the latest scientific developments and many crave the opportunity to meet scientists and find out more about what is going on at CERN. So do not hesitate to contact local colleges and astronomy clubs. Get yourself invited to talk about our research. Last autumn, I gave a series of public lectures all around the province of Québec (Canada) and in the Shetland Islands (Northern Scotland). Both tours took me to remote areas where I was amazed to see the public interest for lectures in physics. In Québec, one of my six stops was Chibougamau, a town of 7500 people (and probably as many moose) locat...

  16. Tests Regarding the Transitory Regimes of Putting off Load of the Hydroagregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Romulus Jurcu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For high power and high revolution aggregates it is required that the operation should take place in safe conditions, for all the running regimes. The most difficult regimes for a hydro aggregate are the transitory regimes. Although, these regimes generally last a rather short period of time, for high power aggregates these regimes are accompanied by electric and mechanic solicitations which sometimes can surpass the admitted values. In the present paper, we present an evaluation method of the rotating parts’ dynamic stability of the hydro aggregates in the transitory regime of putting off load. We present the results obtained from the recordings of putting off load and those obtained after the dynamic equilibration of the hydro aggregate’s rotor.

  17. How to put your darlings on a diet. Philosophical practice as an epistemological practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Today, health care organizations are changing in several ways. New technologies, new audit regimes and new relationships with clients of various kinds all contribute to altering what it takes to perform in health care organizations. Consequently, one of the characteristics of health care organiza...... in the health care organization: “This is important to us and our work. It is like putting one´s darlings on a diet.”...

  18. Effects of physical randomness training on virtual and laboratory golf putting performance in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, T C; Lamb, P F

    2017-10-09

    External randomness exists in all sports but is perhaps most obvious in golf putting where robotic putters sink only 80% of 5 m putts due to unpredictable ball-green dynamics. The purpose of this study was to test whether physical randomness training can improve putting performance in novices. A virtual random-physics golf-putting game was developed based on controlled ball-roll data. Thirty-two subjects were assigned a unique randomness gain (RG) ranging from 0.1 to 2.0-times real-world randomness. Putter face kinematics were measured in 5 m laboratory putts before and after five days of virtual training. Performance was quantified using putt success rate and "miss-adjustment correlation" (MAC), the correlation between left-right miss magnitude and subsequent right-left kinematic adjustments. Results showed no RG-success correlation (r = -0.066, p = 0.719) but mildly stronger correlations with MAC for face angle (r = -0.168, p = 0.358) and clubhead path (r = -0.302, p = 0.093). The strongest RG-MAC correlation was observed during virtual training (r = -0.692, p physical randomness in virtual training, and also that this learning may weakly transfer to real golf putting kinematics. Adaptation to external physical randomness during virtual training may therefore help golfers adapt to external randomness in real-world environments.

  19. Insurance industry troubles put pension, annuity plans at risk; experts urge checkup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallarito, K

    1991-08-05

    Because of recent troubles in the insurance industry, most notably the state seizure of Newark, N.J.-based Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co., it's a good time for hospitals and associations that sponsor pension and annuity plans to check up on the financial health of their investments, experts say. The rapid rise in "non-performing" mortgages held by insurance companies is among the maladies putting plans at risk.

  20. Does the CSIR have the sensor capabilities to put South Africa on the radar screen?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Piernaar, Johan E

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available capabilities to put South Africa on the radar screen? J E PIENAAR, P GOOSEN CSIR DPSS, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001 Email: epienaar@csir.co.za Abstract Through many years of research and development into radar sensors, the CSIR has made a... radar • The Meccano breadboard radar technology demonstrator was contracted in 1990. The aim was to establish a variety of modern radar technologies in support of the new generation of radar applications. These included modern flexible waveform...

  1. Improving access to screening for people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Anna; Turner, Sue; Giraud-Saunders, Alison

    2014-11-04

    People with learning disabilities have poorer health than their non-disabled peers, and are less likely to access screening services than the general population. The National Development Team for Inclusion and the Norah Fry Research Centre developed a toolkit and guidance to improve uptake of five national (English) screening programmes (one of which is delivered through local programmes), based on work to improve access by people with learning disabilities in the south west peninsula of the UK. This article describes the findings in relation to the five English screening programmes and suggests ways to improve uptake of cancer screening by people with learning disabilities.

  2. Happy-People-Pills for All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Walker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    It is argued that we have a moral duty to create, and make available, advanced pharmacological agents to boost the happiness of those in the normal, i.e., the non-depressed, range of happiness. Happiness, conceived as a propensity to positive moods, is a quantitative trait with a sizeable genetic component. One means to boost the happiness of those in the normal range is to test the efficacy of antidepressants for enhancement. A second possibility is to model new pharmacologicals based on the genetics of the happiest amongst us, that is, the hyperthymic. The suggestion, in other words, is to “reverse engineer” the hyperthymic: to investigate what makes the hyperthymic genetically and physiologically different and then put what they have into pill form. To the ‘Brave New World’ objection, that there is more to wellbeing than happiness and that taking happy-people-pills will require the sacrifice of these other aspects of wellbeing, it is countered that contemporary social science research supports the view that happiness promotes achievement in the ‘higher’ endeavors of humanity, including work, love and virtue. In other words, happiness promotes acquisition of traits valued by perfectionists. Those born with genes for hyperthymia, on average, tend to be doubly blessed: they are happier and achieve more than the rest of the population. Happy-people-pills are a means to allow everyone else to share in this good

  3. Research with Arctic peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, H Sally; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2006-01-01

    of environmental and health issues that are unique to the Arctic regions, and research exploring these issues offers significant opportunities, as well as challenges. On July 28-29, 2004, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research co-sponsored a working group...... entitled "Research with Arctic Peoples: Unique Research Opportunities in Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders". The meeting was international in scope with investigators from Greenland, Iceland and Russia, as well as Canada and the United States. Multiple health agencies from Canada and the United States...... sent representatives. Also attending were representatives from the International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) and the National Indian Health Board. The working group developed a set of ten recommendations related to research opportunities in heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders; obstacles...

  4. Park, People and Biodiversity Conservation in Kaziranga National Park, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Das

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaziranga National Park (henceforth, KNP is a protected area situated in the North Eastern part of India. The park is a World Heritage Site and has a very rich ecosystem. KNP is an attractive tourist destination and occupies a significant place in the life and culture of the people living in this part of the country. Conservation of the park started more than a century ago, and local people have often contested such efforts. This is mainly because indigenous people have been facing displacement and deprivation from resources, which they have been using for centuries. Besides deprivation, wild animals often damage their properties and paddy fields. This leads to resentment among local people and become potential cause of grudge in the form of encroachment, poaching, biodiversity loss, and excessive collection of forest products. As a result, conservation measures may fail to deliver desired outcome. This paper tries to examine the gains and losses for living around KNP and assess the park-people relation. We conduct a case study in some periphery villages of the park and find that people have been suffering from difficulty in rearing livestock and loss caused by wild animal. However, people gain from tourism business. Based on the findings we recommend extension of tourism/allied activities and community welfare measures. The findings may be used to derive policy implication for sustainable management of the park.

  5. Political disempowerment among older people in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, P K

    2000-01-01

    The democratic elections that took place in Hong Kong before and after 1997 presented a unique opportunity for older people, politicians and government officials to take action to promote the participation of older people. There were, however, few significant projects undertaken to this end. This paper reports on recent research on political participation of older people in Hong Kong which found that they were active in voting but they were passive in other forms of participation. Factors affecting participation are more significantly related to politicians' mobilization than to civic education or work done by centres for the elderly. In the field, there is little awareness of using more effective strategies to address older people's political powerlessness. Strategies identified include: educational talks in local elderly centres, mock election games and meeting with candidates from different political parties. All these activities were locally based and not well articulated, and there were few concerted efforts to promote the political power and influence of older people at the central level. The present situation of older people in Hong Kong remains one of political powerlessness and the piecemeal strategies used to address the issue have so far had little impact. This paper suggests that political powerlessness is not a natural result of old age. It is a problem which is socially constructed. An analysis of the factors shaping this situation is presented. It also presents some suggested strategies for gerontological practice in promoting political empowerment among older people in Hong Kong.

  6. Creating contexts for effective homebased care of people living with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Campbell

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Home-based care (HBC plays a vital role in the care of people living with AIDS. Most carers perform their arduous role in adverse conditions. Yet little is known about how to facilitate contexts that maximise the effectiveness of carers. This paper reviews existing research into home-based care in sub-Saharan Africa to highlight gaps in understanding and to outline new conceptual frameworks for future research. Current research identifies multi-level factors that undermine carers in performing their role. These include e.g. lack of knowledge, skills and support - both at the individual and organisational levels; physical and psychological burnout; the destruction of household economies in the face of the demands of care; community stigma and rejection. Research and policy documents repeatedly advocate ‘partnerships’ or ‘linkages’ between carers/ patients and more powerful groupings (locally, nationally and/or internationally as a solution to these problems. Yet they give no indication as how best to mobilise already over-burdened carers and their terminally ill charges. Furthermore, partnerships between poor communities and more influential groupings and agencies are notoriously difficult to promote and sustain. If partnerships are indeed to play such a key role in supporting carers and their patients, there is an urgent need for systematic research into the effectiveness of various partnership styles and strategies. The concepts of bonding, bridging and linking social capital - within a framework sensitive to the interaction between social capital and poverty - are put forward as a valuable starting point for the development of better understandings of the types of networks and partnerships most likely to support carers and their local communities.

  7. Local Professionals for Local Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Xiaojie

    2010-01-01

    @@ In the past three decades,the Chinese hotel industry has developed at a rapid pace,with the number of hotels-especially high star hotelsgrowing fast.In Beijing alone,there arc nearly 60 five-star hotels.With the development of the hotel industry.China has also begun to see the number of local hotel professionals,including senior managers,increase.Wen Xiaojie,Deputy General Manager and Owner's Representative of Sofitel Wanda Beijing,is among the most outstanding senior hotel managers.

  8. 77 FR 319 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Put Your Freedom in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Put Your Freedom in the Corner, Save... of Authority No. 257 of April 15, 2003), I hereby determine that the object ``Put Your Freedom in...

  9. 5 CFR 839.411 - What can I elect if I was put in FERS by mistake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What can I elect if I was put in FERS by mistake? 839.411 Section 839.411 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Corrected Erroneous Fers § 839.411 What can I elect if I was put in FERS by mistake? If you were placed...

  10. 5 CFR 839.401 - What can I elect if I was put in CSRS or CSRS Offset by mistake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What can I elect if I was put in CSRS or CSRS Offset by mistake? 839.401 Section 839.401 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Previously Corrected Erroneous Csrs Or Csrs Offset § 839.401 What can I elect if I was put in CSRS or...

  11. 47 CFR 95.208 - (R/C Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (R/C Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna? 95.208 Section 95.208 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... § 95.208 (R/C Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna? (a) Antenna means the radiating system...

  12. Necessary, but Not Sufficient: Critiquing the Role of Information and Communication Technology in Putting Knowledge into Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman V., Rasheed; Hall, Andy; Kalaivani, N. J.; Dorai, Kumuda; Reddy, T. S. Vamsidhar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the experience of ICT applications as a tool for putting research derived knowledge into use for innovation in South Asia. Design/methodology/approach: The article uses the contemporary understanding of communication and innovation in reviewing the experience of ICTs in putting new knowledge into use in South Asia.…

  13. Effective computer training for people with disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Farbeh-Tabrizi

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of computer courses at Methodist City Action computer school for students with psychological and physical disabilities and discusses the motivation behind developing these courses and the original research and development which led to their establishment. It also outlines methods of delivery and the impact of these courses on the students\\' quality of life, independence, social inclusion, literacy, numeracy and employment status. This research was carried out by using available literature found from local libraries and Internet, interviews and classroom observations, and concludes that there is an apparent lack of participation in tertiary education from people with disabilities in New Zealand.

  14. Initiatives on early detection and intervention to proactively identify health and social problems in older people : Experiences from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lette, Manon; Baan, C.A.; van den Berg, Matthijs; de Bruin, Simone R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the last years, several initiatives on early detection and intervention have been put in place to proactively identify health and social problems in (frail) older people. An overview of the initiatives currently available in the Netherlands is lacking, and it is unknown whether they

  15. If Mohammed Can’t Come to the Mountain…——Macheng library brings knowledge to the people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    ON the 15th day of one lunarmonth in 1998,a group of people on bicycles streamedinto the county fair in Macheng.Assoon as they arrived they unpackedthe bicycles which were loaded withbooks,technical materials andphotographs.They put the books andmaterials on a table and pulled outsome string they had brought with

  16. Missing people, migrants, identification and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzolese, E

    2012-11-30

    The increasing volume and complexities of migratory flow has led to a range of problems such as human rights issues, public health, disease and border control, and also the regulatory processes. As result of war or internal conflicts missing person cases and management have to be regarded as a worldwide issue. On the other hand, even in peace, the issue of a missing person is still relevant. In 2007 the Italian Ministry of Interior nominated an extraordinary commissar in order to analyse and assess the total number of unidentified recovered bodies and verify the extent of the phenomena of missing persons, reported as 24,912 people in Italy (updated 31 December 2011). Of these 15,632 persons are of foreigner nationalities and are still missing. The census of the unidentified bodies revealed a total of 832 cases recovered in Italy since the year 1974. These bodies/human remains received a regular autopsy and were buried as 'corpse without name". In Italy judicial autopsy is performed to establish cause of death and identity, but odontology and dental radiology is rarely employed in identification cases. Nevertheless, odontologists can substantiate the identification through the 'biological profile' providing further information that can narrow the search to a smaller number of missing individuals even when no ante mortem dental data are available. The forensic dental community should put greater emphasis on the role of the forensic odontology as a tool for humanitarian action of unidentified individuals and best practise in human identification.

  17. New PIC/Postsecondary Partnerships: How Postsecondary Institutions and Private Industry Councils Are Working Together to Boost Economic Development and Put People Back to Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Shirley

    A project sought ways in which colleges and universities can work more closely with the federally funded Job Training Partnership Act to help the unemployed find work and to encourage business startups and expansion. Partnerships between postsecondary educational institutions and Private Industry Councils (PICs) at six sites were encouraged during…

  18. New PIC/Postsecondary Alliances. How Postsecondary Institutions and Private Industry Councils Are Working Together to Boost Economic Development and Put People Back to Work. Six Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. for Work and Learning, Washington, DC.

    Case studies are provided of the six sites involved in a demonstration project to encourage partnerships between postsecondary educational institutions and Private Industry Councils (PICs). These programs represent instances of collaborations between colleges/universities and the Job Training Partnership Act to help the unemployed find work and…

  19. Local Warming

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderbei, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Using 55 years of daily average temperatures from a local weather station, I made a least-absolute-deviations (LAD) regression model that accounts for three effects: seasonal variations, the 11-year solar cycle, and a linear trend. The model was formulated as a linear programming problem and solved using widely available optimization software. The solution indicates that temperatures have gone up by about 2 degrees Fahrenheit over the 55 years covered by the data. It also correctly identifies the known phase of the solar cycle; i.e., the date of the last solar minimum. It turns out that the maximum slope of the solar cycle sinusoid in the regression model is about the same size as the slope produced by the linear trend. The fact that the solar cycle was correctly extracted by the model is a strong indicator that effects of this size, in particular the slope of the linear trend, can be accurately determined from the 55 years of data analyzed. The main purpose for doing this analysis is to demonstrate that it i...

  20. Rehydrate locally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djokoto, E

    1997-11-01

    In 1991, in the northern region of Ghana, during the cholera epidemic, 10 rural health centers replied to a questionnaire regarding cholera case referrals. The results were as follows: 6 centers referred serious cases to hospitals, 2 did not receive patients because of fear of infection, and 2 received all patients. Although no patients admitted to the rural health centers died, many of the referred patients did. Of 14 cases referred to a hospital, 3 died in transit, 4 died at the hospital, and 7 survived. Deaths might be prevented if patients were treated promptly and locally with oral rehydration solutions based on cereals and rice; these are easy to prepare, superior to, and more available than standard oral rehydration salts (ORS). One mother walked 5 miles to a rural health post with her sick baby on her back, only to find that the dehydrated child had died on the way. During the 1991 cholera epidemic in Ghana, the author treated several patients in their homes; all recovered. Prompt and frequent rehydration in the home is the best treatment for diarrhea and cholera.

  1. The Democratic People`s Republic of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pae Sang Hak [Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Korea, Republic of). Inst. for Disarmament and Peace

    1996-12-31

    The attitude of the Democratic People`s Republic of Korea to the comprehensive nuclear test ban (CTB) treaty is reviewed in the context of the denuclearization of the whole of North East Asia is stated in terms of strict adherence to disarmament and non-proliferation. The influence of Japanese and USA foreign policy on formulating these views is also considered. (UK).

  2. The flipped classroom, putting learning back into the hands of students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkelson, Virginia

    Flipping the classroom is a new style of teaching that puts learning back into the hands of the student and allows the teacher to facilitate each child's learning based on their individual needs. Three units of Chemistry were flipped to give the researcher experience and skill in this new ideology. Technology was used to create podcasts for student's to watch outside of the classroom. Student's used classroom time for problem-solving, activities, discussions and labs. From this experience as well as conferences, classroom observations of the flipping process in action and discussions with other teachers also using this new style of teaching, a handbook was written.

  3. Hematopoietic development at high altitude: blood stem cells put to the test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovein, Ann C; Forsberg, E Camilla

    2015-05-15

    In February 2015, over 200 scientists gathered for the Keystone Hematopoiesis meeting, which was held at the scenic Keystone Resort in Keystone, Colorado, USA. The meeting organizers, Patricia Ernst, Hanna Mikkola and Timm Schroeder, put together an exciting program, during which field leaders and new investigators presented discoveries that spanned developmental and adult hematopoiesis within both physiologic and pathologic contexts. Collectively, the program highlighted the increasing pace of new discoveries and the substantial progress made in the hematopoiesis field since the last Keystone meeting two years ago. In this Meeting Review, we highlight the main concepts discussed at the conference, with an emphasis on topics relevant to developmental biology.

  4. Putting the horse before the cart: a pragmatist analysis of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís M. Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The definition of knowledge as justified true belief is the best we presently have. However, the canonical tripartite analysis of knowledge does not do justice to it due to a Platonic conception of a priori truth that puts the cart before the horse. Within a pragmatic approach, I argue that by doing away with a priori truth, namely by submitting truth to justification, and by accordingly altering the canonical analysis of knowledge, this is a fruitful definition. So fruitful indeed that it renders the Gettier counterexamples vacuous, allowing positive work in epistemology and related disciplines.

  5. Local Experiences in Community Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Fleuret

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of international research with an original approach anchored in health geography, which illustrates the importance of place as a dimension in community health. The aim of the research is to identify the success factors in the processes used to build community health initiatives at the local level. The study is based on interviews encoded and analysed using the framework of the grounded theory. Three main themes—the place, the community and healthcare supply—and two cross-cutting issues referring to 18 explanatory dimensions are identified. These findings are then put to the test in France through an action research approach. Overall, the work suggest avenues to enable the transferability of successful elements of community health initiatives.

  6. Parks, People and Places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Julie Frøik

    This thesis suggests, by applying a ‘place’ perspective, that involving users in operational management of green spaces holds potentials for enhancing ‘place attachment’ of urban inhabitants. As this can also build their commitment to decision making on their local living environment, green space...... approach to green space maintenance. To guide the exploration a theoretical framework was developed inductively, structured around concepts of environmental governance in combination with strategic approaches to green space management. The framework is operationalised by analyses of the governance...... dimensions ‘actors’, ‘resources’ and ‘rules’. Moreover, the impacts of place-based governance processes on green space quality are examined via a review of previous scientific articles. The thesis concludes that place-based governance offers potential for bringing users and managers closer together, through...

  7. The Nagoya Protocol and Indigenous Peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Yolanda Teran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about Indigenous peoples’ involvement in the Nagoya Protocol negotiations from 2006 to 2010, as well as in its implementation to stop biopiracy in order to protect Pachamama, Mother Earth, and to ensure our survival and the survival of coming generations. The Nagoya Protocol is an international instrument that was adopted in Nagoya, Japan in October 2010 by the Conference of Parties (COP 10 and ratified by 51 countries in Pyeongchang, South Korea in October 2014 at COP 12. This protocol governs access to genetic resources and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from their utilization (access and benefit sharing [ABS]. It has several articles related to Indigenous peoples and traditional knowledge, as well as: The interrelation and inseparable nature between genetic resources and traditional knowledge; The diversity of circumstances surrounding traditional knowledge ownership, including by country; The identification of traditional knowledge owners; The declaration of Indigenous peoples' human rights; and The role of women in the biodiversity process. In addition, this protocol lays out obligations on access, specifically participation in equitable benefit sharing, the accomplishment of prior and informed consent, and the mutually agreed terms and elaboration of a national legal ABS framework with the participation of Indigenous peoples and local communities in order to have well-defined roles, responsibilities, and times of negotiations.

  8. Charity Work of People Sentenced to Imprisonment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Sokołowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current socio-economic situation of the country, it is difficult to provide work for all citizens, and especially those who have fallen in conflict with the law. In terms of social interest, convicted people are placed last in the hierarchy of people needing work. Therefore, it is necessary to remind the significance and place of work in social rehabilitation interactions towards convicted persons. An alternative to the lack of employment in the penitentiary system may be charity work, the importance and value of which is so marginalized in supplementing social rehabilitation interactions. The impact of charity work is multifaceted, because it concerns not only convicted persons, but dependent mainly on the social factor. Society also needs humanization in order to understand the process of social rehabilitation of socially maladjusted people, and above all, should be included in it. The social rehabilitation of convicted persons outside the prison depends first of all on the involvement of the penitentiary institutions themselves in cooperation with the local community

  9. Chalearn looking at people 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escalera, Sergio; Fabian, Junior; Baro, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Following previous series on Looking at People (LAP) competitions [14, 13, 11, 12, 2], in 2015 ChaLearn ran two new competitions within the field of Looking at People: (1) age estimation, and (2) cultural event recognition, both in still images. We developed a crowd-sourcing application to collect...

  10. People-Oriented Constitutional Amendments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIWUZHOU

    2004-01-01

    THERE was one practical aspect of the 2004 sessions of the National People's Congress and People's Political Consultative Conference that, for Beijing residents, set the mapart from previous yeats. Coaches transporting NPC deputies and CPPCC committee members meekly waited their ture at main intersections

  11. The People Make the Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Benjamin

    1987-01-01

    Presents a framework for understanding the etiology of organizational behavior, based on theory and research from interactional psychology, vocational psychology, industrial/organizational psychology, and organizational theory. Proposes that organizations are functions of the kinds of people they contain and that the people there are functions of…

  12. Effective Communication with Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Patrick; Elliott, David

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government established the Office for Youth (the Office) in September 2008 in an effort to engage with the young people of Australia. The Office will work with other government agencies to help young people reach their full potential; make effective transitions to adulthood as they continue to learn, start work, make decisions that…

  13. Young people and sexual orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Young people and sexual orientation The Netherlands Institute for Social Research ¦ SCP carries out regular research on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In this report, the focus is on young people in the Netherlands. The report addresses two issues: attitud

  14. Anemia in People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Managing Cancer-related Side Effects Low Blood Counts Anemia in People With Cancer What is anemia? When you don’t have enough healthy red ... the symptoms that bother people most. What causes anemia? There are many different reasons a person with ...

  15. Young Peoples' Ideas of Infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, John

    2001-01-01

    Considers young peoples' views of infinity prior to instruction in the methods mathematicians use in addressing the subject of infinity. Presents a partially historical account of studies examining young peoples' ideas of infinity. Four sections address potential pitfalls for research in this area and the work of Piaget, issues concerning the…

  16. Young people and sexual orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Young people and sexual orientation The Netherlands Institute for Social Research ¦ SCP carries out regular research on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In this report, the focus is on young people in the Netherlands. The report addresses two issues:

  17. Young People and Contemporary Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeris, Helene

    2005-01-01

    In this article empirical examples are used to connect theories about young people, contemporary art forms and learning. The first part of the article introduces the new forms of consciousness which, according to the youth researchers Birgitte Simonsen and Thomas Ziehe, characterize young people of today. In the second part, the qualities of…

  18. Access to treatment for hepatitis C virus infection: time to put patients first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlin, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Sound health policy puts patients first. Antiviral regimens approved in 2014 revolutionised treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Most patients can now be cured. These new regimens, however, were priced at US$83 320-150 000 for a 3-month course. Public and private payers in the USA responded by limiting coverage to patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis, keeping the drugs from being used to prevent those stages. These restrictions defy medical guidelines, lack scientific justification, and undermine public health efforts to stem transmission. Instead of reducing barriers to care, the system has erected new ones. As drug makers and payers battle over billions of dollars, the needs of patients have been cast aside. Physicians and governments have a duty to make sure health policy is driven by the needs of patients and public health. In this Personal View, I call upon these groups to lead the creation of a national consensus among all stakeholders that will allow the advances in therapeutics for HCV infection to be put to work to end the epidemic.

  19. A Study of Families’ Experiences of Putting Their Elders in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Chireh Hafshjani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges facing society today is increasing proportion of its elderly population. Nowadays, elderliness along with its all psychological, socio-cultural, ideological and economic aspects have become a serious and challenging issue affecting families in developing and developed countries. Thus, the current study aimed to examine families’ experiences of putting their elders in nursing homes. A phenomenological research method was employed to pursue this qualitative study. The samples of the study were selected through purposive sampling method; and data collection proceeded until it reached to the data saturation within 10 participants. The instruments adopted by the researcher include note-taking and in-depth and unstructured interviews with the families of the elderly who put their elders in nursing homes. The obtained data were analyzed using Colaizzi’s seven-step process of analysis. The four general themes derived include isolation, peace, abusiveness, children’s inability to look after their elders and guilty conscience; each of which contained some sub-themes. According to the results, it is essential to take the social, economic and health support of the elderly into consideration and to provide the necessary context for improving the life quality of the elderly residing in nursing homes through formulating, planning and making appropriate policies.

  20. Severe Local Storms Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Morgan, G. M.; Stel, F.

    2009-09-01

    Local storms always had a deep impact on people communities, mainly because of the severe damage caused, because of their unpredictability and, up to a few years ago, even because of the lack of knowledge and awareness on their physical origin. Because of this large impact on real life and on imagination, people needed and wanted to describe and report the occurrence of these events, giving them suited names. Often, these nouns are related to the myth developed to explain the cause of the events. In this work, a short presentation and description of the popular nouns used to describe severe local storm events in different areas of the World is given. Countries taken into account span from Italy, moving toward Africa and reaching a few communities of Native Americans. The etymology of the names gives interesting information, useful even under the anthropological point of view, on the Culture and Believes of the peoples who adopted them. This research work is the result of an underground activity carried out in the last ten years by the authors, during their contacts with students and researchers coming from different Countries and mainly met at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste.

  1. Quantum Locality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  2. The lack of influence of food and local alcoholic brew on the blood level of Mectizan(®) (ivermectin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeida, Mamoun M; Malcolm, Stephen B; ElTayeb, A Z; Eversole, Rob R; Elassad, Asma S; Geary, Timothy G; Ali, Magdi M; Mackenzie, Charles D

    2013-08-01

    There is concern that extraneous factors, such as food and drink, may alter the pharmacodynamics of Mectizan(®) (ivermectin) in patients receiving this important anti-parasitic drug, and thus might put such individuals in danger of serious adverse events. The effects of a common local alcohol-containing beverage and a local food on plasma levels of ivermectin were studied in Sudanese volunteers after administration of the standard dose used in mass drug administration programs for onchocerciasis and filariasis. Plasma levels of ivermectin at various time points (0-48h) after administration of ivermectin were ascertained by HPLC assay in ten volunteers given 150μgkg(-1) ivermectin together with either a local sorghum-based food ('assida'), or a locally brewed alcoholic beverage ('arangi' made from sorghum grain) or in those who were fasting. Maximum mean (±SD) plasma levels of ivermectin (67±49ngml(-1)) were reached within 2h in fasting patients, and had dropped to 26±20ngml(-1) after 30h. The coadministration of local food or alcoholic beverage did not cause an increase in ivermectin plasma levels above those observed in people who were fasting. However, at 2h after ivermectin administration, patients given alcohol had significantly lower plasma ivermectin levels than fed patients or fasting patients. There were no significant differences among treatments for AUC0-30, Cmax, or tmax, and so the coadministration of local food or alcoholic beverage did not cause any change in pharmacokinetic parameters of ivermectin in the plasma in comparison with fasting. None of the measured levels of plasma ivermectin were greater than those reported in previous studies with this compound. These findings do not support the hypothesis that acute intake of alcohol is an important factor in the development of the serious adverse reactions that can occur during the treatment of loaisis patients with ivermectin (Mectizan(®)).

  3. Evaluation of a Smoking Cessation Club for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinks, Annette; Linnell, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to undertake a formative evaluation of a young person's Smokebuster club and to examine how young people's experience of being a club member can be used to inform the club's future development. Design/methodology/approach: After seeking and being granted Local Research Ethics Committee approval to undertake the…

  4. Australian Aboriginal Deaf People and Aboriginal Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Des

    2013-01-01

    Many Australian Aboriginal people use a sign language ("hand talk") that mirrors their local spoken language and is used both in culturally appropriate settings when speech is taboo or counterindicated and for community communication. The characteristics of these languages are described, and early European settlers' reports of deaf…

  5. Australian Aboriginal Deaf People and Aboriginal Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Des

    2013-01-01

    Many Australian Aboriginal people use a sign language ("hand talk") that mirrors their local spoken language and is used both in culturally appropriate settings when speech is taboo or counterindicated and for community communication. The characteristics of these languages are described, and early European settlers' reports of deaf Aboriginal…

  6. Cost-Benefit Analysis in Social Care for Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrenit, Jean-Marc

    2005-01-01

    Social care at home for elderly people is now growing rapidly in France. A new question is, What are better forms of care for the different partners concerned? The research presented here, and made for the Comity of Lille Employment Area with cooperation of the Caisse Primaire d'Assurance Maladiede Lille (the local board of the national social…

  7. Approach focused on people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roa Ruben

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Family and community medicine assumes a new epistemological landmark that also provides the use of instruments and tools related to it. This care model permits carrying out a visit where all categories which the health-disease process is expressed are present. Family Medicine intends to combine both visions and, for such, it gifts elements to incorporate disease as an essential part of our patient's approach systematic being the main focus the approach by problems, which is nothing but that which concerns the individual, his family or the physician, or all of them, and at times there will be nuisances while at other times, there will be diseases, and mil in other instances, all of them will co-exist. It is known that the impact of a health problem on an individual affects not only himself, but also his surroundings. In turn, the environment around this individual can act as the origin or perpetuator of the crisis, or else serve to help in solving the conflict. Distinct tools serve the purpose of knowing the context in which health crisis is developed, such as: genogram, individual and family vital cycle. Every time two people communicate, the agreement or disagreement generate possible variables. In the physician-patient relationship, this is no exception. Values, beliefs, feelings, and information of each individual different and physicians not necessarily in agreement in several issues during a visit. The objective is the need to achieve a minimum of agreements so that this visit has therapeutic effectiveness, thus being if/rpm -taw to find a common territory. Relations in general involve power; care, feelings, trust and goals. The objective in this type of relationship must be obviously shared ly both and cannot be any other than that of achieving, the highest level of health to our patient. So, our specialty, considered of low complexity, becomes a highly cognitive complexity, special and there is no doubt that it is a lot easier to handle

  8. Elderly Peoples' Perception of Young People - A Preliminary Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Mateusz Cybulski; Elżbieta Krajewska-Kułak; Paweł Sowa; Magda Orzechowska; Katarzyna Van Damme-Ostapowicz; Emilia Rozwadowska; Andrzej Guzowski

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Aging is becoming a more noticeable phenomenon in Poland and Europe. We analysed the perception of youth by elderly and compared attitudes of students of the University of the Third Age (SU3A) with nursing homes residents (NHR) to young people. Methods Our questionnaire was distributed to 140 people over the age of 50 (70 SU3A and 70 NHR). Results 85.0% of all respondents answered positively to the question “Do you enjoy contact with young people?”, even though their conta...

  9. Discussion on Localization Management Strategy of KFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马遥

    2015-01-01

    In the contemporary society, localization and globalization are inseparable. For multinational corporations, enhancing the relationship between multinational corporations and host countries can achieve a win-win situation. Through analyze the lo-calization management strategies in the field of menu, slogan,ingredient and public relationship of of KFC and conclude that Chinese culture, the needs, preference of Chinese people, good government relationship is more important to multinational cor-porations.

  10. Putting Darwin in His Place: The Need to Watch Our Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braterman, Paul S.; Holbrook, J. Britt

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine the use of language in debating evolution, and suggest careful choice of the terms by which people describe both themselves and their opponents. Present-day evolution science is solidly based on fact, and is as far advanced from Charles Darwin's original theory as present-day chemistry is from Dalton's atomic…

  11. Case Study: Let's Get Personal--Putting Personality into Your Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2017-01-01

    In this case study, the subject for discussion is the need to use teaching notes in order to add personality to case studies. Personality, it is said, is more important than policy, than demographics, than finances, or amorous peccadillos. Personality is essential. It is the interaction of people that capture our interest, yet, the question is…

  12. Multilingual Policies Put into Practice: Co-Participative Educational Workshops in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, Jean Léo; McCabe Gragnic, Julie; Avilés González, Karla Janiré

    2013-01-01

    In a national context where the language rights of indigenous people have been recognized constitutionally since 2003, we deal with the following questions: How can bilingual education programmes in Mexico be clearly defined and applied? And what exactly are the final objectives of a bilingual education programme? We shall address the issue of the…

  13. Putting Darwin in His Place: The Need to Watch Our Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braterman, Paul S.; Holbrook, J. Britt

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine the use of language in debating evolution, and suggest careful choice of the terms by which people describe both themselves and their opponents. Present-day evolution science is solidly based on fact, and is as far advanced from Charles Darwin's original theory as present-day chemistry is from Dalton's atomic…

  14. Strong Pictures Get the Point across: Teens Put Life (and Art) up on a Billboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Teens have issues! They talk about suicide and war. They experiment with drugs, drinking and smoking. Their lives may have been touched by abuse, gangs, or guns. Young people worry about these issues and many others as they work out their emerging identities and race toward their futures. This article discusses how the teachers in Voyager House…

  15. Strong Pictures Get the Point across: Teens Put Life (and Art) up on a Billboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Teens have issues! They talk about suicide and war. They experiment with drugs, drinking and smoking. Their lives may have been touched by abuse, gangs, or guns. Young people worry about these issues and many others as they work out their emerging identities and race toward their futures. This article discusses how the teachers in Voyager House…

  16. Case Study: Let's Get Personal--Putting Personality into Your Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2017-01-01

    In this case study, the subject for discussion is the need to use teaching notes in order to add personality to case studies. Personality, it is said, is more important than policy, than demographics, than finances, or amorous peccadillos. Personality is essential. It is the interaction of people that capture our interest, yet, the question is…

  17. Is REDD+ finance really put to work in the right places?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheba, Andreas; Lund, Jens Friis; Bukhi, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The authors of this guest commentary write that their research “shows that REDD+ finance does not necessarily reach the most relevant people to make a difference on the ground nor does it necessarily address the underlying causes and drivers of deforestation.” The views expressed are those...

  18. The Folly of the Big Idea: How a Liberal Arts Education Puts Fads in Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senechal, Diana

    2013-01-01

    America was made by and for big ideas. Insofar as big ideas have shaped it, it is ever on the verge of hyperbole and dream. Today's big ideas come with an air of celebrity and accessibility; they glitter with glamour but demand little of the Americans. While they have many manifestations, people see them epitomized in TEDTalks. TED (which stands…

  19. Elderly Peoples' Perception of Young People - A Preliminary Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Cybulski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging is becoming a more noticeable phenomenon in Poland and Europe. We analysed the perception of youth by elderly and compared attitudes of students of the University of the Third Age (SU3A with nursing homes residents (NHR to young people.Our questionnaire was distributed to 140 people over the age of 50 (70 SU3A and 70 NHR.85.0% of all respondents answered positively to the question "Do you enjoy contact with young people?", even though their contacts are usually limited and mostly confined to a few s a year. Vast majority of NHR (62.9% and almost half SU3A (48.6% believe that there is a need to integrate seniors and youth to achieve mutual benefits.Young people would benefit from the life experience of the elderly; the elderly could become more active in many areas of life.

  20. Putting a Pause in Pain, A personal journey for this teen | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Pain Management Putting a Pause in Pain, A personal journey for this teen Winter 2017 Table ... Northern Kentucky with an extra confidence and bounce. A fan of Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, she's working ...

  1. Ready to put metadata on the post-2015 development agenda? Linking data publications to responsible innovation and science diplomacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Kolker, Eugene; Hotez, Peter J; Mohin, Sophie; Prainsack, Barbara; Wynne, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Coşkun, Yavuz; Dereli, Türkay; Huzair, Farah; Borda-Rodriguez, Alexander; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Faris, Jack; Ramesar, Raj; Wonkam, Ambroise; Dandara, Collet; Nair, Bipin; Llerena, Adrián; Kılıç, Koray; Jain, Rekha; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Gollapalli, Kishore; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Kickbusch, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Metadata refer to descriptions about data or as some put it, "data about data." Metadata capture what happens on the backstage of science, on the trajectory from study conception, design, funding, implementation, and analysis to reporting. Definitions of metadata vary, but they can include the context information surrounding the practice of science, or data generated as one uses a technology, including transactional information about the user. As the pursuit of knowledge broadens in the 21(st) century from traditional "science of whats" (data) to include "science of hows" (metadata), we analyze the ways in which metadata serve as a catalyst for responsible and open innovation, and by extension, science diplomacy. In 2015, the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) will formally come to an end. Therefore, we propose that metadata, as an ingredient of responsible innovation, can help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on the post-2015 agenda. Such responsible innovation, as a collective learning process, has become a key component, for example, of the European Union's 80 billion Euro Horizon 2020 R&D Program from 2014-2020. Looking ahead, OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, is launching an initiative for a multi-omics metadata checklist that is flexible yet comprehensive, and will enable more complete utilization of single and multi-omics data sets through data harmonization and greater visibility and accessibility. The generation of metadata that shed light on how omics research is carried out, by whom and under what circumstances, will create an "intervention space" for integration of science with its socio-technical context. This will go a long way to addressing responsible innovation for a fairer and more transparent society. If we believe in science, then such reflexive qualities and commitments attained by availability of omics metadata are preconditions for a robust and socially attuned science, which can then remain broadly

  2. 12 CFR 220.122 - “Deep in the money put and call options” as extensions of credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false âDeep in the money put and call optionsâ as....122 “Deep in the money put and call options” as extensions of credit. (a) The Board of Governors has been asked to determine whether the business of selling instruments described as “deep in the money...

  3. Development of an OLAP Based Fuzzy Logic System for Supporting Put Away Decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H.Chung

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In today`s rapidly changing and globally volatile world, manufacturers pay strong efforts on conducting lean production, outsourcing their components, and management on the complex supply chain. Warehouse management plays a vital role to be a successful player in the any kinds of industry which put-away process is a key activity that brings significant influence and challenges to warehouse performance. In this dynamic operating environment, minimizing the operation mistakes and providing accurate real time inventory information to stakeholder become the basic requirements to be an order qualifier. An OLAP based intelligent system called Fuzzy Storage Assignment System (FSAS is proposed to increase availability of decision support data and convert the human knowledge into system for tackling the storage location assignment problem (SLAP. To validate the feasibility of this proposed system, a prototype will be worked out for a third party logistics company.

  4. Putting Thought in Accordance with Things: The Demise of Animal-Based Analogies for Plant Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Miles

    Scientists' attempts to understand plant functions by ascribing animal functions to plants - the analogist tradition, derived from Aristotle - began to be superseded in Europe by an experimentalist tradition in the seventeenth century. In classrooms today, science students learning about plant functions (exemplified here by the topic of transpiration) face a parallel dilemma: the pitching of their own habitual mental processes of analogy building (enhanced by the suggestive morphology of plants)and the persuasiveness of everyday language (for example, about plants and water)against the new experimental evidence presented by the teacher. In the case oftranspiration, six practical suggestions whereby teachers can support students in thisstruggle to put their thoughts (especially everyday mental models) in accordance withthings (classroom experimental evidence) are advanced. The wider implications forhow we teach about Living Things, and how we view the status of analogies in sciencegenerally, are discussed.

  5. Putting Security in Context: Visual Correlation of Network Activity with Real-World Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, William A.; Scherrer, Chad; Zabriskie, Sean J.

    2008-06-04

    To effectively identify and respond to cyber threats, computer security analysts must understand the scale, motivation, methods, source, and target of an attack. Central to developing this situational awareness is the analyst’s world knowledge that puts these attributes in context. What known exploits or new vulnerabilities might an anomalous traffic pattern suggest? What organizational, social, or geopolitical events help forecast or explain attacks and anomalies? Few visualization tools support creating, maintaining, and applying this knowledge of the threat landscape. Through a series of formative workshops with practicing security analysts, we have developed a visualization approach inspired by the human process of contextualization; this system, called NUANCE, creates evolving behavioral models of network actors at organizational and regional levels, continuously monitors external textual information sources for themes that indicate security threats, and automatically determines if behavior indicative of those threats is present on a network.

  6. Putting like a pro: the role of positive contagion in golf performance and perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Lee

    Full Text Available Many amateur athletes believe that using a professional athlete's equipment can improve their performance. Such equipment can be said to be affected with positive contagion, which refers to the belief of transference of beneficial properties between animate persons/objects to previously neutral objects. In this experiment, positive contagion was induced by telling participants in one group that a putter previously belonged to a professional golfer. The effect of positive contagion was examined for perception and performance in a golf putting task. Individuals who believed they were using the professional golfer's putter perceived the size of the golf hole to be larger than golfers without such a belief and also had better performance, sinking more putts. These results provide empirical support for anecdotes, which allege that using objects with positive contagion can improve performance, and further suggest perception can be modulated by positive contagion.

  7. Putting our differences to work the fastest way to innovation, leadership, and high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Debbe

    2008-01-01

    In this rapidly changing world, organisations of every type are finding that putting our differences to work is the most powerful accelerator for generating new levels of innovation, energy, leadership and employee engagement needed for high performance. This new book is a practical guide to the strategies and steps needed to make differences the drivers of success. Debbe Kennedy shows that leveraging all the dimensions of difference -- from thinking styles, perspectives, experience, position, goals, competencies, work habits, culture and management style to traditional diversity rubrics such as gender, race, ethnicity, physical abilities, sexual orientation and age -- can accelerate teams' and organisations' performance. Kennedy's book is a practical guide for leaders at all levels that begins with a compelling invitation to pioneer a new era leadership history. It establishes the need for change, sets the course of action, offers proof points and defines five distinctive qualities all leaders need to add to...

  8. Quantum power source: putting in order of a Brownian motion without Maxwell's demon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristov, Vitaly V.; Nikulov, A. V.

    2003-07-01

    The problem of possible violation of the second law of thermodynamics is discussed. It is noted that the task of the well known challenge to the second law called Maxwell's demon is put in order a chaotic perpetual motion and if any ordered Brownian motion exists then the second law can be broken without this hypothetical intelligent entity. The postulate of absolute randomness of any Brownian motion saved the second law in the beginning of the 20th century when it was realized as perpetual motion. This postulate can be proven in the limits of classical mechanics but is not correct according to quantum mechanics. Moreover some enough known quantum phenomena, such as the persistent current at non-zero resistance, are an experimental evidence of the non-chaotic Brownian motion with non-zero average velocity. An experimental observation of a dc quantum power soruce is interperted as evidence of violation of the second law.

  9. The people and the tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, G C

    1994-08-01

    Wildlife protection activities in Ranthambhore in Rajasthan state in 1993, and conditions of overpopulation and expanded grazing were described. Project Tiger is an ambitious program begun in the 1970s to protect the habitat of the tiger in Ranthambhore National Park. Forest park protection is limited by corrupt, poorly trained staff, who are unmotivated to protect the established sanctuaries. Tiger counts declined from 45 in the 1980s to 25 in 1993. Between 1988 and 1993, the Ranthambhore Foundation has worked to change village attitudes and practices that are based on forest exploitation. The aim was to show how the park and livelihoods can coexist without destruction of the park through excess grazing, and to initiate the planting of trees in a largely arid, treeless region. Demonstrating new ways of living had to be achieved first by building trust. Thapar, an author and environmentalist, has established his own land as an example of how irrigation and fallow land can return the land to productive potential. A mix of Jersey and Holstein cattle are bred to show how nonrange-fed cattle can be produced and deliver higher milk yields than the straggly range-fed ones. A dairy cooperative has been organized in the district, and the milk productivity has increased 1000%. Several bio-gas cookers are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of dung for fuel, instead of wood from the forest. Women become aware of the advantages of shorter walks and the end of potential arrests from taking forest protected fuelwood. There is still work to be done in learning how to work with local people. One foundation program works with instilling ideas about conservation among 3500 village children. Forest Protection Societies have been organized to grow and defend their own trees. Village men are organized to help police unauthorized grazing in protected areas. Not all programs have been successful, and lax administration has been a problem. Tourism has become a problem of too many

  10. Perceived hole size, performance, and body movement during putting in children with and without probable developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Chen; Wu, Sheng-Kuang

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived hole size (perception), performance, and body movement (action) in golf putting for children with probable developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and typically developing children (TDC). Forty-eight children (24 probable DCD, 24 TDC) performed putting in easy and hard conditions. Body movement was measured during putting, performance was measured as the distance between ball and hole, and perceived hole size was recorded using a Microsoft Paint drawing exercise 1 m away from the hole. The present results revealed that perceived hole size was positively related to putting performance, body movement was negatively associated with putting performance, and that there were negative correlations between body movement and perceived hole size. While children with probable DCD tended to perceive the hole as smaller, perform worse, and show more body movement, TDC exhibited the opposite. These findings help characterize the relationships between perception, performance, and action in children with probable DCD and TDC during golf putting.

  11. Global concept, local practice: Taiwanese experience of CouchSurfing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, D.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Hospitality exchange tourism is a new type of niche tourism, which is highly dependent on the Internet. Through participating in global hospitality exchange networks, such as CouchSurfing, tourists can meet local people who are willing to offer free accommodation, and hosts can also meet people arou

  12. Separation of spermatogenic cell types using STA-PUT velocity sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jessica M; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L; Dang, Vanessa M; Berger, Shelley L; Meyer, Ralph G

    2013-10-09

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex differentiation process that occurs in several stages in the seminiferous tubules of the testes. Currently, there is no reliable cell culture system allowing for spermatogenic differentiation in vitro, and most biological studies of spermatogenic cells require tissue harvest from animal models like the mouse and rat. Because the testis contains numerous cell types--both non-spermatogenic (Leydig, Sertoli, myeloid, and epithelial cells) and spermatogenic (spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids, condensing spermatids and spermatozoa)--studies of the biological mechanisms involved in spermatogenesis require the isolation and enrichment of these different cell types. The STA-PUT method allows for the separation of a heterogeneous population of cells--in this case, from the testes--through a linear BSA gradient. Individual cell types sediment with different sedimentation velocity according to cell size, and fractions enriched for different cell types can be collected and utilized in further analyses. While the STA-PUT method does not result in highly pure fractions of cell types, e.g. as can be obtained with certain cell sorting methods, it does provide a much higher yield of total cells in each fraction (~1 x 10(8) cells/spermatogenic cell type from a starting population of 7-8 x 10(8) cells). This high yield method requires only specialized glassware and can be performed in any cold room or large refrigerator, making it an ideal method for labs that have limited access to specialized equipment like a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) or elutriator.

  13. Re-establishing What Went Wrong Before: The Greenspan Put as Macroeconomic Modellers’ New Normal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Watson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Almost a decade after his retirement Alan Greenspan remains the world’s most immediately recognisable and highest profile central banker. This article reviews Greenspan’s ostensible move away from efficient markets theorising as he has tried to come to terms with the patterns of ‘euphoria’ and ‘fear’ he believes explain the build-up to the global financial crisis. In truth, though, it looks much more like an attempt to rescue the reputation of his free market models in the face of an increasing number of sceptics. Greenspan’s new memoire fails to acknowledge what, in effect, was the free put option the Federal Reserve provided to Wall Street traders under his leadership. Indeed, it goes as far as to promote a visualisation technique for how macroeconomic modellers should view the basic structure of the market environment which treats the now increasingly infamous ‘Greenspan put’ as an ostensibly formal component of asset prices. The style of policymaking that helped to stoke such extreme asset price inflation prior to the crisis is now embedded:(i within the class of models that Greenspan has presented as the post-crisis antidote to efficient markets theorising; and (ii within the recent historical data being used in the calibration tests of the models’ efficacy. What macroeconomic modellers can see in the market environment when embracing the supposedly new reality of euphoria and fear is a manifestation of what the prior existence of the Greenspan put first brought into view

  14. [Quality of life for older people under oncological treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitani, K; Murakami, S; Kishi, A

    1992-09-01

    Recently, an argument over the medical treatment of older patients has arisen in the field of clinical oncology. In the past oncological treatment has been geared to young and middle-aged people. Currently, oncological treatment takes the peculiarities of older people into consideration. Firstly, it highlights the multidimensionality of Quality of Life (QOL) as an important element, with subjectivity the second element. This notion has gained a worldwide consensus. The domain of "multidimensionality" consists of: 1. Physical status and functional abilities 2. Psychological status and well-being 3. Social interaction 4. Economic status and factors With these factors in mind, different questions are asked, depending on the condition of each patient, in order to let the patient form his/her own judgment on possible medical treatment. However, it is sometimes difficult for older people to make such judgments due to problems such as depression or their diminishing mental ability. Also, it is impossible to define life satisfaction indiscriminately without regard to individual outlook. QOL for older people is generally characterized by "individuality" which includes: 1) A person's integrity; 2) independence; and 3) autonomy. Though these elements are taken into account in adopting the above-mentioned methodology, the field of clinical oncology's two concepts of QOL still apply in principle. Flexibility to put emphasis on different elements of the domain will be necessary. Even though QOL for older people is a matter of subjective judgment, the "sound judgment of professionals" (objective and scientific judgment of caregivers) can be adopted in cases when there is difficulty in communication.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Local foods meet global foodways: tasting history

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lawrance, Benjamin N; Peña, Carolyn Thomas de la

    2012-01-01

    ... considers movements in context, and, in doing so, complicates the notions that food ' shapes ' culture as it crosses borders or that culture ' adapts ' foods to its neo-local or global contexts. By analysing the dynamics of contact between mobile foods and/or people and the speci fi c cultures of consumption they provoke, these case st...

  16. European courts and old people

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mulley, Graham P

    2013-01-01

    ...). There have been few cases dealing with patients' rights, long-term care or housing. Referrals of selected cases involving old people should be considered if their rights are not being protected...

  17. The Sea Peoples, from cuneiform tablets to carbon dating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kaniewski

    Full Text Available The 13(th century BC witnessed the zenith of the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean civilizations which declined at the end of the Bronze Age, ∼3200 years ago. Weakening of this ancient flourishing Mediterranean world shifted the political and economic centres of gravity away from the Levant towards Classical Greece and Rome, and led, in the long term, to the emergence of the modern western civilizations. Textual evidence from cuneiform tablets and Egyptian reliefs from the New Kingdom relate that seafaring tribes, the Sea Peoples, were the final catalyst that put the fall of cities and states in motion. However, the lack of a stratified radiocarbon-based archaeology for the Sea People event has led to a floating historical chronology derived from a variety of sources spanning dispersed areas. Here, we report a stratified radiocarbon-based archaeology with anchor points in ancient epigraphic-literary sources, Hittite-Levantine-Egyptian kings and astronomical observations to precisely date the Sea People event. By confronting historical and science-based archaeology, we establish an absolute age range of 1192-1190 BC for terminal destructions and cultural collapse in the northern Levant. This radiocarbon-based archaeology has far-reaching implications for the wider Mediterranean, where an elaborate network of international relations and commercial activities are intertwined with the history of civilizations.

  18. Motivation Mechanism of Kucong People in Economic Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on introduction of economic transition of Kucong people, this paper presents two motivation mechanisms, namely, political pulling and economic promotion. For political pulling, it is required to build grass-roots government service system in Zhemi Town and promote economic transition from external side; strengthen leadership of Party Committee of Zhemi Town in grass-roots government; enhance construction of grass-roots government in Zhemi Town; and regulate relationship between grass-roots government and village committee of Zhemi Town. For economic promotion, it is proposed to set up collective producers’ cooperatives and promote economic transition of Kucong people from internal side. By taking pilot of Liuliu xinzhai Village production cooperative as an example, it puts forward that new production working cooperatives should be established to solve Kucong people’s problem of not good at working separately. It is proposed to cultivate their agricultural activities through collectivization, promote development of its backward productivity, and strive for permanent residence and sustainable development of agriculture on the basis of economic development, finally to realize social development of Kucong people.

  19. Meet the local policy workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmelmann, Camilla L.; Vallgårda, Signild; Jensen, Anja MB

    2017-01-01

    of whom we found typified a specific way of reasoning and implementing the guidelines. This typology illustrates the diversity found within a group of local policy workers, and helps explain the variability reported in most studies on policy/guideline implementation. On the level of individuals, variation...... in implementation is often explained by the implementers’ perceptions of need for, and potential benefits of the policy, selfefficacy, and skill proficiency. We add ‘professionally related experiences’ as another explanation. We introduce the concepts of translation and hinterland to understand how and why people...

  20. Young People with a Twist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bo Wagner; Madsen, Diana Højlund

    The report is based on group interviews with 33 young people with ethnic minority backgrounds. They have been asked about their educational and vocational wishes and also touch on a number of issues such as family, gender equality, discrimination and integration.......The report is based on group interviews with 33 young people with ethnic minority backgrounds. They have been asked about their educational and vocational wishes and also touch on a number of issues such as family, gender equality, discrimination and integration....