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Sample records for putative opsonin receptor

  1. Cloning of gp-340, a putative opsonin receptor for lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Mollenhauer, J; Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an oligomeric C type lectin that promotes phagocytosis by binding to microbial surface carbohydrates. A 340-kDa glycoprotein (gp-340) has been shown to bind SP-D in the presence of calcium but does so independently of carbohydrate recognition. This protein exists both...... transcription-PCR analysis showed that the main sites of synthesis of gp-340 are lung, trachea, salivary gland, small intestine, and stomach. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong staining for gp-340 in alveolar and other tissue macrophages. Immunostaining of the macrophage membrane was either uniform or focal...... intestine and in the ducts of salivary glands. The distribution of gp-340 in macrophages is compatible with a role as an opsonin receptor for SP-D....

  2. Cloning of gp-340, a putative opsonin receptor for lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Mollenhauer, J; Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    in a soluble form and in association with the membranes of alveolar macrophages. The primary structure of gp-340 has been established by molecular cloning, which yielded a 7,686-bp cDNA sequence encoding a polypeptide chain of 2, 413 amino acids. The domain organization features 13 scavenger receptor cysteine...

  3. A C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas serves as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin with high binding affinity to LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuai; Li, Hui; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Sun, Jinsheng; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    C1q proteins serve as pattern recognition receptors and involve in the pathogen recognition and complement pathway activation. In the present study, a novel C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas (designated CgC1qDC-1) was isolated by liposaccharide-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 gene was determined by performing a homologous search of eight tryptic peptides identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS against the genome of C. gigas. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 was of 387 bp encoding a polypeptide of 128 amino acids containing a typical globular C1q domain. The globular C1q domain possessed eight β strands with a jelly-roll topology structure, which was similar to the structure of human gC1q domain. The mRNA transcripts of CgC1qDC-1 were dominantly expressed in mantle and hemocytes, while low expressed in hepatopancreas, gonad, gill and muscle. The expression level of CgC1qDC-1 increased drastically at 6 h after Vibrio splendidus stimulation, and then gradually fell to the normal level at about 24 h. ELISA assay quantified that CgC1qDC-1 bound to LPS with high binding affinity (Kd = 0.09 × 10(-6) M). Moreover, CgC1qDC-1 significantly enhanced the phagocytosis of oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. splendidus. These results collectively indicated that CgC1qDC-1 could serve as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin in the innate immune response against invading Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor sequence from fish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Kumaresan; T Venugopal; A Vikas; T J Pandian; S M Athavan

    2000-03-01

    A search for the presence of mariner-like elements in the Labeo rohita genome by polymerase chain reaction led to the amplification of a partial DNA sequence coding for a putative transmembrane domain of gonadotropin hormone receptor. The amplified DNA sequence shows a high degree of homology to the available turkey and human luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormone receptor coding sequences. This is the first report on cloning such sequences of piscine origin.

  5. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, S.M.; Weaver, D.R.; Rivkees, S.A.; Stopa, E.G.

    1988-10-07

    In vitro autoradiography with /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock.

  6. Identification of Putative Receptors for the Novel Adipokine CTRP3 Using Ligand-Receptor Capture Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Ozment, Tammy; Wright, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    C1q TNF Related Protein 3 (CTRP3) is a member of a family of secreted proteins that exert a multitude of biological effects. Our initial work identified CTRP3’s promise as an effective treatment for Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Specifically, we demonstrated that mice fed a high fat diet failed to develop NAFLD when treated with CTRP3. The purpose of this current project is to identify putative receptors which mediate the hepatic actions of CTRP3. Methods We used Ligand-receptor glycocapture technology with TriCEPS™-based ligand-receptor capture (LRC-TriCEPS; Dualsystems Biotech AG). The LRC-TriCEPS experiment with CTRP3-FLAG protein as ligand and insulin as a control ligand was performed on the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell line. Results Initial analysis demonstrated efficient coupling of TriCEPS to CTRP3. Further, flow cytometry analysis (FACS) demonstrated successful oxidation and crosslinking of CTRP3-TriCEPS and Insulin-TriCEPS complexes to cell surface glycans. Demonstrating the utility of TriCEPS under these conditions, the insulin receptor was identified in the control dataset. In the CTRP3 treated cells a total enrichment of 261 peptides was observed. From these experiments 5 putative receptors for CTRP3 were identified with two reaching statistically significance: Lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) and Lysosome membrane protein 2 (LIMP II). Follow-up Co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the association between LAMP1 and CTRP3 and further testing using a polyclonal antibody to block potential binding sites of LAMP1 prevented CTRP3 binding to the cells. Conclusion The LRC-TriCEPS methodology was successful in identifying potential novel receptors for CTRP3. Relevance The identification of the receptors for CTRP3 are important prerequisites for the development of small molecule drug candidates, of which none currently exist, for the treatment NAFLD. PMID:27727322

  7. Putative role of prostaglandin receptor in intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekher eMohan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Each year, approximately 795,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke. Of all strokes, 84% are ischemic, 13% are intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH strokes and 3% are subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH strokes. Despite the decreased incidence of ischemic stroke, there has been no change in the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke in the last decade. ICH is a devastating disease 37-38% of patients between the ages of 45-64 die within 30 days. In an effort to prevent ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes we and others have been studying the role of prostaglandins and their receptors. Prostaglandins are bioactive lipids derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid. They sustain homeostatic functions and mediate pathogenic mechanisms, including the inflammatory response. Most prostaglandins are produced from specific enzymes and act upon cells via distinct G-protein coupled receptors. The presence of multiple prostaglandin receptor’s cross-reactivity and coupling to different signal transduction pathways allow differentiated cells to respond to prostaglandins in a unique manner. Due to the number of prostaglandin receptors, prostaglandin-dependent signaling can function either to promote neuronal survival or injury following acute excitotoxicity, hypoxia, and stress induced by ICH. To better understand the mechanisms of neuronal survival and neurotoxicity mediated by prostaglandin receptors, it is essential to understand downstream signaling. Several groups including ours have discovered unique roles for prostaglandin receptors in rodent models of ischemic stroke, excitotoxicity, and Alzheimer disease, highlighting the emerging role of prostaglandin receptor signaling in hemorrhagic stroke with a focus on cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and calcium (Ca2+ signaling. We review current ICH data and discuss future directions notably on prostaglandin receptors, which may lead to the development of unique therapeutic targets against hemorrhagic stroke and

  8. Putative Biomarkers and Targets of Estrogen Receptor Negative Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Byers

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a progressive and potentially fatal disease that affects women of all ages. Like all progressive diseases, early and reliable diagnosis is the key for successful treatment and annihilation. Biomarkers serve as indicators of pathological, physiological, or pharmacological processes. Her2/neu, CA15.3, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and cytokeratins are biomarkers that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. The structural and functional complexity of protein biomarkers and the heterogeneity of the breast cancer pathology present challenges to the scientific community. Here we review estrogen receptor-related putative breast cancer biomarkers, including those of putative breast cancer stem cells, a minor population of estrogen receptor negative tumor cells that retain the stem cell property of self renewal. We also review a few promising cytoskeleton targets for ER alpha negative breast cancer.

  9. A novel putative tyrosine kinase receptor with oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J W; Schulz, A S; Steenvoorden, A C; Schmidberger, M; Strehl, S; Ambros, P F; Bartram, C R

    1991-11-01

    We have detected transforming activity by a tumorigenicity assay using NIH3T3 cells transfected with DNA from a chronic myeloproliferative disorder patient. Here, we report the cDNA cloning of the corresponding oncogene, designated UFO, in allusion to the as yet unidentified function of its protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 3116bp cDNA clone revealed a 2682-bp-long open reading frame capable of directing the synthesis of a 894 amino acid polypeptide. The predicted UFO protein exhibits characteristic features of a transmembrane receptor with associated tyrosine kinase activity. The UFO proto-oncogene maps to human chromosome 19q13.1 and is transcribed into two 5.0 kb and 3.2 kb mRNAs in human bone marrow and human tumor cell lines. The UFO locus is evolutionarily conserved between vertebrate species. A 4.0 kb mRNA of the murine UFO homolog is expressed in a variety of different mouse tissues. We thus have identified a novel element of the complex signaling network involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  10. Synthesis and radiofluorination of putative NMDA receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, U.

    2011-01-15

    In the course of this work on the synthesis of radioligands for the NMDA receptor the authentic standards and labeling precursors of four compounds with an amidine structure was performed. Synthesis of the precursors followed reaction conditions given in the literature and was successful. The imidoesters used for the synthesis were obtained from their nitriles in a Pinner synthesis, while 2-hydroxybenzylamine was synthesized in a reduction of 2-hydroxybenzonitrile using borane as a reducing agent. After a coupling reaction of the amine and the imidoester in DMF using triethylamine as base the precursors were obtained in good yields and purified by crystallization from methanol. The cyclic standard compound was synthesized directly from 2-(bromomethyl)- benzonitrile and 2-hydroxybenzylamine in a ring closing reaction. Similar to the other precursors, crystallization from methanol produced a pure compound. The authentic standards were synthesized starting from salicylaldehyde. In a four step synthesis the desired ortho-fluoroethoxybenzylamine was obtained in good yield. Coupling of the amine with the respective imidoester or in the case of the cyclic compound 2-(bromomethyl)-benzonitrile gave the desired product which was then purified by column chromatography or by crystallization from ethanol and water. For the labeling procedure 1-bromo-2-[{sub 18}F]fluoroethane was synthesized following a previously published pathway starting from 1,2-dibromoethane. An alternative route of radiosynthesis for this prosthetic group was tested using ethyleneglycole- 1,2-ditosylate. The labeling reaction was performed on one of the precursors testing both DMF and DMSO as solvents and using NaOH as base. Yields of N-(2-fluoroethoxybenzyl)- cinnamamidine were about 78 % at 80 C after 30 minutes in DMSO. The desired product can now be synthesized in sufficient yields for in vitro and in vivo evaluation studies. Labeling on the cyclic precursor was attempted utilizing DMSO as solvent

  11. Identification of putative CLE peptide receptors involved in determinate nodulation on soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Virginie; Fenta, Berhanu Amsalu; Kunert, Karl; Holsters, Marcelle; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-07-01

    CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) peptides tightly control the balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation in several plant developmental processes. Transmission of the CLE peptide signal has been shown to be rather complex. Despite their recent identification, little is known about the receptors by which nodulation-specific CLE peptides, which were identified in soybean, are perceived. Genetic analysis has indicated that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase NARK of soybean (Glycine max) and its orthologs in other legumes are possible candidates. However, more receptors need to be identified because CLE peptides are often detected by heteromultimeric complexes. Here, we identified two additional putative CLE peptide receptor pairs in the soybean genome with a nodulation-related expression pattern, GmRLK1-GmRLK2 and GmRLK3-GmRLK4, and discuss their role in CLE peptide perception during nodulation.

  12. Molecular cloning and properties of a full-length putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, A; Yen, P M; Misiti, S; Cardona, G R; Liu, Y; Chin, W W

    1996-08-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors that regulate target gene transcription. The conserved carboxy-terminal region of the ligand-binding domain (AF-2) has been thought to play a critical role in mediating ligand-dependent transactivation by the interaction with coactivator(s). Using bacterially-expressed TR as a probe, far-Western-based expression cDNA library screening identified cDNAs that encode, in part, the recently reported partial steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) sequence. Additional work, including 5' RACE, has characterized a full-length cDNA that encodes a approximately 160 kD protein as a putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator (F-SRC-1). In vitro binding studies show that F-SRC-1 binds to a variety of nuclear hormone receptors in a ligand-dependent manner, along with TBP and TFIIB, suggesting that F-SRC-1 may play a role as a bridging molecule between nuclear hormone receptors and general transcription factors. Interestingly, AF-2 mutants also retain ligand-dependent interaction with F-SRC-1. Although F-SRC-1 recognizes the ligand-induced conformational changes of nuclear hormone receptors, our observations suggest that F-SRC-1 may bind directly with subregion(s) in nuclear hormone receptors other than the AF-2 region.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a new chemokine receptor gene, the putative chicken CXCR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q J; Lu, S; Ye, R D; Martins-Green, M

    2000-10-31

    This study delineates the isolation and characterization of a novel chemokine receptor gene, the putative chicken CXC receptor 1 (cCXCR1). Using a human CXCR1 probe, we isolated several positive clones from a chicken genomic library. One of the clones contained a fragment of approximately 5000bp that hybridized strongly with the hCXCR1 probe. This fragment was sequenced and subjected to a variety of computer analyses. The open reading frame for this gene predicts a seven transmembrane domain protein with all the characteristics of a chemokine receptor and with 67% sequence homology to hCXCR1, 65% to hCXCR2 and also with considerable sequence homology to other human chemokine receptors such as hCXCR4 (50%), hCCR2 (49%) and hCCR1 (49%). However, the homology to a previously isolated potential G-protein-coupled receptor for chickens (AvCRL1) is only 47%. Using 5' RACE, two transcription initiation sites were identified suggesting the potential for the expression of two protein isoforms (I and II) in vivo. The promoter for the putative cCXCR1 contains a variety of consensus transcription factor binding elements that can potentially be involved in the expression of this chicken receptor upon stimulation by stress-inducing agents. RT-PCR analysis was used to determine the pattern of expression of the larger isoform (I) of this receptor in a variety of tissues. This form of the receptor is expressed primarily in the organs of the gastrointestinal tract, tissues that are frequently exposed to stress-inducing agents, but not in the central nervous system, tissues that are protected from insult by the blood barrier. Using the same RT-PCR approach we show that stress-inducing agents, such as 'first-hand' and 'second-hand' cigarette smoke components, tumor promoters and thrombin, differentially stimulate the expression of the isoform I in primary fibroblasts. Thrombin is an enzyme that plays many important roles in thrombosis, angiogenesis and wound healing and exposure to

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii: function and putative signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Omri; Ventura, Tomer; Manor, Rivka; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Sagi, Amir

    2013-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) are highly conserved members of the tyrosine kinase receptor superfamily found in metazoans and plants. In arthropods, EGFRs are vital for the proper development of embryos and of adult limbs, gonads, and eyes as well as affecting body size. In searching for genes involved in the growth and development of our model organism, the decapod crustacean (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), a comprehensive transcript library was established using next-generation sequencing. Using this library, the expression of several genes assigned to the signal transduction pathways mediated by EGFRs was observed, including a transcript encoding M. rosenbergii EGFR (Mr-EGFR), several potential ligands upstream to the receptor, and most of the putative downstream signal transducer genes. The deduced protein encoded by Mr-EGFR, representing the first such receptor reported thus far in crustaceans, shows sequence similarity to other arthropod EGFRs. The M. rosenbergii gene is expressed in most tested tissues. The role of Mr-EGFR was revealed by temporarily silencing the transcript through weekly injections of double-stranded Mr-EGFR RNA. Such treatment resulted in a significant reduction in growth and a delay in the appearance of a male secondary sexual characteristic, namely the appendix masculina. An additional function of Mr-EGFR was revealed with respect to eye development. Although the optic ganglion appeared to have retained its normal morphology, Mr-EGFR-silenced individuals developed abnormal eyes that presented irregular organization of the ommatidia, reflected by unorganized receptor cells occupying large areas of the dioptric portion and by a shortened crystalline tract layer.

  15. Interactions among mu- and delta-opioid receptors, especially putative delta1- and delta2-opioid receptors, promote dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirose, N.; Murakawa, K.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Nagase, H.; Cools, A.R.; Koshikawa, N.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of interactions among mu- and delta-opioid receptors, especially the putative delta(1)- and delta(2)-opioid receptors, in the nucleus accumbens on accumbal dopamine release was investigated in awake rats by in vivo brain microdialysis. In agreement with previous studies, perfusion of the

  16. Interactions among mu- and delta-opioid receptors, especially putative delta1- and delta2-opioid receptors, promote dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirose, N.; Murakawa, K.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Nagase, H.; Cools, A.R.; Koshikawa, N.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of interactions among mu- and delta-opioid receptors, especially the putative delta(1)- and delta(2)-opioid receptors, in the nucleus accumbens on accumbal dopamine release was investigated in awake rats by in vivo brain microdialysis. In agreement with previous studies, perfusion of the

  17. Cloning and characterization of two putative seven-transmembrane receptor genes from cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Gao; Piming Zhao; Juan Wang; Haiyun Wang; Guiling Wang; Guixian Xia

    2008-01-01

    Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR,two full-length cDNAs encoding putative seven-transmembrane receptors (designated Gh7TMpR1 and Gh7TMpR2) were cloned from cotton plants.Southern blot and an ApaLl restriction site polymorphism analyses revealed that GhTTMpR1 was derived from the ancestral A diploid genome,while Gh7TMpR2 was from the D subgenome.Northern blot hybridization indicated that both Gh7TMpR1 and Gh7TMpR2 were expressed preferentially in the elongation phase of fiber development.Majority of the Gh7TMpR1 proteins were located within the membrane structure and displayed a punctuate pattern of distribution.Overexpression of Gh7TMpR1 in fission yeast disrupted the polar growth and caused the formation of rounded cells.These results suggest that GhT7MpRI may play a critical role in cotton fiber development,perhaps as a signaling receptor that is involved in controlling fiber elongation.

  18. Potential role of transient receptor potential channel M5 in sensing putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshimoto, Arisa; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Garske, Anna; Lopez, Roberto; Rolen, Shane; Flowers, Michael; Arevalo, Nicole; Restrepo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Based on pharmacological studies of chemosensory transduction in transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) knockout mice it was hypothesized that this channel is involved in transduction for a subset of putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Yet, in the same study an electroolfactogram (EOG) in the mouse olfactory epithelium showed no significant difference in the responses to pheromones (and odors) between wild type and TRPM5 knockout mice. Here we show that the number of OSNs expressing TRPM5 is increased by unilateral naris occlusion. Importantly, EOG experiments show that mice lacking TRPM5 show a decreased response in the occluded epithelia to putative pheromones as opposed to wild type mice that show no change upon unilateral naris occlusion. This evidence indicates that under decreased olfactory sensory input TRPM5 plays a role in mediating putative pheromone transduction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cyclic nucleotide gated channel A2 knockout (CNGA2-KO) mice that show substantially decreased or absent responses to odors and pheromones also have elevated levels of TRPM5 compared to wild type mice. Taken together, our evidence suggests that TRPM5 plays a role in mediating transduction for putative pheromones under conditions of reduced chemosensory input.

  19. Identification of a putative nuclear localization sequence within ANG II AT(1A) receptor associated with nuclear activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Raymond, John R; Baldys, Aleksander; Yang, Qing; Lee, Mi-Hye; Luttrell, Louis; Ullian, Michael E

    2007-04-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1 (AT(1)) receptors, similar to other G protein-coupled receptors, undergo desensitization and internalization, and potentially nuclear localization, subsequent to agonist interaction. Evidence suggests that the carboxy-terminal tail may be involved in receptor nuclear localization. In the present study, we examined the carboxy-terminal tail of the receptor for specific regions responsible for the nuclear translocation phenomenon and resultant nuclear activation. Human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing either a wild-type AT(1A) receptor-green fluorescent protein (AT(1A)R/GFP) construct or a site-directed mutation of a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS) [K307Q]AT(1A)R/GFP (KQ/AT(1A)R/GFP), were examined for differences in receptor nuclear trafficking and nuclear activation. Receptor expression, intracellular signaling, and ANG II-induced internalization of the wild-type/GFP construct and of the KQ/AT(1A)R/GFP mutant was similar. Laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that in cells expressing the AT(1A)R/GFP, trafficking of the receptor to the nuclear area and colocalization with lamin B occurred within 30 min of ANG II (100 nM) stimulation, whereas the KQ/AT(1A)R/GFP mutant failed to demonstrate nuclear localization. Immunoblotting of nuclear lysates with an anti-GFP antibody confirmed these observations. Nuclear localization of the wild-type receptor correlated with increase transcription for both EGR-1 and PTGS-2 genes while the nuclear-deficient KQ/AT(1A)R/GFP mutant demonstrated increases for only the EGR-1 gene. These results suggest that a NLS (KKFKKY; aa307-312) is located within the cytoplasmic tail of the AT(1A) receptor and that nuclear localization of the receptor corresponds with specific activation of transcription for the COX-2 gene PTGS-2.

  20. PHARMACOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF R-(+)-7-OH-DPAT, A PUTATIVE DOPAMINE D-3 RECEPTOR-LIGAND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAMSMA, G; BOTTEMA, T; WESTERINK, BHC; TEPPER, PG; DIJKSTRA, D; PUGSLEY, TA; MACKENZIE, RG; HEFFNER, TG; WIKSTROM, H

    1993-01-01

    The R-(+)-isomer of 7-hydroxy-2-(N,N-di-n-propylamino)tetralin (7-OH-DPAT) bound with a more than 200-fold higher affinity to cloned human dopamine D-3 receptors (K-i=0.57 nM) than to dopamine D-2 receptors; the corresponding S-(-)-enantiomer had considerably less affinity for both dopamine receptor

  1. Isolation of a putative receptor for KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (SH-EP) from cotyledons of Vigna mungo seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuru-Furuno, A; Okamoto, T; Minamikawa, T

    2001-10-01

    SH-EP is the major papain-type proteinase expressed in cotyledons of germinated Vigna mungo seeds. The proteinase possesses a KDEL sequence at the C-terminus although the mature form of SH-EP is localized in vacuoles. It has also been shown that the proform of SH-EP is accumulated at the edge or middle region of the endoplasmic reticulum, and the accumulated proSH-EP is directly transported to vacuoles via the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase-accumulating vesicle, KV. In this study, to address the transport machinery of proSH-EP through KV, putative receptor for proSH-EP was isolated from membrane proteins of cotyledons of V. mungo seedlings using a proSH-EP-immobilized column. The deduced amino acid sequence from cDNA to the protein revealed that the putative receptor for proSH-EP is a member of vacuolar sorting receptor, VSR, that is known to be localized in the Golgi-complex and/or clathrin coated vesicle. We carried out subcellular fractionation of cotyledon cells and subsequently conducted SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry with anti-V. mungo VSR (VmVSR) or SH-EP antibody. The results showed that VmVSR is co-localized in the fraction of the gradient in which KV existed.

  2. Identification and characterization of a putative human platelet thromboxane A/sub 2//prostaglandin H/sub 2/ receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saussy, D.L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The thromboxane A/sub 2/ (TXA/sub 2/) analog, 9,11-dimethylmethano-11,12-methano-16-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-13,14-dihydro-13-aza-15..cap alpha beta..-omega-tetranor TXA/sub 2/ (I-PTA-OH) was characterized as a competitive antagonist of TXA/sub 2/ mimetic-induced platelet aggregation, with a K/sub d/ of 190 nM in platelet rich plasma. This antagonism was specific for the putative thromboxane A/sub 2//prostaglandin H/sub 2/ (TXA/sub 2//PGH/sub 2/) receptor, since I-PTA-OH had no inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation stimulated by agonists which act independently of TXA/sub 2//PGH/sub 2/, and did not inhibit platelet TXA/sub 2/ synthesis. (/sup 125/I)-PTA-OH binding to a particulate fraction from human platelets was saturable, displaceable, and linear with protein concentration. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding revealed a single class of high affinity binding sites, with a K/sub d/ of 30 +/- 4 nM and a B/sub max/ of 1.8 +/- 0.3 pmol/mg protein. Kinetic analysis yielded a k/sub 1/ of 1.35 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/ and a k..sqrt../sub 1/ of 0.032 min/sup -1/, K/sub d/ = k..sqrt../sub 1//k/sub 1/ = 24 nM. The subcellular localization of the putative TXA/sub 2//PGH/sub 2/ receptor was determined using (/sup 125/I)-PTA-OH binding as a marker for the receptor. (/sup 125/I)-PTA-OH binding as a marker for the receptor. (/sup 125/I)-PTA-OH binding, was coenriched with markers for plasma membranes and dense tubular system; but not with markers for cytoplasmic constituents, mitochondria, or granules.

  3. Expression analysis of putative vitellogenin and lipophorin receptors in honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) queens and workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidugli-Lazzarini, Karina Rosa; do Nascimento, Adriana Mendes; Tanaka, Erica Donato; Piulachs, Maria Dolors; Hartfelder, Klaus; Bitondi, Márcia Gentile; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2008-07-01

    Two members of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family were identified as putative orthologs for a vitellogenin receptor (Amvgr) and a lipophorin receptor (Amlpr) in the Apis mellifera genome. Both receptor sequences have the structural motifs characteristic of LDLR family members and show a high degree of similarity with sequences of other insects. RT-PCR analysis of Amvgr and Amlpr expression detected the presence of both transcripts in different tissues of adult female (ovary, fat body, midgut, head and specifically hypopharyngeal gland), as well as in embryos. In the head RNA samples we found two variant forms of AmLpR: a full length one and a shorter one lacking 29 amino acids in the O-linked sugar domain. In ovaries the expression levels of the two honey bee LDLR members showed opposing trends: whereas Amvgr expression was upregulated as the ovaries became activated, Amlpr transcript levels gradually declined. In situ hybridization analysis performed on ovaries detected Amvgr mRNA exclusively in germ line cells and corroborated the qPCR results showing an increase in Amvgr gene expression concomitant with follicle growth.

  4. The putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55 affects osteoclast function in vitro and bone mass in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, Lauren S.; Ryberg, Erik; Sims, Natalie A.; Ridge, Susan A.; Mackie, Ken; Greasley, Peter J.; Ross, Ruth A.; Rogers, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    GPR55 is a G protein-coupled receptor recently shown to be activated by certain cannabinoids and by lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI). However, the physiological role of GPR55 remains unknown. Given the recent finding that the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 affect bone metabolism, we examined the role of GPR55 in bone biology. GPR55 was expressed in human and mouse osteoclasts and osteoblasts; expression was higher in human osteoclasts than in macrophage progenitors. Although the GPR55 agonis...

  5. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, C.L.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E. (Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-(3H)cis-methyldioxolane ((3H)CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites was detected and (3H)CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with (3H)CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the (3H)CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. (3H)CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of (3H)CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM (3H)CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting (3H)CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration.

  6. The putative roles of nuclear and membrane-bound progesterone receptors in the female reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Magdalena K; Rekawiecki, Robert; Kotwica, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Progesterone produced by the corpus luteum (CL) is a key regulator of normal cyclical reproductive functions in the females of mammalian species. The physiological effects of progesterone are mediated by the canonical genomic pathway after binding of progesterone to its specific nuclear progesterone receptor (PGR), which acts as a ligand-activated transcription factor and has two main isoforms, PGRA and PGRB. These PGR isoforms play different roles in the cell; PGRB acts as an activator of progesterone-responsive genes, while PGRA can inhibit the activity of PGRB. The ratio of these isoforms changes during the estrous cycle and pregnancy, and it corresponds to the different levels of progesterone signaling occurring in the reproductive tract. Progesterone exerts its effects on cells also by a non-genomic mechanism by the interaction with the progesterone-binding membrane proteins including the progesterone membrane component (PGRMC) 1 and 2, and the membrane progestin receptors (mPRs). These receptors rapidly activate the appropriate intracellular signal transduction pathways, and subsequently they can initiate specific cell responses or modulate genomic cell responses. The diversity of progesterone receptors and their cellular actions enhances the role of progesterone as a factor regulating the function of the reproductive system and other organs. This paper deals with the possible involvement of nuclear and membrane-bound progesterone receptors in the function of target cells within the female reproductive tract.

  7. Enhanced resistance to soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines in transgenic soybean by silencing putative CLE receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLE peptides are small extracellular proteins important in regulating plant meristematic activity through the CLE-receptor kinase-WOX signaling module. Stem cell pools in the SAM (shoot apical meristem), RAM (root apical meristem), and vascular cambium are tightly controlled by CLE signaling pathway...

  8. Putative hAPN receptor binding sites in SARS_CoV spike protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUXiao-Jing; LUOCheng; LinJian-Cheng; HAOPei; HEYou-Yu; GUOZong-Ming; QINLei; SUJiong; LIUBo-Shu; HUANGYin; NANPeng; LIChuan-Song; XIONGBin; LUOXiao-Min; ZHAOGuo-Ping; PEIGang; CHENKai-Xian; SHENXu; SHENJian-Hua; ZOUJian-Ping; HEWei-Zhong; SHITie-Liu; ZHONGYang; JIANGHua-Liang; LIYi-Xue

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To obtain the information of ligand-receptor binding between thd S protein of SARS_CoV and CD13, identify the possible interacting domains or motifs related to binding sites, and provide clues for studying the functions of SARS proteins and designing anti-SARS drugs and vaccines. METHODS: On the basis of comparative genomics, the homology search, phylogenetic analyses, and multi-sequence alignment were used to predict CD13 related interacting domains and binding sites sites in the S protein of SARS_CoV. Molecular modeling and docking simulation methods were employed to address the interaction feature between CD13 and S protein of SARS_CoV in validating the bioinformatics predictions. RESULTS:Possible binding sites in the SARS_CoV S protein to CD13 have been mapped out by using bioinformatics analysis tools. The binding for one protein-protein interaction pair (D757-R761 motif of the SARS_CoV S protein to P585-A653 domain of CD13) has been simulated by molecular modeling and docking simulation methods. CONCLUSION:CD13 may be a possible receptor of the SARS_CoV S protein which may be associated with the SARS infection. This study also provides a possible strategy for mapping the possible binding receptors of the proteins in a genome.

  9. Histopathological effects and determination of the putative receptor of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Da toxin in Spodoptera littoralis midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenFarhat-Touzri, Dalel; Saadaoui, Marwa; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Saadaoui, Imen; Azzouz, Hichem; Tounsi, Slim

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain HD133, known by its effectiveness against Spodoptera species, produces many insecticidal proteins including Cry1Ab, Cry1Ca and Cry1Da. In the present study, the insecticidal activity of Cry1Da against Spodoptera littoralis was investigated. It showed toxicity with an LC(50) of 224.4 ng/cm(2) with 95% confidence limits of (178.61-270.19) and an LC(90) of 467.77 ng/cm(2) with 95% confidence limits of (392.89-542.65). The midgut histopathology of Cry1Da fed larvae showed vesicle formation in the apical region, vacuolization and destruction of epithelial cells. Biotinylated-activated Cry1Da toxin bound protein of about 65 kDa on blots of S. littoralis brush border membrane preparations. This putative receptor differs in molecular size from those recognized by Cry1C and Vip3A which are active against this polyphagous insect. This difference in midgut receptors strongly supports the use of Cry1Da as insecticidal agent, particularly in case of Cry and/or Vip-resistance management.

  10. Characterization of a Putative Receptor Binding Surface on Skint-1, a Critical Determinant of Dendritic Epidermal T Cell Selection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mahboob; Knowles, Timothy J.; Hart, Rosie; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Woodward, Martin J.; Willcox, Carrie R.; Overduin, Michael; Hayday, Adrian C.; Willcox, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC) form a skin-resident γδ T cell population that makes key contributions to cutaneous immune stress surveillance, including non-redundant contributions to protection from cutaneous carcinogens. How DETC become uniquely associated with the epidermis was in large part solved by the identification of Skint-1, the prototypic member of a novel B7-related multigene family. Expressed only by thymic epithelial cells and epidermal keratinocytes, Skint-1 drives specifically the development of DETC progenitors, making it the first clear candidate for a selecting ligand for non-MHC/CD1-restricted T cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning Skint-1 activity are unresolved. Here, we provide evidence that DETC selection requires Skint-1 expression on the surface of thymic epithelial cells, and depends upon specific residues on the CDR3-like loop within the membrane-distal variable domain of Skint-1 (Skint-1 DV). Nuclear magnetic resonance of Skint-1 DV revealed a core tertiary structure conserved across the Skint family, but a highly distinct surface charge distribution, possibly explaining its unique function. Crucially, the CDR3-like loop formed an electrostatically distinct surface, featuring key charged and hydrophobic solvent-exposed residues, at the membrane-distal tip of DV. These results provide the first structural insights into the Skint family, identifying a putative receptor binding surface that directly implicates Skint-1 in receptor-ligand interactions crucial for DETC selection. PMID:26917727

  11. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis in search for a putative Paramecium beta-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płatek, A; Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    1999-01-01

    RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis were performed in order to search for a putative beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) in Paramecium using several beta2-adrenergic-specific molecular probes. Under strictly defined RT-PCR conditions DNA species of expected molecular size about 360 bp were generated with the primers corresponding to the universal mammalian beta2-AR sequence tagged sites (located within the 4th and the 6th transmembrane regions of the receptor). This RT-PCR product hybridized in Southern blot analysis with the oligonucleotide probe designed to the highly conservative beta2-AR region involved in G-proteins interaction and located within the amplified region. Northern hybridization was performed on Paramecium total RNA and mRNA with human beta2-AR cDNA and two oligonucleotide probes: the first included Phe 290 involved in agonist binding (Strader et al., 1995) and the second was the backward RT-PCR primer. All these probes revealed the presence of about 2 kb mRNA which is consistent with the size of beta2-AR transcripts found in higher eukaryotes.

  12. Identification of putative human T cell receptor delta complementary DNA clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, S.; Brenner, M.B.; Krangel, M.S.

    1987-10-30

    A novel T cell receptor (TCR) subunit termed TCR delta, associated with TCY ..gamma.. and CD3 polypeptides, were recently found on a subpopulation of human T lymphocytes. T cell-specific complementary DNA clones present in a human TCR..gamma..delta T cell complementary DNA library were obtained and characterized in order to identify candidate clones encoding TCR delta. One cross-hybridizing group of clones detected transcripts that are expressed in lymphocytes bearing TCR ..gamma..delta but not in other T lymphocytes and are encoded by genes that are rearranged in TCR ..gamma..delta lymphocytes but deleted in other T lymphocytes. Their sequences indicate homology to the variable, joining, and constant elements of other TCR and immunoglobulin genes. These characteristics are strong evidence that the complementary DNA clones encode TCR delta.

  13. Putative bioactive motif of tritrpticin revealed by an antibody with biological receptor-like properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava Sharma

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides represent one of the most promising future strategies for combating infections and microbial drug resistance. Tritrpticin is a 13mer tryptophan-rich cationic antimicrobial peptide with a broad spectrum of activity whose application in antimicrobial therapy has been hampered by ambiguity about its biological target and consequently the molecular interactions necessary for its antimicrobial activity. The present study provides clues about the mechanism of action of tritripticin by using a unique monoclonal antibody (mAb as a 'physiological' structural scaffold. A pool of mAbs were generated against tritrpticin and based on its high affinity and ability to bind tritrpticin analogs, mAb 6C6D7 was selected and characterized further. In a screening of phage displayed random peptides, this antibody was able to identify a novel antimicrobial peptide with low sequence homology to tritrpticin, suggesting that the mAb possessed the physico-chemical characteristics mimicking the natural receptor. Subsequently, thermodynamics and molecular modeling identified a core group of hydrophobic residues in tritrpticin arranged in a distorted's' shaped conformation as critical for antibody binding. Comparison of the mAb induced conformation with the micelle bound structure of tritrpticin reveals how a common motif may be able to interact with multiple classes of biomolecules thus extending the target range of this innate immune peptide. Based on the concurrence between thermodynamic and structural data our results reveal a template that can be used to design novel antimicrobial pharmacophores while simultaneously demonstrating at a more fundamental level the potential of mAbs to act as receptor surrogates.

  14. Repression of estrogen receptor {beta} function by putative tumor suppressor DBC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Satoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Wada-Hiraike, Osamu, E-mail: osamuwh-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Hiraike, Haruko; Miyamoto, Yuichiro; Sone, Kenbun; Oda, Katsutoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Fukuhara, Hiroshi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Kato, Shigeaki [SORST, Japan Science and Technology, Honcho 4-1-8, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0034 (Japan); Yano, Tetsu; Taketani, Yuji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    It has been well established that estrogen is involved in the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} appears to promote the proliferation of cancer tissues, while ER{beta} can protect against the mitogenic effect of estrogen in breast tissue. The expression status of ER{alpha} and ER{beta} may greatly influence on the development, treatment, and prognosis of breast cancer. Previous studies have indicated that the deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1/KIAA1967) gene product has roles in regulating functions of nuclear receptors. The gene encoding DBC1 is a candidate for tumor suppressor identified by genetic search for breast cancer. Caspase-dependent processing of DBC1 promotes apoptosis, and depletion of the endogenous DBC1 negatively regulates p53-dependent apoptosis through its specific inhibition of SIRT1. In addition, DBC1 modulates ER{alpha} expression and promotes breast cancer cell survival by binding to ER{alpha}. Here we report an ER{beta}-specific repressive function of DBC1. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies show that ER{beta} and DBC1 interact in a ligand-independent manner similar to ER{alpha}. In vitro pull-down assays revealed a direct interaction between DBC1 amino-terminus and activation function-1/2 domain of ER{beta}. Although DBC1 shows no influence on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function of ER{alpha}, the expression of DBC1 negatively regulates the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function of ER{beta}in vivo, and RNA interference-mediated depletion of DBC1 stimulates the transactivation function of ER{beta}. These results implicate the principal role of DBC1 in regulating ER{beta}-dependent gene expressions.

  15. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis vacuolar sorting receptor 3 reveals a putative function in guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Emily L; Brown, Michelle; Pan, Songqin; Desikan, Radhika; Neill, Steven J; Girke, Thomas; Surpin, Marci; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2008-01-01

    Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) are responsible for the proper targeting of soluble cargo proteins to their destination compartments. The Arabidopsis genome encodes seven VSRs. In this work, the spatio-temporal expression of one of the members of this gene family, AtVSR3, was determined by RT-PCR and promoter::reporter gene fusions. AtVSR3 was expressed specifically in guard cells. Consequently, a reverse genetics approach was taken to determine the function of AtVSR3 by using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Plants expressing little or no AtVSR3 transcript had a compressed life cycle, bolting approximately 1 week earlier and senescing up to 2 weeks earlier than the wild-type parent line. While the development and distribution of stomata in AtVSR3 RNAi plants appeared normal, stomatal function was altered. The guard cells of mutant plants did not close in response to abscisic acid treatment, and the mean leaf temperatures of the RNAi plants were on average 0.8 degrees C lower than both wild type and another vacuolar sorting receptor mutant, atvsr1-1. Furthermore, the loss of AtVSR3 protein caused the accumulation of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide, signalling molecules implicated in the regulation of stomatal opening and closing. Finally, proteomics and western blot analyses of cellular proteins isolated from wild-type and AtVSR3 RNAi leaves showed that phospholipase Dgamma, which may play a role in abscisic acid signalling, accumulated to higher levels in AtVSR3 RNAi guard cells. Thus, AtVSR3 may play an important role in responses to plant stress.

  16. Putative nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits express differentially through the life cycle of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica A; Garczynski, Stephen F

    2016-04-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the targets of neonicotinoids and spinosads, two insecticides used in orchards to effectively control codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Orchardists in Washington State are concerned about the possibility of codling moth field populations developing resistance to these two insecticides. In an effort to help mitigate this issue, we initiated a project to identify and characterize codling moth nAChR subunits expressed in heads. This study had two main goals; (i) identify transcripts from a codling moth head transcriptome that encode for nAChR subunits, and (ii) determine nAChR subunit expression profiles in various life stages of codling moth. From a codling moth head transcriptome, 24 transcripts encoding for 12 putative nAChR subunit classes were identified and verified by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequence determination. Characterization of the deduced protein sequences encoded by putative nAChR transcripts revealed that they share the distinguishing features of the cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily with 9 α-type subunits and 3 β-type subunits identified. Phylogenetic analysis comparing these protein sequences to those of other insect nAChR subunits supports the identification of these proteins as nAChR subunits. Stage expression studies determined that there is clear differential expression of many of these subunits throughout the codling moth life cycle. The information from this study will be used in the future to monitor for potential target-site resistance mechanisms to neonicotinoids and spinosads in tolerant codling moth populations.

  17. Polymorphism screening of four genes encoding advanced glycation end-product putative receptors. Association study with nephropathy in type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poirier, Odette; Nicaud, Viviane; Vionnet, N

    2001-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) may play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular and renal complications of diabetes. Four putative AGE receptors (RAGEs), AGE-R1, AGE-R2, and AGE-R3 have been described. In this study, we scanned the sequence of the genes enc...

  18. Characterization of putative receptors specific for quercetin on bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.C.; Becker, C.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have reported that tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates (R-BSA), quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells (SMC). To investigate whether there are binding sites or receptors for these polyphenol-containing molecules on SMC, the authors have synthesized /sup 125/I-labeled rutin-bovine serum albumin ((/sup 125/I)R-BSA) of high specific activity (20 Ci/mmol). SMC were isolated from a bovine thoracic aorta and maintained in Eagle's minimum essential medium with 10% calf serum in culture. These SMC at early subpassages were suspended (3-5 x 10/sup 7/ cells/ml) in phosphate-buffered saline and incubated with (/sup 125/I)R-BSA (10 pmol) in the presence or absence of 200-fold unlabeled R-BSA, TGP, BSA, rutin, quercetin or related polyphenols, and catecholamines. Binding of (/sup 125/I)R-BSA to SMC was found to be reproducible and the radioligand was displaced by R-BSA, and also by TGP, rutin, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid, but not by BSA, ellagic acid, naringin, hesperetin, dopamine, epinephrine, or isoproterenol. The binding was saturable, reversible, and pH-dependent. These results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for quercetinon arterial SMC.

  19. Binding properties of nine 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP) analogues to M1, M2, M3 and putative M4 muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Tastenoy, M.; Christophe, J.

    1992-01-01

    1. We compared the binding properties of 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methiodide (4-DAMP) and nine analogues of this compound on muscarinic receptors of human neuroblastoma NB-OK1 cells (M1 subtype), rat heart (M2 subtype), rat pancreas (M3 subtype) and to the putative M4 subtype in striatum. 2. The requirements for high affinity binding were somewhat different for the four receptor subtypes. In general, the requirements of M3 receptors were more stringent than for M1, M2 or putativ...

  20. Computational discovery of putative quorum sensing inhibitors against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annapoorani, Angusamy; Umamageswaran, Venugopal; Parameswari, Radhakrishnan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2012-09-01

    Drugs have been discovered in the past mainly either by identification of active components from traditional remedies or by unpredicted discovery. A key motivation for the study of structure based virtual screening is the exploitation of such information to design targeted drugs. In this study, structure based virtual screening was used in search for putative quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The virtual screening programme Glide version 5.5 was applied to screen 1,920 natural compounds/drugs against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of P. aeruginosa. Based on the results of in silico docking analysis, five top ranking compounds namely rosmarinic acid, naringin, chlorogenic acid, morin and mangiferin were subjected to in vitro bioassays against laboratory strain PAO1 and two more antibiotic resistant clinical isolates, P. aeruginosa AS1 (GU447237) and P. aeruginosa AS2 (GU447238). Among the five compounds studied, except mangiferin other four compounds showed significant inhibition in the production of protease, elastase and hemolysin. Further, all the five compounds potentially inhibited the biofilm related behaviours. This interaction study provided promising ligands to inhibit the quorum sensing (QS) mediated virulence factors production in P. aeruginosa.

  1. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh [Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Zhu, Hao [The Rutgers Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ (United States); Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D.; Melagraki, Georgia [NovaMechanics Ltd., Nicosia (Cyprus); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R{sup 2} = 0.71, STL R{sup 2} = 0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R{sup 2} = 0.53, p < 0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset inclusive of ERα and β (the latter is unique). • New methodology that for the first time affords acceptable ERβ models. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of affinity and function.

  2. Tissue-specific expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and putative developmental regulatory modules in Baltic salmon yolk-sac fry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, Kristiina A. [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)], E-mail: kristiina.vuori@utu.fi; Nordlund, Eija [Department of Information Technology, University of Turku, and Turku Centre for Computer Science (TUCS), FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Kallio, Jenny [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Salakoski, Tapio [Department of Information Technology, University of Turku, and Turku Centre for Computer Science (TUCS), FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Nikinmaa, Mikko [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2008-04-08

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an ancient protein that is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates, indicating its important function throughout evolution. AhR has been studied largely because of its role in toxicology-gene expression via AhR is induced by many aromatic hydrocarbons in mammals. Recently, however, it has become clear that AhR is involved in various aspects of development such as cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell motility and migration. The mechanisms by which AhR regulates these various functions remain poorly understood. Across-species comparative studies of AhR in invertebrates, non-mammalian vertebrates and mammals may help to reveal the multiple functions of AhR. Here, we have studied AhR during larval development of Baltic salmon (Salmon salar). Our results indicate that AhR protein is expressed in nervous system, liver and muscle tissues. We also present putative regulatory modules and module-matching genes, produced by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) cloning and in silico analysis, which may be associated with evolutionarily conserved functions of AhR during development. For example, the module NFKB-AHRR-CREB found from salmon ChIP sequences is present in human ULK3 (regulating formation of granule cell axons in mouse and axon outgrowth in Caernohabditis elegans) and SRGAP1 (GTPase-activating protein involved in the Slit/Robo pathway) promoters. We suggest that AhR may have an evolutionarily conserved role in neuronal development and nerve cell targeting, and in Wnt signaling pathway.

  3. Pharmacological significance of the interplay between angiotensin receptors: MAS receptors as putative final mediators of the effects elicited by angiotensin AT1 receptors antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernomian, Larissa; Pernomian, Laena; Gomes, Mayara S; da Silva, Carlos H T P

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between angiotensin AT1 receptors and MAS receptors relies on several inward regulatory mechanisms from renin-angiotensin system (RAS) including the functional crosstalk between angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the competitive AT1 antagonism exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the antagonist feature assigned to AT1/MAS heterodimerization on AT1 signaling and the AT1-mediated downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Recently, such interplay has acquired an important significance to RAS Pharmacology since a few studies have supporting strong evidences that MAS receptors mediate the effects elicited by AT1 antagonists. The present Perspective provides an overview of the regulatory mechanisms involving AT1 and MAS receptors, their significance to RAS Pharmacology and the future directions on the interplay between angiotensin receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymorphism screening of four genes encoding advanced glycation end-product putative receptors. Association study with nephropathy in type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poirier, Odette; Nicaud, Viviane; Vionnet, N

    2001-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) may play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular and renal complications of diabetes. Four putative AGE receptors (RAGEs), AGE-R1, AGE-R2, and AGE-R3 have been described. In this study, we scanned the sequence of the genes....... The minor allele of a polymorphism located in the promoter region of the RAGE gene (C-1152A) conferred a weak protective effect (P

  5. Discrimination of putative M1 and M2 muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat brain by N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, A.B.; Creese, I.

    1986-03-01

    The EC/sub 50/ of EEDQ for the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding in vitro was approximately 3 fold lower for homogenates of hippocampus than brainstem (containing predominantly putative M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptor subtypes respectively). Furthermore, the time-dependent loss of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding produced by 100 ..mu..M EEDQ was faster in homogenates of hippocampus than brainstem. Administration of EEDQ (20 mg/kg i.p.) irreversibly reduced the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding by 56% and 34% in hippocampus and brainstem respectively. Pirenzepine competition for the remaining (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding sites following in vitro and in vivo treatment with EEDQ revealed a significant increase in the proportion of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding sites having low affinity for pirenzepine (M/sub 2/ receptors), indicating that the high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ receptors) were selectively and irreversibly lost. Thus, EEDQ discriminates the same putative M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptor subtypes that are discriminated by pirenzepine. The reduction of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding could be prevented both in vitro and in vivo by atropine or scopolamine. These data may indicate differences in the accessibility of these putative receptor subtypes to EEDQ or, alternatively, differences in the availability of carboxyl groups able to interact with EEDQ at the ligand recognition site of M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptors.

  6. Identification of putative chemosensory receptor genes from yellow peach moth Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée) antennae transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xing; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2016-01-01

    The yellow peach moth, Conogethes punctiferalis, is an extremely important polyphagous insect in Asia. The chemosensory systems of moth play an important role in detecting food, oviposition sites and mate attraction. Several antennal chemosensory receptors are involved in odor detection. Our study aims to identify chemosensory receptor genes for potential applications in behavioral responses of yellow peach moth. By transcriptomic analysis of male and female antennae, 83 candidate chemosensory receptors, including 62 odorant receptors, 11 ionotropic receptors and 10 gustatory receptors were identified. Through Blast and sequence alignment, the highly conserved co-receptor Orco was annotated, eight unigenes clustered into pheromone receptors, and two clustered as sugar receptor. Among the IRs, one unigenes was similar with co-receptors IR25a. Expression levels of 50 odorant receptors were further evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR in antennae. All the ORs tested were detected in antennae and some of which were associated with sex-biased expression. The chemosensory receptors identified in C. punctiferalis provide a foundational resource for further analysis on olfaction for behavior. The expression profiles of ORs in antennae indicated variant functions in olfactory recognition, and our results provided the possibility for the potential application of semiochemical to control this pest moth. PMID:27659493

  7. Putative model for heat shock protein 70 complexation with receptor of advanced glycation end products through fluorescence proximity assays and normal mode analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Marcelo Sartori; Ligabue-Braun, Rodrigo; Souza, Cristiane Santos; Heimfarth, Luana; Verli, Hugo; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is recognized by receptors on the plasma membrane, such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR2, CD14, and CD40. This leads to activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancement of the phagocytic activity of innate immune cells, and stimulation of antigen-specific responses. However, the specific characteristics of HSP70 binding are still unknown, and all HSP70 receptors have not yet been described. Putative models for HSP70 complexation to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGEs), considering both ADP- and ATP-bound states of HSP70, were obtained through molecular docking and interaction energy calculations. This interaction was detected and visualized by a proximity fluorescence-based assay in A549 cells and further analyzed by normal mode analyses of the docking complexes. The interacting energy of the complexes showed that the most favored docking situation occurs between HSP70 ATP-bound and RAGE in its monomeric state. The fluorescence proximity assay presented a higher number of detected spots in the HSP70 ATP treatment, corroborating with the computational result. Normal-mode analyses showed no conformational deformability in the interacting interface of the complexes. Results were compared with previous findings in which oxidized HSP70 was shown to be responsible for the differential modulation of macrophage activation, which could result from a signaling pathway triggered by RAGE binding. Our data provide important insights into the characteristics of HSP70 binding and receptor interactions, as well as putative models with conserved residues on the interface area, which could be useful for future site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  8. Mannose-binding lectin is a disease modifier in clinical malaria and may function as opsonin for Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, Peter; Nielsen, Morten A; Kurtzhals, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    associated with the occurrence and outcome parameters of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and asked whether MBL may function as an opsonin for P. falciparum. No difference in MBL genotype frequency was observed between infected and noninfected children or between children with cerebral malaria and/or severe...

  9. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of the mouse urocortin II gene: a putative connection between the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alon; Vaughan, Joan; Vale, Wylie W

    2003-08-01

    Peptides encoded by the urocortin II (Ucn II) gene were recently identified as new members of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family. Ucn II is a specific ligand for the type 2 CRF receptor. Using RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, and immunofluorescence staining, we report the expression of Ucn II mRNA in several human and mouse (m) neuronal cell lines. Using these neuronal cell lines, we provide evidence that exposure to glucocorticoid hormones increases mUcn II mRNA expression and promoter activation. The effect of glucocorticoids on mUcn II mRNA expression was tested in the Ucn II/glucocorticoid receptor-positive cell line NG108-15. The results demonstrate that mUcn II mRNA expression is up-regulated by dexamethasone in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Computer analysis revealed the presence of 14 putative half-palindrome glucocorticoid response element sequences within 1.2 kb of the mUcn II 5' flanking region. Transfections with different fragments of the 5'-flanking region of the mUcn II gene fused to a luciferase reporter gene showed a promoter-dependent expression of the reporter gene and regulation by dexamethasone. Promoter deletion studies clarify the sufficient putative glucocorticoid response element site mediating this effect. The steroid hormone antagonist RU486 blocked the effect of dexamethasone on mUcn II mRNA expression and promoter activation, suggesting a direct glucocorticoid receptor-mediated effect of dexamethasone on mUcn II mRNA expression. Ucn II is expressed in vivo in the hypothalamus, brainstem, olfactory bulb, and pituitary. Low levels were also detected in the mouse cortex, hippocampus, and spinal cord. We demonstrated that mUcn II gene transcription was stimulated by glucocorticoid administration in vivo and inhibited by removal of glucocorticoids by adrenalectomy. Administration of dexamethasone to mice resulted in an increase of mUcn II levels in the hypothalamus and brainstem but not in the olfactory bulb region 12 h following

  10. A mutant cell line resistant to Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH): its potential in identification of putative receptor for TDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G; Iida, T; Inoue, H; Yutsudo, M; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T

    1997-05-24

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), a pore-forming toxin produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, is cytotoxic to Rat-1, a fibroblast cell line derived from rat embryo. Through mutagenesis of Rat-1 with nitrosoguanidine, we established a mutant cell line, MR-T1. MR-T1 was over 200 times more resistant to the cytotoxic activity of TDH than Rat-1. TDH increased membrane permeability of Rat-1 but not of MR-T1. Binding analysis showed that, while being able to bind to Rat-1. TDH failed to bind to MR-T1, indicating that MR-T1 is deficient in the putative receptor for TDH. Somatic hybrid cells between Rat-1 and MR-T1 were similarly sensitive to TDH as Rat-1. Moreover, TDH could bind to the hybrid cells as well as to Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that MR-T1 is promising for complementation cloning of a gene related to the putative receptor for TDH.

  11. Actions of Xanthurenic acid, a putative endogenous Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, on sensory transmission in the thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, C S; Neale, S A; Salt, T E

    2013-03-01

    Xanthurenic acid (XA), a molecule arising from tryptophan metabolism by transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine, has recently been identified as an endogenous Group II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor ligand in vitro. Impairments in Group II mGlu receptor expression and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, as have multiple steps in the kynurenine metabolism pathway. Therefore, we examined XA in vivo to further investigate its potential as a Group II mGlu receptor ligand using a preparation that has been previously demonstrated to efficiently reveal the action of other Group II mGlu receptor ligands in vivo. Extracellular single-neurone recordings were made in the rat ventrobasal thalamus (VB) in conjunction with iontophoresis of agonists, an antagonist and a positive allosteric modulator and/or intravenous (i.v.) injection of XA. We found the XA effect on sensory inhibition, when applied iontophoretically and i.v., was similar to that of other Group II mGlu receptor agonists in reducing inhibition evoked in the VB from the thalamic reticular nucleus upon physiological sensory stimulation. Furthermore, we postulate that XA may be the first potential endogenous allosteric agonist (termed 'endocoid') for the mGlu receptors. As the Group II receptors and kynurenine metabolism pathway have both been heavily implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, XA could play a pivotal role in antipsychotic research as this potential endocoid represents both a convergence within these two biological parameters and a novel class of Group II mGlu receptor ligand. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors'.

  12. Role of protease-activated receptor-2 in inflammation, and its possible implications as a putative mediator of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Holzhausen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2 belongs to a novel subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors with seven-transmembrane domains. This receptor is widely distributed throughout the body and seems to be importantly involved in inflammatory processes. PAR2 can be activated by serine proteases such as trypsin, mast cell tryptase, and bacterial proteases, such as gingipain produced by Porphyromonas gingivalis. This review describes the current stage of knowledge of the possible mechanisms that link PAR2 activation with periodontal disease, and proposes future therapeutic strategies to modulate the host response in the treatment of periodontitis.

  13. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonists ICS 205-930 and GR38032F, putative anxiolytic drugs, differ from diazepam in their pharmacological profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, M; Przegalinski, E

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacological profile of the two 5-HT(3) (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptor antagonists, the putative anxiolytics ICS 205-930 and GR38032F was compared with that of diazepam in four standard behavioural tests in rats. All the investigated drugs induced an anxiolytic effect in the passive avoidance test, having reduced the latency to re-enter the chamber previously associated with an inescapable footshock, and increased the time spent in that chamber. On the basis of the lowest effective dose, both ICS 205-930 and GR38032F were about 20 times more potent than diazepam, though the anxiolytic activity of either 5- HT(3) receptor antagonist was confined to a narrow dose range (ICS 205-930: 93.7-187.5 μg/ kg, GR38032F: 125-375 μg/kg), their higher doses having been ineffective. The anxiolytic effect of diazepam, but not of ICS 205-930, was abolished by flumazenil. In contrast to diazepam, neither ICS 205-930 nor GR38032F-both given in doses up to 20 mg/kg-showed any activity in the pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures, open field, and rota-rod tests. These results suggest that the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists may represent a new class of anxiolytic drugs devoid of anticonvulsant, sedative or muscle-relaxant properties, and that their anxi olytic activity is not mediated by benzodiazepine receptors.

  14. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of a Putative Octopamine/Tyramine Receptor during the Developmental Stages of the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Xu, Fei; Huang, Baoyu; Li, Yingxiang; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) and its precursor, tyramine (TA), participate in invertebrate development such as growth, maturation, and reproduction by activating their corresponding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although OA was first discovered in mollusks (octopus), subsequent studies on OA, TA and related receptors have primarily been conducted in Ecdysozoa, especially in insects. Accordingly, only limited reports on OA/TA receptors in mollusks are available and their physiological roles remain unclear. Here, a full-length cDNA encoding a putative 524 amino acid OA/TA receptor (CgGPR1) was isolated from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. CgGPR1 was most closely related to the Lymnaea stagnalis OA receptor OAR2 in sequence. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CgGPR1 belongs to a poorly studied subfamily of invertebrate OA/TA receptors. The spatio-temporal expression of CgGPR1 in C. gigas larvae was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. CgGPR1 was expressed during all developmental stages of C. gigas with higher levels at mid-developmental stages, indicating its potential role in embryogenesis and tissue differentiation. Immunoreactive fluorescence of CgGPR1 was mainly observed in the velum, foot, gill and mantle of C. gigas larvae. CgGPR1 transcripts were detected in all the tested organs of adult C. gigas, with highest level in the mantle. Pharmacological analysis showed that cAMP and Ca2+ concentrations remained unchanged in HEK293 cells expressing CgGPR1 upon addition of OA, TA or related amines, suggesting that CgGPR1 modulates other unknown molecules rather than cAMP and Ca2+. Our study sheds light on CgGPR1 function in oysters. PMID:27992549

  15. Identification of Putative Steroid Receptor Antagonists in Bottled Water: Combining Bioassays and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Martin; Schlüsener, Michael P.; Ternes, Thomas A.; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling and thereby adversely affecting human health. Recent reports provide evidence for the presence of EDCs in commercially available bottled water, including steroid receptor agonists and antagonists. However, since these findings are based on biological data the causative chemicals remain unidentified and, therefore, inaccessible for toxicological evaluation. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of bottled water and to identify the causative steroid receptor antagonists. We evaluated the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of 18 bottled water products in reporter gene assays for human estrogen receptor alpha and androgen receptor. Using nontarget high-resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap Velos), we acquired corresponding analytical data. We combined the biological and chemical information to determine the exact mass of the tentative steroid receptor antagonist. Further MSn experiments elucidated the molecule’s structure and enabled its identification. We detected significant antiestrogenicity in 13 of 18 products. 16 samples were antiandrogenic inhibiting the androgen receptor by up to 90%. Nontarget chemical analysis revealed that out of 24520 candidates present in bottled water one was consistently correlated with the antagonistic activity. By combining experimental and in silico MSn data we identified this compound as di(2-ethylhexyl) fumarate (DEHF). We confirmed the identity and biological activity of DEHF and additional isomers of dioctyl fumarate and maleate using authentic standards. Since DEHF is antiestrogenic but not antiandrogenic we conclude that additional, yet unidentified EDCs must contribute to the antagonistic effect of bottled water. Applying a novel approach to combine biological and chemical analysis this is the first study to identify so far unknown EDCs in bottled water. Notably

  16. Identification of putative steroid receptor antagonists in bottled water: combining bioassays and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wagner

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling and thereby adversely affecting human health. Recent reports provide evidence for the presence of EDCs in commercially available bottled water, including steroid receptor agonists and antagonists. However, since these findings are based on biological data the causative chemicals remain unidentified and, therefore, inaccessible for toxicological evaluation. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of bottled water and to identify the causative steroid receptor antagonists. We evaluated the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of 18 bottled water products in reporter gene assays for human estrogen receptor alpha and androgen receptor. Using nontarget high-resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap Velos, we acquired corresponding analytical data. We combined the biological and chemical information to determine the exact mass of the tentative steroid receptor antagonist. Further MS(n experiments elucidated the molecule's structure and enabled its identification. We detected significant antiestrogenicity in 13 of 18 products. 16 samples were antiandrogenic inhibiting the androgen receptor by up to 90%. Nontarget chemical analysis revealed that out of 24520 candidates present in bottled water one was consistently correlated with the antagonistic activity. By combining experimental and in silico MS(n data we identified this compound as di(2-ethylhexyl fumarate (DEHF. We confirmed the identity and biological activity of DEHF and additional isomers of dioctyl fumarate and maleate using authentic standards. Since DEHF is antiestrogenic but not antiandrogenic we conclude that additional, yet unidentified EDCs must contribute to the antagonistic effect of bottled water. Applying a novel approach to combine biological and chemical analysis this is the first study to identify so far unknown EDCs in bottled water

  17. Macrophage P2X7 Receptor Function Is Reduced during Schistosomiasis: Putative Role of TGF-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen D’arc Santos Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a chronic inflammatory disease whose macrophages are involved in immunopathology modulation. Although P2X7 receptor signaling plays an important role in inflammatory responses mediated by macrophages, no reports have examined the role of P2X7 receptors in macrophage function during schistosomiasis. Thus, we evaluated P2X7 receptor function in peritoneal macrophages during schistosomiasis using an ATP-induced permeabilization assay and measurements of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. ATP treatment induced significantly less permeabilization in macrophages from S. mansoni-infected mice than in control cells from uninfected animals. Furthermore, P2X7-mediated increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels were also reduced in macrophages from infected mice. TGF-β1 levels were increased in the peritoneal cavity of infected animals, and pretreatment of control macrophages with TGF-β1 reduced ATP-induced permeabilization, mimicking the effect of S. mansoni infection. Western blot and qRT-PCR data showed no difference in P2X7 protein and mRNA between uninfected, infected, and TGF-β1-treated groups. However, immunofluorescence analysis revealed reduced cell surface localization of P2X7 receptors in macrophages from infected and TGF-β1-treated mice compared to controls. Therefore, our data suggest that schistosomiasis reduces peritoneal macrophage P2X7 receptor signaling. This effect is likely due to the fact that infected mice have increased levels of TGF-β1, which reduces P2X7 receptor cell surface expression.

  18. Differential splicing of human androgen receptor pre-mRNA in X-linked reifenstein syndrome, because of a deletion involving a putative branch site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Verleun-Mooijman, M.C.T.; Blaeij, T.J.P. de; Brinkmann, A.O.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, mRNA, and protein in a subject with X-linked Reifenstein syndrome (partial androgen insensitivity) is reported. The presence of two mature AR transcripts in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient is established, and, by reverse transcriptase-PCR and RNase transcription analysis, the wild-type transcript and a transcript in which exon 3 sequences are absent without disruption of the translational reading frame are identified. Sequencing and hybridization analysis show a deletion of >6 kb in intron 2 of the human AR gene, starting 18 bp upstream of exon 3. The deletion includes the putative branch-point sequence (BPS) but not the acceptor splice site on the intron 2/exon 3 boundary. The deletion of the putative intron 2 BPS results in 90% inhibition of wild-type splicing. The mutant transcript encodes an AR protein lacking the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Western/immunoblotting analysis is used to show that the mutant AR protein is expressed in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The residual 10% wild-type transcript can be the result of the use of a cryptic BPS located 63 bp upstream of the intron 2/exon 3 boundary of the mutant AR gene. The mutated AR protein has no transcription-activating potential and does not influence the transactivating properties of the wild-type AR, as tested in cotransfection studies. It is concluded that the partial androgen-insensitivity syndrome of this patient is the consequence of the limited amount of wild-type AR protein expressed in androgen target cells, resulting from the deletion of the intron 2 putative BPS. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Biochemical Evidence for a Putative Inositol 1,3,4,5-Tetrakisphosphate Receptor in the Olfactory System of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiongdong Pang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptor neurons in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar appear to use a phosphoinositide-directed phospholipase C (PLC in odorant signal transduction. The consequences of odor-activated PLC depend on its product, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3. Therefore, a plasma membrane rich (PMR fraction, previously characterized from salmon olfactory rosettes, was used to study binding sites for IP3 and its phosphorylation product, inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (IP4. Binding sites for IP3 were present at the lower limit for detection in the PMR fraction but were abundant in a microsomal fraction. Binding sites for IP4 were abundant in the PMR fraction and thus colocalized in the same subcellular fraction with odorant receptors for amino acids and bile acids. Binding of IP4 was saturable and high affinity (Kd = 83 nM. The rank order for potency of inhibition of IP4 by other inositol polyphosphates (InsPx followed the phosphorylation number with InsP6 > InsP5 > other InsP4 isomers > InsP3 isomers > InsP2 isomers, with the latter showing no activity. The consequences of PLC activity in this system may be dictated in part by a putative receptor for IP4.

  20. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-06-30

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways.

  1. The four serotypes of dengue recognize the same putative receptors in Aedes aegypti midgut and Ae. albopictus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camacho-Nuez Minerva

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue viruses (DENV attach to the host cell surface and subsequently enter the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several primary and low affinity co-receptors for this flavivirus have been identified. However, the presence of these binding molecules on the cell surface does not necessarily render the cell susceptible to infection. Determination of which of them serve as bona fide receptors for this virus in the vector may be relevant to treating DENV infection and in designing control strategies. Results (1 Overlay protein binding assay showed two proteins with molecular masses of 80 and 67 kDa (R80 and R67. (2 Specific antibodies against these two proteins inhibited cell binding and infection. (3 Both proteins were bound by all four serotypes of dengue virus. (4 R80 and R67 were purified by affinity chromatography from Ae. aegypti mosquito midguts and from Ae albopictus C6/36 cells. (5 In addition, a protein with molecular mass of 57 kDa was purified by affinity chromatography from the midgut extracts. (6 R80 and R67 from radiolabeled surface membrane proteins of C6/36 cells were immunoprecipitated by antibodies against Ae. aegypti midgut. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that R67 and R80 are receptors for the four serotypes of dengue virus in the midgut cells of Ae. aegypti and in C6/36 Ae. albopictus cells.

  2. The impact of the Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant on the midgut histology of Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and determination of its putative receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghribi, Dhouha; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Boukedi, Hanen; Elleuch, Mouna; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Tounsi, Slim

    2012-02-01

    SPB1 is a Bacillus subtilis strain producing a lipopeptide biosurfactant. The insecticidal activity of this biosurfactant was evaluated against the Egyptian cotton leaf worm (Spodoptera littoralis). It displayed toxicity with an LC(50) of 251 ng/cm(2). The histopathological changes occurred in the larval midgut of S. littoralis treated with B. subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant were vesicle formation in the apical region, cellular vacuolization and destruction of epithelial cells and their boundaries. Ligand-blotting experiments with S. littoralis brush border membrane vesicles showed binding of SPB1 biosurfactant to a protein of 45 kDa corresponding to its putative receptor. The latter differs in molecular size from those recognized by Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3A and Cry1C toxins, commonly known by their activity against S. littoralis. This result wires the application of B. subtilis biosurfactant for effective control of S. littoralis larvae, particularly in the cases where S. littoralis will develop resistance against B. thuringiensis toxins.

  3. The expression and putative role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor in bovine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Li, C; Zhu, X; Wang, C; Liu, Zhuo; Li, W; Lu, Chen; Zhou, Xu

    2012-02-01

    The neurotrophin family of proteins promote the survival and differentiation of nerve cells and are thought to play an important role in development of reproductive tissues. The objective of the present study was to detect the presence of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB in bovine sperm, and explore the potential role of BDNF in sperm function. We demonstrated that both the neorotrophin BDNF and the tyrosine kinase receptor protein TrkB were expressed in ejaculated bovine sperm. Furthermore, BDNF per se was secreted by sperm. Insulin and leptin secretion by bovine sperm were increased (P BDNF, whereas insulin was decreased by K252a. Therefore, we inferred that BDNF could be a regulator of sperm secretion of insulin and leptin through the TrkB receptor. Sperm viability and mitochondrial activity were both decreased (P BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway was blocked with K252a. Furthermore, BDNF promoted apoptosis of bovine sperm through TrkB binding (P BDNF secreted by bovine sperm was important in regulation of insulin and leptin secretion in ejaculated bovine sperm. Furthermore, BDNF may affect sperm mitochondrial activity and apoptosis, as well as their viability.

  4. Characterization of a putative S-locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasrallah, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The major results of our research effort include the determination of the S-Receptor Kinase (SRK) gene structure, the demonstration of S-haplotype-associated SRK polymorphisms and possible co-evolution of SRK and SLG, the characterization of the temporal and spatial expression patterns of SRK, and the demonstration that SRK has intrinsic serine/threonine kinase activity. Our results have indicated that SLG originated from an SRK-like gene by a gene duplication event and suggested a possible molecular basis for leaky S haplotypes. The data have allowed us to develop a model of self-incompatibility based on the interaction of SRK and SLG and the activation of SRK in response to self-pollination. More generally, the information that we have obtained is potentially relevant to understanding mechanisms of signalling inplants. Thus, the interaction of membrane-based receptor protein kinases with secreted forms of their extracellular domains may represent a generalized mechanism by which receptors signal across the plant cell wall.

  5. Neuropeptide S receptor 1 expression in the intestine and skin--putative role in peptide hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundman, L; Saarialho-Kere, U; Vendelin, J; Lindfors, K; Assadi, G; Kaukinen, K; Westerholm-Ormio, M; Savilahti, E; Mäki, M; Alenius, H; D'Amato, M; Pulkkinen, V; Kere, J; Saavalainen, P

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) was recently found to be genetically associated with inflammatory bowel disease in addition to asthma and related traits. Epithelia of several organs express NPSR1 isoforms A and B, including the intestine and the skin, and NPSR1 appears to be upregulated in inflammation. In this study, we used cell lines and tissue samples to characterize the expression of NPSR1 and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) in inflammation. We used polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to investigate the expression of NPS and NPSR1 in intestinal diseases, such as celiac disease and food allergy, and in cutaneous inflammatory disorders. We found that NPSR1-A was expressed by the enteroendocrine cells of the gut. Overall, the expression pattern of NPS was similar to its receptor suggesting an autocrine mechanism. In an NPSR1-A overexpressing cell model, stimulation with NPS resulted in a dose-dependent upregulation of glycoprotein hormone, alpha polypeptide (CGA), tachykinin 1 (TAC1), neurotensin (NTS) and galanin (GAL) encoding peptide hormones secreted by enteroendocrine cells. Because NPSR1 was also expressed in macrophages, neutrophils, and intraepithelial lymphocytes, we demonstrated that stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma increased NPSR1 expression in the THP-1 monocytic cells. In conclusion, similar to other neuropeptides and their receptors, NPSR1 signalling might play a dual role along the gut-brain axis. The NPS/NPSR1 pathway may participate in the regulation of the peptide hormone production in enteroendocrine cells of the small intestine.

  6. Aedes aegypti cadherin serves as a putative receptor of the Cry11Aa toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jianwu; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Fernandez, Luisa E.; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberon, Mario; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2009-01-01

    Cry11Aa of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is the most active toxin to Aedes aegypti in this strain. We previously reported that, in addition to a 65 kDa GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-anchored ALP (alkaline phosphatase), the toxin also binds a 250 kDa membrane protein. Since this protein is the same size as cadherin, which in lepidopteran insects is an important Cry toxin receptor, we developed an anti-AaeCad antibody. This antibody detects a 250 kDa protein in immunoblots of l...

  7. Mutation of putative N-linked glycosylation sites on the human nucleotide receptor P2X7 reveals a key residue important for receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenertz, Lisa Y; Wang, Ziyi; Guadarrama, Arturo; Hill, Lindsay M; Gavala, Monica L; Bertics, Paul J

    2010-06-08

    The nucleotide receptor P2X(7) is an immunomodulatory cation channel and a potential therapeutic target. P2X(7) is expressed in immune cells such as monocytes and macrophages and is activated by extracellular ATP following tissue injury or infection. Ligand binding to P2X(7) can stimulate ERK1/2, the transcription factor CREB, enzymes linked to the production of reactive oxygen species and interleukin-1 isoforms, and the formation of a nonspecific pore. However, little is known about the biochemistry of P2X(7), including whether the receptor is N-linked glycosylated and if this modification affects receptor function. Here we provide evidence that P2X(7) is sensitive to the glycosidases EndoH and PNGase F and that the human receptor appears glycosylated at N187, N202, N213, N241, and N284. Mutation of N187 results in weakened P2X(7) agonist-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CREB, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, as well as a decreased level of pore formation. In further support of a role for glycosylation in receptor function, treatment of RAW 264.7 macrophages with the N-linked glycosylation synthesis inhibitor tunicamycin attenuates P2X(7) agonist-induced, but not phorbol ester-induced, ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Interestingly, residue N187 belongs to an N-linked glycosylation consensus sequence found in six of the seven P2X family members, suggesting this site is fundamentally important to P2X receptor function. To address the mechanism whereby N187 mutation attenuates receptor activity, we developed a live cell proteinase K digestion assay that demonstrated altered cell surface expression of P2X(7) N187A. This is the first report to map human P2X(7) glycosylation sites and reveal residue N187 is critical for receptor trafficking and function.

  8. A semidwarf phenotype of barley uzu results from a nucleotide substitution in the gene encoding a putative brassinosteroid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Makiko; Honda, Ichiro; Zeniya, Haruko; Yoneyama, Koichi; Saisho, Daisuke; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Takatsuto, Suguru; Hoshino, Tsuguhiro; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2003-11-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles throughout plant growth and development. Despite the importance of clarifying the mechanism of BR-related growth regulation in cereal crops, BR-related cereal mutants have been identified only in rice (Oryza sativa). We previously found that semidwarf barley (Hordeum vulgare) accessions carrying the "uzu" gene, called "uzu" barley in Japan, are non-responding for brassinolide (BL). We then performed chemical and molecular analyses to clarify the mechanisms of uzu dwarfism using isogenic line pairs of uzu gene. The response of the uzu line to BL was significantly lower than that of its corresponding normal line. Measurement of BRs showed that the uzu line accumulates BRs, similar to known BR-insensitive mutants. The marker synteny of rice and barley chromosomes suggests that the uzu gene may be homologous to rice D61, a rice homolog of Arabidopsis BR-insensitive 1 (BRI1), encoding a BR-receptor protein. A barley homolog of BRI1, HvBRI1, was isolated by using degenerate primers. A comparison of HvBRI1 sequences in uzu and normal barley varieties showed that the uzu phenotype is correlated with a single nucleotide substitution. This substitution results in an amino acid change at a highly conserved residue in the kinase domain of the BR-receptor protein. These results may indicate that uzu dwarfism is caused by the missense mutation in HvBRI1. The uzu gene is being introduced into all hull-less barley cultivars in Japan as an effective dwarf gene for practical use, and this is the first report about an agronomically important mutation related to BRs.

  9. The scavenger receptor repertoire in six cnidarian species and its putative role in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie F. Neubauer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many cnidarians engage in a mutualism with endosymbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellates that forms the basis of the coral reef ecosystem. Interpartner interaction and regulation includes involvement of the host innate immune system. Basal metazoans, including cnidarians have diverse and complex innate immune repertoires that are just beginning to be described. Scavenger receptors (SR are a diverse superfamily of innate immunity genes that recognize a broad array of microbial ligands and participate in phagocytosis of invading microbes. The superfamily includes subclades named SR-A through SR-I that are categorized based on the arrangement of sequence domains including the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR, the C-type lectin (CTLD and the CD36 domains. Previous functional and gene expression studies on cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis have implicated SR-like proteins in interpartner communication and regulation. In this study, we characterized the SR repertoire from a combination of genomic and transcriptomic resources from six cnidarian species in the Class Anthozoa. We combined these bioinformatic analyses with functional experiments using the SR inhibitor fucoidan to explore a role for SRs in cnidarian symbiosis and immunity. Bioinformatic searches revealed a large diversity of SR-like genes that resembled SR-As, SR-Bs, SR-Es and SR-Is. SRCRs, CTLDs and CD36 domains were identified in multiple sequences in combinations that were highly homologous to vertebrate SRs as well as in proteins with novel domain combinations. Phylogenetic analyses of CD36 domains of the SR-B-like sequences from a diversity of metazoans grouped cnidarian with bilaterian sequences separate from other basal metazoans. All cnidarian sequences grouped together with moderate support in a subclade separately from bilaterian sequences. Functional experiments were carried out on the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida that engages in a symbiosis with Symbiodinium minutum

  10. The scavenger receptor repertoire in six cnidarian species and its putative role in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Emilie F.; Poole, Angela Z.; Davy, Simon K.

    2016-01-01

    Many cnidarians engage in a mutualism with endosymbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellates that forms the basis of the coral reef ecosystem. Interpartner interaction and regulation includes involvement of the host innate immune system. Basal metazoans, including cnidarians have diverse and complex innate immune repertoires that are just beginning to be described. Scavenger receptors (SR) are a diverse superfamily of innate immunity genes that recognize a broad array of microbial ligands and participate in phagocytosis of invading microbes. The superfamily includes subclades named SR-A through SR-I that are categorized based on the arrangement of sequence domains including the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR), the C-type lectin (CTLD) and the CD36 domains. Previous functional and gene expression studies on cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis have implicated SR-like proteins in interpartner communication and regulation. In this study, we characterized the SR repertoire from a combination of genomic and transcriptomic resources from six cnidarian species in the Class Anthozoa. We combined these bioinformatic analyses with functional experiments using the SR inhibitor fucoidan to explore a role for SRs in cnidarian symbiosis and immunity. Bioinformatic searches revealed a large diversity of SR-like genes that resembled SR-As, SR-Bs, SR-Es and SR-Is. SRCRs, CTLDs and CD36 domains were identified in multiple sequences in combinations that were highly homologous to vertebrate SRs as well as in proteins with novel domain combinations. Phylogenetic analyses of CD36 domains of the SR-B-like sequences from a diversity of metazoans grouped cnidarian with bilaterian sequences separate from other basal metazoans. All cnidarian sequences grouped together with moderate support in a subclade separately from bilaterian sequences. Functional experiments were carried out on the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida that engages in a symbiosis with Symbiodinium minutum (clade B1

  11. Interaction of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin with biological and model membranes: A putative protein receptor in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, Marco M; Sot, Jesús; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-03-01

    Epsilon-toxin (ETX) is a powerful toxin produced by some strains of Clostridium perfringens (classified as types B and D) that is responsible for enterotoxemia in animals. ETX forms pores through the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, consisting of a β-barrel of 14 amphipathic β-strands. ETX shows a high specificity for certain cell lines, of which Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) is the first sensitive cell line identified and the most studied one. The aim of this study was to establish the role of lipids in the toxicity caused by ETX and the correlation of its activity in model and biological membranes. In MDCK cells, using cell counting and confocal microscopy, we have observed that the toxin causes cell death mediated by toxin binding to plasma membrane. Moreover, ETX binds and permeabilizes the membranes of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMV). However, little effect is observed on protein-free vesicles. The data suggest the essential role of a protein receptor for the toxin in cell membranes.

  12. D-GPCR: a novel putative G protein-coupled receptor overexpressed in prostate cancer and prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigle, Bernd; Fuessel, Susanne; Ebner, Reinhard; Temme, Achim; Schmitz, Marc; Schwind, Sandra; Kiessling, Andrea; Rieger, Michael A; Meye, Axel; Bachmann, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P; Rieber, E Peter

    2004-09-10

    The use of molecular targets in novel strategies of tumor treatment largely depends on the identification of proteins with a tumor- or tissue-restricted expression. We identified the novel protein D-GPCR that is selectively overexpressed in human prostate cancer and prostate and belongs to the subfamily of odorant-like orphan G protein-coupled receptors. Quantification of D-GPCR transcripts in different human tissues by real-time PCR demonstrated 27-fold overexpression in prostate compared to skeletal muscle, the organ with second highest transcript numbers in males. Investigation of tumor/normal cDNA pairs obtained from 241 cancer patients including four prostate tumors confirmed the preferential expression in prostate. When comparing the mean transcript level of 15 prostate cancer tissues to their non-tumorous counterparts, D-GPCR was almost 6-fold upregulated. Coupled in vitro transcription and translation of D-GPCR cDNA produced a protein band of approximately 28 kDa. Recombinant, His-tagged protein was expressed in transfected HEK293 cells and gave rise to a 30 kDa band specifically detected by anti-His antibody. These data provide the basis for future studies evaluating the diagnostic potential of D-GPCR and its utility as a novel target in immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  13. Stallion spermatozoa: putative target of estrogens; presence of the estrogen receptors ESR1, ESR2 and identification of the estrogen-membrane receptor GPER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkoun, Brahim; Gautier, Camille; Delalande, Christelle; Barrier-Battut, Isabelle; Guénon, Isabelle; Goux, Didier; Bouraïma-Lelong, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    Among mammals, the stallion produces the largest amount of testicular estrogens. These steroid hormones are produced mainly by Leydig and Sertoli cells in the testis and also in the epididymis. Their role in horse testicular physiology and their ability to act on spermatozoa are still unknown. In order to determine if spermatozoa are targets for estrogens, the presence of estrogen receptors in mature ejaculated spermatozoa has been investigated. The presence of a single isoform of ESR1 (66kDa) and ESR2 (61kDa) was found by Western-blot analysis in samples from seven stallions. Confocal analysis mainly showed a flagellar localization for both receptors. Immuno-TEM experiments revealed that they are mostly located near the membranes, which are classically associated with rapid, non-genomic, effects. Moreover, we evidenced the expression of the seven transmembrane estradiol binding receptor GPER in colt testis. The protein was also localized at the connecting piece in mature spermatozoa. In conclusion, our results suggest that horse spermatozoa are a target for estrogens, which could act on several receptors either during the epididymal transit and/or in the female genital tract.

  14. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK[sub 6] cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys[sup 524] codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with [sup 32]P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified [sup 32]p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  15. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the first Porifera tumor necrosis factor superfamily member and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Ghignone, Stefano; Mussino, Francesca; Vezzulli, Luigi; Cerrano, Carlo; Giovine, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the molecular cloning and characterization of the first Tumor Necrosis Factor homologous and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis: chTNF and chTNFR, respectively. The deduced chTNF amino acid sequence is a type II transmembrane protein containing the typical TNFSF domain. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that chTNF is more related to Chordata TNFs rather than to other invertebrates. chTNF and chTNFR are constitutively expressed both in the ectosome and in the choanosome of the sponge, with higher levels in the ectosome. chTNF and chTNFR mRNAs were monitored in sponge fragmorphs treated with Gram(+) or Gram(-) bacteria. chTNF was significantly upregulated in Gram(+)-treated fragmorphs as compared to controls, while chTNFR was upregulated by both treatments. Finally, the possible chTNF fibrogenic role in sponge fragmorphs was studied by TNF inhibitor treatment measuring fibrillar and non fibrillar collagen gene expression; results indicate that the cytokine is involved in sponge collagen deposition and homeostasis.

  16. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

    2011-09-30

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (ΔSO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ΔSO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 μM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

  17. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III (Univ. of Pennyslvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  18. Mutations in WSC genes for putative stress receptors result in sensitivity to multiple stress conditions and impairment of Rlm1-dependent gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, T; Verna, J; Ballester, R

    2001-09-01

    Intracellular signaling by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades plays an essential role in the cellular response to environmental stress. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the PKC1-regulated, stress-activated MAP kinase pathway, the MPK1 cascade, is activated by heat and by a decrease in osmolarity. The genes WSC1, WSC2 and WSC3 encode putative receptors that maintain cell wall integrity under conditions of heat stress. Genetic studies place the function of the WSC genes upstream of the MPK1 kinase cascade. To further define the role of the WSC family in the stress response we determined whether: (1) the wscdelta mutants are sensitive to other environmental stress conditions, in addition to heat shock; (2) expression from four transcriptional control elements, known to be activated by stress, is impaired in wscdelta mutants; and (3) Wsc4, a Wsc homolog, has functions that overlap with those of the other Wsc family members. We report here that deletion of WSC and PKC1 causes hypersensitivity to ethanol, hydrogen peroxide and DNA-damaging drugs. In wscdelta mutants expression of beta-galactosidase from the AP-1 response element (ARE), the heat shock response element (HSE) or the stress response element (STRE) is not reduced. In contrast, expression of a reporter gene placed under the control of the Rlm1 (transcription factor)-dependent response element is significantly reduced in wscdelta mutants. This suggests that the lysis defect of wscdelta mutants is at least in part caused by a defect in transcriptional regulation by Rlm1. Phenotypic analysis of the effect of deleting WSC4 in a wsc1delta mutant show that, unlike WSC2 or WSC3, deletion of WSC4 does not exacerbate the lysis defect of a wsc1delta strain. In contrast, deletion of WSC4 enhances the sensitivity of the wsc1delta mutant to heat shock, ethanol, and a DNA-damaging drug, suggesting that WSC4 plays a role in the response to environmental stress but that its function may differ from those of

  19. Palmitoylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes: reduction in their ability to activate G proteins by mutation of a putative palmitoylation site, cysteine 457, in the carboxyl-terminal tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, M K; Haga, T

    1997-04-15

    A putative palmitoylation site, Cys457, of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor) was eliminated by conversion to alanine or stop codon by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant m2 receptor C457A was not metabolically labeled with [3H] palmitic acid when expressed in Sf9 cells, whereas the wild-type m2 receptor was labeled under the same conditions. These results confirm that the Cys457 is the palmitoylation site. The rate of palmitoylation was markedly accelerated by addition of agonist, indicating that the palmitoylation reaction is affected by conformational changes of the receptor induced by agonist binding. The m2 receptor mutants without palmitoylation were purified and reconstituted with G proteins into phospholipid vesicles. Both mutants were good substrates of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and the phosphorylation was stimulated by agonist and G protein beta gamma subunits, as was the case for wild-type receptors. The mutant receptors interacted with and activate Gi2 and G(o). However, the rate of [35S] GTP gamma S binding to Gi2 was half as much for the mutants as that for the wild type, and the proportion of guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding sites was significantly less for mutants (42-42%) compared to wild type (62%). These results indicate that the palmitoylation of m2 receptors is not an absolute requirement for their interaction with G proteins but enhances the ability of the receptors to interact with G proteins.

  20. A comprehensive study on the putative δ-opioid receptor (sub)types using the highly selective δ-antagonist, Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkas, Erika; Bakota, Lidia; Gulya, Karoly; Wen, Ting; Pintar, John; Tóth, Geza; Szucs, Maria

    2011-08-01

    The goal of our work was a throughout characterization of the pharmacology of the TIPP-analog, Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH and see if putative δ-opioid receptor subtypes can be distinguished. Analgesic latencies were assessed in mouse tail-flick assays after intrathecal administration. In vitro receptor autoradiography, binding and ligand-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays were performed in the presence of putative δ(1)-(DPDPE: agonist, BNTX: antagonist), δ(2)-(agonist: deltorphin II, Ile(5,6)-deltorphin II, antagonist: naltriben) and μ-(DAMGO: agonist) opioid ligands. The examined antagonist inhibited the effect of DPDPE by 60%, but did not antagonize δ(2)- and μ-agonist induced analgesia. The radiolabeled form identified binding sites with K(D)=0.18 nM and receptor densities of 102.7 fmol/mg protein in mouse brain membranes. The binding site distribution of the [(3)H]Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH agreed well with that of [(3)H]Ile(5,6)-deltorphin II as revealed by receptor autoradiography. Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH displayed 2.49±0.06 and 0.30±0.01 nM potency against DPDPE and deltorphin II in the [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay, respectively. The rank order of potency of putative δ(1)- and δ(2)-antagonists against DPDPE and deltorphin was similar in brain and CHO cells expressing human δ-opioid receptors. Deletion of the DOR-1 gene resulted in no residual binding of the radioligand and no significant DPDPE effect on G-protein activation. Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH is a highly potent and δ-opioid specific antagonist both in vivo and in vitro. However, the putative δ(1)- and δ(2)-opioid receptors could not be unequivocally distinguished in vitro.

  1. A novel putative lipoprotein receptor (CasLpR) in the hemocytes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: cloning and up-regulated expression after the injection of LPS and LTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Naoaki; Chung, J Sook

    2012-03-01

    The full-length cDNA encoding a putative lipoprotein receptor (CasLpR) was isolated from the hemocytes of Callinectes sapidus using 5' and 3' RACEs. The open reading frame for CasLpR contains a precursor of putative CasLpR consisting of 1710 amino acid residues including 22 amino acid residues of the signal peptide (22 amino acids). Mature CasLpR (1688 amino acids with 5.6% of phosphorylation sites) has multiple, putative functional domains: five low-density lipoprotein receptor domains in the N-terminus, and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolysis site domain and a 7 transmembrane receptor (secretin family) domain in the C-terminus. To date, there are no proteins with a similar domain structure in the GenBank. The expression pattern of CasLpR was exclusive in hemocytes among all tested tissues obtained from a juvenile female at intermolt stage: brain, eyestalk ganglia, pericardial organs, and thoracic ganglia complex (nervous system); hepatopancreas (digestive system); heart, artery and hemocytes (circulatory system); gill and antennal gland (excretory system), hypodermis; and Y-organ (endocrine organ). There was no CasLpR expression in the ovary of an adult female. A putative function of CasLpR was examined after challenges of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in vivo using qRT-PCR assays. Animals at 24 h after injection of LPS or LTA up-regulated the expression of CasLpR in hemocytes by ∼3.5 and 1.4 folds, respectively, compared to the controls that received saline injection. LPS challenge also caused the greatest increment (∼55 folds) of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) expression in these samples. These data indicate that putative CasLpR and CasHsp90 may be involved in the defense system or the stress response of C. sapidus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural Characterization of the Putative Cholinergic Binding Region alpha(179-201) of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor. Part 1. Review and Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Dynamic Model for the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor, in Computer -Assisted Modeling of Receptor-Ligand Interactions: Theoretical Aspects and...Hunkapillar, M.W., Strader, C.D., Hood, LE.-Acetylcholine receptor: complex of homologous subunits. Sceince vol. 208, pp. 1454-1457, 1980 Ragone, R

  3. Molecular cloning of the cDNA and chromosomal localization of the gene for a putative seven-transmembrane segment (7-TMS) receptor isolated from human spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federsppiel, B.; Melhado, I.G.; Delaney, A.; Clark-Lewis, I. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)); Duncan, A.M.V. (Queens Univ., Kinston, Ontario (Canada)); Jirik, F.R. (Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-06-01

    A family of proinflammatory cytokines sharing several structural features has been described and includes, for example, interleukin-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and melanocyte growth stimulatory activity. Recently, the receptors for interleukin-8 have been isolated and found to belong to the seven-transmembrane domain class of G protein-coupled receptors. As other members of this cytokine family likely interact with similar receptors, the polymerase chain reaction was employed to isolate related receptors from human peripheral blood adherent cells. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on the rabbit interleukin-8 receptor sequence were used. The corresponding full-length cDNA was isolated from a human spleen cDNA library. The predicted protein sequence of this clone, designated pBE1.3, was 93% identical to that of a cDNA isolated from bovine locus coeruleus, which apparently encodes a neuropeptide Y receptor, and also shows similarity with the interleukin-8 receptor and the human cytomegalovirus US28 sequences. The gene, designated D2S201E, was localized to human chromosome 2q21. By Northern blotting, transcripts hybridizing to this cDNA were present in a variety of tissues and cells, including those of hemopoietic origin. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization of protease-activated receptor 1 can be separated by mutation of putative phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, S R; Shapiro, M J; Coughlin, S R

    1999-07-20

    The thrombin receptor PAR1 becomes rapidly phosphorylated upon activation by either thrombin or exogenous SFLLRN agonist peptide. Substitution of alanine for all serine and threonine residues in the receptor's cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail ablated phosphorylation and yielded a receptor defective in both shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization. These observations suggested that activation-dependent phosphorylation of PAR1's cytoplasmic tail is required for both shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization. To identify the phosphorylation site(s) that are necessary for these functions, we generated three mutant receptors in which alanine was substituted for serine and threonine residues in the amino-terminal, middle, and carboxyl-terminal thirds of PAR1's cytoplasmic tail. When stably expressed in fibroblasts, all three mutated receptors were rapidly phosphorylated in response to agonist, while a mutant in which all serines and threonines in the cytoplasmic tail were converted to alanines was not. This result suggests that phosphorylation can occur at multiple sites in PAR1's cytoplasmic tail. Alanine substitutions in the N-terminal and C-terminal portions of the tail had no effect on either receptor shutoff or agonist-triggered internalization. By contrast, alanine substitutions in the "middle" serine cluster between Ser(391) and Ser(406) yielded a receptor with considerably slower shutoff of signaling after thrombin activation than the wild type. Surprisingly, this same mutant was indistinguishable from the wild type in agonist-triggered internalization and degradation. Overexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and GRK3 "suppressed" the shutoff defect of the S --> A (391-406) mutant, consistent with this defect being due to altered receptor phosphorylation. These results suggest that specific phosphorylation sites are required for rapid receptor shutoff, but phosphorylation at multiple alternative sites is sufficient for agonist

  5. Identification and initial characterization of the 3' end of gene transcripts encoding putative members of the pheromone receptor subfamily in Lepidoptera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen F. Garczynski; Kevin W. Wanner; Thomas R. Unruh

    2012-01-01

    Semiochemicals,including pheromones and kairomones,used in pest management programs reduce the need for chemical insecticides,and understanding their interactions with their membrane receptors may help make them more effective in the field.Identification of odorant receptors in the Lepidoptera has mainly been achieved using bioinformatics to search DNA sequences generated by genome or expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing projects.This study reports a rapid method to identify members of the pheromone receptor subfamily in Lepidoptera.Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed against a conserved amino acid sequence in the carboxyl terminus of known lepidopteran pheromone receptors,and the primers were used in a 3' rapid amplification of complementary DNA (cDNA) ends procedure.Polymerase chain reaction products generated from seven different lepidopteran species were TA cloned and sequenced.The eDNA sequences of 25 transcripts were determined to encode potential members of the pheromone receptor subfamily.These cDNAs ranged from 238 to 642 bp and encoded 49-54 amino acids of the carboxyl terminus.Analysis of the 3' untranslated region reveals that most of the transcripts contain multiple polyadenylation signal sequences,and in the case ofManduca sexta,an alternate polyadenylation signal appears to be used in transcript processing.The 3' untranslated region was also useful in determining unique receptors encoded by transcripts having highly similar nucleotide and amino acid sequences.Overall,this technique provides a complementary method of pheromone receptor identification in EST sequencing projects,or can be used as a stand-alone method in conjunction with 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures.

  6. The abnormal cannabidiol analogue O-1602 reduces nociception in a rat model of acute arthritis via the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuelert, Niklas; McDougall, Jason J

    2011-08-01

    Cannabinoids classically act via CB₁ and CB₂ receptors to modulate nociception; however, recent findings suggest that some cannabinoids bind to atypical receptors. One such receptor is GPR55 which is activated by the abnormal cannabidiol analogue O-1602. This study investigated whether the synthetic GPR55 agonist O-1602 can alter joint nociception in a rat model of acute joint inflammation. Acute (24 h) inflammatory joint pain was induced in male Wistar rats by intra-articular injection of 2% kaolin and 2% carrageenan. Single unit extracellular recordings were made from arthritic joint afferents in response to mechanical rotation of the knee. Peripheral administration of O-1602 significantly reduced movement-evoked firing of nociceptive C fibres and this effect was blocked by the GPR55 receptor antagonist O-1918. Co-administration of the CB₁ and CB₂ antagonists (AM281 and AM630 respectively) had no effect on O-1602 responses. This study clearly shows that atypical cannabinoid receptors are involved in joint nociception and these novel targets may be advantageous for the treatment of inflammatory pain.

  7. Inhibitory effects of putative peptidic urotensin-II receptor antagonists on urotensin-II-induced contraction of cat isolated respiratory smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David J; Ao, Zhaohui; Camarda, Valeria; Aiyar, Nambi V; Johns, Douglas G; Douglas, Stephen A

    2005-06-15

    Urotensin-II is purported to influence pulmonary function by modulating smooth muscle tone/growth. In the present study, Northern blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated the presence of UT receptor mRNA in cat trachea, bronchi and lung parenchyma. Urotensin-II contracted cat isolated trachea and bronchi with similar potencies (pEC(50)s 8.61+/-0.07-8.81+/-0.10). Contractile efficacies ranged from 19+/-9% to 63+/-11% KCl in the primary and secondary bronchi. The peptidic UT receptor antagonists BIM-23127, SB-710411 and GSK248451 (7.18+/-0.12, 7.52+/-0.08 and 9.05+/-0.16 cat recombinant UT pK(i)s) inhibited urotensin-II-induced contraction of cat isolated trachea with pK(b)s 6.36+/-0.11, 6.74+/-0.07 and 9.27+/-0.12, respectively. As such, feline lung contains significant amounts of UT mRNA and this receptor appears to be functionally coupled to bronchoconstriction (the peptidic tool compound GSK248451 representing a sub-nanomolar inhibitor of such effects). These findings suggest that the cat represents a suitable species for future studies designed to assess the effects of the urotensin-II receptor on pulmonary (patho)physiology.

  8. N-arachidonoyl glycine, an abundant endogenous lipid, potently drives directed cellular migration through GPR18, the putative abnormal cannabidiol receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel Zvi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglia provide continuous immune surveillance of the CNS and upon activation rapidly change phenotype to express receptors that respond to chemoattractants during CNS damage or infection. These activated microglia undergo directed migration towards affected tissue. Importantly, the molecular species of chemoattractant encountered determines if microglia respond with pro- or anti-inflammatory behaviour, yet the signaling molecules that trigger migration remain poorly understood. The endogenous cannabinoid system regulates microglial migration via CB2 receptors and an as yet unidentified GPCR termed the 'abnormal cannabidiol' (Abn-CBD receptor. Abn-CBD is a synthetic isomer of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD and is inactive at CB1 or CB2 receptors, but functions as a selective agonist at this Gi/o-coupled GPCR. N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly is an endogenous metabolite of the endocannabinoid anandamide and acts as an efficacious agonist at GPR18. Here, we investigate the relationship between NAGly, Abn-CBD, the unidentified 'Abn-CBD' receptor, GPR18, and BV-2 microglial migration. Results Using Boyden chamber migration experiments, yellow tetrazolium (MTT conversion, In-cell Western, qPCR and immunocytochemistry we show that NAGly, at sub-nanomolar concentrations, and Abn-CBD potently drive cellular migration in both BV-2 microglia and HEK293-GPR18 transfected cells, but neither induce migration in HEK-GPR55 or non-transfected HEK293 wildtype cells. Migration effects are blocked or attenuated in both systems by the 'Abn-CBD' receptor antagonist O-1918, and low efficacy agonists N-arachidonoyl-serine and cannabidiol. NAGly promotes proliferation and activation of MAP kinases in BV-2 microglia and HEK293-GPR18 cells at low nanomolar concentrations - cellular responses correlated with microglial migration. Additionally, BV-2 cells show GPR18 immunocytochemical staining and abundant GPR18 mRNA. qPCR demonstrates that

  9. Molecular cloning of a novel, putative G protein-coupled receptor from sea anemones structurally related to members of the FSH, TSH, LH/CG receptor family from mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nothacker, H P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1993-01-01

    hormone (FSH, TSH, LH/CG) receptor family from mammals, including a very large, extracellular N terminus (18-25% sequence identity) and a 7 transmembrane region (44-48% sequence identity). As with the mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptor genes, the sea anemone receptor gene yields transcripts which can...

  10. Mutation of putative GRK phosphorylation sites in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) confers resistance to cannabinoid tolerance and hypersensitivity to cannabinoids in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Daniel J; Davis, Brian J; Kearn, Chris S; Marcus, David; Cook, Alex J; Wager-Miller, Jim; Straiker, Alex; Myoga, Michael H; Karduck, Jeffrey; Leishman, Emma; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Czyzyk, Traci A; Bradshaw, Heather B; Selley, Dana E; Mackie, Ken

    2014-04-09

    For many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R), desensitization has been proposed as a principal mechanism driving initial tolerance to agonists. GPCR desensitization typically requires phosphorylation by a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) and interaction of the phosphorylated receptor with an arrestin. In simple model systems, CB1R is desensitized by GRK phosphorylation at two serine residues (S426 and S430). However, the role of these serine residues in tolerance and dependence for cannabinoids in vivo was unclear. Therefore, we generated mice where S426 and S430 were mutated to nonphosphorylatable alanines (S426A/S430A). S426A/S430A mutant mice were more sensitive to acutely administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), have delayed tolerance to Δ(9)-THC, and showed increased dependence for Δ(9)-THC. S426A/S430A mutants also showed increased responses to elevated levels of endogenous cannabinoids. CB1R desensitization in the periaqueductal gray and spinal cord following 7 d of treatment with Δ(9)-THC was absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Δ(9)-THC-induced downregulation of CB1R in the spinal cord was also absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons from S426A/S430A mice showed enhanced endocannabinoid-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and reduced agonist-mediated desensitization of DSE. These results indicate that S426 and S430 play major roles in the acute response to, tolerance to, and dependence on cannabinoids. Additionally, S426A/S430A mice are a novel model for studying pathophysiological processes thought to involve excessive endocannabinoid signaling such as drug addiction and metabolic disease. These mice also validate the approach of mutating GRK phosphorylation sites involved in desensitization as a general means to confer exaggerated signaling to GPCRs in vivo.

  11. Evaluation of radiolabeled ML04, a putative irreversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor, as a bioprobe for PET imaging of EGFR-overexpressing tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abourbeh, Galith [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Unit of Cellular Signaling, Department of Biological Chemistry, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Dissoki, Samar [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Jacobson, Orit [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Litchi, Amir [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Daniel, Revital Ben [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Laki, Desirediu [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Levitzki, Alexander [Unit of Cellular Signaling, Department of Biological Chemistry, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Mishani, Eyal [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)]. E-mail: mishani@md.huji.ac.il

    2007-01-15

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been implicated in tumor development and malignancy. Evaluating the degree of EGFR expression in tumors could aid in identifying patients for EGFR-targeted therapies and in monitoring treatment. Nevertheless, no currently available assay can reliably quantify receptor content in tumors. Radiolabeled inhibitors of EGFR-TK could be developed as bioprobes for positron emission tomography imaging. Such imaging agents would not only provide a noninvasive quantitative measurement of EGFR content in tumors but also serve as radionuclide carriers for targeted radiotherapy. The potency, reversibility, selectivity and specific binding characteristics of ML04, an alleged irreversible inhibitor of EGFR, were established in vitro. The distribution of the F-18-labeled compound and the extent of EGFR-specific tumor uptake were evaluated in tumor-bearing mice. ML04 demonstrated potent, irreversible and selective inhibition of EGFR, combined with specific binding to the receptor in intact cells. In vivo distribution of the radiolabeled compound revealed tumor/blood and tumor/muscle activity uptake ratios of about 7 and 5, respectively, 3 h following administration of a radiotracer. Nevertheless, only minor EGFR-specific uptake of the compound was detected in these studies, using either EGFR-negative tumors or blocking studies as controls. To improve the in vivo performance of ML04, administration via prolonged intravenous infusion is proposed. Detailed pharmacokinetic characterization of this bioprobe could assist in the development of a kinetic model that would afford accurate measurement of EGFR content in tumors.

  12. A subfamily of putative cytokinin receptors is revealed by an analysis of the evolution of the two-component signaling system of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, Nijuscha; Halawa, Mhyeddeen; Snel, Berend; Seidl, Michael F; Heyl, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The two-component signaling system--the major signaling pathway of bacteria--is found among higher eukaryotes only in plants, where it regulates diverse processes, such as the signaling of the phytohormone cytokinin. Cytokinin is perceived by a hybrid histidine (His) kinase receptor, and the signal is transduced by a multistep phosphorelay system of His phosphotransfer proteins and different classes of response regulators (RRs). To shed light on the origin and evolution of the two-component signaling system members in plants, we conducted a comprehensive domain-based phylogenetic study across the relevant kingdoms, including Charophyceae algae, the group of green algae giving rise to land plants. Surprisingly, we identified a subfamily of cytokinin receptors with members only from the early diverging land plants Marchantia polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens and then experimentally characterized two members of this subfamily. His phosphotransfer proteins of Charophyceae seemed to be more closely related to land plants than to other groups of green algae. Farther down the signaling pathway, the type-B RRs were found across all plant clades, but many members lack either the canonical Asp residue or the DNA binding domain. In contrast, the type-A RRs seemed to be limited to land plants. Finally, the analysis provided hints that one additional group of RRs, the type-C RRs, might be degenerated receptors and thus, of a different evolutionary origin than bona fide RRs.

  13. Spike protein homology between the SARS-associated virus and murine hepatitis virus implies existence of a putative receptor-binding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Coronavirus has been determined to be the cause of the recent outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Human coronavirus 229E had been studied well and its receptor-binding domain was restricted to aa417-547 of S protein. However, this region has no homology with the newly separated SARS-associated virus (Hong Kong isolate CUHK-W1). Then we analyzed the phylogenesis of S1 subunit of the coronavirus spike protein (SARS-associated virus, Hong Kong isolate CUHK-W1). Interestingly, the highest homology between murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and SARS-associated coronavirus was found. And the important sites (aa62-65 and aa214-216) on the spike protein of MHV with receptor-binding capacity were highly conservative in comparison with the newly separated SARS-asso- ciated virus (the corresponding sites are aa51-54 and aa195-197). These results from bioinformatics analysis might help us to study the receptor-binding sites of SARS-associ- ated virus and the mechanism of the virus entry into the target cell, and design antiviral drugs and potent vaccines.

  14. Down-regulation of BdBRI1, a putative brassinosteroid receptor gene produces a dwarf phenotype with enhanced drought tolerance in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying; Yin, Yanhai; Fei, Shuizhang

    2015-05-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in plant growth, development and responses to a range of environmental cues. Although the mechanism of how BRs regulate growth and development is well-understood in Arabidopsis, the effect of BRs on stress tolerance, particularly drought tolerance remains unknown. We isolated a BRI1 (BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1) homologous gene, BdBRI1 from Brachypodium distachyon, a model for temperate grasses and cereals, created and characterized RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown mutants for BdBRI1 in Brachypodium. The loss-of-function BdBRI1-RNAi mutants exhibited reduced plant height, shortened internodes, narrow and short leaf, and reduced expression of BR signaling genes, BdBES1, BdBZR1, BdBLE2, and enhanced expression of BR biosynthesis genes BdD2, BdCPD and BdDWF4. More importantly, BdBRI1 RNAi mutants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance, accompanied by highly elevated expression of drought-responsive genes, BdP5CS, BdCOR47/BdRD17, together with BdERD1 and BdRD26, two putative targets of the transcription factors BES1 and BZR1 that are key components of the BR signaling pathway. Our results suggest that BR signaling and biosynthesis are largely conserved among Arabidopsis, rice and Brachypodium, and that BR signaling plays an important role in drought tolerance by directly regulating expression of key drought-responsive genes. The effect of BR biosynthesis or crosstalks between BR and other hormones or components of stress signaling pathways on drought tolerance is discussed.

  15. Lack of ligand-selective binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor to putative DNA binding sites regulating expression of Bax and paraoxonase 1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA.

  16. Antifolate/folate-activated HGF/c-Met signalling pathways in mouse kidneys-the putative role of their downstream effectors in cross-talk with androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkowska, Magdalena; Bajer, Seweryn; Jaworski, Tomasz; Zielińska, Joanna; Manteuffel-Cymborowska, Małgorzata; Grzelakowska-Sztabert, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    This in vivo study of mouse kidneys was focused on the identification of protein mediators involved in the cross-talk between two signalling pathways. One pathway was triggered by testosterone via an androgen receptor, AR, and the other induced by CB 3717/folate via HGF, and its membrane receptor c-Met. Sequential activation of these pathways leads to a drastic decrease of testosterone-induced ornithine decarboxylase, ODC, expression. We proved that CB 3717/folate-induced ODC expression is Akt-dependent. CB 3717/folate activates Akt and ERK1/2 kinases, PTEN phosphatase and also up-regulates cyclin D2 and PCNA, but decreases GSK3beta and cyclin D1 protein levels. Testosterone activation of AR induces GSK3beta and PTEN. Results of the sequential activation of the studied signalling pathways suggest that Akt, GSK3beta and possibly ERK1/2 kinases may participate in the negative cross-talk and attenuation of AR transactivity, while the involvement of PTEN and cyclin D1 seems to be doubtful.

  17. Delineating the importance of serum opsonins and the bacterial capsule in affecting the uptake and killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei by murine neutrophils and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Mulye

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infection of susceptible hosts by the encapsulated Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp causes melioidosis, with septic patients attaining mortality rates ≥ 40%. Due to its high infectivity through inhalation and limited effective therapies, Bp is considered a potential bioweapon. Thus, there is great interest in identifying immune effectors that effectively kill Bp. Our goal is to compare the relative abilities of murine macrophages and neutrophils to clear Bp, as well as determine the importance of serum opsonins and bacterial capsule. Our findings indicate that murine macrophages and neutrophils are inherently unable to clear either unopsonized Bp or the relatively-avirulent acapsular bacterium B. thailandensis (Bt. Opsonization of Bp and Bt with complement or pathogen-specific antibodies increases macrophage-uptake, but does not promote clearance, although antibody-binding enhances complement deposition. In contrast, complement opsonization of Bp and Bt causes enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils, which is linked with rapid ROS induction against bacteria exhibiting a threshold level of complement deposition. Addition of bacteria-specific antibodies enhances complement deposition, but antibody-binding alone cannot elicit neutrophil clearance. Bp capsule provides some resistance to complement deposition, but is not anti-phagocytic or protective against reactive oxygen species (ROS-killing. Macrophages were observed to efficiently clear Bp only after pre-activation with IFNγ, which is independent of serum- and/or antibody-opsonization. These studies indicate that antibody-enhanced complement activation is sufficient for neutrophil-clearance of Bp, whereas macrophages are ineffective at clearing serum-opsonized Bp unless pre-activated with IFNγ. This suggests that effective immune therapies would need to elicit both antibodies and Th1-adaptive responses for successful prevention/eradication of melioidosis.

  18. Delineating the importance of serum opsonins and the bacterial capsule in affecting the uptake and killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei by murine neutrophils and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulye, Minal; Bechill, Michael P; Grose, William; Ferreira, Viviana P; Lafontaine, Eric R; Wooten, R Mark

    2014-08-01

    Infection of susceptible hosts by the encapsulated Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) causes melioidosis, with septic patients attaining mortality rates ≥ 40%. Due to its high infectivity through inhalation and limited effective therapies, Bp is considered a potential bioweapon. Thus, there is great interest in identifying immune effectors that effectively kill Bp. Our goal is to compare the relative abilities of murine macrophages and neutrophils to clear Bp, as well as determine the importance of serum opsonins and bacterial capsule. Our findings indicate that murine macrophages and neutrophils are inherently unable to clear either unopsonized Bp or the relatively-avirulent acapsular bacterium B. thailandensis (Bt). Opsonization of Bp and Bt with complement or pathogen-specific antibodies increases macrophage-uptake, but does not promote clearance, although antibody-binding enhances complement deposition. In contrast, complement opsonization of Bp and Bt causes enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils, which is linked with rapid ROS induction against bacteria exhibiting a threshold level of complement deposition. Addition of bacteria-specific antibodies enhances complement deposition, but antibody-binding alone cannot elicit neutrophil clearance. Bp capsule provides some resistance to complement deposition, but is not anti-phagocytic or protective against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-killing. Macrophages were observed to efficiently clear Bp only after pre-activation with IFNγ, which is independent of serum- and/or antibody-opsonization. These studies indicate that antibody-enhanced complement activation is sufficient for neutrophil-clearance of Bp, whereas macrophages are ineffective at clearing serum-opsonized Bp unless pre-activated with IFNγ. This suggests that effective immune therapies would need to elicit both antibodies and Th1-adaptive responses for successful prevention/eradication of melioidosis.

  19. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility]. Progress report, January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK{sub 6} cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys{sup 524} codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with {sup 32}P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified {sup 32}p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  20. Conserved residues within the putative S4-S5 region serve distinct functions among thermosensitive vanilloid transient receptor potential (TRPV) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukalova, Stepana; Marsakova, Lenka; Teisinger, Jan; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2010-12-31

    The vanilloid transient receptor potential channel TRPV1 is a tetrameric six-transmembrane segment (S1-S6) channel that can be synergistically activated by various proalgesic agents such as capsaicin, protons, heat, or highly depolarizing voltages, and also by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common activator of the related thermally gated vanilloid TRP channels TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV3. In these channels, the conserved charged residues in the intracellular S4-S5 region have been proposed to constitute part of a voltage sensor that acts in concert with other stimuli to regulate channel activation. The molecular basis of this gating event is poorly understood. We mutated charged residues all along the S4 and the S4-S5 linker of TRPV1 and identified four potential voltage-sensing residues (Arg(557), Glu(570), Asp(576), and Arg(579)) that, when specifically mutated, altered the functionality of the channel with respect to voltage, capsaicin, heat, 2-APB, and/or their interactions in different ways. The nonfunctional charge-reversing mutations R557E and R579E were partially rescued by the charge-swapping mutations R557E/E570R and D576R/R579E, indicating that electrostatic interactions contribute to allosteric coupling between the voltage-, temperature- and capsaicin-dependent activation mechanisms. The mutant K571E was normal in all aspects of TRPV1 activation except for 2-APB, revealing the specific role of Lys(571) in chemical sensitivity. Surprisingly, substitutions at homologous residues in TRPV2 or TRPV3 had no effect on temperature- and 2-APB-induced activity. Thus, the charged residues in S4 and the S4-S5 linker contribute to voltage sensing in TRPV1 and, despite their highly conserved nature, regulate the temperature and chemical gating in the various TRPV channels in different ways.

  1. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2.

  2. Interaction of xenobiotics with estrogen receptors α and β and a putative plasma sex hormone-binding globulin from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, William L.; Patino, Reynaldo; Maule, Alec G.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of physiological functions. Although environmental contaminants (xenoestrogens) which interfere with estrogen signaling are of increasing concern, there is only limited information about their ability to interact with estrogen-binding proteins (SHBG) or receptors (ER). Recombinant ER?? and ?? were obtained after transient transfection of COS-7 cells with channel catfish ER cDNA. Plasma from adult female channel catfish was the source of SHBG. Tritiated estradiol ( 3H-E2) was used in standard radioligand-binding assays to characterize the binding properties of channel catfish SHBG (ccfSHBG) and to estimate the inhibition constants for various estrogenic compounds. Binding of 3H-E2 to ccfSHBG was saturable and of high affinity with a Kd (??SE) of 1.9??0.14nM and a Bmax of 14.3??2.4pmol/mg protein (n=3 assays). Additionally, ccfSHBG displayed binding specificity for androgens and estrogens. Endosulfan, 4-nonylphenol, and 4-octylphenol displaced 3H-E2 binding to ccfSHBG albeit only at very high concentrations, whereas dieldrin and atrazine showed little displacement activity even at the highest concentrations used. The synthetic estrogen ethynylestradiol had higher affinity than E2 for ccfSHBG. This finding differs from results with human and rainbow trout SHBG. The alkylphenolic compounds (4-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol) displayed some ability to displace 3H-E2 binding from ER?? and ?? at high concentrations, but dieldrin and atrazine had little binding activity for both ER subtypes and endosulfan for ER??. The xenobiotics tested generally showed equivalent or greater affinity for ER?? than ER??, whereas natural estrogens had much greater affinity for ER?? than ER??. These observations suggest that results of studies using fish tissue ER extracts must be interpreted with caution, since both ER subtypes may be present, and that the binding of xenoestrogens to SHBG must be taken into account for proper assessment of endocrine

  3. A novel junctional adhesion molecule A (CgJAM-A-L) from oyster (Crassostrea gigas) functions as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Conghui; Wang, Mengqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Hao; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM), a subfamily of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) with a couple of immunoglobulin domains, can act as regulator in homeostasis and inflammation of vertebrates. In the present study, a structural homolog of JAM-A (designated CgJAM-A-L) was screened out from oyster, Crassostrea gigas, through a search of JAM-A D1 domain (N-terminal Ig domain in JAM-A). The cDNA of CgJAM-A-L was of 1188 bp encoding a predicted polypeptide of 395 amino acids. The immunoreactive area of CgJAM-A-L mainly distributed over the plasma membrane of hemocytes. After Vibro splendidus or tumor necrosis factor (CgTNF-1) stimulation, the mRNA transcripts of CgJAM-A-L in hemocytes increased significantly by 4.46-fold and 9.00-fold (p oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and yeast P. pastoris were significantly enhanced after the incubation of rCgJAM-A-L, and even increased more significantly after the pre-incubation of rCgJAM-A-L with microbes (p oyster. Moreover, as the most primitive specie with homolog of JAMs, the information of CgJAM-A-L in oyster would provide useful clues for the evolutionary study of JAMs and immunoglobulins.

  4. A Spodoptera exigua cadherin serves as a putative receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin and shows differential enhancement of Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiang-Liang; Chen, Rui-Rui; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Yan; Cui, Jin-Jie; Han, Zhao-Jun; Mu, Li-Li; Li, Guo-Qing

    2013-09-01

    Crystal toxin Cry1Ca from Bacillus thuringiensis has an insecticidal spectrum encompassing lepidopteran insects that are tolerant to current commercially used B. thuringiensis crops (Bt crops) expressing Cry1A toxins and may be useful as a potential bioinsecticide. The mode of action of Cry1A is fairly well understood. However, whether Cry1Ca interacts with the same receptor proteins as Cry1A remains unproven. In the present paper, we first cloned a cadherin-like gene, SeCad1b, from Spodoptera exigua (relatively susceptible to Cry1Ca). SeCad1b was highly expressed in the larval gut but scarcely detected in fat body, Malpighian tubules, and remaining carcass. Second, we bacterially expressed truncated cadherin rSeCad1bp and its interspecific homologue rHaBtRp from Helicoverpa armigera (more sensitive to Cry1Ac) containing the putative toxin-binding regions. Competitive binding assays showed that both Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac could bind to rSeCad1bp and rHaBtRp, and they did not compete with each other. Third, Cry1Ca ingestion killed larvae and decreased the weight of surviving larvae. Dietary introduction of SeCad1b double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) reduced approximately 80% of the target mRNA and partially alleviated the negative effect of Cry1Ca on larval survival and growth. Lastly, rSeCad1bp and rHaBtRp differentially enhanced the negative effects of Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac on the larval mortalities and growth of S. exigua and H. armigera. Thus, we provide the first lines of evidence to suggest that SeCad1b from S. exigua is a functional receptor of Cry1Ca.

  5. Differential expression of mRNAs encoding the putative inhibin co-receptor (betaglycan) and activin type-I and type-II receptors in preovulatory and prehierarchical follicles of the laying hen ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, T M; Knight, P G; Gladwell, R T

    2006-02-01

    Ovarian follicle development is primarily regulated by an interplay between the pituitary gonadotrophins, LH and FSH, and ovary-derived steroids. Increasing evidence implicates regulatory roles of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily members, including inhibins and activins. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of mRNAs encoding key receptors of the inhibin/activin system in ovarian follicles ranging from 4 mm in diameter to the dominant F1 follicle (approximately 40 mm). Ovaries were collected (n = 16) from mid-sequence hens maintained on a long-day photoschedule (16 h of light:8 h of darkness). All follicles removed were dissected into individual granulosa and thecal layers. RNA was extracted and cDNA synthesized. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to quantify the expression of mRNA encoding betaglycan, activin receptor (ActR) subtypes (type-I, -IIA and -IIB) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH); receptor expression data were normalized to GAPDH expression. Detectable levels of ActRI, -IIA and -IIB and the inhibin co-receptor (betaglycan) expression were found in all granulosa and thecal layers analysed. Granulosa ActRI mRNA peaked (P II activin receptors and betaglycan on granulosa and thecal cells are consistent with a local auto/paracrine role of inhibins and activins in modulating ovarian follicle development, selection and progression in the domestic fowl.

  6. Impact of the putative cancer stem cell markers and growth factor receptor expression on the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and cytotoxic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanenthiran, Soozana; Essapen, Sharadah; Seddon, Alan M.; Modjtahedi, Helmout

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression and activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2 have been reported in numerous cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of a large panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines (OCCLs) to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs. The aim was to see if there was any association between the protein expression of various biomarkers including three putative ovarian cancer stem cell (CSC) markers (CD24, CD44, CD117/c-Kit), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and HER family members and response to treatment with these agents. The sensitivity of 10 ovarian tumour cell lines to the treatment with various forms of HER TKIs (gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sapitinib, afatinib, canertinib, neratinib), as well as other TKIs (dasatinib, imatinib, NVP-AEW541, crizotinib) and cytotoxic agents (paclitaxel, cisplatin and doxorubicin), as single agents or in combination, was determined by SRB assay. The effect on these agents on the cell cycle distribution, and downstream signaling molecules and tumour migration were determined using flow cytometry, western blotting, and the IncuCyte Clear View cell migration assay respectively. Of the HER inhibitors, the irreversible pan-TKIs (canertinib, neratinib and afatinib) were the most effective TKIs for inhibiting the growth of all ovarian cancer cells, and for blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR, HER-2, AKT and MAPK in SKOV3 cells. Interestingly, while the majority of cancer cells were highly sensitive to treatment with dasatinib, they were relatively resistant to treatment with imatinib (i.e., IC50 >10 μM). Of the cytotoxic agents, paclitaxel was the most effective for inhibiting the growth of OCCLs, and of various combinations of these drugs, only treatment with a combination of NVP-AEW541 and paclitaxel produced a synergistic or additive anti-proliferative effect in all three cell lines examined (i.e., SKOV3, Caov3, ES2

  7. Regional distribution of putative NPY Y*U1 receptors and neurons expressing Y*U1 mRNA in forebrain areas of the rat central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Philip J.; Sheikh, Søren P.; Jakobsen, Cherine R.

    1993-01-01

    Anatomi, neurobiologi, neuropeptide Y, NPY analogues, receptor autoradiography, in situ hybridization histochemistry, Y*U1 mRNA, Y*U1 andY*U2 receptors, rat......Anatomi, neurobiologi, neuropeptide Y, NPY analogues, receptor autoradiography, in situ hybridization histochemistry, Y*U1 mRNA, Y*U1 andY*U2 receptors, rat...

  8. Putative sigma(3) sites in mammalian brain have histamine H(1) receptor properties: evidence from ligand binding and distribution studies with the novel H(1) radioligand [(3)H]-(-)-trans-1-phenyl-3-aminotetralin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, R G; Owens, C E; Brown, R L; Bucholtz, E C; Lawler, C P; Wyrick, S D

    1999-08-07

    A novel phenylaminotetralin (PAT) radioligand, [(3)H]-(1R, 3S)-(-)-trans-1-phenyl-3-dimethylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene ([(3)H]-[-]-trans-H(2)-PAT), is shown here to label a saturable (B(max)=39+/-6 fmol/mg protein) population of sites with high affinity (K(d)=0.13+/-0.03 nM) in guinea pig brain. Consistent with previous studies which showed that PATs stimulate catecholamine (dopamine) synthesis in rat striatum, autoradiographic brain receptor mapping studies here indicate that [(3)H]-(-)-trans-H(2)-PAT-labeled sites are highly localized in catecholaminergic nerve terminal fields in hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and striatum in guinea pig brain. Competition binding studies with a broad range of CNS receptor-active ligands and CNS radioreceptor screening assays indicate that the pharmacological binding profile of brain [(3)H]-(-)-trans-H(2)-PAT sites closely resembles histamine H(1)-type receptors. Comparative studies using the histamine H(1) antagonist radioligand, [(3)H]mepyramine, indicate that the H(1) ligand binding profile and guinea pig brain distribution of H(1) receptors and [(3)H]-(-)-trans-H(2)-PAT sites are nearly identical; moreover, both sites have about 40-fold stereoselective affinity for (-)- over (+)-trans-H(2)-PAT. These results are discussed in light of previous studies which suggested that PATs stimulate dopamine synthesis through interaction with a novel sigma-type (sigma(3)) receptor in rodent brain; it now appears instead that PATs represent a new class of ligands for brain histamine H(1) receptors that can be stereoselectively labeled with [(3)H]-(-)-trans-H(2)-PAT. Copyright 1999 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. A putative role for apelin in the etiology of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayalam, Srujana; Della-Fera, Mary Anne; Krieg, Paul A; Cox, Christopher M; Robins, Allan; Baile, Clifton A

    2008-04-11

    Apelin, the endogenous ligand of the G protein-coupled APJ receptor has been shown to promote tumor angiogenesis. However, the effect of apelin on inducing angiogenesis in adipose tissue has not been investigated. In this review, we propose a putative role for apelin in promoting angiogenesis in adipose tissue. We further propose that targeting adipose tissue vasculature by blocking apelin signaling with anti-apelin antibodies will lead not only to inhibition of angiogenesis in adipose tissue but also to decreased adiposity.

  10. Evaluation of [methyl-{sup 3}H]L655,708 and [ethyl-{sup 3}H]RY80 as putative PET ligands for central GABA{sub A} receptors containing {alpha}5 subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opacka-Juffry, J. E-mail: jolanta@cu.rpms.ac.uk; Hirani, E.; Dawson, G.R.; Luthra, S.K.; Hume, S.P

    1999-10-01

    Two selective radioligands of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA){sub A} receptors containing the {alpha}5 subunit, [{sup 3}H]L655,708 and [{sup 3}H]RY80, were evaluated in rats as potential in vivo tracers for positron emission tomography (PET). Brain uptake index (BUI), a measure of first pass extraction, was moderate for [{sup 3}H]L655,708 (BUI of 59%) and good for [{sup 3}H]RY80 (BUI of 96%). This finding was consistent with their in vitro binding to plasma proteins of {approx}76% and 50%, respectively. Following intravenous injection of either radioligand, radioactivity in plasma was measured and uptake characteristics were assessed in brain within a time period relevant to PET scanning (up to 90 min). Discrete brain regions, such as frontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus, thalamus, hippocampus, colliculi, medulla, and cerebellum, were sampled and the temporal distribution of radioactivity analysed. Despite the reasonable delivery to the brain, neither of the radioligands had sufficient retention in the tissues rich in {alpha}5-containing GABA{sub A} receptors to achieve a good selective signal. For both radioligands, a maximal tissue:cerebellum ratio of 1.5 was seen in hippocampus at 10 min after injection. Thus, neither of the compounds studied shows potential for further development as an in vivo PET ligand.

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2 and Its Receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 May Be Putative Biomarkers of Malignant Transformation of Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions into Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Nayak

    Full Text Available There are several factors like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, genetic alterations, mutational factors that are involved in malignant transformation of potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOLs to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 is one of the prototypes of the large family of growth factors that bind heparin. FGF-2 induces angiogenesis and its receptors may play a role in synthesis of collagen. FGFs are involved in transmission of signals between the epithelium and connective tissue, and influence growth and differentiation of a wide variety of tissue including epithelia. The present study was undertaken to analyze expression of FGF-2 and its receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 in 72 PMOLs, 108 OSCC and 52 healthy controls, and their role in risk assessment for malignant transformation of Leukoplakia (LKP and Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF to OSCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3. IHC results were validated by Real Time PCR. Expression of FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 was upregulated from PMOLs to OSCC. While 90% (9/10 of PMOLs which showed malignant transformation (transformed expressed FGF-2, only 24.19% cases (15/62 of PMOLs which were not transformed (untransformed to OSCC expressed FGF-2. Similarly, FGFR-2 expression was seen in 16/62 (25.81% of untransformed PMOLs and 8/10 (80% cases of transformed PMOLs. FGFR-3 expression was observed in 23/62 (37.10% cases of untransformed PMOLs and 6/10 (60% cases of transformed PMOLs. A significant association of FGF-2 and FGFR-2 expression with malignant transformation from PMOLs to OSCC was observed both at phenotypic and molecular level. The results suggest that FGF-2 and FGFR-2 may be useful as biomarkers of malignant transformation in patients with OSMF and LKP.

  12. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) and Its Receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 May Be Putative Biomarkers of Malignant Transformation of Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions into Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Seema; Goel, Madhu Mati; Makker, Annu; Bhatia, Vikram; Chandra, Saumya; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S P

    2015-01-01

    There are several factors like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, genetic alterations, mutational factors that are involved in malignant transformation of potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOLs) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is one of the prototypes of the large family of growth factors that bind heparin. FGF-2 induces angiogenesis and its receptors may play a role in synthesis of collagen. FGFs are involved in transmission of signals between the epithelium and connective tissue, and influence growth and differentiation of a wide variety of tissue including epithelia. The present study was undertaken to analyze expression of FGF-2 and its receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 in 72 PMOLs, 108 OSCC and 52 healthy controls, and their role in risk assessment for malignant transformation of Leukoplakia (LKP) and Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) to OSCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3. IHC results were validated by Real Time PCR. Expression of FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 was upregulated from PMOLs to OSCC. While 90% (9/10) of PMOLs which showed malignant transformation (transformed) expressed FGF-2, only 24.19% cases (15/62) of PMOLs which were not transformed (untransformed) to OSCC expressed FGF-2. Similarly, FGFR-2 expression was seen in 16/62 (25.81%) of untransformed PMOLs and 8/10 (80%) cases of transformed PMOLs. FGFR-3 expression was observed in 23/62 (37.10%) cases of untransformed PMOLs and 6/10 (60%) cases of transformed PMOLs. A significant association of FGF-2 and FGFR-2 expression with malignant transformation from PMOLs to OSCC was observed both at phenotypic and molecular level. The results suggest that FGF-2 and FGFR-2 may be useful as biomarkers of malignant transformation in patients with OSMF and LKP.

  13. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  14. SARS病毒中S蛋白的hAPN受体接合功能域分析%Putative Hapn receptor binding sites in SARS_CoV spike protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞晓晶; 黄音; 南蓬; 李传松; 熊斌; 罗小民; 赵国屏; 裴刚; 陈凯先; 沈旭; 沈建华; 罗成; 左建平; 何伟忠; 石铁流; 钟扬; 蒋华良; 李亦学; 林建成; 郝沛; 何有裕; 郭宗明; 秦磊; 苏炅; 刘博书

    2003-01-01

    目的:获得SARS冠状病毒S蛋白与CD13相互作用的信息,发现其可能的配体-受体作用区域和结合位点,为SARS蛋白功能研究以及设计抗SARS药物和疫苗提供线索.方法:在比较基因组学的基础上,通过运用多序列比对、同源性分析和进化分析等手段预测并确定SARS冠状病毒S蛋白与CD13相互作用的区域和结合位点,并用分子模拟和分子对接分析的方法模建S蛋白与CD13在预测区域的相互作用.结果:获得了SARS冠状病毒S蛋白与CD13相互作用的信息,发现了一个冠状病毒S蛋白与CD13相互作用的功能域,以及位于此功能域中的4个可能的相互作用的位点.分子模拟验证了其中一个可能的相互作用的位点.结论:CD13可能是SARS冠状病毒S蛋白结合的一个靶点,它们之间的相互作用可能是SARS病毒感染的途径之一.同时,本研究也为运用生物信息方法寻找蛋白质作用靶点的线索提供了一种策略.%AIM: To obtain the information of ligand-receptor binding between the S protein of SARS_CoV and CD 13, identify the possible interacting domains or motifs related to binding sites, and provide clues for studying the functions of SARS proteins and designing anti-SARS drugs and vaccines. METHODS: On the basis of comparative genomics, the homology search, phylogenetic analyses, and multi-sequence alignment were used to predict CD 13 related interacting domains and binding sites in the S protein of SARS_CoV. Molecular modeling and docking simulation methods were employed to address the interaction feature between CD13 and S protein of SARS_CoV in validating the bioinformatics predictions. RESULTS: Possible binding sites in the SARS_CoV S protein to CD 13 have been mapped out by using bioinformatics analysis tools. The binding for one protein-protein interaction pair (D757-R761 motif of the SARS_CoV S protein to P585-A653 domain of CD13) has been simulated by molecular modeling and docking simulation

  15. Mechanosensory neurons, cutaneous mechanoreceptors, and putative mechanoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle, M E; Cobo, T; Cobo, J L; Vega, J A

    2012-08-01

    The mammalian skin has developed sensory structures (mechanoreceptors) that are responsible for different modalities of mechanosensitivity like touch, vibration, and pressure sensation. These specialized sensory organs are anatomically and functionally connected to a special subset of sensory neurons called mechanosensory neurons, which electrophysiologically correspond with Aβ fibers. Although mechanosensory neurons and cutaneous mechanoreceptors are rather well known, the biology of the sense of touch still remains poorly understood. Basically, the process of mechanosensitivity requires the conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal through the activation of ion channels that gate in response to mechanical stimuli. These ion channels belong primarily to the family of the degenerin/epithelium sodium channels, especially the subfamily acid-sensing ion channels, and to the family of transient receptor potential channels. This review compiles the current knowledge on the occurrence of putative mechanoproteins in mechanosensory neurons and mechanoreceptors, as well as the involvement of these proteins on the biology of touch. Furthermore, we include a section about what the knock-out mice for mechanoproteins are teaching us. Finally, the possibilities for mechanotransduction in mechanoreceptors, and the common involvement of the ion channels, extracellular membrane, and cytoskeleton, are revisited.

  16. Transcriptional regulators transforming growth factor-β1 and estrogen-related receptor-α identified as putative mediators of calf rumen epithelial tissue development and function during weaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, E E; Baldwin, R L; Walker, M P; Ellis, S E; Li, C; Kahl, S; Chung, H; Li, R W

    2014-07-01

    Molecular mechanisms regulating rumen epithelial development remain largely unknown. To identify gene networks and regulatory factors controlling rumen development, Holstein bull calves (n=18) were fed milk replacer only (MRO) until 42 d of age. Three calves each were euthanized at 14 and 42 d of age for tissue collection to represent preweaning, and the remaining calves were provided diets of either milk replacer + orchard grass hay (MH; n=6) to initiate weaning without development of rumen papillae, or milk replacer + calf starter (MG; n=6) to initiate weaning and development of rumen papillae. At 56 and 70 d of age, 3 calves from the MH and MG groups were euthanized for collection of rumen epithelium. Total RNA and protein were extracted for microarray analysis and to validate detected changes in selected protein expression, respectively. As expected, calves fed MRO had no rumen papillae and development of papillae was greater in MG versus MH calves. Differentially expressed genes between the MRO diet at d 42 (preweaning) versus the MG or MH diets at d 56 (during weaning) were identified using permutation analysis of differential expression. Expression of 345 and 519 transcripts was uniquely responsive to MG and MH feeding, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, Redwood City, CA) indicated that the top-ranked biological function affected by the MG diet was the cell cycle, and TFGB1, FBOX01, and PPARA were identified as key transcriptional regulators of genes responsive to the MG diet and associated with development of rumen papillae. Increased expressions of TGFB1 mRNA and protein in response to the MG diet were confirmed by subsequent analyses. The top-ranking biological function affected by the MH diet was energy production. Receptors for IGF-1 and insulin, ESRRA, and PPARD were identified by ingenuity pathway analysis as transcriptional regulators of genes responsive to the MH diet. Further analysis of TGFB1 and ESRRA mRNA expression in rumen

  17. Putative archaeal viruses from the mesopelagic ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vik, Dean R; Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R; Bolduc, Ben; Emerson, Joanne B; Padilla, Cory C; Stewart, Frank J; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2017-01-01

    Oceanic viruses that infect bacteria, or phages, are known to modulate host diversity, metabolisms, and biogeochemical cycling, while the viruses that infect marine Archaea remain understudied despite the critical ecosystem roles played by their hosts. Here we introduce "MArVD", for Metagenomic Archaeal Virus Detector, an annotation tool designed to identify putative archaeal virus contigs in metagenomic datasets. MArVD is made publicly available through the online iVirus analytical platform. Benchmarking analysis of MArVD showed it to be >99% accurate and 100% sensitive in identifying the 127 known archaeal viruses among the 12,499 viruses in the VirSorter curated dataset. Application of MArVD to 10 viral metagenomes from two depth profiles in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) oxygen minimum zone revealed 43 new putative archaeal virus genomes and large genome fragments ranging in size from 10 to 31 kb. Network-based classifications, which were consistent with marker gene phylogenies where available, suggested that these putative archaeal virus contigs represented six novel candidate genera. Ecological analyses, via fragment recruitment and ordination, revealed that the diversity and relative abundances of these putative archaeal viruses were correlated with oxygen concentration and temperature along two OMZ-spanning depth profiles, presumably due to structuring of the host Archaea community. Peak viral diversity and abundances were found in surface waters, where Thermoplasmata 16S rRNA genes are prevalent, suggesting these archaea as hosts in the surface habitats. Together these findings provide a baseline for identifying archaeal viruses in sequence datasets, and an initial picture of the ecology of such viruses in non-extreme environments.

  18. The long pentraxin PTX3 as a prototypic humoral pattern recognition receptor: interplay with cellular innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Cotena, Alessia; Moalli, Federica; Jaillon, Sebastien; Deban, Livija; Mantovani, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system consists of a cellular arm and a humoral arm. Components of humoral immunity include diverse molecular families, which represent functional ancestors of antibodies. They play a key role as effectors and modulators of innate resistance in animals and humans, interacting with cellular innate immunity. The prototypic long pentraxin, pentraxin 3 (PTX3), represents a case in point of this interplay. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved long pentraxin has unequivocally defined its role at the crossroads of innate immunity, inflammation, matrix deposition, and female fertility. Phagocytes represent a key source of this fluid-phase pattern recognition receptor, which, in turn, facilitates microbial recognition by phagocytes acting as an opsonin. Moreover, PTX3 has modulatory functions on innate immunity and inflammation. Here, we review the studies on PTX3 which emphasize the complexity and complementarity of the crosstalk between the cellular and humoral arms of innate immunity.

  19. Composition of the Putative Prepore Complex of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manoj S.; Dean, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Prepore formation is hypothesized to be an obligate step in the insertion of Cry1Ab toxin into insect brush border membrane vesicles. We examined the architecture of the putative prepore when isolated using the published protocols [1] [2]. Our results demonstrate that the putative prepore form of Cry1Ab is a combination of receptor proteins attached to the toxin, when purified. The results also suggest that this prepore form as prepared by the methods published is different from other membrane-extracted oligomeric forms of Cry toxins and prepore of other toxins in general. While most other known prepores are composed of multimers of a single protein, the Cry1Ab prepore, as generated, is a protein-receptor complex oligomer and monomers of Cry toxins. PMID:26702367

  20. Ten Putative Contributors to the Obesity Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Emily J.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Keith, Scott W.; Aronne, Louis J.; Barger, Jamie; Baskin, Monica; Benca, Ruth M.; Biggio, Joseph; Boggiano, Mary M.; Eisenmann, Joe C.; Elobeid, Mai; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Gluckman, Peter; Hanlon, Erin C.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Redden, David T.; Ruden, Douglas M.; Wang, Chenxi; Waterland, Robert A.; Wright, Suzanne M.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects, as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic. PMID:19960394

  1. Studies on mu and delta opioid receptor selectivity utilizing chimeric and site-mutagenized receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W W; Shahrestanifar, M; Jin, J; Howells, R D

    1995-01-01

    Opioid receptors are members of the guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor family. Three types of opioid receptors have been cloned and characterized and are referred to as the delta, kappa and mu types. Analysis of receptor chimeras and site-directed mutant receptors has provided a great deal of information about functionally important amino acid side chains that constitute the ligand-binding domains and G-protein-coupling domains of G-protein-coupled receptors. We have constructed delta/mu opioid receptor chimeras that were express in human embryonic kidney 293 cells in order to define receptor domains that are responsible for receptor type selectivity. All chimeric receptors and wild-type delta and mu opioid receptors displayed high-affinity binding of etorphine (an agonist), naloxone (an antagonist), and bremazocine (a mixed agonist/antagonist). In contrast, chimeras that lacked the putative first extracellular loop of the mu receptor did not bind the mu-selective peptide [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO). Chimeras that lacked the putative third extracellular loop of the delta receptor did not bind the delta-selective peptide, [D-Ser2,D-Leu5]enkephalin-Thr (DSLET). Point mutations in the putative third extracellular loop of the wild-type delta receptor that converted vicinal arginine residues to glutamine abolished DSLET binding while not affecting bremazocine, etorphine, and naltrindole binding. We conclude that amino acids in the putative first extracellular loop of the mu receptor are critical for high-affinity DAMGO binding and that arginine residues in the putative third extracellular loop of the delta receptor are important for high-affinity DSLET binding. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8618916

  2. Putative Nitrogen Sensing Systems in Higher Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hon-Ming Lam; Ying Ann Chiao; Man-Wah Li; Yuk-Kwong Yung; Sang Ji

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) metabolism is essential for the biosynthesis of vital biomolecules. N status thus exerts profound effects on plant growth and development, and must be closely monitored. In bacteria and fungi, a few sophisticated N sensing systems have been extensively studied. In animals, the ability to receive amino acid signals has evolved to become an integral part of the nervous coordination system. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in the search for putative N sensing systems in higher plants based on homologous systems in bacteria, fungi, and animals. Apparently, although plants have separated and diversified from other organisms during the evolution process, striking similarities can be found in their N sensing systems compared with those of their counterparts; however, our understanding of these systems is still incomplete. Significant modifications of the N sensing systems (including cross-talk with other signal transduction pathways) in higher plants may be a strategy of adaptation to their unique mode of life.

  3. Putative respiratory chain of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuric, Vincent; Rouillon, Astrid; Chandad, Fatiha; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The electron transfer chain in Porphyromonas gingivalis, or periodontopathogens, has not yet been characterized. P. gingivalis, a strict anaerobic bacteria and the second colonizer of the oral cavity, is considered to be a major causal agent involved in periodontal diseases. Primary colonizers create a favorable environment for P. gingivalis growth by decreasing oxygen pressure. Oxygen does not appear to be the final electron acceptor of the respiratory chain. Fumarate and cytochrome b have been implicated as major components of the respiratory activity. However, the P. gingivalis genome shows many other enzymes that could be implicated in aerobic or nitrite respiration. Using bioinformatic tools and literature studies of respiratory pathways, the ATP synthesis mechanism from the sodium cycle and nutrients metabolism, the putative respirasome of P. gingivalis has been proposed.

  4. Putative impact of RNA editing on drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decher, Niels; Netter, Michael F; Streit, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    Virtually all organisms use RNA editing as a powerful post-transcriptional mechanism to recode genomic information and to increase functional protein diversity. The enzymatic editing of pre-mRNA by ADARs and CDARs is known to change the functional properties of neuronal receptors and ion channels regulating cellular excitability. However, RNA editing is also an important mechanism for genes expressed outside the brain. The fact that RNA editing breaks the 'one gene encodes one protein' hypothesis is daunting for scientists and a probable drawback for drug development, as scientists might search for drugs targeting the 'wrong' protein. This possible difficulty for drug discovery and development became more evident from recent publications, describing that RNA editing events have profound impact on the pharmacology of some common drug targets. These recent studies highlight that RNA editing can cause massive discrepancies between the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology. Here, we review the putative impact of RNA editing on drug discovery, as RNA editing has to be considered before using high-throughput screens, rational drug design or choosing the right model organism for target validation.

  5. Putative bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa in immunosuppressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Girginkardesler, Nogay; Celik, Pınar; Yereli, Kor; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be "flagellated protozoa" have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells.

  6. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Morlon

    Full Text Available Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics.

  7. Efficient Amide Based Halogenide Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xing WU; Feng Hua LI; Hai LIN; Shou Rong ZHU; Hua Kuan LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and anion recognition properties of the amide based phenanthroline derivatives 1, 2 and 3. In all cases 1:1 receptor: anion complexes were observed. The receptors were found to be selective for fluoride and chloride respectively over other putative anionic guest species.

  8. Rho is required for the initiation of calcium signaling and phagocytosis by Fcgamma receptors in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackam, D J; Rotstein, O D; Schreiber, A; Zhang, W j; Grinstein, S

    1997-09-15

    Phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and neutrophils is an essential component of host defense against infection. The mechanism whereby the interaction of opsonized particles with Fcgamma receptors triggers the engulfment of opsonized particles remains incompletely understood, although activation of tyrosine kinases has been recognized as an early step. Recent studies in other systems have demonstrated that tyrosine kinases can in turn signal the activation of small GTPases of the ras superfamily. We therefore investigated the possible role of Rho in Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis. To this end we microinjected J774 macrophages with C3 exotoxin from Clostridium botulinum, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates Rho. C3 exotoxin induced the retraction of filopodia, the disappearance of focal complexes, and a global decrease in the F-actin content of J774 cells. In addition, these cells exhibited increased spreading and the formation of vacuolar structures. Importantly, inactivation of Rho resulted in the complete abrogation of phagocytosis. Inhibition of Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis by C3 exotoxin was confirmed in COS cells, which become phagocytic upon transfection of the FcgammaRIIA receptor. Rho was found to be essential for the accumulation of phosphotyrosine and of F-actin around phagocytic cups and for Fcgamma receptor-mediated Ca2+ signaling. The clustering of receptors in response to opsonin, an essential step in Fcgamma-induced signaling, was the earliest event shown to be inhibited by C3 exotoxin. The effect of the toxin was specific, since clustering and internalization of transferrin receptors were unaffected by microinjection of C3. These data identify a role for small GTPases in Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis by leukocytes.

  9. Salivary PYY: a putative bypass to satiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Acosta

    Full Text Available Peptide YY(3-36 is a satiation hormone released postprandially into the bloodstream from L-endocrine cells in the gut epithelia. In the current report, we demonstrate PYY(3-36 is also present in murine as well as in human saliva. In mice, salivary PYY(3-36 derives from plasma and is also synthesized in the taste cells in taste buds of the tongue. Moreover, the cognate receptor Y2R is abundantly expressed in the basal layer of the progenitor cells of the tongue epithelia and von Ebner's gland. The acute augmentation of salivary PYY(3-36 induced stronger satiation as demonstrated in feeding behavioral studies. The effect is mediated through the activation of the specific Y2 receptor expressed in the lingual epithelial cells. In a long-term study involving diet-induced obese (DIO mice, a sustained increase in PYY(3-36 was achieved using viral vector-mediated gene delivery targeting salivary glands. The chronic increase in salivary PYY(3-36 resulted in a significant long-term reduction in food intake (FI and body weight (BW. Thus this study provides evidence for new functions of the previously characterized gut peptide PYY(3-36 suggesting a potential simple and efficient alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of obesity.

  10. Genomic identification of a putative circadian system in the cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, Andrea R.; McCoole, Matthew D.; Harmon, Sarah M.; Baer, Kevin N.; Christie, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    Essentially nothing is known about the molecular underpinnings of crustacean circadian clocks. The genome of Daphnia pulex, the only crustacean genome available for public use, provides a unique resource for identifying putative circadian proteins in this species. Here, the Daphnia genome was mined for putative circadian protein genes using Drosophila melanogaster queries. The sequences of core clock (e.g. CLOCK, CYCLE, PERIOD, TIMELESS and CRYPTOCHROME 2), clock input (CRYPTOCHROME 1) and clock output (PIGMENT DISPERSING HORMONE RECEPTOR) proteins were deduced. Structural analyses and alignment of the Daphnia proteins with their Drosophila counterparts revealed extensive sequence conservation, particularly in functional domains. Comparisons of the Daphnia proteins with other sequences showed that they are, in most cases, more similar to homologs from other species, including vertebrates, than they are to those of Drosophila. The presence of both CRYPTOCHROME 1 and 2 in Daphnia suggests the organization of its clock may be more similar to that of the butterfly Danaus plexippus than to that of Drosophila (which possesses CRYPTOCHROME 1 but not CRYPTOCHROME 2). These data represent the first description of a putative circadian system from any crustacean, and provide a foundation for future molecular, anatomical and physiological investigations of circadian signaling in Daphnia. PMID:21798832

  11. Assembly of PRR-containing receptors on scaffolds: a model for imidazoline I(1)-receptor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, I F; Dehle, F C; Piletz, J

    2003-12-01

    IRAS, a putative clone of the I(1)-imidazoline receptor, possesses a proline-rich region (PRR) motif, which might interact with SH3 regions on tyrosine kinases, and an integrin-binding motif. Receptors with a PRR motif can generally assemble onto multi-element signaling complexes (eg., the beta(3)-receptor on the EGF receptor) and thereby modulate signal transduction. Integrins serve as scaffolds for multi-element signaling complexes, similar to that assembled with the EGF receptor. It is therefore possible that IRAS signals through a complex with other receptors.

  12. The role of opsonins in Aspergillus fumigatus host defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braem, S.G.E.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an important fungal pathogen and a common cause of invasive fungal infections in humans. Susceptible individuals become infected via the inhalation of dormant conidia.If the immune system fails to clear these conidia, they will swell, germinate and grow into large hyphal str

  13. Putative cholesterol-binding sites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Mikhail A; Lee, Po-Hsien; Ott, Albrecht; Helms, Volkhard

    2013-04-01

    Using molecular docking, we identified a cholesterol-binding site in the groove between transmembrane helices 1 and 7 near the inner membrane-water interface of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry into cells. In this docking pose, the amino group of lysine K67 establishes a hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl group of cholesterol, whereas tyrosine Y302 stacks with cholesterol by its aromatic side chain, and a number of residues form hydrophobic contacts with cholesterol. Sequence alignment showed that a similar putative cholesterol-binding site is also present in CCR5, another HIV coreceptor. We suggest that the interaction of cholesterol with these putative cholesterol-binding sites in CXCR4 and CCR5 is responsible for the presence of these receptors in lipid rafts, for the effect of cholesterol on their conformational stability and function, and for the role that cell cholesterol plays in the cell entry of HIV strains that use these membrane proteins as coreceptors. We propose that mutations of residues that are involved in cholesterol binding will make CXCR4 and CCR5 insensitive to membrane cholesterol content. Cholesterol-binding sites in HIV coreceptors are potential targets for steroid drugs that bind to CXCR4 and CCR5 with higher binding affinity than cholesterol, but do not stabilize the native conformation of these proteins.

  14. Putative Corneal Neuralgia Responding to Vitamin D Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Singman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A patient with putative corneal neuralgia was incidentally discovered to have hypovitaminosis D. Supplementation of vitamin D appears to have led to a resolution of the patient's pain, whereas other efforts to treat the patient were unsuccessful.

  15. Phagocytosis via complement or Fc-gamma receptors is compromised in monocytes from type 2 diabetes patients with chronic hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca I Restrepo

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes patients (DM2 have a higher risk of tuberculosis (TB that may be attributed to functional defects in their mononuclear phagocytes given the critical role of these cells in Mycobacterium tuberculosis containment. Our previous findings suggest that monocytes from DM2 have reduced association with serum-opsonized M. tuberculosis. To determine if this alteration is due to defects in phagocytosis via complement or Fc-gamma receptors (FcγRs, in this study we evaluated the uptake of sheep red blood cells coated with IgG or complement, respectively, by monocytes from individuals with and without DM2. We found that chronic hyperglycemia was significantly associated with reduced phagocytosis via either receptor by univariable and multivariable analyses. This defect was independent of host serum opsonins and flow cytometry data indicated this was not attributed to reduced expression of these phagocytic receptors on DM2 monocytes. The positive correlation between both pathways (R = 0.64; p = 0.003 indicate that monocytes from individuals with chronic hyperglycemia have a defect in the two predominant phagocytic pathways of these cells. Given that phagocytosis is linked to activation of effector mechanisms for bacterial killing, it is likely that this defect is one factor contributing to the higher susceptibility of DM2 patients to pathogens like M. tuberculosis.

  16. Scotopic vision in the monkey is modulated by the G protein-coupled receptor 55

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system plays important roles in the retina of mice and monkeys via their classic CB1 and CB2 receptors. We have previously reported that the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), a putative cannabinoid receptor, is exclusively expressed in rod photoreceptors in the mon......The endogenous cannabinoid system plays important roles in the retina of mice and monkeys via their classic CB1 and CB2 receptors. We have previously reported that the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), a putative cannabinoid receptor, is exclusively expressed in rod photoreceptors...

  17. Enrichment of putative human epidermal stem cells based on cell size and collagen type IV adhesiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juxue Li; Enkui Duan; Chenglin Miao; Weixiang Guo; Liwei Jia; Jiaxi Zhou; Baohua Ma; Sha Peng; Shuang Liu; Yujing Cao

    2008-01-01

    The enrichment and identification of human epidermal stem cells (EpSCs) are of paramount importance for both basic research and clinical application. Although several approaches for the enrichment of EpSCs have been established, enriching a pure population of viable EpSCs is still a challenging task. An improved approach is worth developing to enhance the purity and viability of EpSCs. Here we report that cell size combined with collagen type IV adhesiveness can be used in an improved approach to enrich pure and viable human EpSCs. We separated the rapidly adherent keratinocytes into three populations that range in size from 5-7 μm (population A), to 7-9 μm (population B), to >9 μm (population C) in diameter, and found that human putative EpSCs could be further enriched in population A with the smallest size. Among the three populations, population A displayed the highest density of βl-integrin receptor, contained the highest percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, showed the highest nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, and possessed the highest colony formation efficiency (CFE). When injected into murine blastocysts, these cells participated in multi-tissue formation. More significantly, compared with a previous approach that sorted putative EpSCs according to pl-integrin antibody staining, the viability of the EpSCs enriched by the improved approach was significantly enhanced. Our results provide a putative strategy for the enrichment of human EpSCs, and encourage further study into the role of cell size in stem cell biology.

  18. Regulation of Arabidopsis Early Anther Development by Putative Cell-Cell Signaling Molecules and Transcriptional Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jin Sun; Carey LH Hord; Chang-Bin Chen; Hong Ma

    2007-01-01

    Anther development in flowering plants involves the formation of several cell types, including the tapetal and pollen mother cells. The use of genetic and molecular tools has led to the identification and characterization of genes that are critical for normal cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis early anther development. We review here several recent studies on these genes, including the demonstration that the putative receptor protein kinases BAM1 and BAM2 together play essential roles in the control of early cell division and differentiation. In addition, we discuss the hypothesis that BAM1/2 may form a positive-negative feedback regulatory loop with a previously identified key regulator, SPOROCYTELESS (also called NOZZLE),to control the balance between sporogenous and somatic cell types in the anther. Furthermore, we summarize the isolation and functional analysis of the DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM1 (DYT1) gene in promoting proper tapetal cell differentiation. Our finding that DYT1 encodes a putative transcription factor of the bHLH family, as well as relevant expression analyses, strongly supports a model that DYT1 serves as a critical link between upstream factors and downstream target genes that are critical for normal tapetum development and function. These studies, together with other recently published works, indicate that cell-cell communication and transcriptional control are key processes essential for cell fate specification in anther development.

  19. A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillestøl, Reidun K; Redder, Peter; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2006-01-01

    in cells, and that both the mode of inhibition of viral propagation and the mechanism of adding spacer-repeat units to clusters, are dependent on RNAs transcribed from the clusters. Moreover, the putative inhibitory apparatus (piRNA-based) may be evolutionarily related to the interference RNA systems (si...

  20. Putative Lineage of Novel African Usutu Virus, Central Europe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-10-15

    Sarah Gregory reads an abridged version of "Putative Lineage of Novel African Usutu Virus, Central Europe.".  Created: 10/15/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/15/2015.

  1. Putative golden proportions as predictors of facial esthetics in adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiekens, R.M.A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Hof, BE van 't; Maltha, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In orthodontics, facial esthetics is assumed to be related to golden proportions apparent in the ideal human face. The aim of the study was to analyze the putative relationship between facial esthetics and golden proportions in white adolescents. METHODS: Seventy-six adult laypeople

  2. Trypanosoma brucei: a putative RNA polymerase II promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayele, Henry K

    2009-12-01

    RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters are rare in the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei because gene regulation in the parasite is complex and polycistronic. Here, we describe a putative pol II promoter and its structure-function relationship. The promoter has features of an archetypal eukaryotic pol II promoter including putative canonical CCAAT and TATA boxes, and an initiator element. However, the spatial arrangement of these elements is only similar to yeast pol II promoters. Deletion mapping and transcription assays enabled delineation of a minimal promoter that could drive orientation-independent reporter gene expression suggesting that it may be a bidirectional promoter. In vitro transcription in a heterologous nuclear extract revealed that the promoter can be recognized by the basal eukaryotic transcription complex. This suggests that the transcription machinery in the parasite may be very similar to those of other eukaryotes.

  3. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Putative Susceptibility Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Gilling

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a significant genetic component as shown by family and twin studies. However, only a few genes have repeatedly been shown to be involved in the development of ASDs. The aim of this study has been...... to identify possible ASD susceptibility genes. Genome screens in ASD patients suggest possible susceptibility gene regions on almost every chromosome. We identified four ASD patients with chromosomal rearrangements, two of which were familial rearrangements involving one of these putative susceptibility gene......) was performed for all four patients. By combination of these methods we identified several putative susceptibility genes for ASDs. Expression patterns were established for several of these genes by Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) or in situ hybridization and one gene was sequenced in 157 ASD patients. Our results...

  4. Evidence for triclosan-induced activation of human and rodent xenobiotic nuclear receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacteriostat triclosan (2,4,40-trichloro-20-hydroxydiphenylether) (TCS) decreases rat serum thyroxine via putative nuclear receptor (NR) interaction(s) and subsequent transcriptional up-regulation of hepatic catabolism and clearance. However, due to the evolutionary divergenc...

  5. Isolation and Identification of Putative Oral Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; ZHAO Yan-Hua; TANG Xiao-Fei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and characterize putative cancer stem cells in Tea8113 oral squmous cell carcinoma cell line. Methods: Putative cancer stem cells were isolated by limited dilution assay in Tea8113 cell line. Biological features of putative cancer stem cells were detected by MTT assay, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, Colony Forming Efficiency assays, cell motility assay and in vivo tumor formation experiment. Results: Compared with untreated Tea8113 cells, the putative cancer stem cells proliferated more quickly and showed heteroploid cell cycle,higher G0/G1-arrested cells, higher CFE and higher expression levels of ABCG2 belonged to tumor stem cell phenotypes. The putative cancer stem cells had stronger capacity to generate tumors in vivo. Conclusion: The holoclone cells have higher proliferation and self-renewal abilities, which may be cancer stem cells existed in Tea8113 oral squmous cell carcinoma cell line.%目的:分离鉴定口腔鳞癌细胞系Tca8113中的肿瘤干细胞.方法:利用有限稀释的方法分离Tca8113细胞系中的肿瘤干细胞.通过MTT法、流式细胞技术、细胞免疫荧光、克隆形成率分析、细胞迁移能力检测和裸鼠皮下成瘤实验确定分离得到的肿瘤干细胞的生物学特点.结果:分离得到的紧密型克隆肿瘤细胞表现为异倍体样细胞周期,大部分细胞处于G0/G1期,增殖能力、克隆形成率和体外迁移能力都明显高于未分离的肿瘤细胞.紧密型克隆肿瘤细胞肿瘤干细胞标记物ABCG2表达也高于未分离的肿瘤细胞,并且具有更强的裸鼠皮下成瘤能力.结论:我们分离得到的紧密型克隆细胞具有较强的细胞增殖和自我更新能力,可能就是口腔鳞癌细胞系Tca8113中的肿瘤干细胞.

  6. Opioid receptors: toward separation of analgesic from undesirable effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ping-Yee; Reggio, Patricia H; Loh, Horace H

    2013-06-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor hetero-oligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics.

  7. Opioid Receptors: Toward Separation of Analgesic from Undesirable Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, P.Y.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Loh, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor heterooligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics PMID:23598157

  8. Serotonin(4) (5-HT(4)) receptor agonists are putative antidepressants with a rapid onset of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Guillaume; Rymar, Vladimir V; Du, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In contrast, a 3 day treatment with the SSRI citalopram remains devoid of any effect on these parameters. Finally, a 3 day regimen with the 5-HT(4) agonist RS 67333 was sufficient to reduce both the hyperlocomotion induced by olfactory bulbectomy and the diminution of sucrose...

  9. Glycosphingolipids as Putative Receptor for Staphylococcal Enterotoxin-B in Cultured Human Kidney Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    SMase cleaves sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphocholine. Ceramide in turn, induces apoptosis. In this regard, our preliminary results indicate that SEB...sensitivity of the assay for SEB in human urine is higher than in human serum. A possible reason may be that serum has a number of lipid binding proteins...hemagglutination or latexagglutination assay, radioimrnunoassay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and skin test assay. However, such studies have not

  10. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines...

  11. Rho is Required for the Initiation of Calcium Signaling and Phagocytosis by Fcγ Receptors in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackam, David J.; Rotstein, Ori D.; Schreiber, Alan; Zhang, Wei-jian; Grinstein, Sergio

    1997-01-01

    Phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and neutrophils is an essential component of host defense against infection. The mechanism whereby the interaction of opsonized particles with Fcγ receptors triggers the engulfment of opsonized particles remains incompletely understood, although activation of tyrosine kinases has been recognized as an early step. Recent studies in other systems have demonstrated that tyrosine kinases can in turn signal the activation of small GTPases of the ras superfamily. We therefore investigated the possible role of Rho in Fc receptor–mediated phagocytosis. To this end we microinjected J774 macrophages with C3 exotoxin from Clostridium botulinum, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates Rho. C3 exotoxin induced the retraction of filopodia, the disappearance of focal complexes, and a global decrease in the F-actin content of J774 cells. In addition, these cells exhibited increased spreading and the formation of vacuolar structures. Importantly, inactivation of Rho resulted in the complete abrogation of phagocytosis. Inhibition of Fcγ receptor–mediated phagocytosis by C3 exotoxin was confirmed in COS cells, which become phagocytic upon transfection of the FcγRIIA receptor. Rho was found to be essential for the accumulation of phosphotyrosine and of F-actin around phagocytic cups and for Fcγ receptor–mediated Ca2+ signaling. The clustering of receptors in response to opsonin, an essential step in Fcγ-induced signaling, was the earliest event shown to be inhibited by C3 exotoxin. The effect of the toxin was specific, since clustering and internalization of transferrin receptors were unaffected by microinjection of C3. These data identify a role for small GTPases in Fcγ receptor–mediated phagocytosis by leukocytes. PMID:9294149

  12. The V-ATPase a2-subunit as a putative endosomal pH-sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshansky, V

    2007-11-01

    V-ATPase (vesicular H(+)-ATPase)-driven intravesicular acidification is crucial for vesicular trafficking. Defects in vesicular acidification and trafficking have recently been recognized as essential determinants of various human diseases. An important role of endosomal acidification in receptor-ligand dissociation and in activation of lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes is well established. However, the molecular mechanisms by which luminal pH information is transmitted to the cytosolic small GTPases that control trafficking events such as budding, coat formation and fusion are unknown. Here, we discuss our recent discovery that endosomal V-ATPase is a pH-sensor regulating the degradative pathway. According to our model, V-ATPase is responsible for: (i) the generation of a pH gradient between vesicular membranes; (ii) sensing of intravesicular pH; and (iii) transmitting this information to the cytosolic side of the membrane. We also propose the hypothetical molecular mechanism involved in function of the V-ATPase a2-subunit as a putative pH-sensor. Based on extensive experimental evidence on the crucial role of histidine residues in the function of PSPs (pH-sensing proteins) in eukaryotic cells, we hypothesize that pH-sensitive histidine residues within the intra-endosomal loops and/or C-terminal luminal tail of the a2-subunit could also be involved in the pH-sensing function of V-ATPase. However, in order to identify putative pH-sensitive histidine residues and to test this hypothesis, it is absolutely essential that we increase our understanding of the folding and transmembrane topology of the a-subunit isoforms of V-ATPase. Thus the crucial role of intra-endosomal histidine residues in pH-dependent conformational changes of the V-ATPase a2-isoform, its interaction with cytosolic small GTPases and ultimately in its acidification-dependent regulation of the endosomal/lysosomal protein degradative pathway remain to be determined.

  13. Putative neuroprotective actions of N-acyl-ethanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Moesgaard, B.; Petersen, G.

    2002-01-01

    and monounsaturated fatty acids. Formation of NAPE and NAE is catalyzed by an N-acyltransferase and an NAPE-hydrolyzing phospholipase D, respectively, two enzymes that have been characterized only preliminary. Interestingly, NAPEs and NAEs accumulate in the brain in response to neurodegenerative insults at a time...... when other phospholipids are subjected to rapid degradation. This is an important biosynthetic aspect of NAPE and NAE, as NAEs may be neuroprotective by a number of different mechanisms involving both receptor activation and non-receptor-mediated effects, e.g. by binding to cannabinoid receptors...

  14. Molecular genetics: DNA analysis of a putative dog clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heidi G; Kruglyak, Leonid; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2006-03-09

    In August 2005, Lee et al. reported the first cloning of a domestic dog from adult somatic cells. This putative dog clone was the result of somatic-cell nuclear transfer from a fibroblast cell of a three-year-old male Afghan hound into a donor oocyte provided by a dog of mixed breed. In light of recent concerns regarding the creation of cloned human cell lines from the same institution, we have undertaken an independent test to determine the validity of the claims made by Lee et al..

  15. Putative cryptoendolithic life in Devonian pillow basalt, Rheinisches Schiefergebirge, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, J; Bach, W; Behrens, K; Reitner, J

    2008-03-01

    Middle Devonian (Givetian) pillow basalt and inter-pillow breccia from the Rheinisches Schiefergebirge in Germany were found to contain putative biogenic filaments that indicate that life once proliferated within these volcanic rocks. Mineralized filaments are found in carbonate amygdules (vesicles filled by carbonate cement) in the volcanic rock, where they started to form on the internal surface of the once water-filled vesicles. Biogenicity of the filaments is indicated by (1) their size and shape resembling modern microorganisms including a constant diameter along the length of curved filaments, (2) their independence of crystal faces or cleavage planes, (3) branching patterns reminiscent of modern microorganisms, and (4) their spatial clustering and preferential occurrence close to the margin of pillows and in the inter-pillow breccias. A time lag between the deposition of pillow basalt and the activity of endoliths is revealed by the sequence of carbonate cements filling the amygdules. The putative filamentous microorganisms thrived after the formation of early fibrous rim cement, but before later equant calcite spar filled most of the remaining porosity. Microbial clay authigenesis analogous to the encrustation of prokaryotes in modern iron-rich environments led to the preservation of filaments. The filaments predominantly consist of the clay minerals chamosite and illite. Having dwelled in water-filled vesicles, the Devonian basalt-hosted filaments apparently represent cryptoendoliths. This finding suggests that a previously unrecognized niche for life exists within volcanic rock.

  16. Putative golden proportions as predictors of facial esthetics in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekens, Rosemie M A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; van 't Hof, Martin A; van 't Hof, Bep E; Maltha, Jaap C

    2008-10-01

    In orthodontics, facial esthetics is assumed to be related to golden proportions apparent in the ideal human face. The aim of the study was to analyze the putative relationship between facial esthetics and golden proportions in white adolescents. Seventy-six adult laypeople evaluated sets of photographs of 64 adolescents on a visual analog scale (VAS) from 0 to 100. The facial esthetic value of each subject was calculated as a mean VAS score. Three observers recorded the position of 13 facial landmarks included in 19 putative golden proportions, based on the golden proportions as defined by Ricketts. The proportions and each proportion's deviation from the golden target (1.618) were calculated. This deviation was then related to the VAS scores. Only 4 of the 19 proportions had a significant negative correlation with the VAS scores, indicating that beautiful faces showed less deviation from the golden standard than less beautiful faces. Together, these variables explained only 16% of the variance. Few golden proportions have a significant relationship with facial esthetics in adolescents. The explained variance of these variables is too small to be of clinical importance.

  17. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  18. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing....... The generation of knock-out (KO) mice, intended as a means to define the contributions made by individual receptor subtypes, necessarily marks but an approximation. Furthermore, we must now take into account the stunning complexity of receptor co-operation indicated by the observation of receptor homo......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  19. Exceptional error minimization in putative primordial genetic codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The standard genetic code is redundant and has a highly non-random structure. Codons for the same amino acids typically differ only by the nucleotide in the third position, whereas similar amino acids are encoded, mostly, by codon series that differ by a single base substitution in the third or the first position. As a result, the code is highly albeit not optimally robust to errors of translation, a property that has been interpreted either as a product of selection directed at the minimization of errors or as a non-adaptive by-product of evolution of the code driven by other forces. Results We investigated the error-minimization properties of putative primordial codes that consisted of 16 supercodons, with the third base being completely redundant, using a previously derived cost function and the error minimization percentage as the measure of a code's robustness to mistranslation. It is shown that, when the 16-supercodon table is populated with 10 putative primordial amino acids, inferred from the results of abiotic synthesis experiments and other evidence independent of the code's evolution, and with minimal assumptions used to assign the remaining supercodons, the resulting 2-letter codes are nearly optimal in terms of the error minimization level. Conclusion The results of the computational experiments with putative primordial genetic codes that contained only two meaningful letters in all codons and encoded 10 to 16 amino acids indicate that such codes are likely to have been nearly optimal with respect to the minimization of translation errors. This near-optimality could be the outcome of extensive early selection during the co-evolution of the code with the primordial, error-prone translation system, or a result of a unique, accidental event. Under this hypothesis, the subsequent expansion of the code resulted in a decrease of the error minimization level that became sustainable owing to the evolution of a high

  20. Identification of putative insulin-like peptides and components of insulin signaling pathways in parasitic platyhelminths by the use of genome-wide screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Yin, Cai; Dou, Yongxi; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-02-01

    No endogenous insulin-like peptides in parasitic flatworms have been reported. Insulin receptors from flukes and tapeworms have been shown to interact directly with the host-derived insulin molecule, which suggests the exploitation of host-derived insulin. In this study, a strategy of genome-wide searches followed by comprehensive analyses of strictly conserved features of the insulin family was used to demonstrate the presence of putative insulin-like peptides in the genomes of six tapeworms and two flukes. In addition, whole insulin signaling pathways were annotated on a genome-wide scale. Two putative insulin-like peptide genes in each genome of tapeworms and one insulin-like peptide gene in each genome of flukes were identified. The comprehensive analyses revealed that all of these peptides showed the common features shared by other members of the insulin family, and the phylogenetic analysis implied a putative gene duplication event in the Cestoda during the evolution of insulin-like peptide genes. The quantitative expression analysis and immunolocalization results suggested a putative role of these peptides in reproduction. Entire sets of major components of the classic insulin signaling pathway were successfully identified, suggesting that this pathway in parasitic flatworms might also regulate many other important biological activities. We believe that the identification of the insulin-like peptides gives us a better understanding of the insulin signaling pathway in these parasites, as well as host-parasite interactions.

  1. Basal ganglia calcification as a putative cause for cognitive decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo Mendes de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Basal ganglia calcifications (BGC may be present in various medical conditions, such as infections, metabolic, psychiatric and neurological diseases, associated with different etiologies and clinical outcomes, including parkinsonism, psychosis, mood swings and dementia. A literature review was performed highlighting the main neuropsychological findings of BGC, with particular attention to clinical reports of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging studies combined with neuropsychological analysis show that some patients have shown progressive disturbances of selective attention, declarative memory and verbal perseveration. Therefore, the calcification process might represent a putative cause for dementia syndromes, suggesting a probable link among calcinosis, the aging process and eventually with neuronal death. The increasing number of reports available will foster a necessary discussion about cerebral calcinosis and its role in determining symptomatology in dementia patients

  2. Probing the putative active site of YjdL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johanne Mørch; Ismat, Fouzia; Szakonyi, Gerda;

    2012-01-01

    YjdL from E. coli is an unusual proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT). Unlike prototypical POTs, dipeptides are preferred over tripeptides, in particular dipeptides with a positively charged C-terminal residue. To further understand this difference in peptide specificity, the sequences...... of YjdL and YdgR, a prototypical E. coli POT, were compared in light of the crystal structure of a POT from Shewanella oneidensis. Several residues found in the putative active site were mutated and the activities of the mutated variants were assessed in terms of substrate uptake assays, and changes...... pocket that opens towards the extracellular space. The C-terminal side chain faces in the opposite direction into a sub pocket that faces the cytoplasm. These data indicated a stabilizing effect on a bulky N-terminal residue by an Ala281Phe variant and on the dipeptide backbone by Trp278...

  3. Novel putative mechanisms to link circadian clocks to healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Catalin, Bogdan; Buga, Ana-Maria

    2015-08-01

    The circadian clock coordinates the internal physiology to increase the homeostatic capacity thereby providing both a survival advantage to the system and an optimization of energy budgeting. Multiple-oscillator circadian mechanisms are likely to play a role in regulating human health and may contribute to the aging process. Our aim is to give an overview of how the central clock in the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks relate to aging and metabolic disorders, including hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. In particular, we unravel novel putative mechanisms to link circadian clocks to healthy aging. This review may lead to the design of large-scale interventions to help people stay healthy as they age by adjusting daily activities, such as feeding behavior, and or adaptation to age-related changes in individual circadian rhythms.

  4. Ballistic gelatin as a putative substrate for EEG phantom devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hairston, W David; Yu, Alfred B

    2016-01-01

    Phantom devices allow the human variable to be controlled for in order to allow clear comparison and validation of biomedical imaging hardware and software. There is currently no standard phantom for electroencephalography (EEG). To be useful, such a device would need to: (a) accurately recreate the real and imaginary components of scalp electrical impedance, (b) contain internal emitters to create electrical dipoles, and (c) be easily replicable across various labs and research groups. Cost-effective materials, which are conductive, repeatable, and easily formed are a missing key enabler for EEG phantoms. Here, we explore the use of ballistics gelatin, an inexpensive, easily-formable and repeatable material, as a putative substrate by examining its electrical properties and physical stability over time. We show that varied concentrations of NaCl salt relative to gelatin powder shifts the phase/frequency response profile, allowing for selective tuning of the material electrical properties.

  5. Putative benefits of microalgal astaxanthin on exercise and human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo P. Barros

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (ASTA is a pinkish-orange carotenoid produced by microalgae, but also commonly found in shrimp, lobster and salmon, which accumulate ASTA from the aquatic food chain. Numerous studies have addressed the benefits of ASTA for human health, including the inhibition of LDL oxidation, UV-photoprotection and prophylaxis of bacterial stomach ulcers. ASTA is recognized as a powerful scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS, especially those involved in lipid peroxidation. Both aerobic and anaerobic exercise are closely related to overproduction of ROS in muscle tissue. Post-exercise inflammatory processes can even exacerbate the oxidative stress imposed by exercise. Thus, ASTA is suggested here as a putative nutritional alternative/coadjutant for antioxidant therapy to afford additional protection to muscle tissues against oxidative damage induced by exercise, as well as for an (overall integrative redox re-balance and general human health.

  6. The GPRC6A Receptor displays Constitutive Internalization and Sorting to the Slow Recycling Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jansen, Anna Mai

    2017-01-01

    The class C G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A is a putative nutrient sensing receptor and represents a possible new drug target in metabolic disorders. However, the specific physiological role of this receptor has yet to be identified, and the mechanisms regulating its activity and cell surface a......-canonical trafficking mechanisms are a common feature for the nutrient sensing class C family that ensure functional receptors in the cell membrane despite prolonged agonist exposure.......The class C G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A is a putative nutrient sensing receptor and represents a possible new drug target in metabolic disorders. However, the specific physiological role of this receptor has yet to be identified, and the mechanisms regulating its activity and cell surface...

  7. Cryptic species in putative ancient asexual darwinulids (Crustacea, Ostracoda.

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    Isa Schön

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fully asexually reproducing taxa lack outcrossing. Hence, the classic Biological Species Concept cannot be applied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used DNA sequences from the mitochondrial COI gene and the nuclear ITS2 region to check species boundaries according to the evolutionary genetic (EG species concept in five morphospecies in the putative ancient asexual ostracod genera, Penthesilenula and Darwinula, from different continents. We applied two methods for detecting cryptic species, namely the K/θ method and the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC. We could confirm the existence of species in all five darwinulid morphospecies and additional cryptic diversity in three morphospecies, namely in Penthesilenula brasiliensis, Darwinula stevensoni and in P. aotearoa. The number of cryptic species within one morphospecies varied between seven (P. brasiliensis, five to six (D. stevensoni and two (P. aotearoa, respectively, depending on the method used. Cryptic species mainly followed continental distributions. We also found evidence for coexistence at the local scale for Brazilian cryptic species of P. brasiliensis and P. aotearoa. Our ITS2 data confirmed that species exist in darwinulids but detected far less EG species, namely two to three cryptic species in P. brasiliensis and no cryptic species at all in the other darwinulid morphospecies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results clearly demonstrate that both species and cryptic diversity can be recognized in putative ancient asexual ostracods using the EG species concept, and that COI data are more suitable than ITS2 for this purpose. The discovery of up to eight cryptic species within a single morphospecies will significantly increase estimates of biodiversity in this asexual ostracod group. Which factors, other than long-term geographic isolation, are important for speciation processes in these ancient asexuals remains to be investigated.

  8. Putative regulatory factors associated with intramuscular fat content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline S M Cesar

    Full Text Available Intramuscular fat (IMF content is related to insulin resistance, which is an important prediction factor for disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes in human. At the same time, it is an economically important trait, which influences the sensorial and nutritional value of meat. The deposition of IMF is influenced by many factors such as sex, age, nutrition, and genetics. In this study Nellore steers (Bos taurus indicus subspecies were used to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in IMF content. This was accomplished by identifying differentially expressed genes (DEG, biological pathways and putative regulatory factors. Animals included in this study had extreme genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV for IMF. RNA-seq analysis, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA and co-expression network methods, such as partial correlation coefficient with information theory (PCIT, regulatory impact factor (RIF and phenotypic impact factor (PIF were utilized to better understand intramuscular adipogenesis. A total of 16,101 genes were analyzed in both groups (high (H and low (L GEBV and 77 DEG (FDR 10% were identified between the two groups. Pathway Studio software identified 13 significantly over-represented pathways, functional classes and small molecule signaling pathways within the DEG list. PCIT analyses identified genes with a difference in the number of gene-gene correlations between H and L group and detected putative regulatory factors involved in IMF content. Candidate genes identified by PCIT include: ANKRD26, HOXC5 and PPAPDC2. RIF and PIF analyses identified several candidate genes: GLI2 and IGF2 (RIF1, MPC1 and UBL5 (RIF2 and a host of small RNAs, including miR-1281 (PIF. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie fat content and energy balance in muscle and provide important information for the production of healthier beef for human consumption.

  9. Holophytochrome-interacting proteins in Physcomitrella: putative actors in phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena eErmert

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes are the principle photoreceptors in light-regulated plant development, primarily acting via translocation of the light-activated photoreceptor into the nucleus and subsequent gene regulation. However, several independent lines of evidence indicate unambiguously that an additional cytoplasmic signaling mechanism must exist. Directional responses in filament tip cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens are steered by phy4 which has been shown to interact physically with the blue light receptor phototropin at the plasma membrane. This complex might perceive and transduce vectorial information leading to cytoskeleton reorganization and finally a directional growth response. We developed yeast two-hybrid procedures using photochemically-functional, full-length phy4 as bait in Physcomitrella cDNA library screens and growth assays under different light conditions, revealing Pfr-dependent interactions possibly associated with phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling. Candidate proteins were then expressed in planta with fluorescent protein tags to determine their intracellular localization in darkness and red light. Of 14 candidates, 12 were confirmed to interact with phy4 in planta using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We discuss the roles these putative holophytochrome-interacting proteins (HIP's might have in signaling.

  10. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marie Barbaglia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho- lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012. Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein, a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH, which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while

  11. Functional analysis of nine putative chemoreceptor proteins in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Veronika M; Muschler, Paul; Scharf, Birgit E

    2007-03-01

    The genome of the symbiotic soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti contains eight genes coding for methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) McpS to McpZ and one gene coding for a transducer-like protein, IcpA. Seven of the MCPs are localized in the cytoplasmic membrane via two membrane-spanning regions, whereas McpY and IcpA lack such hydrophobic regions. The periplasmic regions of McpU, McpV, and McpX contain the small-ligand-binding domain Cache. In addition, McpU possesses the ligand-binding domain TarH. By probing gene expression with lacZ fusions, we have identified mcpU and mcpX as being highly expressed. Deletion of any one of the receptor genes caused impairments in the chemotactic response toward most organic acids, amino acids, and sugars in a swarm plate assay. The data imply that chemoreceptor proteins in S. meliloti can sense more than one class of carbon source and suggest that many or all receptors work as an ensemble. Tactic responses were virtually eliminated for a strain lacking all nine receptor genes. Capillary assays revealed three important sensors for the strong attractant proline: McpU, McpX, and McpY. Receptor deletions variously affected free-swimming speed and attractant-induced chemokinesis. Noticeably, cells lacking mcpU were swimming 9% slower than the wild-type control. We infer that McpU inhibits the kinase activity of CheA in the absence of an attractant. Cells lacking one of the two soluble receptors were impaired in chemokinetic proficiency by more than 50%. We propose that the internal sensors, IcpA and the PAS domain containing McpY, monitor the metabolic state of S. meliloti.

  12. Functional Authentication of a Novel Gastropod Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Reveals Unusual Features and Evolutionary Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanaugh, Scott I.; Tsai, Pei-San

    2016-01-01

    A gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like molecule was previously identified in a gastropod, Aplysia californica, and named ap-GnRH. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of a putative ap-GnRH receptor (ap-GnRHR) and functionally authenticated this receptor as a bona fide ap-GnRHR. This receptor contains two potential translation start sites, each accompanied by a Kozak sequence, suggesting the translation of a long and a short form of the receptor is possible. The putative ap-GnRH...

  13. Glucocorticoid Regulation of the Vitamin D Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter. PMID:20398752

  14. Early embryonic expression of a putative ecdysteroid-phosphate phosphatase in the water flea, Daphnia magna (Cladocera: Daphniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Miki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Ecdysteroids, known as molting hormones, play central roles in the onset of molting, metamorphosis, and reproduction in arthropods. The ecdysteroids stored in eggs also play an important role in embryogenesis. In insects, ecdysteroids are stored as phosphate esters, which are converted to an active form by ecdysteroid-phosphate phosphatase (EPPase). Although EPPase is believed to be widely conserved in the Ecdysozoa, little is known about its expression in clades other than Insecta. In this study, we cloned a putative EPPase gene from a small fresh water crustacean known as a water flea, Daphnia magna Straus (Cladocera: Daphniidae), and examined its expression during embryogenesis. The amino acid sequence of the putative crustacean EPPase cDNA showed high similarity to insect EPPase and human suppressor of T-cell receptor signaling-1. We also found that the D. magna EPPase was highly expressed during early embryogenesis; its expression rapidly decreased 6 h after oviposition. This timing corresponds to the onset of organogenesis in D. magna. The expression of EPPase could not be detected in diapaused eggs. This is the first report of an EPPase from crustaceans, and the results suggest that the function of EPPase is conserved between insects and crustaceans. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  15. Contrasting phenotypes of putative proprioceptive and nociceptive trigeminal neurons innervating jaw muscle in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Mark

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the clinical significance of muscle pain, and the extensive investigation of the properties of muscle afferent fibers, there has been little study of the ion channels on sensory neurons that innervate muscle. In this study, we have fluorescently tagged sensory neurons that innervate the masseter muscle, which is unique because cell bodies for its muscle spindles are in a brainstem nucleus (mesencephalic nucleus of the 5th cranial nerve, MeV while all its other sensory afferents are in the trigeminal ganglion (TG. We examine the hypothesis that certain molecules proposed to be used selectively by nociceptors fail to express on muscle spindles afferents but appear on other afferents from the same muscle. Results MeV muscle afferents perfectly fit expectations of cells with a non-nociceptive sensory modality: Opiates failed to inhibit calcium channel currents (ICa in 90% of MeV neurons, although ICa were inhibited by GABAB receptor activation. All MeV afferents had brief (1 msec action potentials driven solely by tetrodotoxin (TTX-sensitive Na channels and no MeV afferent expressed either of three ion channels (TRPV1, P2X3, and ASIC3 thought to be transducers for nociceptive stimuli, although they did express other ATP and acid-sensing channels. Trigeminal masseter afferents were much more diverse. Virtually all of them expressed at least one, and often several, of the three putative nociceptive transducer channels, but the mix varied from cell to cell. Calcium currents in 80% of the neurons were measurably inhibited by μ-opioids, but the extent of inhibition varied greatly. Almost all TG masseter afferents expressed some TTX-insensitive sodium currents, but the amount compared to TTX sensitive sodium current varied, as did the duration of action potentials. Conclusion Most masseter muscle afferents that are not muscle spindle afferents express molecules that are considered characteristic of nociceptors, but these

  16. A Combined Computational and Experimental Study on the Structure-Regulation Relationships of Putative Mammalian DNA Replication Initiator GINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reiko Hayashi; Takako Arauchi; Moe Tategu; Yuya Goto; Kenichi Yoshida

    2006-01-01

    GINS, a heterotetramer of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3 proteins, is an emerging chromatin factor recognized to be involved in the initiation and elongation step of DNA replication. Although the yeast and Xenopus GINS genes are well documented, their orthologous genes in higher eukaryotes are not fully characterized.In this study, we report the genomic structure and transcriptional regulation of mammalian GINS genes. Serum stimulation increased the GINS Mrna levels in human cells. Reporter gene assay using putative GINS promoter sequences revealed that the expression of mammalian GINS is regulated by 17β-Estradiolstimulated estrogen receptor α, and human PSF3 acts as a gene responsive to transcription factor E2F1. The goal of this study is to present the current data so as to encourage further work in the field of GINS gene regulation and functions in mammalian cells.

  17. Putative uremic encephalopathy in horses: five cases (1978-1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, M A; Johnson, J S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Savage, C J; Fettman, M J; Gould, D H

    2001-02-15

    To determine historical, physical examination, clinicopathologic, and postmortem findings in horses with putative uremic encephalopathy. Design-Retrospective study. Animals-5 horses with renal failure and neurologic disease not attributable to abnormalities in any other organ system. Medical records from 1978 to 1998 were examined for horses with renal disease and neurologic signs not attributable to primary neurologic, hepatic, or other diseases. Signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, renal ultrasonographic findings, and postmortem data were reviewed. Of 332 horses with renal disease, 5 met selection criteria. Historical findings, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, ultrasonographic data, and postmortem findings were consistent with chronic renal failure. Swollen astrocytes were detected in all 4 horses examined at necropsy. A single criterion was not determined to be pathognomonic for uremic encephalopathy in horses. Uremic encephalopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with evidence of chronic renal failure and encephalopathic neurologic sign not attributable to other causes. Astrocyte swelling, which was common to all 4 horses examined at necropsy, may serve as a microscopic indicator of uremic encephalopathy in horses.

  18. Phytophthora infestans specific phosphorylation patterns and new putative control targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frades, Itziar; Andreasson, Erik

    2016-04-01

    In this study we applied biomathematical searches of gene regulatory mechanisms to learn more about oomycete biology and to identify new putative targets for pesticides or biological control against Phytophthora infestans. First, oomycete phylum-specific phosphorylation motifs were found by discriminative n-gram analysis. We found 11.600 P. infestans specific n-grams, mapping 642 phosphoproteins. The most abundant group among these related to phosphatidylinositol metabolism. Due to the large number of possible targets found and our hypothesis that multi-level control is a sign of usefulness as targets for intervention, we identified overlapping targets with a second screen. This was performed to identify proteins dually regulated by small RNA and phosphorylation. We found 164 proteins to be regulated by both sRNA and phosphorylation and the dominating functions where phosphatidylinositol signalling/metabolism, endocytosis, and autophagy. Furthermore we performed a similar regulatory study and discriminative n-gram analysis of proteins with no clear orthologs in other species and proteins that are known to be unique to P. infestans such as the RxLR effectors, Crinkler (CRN) proteins and elicitins. We identified CRN proteins with specific phospho-motifs present in all life stages. PITG_12626, PITG_14042 and PITG_23175 are CRN proteins that have species-specific phosphorylation motifs and are subject to dual regulation.

  19. Rapid Discrimination Among Putative Mechanistic Models of Biochemical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Jason G; Savageau, Michael A

    2016-08-31

    An overarching goal in molecular biology is to gain an understanding of the mechanistic basis underlying biochemical systems. Success is critical if we are to predict effectively the outcome of drug treatments and the development of abnormal phenotypes. However, data from most experimental studies is typically noisy and sparse. This allows multiple potential mechanisms to account for experimental observations, and often devising experiments to test each is not feasible. Here, we introduce a novel strategy that discriminates among putative models based on their repertoire of qualitatively distinct phenotypes, without relying on knowledge of specific values for rate constants and binding constants. As an illustration, we apply this strategy to two synthetic gene circuits exhibiting anomalous behaviors. Our results show that the conventional models, based on their well-characterized components, cannot account for the experimental observations. We examine a total of 40 alternative hypotheses and show that only 5 have the potential to reproduce the experimental data, and one can do so with biologically relevant parameter values.

  20. Putative role of Tat-Env interaction in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Selina; Moscoso, Carlos G; Xing, Li; Kan, Elaine; Sun, Yide; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Vahlne, Anders G; Srivastava, Indresh K; Barnett, Susan W; Cheng, R Holland

    2013-09-24

    To study the complex formed between Tat protein and Env soluble trimeric immunogen, and compare with previously determined structures of Env native trimers and Env-CD4m complexes. The soluble Env trimer was used to mimic the spike glycoprotein on the virus surface for the study. To overcome limitations of other structural determination methods, cryoelectron microscopy was employed to image the complex, and single particle reconstruction was utilized to reconstruct the structure of the complex from collected micrographs. Molecular modeling of gp120-Tat was performed to provide atomic coordinates for docking. Images were preprocessed by multivariate statistical analysis to identify principal components of variation then submitted for reconstruction. Reconstructed structures were docked with modeled gp120-Tat atomic coordinates to study the positions of crucial epitopes. Analysis of the Env-Tat complex demonstrated an intermediate structure between Env native trimers and Env-CD4m structures. Docking results indicate that the CD4-binding site and the V3 loop are exposed in the Env-Tat complex. The integrin-binding sequence in Tat was also exposed in Env-Tat docking. The intermediate structure induced by Tat-interaction with Env could potentially provide an explanation for increased virus infection in the presence of Tat protein. Consequently, exposure of CD4-binding sites and a putative integrin-binding sequence on Tat in the complex may provide a new avenue for rational design of an effective HIV vaccine. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  1. Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase: Potential Therapeutic Target and Putative Metabolic Oncogene

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    Cheryl K. Zogg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exemplified by cancer cells’ preference for glycolysis, for example, the Warburg effect, altered metabolism in tumorigenesis has emerged as an important aspect of cancer in the past 10–20 years. Whether due to changes in regulatory tumor suppressors/oncogenes or by acting as metabolic oncogenes themselves, enzymes involved in the complex network of metabolic pathways are being studied to understand their role and assess their utility as therapeutic targets. Conversion of glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate into phosphohydroxypyruvate by the enzyme phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH—a rate-limiting step in the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to serine—represents one such mechanism. Forgotten since classic animal studies in the 1980s, the role of PHGDH as a potential therapeutic target and putative metabolic oncogene has recently reemerged following publication of two prominent papers near-simultaneously in 2011. Since that time, numerous studies and a host of metabolic explanations have been put forward in an attempt to understand the results observed. In this paper, I review the historic progression of our understanding of the role of PHGDH in cancer from the early work by Snell through its reemergence and rise to prominence, culminating in an assessment of subsequent work and what it means for the future of PHGDH.

  2. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

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    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  3. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinartz, Andrea; Ehling, Josef; Franz, Susanne; Simon, Verena; Bravo, Ignacio G; Tessmer, Claudia; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Lyer, Stefan; Schneider, Ursula; Köster, Jan; Raupach, Kerstin; Kämmerer, Elke; Klaus, Christina; Tischendorf, Jens J W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Alonso, Angel; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2010-03-07

    Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hongbo; Liu Jing; Guo Dan; Liu Peixiang; Zhao Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Background Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types.The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter,as one of the main regulatory mechanisms,is associated with TGFBI silencing.In this study,we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias.Methods Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia call lines and clinical samples.Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients,bisulfite-converted,and analyzed by the MSP method.Results Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested.Furthermore,a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples.Conclusion The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia,which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  5. Expression and characterization of rice putative PAUSED gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengguo Yao; Liangfa Ge; Wei Li; Botao Zhao; Chaoqun Li; Kangcheng Ruan; Hongxuan Lin; Youxin Jin

    2008-01-01

    In Arab idopsis, PA USED ( PSD ) encodes the ortholog of loslp/ exportin-t, which mediates the nuclear export of transfer RNA (tRNA) in yeast and mammals. However, in monocot plants such as rice, knowledge of the corresponding ortholog is limited, and its effects on growth development and productivity remain unknown. In this study, we verified a rice transfer-DNA insertional mutantpsd line and analyzed its phenotypes;the mutant displayed severe morphological defects including retarded development and low fertility compared with wild-type rice. Examining intronless tRNA-Tyr and intron-containing pre-tRNA-Ala expression levels in cytoplasmic and nuclear fraction with Northern blot analysis between wild -type and mutant leaf tissue suggested that rice PSD might be involved in tRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.Additionally, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that PSD transcript was expressed throughout normal rice plant development, and subcellular localization assays showed that rice PSD protein was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. In summary, our data implied that the putative PSD gene might be indispensable for normal rice development and its function might be the same as that ofArabidopsis PSD.

  6. Conformational study of a putative HLTV-1 retroviral protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llido, S; d'Estaintot, B L; Dautant, A; Geoffre, S; Picard, P; Precigoux, G

    1993-05-01

    The crystal structure of prolyl-glutaminyl-valyl-statyl-alanyl-leucine (Pro-Gln-Val-Sta-Ala-Leu, C(32)H(57)N(7)0(9).5H(2)0, M(r) = 683.9 + 90.1), a putative HTLV-1 protease inhibitor based on one of the consensus retroviral protease cleavage sequences, and containing the statine residue [(4S,3S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-6-methylheptanoic acid], has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The same molecule has been modelled in the active site of the HTLV-1 protease and both conformations have been compared. The peptide crystallizes as a pentahydrate in space group P2(1) with a = 10.874(2), b = 9.501(2), c = 21.062(5) A, beta = 103.68 (1) degrees, Z = 2, V= 2114.3 A(3), D(x) = 1.21 g cm(-3), micro = 8.02 cm(-1), T= 293 K, lambda(Cu Kalpha) = 1.5418 A. The structure has been refined to an R value of 0.070 for 2152 observed reflections. The peptide main chain can be described as extended and adopts the usual zigzag conformation from the prolyl to the statyl residue. The main difference in conformation between the individual observed and modelled molecules is located on the Sta, Ala and Leu residues with the main chain of the modelled molecule rotated by about 180 degrees as compared to the observed conformation in the crystal state.

  7. A new putative sigma factor of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelian, D; Inouye, S

    1993-06-01

    A third putative sigma factor gene, sigC, has been isolated from Myxococcus xanthus by using the sigA gene (formerly rpoD of M. xanthus) as a probe. The nucleotide sequence of sigC has been determined, and an open reading frame of 295 residues (M(r) = 33,430) has been identified. The deduced amino acid sequence of sigC exhibits the features which are characteristic of other bacterial sigma factors. The characterization of a sigC-lacZ strain has demonstrated that sigC expression is induced immediately after cells enter into the developmental cycle and is dramatically reduced at the onset of sporulation. A deletion mutant of sigC grows normally in vegetative culture and is able to develop normally. However, in contrast to the wild-type cells, the sigC deletion mutant cells became capable of forming fruiting bodies and myxospores on semirich agar plates. This suggests that sigC may play a role in expression of genes involved in negatively regulating the initiation of fruiting body formation.

  8. In silico comparative genomic analysis of GABAA receptor transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Christopher J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtypes of the GABAA receptor subunit exhibit diverse temporal and spatial expression patterns. In silico comparative analysis was used to predict transcriptional regulatory features in individual mammalian GABAA receptor subunit genes, and to identify potential transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of the GABAA receptor gene clusters. Results Previously unreported putative promoters were identified for the β2, γ1, γ3, ε, θ and π subunit genes. Putative core elements and proximal transcriptional factors were identified within these predicted promoters, and within the experimentally determined promoters of other subunit genes. Conserved intergenic regions of sequence in the mammalian GABAA receptor gene cluster comprising the α1, β2, γ2 and α6 subunits were identified as potential long range transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of these genes. A region of predicted DNase I hypersensitive sites within the cluster may contain transcriptional regulatory features coordinating gene expression. A novel model is proposed for the coordinate control of the gene cluster and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunits, based upon the selective action of putative Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions (S/MARs. Conclusion The putative regulatory features identified by genomic analysis of GABAA receptor genes were substantiated by cross-species comparative analysis and now require experimental verification. The proposed model for the coordinate regulation of genes in the cluster accounts for the head-to-head orientation and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunit genes, and for the disruption of transcription caused by insertion of a neomycin gene in the close vicinity of the α6 gene, which is proximal to a putative critical S/MAR.

  9. The aerosols' fate in a putative ammonia ocean on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, S. I.; Coll, P.; Buch, A.; Brassé, C.; Poch, O.; Raulin, F.

    2010-04-01

    A laboratory study on the chemical transformation of Titan's aerosol analogues placed under putative surface conditions of the satellite was performed. The surface of Titan was one of the targets of the Cassini-Huygens mission and of several of the Cassini orbiter instruments, especially ISS, VIMS and Radar. The first images revealed an interesting solid surface with features that suggest aeolian, tectonic, fluvial processes and even an impact structure[1]. Since then, more detailed descriptions of dunes, channels, lakes, impact craters and cryovolcanic structures have been documented[2]. The existence of an internal liquid water ocean, containing a few percent ammonia has been proposed[2, 3]. It has also been proposed that ammonia-water mixtures can erupt from the putative subsurface ocean leading to cryovolcanism[4]. The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images during 2004 and 2005 that revealed a highly complex geology occurring at Titan's surface[5], among which cryovolcanic features play a central role. The composition of the cryomagma is mainly proposed to be a mixture of water ice and ammonia[6, 7, 8], although ammonia has not been directly detected on Titan, but suggested by recent Cassini-VIMS observations[9]. In order to understand the role that ammonia may play on the chemical transformation of atmospheric aerosols once they reach the surface, we designed the following protocol: laboratory analogues of Titan's aerosols were synthesized from a N2:CH4 (98:2) mixture irradiated under a continuous flow regime of 845 sccm inside which, a cold plasma of 180 W was established. The synthesized analogues were recovered and partitioned in several 10.0 mg samples that were placed in 4.0 mL-volume of aqueous ammonia solutions (25.00, 12.50, 6.25 and 3.125%) at different temperatures (298, 277, 253 and 93 K) for 10 weeks. After a derivatization process performed to the aerosols' refractory phase with N

  10. Molecular diagnosis of putative Stargardt disease probands by exome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strom Samuel P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The commonest genetic form of juvenile or early adult onset macular degeneration is Stargardt Disease (STGD caused by recessive mutations in the gene ABCA4. However, high phenotypic and allelic heterogeneity and a small but non-trivial amount of locus heterogeneity currently impede conclusive molecular diagnosis in a significant proportion of cases. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES of nine putative Stargardt Disease probands and searched for potentially disease-causing genetic variants in previously identified retinal or macular dystrophy genes. Follow-up dideoxy sequencing was performed for confirmation and to screen for mutations in an additional set of affected individuals lacking a definitive molecular diagnosis. Results Whole exome sequencing revealed seven likely disease-causing variants across four genes, providing a confident genetic diagnosis in six previously uncharacterized participants. We identified four previously missed mutations in ABCA4 across three individuals. Likely disease-causing mutations in RDS/PRPH2, ELOVL, and CRB1 were also identified. Conclusions Our findings highlight the enormous potential of whole exome sequencing in Stargardt Disease molecular diagnosis and research. WES adequately assayed all coding sequences and canonical splice sites of ABCA4 in this study. Additionally, WES enables the identification of disease-related alleles in other genes. This work highlights the importance of collecting parental genetic material for WES testing as the current knowledge of human genome variation limits the determination of causality between identified variants and disease. While larger sample sizes are required to establish the precision and accuracy of this type of testing, this study supports WES for inherited early onset macular degeneration disorders as an alternative to standard mutation screening techniques.

  11. A putatively novel form of spontaneous coordination in neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermer-Vazquez, Raymond; Hermer-Vazquez, Linda; Srinivasan, Sridhar

    2009-04-06

    We simultaneously recorded local field potentials from three sites along the olfactory-entorhinal axis in rats lightly anesthetized with isoflurane, as part of another experiment. While analyzing the initial data from that experiment with spectrograms, we discovered a potentially novel form of correlated neural activity, with near-simultaneous occurrence across the three widely separated brain sites. After validating their existence further, we named these events Synchronous Frequency Bursts (SFBs). Here we report our initial investigations into their properties and their potential functional significance. In Experiment 1, we found that SFBs have highly regular properties, consisting of brief (approximately 250 ms), high amplitude bursts of LFP energy spanning frequency ranges from the delta band (1-4 Hz) to at least the low gamma band (30-50 Hz). SFBs occurred almost simultaneously across recording sites, usually with onsets sites. While the SFBs had fairly typical, exponentially decaying power spectral density plots, their coherence structure was unusual, with high peaks in several narrow frequency ranges and little coherence in other bands. In Experiment 2, we found that SFBs occurred far more often under light anesthesia than deeper anesthetic states, and were especially prevalent as the animals regained consciousness. Finally, in Experiment 3 we showed that SFBs occur simultaneously at a significant rate across brain sites from putatively different functional subsystems--olfactory versus motor pathways. We suggest that SFBs do not carry information per se, but rather, play a role in coordinating activity in different frequency bands, potentially brain-wide, as animals progress from sleep or anesthesia toward full consciousness.

  12. Tissue factor residues that putatively interact with membrane phospholipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ke

    Full Text Available Blood clotting is initiated by the two-subunit enzyme consisting of the plasma protease, factor VIIa (the catalytic subunit, bound to the integral membrane protein, tissue factor (the regulatory subunit. Molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that certain residues in the tissue factor ectodomain interact with phosphatidylserine headgroups to ensure optimal positioning of the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex relative to its membrane-bound protein substrates, factors IX and X. In this study, we individually mutated to alanine all the putative phosphatidylserine-interactive residues in the tissue factor ectodomain and measured their effects on tissue factor cofactor function (activation of factors IX and X by tissue factor/factor VIIa, and clotting of plasma. Some tissue factor mutants exhibited decreased activity in all three assays, with the most profound defects observed from mutations in or near the flexible loop from Lys159 to Gly164. The decreased activity of all of these tissue factor mutants could be partially or completely overcome by increasing the phosphatidylserine content of tissue factor-liposomes. Additionally, yeast surface display was used to screen a random library of tissue factor mutants for enhanced factor VIIa binding. Surprisingly, mutations at a single amino acid (Lys165 predominated, with the Lys165→Glu mutant exhibiting a 3-fold enhancement in factor VIIa binding affinity. Our studies reveal the functional contributions of residues in the C-terminal half of the tissue factor ectodomain that are implicated in interacting with phosphatidylserine headgroups to enhance tissue factor cofactor activity, possibly by allosterically modulating the conformation of the adjacent substrate-binding exosite region of tissue factor.

  13. A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidun Lillestøl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of regularly spaced direct repeats, separated by unconserved spacer sequences, are ubiquitous in archaeal chromosomes and occur in some plasmids. Some clusters constitute around 1% of chromosomal DNA. Similarly structured clusters, generally smaller, also occur in some bacterial chromosomes. Although early studies implicated these clusters in segregation/partition functions, recent evidence suggests that the spacer sequences derive from extrachromosomal elements, and, primarily, viruses. This has led to the proposal that the clusters provide a defence against viral propagation in cells, and that both the mode of inhibition of viral propagation and the mechanism of adding spacer-repeat units to clusters, are dependent on RNAs transcribed from the clusters. Moreover, the putative inhibitory apparatus (piRNA-based may be evolutionarily related to the interference RNA systems (siRNA and miRNA, which are common in eukarya. Here, we analyze all the current data on archaeal repeat clusters and provide some new insights into their diverse structures, transcriptional properties and mode of structural development. The results are consistent with larger cluster transcripts being processed at the centers of the repeat sequences and being further trimmed by exonucleases to yield a dominant, intracellular RNA species, which corresponds approximately to the size of a spacer. Furthermore, analysis of the extensive clusters of Sulfolobus solfataricus strains P1 and P2B provides support for the presence of a flanking sequence adjoining a cluster being a prerequisite for the incorporation of new spacer-repeat units, which occurs between the flanking sequence and the cluster. An archaeal database summarizing the data will be maintained at http://dac.molbio.ku.dk/dbs/SRSR/.

  14. Putative Risk Factors in Developmental Dyslexia: A Case-Control Study of Italian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascheretti, Sara; Marino, Cecilia; Simone, Daniela; Quadrelli, Ermanno; Riva, Valentina; Cellino, Maria Rosaria; Maziade, Michel; Brombin, Chiara; Battaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Although dyslexia runs in families, several putative risk factors that cannot be immediately identified as genetic predict reading disability. Published studies analyzed one or a few risk factors at a time, with relatively inconsistent results. To assess the contribution of several putative risk factors to the development of dyslexia, we conducted…

  15. Putative Risk Factors in Developmental Dyslexia: A Case-Control Study of Italian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascheretti, Sara; Marino, Cecilia; Simone, Daniela; Quadrelli, Ermanno; Riva, Valentina; Cellino, Maria Rosaria; Maziade, Michel; Brombin, Chiara; Battaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Although dyslexia runs in families, several putative risk factors that cannot be immediately identified as genetic predict reading disability. Published studies analyzed one or a few risk factors at a time, with relatively inconsistent results. To assess the contribution of several putative risk factors to the development of dyslexia, we conducted…

  16. Hypoxia Sensing in Plants: On a Quest for Ion Channels as Putative Oxygen Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Shabala, Sergey

    2017-07-01

    Over 17 million km2 of land is affected by soil flooding every year, resulting in substantial yield losses and jeopardizing food security across the globe. A key step in resolving this problem and creating stress-tolerant cultivars is an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants sense low-oxygen stress. In this work, we review the current knowledge about the oxygen-sensing and signaling pathway in mammalian and plant systems and postulate the potential role of ion channels as putative oxygen sensors in plant roots. We first discuss the definition and requirements for the oxygen sensor and the difference between sensing and signaling. We then summarize the literature and identify several known candidates for oxygen sensing in the mammalian literature. This includes transient receptor potential (TRP) channels; K+-permeable channels (Kv, BK and TASK); Ca2+ channels (RyR and TPC); and various chemo- and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent oxygen sensors. Identified key oxygen-sensing domains (PAS, GCS, GAF and PHD) in mammalian systems are used to predict the potential plant counterparts in Arabidopsis. Finally, the sequences of known mammalian ion channels with reported roles in oxygen sensing were employed to BLAST the Arabidopsis genome for the candidate genes. Several plasma membrane and tonoplast ion channels (such as TPC, AKT and KCO) and oxygen domain-containing proteins with predicted oxygen-sensing ability were identified and discussed. We propose a testable model for potential roles of ion channels in plant hypoxia sensing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  18. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  19. REVISITING THE PUTATIVE TCR Cα DIMERIZATION MODEL THROUGH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-huai eWang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite major advances in T cell receptor (TCR biology and structure, how peptide-MHC complex (pMHC ligands trigger αβ TCR activation remains unresolved. Two views exist. One model postulates that monomeric TCR-pMHC ligation events are sufficient while a second proposes that TCR-TCR dimerization in cis via Cα domain interaction plus pMHC binding is critical. We scrutinized 22 known TCR/pMHC complex crystal structures, and did not find any predicted molecular Cα-Cα contacts in these crystals that would allow for physiological TCR dimerization. Moreover, the presence of conserved glycan adducts on the outer face of the Cα domain preclude the hypothesized TCR dimerization through the Cα domain. Observed functional consequences of Cα mutations are likely indirect, with TCR microclusters at the immunological synapse driven by TCR transmembrane/cytoplasmic interactions via signaling molecules, scaffold proteins and/or cytoskeletal elements.

  20. The biosynthesis of N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), a putative endocannabinoid and endovanilloid, via conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Bradshaw, Heather B; Benton, Valery M; Chen, Jay Shih-Chieh; Huang, Susan M; Minassi, Alberto; Bisogno, Tiziana; Masuda, Kim; Tan, Bo; Roskoski, Robert; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Walker, J Michael

    2009-10-01

    N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) is an endogenous ligand that activates the cannabinoid type 1 receptor and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel. Two potential biosynthetic pathways for NADA have been proposed, though no conclusive evidence exists for either. The first is the direct conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine and the other is via metabolism of a putative N-arachidonoyl tyrosine (NA-tyrosine). In the present study we investigated these biosynthetic mechanisms and report that NADA synthesis requires TH in dopaminergic terminals; however, NA-tyrosine, which we identify here as an endogenous lipid, is not an intermediate. We show that NADA biosynthesis primarily occurs through an enzyme-mediated conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine. While this conjugation likely involves a complex of enzymes, our data suggest a direct involvement of fatty acid amide hydrolase in NADA biosynthesis either as a rate-limiting enzyme that liberates arachidonic acid from AEA, or as a conjugation enzyme, or both.

  1. Protracted treatment with diazepam increases the turnover of putative endogenous ligands for the benzodiazepine/. beta. -carboline recognition site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, M.; Mocchetti, I.; Ferrarese, C.; Guidotti, A.; Costa, E.

    1987-03-01

    DBI (diazepam-binding inhibitor) is a putative neuromodulatory peptide isolated from rat brain that acts on ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine-Cl/sup -/ ionosphore receptor complex inducing ..beta..-carboline-like effects. The authors used a cDNA probe complementary to DBI mRNA and a specific antibody for rat DBI to study in rat brain how the dynamic state of DBI can be affected after protected (three times a day for 10 days) treatment with diazepam and chlordiazepoxide by oral gavage. Both the content of DBI and DBI mRNA increased in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex but failed to change in the hippocampus and striatum of rats receiving this protracted benzodiazepine treatment. Acute treatment with diazepam did not affect the dynamic state of brain DBI. An antibody was raised against a biologically active octadecaneuropeptide derived from the tryptic digestion of DBI. The combined HPLC/RIA analysis of rat cerebellar extracts carried out with this antibody showed that multiple molecular forms of the octadecaneuropeptide-like reactivity are present and all of them are increased in rats receiving repeated daily injections of diazepam. It is inferred that tolerance to benzodiazepines in associated with an increase in the turnover rate of DBI, which may be responsible for the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid receptor desensitization that occurs after protracted benzodiazepine administration.

  2. The soluble leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor (LAIR)-2 antagonizes the collagen/LAIR-1 inhibitory immune interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebbink, R.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/318915006; van den Berg, M.C.; de Ruiter, T.; Raynal, N.; van Roon, J.A.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/158985826; Lenting, P.J.; Jin, B.; Meyaard, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/13444972X

    2008-01-01

    Leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor (LAIR)-1 is a collagen-receptor that inhibits immune cell function upon collagen binding. Next to LAIR-1, the human genome encodes LAIR-2, a putative soluble homolog. In this study we show, for the first time, that the LAIR-2 gene is broadly transcribed in human

  3. Localization of dopamine D2 receptor in rat spinal cord identified with immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Dijken (Henk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn the present study the distribution of dopamine D2 receptors in rat spinal cord was determined by means of immunocytochemistry using an anti-peptide antibody, directed against the putative third intracellular loop of the D2 receptor and in situ hybridization (ISH) using a [35S]UTP

  4. Prioritization of putative metabolite identifications in LC-MS/MS experiments using a computational pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Xiao, Jun Feng; Ressom, Habtom W

    2013-01-01

    One of the major bottle-necks in current LC-MS-based metabolomic investigations is metabolite identification. An often-used approach is to first look up metabolites from databases through peak mass, followed by verification of the obtained putative identifications using MS/MS data. However, the mass-based search may provide inappropriate putative identifications when the observed peak is from isotopes, fragments, or adducts. In addition, a large fraction of peaks is often left with multiple putative identifications. To differentiate these putative identifications, manual verification of metabolites through comparison between biological samples and authentic compounds is necessary. However, such experiments are laborious, especially when multiple putative identifications are encountered. It is desirable to use computational approaches to obtain more reliable putative identifications and prioritize them before performing experimental verification of the metabolites. In this article, a computational pipeline is proposed to assist metabolite identification with improved metabolome coverage and prioritization capability. Multiple publicly available software tools and databases, along with in-house developed algorithms, are utilized to fully exploit the information acquired from LC-MS/MS experiments. The pipeline is successfully applied to identify metabolites on the basis of LC-MS as well as MS/MS data. Using accurate masses, retention time values, MS/MS spectra, and metabolic pathways/networks, more appropriate putative identifications are retrieved and prioritized to guide subsequent metabolite verification experiments.

  5. Lipoxin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Romano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxins (LXs represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL. In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1. This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed.

  6. Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor-Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    cDNA. Lobular carcinoma - 2 A polyclonal pan-TM antibody that recognizes multiple TM Phyllodes tumor - 1 Not determined from the initial pathology...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8162 TITLE: Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Tropomyosin-l, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker DAMD17-98-1-8162 of Human Breast Cancer 6. A UTHOR

  7. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Haemophilus parasuis Isolates Exhibit More Putative Virulence Factors than Their Susceptible Counterparts

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jiantao; Yan, Shuxian; Yang, Yujie; Zhang, Anding; Jin, Meilin

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of 23 putative virulence factors among fluoroquinolone-susceptible and -resistant Haemophilus parasuis isolates was analyzed. Putative hemolysin precursor, fimbrial assembly chaperone, and type I site-specific restriction modification system R subunit genes were more prevalent among fluoroquinolone-resistant H. parasuis isolates than among fluoroquinolone-susceptible H. parasuis isolates. Fluoroquinolone resistance may be associated with an increase in the presence of some viru...

  8. Nuclear receptor complement of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis: phylogenetic relationships and developmental expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarrant Ann M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of metazoan transcription factors that regulate diverse developmental and physiological processes. Sequenced genomes from an increasing number of bilaterians have provided a more complete picture of duplication and loss of nuclear receptors in protostomes and deuterostomes but have left open the question of which nuclear receptors were present in the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor. In addition, nuclear receptor expression and function are largely uncharacterized within cnidarians, preventing determination of conserved and novel nuclear receptor functions in the context of animal evolution. Results Here we report the first complete set of nuclear receptors from a cnidarian, the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. Genomic searches using conserved DNA- and ligand-binding domains revealed seventeen nuclear receptors in N. vectensis. Phylogenetic analyses support N. vectensis orthologs of bilaterian nuclear receptors in four nuclear receptor subfamilies within nuclear receptor family 2 (COUP-TF, TLL, HNF4, TR2/4 and one putative ortholog of GCNF (nuclear receptor family 6. Other N. vectensis genes grouped well with nuclear receptor family 2 but represented lineage-specific duplications somewhere within the cnidarian lineage and were not clear orthologs of bilaterian genes. Three nuclear receptors were not well-supported within any particular nuclear receptor family. The seventeen nuclear receptors exhibited distinct developmental expression patterns, with expression of several nuclear receptors limited to a subset of developmental stages. Conclusion N. vectensis contains a diverse complement of nuclear receptors including orthologs of several bilaterian nuclear receptors. Novel nuclear receptors in N. vectensis may be ancient genes lost from triploblastic lineages or may represent cnidarian-specific radiations. Nuclear receptors exhibited distinct developmental expression patterns, which

  9. Prevalence and characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae "putative serotype 6E" isolates from Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Yang; Park, In Ho; So, Thomas Man-kit; Lalitha, M K; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Yasin, Rohani Md; Carlos, Celia C; Perera, Jennifer; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Van, Pham Hung; Shibl, Atef M; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility, and genotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae “putative serotype 6E” isolates from Asian countries were investigated. A total of 244 S. pneumoniae serogroup 6 isolates obtained from 11 Asian countries were included in this study. Of the 244 serogroup 6 isolates, 101 (41.4%) were typed as "putative serotype 6E," followed by serotypes 6A, 6B, 6C, and 6D (27.0, 20.1, 5.7, and 5.7%, respectively). Multilocus sequence typing revealed that clonal complex (CC) 90, including ST90 and its variants, was the most prevalent clonal group of "putative serotype 6E" isolates (n = 63; 62.4%). CC146 and CC315 were also found frequently in some of the countries. Most of the "putative serotype 6E" isolates showed very high resistance rates against cefuroxime, erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, probably due to their highly resistant to antimicrobials clone, CC90. Our results indicate that “putative serotype 6E” is prevalent in Asian countries. The clonal dissemination of "putative serotype 6E" isolates was also identified.

  10. Characterization of putative effectors from the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera avenae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiangkuan; Peng, Huan; Qiao, Fen; Wang, Gaofeng; Huang, Wenkun; Wu, Duqign; Peng, Deliang

    2017-09-20

    Few molecular details of effectors of Heterodera avenae parasitism are known. We performed a high-throughput sequencing analysis of the H. avenae transcriptome at five developmental stages. A total of 82,549 unigenes were ultimately obtained, and 747 transcripts showed best hits to genes putatively encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes in plant parasitic nematodes that play an important role in the invasion process. A total of 1480 unigenes were homologous to known phytonematode effectors, and 63 putative novel effectors were identified in the H. avenae transcriptomes. Twenty-three unigenes were analyzed by qRT-PCR and confirmed to be highly expressed during at least one developmental stage. For in situ hybridization, 17 of the 22 tested putative effectors were specifically expressed and located in the subventral gland cells, and five putative novel effectors were specifically expressed in the dorsal gland. Furthermore, 115 transcripts were found to have putative lethal RNA interference (RNAi) phenotypes. Three target genes with lethal RNAi phenotypes and two of the four tested putative effectors were associated with a decrease in the number of cysts through in vitro RNAi technology. These transcriptomic data lay a foundation for further studies of interactions of H. avenae with cereal and H. avenae parasitic control.

  11. Amylin receptor: a common pathophysiological target in Alzheimer’s Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen eFu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Amylin (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid beta protein (Abeta, which are deposited within pancreatic islets of diabetics and brains of Alzheimer’s patients respectively, share many biophysical and physiological properties. Emerging evidence indicates that the amylin receptor is a putative target receptor for the actions of human amylin and Abeta in the brain. The amylin receptor consists of the calcitonin receptor dimerized with a receptor activity-modifying protein and is widely distributed within central nervous system. Both amylin and Abeta directly activate this G protein-coupled receptor and trigger multiple common intracellular signal transduction pathways that can culminate in apoptotic cell death. Moreover, amylin receptor antagonists can block both the biological and neurotoxic effects of human amylin and Abeta. Amylin receptors thus appear to be involved in the pathophysiology of AD and diabetes, and could serve as a molecular link between the two conditions that are associated epidemiologically.

  12. Opioid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the oldest and most potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g., postoperative) and cancer pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met increasing scrutiny. This article reviews mechanisms underlying opioid analgesia and other opioid actions. It discusses the structure, function, and plasticity of opioid receptors; the central and peripheral sites of analgesic actions and side effects; endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands; and conventional and novel opioid compounds. Challenging clinical situations, such as the tension between chronic pain and addiction, are also illustrated.

  13. Angiotensin-II is a putative neurotransmitter in lactate-induced panic-like responses in rats with disruption of GABAergic inhibition in the dorsomedial hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Anantha; Johnson, Philip L; Sajdyk, Tammy J; Fitz, Stephanie D; Keim, Stanley R; Kelley, Pamela E; Gehlert, Donald R; DiMicco, Joseph A

    2006-09-06

    Intravenous sodium lactate infusions or the noradrenergic agent yohimbine reliably induce panic attacks in humans with panic disorder but not in healthy controls. However, the exact mechanism of lactate eliciting a panic attack is still unknown. In rats with chronic disruption of GABA-mediated inhibition in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), achieved by chronic microinfusion of the glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibitor L-allylglycine, sodium lactate infusions or yohimbine elicits panic-like responses (i.e., anxiety, tachycardia, hypertension, and tachypnea). In the present study, previous injections of the angiotensin-II (A-II) type 1 receptor antagonist losartan and the nonspecific A-II receptor antagonist saralasin into the DMH of "panic-prone" rats blocked the anxiety-like and physiological components of lactate-induced panic-like responses. In addition, direct injections of A-II into the DMH of these panic-prone rats also elicited panic-like responses that were blocked by pretreatment with saralasin. Microinjections of saralasin into the DMH did not block the panic-like responses elicited by intravenous infusions of the noradrenergic agent yohimbine or by direct injections of NMDA into the DMH. The presence of the A-II type 1 receptors in the region of the DMH was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry. Thus, these results implicate A-II pathways and the A-II receptors in the hypothalamus as putative substrates for sodium lactate-induced panic-like responses in vulnerable subjects.

  14. The immune function of MHC class II molecules mutated in the putative superdimer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayball, John D; Lake, Richard A

    2005-05-01

    Analysis of the crystal structure of human class II (HLA-DR1) molecules suggests that the alphabeta heterodimer may be further ordered as a dimer of heterodimers (superdimer), leading to the hypothesis that T cell receptor dimerisation is a mechanism for initiating signaling events preceding T cell activation. The interface between pairs of molecules is stabilised by both salt bridges, polar and hydrophobic interactions. The residues that form the superdimer interface occur in three areas distinct from the antigen-binding groove. They can be defined as follows: region 1, beta-beta contacts in the helix of the beta1 domain; region 2, alpha-alpha contacts near the alpha 1/alpha2 domain junction and region 3; alpha-beta contacts in the alpha2/beta2 domains adjacent to the plasma membrane. To determine whether salt bridges and polar interactions formed within these regions are involved in the immune function of the murine MHC class II molecule, I-A(b), appropriate residues in both the alpha and beta chain were identified and mutated to uncharged alanine. Cell lines transfected with different combinations of mutated alpha and beta chains were generated and tested for MHC class II expression, peptide binding capabilities, and ability to present antigenic peptide to an OVA-specific T cell hybridoma. With the exception of two residues in region 2, the substitutions tested did not modulate MHC class II expression, or peptide binding function. When tested for ability to present peptide to an antigen-specific T cell hybridoma, with the exception of mutations in region 2, the substitutions did not appear to abrogate the ability of I-A(b) to stimulate the T cells. These results suggest that mutation of residues in region 2 of the putative superdimer interface have a gross effect on the ability of I-A(b) to be expressed on the cell surface. However, abrogation of salt bridges in region 1 and 3 do not influence I-A(b) cell surface expression, peptide binding or ability to

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptor expression in olfactory receptor neurons from the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, K F; Tran, H N; Parker, J M; Caprio, J; Bruch, R C

    1998-04-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) were identified in olfactory receptor neurons of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, by polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequence analysis confirmed the presence of two subtypes, mGluR1 and mGluR3, that were coexpressed with each other and with the putative odorant receptors within single olfactory receptor neurons. Immunocytochemical data showed that both mGluR subtypes were expressed in the apical dendrites and some cilia of olfactory neurons. Pharmacological analysis showed that antagonists to each mGluR subtype significantly decreased the electrophysiological response to odorant amino acids. alpha-Methyl-L-CCG1/(2S,3S,4S)-2-methyl-2-(carboxycyclopropyl++ +)glycine (MCCG), a known antagonist to mGluR3, and (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (S-4CPG), a specific antagonist to mGluR1, each significantly reduced olfactory receptor responses to L-glutamate. S-4CPG and MCCG reduced the glutamate response to 54% and 56% of control, respectively, which was significantly greater than their effect on a neutral amino acid odorant, methionine. These significant reductions of odorant response by the antagonists, taken with the expression of these receptors throughout the dendritic and ciliated portions of some olfactory receptor neurons, suggest that these mGluRs may be involved in olfactory reception and signal transduction.

  16. 5-HT7 receptor modulates GABAergic transmission in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus and controls cortical release of serotonin

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena eKusek; Joanna eSowa; Katarzyna eKamińska; Krystyna eGołembiowska; Krzysztof eTokarski; Grzegorz eHess

    2015-01-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the several serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes that are expressed in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Some earlier findings suggested that 5-HT7 receptors in the DRN were localized on GABAergic interneurons modulating the activity of 5-HT projection neurons. The aim of the present study was to find out how the 5-HT7 receptor modulates the GABAergic synaptic input to putative 5-HT DRN neurons, and whether blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor would affect the release of 5-...

  17. Carbamate Insecticides Target Human Melatonin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V

    2017-02-20

    Carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) and carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate) are among the most toxic insecticides, implicated in a variety of diseases including diabetes and cancer among others. Using an integrated pharmacoinformatics based screening approach, we have identified these insecticides to be structural mimics of the neurohormone melatonin and were able to bind to the putative melatonin binding sites in MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in silico. Carbaryl and carbofuran then were tested for competition with 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin (300 pM) binding to hMT1 or hMT2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells. Carbaryl and carbofuran showed higher affinity for competition with 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin binding to the hMT2 compared to the hMT1 melatonin receptor (33 and 35-fold difference, respectively) as predicted by the molecular modeling. In the presence of GTP (100 μM), which decouples the G-protein linked receptors to modulate signaling, the apparent efficacy of carbaryl and carbofuran for 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin binding for the hMT1 melatonin receptor was not affected but significantly decreased for the hMT2 melatonin receptor compatible with receptor antagonist/inverse agonist and agonist efficacy, respectively. Altogether, our data points to a potentially new mechanism through which carbamate insecticides carbaryl and carbofuran could impact human health by altering the homeostatic balance of key regulatory processes by directly binding to melatonin receptors.

  18. Diversity of secondary endosymbionts among different putative species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Xiao-Li; Ruan, Yong-Ming; Rao, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    Endosymbionts are important components of arthropod biology. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a cryptic species complex composed of ≥ 28 putative species. In addition to the primary endosymbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum, six secondary endosymbionts (S-endosymbionts), Hamiltonella, Rickettsia, Wolbachia, Cardinium, Arsenophonus and Fritschea, have been identified in B. tabaci thus far. Here, we tested five of the six S-endosymbiont lineages (excluding Fritschea) from 340 whitely individuals representing six putative species from China. Hamiltonella was detected only in the two exotic invaders, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED). Rickettsia was absent in Asia II 1 and MED, scarce in Asia II 3 (13%), but abundant in Asia II 7 (63.2%), China 1 (84.7%) and MEAM1 (100%). Wolbachia, Cardinium and Arsenophonus were absent in the invasive MEAM1 and MED but mostly abundant in the native putative species. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses revealed that some S-endosymbionts have several clades and different B. tabaci putative species can harbor different clades of a given S-endosymbiont, demonstrating further the complexity of S-endosymbionts in B. tabaci. All together, our results demonstrate the variation and diversity of S-endosymbionts in different putative species of B. tabaci, especially between invasive and native whiteflies.

  19. Diversity of secondary endosymbionts among different putative species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Li Bing; Yong-Ming Ruan; Qiong Rao; Xiao-Wei Wang; Shu-Sheng Liu

    2013-01-01

    Endosymbionts are important components of arthropod biology.The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae) is a cryptic species complex composed of≥28 putative species.In addition to the primary endosymbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum,six secondary endosymbionts (S-endosymbionts),Hamiltonella,Rickettsia,Wolbachia,Cardinium,Arsenophonus and Fritschea,have been identified in B.tabaci thus far.Here,we tested five of the six S-endosymbiont lineages (excluding Fritschea) from 340 whitely individuals representing six putative species from China.Hamiltonella was detected only in the two exotic invaders,Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM 1) and Mediterranean (MED).Rickettsia was absent in Asia Ⅱ 1 and MED,scarce in Asia Ⅱ 3 (13%),but abundant in Asia Ⅱ 7 (63.2%),China 1 (84.7%) and MEAM1 (100%).Wolbachia,Cardinium and Arsenophonus were absent in the invasive MEAM 1 and MED but mostly abundant in the native putative species.Furthermore,phylogenetic analyses revealed that some S-endosymbionts have several clades and different B.tabaci putative species can harbor different clades of a given S-endosymbiont,demonstrating further the complexity of S-endosymbionts in B.tabaci.All together,our results demonstrate the variation and diversity of S-endosymbionts in different putative species ofB.tabaci,especially between invasive and native whiteflies.

  20. Putative members of the Arabidopsis Nup107-160 nuclear pore sub-complex contribute to pathogen defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiermer, Marcel; Cheng, Yu Ti; Imkampe, Julia; Li, Meilan; Wang, Dongmei; Lipka, Volker; Li, Xin

    2012-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, transduction of external stimuli into the nucleus to induce transcription and export of mRNAs for translation in the cytoplasm is mediated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) composed of nucleoporin proteins (Nups). We previously reported that Arabidopsis MOS3, encoding the homolog of vertebrate Nup96, is required for plant immunity and constitutive resistance mediated by the de-regulated Toll interleukin 1 receptor/nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat (TNL)-type R gene snc1. In vertebrates, Nup96 is a component of the conserved Nup107-160 nuclear pore sub-complex, and implicated in immunity-related mRNA export. Here, we used a reverse genetics approach to examine the requirement for additional subunits of the predicted Arabidopsis Nup107-160 complex in plant immunity. We show that, among eight putative complex members, beside MOS3, only plants with defects in Nup160 or Seh1 are impaired in basal resistance. Constitutive resistance in the snc1 mutant and immunity mediated by TNL-type R genes also depend on functional Nup160 and have a partial requirement for Seh1. Conversely, resistance conferred by coiled coil-type immune receptors operates largely independently of both genes, demonstrating specific contributions to plant defense signaling. Our functional analysis further revealed that defects in nup160 and seh1 result in nuclear accumulation of poly(A) mRNA, and, in the case of nup160, considerable depletion of EDS1, a key positive regulator of basal and TNL-triggered resistance. These findings suggest that Nup160 is required for nuclear mRNA export and full expression of EDS1-conditioned resistance pathways in Arabidopsis.

  1. Pirenzepine binding to membrane-bound, solubilized and purified muscarinic receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgold, J.

    1986-05-01

    Muscarinic receptors were purified to near-homogeneity from bovine cortex, an area rich in the putative M1 subtype, and from bovine pons/medulla, an area rich in the putative M2 subtype. In both cases, the receptors were solubilized in digitonin and purified over an affinity column. Both the cortical and pons/medulla preparations yielded receptor proteins of 70,000 daltons. Pirenzepine binding was deduced from its competition with /sup 3/H-N-methyl scopolamine. The binding of pirenzepine to membrane-bound receptors from cortex was best described by a two site model, with approximately half the sites having a Ki of 6.4 x 10/sup -9/ M and the remaining sites having a Ki of 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M. Membrane-bound receptors from pons/medulla bound pirenzepine according to a one-site model with a Ki of 1.1 x 10/sup -7/ M. After solubilization the two-site binding of cortical receptors became a one-site binding, Ki = 1.1 x 10/sup -7/M. This value was still five-fold lower than that of soluble receptors from pons/medulla. After purification however the affinity of pirenzepine for the pons/medulla receptor increased so that the two putative subtypes bound pirenzepine with approximately the same affinity. These findings suggest that the different pirenzepine binding characteristics used to define muscarinic receptor subtypes are not inherent in the receptor protein itself but may be due to coupling factors associated with the receptor.

  2. Receptor-Mediated Signalling in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M Grice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is the most pathogenic species among the Aspergilli, and the major fungal agent of human pulmonary infection. To prosper in diverse ecological niches, Aspergilli have evolved numerous mechanisms for adaptive gene regulation, some of which are also crucial for mammalian infection. Among the molecules which govern such responses, integral membrane receptors are thought to be the most amenable to therapeutic modulation. This is due to the localisation of these molecular sensors at the periphery of the fungal cell, and to the prevalence of small molecules and licensed drugs which target receptor-mediated signalling in higher eukaryotic cells. In this review we highlight the progress made in characterising receptor-mediated environmental adaptation in A. fumigatus and its relevance for pathogenicity in mammals. By presenting a first genomic survey of integral membrane proteins in this organism, we highlight an abundance of putative 7TMD receptors, the majority of which remain uncharacterised. Given the dependency of A. fumigatus upon stress adaptation for colonisation and infection of mammalian hosts, and the merits of targeting receptor-mediated signalling as an antifungal strategy, a closer scrutiny of sensory perception and signal transduction in this organism is warranted.

  3. Mutagenic analysis of putative domain II and surface residues in mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis Cry19Aa toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong Yul; Nair, Manoj S; Liu, Xinyan Sylvia; Dean, Donald H

    2009-06-01

    The mosquitocidal crystal protein, Cry19Aa, from Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. jegathesan, has high toxicity to Anopheles stephensi and Culex pipiens but is less toxic to Aedes aegypti. To study the functional role of putative domain II and surface residues in mosquito toxicity, 16 alanine substitution mutations were introduced into Cry19Aa. All mutant constructs were expressed as 65-kDa protoxins and subsequently digested by trypsin to produce further fragmented polypeptides of 40 and 25 kDa. With chymotrypsin, however, most protoxins were digested to 60 kDa and minor bands. The circular dichroism spectra of the chymotrypsin-activated toxins of Cry19Aa and muteins, Y324A, W357A, Y412A, Y414A, W416A, D418A and F485A indicated that there was no significant variation in their structure. In mosquito bioassays, Y324A, W357A, Y410A, W416A, D418A and F485A muteins showed substantial reductions in mosquitocidal activity toward A. aegypti and C. pipiens. These muteins also showed reduced competition with wild-type fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate-labeled Cry19Aa for binding to C. pipiens brush border membrane vesicles. These data suggest that the reduction of toxicity was a result of the reduced binding affinity. From these studies we have identified loop residues of domain II that are important in toxicity and receptor binding to Culex larval midgut.

  4. A new logical insight and putative mechanism behind fluoxetine-induced amenorrhea, hyperprolactinemia and galactorrhea in a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Indranil; Das, Saibal; Ganguly, Abhrajit; Das, Debasis; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar

    2013-01-01

    With the exception of fluoxetine, all selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) commonly cause hyperprolactinemia through presynaptic mechanisms indirectly via 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-mediated inhibition of tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons. However, there is little insight regarding the mechanisms by which fluoxetine causes hyperprolactinemia via the postsynaptic pathway. In this text, analysis of five spontaneously reported clinical cases of hyperprolactinemia resulting in overt symptoms of amenorrhea with or without galactorrhea, were scrupulously analyzed after meticulously correlating relevant literature and an attempt was made to explore the putative postsynaptic pathway of fluoxetine inducing hyperprolactinemia. Hypothetically, serotonin regulates prolactin release either by increasing oxytocin (OT) level via direct stimulation of vasoactitive intestinal protein (VIP) or indirectly through stimulation of GABAergic neurons. The pharmacodynamic exception and pharmacokinetic aspect of fluoxetine are highlighted to address the regulation of prolactin release via serotonergic pathway, either directly through stimulation of prolactin releasing factors (PRFs) VIP and OT via 5-HT2A receptors predominantly on PVN (neurosecretory magnocellular cell) or through induction of 5-HT1A-mediated direct and indirect GABAergic actions. Prospective molecular and pharmacogenetic studies are warranted to visualize how fluoxetine regulate neuroendocrine system and cause adverse consequences, which in turn may explore new ways of approach of drug development by targeting the respective metabolic pathways to mitigate these adverse impacts. PMID:24294485

  5. Activity in neurons of a putative protocerebral circuit representing information about a ten component plant odour blend in Heliothis virescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarte Bye Løfaldli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory pathway in the insect brain is anatomically well described from the antennal lobe to the mushroom bodies and the lateral protocerebrum in several species. Less is known about the further connections of the olfactory network in protocerebrum and how information about relevant plant odorants and mixtures are represented in this network, resulting in output information mediated by descending neurons. In the present study we have recorded intracellularly followed by dye injections from neurons in the lateral- and superior protocerebrum of the moth, Heliothis virescens. As relevant stimuli, we have used selected primary plant odorants and mixtures of them. The results provide the morphology and physiological responses of neurons involved in a putative circuit connecting the mushroom body lobes, the superior and the lateral protocerebrum, as well as input to superior and lateral protocerebrum by one multiglomerular antennal lobe neuron and output from the lateral protocerebrum by one descending neuron. All neurons responded to one particular mixture of ten primary plant odorants, some of them also to single odorants of the mixture. Altogether, the physiological data indicate integration in protocerebral neurons of information from several of the receptor neuron types functionally described in this species.

  6. Anticholinesterase Effects on Number and Function of Brain Muscarinic Receptors and Central Cholinergic Activity: Drug Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-11

    chloride; pirenzepine ;scopolamine;N-methyL- scopolamine; McN-A-343; quinpiroLe; putative neurotransmitters;dopamine;noradrenaline; glutamate;serotonin... pirenzepine /( H)QNB competition experiments revealed the presence of two muscarinic receptor subtypes :-1, . . - the high affinity site,and M-2...also to occur through activation of the M-2 type, e.g. pretreatment with pirenzepine , a selective and potent M- 1 receptor antagonist failed to block

  7. A putative cell surface receptor for white spot syndrome virus is a member of a transporter superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Ting Huang

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV, a large enveloped DNA virus, can cause the most serious viral disease in shrimp and has a wide host range among crustaceans. In this study, we identified a surface protein, named glucose transporter 1 (Glut1, which could also interact with WSSV envelope protein, VP53A. Sequence analysis revealed that Glut1 is a member of a large superfamily of transporters and that it is most closely related to evolutionary branches of this superfamily, branches that function to transport this sugar. Tissue tropism analysis showed that Glut1 was constitutive and highly expressed in almost all organs. Glut1's localization in shrimp cells was further verified and so was its interaction with Penaeus monodon chitin-binding protein (PmCBP, which was itself identified to interact with an envelope protein complex formed by 11 WSSV envelope proteins. In vitro and in vivo neutralization experiments using synthetic peptide contained WSSV binding domain (WBD showed that the WBD peptide could inhibit WSSV infection in primary cultured hemocytes and delay the mortality in shrimps challenged with WSSV. These findings have important implications for our understanding of WSSV entry.

  8. Novel variants in the putative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} promoter and relationships with obesity in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas M; Larsen, Lesli H; Torekov, Signe K

    2005-01-01

    , and there was a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between several of the novel variants and Pro12Ala. The novel variants were, together with Pro12Ala and 1431C>T, examined for relationships with obesity among 234 men with early-onset obesity with a BMI at age approximately 20 years of 33.2+/-2.5 kg/m2 and 323...

  9. Eliciting maltreated and nonmaltreated children's transgression disclosures: narrative practice rapport building and a putative confession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Thomas D; Wandrey, Lindsay; Ahern, Elizabeth; Licht, Robyn; Sim, Megan P Y; Quas, Jodi A

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the effects of narrative practice rapport building (asking open-ended questions about a neutral event) and a putative confession (telling the child an adult "told me everything that happened and he wants you to tell the truth") on 4- to 9-year-old maltreated and nonmaltreated children's reports of an interaction with a stranger who asked them to keep toy breakage a secret (n = 264). Only one third of children who received no interview manipulations disclosed breakage; in response to a putative confession, one half disclosed. Narrative practice rapport building did not affect the likelihood of disclosure. Maltreated children and nonmaltreated children responded similarly to the manipulations. Neither narrative practice rapport building nor a putative confession increased false reports.

  10. Molecular diagnosis of putative Stargardt disease by capture next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Ge, Xianglian; Shi, Wei; Huang, Ping; Min, Qingjie; Li, Minghan; Yu, Xinping; Wu, Yaming; Zhao, Guangyu; Tong, Yi; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Stargardt Disease (STGD) is the commonest genetic form of juvenile or early adult onset macular degeneration, which is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Molecular diagnosis of STGD remains a challenge in a significant proportion of cases. To address this, seven patients from five putative STGD families were recruited. We performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) of the probands and searched for potentially disease-causing genetic variants in previously identified retinal or macular dystrophy genes. Seven disease-causing mutations in ABCA4 and two in PROM1 were identified by CNGS, which provides a confident genetic diagnosis in these five families. We also provided a genetic basis to explain the differences among putative STGD due to various mutations in different genes. Meanwhile, we show for the first time that compound heterozygous mutations in PROM1 gene could cause cone-rod dystrophy. Our findings support the enormous potential of CNGS in putative STGD molecular diagnosis.

  11. Putative epidermal stem cell convert into corneal epithelium-like cell under corneal tissue in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Nan; CUI GuangHui; WANG ZhiChong; HUANG Bing; GE Jian; LU Rong; ZHANG KeFei; FAN ZhiGang; LU Li; PENG Zhan

    2007-01-01

    Rhesus putative epidermal stem cells are being investigated for their potential use in regenerative corneal epithelium-like cells, which may provide a practical source of autologous seed cells for the construction of bioengineered corneas. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of epidermal stem cells for trans-differentiation into corneal epithelium-like cells. Rhesus putative epidermal stem cells were isolated by type IV collagen attachment method. Flow cytometry analysis, immunohistology and RT-PCR were conducted to identify the expression of specific markers (β1, α6 integrin, K15, K1/K10, K3/K12 and CD71) on the isolated rapid attaching cells. The isolated cells were cocultured with human corneal limbal stroma and corneal epithelial cells. After coculture, the expression of the same specific markers was evaluated in order to identify expression difference caused by the coculture conditions. K3/K12 expression was analyzed in coculture cells on day 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. Putative epidermal stem cells in conditioned culture media were used as control. Putative epidermal stem cells were predominant in rapid attaching cells by type IV collagen attachment isolation. Before being cocultured, the rhesus putative epidermal stem cells expressed K15, α6 and β1 integrin, but no CD71, K1/K10 and K3/K12. After coculture, these cells expressed K3/K12 (a marker of corneal epithelial cells), K15 and β 1 integrin, but no K1/K10. Cells being not coculture converted into terminally differentiated cells expressing K1/K10. These results indicate that rhesus putative epidermal stem cells can trans-differentiate into corneal epithelium-like cells and, therefore, may have potential therapeutic application as autologous seed cells for the construction of bioengineered corneas.

  12. CLONING, SEQUENCE ANALYSIS, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PUTATIVE BETA-LACTAMASE OF STENOTROPHOMONAS MALTOPHILIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Seng Shueh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of current study was to explore the function of chromosomal putative beta-lactamase gene (smlt 0115 in clinical Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Antibiotic susceptibility test (AST screening for current antimicrobial drugs was done and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC level towards beta-lactams was determined by E-test. Putative beta-lactamase gene of S. maltophilia was amplified via PCR, with specific primers, then cloned into pET-15 expression plasmid and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The gene was sequenced and analyzed. The expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography and the kinetic assay was performed. S. maltophilia ATCC 13637 was included in this experiment. Besides, a hospital strain which exhibited resistant to a series of beta-lactams including cefepime was identified via AST and MIC, hence it was named as S2 strain and was considered in this study. Sequencing result showed that putative beta-lactamase gene obtained from ATCC 13637 and S2 strains were predicted to have cephalosporinase activity by National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI blast program. Differences in the sequences of both ATCC 13637 and S2 strains were found via ClustalW alignment software. Kinetic assay proved a cephalosporinase characteristic produced by E. coli BL21 clone that overexpressed the putative beta-lactamase gene cloned under the control of an external promoter. Yet, expressed protein purified from S2 strain had high catalytic activity against beta-lactam antibiotics which was 14-fold higher than expressed protein purified from ATCC 13637 strain. This study represents the characterization analysis of putative beta-lactamase gene (smlt 0115 of S. maltophilia. The presence of the respective gene in the chromosome of S. maltophilia suggested that putative beta-lactamase gene (smlt 0115 of S. maltophilia plays a role in beta-lactamase resistance.

  13. Putative epidermal stem cell convert into corneal epithelium-like cell under corneal tissue in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Rhesus putative epidermal stem cells are being investigated for their potential use in regenerative corneal epithelium-like cells, which may provide a practical source of autologous seed cells for the construction of bioengineered corneas. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of epi-dermal stem cells for trans-differentiation into corneal epithelium-like cells. Rhesus putative epidermal stem cells were isolated by type IV collagen attachment method. Flow cytometry analysis, immuno-histology and RT-PCR were conducted to identify the expression of specific markers (β1, α6 integrin, K15, K1/K10, K3/K12 and CD71) on the isolated rapid attaching cells. The isolated cells were cocultured with human corneal limbal stroma and corneal epithelial cells. After coculture, the expression of the same specific markers was evaluated in order to identify expression difference caused by the coculture conditions. K3/K12 expression was analyzed in coculture cells on day 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. Putative epi-dermal stem cells in conditioned culture media were used as control. Putative epidermal stem cells were predominant in rapid attaching cells by type IV collagen attachment isolation. Before being co-cultured, the rhesus putative epidermal stem cells expressed K15, α6 and β1 integrin, but no CD71, K1/K10 and K3/K12. After coculture, these cells expressed K3/K12 (a marker of corneal epithelial cells), K15 and β 1 integrin, but no K1/K10. Cells being not coculture converted into terminally differentiated cells expressing K1/K10. These results indicate that rhesus putative epidermal stem cells can trans-differentiate into corneal epithelium-like cells and, therefore, may have potential therapeutic application as autologous seed cells for the construction of bioengineered corneas.

  14. The macrophage CD163 surface glycoprotein is an erythroblast adhesion receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabriek, Babs O; Polfliet, Machteld M J; Vloet, Rianka P M

    2007-01-01

    the adhesion of erythroblastic cells. Furthermore, we identified a 13-amino acid motif (CD163p2) corresponding to a putative interaction site within the second scavenger receptor domain of CD163 that could mediate erythroblast binding. Finally, CD163p2 promoted erythroid expansion in vitro, suggesting...

  15. NO EVIDENCE FOR A ROLE OF MUSCARINIC M(2) RECEPTORS IN FUNCTIONAL ANTAGONISM IN BOVINE TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; MEURS, H; ELZINGA, CRS; ZAAGSMA, J

    1 The functional antagonism between methacholine- or histamine-induced contraction and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation was evaluated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle in vitro. In addition, the putative contribution of muscarinic M(2) receptors mediating inhibition of beta-adrenoceptor-induced

  16. GABA(A) receptor- and GABA transporter polymorphisms and risk for essential tremor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thier, S; Kuhlenbäumer, G; Lorenz, D

    2011-01-01

    Background:  Clinical features and animal models of essential tremor (ET) suggest gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A) R) subunits and GABA transporters as putative candidate genes. Methods:  A total of 503 ET cases and 818 controls were investigated for an association between polymorphisms...

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in pancreatic lesions induced in the rat by azaserine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C.J.T.; Weger, R.A. de; Blokland, W.T.M. van; Seifert-Bock, I.; Kobrin, M.S.; Korc, M.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was investigated in putative preneoplastic and neoplastic acinar cell lesions induced in the rat pancreas by azaserine, using Northern blotting, in situ hybridisation (ISH) and immunohistochemistry. EGFR protein leve

  18. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a novel GABAB-related G-protein coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, A R; Michalovich, D; Testa, T T; Robbins, M J; Jaillard, C; Hill, J; Szekeres, P G; Charles, K J; Jourdain, S; Holbrook, J D; Boyfield, I; Patel, N; Medhurst, A D; Pangalos, M N

    2003-02-20

    Using a homology-based bioinformatics approach we have analysed human genomic sequence and identified the human and rodent orthologues of a novel putative seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor, termed GABA(BL). The amino acid sequence homology of these cDNAs compared to GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) led us to postulate that GABA(BL) was a putative novel GABA(B) receptor subunit. The C-terminal sequence of GABA(BL) contained a putative coiled-coil domain, di-leucine and several RXR(R) ER retention motifs, all of which have been shown to be critical in GABA(B) receptor subunit function. In addition, the distribution of GABA(BL) in the central nervous system was reminiscent of that of the other known GABA(B) subunits. However, we were unable to detect receptor function in response to any GABA(B) ligands when GABA(BL) was expressed in isolation or in the presence of either GABA(B1) or GABA(B2). Therefore, if GABA(BL) is indeed a GABA(B) receptor subunit, its partner is a potentially novel receptor subunit or chaperone protein which has yet to be identified.

  19. Detection of putative new mutacins by bioinformatic analysis using available web tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Guillaume G

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to characterise new bacteriocins produced by Streptococcus mutans we perform a complete bioinformatic analyses by scanning the genome sequence of strains UA159 and NN2025. By searching in the adjacent genomic context of the two-component signal transduction system we predicted the existence of many putative new bacteriocins' maturation pathways and some of them were only exclusive to a group of Streptococcus. Computational genomic and proteomic analysis combined to predictive functionnal analysis represent an alternative way for rapid identification of new putative bacteriocins as well as new potential antimicrobial drugs compared to the more traditional methods of drugs discovery using antagonism tests.

  20. Strigolactone Analogs as Molecular Probes in Chasing the (SLs) Receptor/s: Design and Synthesis of Fluorescent Labeled Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Prandi; Helèna Rosso; Beatrice Lace; Ernesto G. Occhiato; Alberto Oppedisano; Silvia Tabasso; Gabriele Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Originally identified as allelochemicals involved in plant-parasite interactions,more recently,Strigolactones (SLs) have been shown to play multiple key roles in the rhizosphere communication between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.Even more recent is the hormonal role ascribed to SLs which broadens the biological impact of these relatively simple molecules.In spite of the crucial and multifaceted biological role of SLs,there are no data on the receptor(s) which bind(s) such active molecules,neither in the producing plants nor in parasitic weeds or AM fungi.Information about the putative receptor of SLs can be gathered by means of structural,molecular,and genetic approaches.Our contribution on this topic is the design and synthesis of fluorescent labeled SL analogs to be used as probes for the detection in vivo of the receptor(s).Knowledge of the putative receptor structure will boost the research on analogs of the natural substrates as required for agricultural applications.

  1. Expression of SOCS1 and the downstream targets of its putative tumor suppressor functions in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Martin; Bobbala, Diwakar; Villalobos-Hernandez, Alberto; Khan, Md Gulam Musawwir; Ramanathan, Sheela; Saucier, Caroline; Ferbeyre, Gerardo; Geha, Sameh; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2017-02-24

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is considered a tumor suppressor due to frequent epigenetic and micro-RNA-mediated repression of its gene expression in diverse cancers. In prostate cancer (PCa), elevated expression of miR-30d that targets SOCS1 mRNA is associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. SOCS1 can mediate its tumor suppressor functions by diverse mechanisms such as inhibiting the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, promoting the tumor suppressor functions of p53, attenuating MET receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and blocking the oncogenic potential of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CIP1) (p21). Here, we studied the expression of SOCS1 and the downstream targets of its putative tumor suppressor functions (p53, MET and p21) in human PCa specimens to evaluate their significance as markers of disease prognosis. Tissue microarrays were constructed of 78 archived prostatectomy specimens that were grouped according to the recommendations of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) based on the Gleason patterns. SOCS1, p53, MET and p21 protein expression were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining alongside the common prostate cancer-related markers Ki67, prostein and androgen receptor. Statistical correlations between the staining intensities of these markers and ISUP grade groups, local invasion or lymph node metastasis were evaluated. SOCS1 showed diffuse staining in the prostatic epithelium. SOCS1 staining intensity correlated inversely with the ISUP grade groups (ρ = -0.4687, p <0.0001) and Ki67 (ρ = -0.2444, p = 0.031), and positively with prostein (ρ = 0.3511, p = 0.0016). Changes in SOCS1 levels did not significantly associate with those of p53, MET or p21. However, p21 positively correlated with androgen receptor expression (ρ = -0.1388, p = 0.0003). A subset of patients with regional lymph node metastasis, although small in number, showed reduced SOCS1 expression and increased expression of

  2. Epidermal growth factor promotes protein degradation of epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN), a putative metastasis suppressor, during epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumin; Wang, Xu; Iqbal, Shareen; Wang, Yanru; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Chen, Zhengjia; Chen, Zhuo; Shin, Dong M; Yuan, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang A; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K; Ritenour, Chad; Kucuk, Omer; Wu, Daqing

    2013-01-18

    Aberrant expression of EGF receptors has been associated with hormone-refractory and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). However, the molecular mechanism for EGF signaling in promoting PCa metastasis remains elusive. Using experimental models of PCa metastasis, we demonstrated that EGF could induce robust epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increase invasiveness. Interestingly, EGF was found to be capable of promoting protein turnover of epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN), a putative suppressor of EMT and tumor metastasis. Mechanistic study revealed that EGF could activate the phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation of EPLIN through an extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2)-dependent signaling cascade. Pharmacological inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway effectively antagonized EGF-induced EPLIN degradation. Two serine residues, i.e. serine 362 and serine 604, were identified as putative ERK1/2 phosphorylation sites in human EPLIN, whose point mutation rendered resistance to EGF-induced protein turnover. This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism for EGF regulation of EMT and invasiveness in PCa cells, indicating that blockade of EGF signaling could be beneficial in preventing and retarding PCa metastasis at early stages.

  3. Occurrence of Putative Pathogenicity Islands in Enterococci from Distinct Species and of Differing Origins▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Barreto-Crespo, Maria Teresa; Tenreiro, Rogério

    2009-01-01

    Enterococci isolated from ewe's milk and cheese, clinical isolates of human and veterinary origins, and reference strains obtained from culture collections were screened for the occurrence of putative pathogenicity island (PAIs). Results obtained after PCR amplification and hybridization point toward PAI dissemination among enterococci of diverse origins (food/clinical) and species (Enterococcus faecalis/non-E. faecalis).

  4. Cloning and characterization of prunus serotina AGAMOUS, a putative flower homeotic gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaomei Liu; Joseph Anderson; Paula Pijut

    2010-01-01

    Members of the AGAMOUS subfamily of MADS-box transcription factors play an important role in regulating the development of reproductive organs in flowering plants. To help understand the mechanism of floral development in black cherry (Prunus serotina), PsAG (a putative flower homeotic identity gene) was isolated...

  5. A new putative alphapartitivirus recovered from the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe palczewskii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guihong; Qiu, Ping; Li, Cong; Chen, Zhuo; Islam, Saif Ul; Fang, Shouguo; Wu, Zujian; Zhang, Songbai; Du, Zhenguo

    2017-02-27

    Two double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) likely representing the genome of a novel alphapartitivirus which we provisionally named Erysiphe palczewskii alphapartitivirus 1 (EpV1) were recovered from the powdery mildew fungus E. palczewskii infecting Sophora japonica in Jingzhou, Hubei province of China. The two dsRNAs, 1955 (dsRNA1) and 1917 (dsRNA2) bp in size, respectively, each contains a single open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 585- and 528-aa protein, respectively. The 585-aa protein contains a conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain and shows significant homology to RdRps of approved or putative partitiviruses, particularly those belonging to the genus Alphapartitivirus. However, it shares an aa sequence identity lower than 80% with its closest relative, the RdRp of the putative alphapartitivirus Grapevine partitivirus, and lower than 60% with the RdRps of other partitiviruses. In a phylogenetic tree constructed with RdRp aa sequences of selected partitiviruses, the putative virus EpV1 clustered with Grapevine partitivirus and formed a well-supported monophyletic clade with known or putative alphapartitiviruses.

  6. A rapid approach to evaluate putative nursery sites for penaeid prawns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matthew D.; Smith, James A.; Boys, Craig A.; Whitney, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    Identifying nursery habitats for an aquatic species generally requires tracing adult individuals back through time and space to the area or habitat in which they developed as juveniles. We develop and trial a study design and analytical approach to evaluate the suitability of using stable isotopes to trace emigrating prawns to putative nursery sites, and evaluate assumptions inherent in the application of the approach using two penaeid species with Type-II life cycles: Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus and Metapenaeus macleayi. Prawns were collected in putative nursery sites within the Hunter River, Australia, and analysed as composite samples of 6 individuals to provide habitat-specific isotopic signatures. Prawns emigrating from the mouth of the river were used as a proxy for individuals recruiting to the adult population, and assigned to putative nursery sites using a probabilistic mixing model and a simple, distance-based approach. Bivariate (δ15N and δ13C) isotopic data was sufficient to distinguish prawns from different putative nursery sites, and isotopic composition correlated closely with salinity. Approximately 90% of emigrating prawns collected could be assigned to these sites using bivariate isotopic data, and both analytical approaches gave similar results. The design developed here is broadly applicable to a suite of penaeid species, but its application will be most powerful when sampling is also aimed at understanding nursery function by simultaneous monitoring of size structure/growth, density, and trophic relationships within nursery habitats.

  7. Mapping the flow of information within the putative mirror neuron system during gesture observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Marleen B.; Keysers, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The putative mirror neuron system may either function as a strict feed-forward system or as a dynamic control system. A strict feed-forward system would predict that action observation leads to a predominantly temporal -> parietal -> premotor flow of information in which a visual representation is t

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Putative Densovirus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Jared C; Nouri, Shahideh; Falk, Bryce W

    2016-07-28

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a putative densovirus of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Diaphorina citri densovirus (DcDNV) was originally identified through metagenomics, and here, we obtained the complete nucleotide sequence using PCR-based approaches. Phylogenetic analysis places DcDNV between viruses of the Ambidensovirus and Iteradensovirus genera.

  9. Expression of putative expansin genes in phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) induced root galls of Vitis spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawo, N C; Griesser, M; Forneck, A

    Grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) is a serious global pest in viticulture. The insects are sedentary feeders and require a gall to feed and reproduce. The insects induce their feeding site within the meristematic zone of the root tip, where they stay attached, feeding both intra- and intercellularly, and causing damage by reducing plant vigour. Several changes in cell structure and composition, including increased cell division and tissue swelling close to the feeding site, cause an organoid gall called a nodosity to develop. Because alpha expansin genes are involved in cell enlargement and cell wall loosening in many plant tissues it may be anticipated that they are also involved in nodosity formation. To identify expansin genes in Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot noir, we mined for orthologues genes in a comparative analysis. Eleven putative expansin genes were identified and shown to be present in the rootstock Teleki 5C (V. berlandieri Planch. x V. riparia Michx.) using specific PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Expression analysis of young and mature nodosities and uninfested root tips were conducted via quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Up-regulation was measured for three putative expansin genes (VvEXPA15, -A17 and partly -A20) or down-regulation for three other putative genes (VvEXPA7, -A12, -A20) in nodosities. The present study clearly shows the involvement of putative expansin genes in the phylloxera-root interaction.

  10. A review on the putative association between beta-blockers and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D.E.; van Riezen, J.; de Boer, R.A.; van Melle, J.P.; de Jonge, P.

    Several kinds of systematic studies have been conducted verifying the putative association between beta-blockers and depressive symptoms. However, many of these studies had important limitations in their design. In most of the studies, no effect of beta-blockers on depressive symptoms was seen.

  11. A review on the putative association between beta-blockers and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D.E.; van Riezen, J.; de Boer, R.A.; van Melle, J.P.; de Jonge, P.

    2011-01-01

    Several kinds of systematic studies have been conducted verifying the putative association between beta-blockers and depressive symptoms. However, many of these studies had important limitations in their design. In most of the studies, no effect of beta-blockers on depressive symptoms was seen. Beca

  12. DETERMINATION OF ROCURONIUM AND ITS PUTATIVE METABOLITES IN BODY-FLUIDS AND TISSUE-HOMOGENATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLEEF, UW; PROOST, JH; ROGGEVELD, J

    1993-01-01

    A sensitive and selective HPLC method was developed for the quantification of the neuromuscular blocking agent rocuronium and its putative metabolites (the 17-desacetyl derivative and the N-desallyl derivative of rocuronium) in plasma, urine, bile, tissue homogenates and stoma fluid. Samples were pr

  13. Search strings for the study of putative occupational determinants of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mattioli; F. Zanardi; A. Baldasseroni; F. Schaafsma; R.M.T. Cooke; G. Mancini; M. Fierro; C. Santangelo; A. Farioli; S. Fucksia; S. Curti; F.S. Violante; J. Verbeek

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify efficient PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles regarding putative occupational determinants of conditions not generally considered to be work related. Methods Based on MeSH definitions and expert knowledge, we selected as candidate search terms the four MeSH terms desc

  14. Search strings for the study of putative occupational determinants of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattioli, S.; Zanardi, F.; Baldasseroni, A.; Schaafsma, F.; Cooke, R.M.T.; Mancini, G.; Fierro, M.; Santangelo, C.; Farioli, A.; Fucksia, S.; Curti, S.; Violante, F.S.; Verbeek, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify efficient PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles regarding putative occupational determinants of conditions not generally considered to be work related. Methods Based on MeSH definitions and expert knowledge, we selected as candidate search terms the four MeSH terms

  15. Isolation of Bartonella quintana from a Woman and a Cat following Putative Bite Transmission▿

    OpenAIRE

    Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Maggi, Ricardo G; Sigmon, Betsy; Nicholson, William L.

    2006-01-01

    We report here the detection of Bartonella quintana, after putative bite transmission, in pre-enrichment blood cultures from a woman and from two feral barn cats. Prospective molecular epidemiological studies are necessary to characterize the risk of human Bartonella quintana infection following cat bites.

  16. Isolation and characterization of 17 different genes encoding putative endopolygalacturonase genes from Rhizopus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes are a valuable aid in the retting of flax for production of linens and, more recently, production of biofuels from citrus wastes. In a search of the recently sequenced Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 genome database, 18 putative endopolygalacturonase genes were identified, w...

  17. Biased and G protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eSteen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor, different receptors (with the same ligand or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand-receptor pair. Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e. full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of classic redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confer a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor- or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the

  18. Differential expression patterns in chemosensory and non-chemosensory tissues of putative chemosensory genes identified by transcriptome analysis of insect pest the purple stem borer Sesamia inferens (Walker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Nan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large number of insect chemosensory genes from different gene subfamilies have been identified and annotated, but their functional diversity and complexity are largely unknown. A systemic examination of expression patterns in chemosensory organs could provide important information. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 92 putative chemosensory genes by analysing the transcriptome of the antennae and female sex pheromone gland of the purple stem borer Sesamia inferens, among them 87 are novel in this species, including 24 transcripts encoding for odorant binding proteins (OBPs, 24 for chemosensory proteins (CSPs, 2 for sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs, 39 for odorant receptors (ORs and 3 for ionotropic receptors (IRs. The transcriptome analyses were validated and quantified with a detailed global expression profiling by Reverse Transcription-PCR for all 92 transcripts and by Quantitative Real Time RT-PCR for selected 16 ones. Among the chemosensory gene subfamilies, CSP transcripts are most widely and evenly expressed in different tissues and stages, OBP transcripts showed a clear antenna bias and most of OR transcripts are only detected in adult antennae. Our results also revealed that some OR transcripts, such as the transcripts of SNMP2 and 2 IRs were expressed in non-chemosensory tissues, and some CSP transcripts were antenna-biased expression. Furthermore, no chemosensory transcript is specific to female sex pheromone gland and very few are found in the heads. CONCLUSION: Our study revealed that there are a large number of chemosensory genes expressed in S. inferens, and some of them displayed unusual expression profile in non-chemosensory tissues. The identification of a large set of putative chemosensory genes of each subfamily from a single insect species, together with their different expression profiles provide further information in understanding the functions of these chemosensory genes in S. inferens as

  19. G Protein-coupled Receptor Gpr4 Senses Amino Acids and Activates the cAMP-PKA Pathway in Cryptococcus neoformansD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Chaoyang; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Cox, Gary M.; Heitman, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The Gα protein Gpa1 governs the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and plays a central role in virulence and differentiation in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, but the signals and receptors that trigger this pathway were unknown. We identified seven putative proteins that share identity with known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One protein, Gpr4, shares limited sequence identity with the Dictyostelium discoideum cAMP receptor cAR1 and the Aspergillus nidulans GPCR protein Gpr...

  20. Functional domains of the poliovirus receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Satoshi; Ise, Iku; Nomoto, Akio (Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (Japan))

    1991-05-15

    A number of mutant cDNAs of the human poliovirus receptor were constructed to identify essential regions of the molecule as the receptor. All mutant cDNAs carrying the sequence coding for the entire N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain I) confer permissiveness for poliovirus to mouse L cells, but a mutant cDNA lacking the sequence for domain I does not. The transformants permissive for poliovirus were able to bind the virus and were also recognized by monoclonal antibody D171, which competes with poliovirus for the cellular receptor. These results strongly suggest that the poliovirus binding site resides in domain I of the receptor. Mutant cDNAs for the sequence encoding the intracellular peptide were also constructed and expressed in mouse L cells. Susceptibility of these cells to poliovirus revealed that the entire putative cytoplasmic domain is not essential for virus infection. Thus, the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule appears not to play a role in the penetration of poliovirus.

  1. Functional Authentication of a Novel Gastropod Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Reveals Unusual Features and Evolutionary Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    A gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like molecule was previously identified in a gastropod, Aplysia californica, and named ap-GnRH. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of a putative ap-GnRH receptor (ap-GnRHR) and functionally authenticated this receptor as a bona fide ap-GnRHR. This receptor contains two potential translation start sites, each accompanied by a Kozak sequence, suggesting the translation of a long and a short form of the receptor is possible. The putative ap-GnRHR maintains the conserved structural motifs of GnRHR-like receptors and shares 45% sequence identity with the octopus GnRHR. The expression of the putative ap-GnRHR short form is ubiquitous in all tissues examined, whereas the long form is only expressed in parts of the central nervous system, osphradium, small hermaphroditic duct, and ovotestis. The cDNA encoding the long or the short receptor was transfected into the Drosophila S2 cell line and subject to a radioreceptor assay using 125I-labeled ap-GnRH as the radioligand. Further, the transfected cells were treated with various concentrations of ap-GnRH and measured for the accumulation of cAMP and inositol monophosphate (IP1). Radioreceptor assay revealed that only the long receptor bound specifically to the radioligand. Further, only the long receptor responded to ap-GnRH with an increased accumulation of IP1, but not cAMP. Our studies show that despite the more prevalent expression of the short receptor, only the long receptor is the functional ap-GnRHR. Importantly, this is only the second report on the authentication of a protostome GnRHR, and based on the function and the phylogenetic grouping of ap-GnRHR, we suggest that this receptor is more similar to protostome corazonin receptors than chordate GnRHRs. PMID:27467252

  2. Functional Authentication of a Novel Gastropod Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Reveals Unusual Features and Evolutionary Insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Scott I; Tsai, Pei-San

    2016-01-01

    A gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like molecule was previously identified in a gastropod, Aplysia californica, and named ap-GnRH. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of a putative ap-GnRH receptor (ap-GnRHR) and functionally authenticated this receptor as a bona fide ap-GnRHR. This receptor contains two potential translation start sites, each accompanied by a Kozak sequence, suggesting the translation of a long and a short form of the receptor is possible. The putative ap-GnRHR maintains the conserved structural motifs of GnRHR-like receptors and shares 45% sequence identity with the octopus GnRHR. The expression of the putative ap-GnRHR short form is ubiquitous in all tissues examined, whereas the long form is only expressed in parts of the central nervous system, osphradium, small hermaphroditic duct, and ovotestis. The cDNA encoding the long or the short receptor was transfected into the Drosophila S2 cell line and subject to a radioreceptor assay using 125I-labeled ap-GnRH as the radioligand. Further, the transfected cells were treated with various concentrations of ap-GnRH and measured for the accumulation of cAMP and inositol monophosphate (IP1). Radioreceptor assay revealed that only the long receptor bound specifically to the radioligand. Further, only the long receptor responded to ap-GnRH with an increased accumulation of IP1, but not cAMP. Our studies show that despite the more prevalent expression of the short receptor, only the long receptor is the functional ap-GnRHR. Importantly, this is only the second report on the authentication of a protostome GnRHR, and based on the function and the phylogenetic grouping of ap-GnRHR, we suggest that this receptor is more similar to protostome corazonin receptors than chordate GnRHRs.

  3. Extended Synaptotagmin Interaction with the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Depends on Receptor Conformation, Not Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Michel G; Herdman, Chelsea; Guillou, François; Mishra, Prakash K; Baril, Joëlle; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Moss, Tom

    2015-06-26

    We previously demonstrated that ESyt2 interacts specifically with the activated FGF receptor and is required for a rapid phase of receptor internalization and for functional signaling via the ERK pathway in early Xenopus embryos. ESyt2 is one of the three-member family of Extended Synaptotagmins that were recently shown to be implicated in the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions and in the Ca(2+) dependent regulation of these junctions. Here we show that ESyt2 is directed to the ER by its putative transmembrane domain, that the ESyts hetero- and homodimerize, and that ESyt2 homodimerization in vivo requires a TM adjacent sequence but not the SMP domain. ESyt2 and ESyt3, but not ESyt1, selectively interact in vivo with activated FGFR1. In the case of ESyt2, this interaction requires a short TM adjacent sequence and is independent of receptor autophosphorylation, but dependent on receptor conformation. The data show that ESyt2 recognizes a site in the upper kinase lobe of FGFR1 that is revealed by displacement of the kinase domain activation loop during receptor activation.

  4. Evidence for a precursor of the high-affinity metastasis-associated murine laminin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, C N; Castronovo, V; Schmitt, M C;

    1989-01-01

    The high-affinity cellular receptor for the basement membrane component laminin is differentially expressed during tumor invasion and metastasis. A cDNA clone encoding the murine laminin receptor was isolated and identified on the basis of sequence homology to the human laminin receptor [Wewer et...... al. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 7137-7141]. Primer extension experiments demonstrated that the clone contained the complete 5' sequence of the murine laminin receptor mRNA. RNA blot data demonstrated a single-sized laminin receptor mRNA, approximately 1400 bases long, in human, mouse......, and rat. The nascent laminin receptor predicted from the cDNA sequence is 295 amino acids long, with a molecular weight of 33,000, and contains one intradisulfide bridge, a short putative transmembrane domain, and an extracellular carboxy-terminal region which has abundant glutamic acid residues...

  5. Olfactory Ionotropic Receptors in Mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Man, Yahui; Li, Jianyong; Pei, Di; Wu, Wenjian

    2017-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are a conserved family of ligand-gated ion channels that primarily function to mediate neuronal communication at synapses. A variant subfamily of iGluRs, the ionotropic receptors (IRs), was recently identified in insects and proved with the function in odorant recognition. Ionotropic receptors participate in a distinct olfactory signaling pathway that is independent of olfactory receptors activity. In the present study, we identify 102 putative IR genes, dubbed as AalbIr genes, in mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse) by in silico comparative sequence analysis. Among AalbIr genes, 19 show expression in the female antenna by RT-PCR. These putative olfactory AalbIRs share four conservative hydrophobic domains of amino acids, similar to the transmembrane and ion channel pore regions found in conventional iGluRs. To determine the potential function of these olfactory AalbIRs in host-seeking, we compared their transcript expression levels in the antennae of blood-fed females with that of non-blood-fed females by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Three AalbIr genes showed downregulation when the mosquito finished a bloodmeal. These results may help to improve our understanding of the IR-mediated olfactory signaling in mosquitoes. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty acids,

  7. Putative and unique gene sequence utilization for the design of species specific probes as modeled by Lactobacillus plantarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of utilizing putative and unique gene sequences for the design of species specific probes was tested. The abundance profile of assigned functions within the Lactobacillus plantarum genome was used for the identification of the putative and unique gene sequence, csh. The targeted gene (cs...

  8. Functional mapping of cannabinoid receptor homologs in mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, John M; Glass, Michelle

    2003-07-17

    Over the past decade, several putative homologs of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) have been identified by homology screening. Homology screening utilizes sequence alignment search engines to recognize homologs. We investigated these putative CBR homologs further by 'functional mapping' of their deduced amino acid sequences. The entire pharmacophore of a CBR has not yet been elucidated, but point-mutation studies have identified over 20 amino acid residues that impart CBR specificity for ligand recognition and/or signal transduction. Twenty point-mutation studies were used to construct a CBR functionality matrix. Sixteen putative CBR homologs were then mapped over the matrix. Several putative homologs did not hold up to this analysis: human GPR3, GPR6, GPR12, and Caenorhabditis elegans C02H7.2 expressed a series of crippling substitutions in the matrix, strongly suggesting they do not encode functional CBRs. Mapping the contested leech (Hirudo medicinalis) CBR sequence suggests that it encodes a functional CB1; it expresses fewer substitutions than the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) CB1 sequence. Mapping a putative CB2 ortholog in the puffer fish (Fugu rubripes T012234) suggests it may encode a CBR other than CB2. These findings are consistent with the lack of experimental data proving these putative CBRs have affinity for cannabinoid ligands. Matrix analysis also reveals that SR144528, a 'CB2-specific' synthetic antagonist, has affinity for non-mammalian CB1 receptors, and that L3.45 appears to be CB2-specific, its cognate in CB1 receptors is F3.45. In conclusion, functional mapping, utilizing point-mutation studies, may improve the specificity of homology screening performed by sequence alignment search engines.

  9. Endothelin Receptors, Mitochondria and Neurogenesis in Cerebral Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurogenesis is most active during pre-natal development, however, it persists throughout the human lifespan. The putative role of mitochondria in neurogenesis and angiogenesis is gaining importance. Since, ETB receptor mediated neurogenesis and angiogenesis has been identified, the role of these receptors with relevance to mitochondrial functions is of interest. Methods: In addition to work from our laboratory, we undertook an extensive search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature. Specific technical terms such as endothelin, mitochondria and neurogenesis were used to seek out and critically evaluate literature that was relevant. Results: The ET family consists of three isopeptides (ET-1, ET-2 and ET-3) that produce biological actions by acting on two types of receptors (ETA and ETB). In the central nervous system (CNS) ETA receptors are potent constrictors of the cerebral vasculature and appear to contribute in the causation of cerebral ischemia. ETA receptor antagonists have been found to be effective in animal model of cerebral ischemia; however, clinical studies have shown no efficacy. Mitochondrial functions are critically important for several neural development processes such as neurogenesis, axonal and dendritic growth, and synaptic formation. ET appears to impair mitochondrial functions through activation of ETA receptors. On the other hand, blocking ETB receptors has been shown to trigger apoptotic processes by activating intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Mitochondria are important for their role in molecular regulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Stimulation of ETB receptors in the adult ischemic brain has been found to promote angiogenesis and neurogenesis mediated through vascular endothelial growth factor and nerve growth factor. It will be interesting to investigate the effect of ETB receptor stimulation on mitochondrial functions in the CNS following cerebral ischemia. Conclusion: The findings of this

  10. Evidence against dopamine D1/D2 receptor heteromers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Aliya L.; Yano, Hideaki; Trifilieff, Pierre; Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Biezonski, Dominik; Mészáros, József; Sibley, David R.; Kellendonk, Christoph; Sonntag, Kai C.; Graham, Devon L.; Colbran, Roger J.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Hetero-oligomers of G-protein-coupled receptors have become the subject of intense investigation because their purported potential to manifest signaling and pharmacological properties that differ from the component receptors makes them highly attractive for the development of more selective pharmacological treatments. In particular, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors have been proposed to form hetero-oligomers that couple to Gαq proteins, and SKF83959 has been proposed to act as a biased agonist that selectively engages these receptor complexes to activate Gαq and thus phospholipase C. D1/D2 heteromers have been proposed as relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and schizophrenia. We used in vitro bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), ex vivo analyses of receptor localization and proximity in brain slices, and behavioral assays in mice to characterize signaling from these putative dimers/oligomers. We were unable to detect Gαq or Gα11 protein coupling to homomers or heteromers of D1 or D2 receptors using a variety of biosensors. SKF83959-induced locomotor and grooming behaviors were eliminated in D1 receptor knockout mice, verifying a key role for D1-like receptor activation. In contrast, SKF83959-induced motor responses were intact in D2 receptor and Gαq knockout mice, as well as in knock-in mice expressing a mutant Ala286-CaMKIIα, that cannot autophosphorylate to become active. Moreover, we found that in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, even in neurons in which D1 and D2 receptor promoters are both active, the receptor proteins are segregated and do not form complexes. These data are not compatible with SKF83959 signaling through Gαq or through a D1–D2 heteromer and challenge the existence of such a signaling complex in the adult animals that we used for our studies. PMID:25560761

  11. Structure, regulation, and putative function of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruening, Petra; Fulde, Marcus; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important cause of infectious diseases in young pigs. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. suis. Recently, we have identified two proteins of the arginine deiminase system (ADS) of S. suis, which were temperature induced and expressed on the streptococcal surface (N. Winterhoff, R. Goethe, P. Gruening, M. Rohde, H. Kalisz, H. E. Smith, and P. Valentin-Weigand, J. Bacteriol. 184:6768-6776, 2002). In the present study, we analyzed the complete ADS of S. suis. Due to their homologies to the recently published S. gordonii ADS genes, the genes for arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl-transferase, and carbamate kinase, which were previously designated adiS, octS, and ckS, respectively, were renamed arcA, arcB, and arcC, respectively. Our data revealed that arcA, arcB, and arcC of the S. suis ADS are transcribed from an operon (arcABC operon). Additionally, putative ADS-associated genes were cloned and sequenced which, however, did not belong to the arcABC operon. These were the flpS gene upstream of the arcABC operon with homology to the flp transcription regulator of S. gordonii and the arcD, arcT, arcH, and argR genes downstream of the arcABC operon with high homologies to a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter, a putative dipeptidase of S. gordonii, a putative beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase of S. pneumoniae, and a putative arginine repressor of S. gordonii, respectively. The transcriptional start point of the arcABC operon was determined, and promoter analysis provided evidence that multiple factors contribute to the regulation of the ADS. Thus, a putative binding site for a transcription regulator of the Crp/Fnr family, an ArgR-binding site, and two cis-acting catabolite response elements were identified in the promoter-operator region of the operon. Consistent with this, we could demonstrate that the ADS of S. suis is inducible by arginine and reduced O2 tension and subject to carbon catabolite

  12. On the existence and function of galanin receptor heteromers in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Galanin receptor (GalR subtypes1-3 linked to central galanin neurons may form heteromers with each other and other types of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs in the Central Nervous System (CNS. These heteromers may be one molecular mechanism for galanin peptides and their N-terminal fragments (gal 1-15 to modulate the function of different types of glia-neuronal networks in the CNS, especially the emotional and the cardiovascular networks. GalR-5-HT1A heteromers likely exist with antagonistic GalR-5-HT1A receptor-receptor interactions in the ascending midbrain raphe 5-HT neuron systems and their target regions. They represent a novel target for antidepressant drugs. Evidence is given for the existence of GalR1-5-HT1A heteromers in cellular models with transinhibition of the protomer signaling. A GalR1-GalR2 heteromer is proposed to be a galanin N-terminal fragment preferring receptor (1-15 in the CNS. Furthermore, a GalR1-GalR2-5-HT1A heterotrimer is postulated to explain why only galanin (1-15 but not galanin (1-29 can antagonistically modulate the 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal hippocampus rich in gal fragment binding sites. The results underline a putative role of different types of GalR-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes in depression. GalR antagonists may also have therapeutic actions in depression by blocking the antagonistic GalR-NPYY1 receptor interactions in putative GalR-NPYY1 receptor heteromers in the CNS resulting in increases in NPYY1 transmission and antidepressant effects. In contrast the galanin fragment receptor (a postulated GalR1-GalR2 heteromer appears to be linked to the NPYY2 receptor enhancing the affinity of the NPYY2 binding sites in a putative GalR1-GalR2-NPYY2 heterotrimer. Finally, putative GalR-α2-adrenoreceptor heteromers with antagonistic receptor-receptor interactions may be a widespread mechanism in the CNS for integration of galanin and noradrenaline signals also of likely relevance for depression.

  13. Computer-aided molecular modeling of a thromboxane receptor antagonist S-145 and its related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, K; Yamakawa, M; Narisada, M

    1990-04-01

    Conformational analyses on thromboxane A2 (TxA2), its receptor agonist, U-46619, and its receptor antagonist, sulotroban, were carried out by molecular mechanics (MMFF) or molecular orbital (MNDO) methods. Two kinds of putative active conformations of TxA2 and the agonist were proposed on the basis of these results by referring to the hairpin conformation hypothesis. From the superposition of stable conformers of sulotroban on those conformers, the molecular structural requirements for potent TxA2 receptor antagonism were elucidated. S-145 in which these requirements are satisfied was a very potent TxA2 antagonist.

  14. Distinguishing molecular features and clinical characteristics of a putative new rhinovirus species, human rhinovirus C (HRV C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter McErlean

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human rhinoviruses (HRVs are the most frequently detected pathogens in acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs and yet little is known about the prevalence, recurrence, structure and clinical impact of individual members. During 2007, the complete coding sequences of six previously unknown and highly divergent HRV strains were reported. To catalogue the molecular and clinical features distinguishing the divergent HRV strains, we undertook, for the first time, in silico analyses of all available polyprotein sequences and performed retrospective reviews of the medical records of cases in which variants of the prototype strain, HRV-QPM, had been detected. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Genomic analyses revealed that the six divergent strains, residing within a clade we previously called HRV A2, had the shortest polyprotein of all picornaviruses investigated. Structure-based amino acid alignments identified conserved motifs shared among members of the genus Rhinovirus as well as substantive deletions and insertions unique to the divergent strains. Deletions mostly affected regions encoding proteins traditionally involved in antigenicity and serving as HRV and HEV receptor footprints. Because the HRV A2 strains cannot yet be cultured, we created homology models of predicted HRV-QPM structural proteins. In silico comparisons confirmed that HRV-QPM was most closely related to the major group HRVs. HRV-QPM was most frequently detected in infants with expiratory wheezing or persistent cough who had been admitted to hospital and required supplemental oxygen. It was the only virus detected in 65% of positive individuals. These observations contributed to an objective clinical impact ranging from mild to severe. CONCLUSIONS: The divergent strains did not meet classification requirements for any existing species of the genus Rhinovirus or Enterovirus. HRV A2 strains should be partitioned into at least one new species, putatively called Human

  15. Comprehensive Phenotyping in Multiple Sclerosis: Discovery Based Proteomics and the Current Understanding of Putative Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. O’Connor

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no single test for multiple sclerosis (MS. Diagnosis is confirmed through clinical evaluation, abnormalities revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF chemistry. The early and accurate diagnosis of the disease, monitoring of progression, and gauging of therapeutic intervention are important but elusive elements of patient care. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the disease pathology is needed, including discovery of accurate biomarkers for MS. Herein we review putative biomarkers of MS relating to neurodegeneration and contributions to neuropathology, with particular focus on autoimmunity. In addition, novel assessments of biomarkers not driven by hypotheses are discussed, featuring our application of advanced proteomics and metabolomics for comprehensive phenotyping of CSF and blood. This strategy allows comparison of component expression levels in CSF and serum between MS and control groups. Examination of these preliminary data suggests that several CSF proteins in MS are differentially expressed, and thus, represent putative biomarkers deserving of further evaluation.

  16. Hippocampal and thalamic neuronal metabolism in a putative rat model of schizophrenia○

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guolin Ma; Tianbin Song; Min Chen; Yuan Fu; Yong Xu; Ensen Ma; Wu Wang; Jiang Du; Mingxiong Huang

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor early growth response protein 3 (EGR3) is involved in schizophrenia. We developed a putative rat model of schizophrenia by transfecting lentiviral particles carrying the Egr3 gene into bilateral hippocampal dentate gyrus. We assessed spatial working memory using the Morris water maze test, and neuronal metabolite levels in bilateral hippocampus and thalamus were determined by 3.0 T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Choline content was significantly greater in the hippocampus after transfection, while N-acetylaspartate and the ratio of N-acetylaspartate to creatine/phosphocreatine in the thalamus were lower than in controls. This study is the first to report evaluation of brain metabolites using 3.0 T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats transfected with Egr3, and reveals metabolic abnormalities in the hippocampus and thalamus in this putative model of schizophrenia.

  17. Functional characterization of a putative β-lactamase gene in the genome of Zymomonas mobilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnish, K Narayanan; Asraf, Sheik Abdul Kader Sheik; Manju, Nagarajan; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2011-12-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is resistant to β-lactam antibiotics but there are no reports of a β-lactam resistance gene and its regulation. A putative β-lactamase gene sequence (ZMO0103) in the genome of Z. mobilis showed a 55% amino acid sequence identity with class C β-lactamase genes. qPCR analysis of the β-lactamase transcript indicated a higher level expression of the β-lactamase compared to the relative transcript quantities in antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. The putative β-lactamase gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the product, AmpC, was purified to homogeneity. Its optimal activity was at pH 6 and 30 °C. Further, the β-lactamase had a higher affinity towards penicillins than cephalosporin antibiotics. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  18. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes may persist for long periods in food processing environments. In some instances, this may be due to aggregation or biofilm formation. To investigate the mechanism controlling biofilm formation in the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes, we characterized LM-49, a mutant...... with enhanced ability of biofilm-formation generated via transposon Tn917 mutagenesis of L. monocytogenes 4b G. In this mutant, a Tn917 insertion has disrupted the coding region of the gene encoding a putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease identical to Lmof2365_1771 (a putative ABC......-transporter permease) presented in the sequenced strain L. monocytogenes str. 4b F2365. This disrupted gene, denoted lm.G_1771, encoded a protein with 10 transmembrane helixes. The revertant, LM-49RE, was obtained by replacing lm.G_1771::Tn917 with lm.G_1771 via homologous recombination. We found that LM-49RE formed...

  19. The solution structure of ChaB, a putative membrane ion antiporter regulator from Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iannuzzi Pietro

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ChaB is a putative regulator of ChaA, a Na+/H+ antiporter that also has Ca+/H+ activity in E. coli. ChaB contains a conserved 60-residue region of unknown function found in other bacteria, archaeabacteria and a series of baculoviral proteins. As part of a structural genomics project, the structure of ChaB was elucidated by NMR spectroscopy. Results The structure of ChaB is composed of 3 α-helices and a small sheet that pack tightly to form a fold that is found in the cyclin-box family of proteins. Conclusion ChaB is distinguished from its putative DNA binding sequence homologues by a highly charged flexible loop region that has weak affinity to Mg2+ and Ca2+ divalent metal ions.

  20. Exploring Universal Partnerships and Putative Marriages as Tools for Awarding Partnership Property in Contemporary Family Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsje Bonthuys

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Following upon the Supreme Court of Appeal's judgment in Butters v Mncora 2012 4 SA 1 (SCA, which broadened the criteria and consequences of universal partnerships in cohabitation relationships, this article investigates the potential of universal partnerships and putative marriages to allocate rights to share in partnership property in other intimate relationships. It traverses several instances in which marriages are not recognised - bigamous marriages, Muslim and Hindu religious marriages and invalid customary marriages – examining whether the wives in these marriages could use universal partnerships and putative marriages to claim a share in property. It then considers the use of universal partnerships to obtain a share of property in civil marriages out of community of property. It concludes by pointing out several issues which are in need of clarification and where the common law should be developed to give effect to fundamental constitutional rights.

  1. Enrichment of putative stem cells from adipose tissue using dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykoukal, Jody; Vykoukal, Daynene M.; Freyberg, Susanne; Alt, Eckhard U.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.

    2009-01-01

    We have applied the microfluidic cell separation method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) to the enrichment of a putative stem cell population from an enzyme-digested adipose tissue derived cell suspension. A DEP-FFF separator device was constructed using a novel microfluidic-microelectronic hybrid flex-circuit fabrication approach that is scaleable and anticipates future low-cost volume manufacturing. We report the separation of a nucleated cell fraction from cell debris and the bulk of the erythrocyte population, with the relatively rare (<2% starting concentration) NG2-positive cell population (pericytes and/or putative progenitor cells) being enriched up to 14-fold. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application for DEP-FFF and further establishes the utility of the method for achieving label-free fractionation of cell subpopulations. PMID:18651083

  2. Identification of putative effector genes and their transcripts in three strains related to 'Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabestani, Ameneh; Izadpanah, Keramat; Abbà, Simona; Galetto, Luciana; Ghorbani, Abozar; Palmano, Sabrina; Siampour, Majid; Veratti, Flavio; Marzachì, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying phytoplasma interactions with host plants are largely unknown. In this study attempts were made to identify effectors of three phytoplasma strains related to 'Ca. P. aurantifolia', crotalaria phyllody (CrP), faba bean phyllody (FBP), and witches' broom disease of lime (WBDL), using information from draft genome of peanut witches' broom phytoplasma. Seven putative effectors were identified in WBDL genome (SAP11, SAP21, Eff64, Eff115, Eff197, Eff211 and EffSAP67), five (SAP11, SAP21, Eff64, Eff99 and Eff197) in CrP and two (SAP11, Eff64) in FBP. No homologs to Eff64, Eff197 and Eff211 in phytoplasmas of other phylogenetic groups were found. SAP11 and Eff64 homologs of 'Ca. P. aurantifolia' strains shared at least 95.9% identity and were detected in the three phytoplasmas, supporting their role within the group. Five of the putative effectors (SAP11, SAP21, Eff64, Eff115, and Eff99) were transcribed from total RNA extracts of periwinkle plants infected with these phytoplasmas. Transcription profiles of selected putative effectors of CrP, FBP and WBDL indicated that SAP11 transcripts were the most abundant in the three phytoplasmas. SAP21 transcript levels were comparable to those of SAP11 for CrP and not measurable for the other phytoplasmas. Eff64 had the lowest transcription level irrespective of sampling date and phytoplasma isolate. Eff115 transcript levels were the highest in WBDL infected plants. This work reports the first sequence information for 14 putative effectors in three strains related to 'Ca. P. aurantifolia', and offers novel insight into the transcription profile of five of them during infection of periwinkle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel putative auxin carrier family regulates intracellular auxin homeostasis in plants

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin acts as a prominent signal, providing, by its local accumulation or depletion in selected cells, a spatial and temporal reference for changes in the developmental program. The distribution of auxin depends on both auxin metabolism (biosynthesis, conjugation and degradation) and cellular auxin transport. We identified in silico a novel putative auxin transport facilitator family, called PIN-LIKES (PILS). Here we illustrate that PILS proteins are required for auxin-depend...

  4. ANTIBIOTICS RESISTANCE AND PUTATIVE VIRULENCE FACTORS OF AEROMONAS HYDROPHILA ISOLATED FROM ESTUARY

    OpenAIRE

    Olumide Adedokun Odeyemi; Ahmad Asmat; Gires Usup

    2012-01-01

    This study aim to investigate antibiotics resistance profile and putative virulence factors of Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from estuary. Bacteria used for this study were isolated from water and sediment samples obtained from Sungai Melayu, Johor, Malaysia. Serially diluted 100 µL water and 1g sediment were inoculated on modified Rimler - Shott (mRS) agar. Colonies with distinct cultural characteristics were picked for further studies. Isolates were tested for biofilm productions, protease ...

  5. Bioinformatic Analysis of Putative Gene Products Encoded in SARS-HCoV Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵心刚; 韩敬东; 宁元亨; 孟安明; 陈晔光

    2003-01-01

    The cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new coronavirus named as SARS-HCoV.Using bioinformatic methods, we have performed a detailed domain search.In addition to the viral structure proteins, we have found that several putative polypeptides share sequence similarity to known domains or proteins.This study may provide a basis for future studies on the infection and replication process of this notorious virus.

  6. Detection of putative periodontopathic bacteria in type 1 diabetic and healthy children: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare and assess the risk of periodontitis due to the presence of four putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) in type 1 diabetic and healthy children. Materials and Methods: Fifty type 1 diabetic and 50 healthy children in the age group of 7-14 years were recruited for the study. Subgingival plaque samples collected from permanent first molars w...

  7. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  8. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Fact Sheet GLP-1 Receptor Agonists May, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Silvio ... are too high or too low. What are GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines? GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines, also called ...

  9. Immunodiagnosis of episomal Banana streak MY virus using polyclonal antibodies to an expressed putative coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Kumar, P Vignesh; Baranwal, Virendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    A cryptic Badnavirus species complex, known as banana streak viruses (BSV) poses a serious threat to banana production and genetic improvement worldwide. Due to the presence of integrated BSV sequences in the banana genome, routine detection is largely based on serological and nucleo-serological diagnostic methods which require high titre specific polyclonal antiserum. Viral structural proteins like coat protein (CP) are the best target for in vitro expression, to be used as antigen for antiserum production. However, in badnaviruses precise CP sequences are not known. In this study, two putative CP coding regions (p48 and p37) of Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) were identified in silico by comparison with caulimoviruses, retroviruses and Rice tungro bacilliform virus. The putative CP coding region (p37) was in vitro expressed in pMAL system and affinity purified. The purified fusion protein was used as antigen for raising polyclonal antiserum in rabbit. The specificity of antiserum was confirmed in Western blots, immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and antigen coated plate-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA). The antiserum (1:2000) was successfully used in ACP-ELISA for specific detection of BSMYV infection in field and tissue culture raised banana plants. The antiserum was also utilized in immuno-capture PCR (IC-PCR) based indexing of episomal BSMYV infection. This is the first report of in silico identification of putative CP region of BSMYV, production of polyclonal antiserum against recombinant p37 and its successful use in immunodetection.

  10. Identification of Putative Coffee Rust Mycoparasites via Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing of Infected Pustules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Timothy Y; Marino, John A; Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2015-11-13

    The interaction of crop pests with their natural enemies is a fundament to their control. Natural enemies of fungal pathogens of crops are poorly known relative to those of insect pests, despite the diversity of fungal pathogens and their economic importance. Currently, many regions across Latin America are experiencing unprecedented epidemics of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix). Identification of natural enemies of coffee rust could aid in developing management strategies or in pinpointing species that could be used for biocontrol. In the present study, we characterized fungal communities associated with coffee rust lesions by single-molecule DNA sequencing of fungal rRNA gene bar codes from leaf discs (≈28 mm(2)) containing rust lesions and control discs with no rust lesions. The leaf disc communities were hyperdiverse in terms of fungi, with up to 69 operational taxonomic units (putative species) per control disc, and the diversity was only slightly reduced in rust-infected discs, with up to 63 putative species. However, geography had a greater influence on the fungal community than whether the disc was infected by coffee rust. Through comparisons between control and rust-infected leaf discs, as well as taxonomic criteria, we identified 15 putative mycoparasitic fungi. These fungi are concentrated in the fungal family Cordycipitaceae and the order Tremellales. These data emphasize the complexity of diverse fungi of unknown ecological function within a leaf that might influence plant disease epidemics or lead to the development of species for biocontrol of fungal disease.

  11. Emissions of putative isoprene oxidation products from mango branches under abiotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Kolby J.; Meyers, Kimberly; Abrell, Leif; Alves, Eliane G.; Yanez Serrano, Ana Maria; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Karl, Thomas; Guenther, Alex; Vickers, Claudia; Chambers, Jeffrey Q.

    2013-01-01

    Although several per cent of net carbon assimilation can be re-released as isoprene emissions to the atmosphere by many tropical plants, much uncertainty remains regarding its biological significance. In a previous study, we detected emissions of isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from tropical plants under high temperature/light stress, suggesting that isoprene is oxidized not only in the atmosphere but also within plants. However, a comprehensive analysis of the suite of isoprene oxidation products in plants has not been performed and production relationships with environmental stress have not been described. In this study, putative isoprene oxidation products from mango (Mangifera indica) branches under abiotic stress were first identified. High temperature/light and freeze–thaw treatments verified direct emissions of the isoprene oxidation products MVK and MACR together with the first observations of 3-methyl furan (3-MF) and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) as putative novel isoprene oxidation products. Mechanical wounding also stimulated emissions of MVK and MACR. Photosynthesis under 13CO2 resulted in rapid (<30min) labelling of up to five carbon atoms of isoprene, with a similar labelling pattern observed in the putative oxidation products. These observations highlight the need to investigate further the mechanisms of isoprene oxidation within plants under stress and its biological and atmospheric significance. PMID:23881400

  12. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue.

  13. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  14. Phylogeny of algal sequences encoding carbohydrate sulfotransferases, formylglycine-dependent sulfatases and putative sulfatase modifying factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai-Ling eHo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many algae are rich sources of sulfated polysaccharides with biological activities. The physicochemical/rheological properties and biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides are affected by the pattern and number of sulfate moieties. Sulfation of carbohydrates is catalyzed by carbohydrate sulfotransferases (CHSTs while modification of sulfate moieties on sulfated polysaccharides was presumably catalyzed by sulfatases including formylglycine-dependent sulfatases (FGly-SULFs. Post-translationally modification of Cys to FGly in FGly-SULFs by sulfatase modifiying factors (SUMFs is necessary for the activity of this enzyme. The aims of this study are to mine for sequences encoding algal CHSTs, FGly-SULFs and putative SUMFs from the fully sequenced algal genomes and to infer their phylogenetic relationships to their well characterized counterparts from other organisms. Algal sequences encoding CHSTs, FGly-SULFs, SUMFs and SUMF-like proteins were successfully identified from green and brown algae. However, red algal FGly-SULFs and SUMFs were not identified. In addition, a group of SUMF-like sequences with different gene structure and possibly different functions were identified for green, brown and red algae. The phylogeny of these putative genes contributes to the corpus of knowledge of an unexplored area. The analyses of these putative genes contribute towards future production of existing and new sulfated carbohydrate polymers through enzymatic synthesis and metabolic engineering.

  15. Cloning and localization of two multigene receptor families in goldfish olfactory epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanxiang; Oh, Bryan C.; Stryer, Lubert

    1998-01-01

    Goldfish reproduction is coordinated by pheromones that are released by ovulating females and detected by males. Two highly potent pheromones, a dihydroxyprogesterone and a prostaglandin, previously have been identified, and their effects on goldfish behavior have been studied in depth. We have cloned goldfish olfactory epithelium cDNAs belonging to two multigene G-protein coupled receptor families as a step toward elucidating the molecular basis of pheromone recognition. One gene family (GFA) consists of homologs of putative odorant receptors (≈320 residues) found in the olfactory epithelium of other fish and mammals. The other family (GFB) consists of homologs of putative pheromone receptors found in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) of mammals and also in the nose of pufferfish. GFB receptors (≈840 residues) are akin to the V2R family of VNO receptors, which possess a large extracellular N-terminal domain and are homologs of calcium-sensing and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In situ hybridization showed that the two families of goldfish receptors are differentially expressed in the olfactory epithelium. GFB mRNA is abundant in rather compact cells whose nuclei are near the apical surface. In contrast, GFA mRNA is found in elongated cells whose nuclei are positioned deeper in the epithelium. Our findings support the hypothesis that the separate olfactory organ and VNO of terrestrial vertebrates arose in evolution by the segregation of distinct classes of neurons that were differentially positioned in the olfactory epithelium of a precursor aquatic vertebrate. PMID:9751777

  16. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangith, Nikhil; Srinivasaraghavan, Kannan; Sahu, Indrajit; Desai, Ankita; Medipally, Spandana; Somavarappu, Arun Kumar; Verma, Chandra; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9), a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a) proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b) PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein), S14 (a ribosomal protein), CSH1 (a growth hormone), E12 (a transcription factor) and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM) at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions. PMID:25009770

  17. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Sangith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9, a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein, S14 (a ribosomal protein, CSH1 (a growth hormone, E12 (a transcription factor and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions.

  18. Functional, molecular and pharmacological advances in 5-HT7 receptor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Peter B; Sutcliffe, J Gregor

    2004-09-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor was among a group of 5-HT receptors that were discovered using targeted cloning strategies 12 years ago. This receptor is a seven-transmembrane-domain G-protein-coupled receptor that is positively linked to adenylyl cyclase. The distributions of 5-HT7 receptor mRNA, immunolabeling and radioligand binding exhibit strong similarities, with the highest receptor densities present in the thalamus and hypothalamus and significant densities present in the hippocampus and cortex. The recent availability of selective antagonists and knockout mice strains has dramatically increased our knowledge about this receptor. Together with unselective agonists, these new tools have helped to reveal the 5-HT7 receptor distribution in more detail. Important functional roles for the 5-HT7 receptor in thermoregulation, circadian rhythm, learning and memory, hippocampal signaling and sleep have also been established. Hypotheses driving current research indicate that this receptor might be involved in mood regulation, suggesting that the 5-HT7 receptor is a putative target in the treatment of depression.

  19. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Godet, Julie [Laboratoire d’anatomie et de cytologie pathologiques, CHU de Poitiers, 2 rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Chadéneau, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.chadeneau@univ-poitiers.fr [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  20. Interleukin 18 function in atherosclerosis is mediated by the interleukin 18 receptor and the Na-Cl co-transporter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Sun, C.; Gerdes, N.; Liu, C.; Liao, M.; Liu, J.; Shi, M.A.; He, A.; Zhou, Y.; Sukhova, G.K.; Chen, H.; Cheng, X.W.; Kuzuya, M.; Murohara, T.; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, X.; Jiang, M.; Shull, G.E.; Rogers, S.; Yang, C.L.; Ke, Q.; Jelen, S.K.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Ellison, D.H.; Jarolim, P.; Libby, P.; Shi, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL18) participates in atherogenesis through several putative mechanisms. Interruption of IL18 action reduces atherosclerosis in mice. Here, we show that absence of the IL18 receptor (IL18r) does not affect atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe(-/-)) mice, nor does it

  1. Localization of putative carbonic anhydrases in two marine diatoms, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masaaki; Allen, Andrew E; Kikutani, Sae; Endo, Yuri; Bowler, Chris; Matsuda, Yusuke

    2011-09-01

    It is believed that intracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are essential components of carbon concentrating mechanisms in microalgae. In this study, putative CA-encoding genes were identified in the genome sequences of the marine diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Subsequently, the subcellular localizations of the encoded proteins were determined. Nine and thirteen CA sequences were found in the genomes of P. tricornutum and T. pseudonana, respectively. Two of the β-CA genes in P. tricornutum corresponded to ptca1 and ptca2 identified previously. Immunostaining transmission electron microscopy of a PtCA1:YFP fusion expressed in the cells of P. tricornutum clearly showed the localization of PtCA1 within the central part of the pyrenoid structure in the chloroplast. Besides these two β-CA genes, P. tricornutum likely contains five α- and two γ-CA genes, whereas T. pseudonana has three α-, five γ-, four δ-, and one ζ-CA genes. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR performed on mRNA from the two diatoms grown in changing light and CO(2) conditions revealed that levels of six putative α- and γ-CA mRNAs in P. tricornutum did not change between cells grown in air-level CO(2) and 5% CO(2). However, mRNA levels of one putative α-CA gene, CA-VII in P. tricornutum, were reduced in the dark compared to that in the light. In T. pseudonana, mRNA accumulation levels of putative α-CA (CA-1), ζ-CA (CA-3) and δ-CA (CA-7) were analyzed and all levels found to be significantly reduced when cells were grown in 0.16% CO(2). Intercellular localizations of eight putative CAs were analyzed by expressing GFP fusion in P. tricornutum and T. pseudonana. In P. tricornutum, CA-I and II localized in the periplastidial compartment, CA-III, VI, VII were found in the chloroplast endoplasmic reticulum, and CA-VIII was localized in the mitochondria. On the other hand, T. pseudonana CA-1 localized in the stroma and CA-3 was found in the periplasm

  2. Coevolution of paired receptors in Xenopus carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule families suggests appropriation as pathogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Kammerer, Robert

    2016-11-16

    In mammals, CEACAM1 and closely related members represent paired receptors with similar extracellular ligand-binding regions and cytoplasmic domains with opposing functions. Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM3 which have inhibitory ITIM/ITSM and activating ITAM-like motifs, respectively, in their cytoplasmic regions are such paired receptors. Various bacterial pathogens bind to CEACAM1 on epithelial and immune cells facilitating both entry into the host and down-regulation of the immune response whereas interaction with granulocyte-specific CEACAM3 leads to their uptake and destruction. It is unclear whether paired CEACAM receptors also exist in other vertebrate clades. We identified more than 80 ceacam genes in Xenopus tropicalis and X. laevis. They consist of two subgroups containing one or two putative paired receptor pairs each. Analysis of genomic sequences of paired receptors provide evidence that their highly similar ligand binding domains were adjusted by recent gene conversion events. In contrast, selection for diversification is observed among inhibitory receptor orthologs of the two frogs which split some 60 million years ago. The allotetraploid X. laevis arose later by hybridization of two closely related species. Interestingly, despite the conservation of the genomic landscape surrounding the homeologous ceacam loci only one locus resembles the one found in X. tropicalis. From the second X. laevis locus more than 80 % of the ceacam genes were lost including 5 of the 6 paired receptor genes. This suggests that once the gene for one of the paired receptors is lost the remaining gene cluster degrades rapidly probably due to lack of selection pressure exerted by pathogens. The presence of paired receptors and selection for diversification suggests that also in amphibians CEACAM1-related inhibitory proteins are or were used as pathogen receptors.

  3. LysM domain receptor kinases regulating rhizobial Nod factor-induced infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpens, Erik; Franken, Carolien; Smit, Patrick; Willemse, Joost; Bisseling, Ton; Geurts, René

    2003-10-24

    The rhizobial infection of legumes has the most stringent demand toward Nod factor structure of all host responses, and therefore a specific Nod factor entry receptor has been proposed. The SYM2 gene identified in certain ecotypes of pea (Pisum sativum) is a good candidate for such an entry receptor. We exploited the close phylogenetic relationship of pea and the model legume Medicago truncatula to identify genes specifically involved in rhizobial infection. The SYM2 orthologous region of M. truncatula contains 15 putative receptor-like genes, of which 7 are LysM domain-containing receptor-like kinases (LYKs). Using reverse genetics in M. truncatula, we show that two LYK genes are specifically involved in infection thread formation. This, as well as the properties of the LysM domains, strongly suggests that they are Nod factor entry receptors.

  4. An angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation switch patch revealed through evolutionary trace analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Yao, Rong; Ma, Jian-Nong;

    2010-01-01

    in the cytoplasmic parts of TM2, TM3, and TM6 to form an activation switch that is common to all family A 7TM receptors. We tested this hypothesis in the rat Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1a (AT1a) receptor. The receptor has important roles in the cardiovascular system, but has also frequently been applied as a model...... for 7TM receptor activation and signaling. Six mutations: F66A, L67R, L70R, L119R, D125A, and I245F were targeted to the putative switch and assayed for changes in activation state by their ligand binding, signaling, and trafficking properties. All but one receptor mutant (that was not expressed well...

  5. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained...... to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist...

  6. Predicting the CRIP1a-cannabinoid 1 receptor interactions with integrated molecular modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mostafa H.; Kellogg, Glen E.; Selley, Dana E.; Safo, Martin; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors are a family of G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes and diseases. One of the key regulators that are unique to cannabinoid receptors is the cannabinoid receptor interacting proteins (CRIPs). Among them CRIP1a was found to decrease the constitutive activity of the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R). The aim of this study is to gain an understanding of the interaction between CRIP1a and CB1R through using different computational techniques. The generated model demonstrated several key putative interactions between CRIP1a and CB1R, including those involving Lys130 of CRIP1a. PMID:24461351

  7. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Andrés Peralta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators.

  8. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  9. 5-HT receptors and reward-related behaviour: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Dave J; Greenshaw, Andrew J

    2011-05-01

    The brain's serotonin (5-HT) system is key in the regulation of reward-related behaviours, from eating and drinking to sexual activity. The complexity of studying this system is due, in part, to the fact that 5-HT acts at many receptor subtypes throughout the brain. The recent development of drugs with greater selectivity for individual receptor subtypes has allowed for rapid advancements in our understanding of this system. Use of these drugs in combination with animal models entailing selective reward measures (i.e. intracranial self-stimulation, drug self-administration, conditioned place preference) have resulted in a greater understanding of the pharmacology of reward-related processing and behaviour (particularly regarding drugs of abuse). The putative roles of each 5-HT receptor subtype in the pharmacology of reward are outlined and discussed here. It is concluded that the actions of 5-HT in reward are receptor subtype-dependent (and thus should not be generalized) and that all studied subtypes appear to have a unique profile which is determined by content (e.g. receptor function, localization - both throughout the brain and within the synapse) and context (e.g. type of behavioural paradigm, type of drug). Given evidence of altered reward-related processing and serotonergic function in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, and addiction, a clearer understanding of the role of 5-HT receptor subtypes in this context may lead to improved drug development and therapeutic approaches.

  10. Foetal vascular responses to thromboxane receptor blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Meyer

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that foetal administration of SQ-29,548, a putative thromboxane receptor blocker, would prevent foeto–placental vasoconstriction produced by the thromboxane mimic U46619. Arterial blood gases, continuous monitoring of maternal and foetal heart rates and blood pressures were performed in chronically catheterized pregnant ewes. Foetal blood flows and vascular resistance were determined with radioactive microspheres. SQ-29,548 effectively blocked the expected vasoconstrictive effects of thromboxane. However, prolonged infusion of SQ-29,548 resulted in significant decreases in umbilical–placental blood flow and foetal mean arterial pressure. This was accompanied by a respiratory acidemia. Potential therapy for the vasoconstrictive disorders of pregnancy with SQ-29,548 awaits further investigation of its intrinsic vasoactive properties in the umbilical–placental vasculature.

  11. A Hypothesis for the Abiotic and Non-Martian Origins of Putative Signs of Ancient Martian Life in ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2001-01-01

    Putative evidence of martian life in ALH84001 can be explained by abiotic and non-martian processes consistent with the meteorite's geological history. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Haemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the Tween 80-extracted putative haemolysin of Pasteurella multocida B:2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachra, D; Coote, J G; Parton, R; Jand, S K

    2011-06-02

    The objective of this study was to investigate the haemolytic and cytotoxic activity of Pasteurella multocida B:2 strains, originally from cases of haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle. All six P. multocida B:2 strains were non-haemolytic on sheep blood agar (SBA) and horse blood agar (HBA) when grown aerobically and on SBA anaerobically but they were haemolytic on HBA when grown anaerobically. No haemolytic activity against horse red blood cells was detected in culture supernates from aerobically or anaerobically grown cultures and only very weak haemolytic activity was obtained in supernates or pellet fractions from sonicated cells. However, after repeated extraction of sonicated cells with Tween 80, haemolytic activity was found in various cell fractions, both Tween-soluble and -insoluble. The Tween-extracted putative haemolysin and other bacterial fractions were also cytotoxic for mouse macrophage-like J774.2 cells. Further characterisation of the putative haemolysin revealed it to be a heat-labile, non-pore-forming protein of molecular weight >10 kDa whose activity was completely destroyed by trypsin and greatly reduced with protease and proteinase K treatment. Congo red also reduced the haemolytic activity. Non-denaturing gel-electrophoresis and RBC agar overlay revealed clear haemolytic zones but suggested that Tween was bound to some component of the P. multocida B:2 fractions and was responsible, to some extent, for the haemolytic activity observed. However, the effect of heat and other reagents on the Tween-extracted fractions and the lack of haemolytic activity in different Tween-extracted cell fractions of organisms other than P. multocida suggested that some proteinaceous component of the organism could indeed act as a haemolysin. This putative haemolysin may be one of the virulence attributes of P. multocida, but its characterisation and role in pathogenesis require further study.

  13. Isolation and characterization of two mitoviruses and a putative alphapartitivirus from Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Hideki; Sasaki, Atsuko; Nomiyama, Koji; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Tomioka, Keisuke; Takehara, Toshiaki

    2015-06-01

    The filamentous fungus Fusarium spp. includes several important plant pathogens. We attempted to reveal presence of double-stranded (ds) RNAs in the genus. Thirty-seven Fusarium spp. at the MAFF collection were analyzed. In the strains of Fusarium coeruleum, Fusarium globosum and Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, single dsRNA bands were detected. The strains of F. coeruleum and F. solani f. sp. pisi cause potato dry rot and mulberry twig blight, respectively. Sequence analyses revealed that dsRNAs in F. coeruleum and F. globosum consisted of 2423 and 2414 bp, respectively. Using the fungal mitochondrial translation table, the positive strands of these cDNAs were found to contain single open reading frames with the potential to encode a protein of putative 757 and 717 amino acids (molecular mass 88.5 and 84.0 kDa, respectively), similar to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of members of the genus Mitovirus. These dsRNAs in F. coeruleum and F. globosum were assigned to the genus Mitovirus (family Narnaviridae), and these two mitoviruses were designated as Fusarium coeruleum mitovirus 1 and Fusarium globosum mitovirus 1. On the other hand, a positive strand of cDNA (1950 bp) from dsRNA in F. solani f. sp. pisi contained an ORF potentially encoding a putative RdRp of 608 amino acids (72.0 kDa). The putative RdRp was shown to be related to those of members of the genus of Alphapartitivirus (family Partitiviridae). We coined the name Fusarium solani partitivirus 2 for dsRNA in F. solani f. sp. pisi.

  14. The intracellular mobility of NPY and a putative mitochondrial form of NPY in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipio, Katja; Pesonen, Ullamari

    2009-01-30

    Preproneuropeptide Y is a precursor peptide to mature neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is a universally expressed peptide in the central and peripheral nervous system. NPY is normally routed to endoplasmic reticulum and secretory vesicles in cells, which secrete NPY. In our previous studies, we found a functional Leucine7 to Proline7 (L7P) polymorphism in the signal peptide sequence of preproNPY. This polymorphism affects the secretion of NPY and causes multiple physiological effects in humans. The sequence of NPY mRNA contains two in frame kozak sequences that allow translation initiation to shift, and translation of two proteins. In addition to mature NPY(1-36) also a putative truncated NPY(17-36) with mitochondrial targeting signal is produced. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protein mobility of the putative mitochondrial fragment and the effect of the L7P polymorphism on the cellular level using GFP tagged constructs. The mobility was studied with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique in a neuronal cell line. We found that the mobility of the secretory vesicles with NPY(1-36) in cells with L7P genotype was increased in comparison to vesicle mobility in cells with the more abundant L7L genotype. The mobility in the cells with the putative mitochondrial construct was found to be very low. According to the results of the present study, the mitochondrial truncated peptide stays in the mitochondrion. It can be hypothesized that this could be one of the factors affecting energy balance of the membranes of the mitochondrion.

  15. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding a putative lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase from Arachis hypogaea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Si-Long Chen; Jia-Quan Huang; Lei Yong; Yue-Ting Zhang; Xiao-Ping Ren; Yu-Ning Chen; Hui-Fang Jiang; Li-Ying Yan; Yu-Rong Li; Bo-Shou Liao

    2012-12-01

    Lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase (LPAT) is the important enzyme responsible for the acylation of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), leading to the generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) in plant. Its encoding gene is an essential candidate for oil crops to improve oil composition and increase seed oil content through genetic engineering. In this study, a full-length AhLPAT4 gene was isolated via cDNA library screening and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE); our data demonstrated that AhLPAT4 had 1631 nucleotides, encoding a putative 43.8 kDa protein with 383 amino acid residues. The deduced protein included a conserved acyltransferase domain and four motifs (I–IV) with putative LPA and acyl-CoA catalytic and binding sites. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that AhLPAT4 contained four transmembrane domains (TMDs), localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane; detailed analysis indicated that motif I and motifs II–III in AhLPAT4 were separated by the third TMD, which located on cytosolic and ER luminal side respectively, and hydrophobic residues on the surface of AhLPAT4 protein fold to form a hydrophobic tunnel to accommodate the acyl chain. Subcellular localization analysis confirmed that AhLPAT4 was a cytoplasm protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AhLPAT4 had a high homology (63.7–78.3%) with putative LPAT4 proteins from Glycine max, Arabidopsis thaliana and Ricinus communis. AhLPAT4 was ubiquitously expressed in diverse tissues except in flower, which is almost undetectable. The expression analysis in different developmental stages in peanut seeds indicated that AhLPAT4 did not coincide with oil accumulation.

  16. Identification of putative rhamnogalacturonan-II specific glycosyltransferases in Arabidopsis using a combination of bioinformatics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voxeur, Aline; André, Aurélie; Breton, Christelle; Lerouge, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is a complex plant cell wall polysaccharide that is composed of an α(1,4)-linked homogalacturonan backbone substituted with four side chains. It exists in the cell wall in the form of a dimer that is cross-linked by a borate di-ester. Despite its highly complex structure, RG-II is evolutionarily conserved in the plant kingdom suggesting that this polymer has fundamental functions in the primary wall organisation. In this study, we have set up a bioinformatics strategy aimed at identifying putative glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in RG-II biosynthesis. This strategy is based on the selection of candidate genes encoding type II membrane proteins that are tightly coexpressed in both rice and Arabidopsis with previously characterised genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of RG-II and exhibiting an up-regulation upon isoxaben treatment. This study results in the final selection of 26 putative Arabidopsis GTs, including 10 sequences already classified in the CAZy database. Among these CAZy sequences, the screening protocol allowed the selection of α-galacturonosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of α4-GalA oligogalacturonides present in both homogalacturonans and RG-II, and two sialyltransferase-like sequences previously proposed to be involved in the transfer of Kdo and/or Dha on the pectic backbone of RG-II. In addition, 16 non-CAZy GT sequences were retrieved in the present study. Four of them exhibited a GT-A fold. The remaining sequences harbored a GT-B like fold and a fucosyltransferase signature. Based on homologies with glycosyltransferases of known functions, putative roles in the RG-II biosynthesis are proposed for some GT candidates.

  17. Novel mutations in the GH gene (GH1) uncover putative splicing regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Deepak; Mellone, Simona; Fusco, Ileana; Petri, Antonella; Walker, Gillian E; Bellone, Simonetta; Prodam, Flavia; Momigliano-Richiardi, Patricia; Bona, Gianni; Giordano, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Mutations affecting exon 3 splicing are the main cause of autosomal dominant Isolated GH Deficiency II (IGHDII) by increasing the level of exon 3-skipped mRNA encoding the functionally inactive dominant-negative 17.5-kDa isoform. The exons and introns of the gene encoding GH (GH1) were screened for the presence of mutations in 103 sporadic isolated GH deficiency cases. Four different variations within exon 3 were identified in 3 patients. One carried c.261C>T (p.Pro87Pro) and c.272A>T (p.Glu91Val), the second c.255G>A (p.Pro85Pro) and c.261 C>T, and the third c.246G>C (p.Glu82Asp). All the variants were likely generated by gene conversion from an homologous gene in the GH1 cluster. In silico analysis predicted that positions c.255 and c.272 were included within 2 putative novel exon splicing enhancers (ESEs). Their effect on splicing was confirmed in vitro. Constructs bearing these 2 variants induced consistently higher levels both of transcript and protein corresponding to the 17.5-kDa isoform. When c.255 and c.272 were combined in cis with the c.261 variant, as in our patients, their effect was weaker. In conclusion, we identified 2 variations, c.255G>A and c.272A>T, located in 2 novel putative exon splicing enhancers and affecting GH1 splicing in vitro by increasing the production of alternatively spliced isoforms. The amount of aberrant isoforms is further regulated by the presence in cis of the c.261 variant. Thus, our results evidenced novel putative splicing regulatory elements within exon 3, confirming the crucial role of this exon in mRNA processing.

  18. A Proteomics Approach to Identify New Putative Cardiac Intercalated Disk Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddarth Soni

    Full Text Available Synchronous beating of the heart is dependent on the efficient functioning of the cardiac intercalated disk (ID. The ID is composed of a complex protein network enabling electrical continuity and chemical communication between individual cardiomyocytes. Recently, several different studies have shed light on increasingly prevalent cardiac diseases involving the ID. Insufficient knowledge of its composition makes it difficult to study these disease mechanisms in more detail and therefore here we aim expand the ID proteome. Here, using a combination of general membrane enrichment, in-depth quantitative proteomics and an intracellular location driven bioinformatics approach, we aim to discover new putative ID proteins in rat ventricular tissue.General membrane isolation, enriched amongst others also with ID proteins as based on presence of the established markers connexin-43 and n-cadherin, was performed using centrifugation. By mass spectrometry, we quantitatively evaluated the level of 3455 proteins in the enriched membrane fraction (EMF and its counterpart, the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. These data were stringently filtered to generate a final set of 97 enriched, putative ID proteins. These included Cx43 and n-cadherin, but also many interesting novel candidates. We selected 4 candidates (Flotillin-2 (FLOT2, Nexilin (NEXN, Popeye-domain-containg-protein 2 (POPDC2 and thioredoxin-related-transmembrane-protein 2 (TMX2 and confirmed their co-localization with n-cadherin in the ID of human and rat heart cryo-sections, and isolated dog cardiomyocytes.The presented proteomics dataset of putative new ID proteins is a valuable resource for future research into this important molecular intersection of the heart.

  19. Two putative-aquaporin genes are differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) are widespread symbioses that provide great advantages to the plant, improving its nutritional status and allowing the fungus to complete its life cycle. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of AM symbiosis are not yet fully deciphered. Here, we have focused on two putative aquaporin genes, LjNIP1 and LjXIP1, which resulted to be upregulated in a transcriptomic analysis performed on mycorrhizal roots of Lotus japonicus. Results A phylogenetic analysis has shown that the two putative aquaporins belong to different functional families: NIPs and XIPs. Transcriptomic experiments have shown the independence of their expression from their nutritional status but also a close correlation with mycorrhizal and rhizobial interaction. Further transcript quantification has revealed a good correlation between the expression of one of them, LjNIP1, and LjPT4, the phosphate transporter which is considered a marker gene for mycorrhizal functionality. By using laser microdissection, we have demonstrated that one of the two genes, LjNIP1, is expressed exclusively in arbuscule-containing cells. LjNIP1, in agreement with its putative role as an aquaporin, is capable of transferring water when expressed in yeast protoplasts. Confocal analysis have demonstrated that eGFP-LjNIP1, under its endogenous promoter, accumulates in the inner membrane system of arbusculated cells. Conclusions Overall, the results have shown different functionality and expression specificity of two mycorrhiza-inducible aquaporins in L. japonicus. One of them, LjNIP1 can be considered a novel molecular marker of mycorrhizal status at different developmental stages of the arbuscule. At the same time, LjXIP1 results to be the first XIP family aquaporin to be transcriptionally regulated during symbiosis. PMID:23046713

  20. Two putative-aquaporin genes are differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus japonicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovannetti Marco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM are widespread symbioses that provide great advantages to the plant, improving its nutritional status and allowing the fungus to complete its life cycle. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of AM symbiosis are not yet fully deciphered. Here, we have focused on two putative aquaporin genes, LjNIP1 and LjXIP1, which resulted to be upregulated in a transcriptomic analysis performed on mycorrhizal roots of Lotus japonicus. Results A phylogenetic analysis has shown that the two putative aquaporins belong to different functional families: NIPs and XIPs. Transcriptomic experiments have shown the independence of their expression from their nutritional status but also a close correlation with mycorrhizal and rhizobial interaction. Further transcript quantification has revealed a good correlation between the expression of one of them, LjNIP1, and LjPT4, the phosphate transporter which is considered a marker gene for mycorrhizal functionality. By using laser microdissection, we have demonstrated that one of the two genes, LjNIP1, is expressed exclusively in arbuscule-containing cells. LjNIP1, in agreement with its putative role as an aquaporin, is capable of transferring water when expressed in yeast protoplasts. Confocal analysis have demonstrated that eGFP-LjNIP1, under its endogenous promoter, accumulates in the inner membrane system of arbusculated cells. Conclusions Overall, the results have shown different functionality and expression specificity of two mycorrhiza-inducible aquaporins in L. japonicus. One of them, LjNIP1 can be considered a novel molecular marker of mycorrhizal status at different developmental stages of the arbuscule. At the same time, LjXIP1 results to be the first XIP family aquaporin to be transcriptionally regulated during symbiosis.

  1. Temporal dynamics and decay of putatively allochthonous and autochthonous viral genotypes in contrasting freshwater lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Ian; Barbosa, Jorge G; Brown, Julia M; Donelan, Ryan P; Eaglesham, James B; Eggleston, Erin M; LaBarre, Brenna A

    2012-09-01

    Aquatic viruses play important roles in the biogeochemistry and ecology of lacustrine ecosystems; however, their composition, dynamics, and interactions with viruses of terrestrial origin are less extensively studied. We used a viral shotgun metagenomic approach to elucidate candidate autochthonous (i.e., produced within the lake) and allochthonous (i.e., washed in from other habitats) viral genotypes for a comparative study of their dynamics in lake waters. Based on shotgun metagenomes prepared from catchment soil and freshwater samples from two contrasting lakes (Cayuga Lake and Fayetteville Green Lake), we selected two putatively autochthonous viral genotypes (phycodnaviruses likely infecting algae and cyanomyoviruses likely infecting picocyanobacteria) and two putatively allochthonous viral genotypes (geminiviruses likely infecting terrestrial plants and circoviruses infecting unknown hosts but common in soil libraries) for analysis by genotype-specific quantitative PCR (TaqMan) applied to DNAs from viruses in the viral size fraction of lake plankton, i.e., 0.2 μm > virus > 0.02 μm. The abundance of autochthonous genotypes largely reflected expected host abundance, while the abundance of allochthonous genotypes corresponded with rainfall and storm events in the respective catchments, suggesting that viruses with these genotypes may have been transported to the lake in runoff. The decay rates of allochthonous and autochthonous genotypes, assessed in incubations where all potential hosts were killed, were generally lower (0.13 to 1.50% h(-1)) than those reported for marine virioplankton but similar to those for freshwater virioplankton. Both allochthonous and autochthonous viral genotypes were detected at higher concentrations in subsurface sediments than at the water-sediment interface. Our data indicate that putatively allochthonous viruses are present in lake plankton and sediments, where their temporal dynamics reflect active transport to the lake during

  2. Further insight into reproductive incompatibility between putative cryptic species of the Bemisia tabaci whitefly complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Pan, Li-Long; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), with its global distribution and extensive genetic diversity, is now known to be a complex of over 35 cryptic species. However, a satisfactory resolution of the systematics of this species complex is yet to be achieved. Here, we designed experiments to examine reproductive compatibility among species with different levels of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) divergence. The data show that putative species with mtCOI divergence of >8% between them consistently exhibited complete reproductive isolation. However, two of the putative species, Asia II 9 and Asia II 3, with mtCOI divergence of 4.47% between them, exhibited near complete reproductive compatibility in one direction of their cross, and partial reproductive compatibility in the other direction. Together with some recent reports on this topic from the literature, our data indicates that, while divergence in the mtCOI sequences provides a valid molecular marker for species delimitation in most clades, more genetic markers and more sophisticated molecular phylogeny will be required to achieve adequate delimitation of all species in this whitefly complex. While many attempts have been made to examine the reproductive compatibility among genetic groups of the B. tabaci complex, our study represents the first effort to conduct crossing experiments with putative species that were chosen with considerations of their genetic divergence. In light of the new data, we discuss the best strategy and protocols to conduct further molecular phylogenetic analysis and crossing trials, in order to reveal the overall pattern of reproductive incompatibility among species of this whitefly complex.

  3. Structure of MERS-CoV spike receptor-binding domain complexed with human receptor DPP4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nianshuang Wang; Xuanling Shi; Liwei Jiang; Senyan Zhang; Dongli Wang; Pei Tong; Dongxing Guo

    2013-01-01

    The spike glycoprotein (S) of recently identified Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) targets the cellular receptor,dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4).Sequence comparison and modeling analysis have revealed a putative receptor-binding domain (RBD) on the viral spike,which mediates this interaction.We report the 3.0 (A)resolution crystal structure of MERS-CoV RBD bound to the extracellular domain of human DPP4.Our results show that MERS-CoV RBD consists of a core and a receptor-binding subdomain.The receptor-binding subdomain interacts with DPP4 p-propeller but not its intrinsic hydrolase domain.MERS-CoV RBD and related SARS-CoV RBD share a high degree of structural similarity in their core subdomains,but are notably divergent in the receptorbinding subdomain.Mutagenesis studies have identified several key residues in the receptor-binding subdomain that are critical for viral binding to DPP4 and entry into the target cell.The atomic details at the interface between MERS-CoV RBD and DPP4 provide structural understanding of the virus and receptor interaction,which can guide development of therapeutics and vaccines against MERS-CoV infection.

  4. Evaluation of two putative susceptibility loci for oral clefts in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, L E; Murray, J C; O'Brien, S;

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL+/-P) and isolated cleft palate (CP) is influenced by genetic variation at several loci and that the relation between specific genetic variants and disease risk may be modified by environmental factors....... The present study evaluated potential associations between CL+/-P and CP and two putative clefting susceptibility loci, MSX1 and TGFB3, using data from a nationwide case-control study conducted in Denmark from 1991 to 1994. The potential effects of interactions between these genes and two common environmental...

  5. Role of putative neurotransmitters in the central gastric antisecretory effect of prostaglandin E2 in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Puurunen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The role of putative neurotransmitters of the central nervous system in the central gastric antisecretory effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was investigated in pylorus-ligated rats. Pretreatment of the rats with an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) prevented the antisecretory effect of the i.c.v. administration of PGE2, whereas pretreatment with 5,6-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6-DHT) plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) had no effect. I.c.v.-administered phentol...

  6. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described.

  7. A specimen of Rhamphorhynchus with soft tissue preservation, stomach contents and a putative coprolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite being known for nearly two centuries, new specimens of the derived non-pterodactyloid pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus continue to be discovered and reveal new information about their anatomy and palaeobiology. Here we describe a specimen held in the collections of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Alberta, Canada that shows both preservation and impressions of soft tissues, and also preserves material interpreted as stomach contents of vertebrate remains and, uniquely, a putative coprolite. The specimen also preserves additional evidence for fibers in the uropatagium.

  8. A putative transglycosylase encoded by SCO4132 influences morphological differentiation and actinorhodin production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei Xie; Ana Zeng; Xiaoting Lv; Qiuxiang Cheng; Zhongjun Qin

    2013-01-01

    Here we report that tgdA,a novel gene encoding a putative transglycosylase,affects both the morphological differentiation and the yield of blue-pigmented compound actinorhodin in Streptomyces coelicolor.The tgdA null mutant displays sparse aerial hyphae and irregular spore chains frequently lacking chromosomal DNA.Elevated actinorhodin production coincides with the overexpression of actⅡ-orf4 in mutant.tgdA expression is temporally and developmentally regulated.The tgdA orthologs in Streptomyces avermilitis and Streptomyces lividans also affect differentiation.

  9. Prevalence of Clinical Periodontitis and Putative Periodontal Pathogens among South Indian Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Tellapragada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of recent understanding of the association of periodontal infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes, the present investigation was undertaken to study the periodontal infections among 390 asymptomatic pregnant women and to find an association of bacterial etiologies with the disease. Prevalence of gingivitis was 38% and clinical periodontitis was 10% among the study population. Subgingival plaque specimens were subjected to multiplex PCR targeting ten putative periodontopathogenic bacteria. Among the periodontitis group, high detection rates of Porphyromonas gingivalis (56%, Prevotella nigrescens (44%, Treponema denticola (32%, and Prevotella intermedius (24% were noted along with significant association with the disease (P<0.05.

  10. A specimen of Rhamphorhynchus with soft tissue preservation, stomach contents and a putative coprolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, David; Henderson, Donald M; Therrien, François; Habib, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite being known for nearly two centuries, new specimens of the derived non-pterodactyloid pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus continue to be discovered and reveal new information about their anatomy and palaeobiology. Here we describe a specimen held in the collections of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Alberta, Canada that shows both preservation and impressions of soft tissues, and also preserves material interpreted as stomach contents of vertebrate remains and, uniquely, a putative coprolite. The specimen also preserves additional evidence for fibers in the uropatagium.

  11. A comparison of the effects of two putative 5-hydroxytryptamine renal prodrugs in normal man.

    OpenAIRE

    LI KAM WA, T. C.; Freestone, S.; Samson, R. R.; JOHNSTON, N. R.; Lee, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of 1 h intravenous infusions of equimolar amounts of two putative 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) renal prodrugs, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP, 10 micrograms kg-1 min-1) and gamma-L-glutamyl-5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (glu-5-HTP, 16.6 micrograms kg-1 min-1) were examined in five healthy male volunteers in a randomised, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. 2. Both compounds increased urinary excretion of 5-HT and there was greater extra-renal formation of 5-HT following 5-HTP administr...

  12. Molecular modelling of the ORL1 receptor and its complex with nociceptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, C M; Moulédous, L; Poda, G; Maigret, B; Meunier, J C

    1998-12-01

    The opioid receptor like (ORL1) receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and regulates a plethora of neurophysiological functions. The structural requirements for receptor activation by its endogenous agonist, nociceptin (FGGFTGARKSARKLANQ), differ markedly from those of the kappa-opioid receptor and its putative peptide agonist, dynorphin A (YGGFLRRIRPKLKWDNQ). In order to probe the functional architecture of the ORL1 receptor, a molecular model of the receptor has been built, including the TM domain and the extra- and intracellular loops. An extended binding site able to accommodate nociceptin-(1-13), the shortest fully active analogue of nociceptin, has been characterized. The N-terminal FGGF tetrapeptide is proposed to bind in a highly conserved region, comprising two distinct hydrophobic pockets in a cavity formed by TM helices 3, 5, 6 and 7, capped by the acidic second extracellular (EL2) loop controlling access to the TM elements of the peptide binding site. The nociceptin conformation provides for the selective preference of the ORL1 receptor for nociceptin over dynorphin A, conferred by residue positions 5 and 6 (TG versus LR), and the favourable interaction of its highly positively charged core (residues 8-13) with the EL2 loop, thought to mediate receptor activation. The functional roles of the EL2 loop and the conserved N-terminal tetrapeptide opioid 'message' binding site are discussed in the context of the different structural requirements of the ORL1 and kappa-opioid receptors for activation.

  13. Control of meristem development by CLAVATA1 receptor kinase and kinase-associated protein phosphatase interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, J.M.; Walker, J.C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Div. of Biological Sciences; Trotochaud, A.E.; Clark, S.E. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1998-08-01

    The CLAVATA1 (CLV1) gene encodes a putative receptor kinase required for the proper balance between cell proliferation and differentiation in Arabidopsis shoot and flower meristems. Impaired CLV1 signaling results in masses of undifferentiated cells at the shoot and floral meristems. Although many putative receptor kinases have been identified in plants, the mechanism of signal transduction mediated by plant receptor-like kinases is largely unknown. One potential effector of receptor kinase signaling is kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP), a protein that binds to multiple plant receptor-like kinases in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. To examine a possible role for KAPP in CLV1-dependent plant development, the interaction of CLV1 and KAPP was investigated in vitro and in vivo. KAPP binds directly to autophosphorylated CLV1 in vitro and co-immunoprecipitates with CLV1 in plant extracts derived from meristematic tissue. Reduction of KAPP transcript accumulation in an intermediate clv1 mutant suppresses the mutant phenotype, and the degree of suppression is inversely correlated with KAPP mRNA levels. These data suggest that KAPP functions as a negative regulator of CLV1 signaling in plant development. This may represent a general model for the interaction of KAPP with receptor kinases.

  14. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  15. Expression, regulation and putative nutrient-sensing function of taste GPCRs in the heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon R Foster

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are critical for cardiovascular physiology. Cardiac cells express >100 nonchemosensory GPCRs, indicating that important physiological and potential therapeutic targets remain to be discovered. Moreover, there is a growing appreciation that members of the large, distinct taste and odorant GPCR families have specific functions in tissues beyond the oronasal cavity, including in the brain, gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. To date, these chemosensory GPCRs have not been systematically studied in the heart. We performed RT-qPCR taste receptor screens in rodent and human heart tissues that revealed discrete subsets of type 2 taste receptors (TAS2/Tas2 as well as Tas1r1 and Tas1r3 (comprising the umami receptor are expressed. These taste GPCRs are present in cultured cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts, and by in situ hybridization can be visualized across the myocardium in isolated cardiac cells. Tas1r1 gene-targeted mice (Tas1r1(Cre/Rosa26(tdRFP strikingly recapitulated these data. In vivo taste receptor expression levels were developmentally regulated in the postnatal period. Intriguingly, several Tas2rs were upregulated in cultured rat myocytes and in mouse heart in vivo following starvation. The discovery of taste GPCRs in the heart opens an exciting new field of cardiac research. We predict that these taste receptors may function as nutrient sensors in the heart.

  16. CXCL12 chemokine and GABA neurotransmitter systems crosstalk and their putative roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyon eAlice

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Since CXCL12 and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, have been found in the brain, the role of this chemokine has been expanded from chemoattractant in the immune system to neuromodulatory in the brain. Several pieces of evidence suggest that this chemokine system could crosstalk with the GABAergic system, known to be the main inhibitory neurotransmitter system in the brain. Indeed, GABA and CXCL12 as well as their receptors are colocalized in many cell types including neurons and there are several examples in which these two systems interact. Several mechanisms can be proposed to explain how these systems interact, including receptor-receptor interactions, crosstalk at the level of second messenger cascades, or direct pharmacological interactions, as GABA and GABAB receptor agonists/antagonists have been shown to be allosteric modulators of CXCR4.The interplay between CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 and GABA/GABAA-GABAB receptors systems could have many physiological implications in neurotransmission, cancer and inflammation. In addition, the GABAB agonist baclofen is currently used in medicine to treat spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and other disorders. More recently it has also been used in the treatment of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. The allosteric effects of this agent on CXCR4 could contribute to these beneficial effects or at the opposite, to its side effects.

  17. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of t

  18. Mammalian Sweet Taste Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Greg; Hoon, Mark A; Chandrashekar, Jayaram; Zhang, Yifeng; Ryba, Nicholas J.P; Zuker, Charles S

    2001-01-01

    ... and information coding, and have focused on the isolation and characterization of genes encoding sweet and bitter taste receptors. The identification of taste receptors generates powerful molecular tools to investigate not only the function of taste receptor cells, but also the logic of taste coding. For example, defining the size and diversity of the re...

  19. On the Origin of the Supergiant HI Shell and Putative Companion in NGC 6822

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, John M; Weisz, Daniel R; Skillman, Evan D; Dolphin, Andrew E; Bigiel, Frank; Cole, Andrew A; de Blok, W J G; Walter, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging of six positions spanning 5.8 kpc of the HI major axis of the Local Group dIrr NGC 6822, including both the putative companion galaxy and the large HI hole. The resulting deep color magnitude diagrams show that NGC 6822 has formed >50% of its stars in the last ~5 Gyr. The star formation histories of all six positions are similar over the most recent 500 Myr, including low-level star formation throughout this interval and a weak increase in star formation rate during the most recent 50 Myr. Stellar feedback can create the giant HI hole, assuming that the lifetime of the structure is longer than 500 Myr; such long-lived structures have now been observed in multiple systems and may be the norm in galaxies with solid-body rotation. The old stellar populations (red giants and red clump stars) of the putative companion are consistent with those of the extended halo of NGC 6822; this argues against the interpretation of this structure as a bon...

  20. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE SUPERGIANT H I SHELL AND PUTATIVE COMPANION IN NGC 6822

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, John M.; O' Leary, Erin M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Cole, Andrew A.; Walter, Fabian [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart 7001, Tasmania (Australia); De Blok, W.J.G., E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: eoleary@macalester.edu, E-mail: dweisz@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com, E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de, E-mail: andrew.cole@utas.edu.au, E-mail: edeblok@ast.uct.ac.za, E-mail: walter@mpia.de [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2012-03-10

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging of six positions spanning 5.8 kpc of the H I major axis of the Local Group dIrr NGC 6822, including both the putative companion galaxy and the large H I hole. The resulting deep color-magnitude diagrams show that NGC 6822 has formed >50% of its stars in the last {approx}5 Gyr. The star formation histories of all six positions are similar over the most recent 500 Myr, including low-level star formation throughout this interval and a weak increase in star formation rate during the most recent 50 Myr. Stellar feedback can create the giant H I hole, assuming that the lifetime of the structure is longer than 500 Myr; such long-lived structures have now been observed in multiple systems and may be the norm in galaxies with solid-body rotation. The old stellar populations (red giants and red clump stars) of the putative companion are consistent with those of the extended halo of NGC 6822; this argues against the interpretation of this structure as a bona fide interacting companion galaxy and against its being linked to the formation of the H I hole via an interaction. Since there is no evidence in the stellar population of a companion galaxy, the most likely explanation of the extended H I structure in NGC 6822 is a warped disk inclined to the line of sight.

  1. Transcriptome-Based Examination of Putative Pollen Allergens of Rice(Oryza sativa ssp.japonica)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott D.Russell; Prem L Bhalla; Mohan B.Singh

    2008-01-01

    Pollen allergens are among the most abundantly transcribed and translated products in the Iife history of plants,and particularly grasses.To identify different pollen allergens in rice,putative allergens were identified in the rice genome and their expression characterized using the Affymetrix 57K rice GeneChip microarray.Among the most abundant pollen-specific candidate transcripts were Ory s 1 beta-expansin.Ory s 2,Ory s 7 EFhand,Ory s 11,Ory s 12 profilin A,Ory s 23,glycosyl hydrolase family 28(polygalacturonase).and FAD binding proteins.Highly expressed pollen proteins are frequently present in multiple copy numbers,sometimes with mirror images Iocated on nearby regions of the opposite DNA strand.Many of these are intronless and inserted as copies that retain nearly exact copies of their regulatory elements.Ory s 23 reflects low variability and high copy number,suggesting recent gene amplification.Some copies contain pseudogenes,which may reflect their origin through activity of retrotransposition;some putative allergenic sequences bear fusion products with repeat sequences of transposable elements(LTRs).The abundance of nearby repetitive sequences,activation of transposable elements.and high production of mRNA transcripts appear to coincide in pollen and may contribute to a syndrome in which highly transcribed proteins may be copied and inserted with streamlined features for translation,including grouping and removaI of introns.

  2. Identification of putative DnaN-binding motifs in plasmid replication initiation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Brian P; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Wijffels, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Recently the plasmid RK2 replication initiation protein, TrfA, has been shown to bind to the beta subunit of DNA Polymerase III (DnaN) via a short pentapeptide with the consensus QL[S/D]LF. A second consensus peptide, the hexapeptide QLxLxL, has also been demonstrated to mediate binding to DnaN. Here we describe the results of a comprehensive survey of replication initiation proteins encoded by bacterial plasmids to identify putative DnaN-binding sites. Both pentapeptide and hexapeptide motifs have been identified in a number of families of replication initiation proteins. The distribution of sites is sporadic and closely related families of proteins may differ in the presence, location, or type of putative DnaN-binding motif. Neither motif has been identified in replication initiation proteins encoded by plasmids that replicate via rolling circles or strand displacement. The results suggest that the recruitment of DnaN to the origin of replication of a replisome by plasmid replication initiation proteins is not generally required for plasmid replication, but that in some cases it may be beneficial for efficiency of replication initiation.

  3. Uncovering the Putative B-Star Binary Companion of the SN 1993J Progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Ori D; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Filippenko, Alexei V; Fransson, Claes; Matheson, Thomas; Cenko, S Bradley; Chandra, Poonam; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Li, Weidong; Parker, Alex H; Smith, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The Type IIb supernova (SN) 1993J is one of only a few stripped-envelope supernovae with a progenitor star identified in pre-explosion images. SN IIb models typically invoke H envelope stripping by mass transfer in a binary system. For the case of SN 1993J, the models suggest that the companion grew to 22 M_solar and became a source of ultraviolet (UV) excess. Located in M81, at a distance of only 3.6 Mpc, SN 1993J offers one of the best opportunities to detect the putative companion and test the progenitor model. Previously published near-UV spectra in 2004 showed evidence for absorption lines consistent with a hot (B2 Ia) star, but the field was crowded and dominated by flux from the SN. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of SN 1993J from 2012, at which point the flux from the SN had faded sufficiently to potentially measure the UV continuum properties from the putative companion. The resulting UV spectrum is consistent ...

  4. Evolution and structural diversification of PILS putative auxin carriers in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eFeraru

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The phytohormone auxin contributes to virtually every aspect of the plant development. The spatiotemporal distribution of auxin depends on a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and intercellular auxin transport. Intracellular auxin compartmentalization provides another link between auxin transport processes and auxin metabolism. The PIN-LIKES (PILS putative auxin carriers localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and contribute to cellular auxin homeostasis. PILS proteins regulate intracellular auxin accumulation, the rate of auxin conjugation and subsequently, affect nuclear auxin signalling. Here, we investigate sequence diversification of the PILS family in Arabidopsis thaliana and provide insights into the evolution of these novel putative auxin carriers in plants. Our data suggest that PILS proteins are conserved throughout the plant lineage and expanded during higher plant evolution. PILS proteins diversified early during plant evolution into three clades. Besides the ancient Clade I encompassing non-land plant species, PILS proteins evolved into two clades. The diversification of Clade II and Clade III occurred already at the level of non-vascular plant evolution and, hence, both clades contain vascular and non-vascular plant species. Nevertheless, Clade III contains fewer non- and increased numbers of vascular plants, indicating higher importance of Clade III for vascular plant evolution. Notably, PILS proteins are distinct and appear evolutionarily older than the prominent PIN-FORMED auxin carriers. Moreover, we revealed particular PILS sequence divergence in Arabidopsis and assume that these alterations could contribute to distinct gene regulations and protein functions.

  5. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar; Haque, Abdul; De Zorzi, Rita; Mirza, Osman; Walz, Thomas; Rahman, Moazur

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874 conferred resistance to at least ten of the tested antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which were drugs of choice to treat S. Typhi infections. Cell-based functional studies using ethidium bromide and acriflavine showed that STY4874 functions as a H(+)-dependent exporter. These results suggest that STY4874 may be an important drug target, which can now be tested by studying the susceptibility of a STY4874-deficient S. Typhi strain to antimicrobials.

  6. Mutation analysis of novel human liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Liao; Tsai-Ping Li; Mu-Jun Zhao; Jing Zhao; Hai Song; Pascal Pineau; Agnès Marchio; Anne Dejean; Pierre Tiollais; Hong-Yang Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To find the point mutations meaningful for inactivationof liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene (LPTS) gene,a human novel liver-related putative tumor suppressor geneand telomerase inhibitor in hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: The entire coding sequence of LPTS genewas examined for mutations by single strand conformationpolymorphism (SSCP) assay and PCR products directsequencing in 56 liver cancer cell lines, 7 ovarian cancerand 7 head & neck tumor cell lines and 70 pairs of HCCtissues samples. The cDNA fragment coding for the mostfrequent mutant protein was subcloned into GST fusionexpression vector. The product was expressed in E. coliand purified by glutathione-agarose column. Telomericrepeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays wereperformed to study the effect of point mutation totelomerase inhibitory activity.RESULTS: SSCP gels showed the abnormal shifting bandsand DNA sequencing found that there were 5 differentmutations and/or polymorphisms in 12 tumor cell lineslocated at exon2, exon5 and exon7. The main alterationswere A(778)A/G and A(880)T in exon7. The change in siteof 778 could not be found in HCC tissue samples, while themutation in position 880 was seen in 7 (10 %) cases. Themutation in the site of 880 had no effect on telomeraseinhibitory activity.CONCLUSION: Alterations identified in this study arepolymorphisms of LPTS gene. LPTS mutations occur in HCCbut are infrequent and of little effect on the telomeraseinhibitory function of the protein. Epigenetics, such asmethylation, acetylation, may play the key role in inactivationof LPTS.

  7. Expression of putative virulence factors in the potato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtsmark, Ingrid; Takle, Gunnhild W; Brurberg, May Bente

    2008-02-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus is the causal agent of bacterial wilt and ring rot of potato. So far, only two proteins have been shown to be essential for virulence, namely a plasmid-encoded cellulase CelA and a hypersensitive response-inducing protein. We have examined the relative expression of CelA and eight putative virulence factors during infection of potato and in liquid culture, using quantitative real-time PCR. The examined putative virulence genes were celB, a cellulase-encoding gene and genes encoding a pectate lyase, a xylanase and five homologues of the Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis pathogenicity factor Pat-1 thought to encode a serine protease. Six of the nine assayed genes were up-regulated during infection of potato, including celA, celB, the xylanase gene, and two of the pat genes. The pectate lyase gene showed only slightly elevated expression, whereas three of the five examined pat genes were down-regulated during infection in potato. Interestingly, the two up-regulated pat genes showed a noticeable sequence difference compared to the three down-regulated pat genes. These results reveal several new proteins that are likely to be involved in Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus pathogenicity.

  8. Transcriptome of Aphanomyces euteiches: new oomycete putative pathogenicity factors and metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Gaulin

    Full Text Available Aphanomyces euteiches is an oomycete pathogen that causes seedling blight and root rot of legumes, such as alfalfa and pea. The genus Aphanomyces is phylogenically distinct from well-studied oomycetes such as Phytophthora sp., and contains species pathogenic on plants and aquatic animals. To provide the first foray into gene diversity of A. euteiches, two cDNA libraries were constructed using mRNA extracted from mycelium grown in an artificial liquid medium or in contact to plant roots. A unigene set of 7,977 sequences was obtained from 18,864 high-quality expressed sequenced tags (ESTs and characterized for potential functions. Comparisons with oomycete proteomes revealed major differences between the gene content of A. euteiches and those of Phytophthora species, leading to the identification of biosynthetic pathways absent in Phytophthora, of new putative pathogenicity genes and of expansion of gene families encoding extracellular proteins, notably different classes of proteases. Among the genes specific of A. euteiches are members of a new family of extracellular proteins putatively involved in adhesion, containing up to four protein domains similar to fungal cellulose binding domains. Comparison of A. euteiches sequences with proteomes of fully sequenced eukaryotic pathogens, including fungi, apicomplexa and trypanosomatids, allowed the identification of A. euteiches genes with close orthologs in these microorganisms but absent in other oomycetes sequenced so far, notably transporters and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, and suggests the presence of a defense mechanism against oxidative stress which was initially characterized in the pathogenic trypanosomatids.

  9. Characterization of Putative cis-Regulatory Elements in Genes Preferentially Expressed in Arabidopsis Male Meiocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is essential for plant reproduction because it is the process during which homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, and meiotic recombination occur. The meiotic transcriptome is difficult to investigate because of the size of meiocytes and the confines of anther lobes. The recent development of isolation techniques has enabled the characterization of transcriptional profiles in male meiocytes of Arabidopsis. Gene expression in male meiocytes shows unique features. The direct interaction of transcription factors (TFs with DNA regulatory sequences forms the basis for the specificity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we identified putative cis-regulatory elements (CREs associated with male meiocyte-expressed genes using in silico tools. The upstream regions (1 kb of the top 50 genes preferentially expressed in Arabidopsis meiocytes possessed conserved motifs. These motifs are putative binding sites of TFs, some of which share common functions, such as roles in cell division. In combination with cell-type-specific analysis, our findings could be a substantial aid for the identification and experimental verification of the protein-DNA interactions for the specific TFs that drive gene expression in meiocytes.

  10. Identification and site of action of the remaining four putative pseudouridine synthases in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, M; Kaya, Y; Ofengand, J

    2001-11-01

    There are 10 known putative pseudouridine synthase genes in Escherichia coli. The products of six have been previously assigned, one to formation of the single pseudouridine in 16S RNA, three to the formation of seven pseudouridines in 23S RNA, and three to the formation of three pseudouridines in tRNA (one synthase makes pseudouridine in 23S RNA and tRNA). Here we show that the remaining four putative synthase genes make bona fide pseudouridine synthases and identify which pseudouridines they make. RluB (formerly YciL) and RluE (formerly YmfC) make pseudouridine2605 and pseudouridine2457, respectively, in 23S RNA. RluF (formerly YjbC) makes the newly discovered pseudouridine2604 in 23S RNA, and TruC (formerly YqcB) makes pseudouridine65 in tRNA(Ile1) and tRNA(Asp). Deletion of each of these synthase genes individually had no effect on exponential growth in rich media at 25 degrees C, 37 degrees C, or 42 degrees C. A strain lacking RluB and RluF also showed no growth defect under these conditions. Mutation of a conserved aspartate in a common sequence motif, previously shown to be essential for the other six E. coli pseudouridine synthases and several yeast pseudouridine synthases, also caused a loss of in vivo activity in all four of the synthases studied in this work.

  11. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Putative Genes Involved in Iridoid Biosynthesis in Rehmannia glutinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianen Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the Orient, is rich in biologically active iridoids. Despite their medicinal importance, no molecular information about the iridoid biosynthesis in this plant is presently available. To explore the transcriptome of R. glutinosa and investigate genes involved in iridoid biosynthesis, we used massively parallel pyrosequencing on the 454 GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset. Based on sequence similarity searches against the public sequence databases, the sequences were first annotated and then subjected to Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG based analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the 454 assembly contained a set of genes putatively involved in iridoid biosynthesis. Significantly, homologues of the secoiridoid pathway genes that were only identified in terpenoid indole alkaloid producing plants were also identified, whose presence implied that route II iridoids and route I iridoids share common enzyme steps in the early stage of biosynthesis. The gene expression patterns of four prenyltransferase transcripts were analyzed using qRT-PCR, which shed light on their putative functions in tissues of R. glutinosa. The data explored in this study will provide valuable information for further studies concerning iridoid biosynthesis.

  12. Mapping the flow of information within the putative mirror neuron system during gesture observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, Marleen B; Keysers, Christian

    2011-07-01

    The putative mirror neuron system may either function as a strict feed-forward system or as a dynamic control system. A strict feed-forward system would predict that action observation leads to a predominantly temporal→parietal→premotor flow of information in which a visual representation is transformed into motor-programs which contribute to action understanding. Instead, a dynamic feedback control system would predict that the reverse direction of information flow predominates because of a combination of inhibitory forward and excitatory inverse models. Here we test which of these conflicting predictions best matches the information flow within the putative mirror neuron system (pMNS) and between the pMNS and the rest of the brain during the observation of comparatively long naturalistic stretches of communicative gestures. We used Granger causality to test the dominant direction of influence. Our results fit the predictions of the dynamic feedback control system: we found predominantly an information flow within the pMNS from premotor to parietal and middle temporal cortices. This is more pronounced during an active guessing task than while passively reviewing the same gestures. In particular, the ventral premotor cortex sends significantly more information to other pMNS areas than it receives during active guessing than during passive observation.

  13. Identification and functional analysis of Penicillium digitatum genes putatively involved in virulence towards citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Mario; Ballester, Ana-Rosa; González-Candelas, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The fungus Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mould rot, is the most destructive post-harvest pathogen of citrus fruit in Mediterranean regions. In order to identify P. digitatum genes up-regulated during the infection of oranges that may constitute putative virulence factors, we followed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA macroarray hybridization approach. The origin of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was determined by comparison against the available genome sequences of both organisms. Genes coding for fungal proteases and plant cell wall-degrading enzymes represent the largest categories in the subtracted cDNA library. Northern blot analysis of a selection of P. digitatum genes, including those coding for proteases, cell wall-related enzymes, redox homoeostasis and detoxification processes, confirmed their up-regulation at varying time points during the infection process. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was used to generate knockout mutants for two genes encoding a pectin lyase (Pnl1) and a naphthalene dioxygenase (Ndo1). Two independent P. digitatum Δndo1 mutants were as virulent as the wild-type. However, the two Δpnl1 mutants analysed were less virulent than the parental strain or an ectopic transformant. Together, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the putative determinants of the virulence mechanisms of P. digitatum.

  14. Unprecedented diversity of catalytic domains in the first four modules of the putative pederin polyketide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Jörn; Wen, Gaiping; Platzer, Matthias; Hui, Dequan

    2004-01-03

    Polyketides of the pederin group are highly potent antitumor compounds found in terrestrial beetles and marine sponges. Pederin is used by beetles of the genera Paederus and Paederidus as a chemical defense. We have recently identified a group of putative pederin biosynthesis genes and localized them to the genome of an as yet unculturable Pseudomonas sp. symbiont, the likely true pederin producer. However, this polyketide synthase cluster lacks several genes expected for pederin production. Here we report an additional polyketide synthase encoded on a separate region of the symbiont genome. It contains at least three novel catalytic domains that are predicted to be involved in pederin chain initiation and the formation of an unusual exomethylene bond. The region is bordered by mobility pseudogenes; this suggests that gene transposition led to the disjointed cluster organization. With this work, all putative pederin genes have been identified. Their heterologous expression in a culturable bacterium will provide important insights into how sustainable sources of invertebrate-derived drug candidates can be created.

  15. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants.

  16. TiD: Standalone software for mining putative drug targets from bacterial proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Reena; Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Jain, Arun Kumar; Rai, Chandra Shekhar

    2017-01-01

    TiD is a standalone application, which relies on basic assumption that a protein must be essential for pathogens survival and non-homologous with host to qualify as putative target. With an input bacterial proteome, TiD removes paralogous proteins, picks essential ones, and excludes proteins homologous with host organisms. The targets illustrate non-homology with at least 40 out of 84 gut microbes, considered safe for human. TiD classifies proposed targets as known, novel and virulent. Users can perform pathway analysis, choke point analysis, interactome analysis, subcellular localization and functional annotations through web servers cross-referenced with the application. Drug targets identified by TiD for Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have revealed significant overlaps with previous studies. TiD takes <2h to scan putative targets from a bacterial proteome with ~5000 proteins; hence, we propose it as a useful tool for rational drug design. TiD is available at http://bmicnip.in/TiD/. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. VenomKB, a new knowledge base for facilitating the validation of putative venom therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Joseph D; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-11-24

    Animal venoms have been used for therapeutic purposes since the dawn of recorded history. Only a small fraction, however, have been tested for pharmaceutical utility. Modern computational methods enable the systematic exploration of novel therapeutic uses for venom compounds. Unfortunately, there is currently no comprehensive resource describing the clinical effects of venoms to support this computational analysis. We present VenomKB, a new publicly accessible knowledge base and website that aims to act as a repository for emerging and putative venom therapies. Presently, it consists of three database tables: (1) Manually curated records of putative venom therapies supported by scientific literature, (2) automatically parsed MEDLINE articles describing compounds that may be venom derived, and their effects on the human body, and (3) automatically retrieved records from the new Semantic Medline resource that describe the effects of venom compounds on mammalian anatomy. Data from VenomKB may be selectively retrieved in a variety of popular data formats, are open-source, and will be continually updated as venom therapies become better understood.

  18. Small-fragment genomic libraries for the display of putative epitopes from clinically significant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henics, T; Winkler, B; Pfeifer, U; Gill, S R; Buschle, M; von Gabain, A; Meinke, A L

    2003-07-01

    Taking advantage of whole genome sequences of bacterial pathogens in many thriving diseases with global impact, we developed a comprehensive screening procedure for the identification of putative vaccine candidate antigens. Importantly, this procedure relies on highly representative small-fragment genomic libraries that are expressed to display frame-selected epitope-size peptides on a bacterial cell surface and to interact directly with carefully selected disease-relevant high-titer sera. Here we describe the generation of small-fragment genomic libraries of Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinically significant pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia pneumoniae, the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni. Large-scale sequencing revealed that the libraries, which provide an average of 20-fold coverage, were random and, as demonstrated with two S. aureus libraries, highly representative. Consistent with the comprehensive nature of this approach is the identification of epitopes that reside in both annotated and putatively novel open reading frames. The use of these libraries therefore allows for the rapid and direct identification of immunogenic epitopes with no apparent bias or difficulty that often associate with conventional expression methods.

  19. Five putative nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase genes are expressed in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Dos Santos, Odelta; Meirelles, Lúcia Collares; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan that parasitizes the human urogenital tract causing trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease. The parasite has unique genomic characteristics such as a large genome size and expanded gene families. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) is an enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing nucleoside tri- and diphosphates and has already been biochemically characterized in T. vaginalis. Considering the important role of this enzyme in the production of extracellular adenosine for parasite uptake, we evaluated the gene expression of five putative NTPDases in T. vaginalis. We showed that all five putative TvNTPDase genes (TvNTPDase1-5) were expressed by both fresh clinical and long-term grown isolates. The amino acid alignment predicted the presence of the five crucial apyrase conserved regions, transmembrane domains, signal peptides, phosphorylation and catalytic sites. Moreover, a phylogenetic analysis showed that TvNTPDase sequences make up a clade with NTPDases intracellularly located. Biochemical NTPDase activity (ATP and ADP hydrolysis) is responsive to the serum-restrictive conditions and the gene expression of TvNTPDases was mostly increased, mainly TvNTPDase2 and TvNTPDase4, although there was not a clear pattern of expression among them. In summary, the present report demonstrates the gene expression patterns of predicted NTPDases in T. vaginalis.

  20. Functional characterization of PaLAX1, a putative auxin permease, in heterologous plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyerová, Klára; Perry, Lucie; Hand, Paul; Lanková, Martina; Kocábek, Tomás; May, Sean; Kottová, Jana; Paces, Jan; Napier, Richard; Zazímalová, Eva

    2008-03-01

    We have isolated the cDNA of the gene PaLAX1 from a wild cherry tree (Prunus avium). The gene and its product are highly similar in sequences to both the cDNAs and the corresponding protein products of AUX/LAX-type genes, coding for putative auxin influx carriers. We have prepared and characterized transformed Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying the gene PaLAX1. We have proved that constitutive overexpression of PaLAX1 is accompanied by changes in the content and distribution of free indole-3-acetic acid, the major endogenous auxin. The increase in free indole-3-acetic acid content in transgenic plants resulted in various phenotype changes, typical for the auxin-overproducing plants. The uptake of synthetic auxin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, was 3 times higher in transgenic lines compared to the wild-type lines and the treatment with the auxin uptake inhibitor 1-naphthoxyacetic acid reverted the changes caused by the expression of PaLAX1. Moreover, the agravitropic response could be restored by expression of PaLAX1 in the mutant aux1 plants, which are deficient in auxin influx carrier activity. Based on our data, we have concluded that the product of the gene PaLAX1 promotes the uptake of auxin into cells, and, as a putative auxin influx carrier, it affects the content and distribution of free endogenous auxin in transgenic plants.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of the relationship between disease occurrence and distance from a putative source of pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Dreassi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The relation between disease risk and a point source of pollution is usually investigated using distance from the source as a proxy of exposure. The analysis may be based on case-control data or on aggregated data. The definition of the function relating risk of disease and distance is critical, both in a classical and in a Bayesian framework, because the likelihood is usually very flat, even with large amounts of data. In this paper we investigate how the specification of the function relating risk of disease with distance from the source and of the prior distributions on the parameters of the function affects the results when case-control data and Bayesian methods are used. We consider different popular parametric models for the risk distance function in a Bayesian approach, comparing estimates with those derived by maximum likelihood. As an example we have analyzed the relationship between a putative source of environmental pollution (an asbestos cement plant and the occurrence of pleural malignant mesothelioma in the area of Casale Monferrato (Italy in 1987-1993. Risk of pleural malignant mesothelioma turns out to be strongly related to distance from the asbestos cement plant. However, as the models appeared to be sensitive to modeling choices, we suggest that any analysis of disease risk around a putative source should be integrated with a careful sensitivity analysis and possibly with prior knowledge. The choice of prior distribution is extremely important and should be based on epidemiological considerations.

  2. Putative monofunctional type I polyketide synthase units: a dinoflagellate-specific feature?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Eichholz

    Full Text Available Marine dinoflagellates (alveolata are microalgae of which some cause harmful algal blooms and produce a broad variety of most likely polyketide synthesis derived phycotoxins. Recently, novel polyketide synthesase (PKS transcripts have been described from the Florida red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (gymnodiniales which are evolutionarily related to Type I PKS but were apparently expressed as monofunctional proteins, a feature typical of Type II PKS. Here, we investigated expression units of PKS I-like sequences in Alexandrium ostenfeldii (gonyaulacales and Heterocapsa triquetra (peridiniales at the transcript and protein level. The five full length transcripts we obtained were all characterized by polyadenylation, a 3' UTR and the dinoflagellate specific spliced leader sequence at the 5'end. Each of the five transcripts encoded a single ketoacylsynthase (KS domain showing high similarity to K. brevis KS sequences. The monofunctional structure was also confirmed using dinoflagellate specific KS antibodies in Western Blots. In a maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of KS domains from diverse PKSs, dinoflagellate KSs formed a clade placed well within the protist Type I PKS clade between apicomplexa, haptophytes and chlorophytes. These findings indicate that the atypical PKS I structure, i.e., expression as putative monofunctional units, might be a dinoflagellate specific feature. In addition, the sequenced transcripts harbored a previously unknown, apparently dinoflagellate specific conserved N-terminal domain. We discuss the implications of this novel region with regard to the putative monofunctional organization of Type I PKS in dinoflagellates.

  3. Redefining the structure-activity relationships of 2,6-methano-3-benzazocines. 5. Opioid receptor binding properties of N-((4'-phenyl)-phenethyl) analogues of 8-CAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanAlstine, Melissa A; Wentland, Mark P; Cohen, Dana J; Bidlack, Jean M

    2007-12-01

    A series of aryl-containing N-monosubstituted analogues of the lead compound 8-[N-((4'-phenyl)-phenethyl)]-carboxamidocyclazocine were synthesized and evaluated to probe a putative hydrophobic binding pocket of opioid receptors. Very high binding affinity to the mu opioid receptor was achieved though the N-(2-(4'-methoxybiphenyl-4-yl)ethyl) analogue of 8-CAC. High binding affinity to mu and very high binding affinity to kappa opioid receptors was observed for the N-(3-bromophenethyl) analogue of 8-CAC. High binding affinity to all three opioid receptors were observed for the N-(2-naphthylethyl) analogue of 8-CAC.

  4. A Meta-analysis of Multiple Myeloma Risk Regions in African and European Ancestry Populations Identifies Putatively Functional Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Kristin A; Song, Chi; Dean, Eric; Serie, Daniel J; Curtin, Karen; Sheng, Xin; Hu, Donglei; Huff, Carol Ann; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon; Tomasson, Michael H; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Singhal, Seema; Pawlish, Karen; Peters, Edward S; Bock, Cathryn H; Stram, Alex; Van Den Berg, David J; Edlund, Christopher K; Conti, David V; Zimmerman, Todd; Hwang, Amie E; Huntsman, Scott; Graff, John; Nooka, Ajay; Kong, Yinfei; Pregja, Silvana L; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chu, Lisa; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Lieber, Michael R; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hennis, Anselm J M; Hsing, Ann W; Mehta, Jayesh; Kittles, Rick A; Kolb, Suzanne; Klein, Eric A; Leske, Cristina; Murphy, Adam B; Nemesure, Barbara; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Strom, Sara S; Vij, Ravi; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Stanford, Janet L; Signorello, Lisa B; Witte, John S; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bhatti, Parveen; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Olshan, Andrew F; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah J; Bandera, Elisa V; Birmann, Brenda M; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Atanackovic, Djordje; Glenn, Martha J; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Jones, Brandt; Tricot, Guido; Martin, Thomas G; Kumar, Shaji K; Wolf, Jeffrey L; Deming Halverson, Sandra L; Rothman, Nathaniel; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chanock, Stephen J; Slager, Susan L; Severson, Richard K; Janakiraman, Nalini; Terebelo, Howard R; Brown, Elizabeth E; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Mohrbacher, Ann F; Colditz, Graham A; Giles, Graham G; Spinelli, John J; Chiu, Brian C; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Levy, Joan; Zonder, Jeffrey A; Orlowski, Robert Z; Lonial, Sagar; Camp, Nicola J; Vachon, Celine M; Ziv, Elad; Stram, Daniel O; Hazelett, Dennis J; Haiman, Christopher A; Cozen, Wendy

    2016-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in European populations have identified genetic risk variants associated with multiple myeloma. We performed association testing of common variation in eight regions in 1,318 patients with multiple myeloma and 1,480 controls of European ancestry and 1,305 patients with multiple myeloma and 7,078 controls of African ancestry and conducted a meta-analysis to localize the signals, with epigenetic annotation used to predict functionality. We found that variants in 7p15.3, 17p11.2, 22q13.1 were statistically significantly (P < 0.05) associated with multiple myeloma risk in persons of African ancestry and persons of European ancestry, and the variant in 3p22.1 was associated in European ancestry only. In a combined African ancestry-European ancestry meta-analysis, variation in five regions (2p23.3, 3p22.1, 7p15.3, 17p11.2, 22q13.1) was statistically significantly associated with multiple myeloma risk. In 3p22.1, the correlated variants clustered within the gene body of ULK4 Correlated variants in 7p15.3 clustered around an enhancer at the 3' end of the CDCA7L transcription termination site. A missense variant at 17p11.2 (rs34562254, Pro251Leu, OR, 1.32; P = 2.93 × 10(-7)) in TNFRSF13B encodes a lymphocyte-specific protein in the TNF receptor family that interacts with the NF-κB pathway. SNPs correlated with the index signal in 22q13.1 cluster around the promoter and enhancer regions of CBX7 CONCLUSIONS: We found that reported multiple myeloma susceptibility regions contain risk variants important across populations, supporting the use of multiple racial/ethnic groups with different underlying genetic architecture to enhance the localization and identification of putatively functional alleles. A subset of reported risk loci for multiple myeloma has consistent effects across populations and is likely to be functional. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(12); 1609-18. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Increased natriuretic peptide receptor A and C gene expression in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Aplin, Mark; Strom, Claes C.

    2006-01-01

    Both atrial (ANP) and brain (BNP) natriuretic peptide affect development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis via binding to natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A in the heart. A putative clearance receptor, NPR-C, is believed to regulate cardiac levels of ANP and BNP. The renin-angiotensin system...... also affects cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. In this study we examined the expression of genes for the NPRs in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy. The ANG II type 1 receptor was blocked with losartan (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) to investigate a possible role of the renin-angiotensin system...

  6. Increased natriuretic peptide receptor A and C gene expression in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Aplin, Mark; Strom, Claes C.

    2006-01-01

    Both atrial (ANP) and brain (BNP) natriuretic peptide affect development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis via binding to natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A in the heart. A putative clearance receptor, NPR-C, is believed to regulate cardiac levels of ANP and BNP. The renin-angiotensin system...... also affects cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. In this study we examined the expression of genes for the NPRs in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy. The ANG II type 1 receptor was blocked with losartan (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) to investigate a possible role of the renin-angiotensin system...

  7. [Melatonin receptor agonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland and is involved in the regulation of human sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms. The melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus play a pivotal role in the sleep-wake regulation. Based on the fact that MT1 receptors are involved in human sleep onset process, melatonin receptor agonists have been developed to treat insomnia. In this article, we first reviewed functions of melatonin receptors with special reference to MT1 and MT2, and properties and clinical application of melatonin receptor agonists as hypnotics.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Spider Cupiennius salei Reveals Multiple Putative Cys-Loop Ligand Gated Ion Channel Subunits and an Acetylcholine Binding Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi H Torkkeli

    Full Text Available Invertebrates possess a diverse collection of pentameric Cys-loop ligand gated ion channel (LGIC receptors whose molecular structures, evolution and relationships to mammalian counterparts have been intensely investigated in several clinically and agriculturally important species. These receptors are targets for a variety of control agents that may also harm beneficial species. However, little is known about Cys-loop receptors in spiders, which are important natural predators of insects. We assembled de novo transcriptomes from the central and peripheral nervous systems of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei, a model species for neurophysiological, behavioral and developmental studies. We found 15 Cys-loop receptor subunits that are expected to form anion or cation permeable channels, plus a putative acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP that has only previously been reported in molluscs and one annelid. We used phylogenetic and sequence analysis to compare the spider subunits to homologous receptors in other species and predicted the 3D structures of each protein using the I-Tasser server. The quality of homology models improved with increasing sequence identity to the available high-resolution templates. We found that C. salei has orthologous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, GluCl, pHCl, HisCl and nAChα LGIC subunits to other arthropods, but some subgroups are specific to arachnids, or only to spiders. C. salei sequences were phylogenetically closest to gene fragments from the social spider, Stegodyphus mimosarum, indicating high conservation within the Araneomorphae suborder of spiders. C. salei sequences had similar ligand binding and transmembrane regions to other invertebrate and vertebrate LGICs. They also had motifs associated with high sensitivity to insecticides and antiparasitic agents such as fipronil, dieldrin and ivermectin. Development of truly selective control agents for pest species will require information about

  9. Dopamine receptors and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees Ahmad; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2008-08-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in regulating renal function and blood pressure. Dopamine synthesis and dopamine receptor subtypes have been shown in the kidney. Dopamine acts via cell surface receptors coupled to G proteins; the receptors are classified via pharmacologic and molecular cloning studies into two families, D1-like and D2-like. Two D1-like receptors cloned in mammals, the D1 and D5 receptors (D1A and D1B in rodents), are linked to adenylyl cyclase stimulation. Three D2-like receptors (D2, D3, and D4) have been cloned and are linked mainly to adenylyl cyclase inhibition. Activation of D1-like receptors on the proximal tubules inhibits tubular sodium reabsorption by inhibiting Na/H-exchanger and Na/K-adenosine triphosphatase activity. Reports exist of defective renal dopamine production and/or dopamine receptor function in human primary hypertension and in genetic models of animal hypertension. In humans with essential hypertension, renal dopamine production in response to sodium loading is often impaired and may contribute to hypertension. A primary defect in D1-like receptors and an altered signaling system in proximal tubules may reduce dopamine-mediated effects on renal sodium excretion. The molecular basis for dopamine receptor dysfunction in hypertension is being investigated, and may involve an abnormal posttranslational modification of the dopamine receptor.

  10. Molecular characterization of the Aphis gossypii olfactory receptor gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depan Cao

    Full Text Available The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, is a polyphagous pest that inflicts great damage to cotton yields worldwide. Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by odorant receptors (ORs and ionotropic receptors (IRs, which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, our aim is to identify chemosensory receptors in the cotton aphid genome, as a means to uncover olfactory encoding of the polyphagous feeding habits as well as to aid the discovery of new targets for behavioral interference. We identified a total of 45 candidate ORs and 14 IRs in the cotton aphid genome. Among the candidate AgoORs, 9 are apparent pseudogenes, while 19 can be clustered with ORs from the pea aphid, forming 16 AgoOR/ApOR orthologous subgroups. Among the candidate IRs, we identified homologs of the two highly conserved co-receptors IR8a and IR25a; no AgoIR retain the complete glutamic acid binding domain, suggesting that putative AgoIRs bind different ligands. Our results provide the necessary information for functional characterization of the chemosensory receptors of A. gossypii, with potential for new or refined applications of semiochemicals-based control of this pest insect.

  11. Expression and characterization of purinergic receptors in rat middle meningeal artery-potential role in migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Agmund Haanes

    Full Text Available The dura mater and its vasculature have for decades been central in the hypothesis of migraine and headache pathophysiology. Although recent studies have questioned the role of the vasculature as the primary cause, dural vessel physiology is still relevant in understanding the complex pathophysiology of migraine. The aim of the present study was to isolate the middle meningeal artery (MMA from rodents and characterize their purinergic receptors using a sensitive wire myograph method and RT-PCR. The data presented herein suggest that blood flow through the MMA is, at least in part, regulated by purinergic receptors. P2X1 and P2Y6 receptors are the strongest contractile receptors and, surprisingly, ADPβS caused contraction most likely via P2Y1 or P2Y13 receptors, which is not observed in other arteries. Adenosine addition, however, caused relaxation of the MMA. The adenosine relaxation could be inhibited by SCH58261 (A2A receptor antagonist and caffeine (adenosine receptor antagonist. This gives one putative molecular mechanism for the effect of caffeine, often used as an adjuvant remedy of cranial pain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR expression data for the receptors correlate well with the functional findings. Together these observations could be used as targets for future understanding of the in vivo role of purinergic receptors in the MMA.

  12. The 5-HT7 receptor influences stereotypic behavior in a model of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Peter B; Sutcliffe, J Gregor

    2007-03-13

    The 5-HT7 receptor has been suggested as a new putative target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, especially depression. This hypothesis is based on the finding that antidepressant drugs have relatively high affinity for the 5-HT7 receptor, and that inactivation or blockade of the receptor leads to an antidepressant-like profile in behavioral models and sleep parameters. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is also believed to involve the serotonergic system and is treated using antidepressants, thus it is of interest to study the possible role of the 5-HT7 receptor in this disorder. We have evaluated the effect of inactivation or pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor in three mouse behavioral models that are believed to mimic some of the stereotypic aspects of obsessive-compulsive disorder. In the most well-established behavioral model, marble burying, both inactivation and blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor reduced stereotypic behavior in that the number of marbles buried decreased. In two newer, less well-characterized models, head dipping and plastic-mesh screen chewing, there was no difference between wild-type mice and mice lacking the 5-HT7 receptor. Taken together the data confirms and expands on previous findings that the 5-HT7 receptor is of importance for behaviors affected by antidepressants, and suggests that the 5-HT7 receptor might be of relevance as a target for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  13. Dichotomous Distribution of Putative Cholinergic Interneurons in Mouse Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marking, Sarah; Krosnowski, Kurt; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Sensory information processing in the olfactory bulb (OB) relies on diverse populations of bulbar interneurons. In rodents, the accessory OB (AOB) is divided into two bulbar regions, the anterior (aAOB) and posterior (pAOB), which differ substantially in their circuitry connections and associated behaviors. We previously identified and characterized a large number of morphologically diverse cholinergic interneurons in the main OB (MOB) using transgenic mice to visualize the cell bodies of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons and immunolabeling (Krosnowski et al., 2012)). However, whether there are cholinergic neurons in the AOB is controversial and there is no detailed characterization of such neurons. Using the same line of ChAT(bacterial artificial chromosome, BAC)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice, we investigated cholinergic neurons in the AOB. We found significant differences in the number and location of GFP-expressing (GFP+), putative cholinergic interneurons between the aAOB and pAOB. The highest numbers of GFP+ interneurons were found in the aAOB glomerular layer (aGL) and pAOB mitral/tufted cell layer (pMCL). We also noted a high density of GFP+ interneurons encircling the border region of the pMCL. Interestingly, a small subset of glomeruli in the middle of the GL receives strong MCL GFP+ nerve processes. These local putative cholinergic-innervated glomeruli are situated just outside the aGL, setting the boundary between the pGL and aGL. Many but not all GFP+ neurons in the AOB were weakly labeled with antibodies against ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). We further determined if these GFP+ interneurons differ from other previously characterized interneuron populations in the AOB and found that AOB GFP+ interneurons express neither GABAergic nor dopaminergic markers and most also do not express the glutamatergic marker. Similar to the cholinergic interneurons of the MOB, some AOB GFP+ interneurons

  14. Coral bleaching under thermal stress: putative involvement of host/symbiont recognition mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambutte Sylvie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral bleaching can be defined as the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or their photosynthetic pigments from their cnidarian host. This major disturbance of reef ecosystems is principally induced by increases in water temperature. Since the beginning of the 1980s and the onset of global climate change, this phenomenon has been occurring at increasing rates and scales, and with increasing severity. Several studies have been undertaken in the last few years to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of coral bleaching but the jigsaw puzzle is far from being complete, especially concerning the early events leading to symbiosis breakdown. The aim of the present study was to find molecular actors involved early in the mechanism leading to symbiosis collapse. Results In our experimental procedure, one set of Pocillopora damicornis nubbins was subjected to a gradual increase of water temperature from 28°C to 32°C over 15 days. A second control set kept at constant temperature (28°C. The differentially expressed mRNA between the stressed states (sampled just before the onset of bleaching and the non stressed states (control were isolated by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization. Transcription rates of the most interesting genes (considering their putative function were quantified by Q-RT-PCR, which revealed a significant decrease in transcription of two candidates six days before bleaching. RACE-PCR experiments showed that one of them (PdC-Lectin contained a C-Type-Lectin domain specific for mannose. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that this host gene mediates molecular interactions between the host and the symbionts suggesting a putative role in zooxanthellae acquisition and/or sequestration. The second gene corresponds to a gene putatively involved in calcification processes (Pdcyst-rich. Its down-regulation could reflect a trade-off mechanism leading to the arrest of the mineralization process under stress

  15. Identification of putative drug targets of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 by subtractive genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Musharaf Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prolonged and uncontrolled use of antibiotics in treatment against many pathogens causes the multiple drug resistance. The drug resistance of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 has been evolved, which cause a major disease listeriosis. The drug dose limit against that pathogen was also increased for currently prescribed antibiotics and more often combinational therapy was preferred. Therefore, identification of an extensive novel drug target, unique and essential to the microorganism and subjected to its validation and drug development is imperative. Availability of the total proteome of L. monocytogenes F2365 enabled in silico identification of putative common drug targets and their subcellular localization by subtractive genomics approach. In the present work subtractive genomics approach is used to identify vaccine and drug targets of L. monocytogenes F2365 to speed up the rational drug and vaccine design. It has revealed that out of 2821 reference sequences of the pathogen, 744 represent essential proteins and among them 274 are human non-homolog proteins. Besides, all predicted human non-homologs were then analyzed by subcellular localization servers, in which 46 proteins were identified as surface exposed proteins and can be considered as potential drug and vaccine targets for the pathogen. The 3D structure of two human non-homolog putative drug targets, pantothenate kinase (LmPK and holliday junction resolvase-like protein (LmHJR of L. monocytogenes F2365 were generated by homology modeling program Easymodeller 4.0; a GUI version of modeller. Generated structures were also validated by several online servers. The overall stereochemical quality of the model was assessed by Ramachandran plot analysis that was provided by PROCHECK. ProQ, ERRAT, Pro-SA web and VERIFY 3D of SAVES programs were also used to compute several validation parameters during the evaluation of the model. This protein structure information is important in structure

  16. Genome-wide analysis of putative peroxiredoxin in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Hongli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic prokaryotes with wide variations in genome sizes and ecological habitats. Peroxiredoxin (PRX is an important protein that plays essential roles in protecting own cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS. PRXs have been identified from mammals, fungi and higher plants. However, knowledge on cyanobacterial PRXs still remains obscure. With the availability of 37 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of PRXs and explored their diversity, distribution, domain structure and evolution. Results Overall 244 putative prx genes were identified, which were abundant in filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Acaryochloris marina MBIC 11017, and unicellular cyanobacteria inhabiting freshwater and hot-springs, while poor in all Prochlorococcus and marine Synechococcus strains. Among these putative genes, 25 open reading frames (ORFs encoding hypothetical proteins were identified as prx gene family members and the others were already annotated as prx genes. All 244 putative PRXs were classified into five major subfamilies (1-Cys, 2-Cys, BCP, PRX5_like, and PRX-like according to their domain structures. The catalytic motifs of the cyanobacterial PRXs were similar to those of eukaryotic PRXs and highly conserved in all but the PRX-like subfamily. Classical motif (CXXC of thioredoxin was detected in protein sequences from the PRX-like subfamily. Phylogenetic tree constructed of catalytic domains coincided well with the domain structures of PRXs and the phylogenies based on 16s rRNA. Conclusions The distribution of genes encoding PRXs in different unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria especially those sub-families like PRX-like or 1-Cys PRX correlate with the genome size, eco-physiology, and physiological properties of the organisms. Cyanobacterial and eukaryotic PRXs share similar conserved motifs, indicating that cyanobacteria adopt similar catalytic

  17. Identification of a putative protein profile associated with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E; den Bakker, Michael A; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W M; Luider, Theo M; Foekens, John A; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2009-06-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that are associated with tamoxifen resistance is a first step toward better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer using nano-LC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on approximately 5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to approximately 550 ng of protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n = 24 and n = 27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag reference databases. A total of 17,263 unique peptides were identified that corresponded to 2,556 non-redundant proteins identified with > or = 2 peptides. 1,713 overlapping proteins between the two data sets were used for further analysis. Comparative proteome analysis revealed 100 putatively differentially abundant proteins between tamoxifen-sensitive and tamoxifen-resistant tumors. The presence and relative abundance for 47 differentially abundant proteins were verified by targeted nano-LC-MS/MS in a selection of unpooled, non-microdissected discovery set tumor tissue extracts. ENPP1, EIF3E, and GNB4 were significantly associated with progression-free survival upon tamoxifen treatment for recurrent disease. Differential abundance of our top discriminating protein, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, was validated by tissue microarray in an independent patient cohort (n = 156). Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer levels were

  18. Genome-wide analysis of putative peroxiredoxin in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic prokaryotes with wide variations in genome sizes and ecological habitats. Peroxiredoxin (PRX) is an important protein that plays essential roles in protecting own cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS). PRXs have been identified from mammals, fungi and higher plants. However, knowledge on cyanobacterial PRXs still remains obscure. With the availability of 37 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of PRXs and explored their diversity, distribution, domain structure and evolution. Results Overall 244 putative prx genes were identified, which were abundant in filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Acaryochloris marina MBIC 11017, and unicellular cyanobacteria inhabiting freshwater and hot-springs, while poor in all Prochlorococcus and marine Synechococcus strains. Among these putative genes, 25 open reading frames (ORFs) encoding hypothetical proteins were identified as prx gene family members and the others were already annotated as prx genes. All 244 putative PRXs were classified into five major subfamilies (1-Cys, 2-Cys, BCP, PRX5_like, and PRX-like) according to their domain structures. The catalytic motifs of the cyanobacterial PRXs were similar to those of eukaryotic PRXs and highly conserved in all but the PRX-like subfamily. Classical motif (CXXC) of thioredoxin was detected in protein sequences from the PRX-like subfamily. Phylogenetic tree constructed of catalytic domains coincided well with the domain structures of PRXs and the phylogenies based on 16s rRNA. Conclusions The distribution of genes encoding PRXs in different unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria especially those sub-families like PRX-like or 1-Cys PRX correlate with the genome size, eco-physiology, and physiological properties of the organisms. Cyanobacterial and eukaryotic PRXs share similar conserved motifs, indicating that cyanobacteria adopt similar catalytic mechanisms as eukaryotes. All

  19. A new perspective on cannabinoid signalling: complementary localization of fatty acid amide hydrolase and the CB1 receptor in rat brain.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    CB1-type cannabinoid receptors in the brain mediate effects of the drug cannabis. Anandamide and sn-2 arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) are putative endogenous ligands for CB1 receptors, but it is not known which cells in the brain produce these molecules. Recently, an enzyme which catalyses hydrolysis of anandamide and 2-AG, known as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), was identified in mammals. Here we have analysed the distribution of FAAH in rat brain and compared its cellular localization with C...

  20. General synthesis of β-alanine-containing spider polyamine toxins and discovery of nephila polyamine toxins 1 and 8 as highly potent inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Simon; Poulsen, Mette H; Nørager, Niels G; Barslund, Anne F; Bach, Tinna B; Kristensen, Anders S; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-11-26

    Certain spiders contain large pools of polyamine toxins, which are putative pharmacological tools awaiting further discovery. Here we present a general synthesis strategy for this class of toxins and prepare five structurally varied polyamine toxins. Electrophysiological testing at three ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes reveals that two of these, Nephila polyamine toxins 1 (NPTX-1) and 8 (NPTX-8), comprise intriguing pharmacological activities by having subnanomolar IC(50) values at kainate receptors.

  1. Sequencing and characterizing odorant receptors of the cerambycid beetle Megacyllene caryae

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Robert F.; Hughes, David T.; Luetje, Charles W.; Millar, Jocelyn G.; Soriano-Agatón, Flor; Hanks, Lawrence M.; Robertson, Hugh M.

    2012-01-01

    Odorant receptors (Ors) are a unique family of ligand-gated ion channels and the primary mechanism by which insects detect volatile chemicals. Here, we describe 57 putative Ors sequenced from an antennal transcriptome of the cerambycid beetle Megacyllene caryae (Gahan). The male beetles produce a pheromone blend of nine components, and we functionally characterized Ors tuned to three of these chemicals: receptor McOr3 is sensitive to (S)-2-methyl-1-butanol; McOr20 is sensitive to (2S,3R)-2,3-...

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  4. Antiviral Activities and Putative Identification of Compounds in Microbial Extracts from the Hawaiian Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanan Lu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine environments are a rich source of significant bioactive compounds. The Hawaiian archipelago, located in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, hosts diverse microorganisms, including many endemic species. Thirty-eight microbial extracts from Hawaiian coastal waters were evaluated for their antiviral activity against four mammalian viruses including herpes simplex virus type one (HSV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, vaccinia virus and poliovirus type one (poliovirus-1 using in vitro cell culture assay. Nine of the 38 microbial crude extracts showed antiviral potencies and three of these nine microbial extracts exhibited significant activity against the enveloped viruses. A secosteroid, 5α(H,17α(H,(20R-beta-acetoxyergost-8(14-ene was putatively identified and confirmed to be the active compound in these marine microbial extracts. These results warrant future in-depth tests on the isolation of these active elements in order to explore and validate their antiviral potential as important therapeutic remedies.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis evolutionary pathogenesis and its putative impact on drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Chevalier, Fabien; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Majlessi, Laleh; Herrmann, Jean Louis; Brosch, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human TB, is the most important mycobacterial pathogen in terms of global patient numbers and gravity of disease. The molecular mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis causes disease are complex and the result of host-pathogen coevolution that might have started already in the time of its Mycobacterium canettii-like progenitors. Despite research progress, M. tuberculosis still holds many secrets of its successful strategy for circumventing host defences, persisting in the host and developing resistance, which makes anti-TB treatment regimens extremely long and often inefficient. Here, we discuss what we have learned from recent studies on the evolution of the pathogen and its putative new drug targets that are essential for mycobacterial growth under in vitro or in vivo conditions.

  6. Expression of putative markers of pluripotency in equine embryonic and adult tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Cristina L; Sharma, Ruchi; Dawson, Lucy; Taylor, Sarah E; Pearson, Gemma; Keen, John A; McDonald, Kieran; Aurich, Christine; Donadeu, F Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Expression of several putative markers of pluripotency (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28A, REX1, DNMT3B and TERT) was examined in a range of equine tissues, including early embryos, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), testis, adipose- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), and keratinocytes. Transcript levels of all markers were highest in embryos and iPSCs and, except for SOX2, were very low or undetectable in keratinocytes. Mean expression levels of all markers were lower in testis than in embryos or iPSCs and, except for DNMT3B, were higher in testis than in MSCs. Expression of OCT4, NANOG and DNMT3B, but not the other markers, was detected in MSCs. Of all markers analysed, only LIN28A, REX1 and TERT were associated exclusively with pluripotent cells in the horse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I; Brown, Eric C; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H H; Gejman, Pablo V

    2015-08-15

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms.

  8. White Matter Abnormalities and Animal Models Examining a Putative Role of Altered White Matter in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyun Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder affecting about 1% of the population worldwide. Although the dopamine (DA hypothesis is still keeping a dominant position in schizophrenia research, new advances have been emerging in recent years, which suggest the implication of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. In this paper, we will briefly review some of recent human studies showing white matter abnormalities in schizophrenic brains and altered oligodendrocyte-(OL- and myelin-related genes in patients with schizophrenia and will consider abnormal behaviors reported in patients with white matter diseases. Following these, we will selectively introduce some animal models examining a putative role of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. The emphasis will be put on the cuprizone (CPZ model. CPZ-fed mice show demyelination and OLs loss, display schizophrenia-related behaviors, and have higher DA levels in the prefrontal cortex. These features suggest that the CPZ model is a novel animal model of schizophrenia.

  9. Identification of a putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene in Gracilaria lemaneiformis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyte)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueying; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2008-08-01

    A putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene, designated as SSH466 (GenBank accession No. DQ019223), was one of the genes identified in this work using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method in Gracilaria lemaneiformis. The full length of the gene was obtained using SMART RACE strategy. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene had 1 019 nucleotides, including an open reading frame of 498 nucleotides encoding 166 amino acid residues, 158 nucleotides of 5' untranslated region and 363 nucleotides of 3' non-coding region. Protein motif and secondary structure prediction showed that there existed a transmembrane domain with a unique β-sheet. Thus, SSH466 protein might be a cross-membrane protein. Sequence homology search in the public GenBank databases did not reveal any significant match with SSH466. Virtual Northern blot analysis confirmed that it was a tetrasporophyte-specific gene.

  10. Comparative genomics study for identification of putative drug targets in Salmonella typhi Ty2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, Nisha; Waqar, Maleeha; Batool, Sidra

    2016-01-15

    Typhoid presents a major health concern in developing countries with an estimated annual infection rate of 21 million. The disease is caused by Salmonella typhi, a pathogenic bacterium acquiring multiple drug resistance. We aim to identify proteins that could prove to be putative drug targets in the genome of S. typhi str. Ty2. We employed comparative and subtractive genomics to identify targets that are absent in humans and are essential to S. typhi Ty2. We concluded that 46 proteins essential to pathogen are absent in the host genome. Filtration on the basis of drug target prioritization singled out 20 potentially therapeutic targets. Their absence in the host and specificity to S. typhi Ty2 makes them ideal targets for treating typhoid in Homo sapiens. 3D structures of two of the final target enzymes, MurA and MurB have been predicted via homology modeling which are then used for a docking study.

  11. Keratin 15 promoter targets putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaping; Lyle, Stephen; Yang, Zaixin; Cotsarelis, George

    2003-11-01

    Putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge are thought to play pivotal roles in the homeostasis, aging, and carcinogenesis of the cutaneous epithelium. Elucidating the role of bulge cells in these processes has been hampered by the lack of gene promoters that target this area with specificity. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse keratin 15 (K15) promoter and demonstrate its utility for preferentially targeting hair follicle bulge cells in adult K15/lacZ transgenic mice. We found that patterns of K15 expression and promoter activity changed with age and correlated with levels of differentiation within the cutaneous epithelium; less differentiated keratinocytes in the epidermis of the neonatal mouse and in the bulge area of the adult mouse preferentially expressed K15. These findings demonstrate the utility of the K15 promoter for targeting epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and set the stage for elucidating the role of bulge cells in skin biology.

  12. Exploring the putative self-binding property of the human farnesyltransferase alpha-subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Anna; Müller, Grit; Manthey, Iris; Bachmann, Hagen Sjard

    2017-09-26

    Farnesylation is an important post-translational protein modification in eukaryotes. Farnesylation is performed by protein farnesyltransferase, a heterodimer composed of an α- (FTα) and a β-subunit. Recently, homo-dimerization of truncated rat and yeast FTα has been detected, suggesting a new role for FTα homodimers in signal transduction. We investigated the putative dimerization behaviour of human and rat FTα. Different in vitro and in vivo approaches revealed no self-dimerization and a presumably artificial formation of homo-trimers and higher homo-oligomers in vitro. Our study contributes to the clarification of the physiological features of FTase in different species and may be important for the ongoing development of FTase inhibitors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of calcium-transporting ATPases of Entamoeba histolytica and cellular localization of the putative SERCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Higuera, Aarón; Salas-Casas, Andrés; Calixto-Gálvez, Mercedes; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Pérez-Ishiwara, D Guillermo; Ximénez, Cecilia; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2013-09-01

    Calcium has an important role on signaling of different cellular processes in the protozoa parasite Entamoeba histolytica, including development and pathogenesis. However, the systems that control calcium responses in this parasite are incompletely understood. Calcium-ATPases (Ca(2+)-ATPases) are proteins that play an important role in calcium homeostasis by catalyzing the active efflux of this ion from cytoplasm and are essential to the correct functioning of the cell machinery. Here, we reported the identification of five E. histolytica genes encoding putative Ca(2+)-ATPases, three related to PMCA, and two related to organellar ATPases. RT-PCR assays showed that all those genes are expressed in trophozoites and specific antibodies against the SERCA-like member located this protein in a continuous cytoplasmic network, supporting the hypothesis that it corresponds to the Ca(2+)-ATPase responsible to sequester calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of this parasite.

  14. PLCζ or PAWP: revisiting the putative mammalian sperm factor that triggers egg activation and embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashir, Junaid; Nomikos, Michail; Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, egg activation is initiated by multiple cytosolic Ca(2+) transients (Ca(2+) oscillations) that are triggered following delivery of a putative sperm factor from the fertilizing sperm. The identity of this 'sperm factor' thus holds much significance, not only as a vital component in creating a new life, but also for its potential therapeutic and diagnostic value in human infertility. Recent data have emerged suggesting the sperm factor may be a post-acrosomal sheath WW domain-binding protein (PAWP). However, a significant body of research points to a testis-specific phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) as the sperm factor. Herein, we examine the evidence presented in favour of PAWP in relation to PLCζ and the requisite physiological properties of the mammalian sperm factor.

  15. Identification of a Putative Tetrasporophyte-Specific Gene in Gracilaria lemaneiformis(Gracilariales, Rhodophyte)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xueying; ZHANG Xuecheng

    2008-01-01

    A putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene, designated as SSH466 (GenBank accession No. DQ019223), was one of the genes identified in this work using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method in Gracilaria lemaneiformis. The full length of the gene was obtained using SMART RACE strategy. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene had 1 019 nucleotides, including an open reading frame of 498 nucleotides encoding 166 amino acid residues, 158 nucleotides of 5' untranslated region and 363 nucleo- tides of 3' non-coding region. Protein motif and secondary structure prediction showed that there existed a transmembrane domain with a unique β-sheet. Thus, SSH466 protein might be a cross-membrane protein. Sequence homology search in the public GenBank databases did not reveal any significant match with SSH466. Virtual Northern blot analysis confirmed that it was a tetrasporo- phyte-specific gene.

  16. Revision of the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene, a putative biosynthetic intermediate of pseudopterosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuda, Masayuki; Ohmori, Miho; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In the past, we have questioned the accuracy of the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene, a putative biosynthetic intermediate of pseudopterosins, in light of the configuration of elisabethatrienol isolated from Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae, which was represented as 1S,4R,9S,11S. We have reinvestigated the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene. Elisabethatriene with the reported 1S,4R,9R,11S configuration was synthesized starting from (-)-isopulegol in its enantiomeric form. The (1)H- and (13)C-NMR data of the synthesized compound differed from those reported for elisabethatriene. In addition to the fact that elisabethatriene is converted into pseudopterosins, this finding has allowed us to propose that elisabethatriene should have the 1S,4R,9S,11S stereochemistry, which is identical to that of elisabethatrienol.

  17. Excitatory amino acid b-N-methylamino-L-alanine is a putative environmental neurotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR NEDELJKOV

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid b-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA has been associated with the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex in three distinct western Pacific populations. The putative neurotoxin is produced by cyanobacteria, which live symbiotically in the roots of cycad trees. L-BMAA was thought to be a threat only to those few populations whose diet and medicines rely heavily on cycad seeds. However, the recent discovery that cyanobacteria from diverse terrestrial, freshwater, and saltwater ecosystems around the world produce the toxin requires a reassessment of whether it poses a larger health threat. Therefore, it is proposed that monitoring L-BMAA levels in cyanobacteria-contaminated water supplies might be prudent.

  18. Molecular mapping of the putative gonadoblastoma locus on the Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, P; Kääriäinen, H; Petrovic, V; Peltomäki, P; Page, D C; de la Chapelle, A

    1995-11-01

    Based on the high incidence of gonadoblastoma in females with XY gonadal dysgenesis or 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, the existence of a susceptibility locus on the Y chromosome (GBY) has been postulated. We attempted to map GBY by making use of a recently developed dense map of Y-chromosomal sequence-tagged sites (STSs). In two female patients with gonadoblastoma, small marker chromosomes contained portions of the Y chromosome, and a single region of overlap could be defined extending from probe pDP97 in interval 4B, which contains the centromere, to marker sY182 in interval 5E of the proximal long arm. This interval is contained in a YAC contig that comprises approximately 4 Mb of DNA. Our findings confirm the previous localization of GBY and greatly refine it. The localization of GBY overlaps with the region to which a putative growth determinant, GCY, was recently assigned.

  19. Identification of Pns6, a putative movement protein of RRSV, as a silencing suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qiying

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract RNA silencing is a potent antiviral response in plants. As a counterdefense, most plant and some animal viruses encode RNA silencing suppressors. In this study, we showed that Pns6, a putative movement protein of Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV, exhibited silencing suppressor activity in coinfiltration assays with the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c. Pns6 of RRSV suppressed local silencing induced by sense RNA but had no effect on that induced by dsRNA. Deletion of a region involved in RNA binding abolished the silencing suppressor activity of Pns6. Further, expression of Pns6 enhanced Potato virus × pathogenicity in N. benthamiana. Collectively, these results suggested that RRSV Pns6 functions as a virus suppressor of RNA silencing that targets an upstream step of the dsRNA formation in the RNA silencing pathway. This is the first silencing suppressor to be identified from the genus Oryzavirus.

  20. Analysis of the expression of putatively imprinted genes in bovine peri-implantation embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille Yde; Alexopoulos, N.I.; Cooney, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    imprinted genes (Ata3, Dlk1, Gnas, Grb10, Magel2, Mest-1, Ndn and Sgce) in bovine peri-implantation embryos. Two embryonic developmental stages were examined, Day 14 and Day 21. The gene expression pattern of single embryos was recorded for in vivo, in vitro produced (IVP) and parthenogenetic embryos...... (LOS) in bovine embryos resulting in increased embryonic morbidity and mortality. In the bovine, limited numbers of imprinted genes have been studied and studies have primarily been restricted to pre-implantation stages. This study reports original data on the expression pattern of 8 putatively...... procedures, either by in vitro maturation, fertilization or culture. In conclusion, effects of genomic imprinting and of in vitro procedures for embryo production may influence the success of bovine embryo implantation....

  1. Identification of putative PPAR response elements in and around the murine UCP3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Majken

    in thermogenesis in unerring, the physiological functions of UCP2 and UCP3 are at present not fully understood. Synthetic agonists for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) as well as fatty acids have been shown to increase murine UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression but response elements and mechanisms...... differentiation. Results from sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitated (ChIP) material from 3T3-L1 adipocytes revealed three PPAR and retinoid X receptor (RXR) binding sites in and around the murine UCP3 gene. The recruitment of PPAR and RXR to the three potential PPREs was determined by ChIP combined...

  2. Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus: Putative Functional Variants Differentially Bind FOXA1 and E2F1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kerstin B.; O’Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carlebur, Saskia; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Prathalingham, Radhika; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; de Santiago, Ines; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van ’t Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias, Jose I.; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dur, Christina C.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Ditsch, Nina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Dörk, Thilo; Helbig, Sonja; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har; Phuah, Sze-Yee; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hartef; Eriksson, Kimael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Harrington, Patricia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Lim, Wei-Yen; Buhari, Shaik A.; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Fostira, Florentia; Pilarski, Robert; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.

    2013-01-01

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ERα to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease. PMID:24290378

  3. Cellular receptors for plasminogen activators recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, V

    1997-10-01

    The generation of the broad-specificity protease plasmin by the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is implicated in a variety of pathophysiological processes, including vascular fibrin dissolution, extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling, and cell migration. A mechanism for the regulation of plasmin generation is through binding of the plasminogen activators to specific cellular receptors: uPA to the glycolipid-anchored membrane protein urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and tPA to a number of putative binding sites. The uPA-uPAR complex can interact with a variety of ligands, including plasminogen, vitronectin, and integrins, indicating a multifunctional role for uPAR, regulating not only efficient and spatially restricted plasmin generation but also having the potential to modulate cell adhesion and signal transduction. The cellular binding of tPA, although less well characterized, also has the capacity to regulate plasmin generation and to play a significant role in vessel-wall biology. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:227-234). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  4. Cloning of two adenosine receptor subtypes from mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, D L; Walker, L L; Heinemann, S

    1994-05-01

    Adenosine potentiates the stimulated release of mast cell mediators. Pharmacologic studies suggest the presence of two adenosine receptors, one positively coupled to adenylate cyclase and the other coupled to phospholipase C activation. To identify mast cell adenosine receptor subtypes, cDNAs for the A1 and A2a adenosine receptors were obtained by screening a mouse brain cDNA library with the use of PCR-derived probes. Mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell cDNA libraries were constructed and screened with the use of A1 and A2a cDNA probes, which revealed the presence of A2a, but not A1, receptor clones. A putative A2b receptor was identified by using low stringency mast cell library screening. Northern blotting of mast cell poly(A)+ RNA with the use of receptor subtype probes labeled single mRNA bands of 2.4 kb and 1.8 kb for the A2a and A2b receptors, respectively. In situ cells. An A2a receptor-specific agonist failed to enhance mast cell mediator release, which suggests that the secretory process is modulated through the A2b and/or another receptor subtype. By using RNase protection assays, we found that mast cells that had been cultured in the presence of N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine for 24 h exhibited a decrease in both A2a and A2b receptor RNA levels. Cells that had been cultured for 1 to 2 days in the presence of dexamethasone demonstrated increased amounts of A2a receptor mRNA, but no identifiable change in A2b receptor mRNA. Mast cells possess at least two adenosine receptor subtypes that may be differentially regulated.

  5. Sequence Divergence of Microsatellites and Phylogeny Analysis in Tetraploid Cotton Species and Their Putative Diploid Ancestors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-Zhen GUO; Dong FANG; Wen-Duo YU; Tian-Zhen ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    To determine the level of microsatellite sequence differences and to use the information to construct a phylogenetic relationship for cultivated tetraploid cotton (Gossypium spp.) species and their putative diploid ancestors, 10 genome-derived microsatellite primer pairs were used to amplify eight species,including two tetraploid and six diploid species, in Gossypium. A total of 92 unique amplicons were resolved using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Each amplicon was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed using standard phylogenetic software. Allelic diversities were caused mostly by changes in the number of simple sequence repeat (SSR) motif repeats and only a small proportion resulted from interruption of the SSR motif within the locus for the same genome. The frequency of base substitutions was 0.5%-1.0% in different genomes, with only few indels found. Based on the combined 10 SSR flanking sequence data, the homology of A-genome diploid species averaged 98.9%, even though most of the amplicons were of the same size, and the sequence homology between G. gossypioides (Ulbr.) Standl. and three other D-genome species (G.raimondii Ulbr., G. davidsonii Kell., and G. thurberi Tod.) was 98.5%, 98.6%, and 98.5%, respectively.Phylogenetic trees of the two allotetraploid species and their putative diploid progenitors showed that homoelogous sequences from the A- and D-subgenome were still present in the polyploid subgenomes and they evolved independently. Meanwhile, homoelogous sequence interaction that duplicated loci in the polyploid subgenomes became phylogenetic sisters was also found in the evolutionary history of tetraploid cotton species. The results of the present study suggest that evaluation of SSR variation at the sequence level can be effective in exploring the evolutionary relationships among Gossypuim species.

  6. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baeyens, A

    2002-12-02

    The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75-78%).

  7. Genetic analysis of BIRC4/XIAP as a putative modifier gene of Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karl Heinz; Runz, Heiko; Noe, Barbara; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Merle, Uta; Ferenci, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2010-12-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive copper overload disorder caused by mutations in the copper-transporting adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) ATP7B. It presents with a highly variable clinical phenotype ranging from asymptomatic to fulminant hepatic failure or progressive neurological involvement. No clear genotype-phenotype correlation has been established. Thus, variants in modifier genes could have an impact on WD manifestation and severity. Recently, the antiapoptotic protein baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 4 BIRC4/XIAP has been suggested as a regulator of copper-induced cell death. With the aim of investigating a putative role of BIRC4/XIAP as modifier gene in individuals with copper overload, we analyzed a WD patient cohort (n = 98) for sequence variants at the BIRC4/XIAP locus. When compared with clinical data, the previously described coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the BRIC4/XIAP locus (rs28382721, rs28382722, rs28382723, rs5956583, rs28382740, rs12838858, rs28382741) did not correlate with age of onset or clinical presentation in our collective. However, three previously unreported variants in the BIRC4/XIAP gene were identified (c.1-26 T > G; c.1408A > T; p.T470S; c.1019A > G; p.N340S). The two patients with variants leading to amino acid exchanges in the BIRC4/XIAP protein showed a remarkably early disease onset at the age of 5 years. Furthermore, one of these patients was only heterozygous for disease-causing mutations in the ATP7B gene. In summary, these data emphasize the need to further elucidate a role of BIRC4/XIAP variants as putative pathogenetic factors in copper overload disorders.

  8. Identification and Characterization of a Putative Manganese Export Protein in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carolyn R; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Peng, Eric D; Payne, Shelley M

    2016-10-15

    Manganese plays an important role in the cellular physiology and metabolism of bacterial species, including the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae The intracellular level of manganese ions is controlled through coordinated regulation of the import and export of this element. We have identified a putative manganese exporter (VC0022), named mneA (manganese exporter A), which is highly conserved among Vibrio spp. An mneA mutant exhibited sensitivity to manganese but not to other cations. Under high-manganese conditions, the mneA mutant showed an almost 50-fold increase in intracellular manganese levels and reduced intracellular iron relative to those of its wild-type parent, suggesting that the mutant's manganese sensitivity is due to the accumulation of toxic levels of manganese and reduced iron. Expression of mneA suppressed the manganese-sensitive phenotype of an Escherichia coli strain carrying a mutation in the nonhomologous manganese export gene, mntP, further supporting a manganese export function for V. cholerae MneA. The level of mneA mRNA was induced approximately 2.5-fold after addition of manganese to the medium, indicating regulation of this gene by manganese. This study offers the first insights into understanding manganese homeostasis in this important pathogen. Bacterial cells control intracellular metal concentrations by coordinating acquisition in metal-limited environments with export in metal-excess environments. We identified a putative manganese export protein, MneA, in Vibrio cholerae An mneA mutant was sensitive to manganese, and this effect was specific to manganese. The mneA mutant accumulated high levels of intracellular manganese with a concomitant decrease in intracellular iron levels when grown in manganese-supplemented medium. Expression of mneA in trans suppressed the manganese sensitivity of an E. coli mntP mutant. This study is the first to investigate manganese export in V. cholerae. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology

  9. Expression of putative immune response genes during early ontogeny in the coral Acropora millepora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneour Puill-Stephan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Corals, like many other marine invertebrates, lack a mature allorecognition system in early life history stages. Indeed, in early ontogeny, when corals acquire and establish associations with various surface microbiota and dinoflagellate endosymbionts, they do not efficiently distinguish between closely and distantly related individuals from the same population. However, very little is known about the molecular components that underpin allorecognition and immunity responses or how they change through early ontogeny in corals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patterns in the expression of four putative immune response genes (apextrin, complement C3, and two CELIII type lectin genes were examined in juvenile colonies of Acropora millepora throughout a six-month post-settlement period using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. Expression of a CELIII type lectin gene peaked in the fourth month for most of the coral juveniles sampled and was significantly higher at this time than at any other sampling time during the six months following settlement. The timing of this increase in expression levels of putative immune response genes may be linked to allorecognition maturation which occurs around this time in A. millepora. Alternatively, the increase may represent a response to immune challenges, such as would be involved in the recognition of symbionts (such as Symbiodinium spp. or bacteria during winnowing processes as symbioses are fine-tuned. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data, although preliminary, are consistent with the hypothesis that lectins may play an important role in the maturation of allorecognition responses in corals. The co-expression of lectins with apextrin during development of coral juveniles also raises the possibility that these proteins, which are components of innate immunity in other invertebrates, may influence the innate immune systems of corals through a common pathway or system. However, further studies

  10. Putative Cross-Contamination Routes of Listeria monocytogenes in a Meat Processing Facility in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolocan, Andrei Sorin; Oniciuc, Elena Alexandra; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Jordan, Kieran; Nicolau, Anca Ioana

    2015-09-01

    Putative routes of Listeria monocytogenes contamination, based on the workflow of the employees, were studied in a meat processing facility by investigating 226 samples collected from food contact surfaces, non-food contact surfaces, raw materials, and ready-to-eat meat products on four occasions over a 1-year period. In total, 19.7% of non-food contact surfaces, 22.9% of food contact surfaces, 45% of raw materials, and 20% of ready-to-eat meat products were positive for L. monocytogenes (analyzed by the International Organization for Standardization standard method ISO 11290). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles were determined for a representative subset of these isolates, and 11 distinct pulsotypes were identified, two of which were frequently isolated (T4 and T8) and considered persistent. Strains from the various pulsotypes were screened for the presence of bcrABC and qacH, the genes responsible for tolerance responses to quaternary ammonium compounds. Two strains harbored bcrABC, and these strains had a higher benzalkonium chloride tolerance; however, they were not considered persistent strains. The frequently isolated PFGE pulsotype T8 strains were highly adhesive to abiotic surfaces at 10 and 20°C; however, the pulsotype T6 strain, which was isolated only at the last sampling time, had the highest adhesion ability, and the pulsotype T4 strain (the second most persistent pulsotype) had only modest adhesion. Four putative cross-contamination routes were confirmed by mapping the persistent and other isolates. This information could allow a food safety manager to adjust the work flow to improve the hygienic conditions in a meat processing facility. This study revealed the prevalence and persistence of L. monocytogenes strains in a meat processing facility and established the importance of developing strategies to avoid cross-contamination, recalls, and outbreaks of listeriosis.

  11. High amino acid diversity and positive selection at a putative coral immunity gene (tachylectin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellberg Michael E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes involved in immune functions, including pathogen recognition and the activation of innate defense pathways, are among the most genetically variable known, and the proteins that they encode are often characterized by high rates of amino acid substitutions, a hallmark of positive selection. The high levels of variation characteristic of immunity genes make them useful tools for conservation genetics. To date, highly variable immunity genes have yet to be found in corals, keystone organisms of the world's most diverse marine ecosystem, the coral reef. Here, we examine variation in and selection on a putative innate immunity gene from Oculina, a coral genus previously used as a model for studies of coral disease and bleaching. Results In a survey of 244 Oculina alleles, we find high nonsynonymous variation and a signature of positive selection, consistent with a putative role in immunity. Using computational protein structure prediction, we generate a structural model of the Oculina protein that closely matches the known structure of tachylectin-2 from the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus, a protein with demonstrated function in microbial recognition and agglutination. We also demonstrate that at least three other genera of anthozoan cnidarians (Acropora, Montastrea and Nematostella possess proteins structurally similar to tachylectin-2. Conclusions Taken together, the evidence of high amino acid diversity, positive selection and structural correspondence to the horseshoe crab tachylectin-2 suggests that this protein is 1 part of Oculina's innate immunity repertoire, and 2 evolving adaptively, possibly under selective pressure from coral-associated microorganisms. Tachylectin-2 may serve as a candidate locus to screen coral populations for their capacity to respond adaptively to future environmental change.

  12. Characterization of ERAS, a putative novel human oncogene, in skin and breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña Avalos, B.L. de la

    2014-07-01

    Most human tumors have mutations in genes of the RAS small GTPase protein family. RAS works as a molecular switch for signaling pathways that modulate many aspects of cell behavior, including proliferation, differentiation, motility and death. Oncogenic mutations in RAS prevent GTP hydrolysis, locking RAS in a permanently active state, being the most common mutations in HRAS, KRAS and NRAS. The human RAS family consists of at least 36 different genes, many of which have been scarcely studied. One of these relatively unknown genes is ERAS (ES cell-expressed RAS), which is a constitutively active RAS protein, localized in chromosome X and expressed only in embryonic cells, being undetectable in adult tissues. New high throughput technologies have made it possible to screen complete cancer genomes for identification of mutations associated to cancer. Using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system, ERAS was identified as a putative novel oncogene in non-melanoma skin and breast cancers. The major aim of this project is to determine the general characteristics of ERAS as a putative novel human oncogene in skin and breast cells. Forced expression of ERAS results in drastic changes in cell shape, proliferation and motility. When ERAS is overexpressed in skin and breast human cells it is mainly localized in the cytoplasmic membrane. ERAS activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) pathway but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. ERAS-expressing cells suffer spontaneous morphologic and phenotypic EMT-like changes, including cytoskeleton reorganization, vimentin and N-cadherin up-regulation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, which can be associated with increased malignancy, and invasive and metastatic potential. Our results suggest that inappropriate expression of ERAS lead to transformation of human cells. (Author)

  13. Putative glycosyltransferases and other plant Golgi apparatus proteins are revealed by LOPIT proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolovski, Nino; Rubtsov, Denis; Segura, Marcelo P; Miles, Godfrey P; Stevens, Tim J; Dunkley, Tom P J; Munro, Sean; Lilley, Kathryn S; Dupree, Paul

    2012-10-01

    The Golgi apparatus is the central organelle in the secretory pathway and plays key roles in glycosylation, protein sorting, and secretion in plants. Enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of complex polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids are located in this organelle, but the majority of them remain uncharacterized. Here, we studied the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) membrane proteome with a focus on the Golgi apparatus using localization of organelle proteins by isotope tagging. By applying multivariate data analysis to a combined data set of two new and two previously published localization of organelle proteins by isotope tagging experiments, we identified the subcellular localization of 1,110 proteins with high confidence. These include 197 Golgi apparatus proteins, 79 of which have not been localized previously by a high-confidence method, as well as the localization of 304 endoplasmic reticulum and 208 plasma membrane proteins. Comparison of the hydrophobic domains of the localized proteins showed that the single-span transmembrane domains have unique properties in each organelle. Many of the novel Golgi-localized proteins belong to uncharacterized protein families. Structure-based homology analysis identified 12 putative Golgi glycosyltransferase (GT) families that have no functionally characterized members and, therefore, are not yet assigned to a Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes database GT family. The substantial numbers of these putative GTs lead us to estimate that the true number of plant Golgi GTs might be one-third above those currently annotated. Other newly identified proteins are likely to be involved in the transport and interconversion of nucleotide sugar substrates as well as polysaccharide and protein modification.

  14. Putative roles for a rhamnose binding lectin in Flavobacterium columnare pathogenesis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Benjamin H; Farmer, Bradley D; Straus, David L; Li, Chao; Peatman, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Columnaris disease, caused by the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium columnare, continues to be a major problem worldwide and commonly leads to tremendous losses of both wild and cultured freshwater fish, particularly in intensively farmed aquaculture species such as channel catfish. Despite its ecologic and economic impacts, the fundamental molecular mechanisms of the host immune response to this pathogen remain unclear. While F. columnare can induce marked pathologic changes in numerous ectopic tissues, the adhesion of F. columnare to the gill in particular is strongly associated with pathogen virulence and host susceptibility. Recently, in this regard, using RNA-seq expression profiling we found that a rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) was dramatically upregulated in the gill of fish infected with F. columnare (as compared to naïve fish). Thus, in the present study we sought to further characterize and understand the RBL response in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). We first identified two distinct catfish families with differential susceptibilities to columnaris disease; one family was found to be completely resistant while the other was susceptible (0% mortality versus 18.3% respectively, P catfish RBL that persisted for at least 24 h (P catfish to different doses of the putative RBL ligands l-rhamnose and d-galactose, and found that these sugars, protected channel catfish against columnaris disease, likely through competition with F. columnare binding of host RBL. Finally, we examined the role of nutritional status on RBL regulation and found that RBL expression was upregulated (>120-fold; P < 0.05) in fish fasted for 7 d (as compared to fish fed to satiation daily), yet expression levels returned to those of satiated fish within 4 h after re-feeding. Collectively, these findings highlight putative roles for RBL in the context of columnaris disease and reveal new aspects linking RBL regulation to feed availability.

  15. Putative cross-kingdom horizontal gene transfer in sponge (Porifera mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Micha

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial genome of Metazoa is usually a compact molecule without introns. Exceptions to this rule have been reported only in corals and sea anemones (Cnidaria, in which group I introns have been discovered in the cox1 and nad5 genes. Here we show several lines of evidence demonstrating that introns can also be found in the mitochondria of sponges (Porifera. Results A 2,349 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cox1 gene was sequenced from the sponge Tetilla sp. (Spirophorida. This fragment suggests the presence of a 1143 bp intron. Similar to all the cnidarian mitochondrial introns, the putative intron has group I intron characteristics. The intron is present in the cox1 gene and encodes a putative homing endonuclease. In order to establish the distribution of this intron in sponges, the cox1 gene was sequenced from several representatives of the demosponge diversity. The intron was found only in the sponge order Spirophorida. A phylogenetic analysis of the COI protein sequence and of the intron open reading frame suggests that the intron may have been transmitted horizontally from a fungus donor. Conclusion Little is known about sponge-associated fungi, although in the last few years the latter have been frequently isolated from sponges. We suggest that the horizontal gene transfer of a mitochondrial intron was facilitated by a symbiotic relationship between fungus and sponge. Ecological relationships are known to have implications at the genomic level. Here, an ecological relationship between sponge and fungus is suggested based on the genomic analysis.

  16. Putative cross-kingdom horizontal gene transfer in sponge (Porifera) mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rot, Chagai; Goldfarb, Itay; Ilan, Micha; Huchon, Dorothée

    2006-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome of Metazoa is usually a compact molecule without introns. Exceptions to this rule have been reported only in corals and sea anemones (Cnidaria), in which group I introns have been discovered in the cox1 and nad5 genes. Here we show several lines of evidence demonstrating that introns can also be found in the mitochondria of sponges (Porifera). Results A 2,349 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cox1 gene was sequenced from the sponge Tetilla sp. (Spirophorida). This fragment suggests the presence of a 1143 bp intron. Similar to all the cnidarian mitochondrial introns, the putative intron has group I intron characteristics. The intron is present in the cox1 gene and encodes a putative homing endonuclease. In order to establish the distribution of this intron in sponges, the cox1 gene was sequenced from several representatives of the demosponge diversity. The intron was found only in the sponge order Spirophorida. A phylogenetic analysis of the COI protein sequence and of the intron open reading frame suggests that the intron may have been transmitted horizontally from a fungus donor. Conclusion Little is known about sponge-associated fungi, although in the last few years the latter have been frequently isolated from sponges. We suggest that the horizontal gene transfer of a mitochondrial intron was facilitated by a symbiotic relationship between fungus and sponge. Ecological relationships are known to have implications at the genomic level. Here, an ecological relationship between sponge and fungus is suggested based on the genomic analysis. PMID:16972986

  17. Bioinformatic selection of putative epigenetically regulated loci associated with obesity using gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcot, Valérie; Groom, Alexandra; McConnell, James C; Pearce, Mark S; Potter, Catherine; Embleton, Nicholas D; Swan, Daniel C; Relton, Caroline L

    2012-05-10

    There is considerable interest in defining the relationship between epigenetic variation and the risk of common complex diseases. Strategies which assist in the prioritisation of target loci that have the potential to be epigenetically regulated might provide a useful approach in identifying concrete examples of epigenotype-phenotype associations. Focusing on the postulated role of epigenetic factors in the aetiopathogenesis of obesity this report outlines an approach utilising gene expression data and a suite of bioinformatic tools to prioritise a list of target candidate genes for more detailed experimental scrutiny. Gene expression microarrays were performed using peripheral blood RNA from children aged 11-13years selected from the Newcastle Preterm Birth Growth Study which were grouped by body mass index (BMI). Genes showing ≥2.0 fold differential expression between low and high BMI groups were selected for in silico analysis. Several bioinformatic tools were used for each following step; 1) a literature search was carried out to identify whether the differentially expressed genes were associated with adiposity phenotypes. Of those obesity-candidate genes, putative epigenetically regulated promoters were identified by 2) defining the promoter regions, 3) then by selecting promoters with a CpG island (CGI), 4) and then by identifying any transcription factor binding modules covering CpG sites within the CGI. This bioinformatic processing culminated in the identification of a short list of target obesity-candidate genes putatively regulated by DNA methylation which can be taken forward for experimental analysis. The proposed workflow provides a flexible, versatile and low cost methodology for target gene prioritisation that is applicable to multiple species and disease contexts. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Genetic profiling of putative breast cancer stem cells from malignant pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiran, Verena; Stanzer, Stefanie; Heitzer, Ellen; Meilinger, Michael; Rossmann, Christopher; Lax, Sigurd; Tsybrovskyy, Oleksiy; Dandachi, Nadia; Balic, Marija

    2017-01-01

    A common symptom during late stage breast cancer disease is pleural effusion, which is related to poor prognosis. Malignant cells can be detected in pleural effusions indicating metastatic spread from the primary tumor site. Pleural effusions have been shown to be a useful source for studying metastasis and for isolating cells with putative cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. For the present study, pleural effusion aspirates from 17 metastatic breast cancer patients were processed to propagate CSCs in vitro. Patient-derived aspirates were cultured under sphere forming conditions and isolated primary cultures were further sorted for cancer stem cell subpopulations ALDH1+ and CD44+CD24-/low. Additionally, sphere forming efficiency of CSC and non-CSC subpopulations was determined. In order to genetically characterize the different tumor subpopulations, DNA was isolated from pleural effusions before and after cell sorting, and compared with corresponding DNA copy number profiles from primary tumors or bone metastasis using low-coverage whole genome sequencing (SCNA-seq). In general, unsorted cells had a higher potential to form spheres when compared to CSC subpopulations. In most cases, cell sorting did not yield sufficient cells for copy number analysis. A total of five from nine analyzed unsorted pleura samples (55%) showed aberrant copy number profiles similar to the respective primary tumor. However, most sorted subpopulations showed a balanced profile indicating an insufficient amount of tumor cells and low sensitivity of the sequencing method. Finally, we were able to establish a long term cell culture from one pleural effusion sample, which was characterized in detail. In conclusion, we confirm that pleural effusions are a suitable source for enrichment of putative CSC. However, sequencing based molecular characterization is impeded due to insufficient sensitivity along with a high number of normal contaminating cells, which are masking genetic alterations of

  19. The Bacillus anthracis chromosome contains four conserved, excision-proficient, putative prophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sozhamannan Shanmuga

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is considered to be a recently emerged clone within the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group. The B. anthracis genome sequence contains four putative lambdoid prophages. We undertook this study in order to understand whether the four prophages are unique to B. anthracis and whether they produce active phages. Results More than 300 geographically and temporally divergent isolates of B. anthracis and its near neighbors were screened by PCR for the presence of specific DNA sequences from each prophage region. Every isolate of B. anthracis screened by PCR was found to produce all four phage-specific amplicons whereas none of the non-B. anthracis isolates, produced more than one phage-specific amplicon. Excision of prophages could be detected by a PCR based assay for attP sites on extra-chromosomal phage circles and for attB sites on phage-excised chromosomes. SYBR-green real-time PCR assays indicated that prophage excision occurs at very low frequencies (2 × 10-5 - 8 × 10-8/cell. Induction with mitomycin C increased the frequency of excision of one of the prophages by approximately 250 fold. All four prophages appear to be defective since, mitomycin C induced culture did not release any viable phage particle or lyse the cells or reveal any phage particle under electron microscopic examination. Conclusion The retention of all four putative prophage regions across all tested strains of B. anthracis is further evidence of the very recent emergence of this lineage and the prophage regions may be useful for differentiating the B. anthracis chromosome from that of its neighbors. All four prophages can excise at low frequencies, but are apparently defective in phage production.

  20. The gene corresponding to the putative Goodpasture antigen is present in Alport's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savige, J A

    1991-08-01

    Alport's syndrome is a heterogeneous group of inherited abnormalities of basement membranes that may result in progressive renal failure, defective hearing and lens abnormalities. The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) characteristically has areas of reduplication, lamellation and attenuation on electron microscopic examination. In the majority of affected males and some females, there is reduced or variable binding of serum from patients with anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture's syndrome) to these basement membranes. These sera contain antibodies directed against the Goodpasture antigen which has been thought to be located in the non-collagenous domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen and is presumed to be important in cross-linking of the collagen molecules. The reduced staining for the Goodpasture antigen suggests that this structure is either absent or masked in Alport's syndrome. We have tested DNA from six unrelated individuals with Alport's syndrome. All had been transplanted for renal failure. The diagnosis of Alport's syndrome was made on the characteristic electron microscopic appearance of the renal basement membranes (n = 4), the presence of sensori-neural deafness (n = 4), a family history of Alport's syndrome (n = 5) and the presence of circulating inhibitable anti-GBM antibody activity post-transplant (n = 2). Oligonucleotides (20mers) corresponding to the 5' and 3' ends of the known 25 amino acid sequence for the putative Goodpasture antigen were used as primers for amplification of genomic DNA. The products were then blotted and probed with an intermediate 19-mer DNA. All Alport's patients contained a 75-bp fragment corresponding to the published peptide sequence for the non-collagenous domain of the alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen, suggesting that a large deletion of this region, the putative Goodpasture antigen, is unlikely to account for the defect in Alport's syndrome.

  1. Coleopteran-specific and putative novel cry genes in Iranian native Bacillus thuringiensis collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Amin; Jahangiri, Rosa; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Seifinejad, Ali; Soheilivand, Saeed; Bagheri, Omolbanin; Keshavarzi, Mansoureh; Alamisaeid, Khalil

    2009-10-01

    The characterization of the strains containing Coleopteran-specific and also putative novel cry genes in Iranian native Bacillus thuringiensis collection is presented. Characterization was based on PCR analysis using 31 general and specific primers for cry1B, cry1I, cry3A, cry3B, cry3C, cry7A, cry8A, cry8B, cry8C, cry14, cry18, cry26, cry28, cry34 and cry35 genes, protein band patterns as well as their insecticidal activity on Xanthogaleruca luteola Mull. larvae. Forty six isolates (65.7%) contained minimum one Coleopteran-active cry gene. Based on universal primers, strains containing cry18 and cry26 genes were the most abundant and represent 27.1% and 24% of the isolates, respectively, whereas cry14, cry3, cry28, cry34, cry35, cry7, cry8 genes were less abundant, found in 14.2, 12.5, 10, 7, 7 and 5.6% of the strains, respectively. Based on specific primers, isolates containing cry1I were the most abundant (48.5%). Two strains containing Coleopteran-active cry genes showed higher activity against X. luteola larvae than B. thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni pathovar tenebrionis. Thirty isolates, when assayed for cry1C, cry5, cry6, cry8b, cry9, cry10, cry11, cry18, cry24 and cry35 genes, showed unexpected size bands. Cloning and sequencing of the amplicons allowed both the identification of known cry genes and the detection of putative novel cry1C sequences.

  2. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  3. A novel Tenebrio molitor cadherin is a functional receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrick, Jeff; Oppert, Cris; Lorenzen, Marcé D; Morris, Kaley; Oppert, Brenda; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2009-07-03

    Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are effective biological insecticides. Cadherin-like proteins have been reported as functional Cry1A toxin receptors in Lepidoptera. Here we present data that demonstrate that a coleopteran cadherin is a functional Cry3Aa toxin receptor. The Cry3Aa receptor cadherin was cloned from Tenebrio molitor larval midgut mRNA, and the predicted protein, TmCad1, has domain structure and a putative toxin binding region similar to those in lepidopteran cadherin B. thuringiensis receptors. A peptide containing the putative toxin binding region from TmCad1 bound specifically to Cry3Aa and promoted the formation of Cry3Aa toxin oligomers, proposed to be mediators of toxicity in lepidopterans. Injection of TmCad1-specific double-stranded RNA into T. molitor larvae resulted in knockdown of the TmCad1 transcript and conferred resistance to Cry3Aa toxicity. These data demonstrate the functional role of TmCad1 as a Cry3Aa receptor in T. molitor and reveal similarities between the mode of action of Cry toxins in Lepidoptera and Coleoptera.

  4. A comparative study on efficiency of adult fibroblast, putative embryonic stem cell and lymphocyte as donor cells for production of handmade cloned embryos in goat and characterization of putative ntES cells obtained from these embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Rahul; Malakar, Dhruba; Khate, Keviletsu; Sahu, Shailendra; Akshey, Yogesh; Mukesh, Manishi

    2011-09-15

    The main purpose of the experiment was to compare the efficiency of three cell types, namely adult fibroblast, putative embryonic stem (ES) cell, and lymphocyte, as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer by handmade cloning in goats. The outcome clearly shows that putative embryonic stem cells, with a cleavage and blastocyst production rate of 74.69% ± 3.92 and 39.75% ± 3.86, respectively, performs better in comparison to adult fibroblast cell and lymphocyte. Between adult fibroblast cell and lymphocyte no statistically significant difference exists at P II DRB genes of cloned embryos and three donor cells were performed to verify the cloned embryos. The amplified PCR products were subjected to SSCP to confirm their genetic identity. The karyotyping of the cloned embryos showed normal chromosomal status as expected in goat. Significantly, in the second stage of the experiment, the produced cloned embryos were successfully used to derive ntES-like cells. The rate of primary colony formation rate was 62.50% ± 4.62 for fibroblast donor cell derived embryos. The same was 60.60% ± 4.62 for putative ES donor cell derived embryos and 66.66% ± 4.62 for lymphocyte donor cell derived embryos, respectively. The putative ntES colonies were positively characterized for alkaline phosphatase, Oct-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Sox-2, and Nanog by Immunocytochemistry and Reverse Transcription PCR. To further validate the stem ness, the produced putative ntES colonies were differentiated to embryoid bodies. Immunocytochemistry revealed that embryoid bodies expressed NESTIN specific for ectodermal lineage; GATA-4 for endodermal lineage and smooth muscle actin-I, and troponin-I specific for mesodermal lineage. The study has established an efficient protocol for putative ntES cell derivation from HMC embryos. It could be of substantial significance as patient specific ntES cells have proven therapeutic significance.

  5. Seventeen copies of the human 37 kDa laminin receptor precursor/p40 ribosome-associated protein gene are processed pseudogenes arisen from retropositional events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackers, P; Clausse, N; Fernandez, M

    1996-01-01

    A cDNA coding for a 37 kDa polypeptide has been identified in several species as both the potential precursor of the 67 kDa laminin receptor (37LRP) and a putative ribosome-associated protein (p40). Interestingly, increased expression of this polypeptide (37LRP/p40) is consistently observed in in...

  6. Human LINE1 endonuclease domain as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies involved in the pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wei-ping; SHU Cui-li; LI Bo-an; ZHAO Jun; CHENG Yun

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS)is a disease with a mortality of 9.56%.Although SARS is etiologically linked to a new coronavirus(SARS-CoV)and functional cell receptor has been identified,the pathogenesis of the virus infection is largely unclear.Methods The clinical specimens were processed and analyzed using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in-house.Further investigations of target antigen included reviews of phage display technique,rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE)technique,protein expression and purification,Western blotting validation,serological and immunohistochemical staining in postmortem tissue.Results A type of medium or low titer anti-lung tissue antibodies were found in the sera of SARS patients at the early stage of the disease.Human long interspersed nuclear element 1(LINE1)gene endonuclease(EN)domain protein was one of the target autoantigens and it was aberrantly expressed in the lung tissue of SARS patients.Anti-EN antibody was positive in the sera of 40.9% of SARS patients.Conclusions Human LINE1 endonuclease domain was identified as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies,which were presented in the serum of SARS patients and may be involved in the pathogenesis of SARS.

  7. Putative PPAR target genes express highly in skeletal muscle of insulin-resistant MetS model SHR/NDmc-cp rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariya, Natsuyo; Miyake, Kunio; Kubota, Takeo; Goda, Toshinao; Mochizuki, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    It is known that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle induces subsequent metabolic diseases such as metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, which genes are altered in the skeletal muscle by development of insulin resistance in animal models has not been examined. In this study, we performed microarray and subsequent real-time RT-PCR analyses using total RNA extracted from the gastrocnemius muscle of the MetS model, spontaneously hypertensive corpulent congenic (SHR/NDmc-cp) rats, and control Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. SHR/NDmc-cp rats displayed overt insulin resistance relative to WKY rats. The expression of many genes related to fatty acid oxidation was higher in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in WKY rats. Among 18 upregulated genes, putative peroxisome proliferator responsive elements were found in the upstream region of 15 genes. The protein expression of ACOX2, an upregulated gene, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) G1, but not of PPARG2, PPARA or PPARD, was higher in the gastrocnemius muscle of SHR/NDmc-cp rats than that in WKY rats. These results suggest that insulin resistance in the MetS model, SHR/NDmc-cp rats, is positively associated with the expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes, which are presumably PPARs’ targets, in skeletal muscle.

  8. The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is a transmembrane protein present in all cell types of adult Hydra and upregulated at the boundary between bud and parent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tischer Susanne

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Notch signalling pathway is conserved in pre-bilaterian animals. In the Cnidarian Hydra it is involved in interstitial stem cell differentiation and in boundary formation during budding. Experimental evidence suggests that in Hydra Notch is activated by presenilin through proteolytic cleavage at the S3 site as in all animals. However, the endogenous ligand for HvNotch has not been described yet. Results We have cloned a cDNA from Hydra, which encodes a bona-fide Notch ligand with a conserved domain structure similar to that of Jagged-like Notch ligands from other animals. Hyjagged mRNA is undetectable in adult Hydra by in situ hybridisation but is strongly upregulated and easily visible at the border between bud and parent shortly before bud detachment. In contrast, HyJagged protein is found in all cell types of an adult hydra, where it localises to membranes and endosomes. Co-localisation experiments showed that it is present in the same cells as HvNotch, however not always in the same membrane structures. Conclusions The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is conserved in Cnidarians. Together with HvNotch it may be involved in the formation of the parent-bud boundary in Hydra. Moreover, protein distribution of both, HvNotch receptor and HyJagged indicate a more widespread function for these two transmembrane proteins in the adult hydra, which may be regulated by additional factors, possibly involving endocytic pathways.

  9. Chicken NK cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Christian; Neulen, Marie-Luise; Sperling, Beatrice; Windau, Katharina; Zechmann, Maria; Jansen, Christine A; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Göbel, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer cells are innate immune cells that destroy virally infected or transformed cells. They recognize these altered cells by a plethora of diverse receptors and thereby differ from other lymphocytes that use clonally distributed antigen receptors. To date, several receptor families that play a role in either activating or inhibiting NK cells have been identified in mammals. In the chicken, NK cells have been functionally and morphologically defined, however, a conclusive analysis of receptors involved in NK cell mediated functions has not been available. This is partly due to the low frequencies of NK cells in blood or spleen that has hampered their intensive characterization. Here we will review recent progress regarding the diverse NK cell receptor families, with special emphasis on novel families identified in the chicken genome with potential as chicken NK cell receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Drosophila gene brainiac encodes a glycosyltransferase putatively involved in glycosphingolipid synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwientek, Tilo; Keck, Birgit; Levery, Steven B

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila genes fringe and brainiac exhibit sequence similarities to glycosyltransferases. Drosophila and mammalian fringe homologs encode UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:fucose-O-Ser beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modulate the function of Notch family receptors. The biological function...

  11. Regulators of gene expression in Enteric Neural Crest Cells are putative Hirschsprung disease genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schriemer, Duco; Sribudiani, Yunia; IJpma, Arne; Natarajan, Dipa; MacKenzie, Katherine C.; Metzger, Marco; Binder, Ellen; Burns, Alan J.; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Eggen, Bart J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is required for peristalsis of the gut and is derived from Enteric Neural Crest Cells (ENCCs). During ENS development, the RET receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of ENCCs, their migration along the developing gut, and dif

  12. Regulators of gene expression in Enteric Neural Crest Cells are putative Hirschsprung disease genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schriemer, Duco; Sribudiani, Yunia; IJpma, Arne; Natarajan, Dipa; MacKenzie, Katherine C; Metzger, Marco; Binder, Ellen; Burns, Alan J; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M W; Eggen, Bart J L

    2016-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is required for peristalsis of the gut and is derived from enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs). During ENS development, the RET receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of ENCCs, their migration along the developing gut, and dif

  13. Characterization of Gibberellin Receptor Mutants of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M.Chandler; Carol A.Harding; Anthony R.Ashton; Mark D.Mulcair; Nicholas E.Dixon; Lewis N.Mander

    2008-01-01

    The sequence of Gidl (a gene for a gibberellin (GA) receptor from rice) was used to identify a putative orthoIogue from barley.This was expressed in E.coil,and produced a protein that was able to bind GA in vitro with both structural specificity and saturability.Its potential role in GA responses was investigated using barley mutants with reduced GA sensitivity (gsel mutants).Sixteen different gsel mutants each carried a unique nucleotide substitution in this sequence.In all but one case,these changes resulted in single amino acid substitutions,and,for the remaining mutant,a substitution in the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA is proposed to interfere with translation initiation.There was perfect linkage in segregating populations between new mutant alleles and the gsel phenotype,leading to the conclusion that the putative GID1 GA receptor sequence in barley corresponds to the Gsel locus.Determination of endogenous GA contents in one of the mutants revealed enhanced accumulation of bioactive GA1,and a deficit of C20 GA precursors.All of the gsel mutants had reduced sensitivity to exogenous GA3,and to AC94377 (a GA analogue) at concentrations that are normally 'saturating',but,at much higher concentrations,there was often a considerable response.The comparison between barley and rice mutants reveals interesting differences between these two cereal species in GA hormonal physiology.

  14. Novel cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A J

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids have numerous physiological effects. In the years since the molecular identification of the G protein-coupled receptors CB1 and CB2, the ion channel TRPV1, and their corresponding endogenous ligand systems, many cannabinoid-evoked actions have been shown conclusively to be mediated by one of these specific receptor targets. However, there remain several examples where these classical cannabinoid receptors do not explain observed pharmacology. Studies using mice genetically delete...

  15. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs).

  16. Genetic diversity of bovine papillomavirus types, including two putative new types, in teat warts from dairy cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Michele; de Camargo Tozato, Claudia; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes; de Alcântara, Brígida Kussumoto; Vilas-Boas, Laurival Antonio; Otonel, Rodrigo Alejandro Arellano; Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo

    2016-06-01

    Teat papillomatosis affects dairy cows worldwide. Milking can become difficult due to teat warts, and maintaining affected cows in the herds may diminish economic profit in the dairy industry. Currently, 13 bovine papillomavirus (BPV) types have been fully characterized, and numerous putative BPV types have been identified through partial L1 gene PCR. In order to identify the viral types present in warts on the udders of dairy cows, 40 teat lesions from 24 cows from 13 cattle farms in three States of Brazil were evaluated by PV L1 gene PCR. The warts that were evaluated contained sequences from BPVs 6-10, the putative BPV types BAPV9 and BAPV4, and two unreported putative papillomavirus (PV) types, named BPV/BR-UEL6 and BPV/BR-UEL7. In addition, mixed infections and coinfections were identified, since more than one lesion was observed on the udders of 13 cows. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BPV/BR-UEL6 is closely related to BPVs belonging to the genus Xipapillomavirus, while BPV/BR-UEL7 clustered with the previously reported strains Cervus timorensis and Pudu puda PVs, which represent a putative new PV type, and it was only distantly related to xi-, epsilon-, delta- and dyoxi-PVs. These results provide information that will assist in the understanding of the association of BPVs 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, as well as putative BPV types BAPV4 and BAPV9, with mammary papillomatosis. This is the first characterization of putative novel PV types BPV/BR-UEL6 and BPV/BR-UEL7 in teat warts of dairy cows, highlighting the high genetic diversity of BPVs associated with teat papillomatosis.

  17. Opioid receptors and cardioprotection - 'opioidergic conditioning' of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, John P; See Hoe, Louise E; Du Toit, Eugene F; Peart, Jason N

    2015-04-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) remains a major cause of morbidity/mortality globally, firmly established in Westernized or 'developed' countries and rising in prevalence in developing nations. Thus, cardioprotective therapies to limit myocardial damage with associated ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R), during infarction or surgical ischaemia, is a very important, although still elusive, clinical goal. The opioid receptor system, encompassing the δ (vas deferens), κ (ketocyclazocine) and μ (morphine) opioid receptors and their endogenous opioid ligands (endorphins, dynorphins, enkephalins), appears as a logical candidate for such exploitation. This regulatory system may orchestrate organism and organ responses to stress, induces mammalian hibernation and associated metabolic protection, triggers powerful adaptive stress resistance in response to ischaemia/hypoxia (preconditioning), and mediates cardiac benefit stemming from physical activity. In addition to direct myocardial actions, central opioid receptor signalling may also enhance the ability of the heart to withstand I-R injury. The δ- and κ-opioid receptors are strongly implicated in cardioprotection across models and species (including anti-infarct and anti-arrhythmic actions), with mixed evidence for μ opioid receptor-dependent protection in animal and human tissues. A small number of clinical trials have provided evidence of cardiac benefit from morphine or remifentanil in cardiopulmonary bypass or coronary angioplasty patients, although further trials of subtype-specific opioid receptor agonists are needed. The precise roles and utility of this GPCR family in healthy and diseased human myocardium, and in mediating central and peripheral survival responses, warrant further investigation, as do the putative negative influences of ageing, IHD co-morbidities, and relevant drugs on opioid receptor signalling and protective responses.

  18. The Receptors that Mediate the Direct Lethality of Anthrax Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H. Leppla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor endothelium marker-8 (TEM8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2 are the two well-characterized anthrax toxin receptors, each containing a von Willebrand factor A (vWA domain responsible for anthrax protective antigen (PA binding. Recently, a cell-based analysis was used to implicate another vWA domain-containing protein, integrin β1 as a third anthrax toxin receptor. To explore whether proteins other than TEM8 and CMG2 function as anthrax toxin receptors in vivo, we challenged mice lacking TEM8 and/or CMG2. Specifically, we used as an effector protein the fusion protein FP59, a fusion between the PA-binding domain of anthrax lethal factor (LF and the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. FP59 is at least 50-fold more potent than LF in the presence of PA, with 2 μg PA + 2 μg FP59 being sufficient to kill a mouse. While TEM8−/− and wild type control mice succumbed to a 5 μg PA + 5 μg FP59 challenge, CMG2−/− mice were completely resistant to this dose, confirming that CMG2 is the major anthrax toxin receptor in vivo. To detect whether any toxic effects are mediated by TEM8 or other putative receptors such as integrin β1, CMG2−/−/TEM8−/− mice were challenged with as many as five doses of 50 μg PA + 50 μg FP59. Strikingly, the CMG2−/−/TEM8−/− mice were completely resistant to the 5-dose challenge. These results strongly suggest that TEM8 is the only minor anthrax toxin receptor mediating direct lethality in vivo and that other proteins implicated as receptors do not play this role.

  19. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...

  1. Characterization of three putative xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolases in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Takashi; Tajima, Naoyuki; Sekine, Kohsuke; Sato, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (Xfp) is a key enzyme in the central carbohydrate metabolism in heterofermentative bacteria, in which enzymatic property of Xfps is well characterized. This is not the case in other microbes. The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 possesses three putative genes encoding Xfp, all1483, all2567, and alr1850. We purified three putative Xfps as recombinant proteins. The results of gel filtration indicated that these proteins form homomultimer complex. All1483 and All2567 showed phosphoketolase activity, whereas Alr1850 did not show the activity. Kinetic analyses demonstrated that substrates, fructose 6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate, are cooperatively bound to enzymes positively and negatively, respectively.

  2. /sup 3/H)pirenzepine and (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat cerebral cortical and cardiac muscarinic cholinergic sites. II. Characterization and regulation of antagonist binding to putative muscarinic subtypes

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    Watson, M.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-05-01

    Studies show (/sup 3/H)PZ identified selectively a subpopulation of muscarinic binding sites compared to classical antagonists like (-)-(/sup 3/H)QNB in many central and peripheral tissues. We characterized the binding and regulation of selected antagonists to high-affinity (/sup 3/H)PZ (putative M1) and low-affinity PZ (putative M2) sites in rat cerebral cortex (predominantly M1) and heart (predominantly M2). Saturation isotherms of (/sup 3/H)PZ and (-)-(/sup 3/H)QNB were performed under various conditions. Guanyl-5'-yl-imidodiphosphate (30 microM) showed little effect on Kd (dissociation constant) or total binding capacity (total receptor density) values. Higher ionic strength buffers yielded lower affinity values for (/sup 3/H)PZ and (-)-(/sup 3/H)QNB. Kinetic studies confirmed high affinity Kd values seen in steady-state assays. We conducted inhibition studies of selected muscarinic antagonists including the reportedly cardioselective (putative M2) drug, AF-DX 116 (11-((2-(diethylamino)methyl-1-piperidinyl)-acetyl)-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)-benzodiazepine-6-one), the reportedly M1 selective compound, PZ, and the classical antagonist (-)QNB, using (/sup 3/H)PZ and (-)-(/sup 3/H)QNB-labeled cerebral cortical and cardiac homogenates. Assays were done with and without guanyl-5'-yl-imidophosphate at 25 degrees C in 10 mM Na-K-phosphate, 50 mM Na-K-phosphate and modified Krebs-phosphate buffer. Studies showed antagonists generally had higher affinity in 10 mM Na-K-phosphate buffer, were insensitive to guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate and had Hill values (nH) nearly equal to one. Cardiac PZ/(/sup 3/H)QNB curves were steep.

  3. Predicting the molecular interactions of CRIP1a-cannabinoid 1 receptor with integrated molecular modeling approaches.

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    Ahmed, Mostafa H; Kellogg, Glen E; Selley, Dana E; Safo, Martin K; Zhang, Yan

    2014-02-15

    Cannabinoid receptors are a family of G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes and diseases. One of the key regulators that are unique to cannabinoid receptors is the cannabinoid receptor interacting proteins (CRIPs). Among them CRIP1a was found to decrease the constitutive activity of the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R). The aim of this study is to gain an understanding of the interaction between CRIP1a and CB1R through using different computational techniques. The generated model demonstrated several key putative interactions between CRIP1a and CB1R, including the critical involvement of Lys130 in CRIP1a.

  4. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience.

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    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H; Vinkers, Christiaan H

    2015-02-01

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has received less attention. Nevertheless, pioneering in-depth studies over the past two decades have shown the importance of the brain MR in the processing of stressful information. Moreover, a membrane-bound MR mediating the rapid effects of cortisol was recently discovered. This review summarizes how the MR may play a role in stress resilience. Both preclinical and clinical studies suggest that the MR is an important stress modulator and influences basal as well as stress-induced HPA-axis activity, stress appraisal, and fear-related memories. These MR effects are mediated by both genomic and non-genomic MRs and appear to be at least partially sex-dependent. Moreover, the majority of studies indicate that high MR functionality or expression may confer resilience to traumatic stress. This has direct clinical implications. First, increasing activity or expression of brain MRs may prevent or reverse symptoms of stress-related depression. Second, individuals with a relatively low MR functionality may possess an increased stress susceptibility for depression. Nevertheless, the number of clinical MR studies is currently limited. In conclusion, the recent emergence of the MR as a putative stress resilience factor is important and may open up new avenues for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  5. The Histamine H4 Receptor: From Orphan to the Clinic

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    Robin L. Thurmond

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The histamine H4 receptor (H4R was first noted as a sequence in genomic databases that had features of a G-protein coupled receptor. This putative receptor was found to bind histamine consistent with its homology to other histamine receptors and thus became the fourth member of the histamine receptor family. Due to the previous success of drugs that target the H1 and H2 receptors, an effort was made to understand the function of this receptor and determine if it represented a drug target. Taking advantage of the vast literature on histamine, a search for histamine activity that did not appear to be mediated by the other three histamine receptors was undertaken. From this asthma and pruritus emerged as areas of particular interest. Histamine has long been suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, but antihistamines that target the H1 and H2 receptors have not been shown to be effective for this condition. The use of selective ligands in animal models of asthma has now potentially filled this gap by showing a role for the H4R in mediating lung function and inflammation. A similar story exists for chronic pruritus associated with conditions such as atopic dermatitis. Antihistamines that target the H1 receptor are effective in reducing acute pruritus, but are ineffective in pruritus experienced by patients with atopic dermatitis. As for asthma, animal models have now suggested a role for the H4R in mediating pruritic responses, with antagonists to the H4R reducing pruritus in a number of different conditions. The anti-pruritic effect of H4R antagonists has recently been shown in human clinical studies, validating the preclinical findings in the animal models. A selective H4R antagonist inhibited histamine-induced pruritus in health volunteers and reduced pruritus in patients with atopic dermatitis. The history to date of the H4R provides an excellent example of the deorphanization of a novel receptor and the translation of this into

  6. The nuclear receptor gene family in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, contains a novel subfamily group.

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    Vogeler, Susanne; Galloway, Tamara S; Lyons, Brett P; Bean, Tim P

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of transcription factors important in key biological, developmental and reproductive processes. Several of these receptors are ligand- activated and through their ability to bind endogenous and exogenous ligands, are potentially vulnerable to xenobiotics. Molluscs are key ecological species in defining aquatic and terrestrial habitats and are sensitive to xenobiotic compounds in the environment. However, the understanding of nuclear receptor presence, function and xenobiotic disruption in the phylum Mollusca is limited. Here, forty-three nuclear receptor sequences were mined from the genome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. They include members of NR0-NR5 subfamilies, notably lacking any NR6 members. Phylogenetic analyses of the oyster nuclear receptors have been conducted showing the presence of a large novel subfamily group not previously reported, which is named NR1P. Homologues to all previous identified nuclear receptors in other mollusc species have also been determined including the putative heterodimer partner retinoid X receptor, estrogen receptor and estrogen related receptor. C. gigas contains a highly diverse set of nuclear receptors including a novel NR1 group, which provides important information on presence and evolution of this transcription factor superfamily in invertebrates. The Pacific oyster possesses two members of NR3, the sex steroid hormone receptor analogues, of which there are 9 in humans. This provides increasing evidence that steroid ligand specific expansion of this family is deuterostome specific. This new knowledge on divergence and emergence of nuclear receptors in C. gigas provides essential information for studying regulation of molluscan gene expression and the potential effects of xenobiotics.

  7. Adrenomedullin receptor is found exclusively in noradrenaline-secreting cells of the rat adrenal medulla.

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    Renshaw, D; Thomson, L M; Michael, G J; Carroll, M; Kapas, S; Hinson, J P

    2000-04-01

    Adrenomedullin, originally identified in the adrenal medulla, has binding sites in the adrenal gland; however, its role in the adrenal medulla is unclear. This study was designed to characterise adrenomedullin binding sites in the rat adrenal medulla, using ligand binding studies, immunocytochemistry, and mRNA analysis. A single population of specific adrenomedullin receptors was identified in adrenal medullary homogenates. 125I-Adrenomedullin was displaced only by adrenomedullin1-50 and not by calcitonin gene-related peptide or amylin at concentrations up to 100 nmol/L. The receptor K(D) was 3.64 nmol/L with a receptor density of 570 fmol/mg of protein. Analysis of mRNA revealed that the genes encoding both the putative adrenomedullin receptors, termed calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and L1, were expressed in the rat adrenal medulla. Dual-colour indirect-labelled immunofluorescence was used to localise phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) and the adrenomedullin receptor in the same section. PNMT is the enzyme that converts noradrenaline to adrenaline and is not expressed in noradrenaline-secreting cells. These studies revealed that both CRLR and L1 were expressed only in cells that did not express PNMT, suggesting that adrenomedullin receptors are only found in noradrenaline-secreting cells. Further evidence to support this conclusion was provided by the demonstration of colocalisation of adrenomedullin receptors with dopamine beta-hydroxylase, confirming the presence of the receptors in medullary chromaffin cells. Taken together, these data suggest that adrenomedullin acts through a specific adrenomedullin receptor in the rat adrenal medulla. RT-PCR and northern blot analysis revealed greater abundance of mRNA for L1 than for CRLR, possibly suggesting that L1 may be the major adrenomedullin receptor expressed in this tissue. As it has been reported that adrenomedullin is synthesised predominantly by adrenaline-secreting cells, it appears likely

  8. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice.

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    Andrea Degl'Innocenti

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice.Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice.Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J, and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections.In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12, Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a whole, our findings

  9. Multiple functions of mfa-1, a putative pheromone precursor gene of Neurospora crassa.

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    Kim, Hyojeong; Metzenberg, Robert L; Nelson, Mary Anne

    2002-12-01

    A putative pheromone precursor gene of Neurospora crassa, mfa-1 (which encodes mating factor a-1), was identified as the most abundant clone in starved mycelial and perithecial cDNA libraries. Northern analysis demonstrated high mfa-1 expression in all mating type a tissues and suggested low expression levels in mat A tissues. The mfa-1 gene was expressed as an approximately 1.2-kb transcript predicted to encode a 24-residue peptide, followed by a long 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). The predicted MFA1 sequence showed 100% sequence identity to PPG2 of Sordaria macrospora and structural similarity (a carboxy-terminal CAAX motif) to many hydrophobic fungal pheromone precursors. Mutants with a disrupted open reading frame (ORF) in which the critical cysteine residue had been changed to a nonprenylatable residue, tyrosine (YAAX mutants), were isolated, as were mfa-1 mutants with intact ORFs but multiple mutations in the 3' noncoding region (CAAX mutants). The 3' UTR is required for the full range of mfa-1 gene activity. Both classes of mutants showed delayed and reduced vegetative growth (which was suppressed by supplementation with a minute amount [30 micro M] of ornithine, citrulline, or arginine), as well as aberrant sexual development. When crossed as female parents to wild-type males, the CAAX and YAAX mutants showed greatly reduced ascospore production. No ascospores were produced in homozygous mfa-1 crosses. As males, YAAX mat a mutants were unable to attract wild-type mat A trichogynes (female-specific hyphae) or to initiate sexual development, while CAAX mat a mutants were able to mate and produce sexual progeny despite their inability to attract mat A trichogynes. In the mat A background, both CAAX and YAAX mutants showed normal male fertility but defective vegetative growth and aberrant female sexual development. Thus, the mfa-1 gene appears to have multiple roles in N. crassa development: (i) it encodes a hydrophobic pheromone with a putative farnesylated

  10. PRE AND POST TRAINING EVALUATION ON UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS (UP PRACTICES AT PUTAT JAYA HEALTH CENTER, SURABAYA

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    Cholis Bachroen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Praktek untuk mematuhi 'universal precaution' (UP di institusi pelayanan kesehatan (termasuk puskesmas, klinik dsb dimaksudkan untuk melindungi pasien dan petugas kesehatan dari penularan penyakit yang dapat terjadi karena tindakan pelayanan kesehatan yang kurang atau tidak tepat (tidak mengikuti UP. Penyakit  yang mungkin dapat menular dengan tidak ditepatinya UP oleh petugas kesehatan antara lain adalah penyakit yang dapat menular lewat darah (blood bome diseases termasuk HIV/AIDS dan Hepatitis B dan C. Mengingat kepatuhan  terhadap UP di antara petugas kesehatan selama melayani pasien dinilai masih kurang, maka dilaksanakan Pelatihan UP di puskesmas. Study ini dilakukan di Puskesmas Putat Jays yang Juga mempunyai klinik yang khusus melayani Pekerja Seksual Komersial (PSK dalam rangka menekan terjadinya penularan penyakit kelamin dan HIV/AIDS. Puskesmas Putat Jays merupakan sasaran yang strategis karena mempunyat daerah binaan antara lain Lokalisasi (PSK Dolly dan Jarak. Studi evaluatif ini dimaksudkan untuk melihat tingkat kepatuhan petugas terhadap UP selama melayani pasien serta mengkaji adanya perubahan kepatuhan tersebut setelah mendapat pelatihan. Data kualitaltf dan kuantitatif dikumpulkan melalui observasi, in depth interview dan diskusi. Hasil studi menunjukkan bahwa setelah pelatihan, pengetahuan tentang UP secara umum serta kesadaran untuk melindungi pasien dari penularan penyakit meningkat. Penggunaan ulang jarum suntik sudah tidak dilakukan (selalu memakai jarum diposable, spuit dan jarum di-disinfeksi sebelum dibuang serta pelaksanaan disinfeksilsterilisasi telah sesuai dengan prosedur. Data kuantitatif menunjukkan bahwa dengan pelatihan terjadi peningkatan jumlah petugas kesehatan yang mempunyai kebiasaan mencuci tangan secara tepat pada waktu melayani pasien yaitu dari 10% menjadi 90%, mengganti sarung tangan dengan tepat dari 33,3% menjadi 66,67%, memakai 'one hand technique' waktu menutup jarum dari 0% menjadi 100%, dan

  11. Can Genetic Analysis of Putative Blood Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers Lead to Identification of Susceptibility Loci?

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    Robert C Barber

    Full Text Available Although 24 Alzheimer's disease (AD risk loci have been reliably identified, a large portion of the predicted heritability for AD remains unexplained. It is expected that additional loci of small effect will be identified with an increased sample size. However, the cost of a significant increase in Case-Control sample size is prohibitive. The current study tests whether exploring the genetic basis of endophenotypes, in this case based on putative blood biomarkers for AD, can accelerate the identification of susceptibility loci using modest sample sizes. Each endophenotype was used as the outcome variable in an independent GWAS. Endophenotypes were based on circulating concentrations of proteins that contributed significantly to a published blood-based predictive algorithm for AD. Endophenotypes included Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP1, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM1, Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP, Beta2 Microglobulin (B2M, Factor VII (F7, Adiponectin (ADN and Tenascin C (TN-C. Across the seven endophenotypes, 47 SNPs were associated with outcome with a p-value ≤1x10(-7. Each signal was further characterized with respect to known genetic loci associated with AD. Signals for several endophenotypes were observed in the vicinity of CR1, MS4A6A/MS4A4E, PICALM, CLU, and PTK2B. The strongest signal was observed in association with Factor VII levels and was located within the F7 gene. Additional signals were observed in MAP3K13, ZNF320, ATP9B and TREM1. Conditional regression analyses suggested that the SNPs contributed to variation in protein concentration independent of AD status. The identification of two putatively novel AD loci (in the Factor VII and ATP9B genes, which have not been located in previous studies despite massive sample sizes, highlights the benefits of an endophenotypic approach for resolving the genetic basis for complex diseases. The coincidence of several of the endophenotypic signals with known AD loci may point

  12. Discovery of Putative Herbicide Resistance Genes and Its Regulatory Network in Chickpea Using Transcriptome Sequencing

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    Mir A. Iquebal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. contributes 75% of total pulse production. Being cheaper than animal protein, makes it important in dietary requirement of developing countries. Weed not only competes with chickpea resulting into drastic yield reduction but also creates problem of harboring fungi, bacterial diseases and insect pests. Chemical approach having new herbicide discovery has constraint of limited lead molecule options, statutory regulations and environmental clearance. Through genetic approach, transgenic herbicide tolerant crop has given successful result but led to serious concern over ecological safety thus non-transgenic approach like marker assisted selection is desirable. Since large variability in tolerance limit of herbicide already exists in chickpea varieties, thus the genes offering herbicide tolerance can be introgressed in variety improvement programme. Transcriptome studies can discover such associated key genes with herbicide tolerance in chickpea.Results: This is first transcriptomic studies of chickpea or even any legume crop using two herbicide susceptible and tolerant genotypes exposed to imidazoline (Imazethapyr. Approximately 90 million paired-end reads generated from four samples were processed and assembled into 30,803 contigs using reference based assembly. We report 6,310 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, of which 3,037 were regulated by 980 miRNAs, 1,528 transcription factors associated with 897 DEGs, 47 Hub proteins, 3,540 putative Simple Sequence Repeat-Functional Domain Marker (SSR-FDM, 13,778 genic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP putative markers and 1,174 Indels. Randomly selected 20 DEGs were validated using qPCR. Pathway analysis suggested that xenobiotic degradation related gene, glutathione S-transferase (GST were only up-regulated in presence of herbicide. Down-regulation of DNA replication genes and up-regulation of abscisic acid pathway genes were observed. Study further reveals

  13. Determination and Analysis of the Putative AcaCD-Responsive Promoters of Salmonella Genomic Island 1

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    Olasz, Ferenc; Kiss, János

    2016-01-01

    The integrative genomic island SGI1 and its variants confer multidrug resistance in numerous Salmonella enterica serovariants and several Proteus mirabilis and Acinetobacter strains. SGI1 is mobilized by the IncA/C family plasmids. The island exploits not only the conjugation apparatus of the plasmid, but also utilizes the plasmid-encoded master regulator AcaCD to induce the excision and formation of its transfer-competent form, which is a key step in the horizontal transfer of SGI1. Triggering of SGI1 excision occurs via the AcaCD-dependent activation of xis gene expression. AcaCD binds in Pxis to an unusually long recognition sequence. Beside the Pxis promoter, upstream regions of four additional SGI1 genes, S004, S005, S012 and S018, also contain putative AcaCD-binding sites. Furthermore, SGI1 also encodes an AcaCD-related activator, FlhDCSGI1, which has no known function. Here, we have analysed the functionality of the putative AcaCD-dependent promoter regions and proved their activation by either AcaCD or FlhDCSGI1. Moreover, we provide evidence that both activators act on the same binding site in Pxis and that FlhDCSGI1 is able to complement the acaCD deletion of the IncA/C family plasmid R16a. We determined the transcription start sites for the AcaCD-responsive promoters and showed that orf S004 is expressed probably from a different start codon than predicted earlier. Additionally, expression of S003 from promoter PS004 was ruled out. Pxis and the four SGI1 promoters examined here also lack obvious -35 promoter box and their promoter profile is consistent with the class II-type activation pathway. Although the role of the four additionally analysed AcaCD/FlhDCSGI1-controlled genes in transfer and/or maintenance of SGI1 is not yet clear, the conservation of the whole region suggests the existence of some selection for their functionality. PMID:27727307

  14. Putative molecular mechanism underlying sperm chromatin remodelling is regulated by reproductive hormones

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    Gill-Sharma Manjeet Kaur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The putative regulatory role of the male reproductive hormones in the molecular mechanism underlying chromatin condensation remains poorly understood. In the past decade, we developed two adult male rat models wherein functional deficits of testosterone or FSH, produced after treatments with 20 mg/Kg/d of cyproterone acetate (CPA per os, for a period of 15 days or 3 mg/Kg/d of fluphenazine decanoate (FD subcutaneously, for a period of 60 days, respectively, affected the rate of sperm chromatin decondensation in vitro. These rat models have been used in the current study in order to delineate the putative roles of testosterone and FSH in the molecular mechanism underlying remodelling of sperm chromatin. Results We report that deficits of both testosterone and FSH affected the turnover of polyubiquitylated histones and led to their accumulation in the testis. Functional deficits of testosterone reduced expression of MIWI, the 5-methyl cap binding RNA-binding protein (PIWIlike murine homologue of the Drosophila protein PIWI/P-element induced wimpy testis containing a PAZ/Piwi-Argonaut-Zwille domain and levels of histone deacetylase1 (HDAC1, ubiquitin ligating enzyme (URE-B1/E3, 20S proteasome α1 concomitant with reduced expression of ubiquitin activating enzyme (ube1, conjugating enzyme (ube2d2, chromodomain Y like protein (cdyl, bromodomain testis specific protein (brdt, hdac6 (histone deacetylase6, androgen-dependent homeobox placentae embryonic protein (pem/RhoX5, histones h2b and th3 (testis-specific h3. Functional deficits of FSH reduced the expression of cdyl and brdt genes in the testis, affected turnover of ubiquitylated histones, stalled the physiological DNA repair mechanism and culminated in spermiation of DNA damaged sperm. Conclusions We aver that deficits of both testosterone and FSH differentially affected the process of sperm chromatin remodelling through subtle changes in the ‘chromatin condensation

  15. Localization and transcriptional responses of Chrysoporthe austroafricana in Eucalyptus grandis identify putative pathogenicity factors

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    Ronishree Mangwanda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrysoporthe austroafricana is a fungal pathogen that causes the development of stem cankers on susceptible Eucalyptus grandis trees. Clones of E. grandis that are partially resistant and highly susceptible have been identified based on the extent of lesion formation on the stem upon inoculation with C. austroafricana. These interactions have been used as a model pathosystem to enhance our understanding of interactions between pathogenic fungi and woody hosts, which may be different to herbaceous hosts. In previous research, transcriptomics of host responses in these two clones to C. austroafricana suggested roles for salicylic acid and gibberellic acid phytohormone signalling in defense. However, it is unclear how the pathogen infiltrates host tissue and which pathogenicity factors facilitate its spread in the two host genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate these two aspects of the E. grandis-C. austroafricana interaction and to test the hypothesis that the pathogen possesses mechanisms to modulate the tree phytohormone-mediated defenses. Light microscopy showed that the pathogen occurred in most cell types and structures within infected E. grandis stem tissue. Notably, the fungus appeared to spread through the stem by penetrating cell wall pits. In order to understand the molecular interaction between these organisms and predict putative pathogenicity mechanisms of C. austroafricana, fungal gene expression was studied in vitro and in planta. Fungal genes associated with cell wall degradation, carbohydrate metabolism and phytohormone manipulation were expressed in planta by C. austroafricana. These genes could be involved in fungal spread by facilitating cell wall pit degradation and manipulating phytohormone mediated defense in each host environment, respectively. Specifically, the in planta expression of an ent-kaurene oxidase and salicylate hydroxylase in C. austroafricana suggests putative mechanisms by which the pathogen can

  16. Pyrosequencing of the Camptotheca acuminata transcriptome reveals putative genes involved in camptothecin biosynthesis and transport

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    Sun Yongzhen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptotheca acuminata is a Nyssaceae plant, often called the "happy tree", which is indigenous in Southern China. C. acuminata produces the terpenoid indole alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT, which exhibits clinical effects in various cancer treatments. Despite its importance, little is known about the transcriptome of C. acuminata and the mechanism of CPT biosynthesis, as only few nucleotide sequences are included in the GenBank database. Results From a constructed cDNA library of young C. acuminata leaves, a total of 30,358 unigenes, with an average length of 403 bp, were obtained after assembly of 74,858 high quality reads using GS De Novo assembler software. Through functional annotation, a total of 21,213 unigenes were annotated at least once against the NCBI nucleotide (Nt, non-redundant protein (Nr, Uniprot/SwissProt, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, and Arabidopsis thaliana proteome (TAIR databases. Further analysis identified 521 ESTs representing 20 enzyme genes that are involved in the backbone of the CPT biosynthetic pathway in the library. Three putative genes in the upstream pathway, including genes for geraniol-10-hydroxylase (CaPG10H, secologanin synthase (CaPSCS, and strictosidine synthase (CaPSTR were cloned and analyzed. The expression level of the three genes was also detected using qRT-PCR in C. acuminata. With respect to the branch pathway of CPT synthesis, six cytochrome P450s transcripts were selected as candidate transcripts by detection of transcript expression in different tissues using qRT-PCR. In addition, one glucosidase gene was identified that might participate in CPT biosynthesis. For CPT transport, three of 21 transcripts for multidrug resistance protein (MDR transporters were also screened from the dataset by their annotation result and gene expression analysis. Conclusion This study produced a large amount of transcriptome data from C. acuminata by 454 pyrosequencing. According to

  17. Cloning and expression of the VHDL receptor from fat body of the corn ear worm, Helicoverpa zea.

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    Persaud, Deryck R; Haunerland, Norbert H

    2004-01-01

    In Noctuids, storage proteins are taken up into fat body by receptor-mediated endocytosis. These include arylphorin and a second, structurally unrelated very high-density lipoprotein (VHDL). Previously, we have isolated a single storage protein receptor from the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, which binds both VHDL and arylphorin. The receptor protein is a basic, N-terminally blocked, approximately 80 kDa protein that is associated with fat body membranes. Microsequencing of proteolytic fragments of the isolated receptor protein revealed internal sequences that were used to clone the complete cDNA of the VHDL receptor by 3' and 5' RACE techniques. The receptor protein, when expressed in vitro via a suitable insect expression vector, reacted with antibodies against the native VHDL receptor and bound strongly to its ligand VHDL, thus confirming that the cloned cDNA represents indeed the previously purified VHDL receptor. The receptor protein and a second, similar protein also found associated with the fat body membrane show considerable homology to putative basic juvenile hormone suppressible proteins cloned previously from other Noctuid species. Sequence analysis revealed that the receptor is likely a peripheral membrane protein that may mediate the selective uptake of VHDL.

  18. Cloning and expression of the VHDL receptor from fat body of the corn ear worm, Helicoverpa zea

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    Deryck R. Persaud

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In Noctuids, storage proteins are taken up into fat body by receptor-mediated endocytosis. These include arylphorin and a second, structurally unrelated very high-density lipoprotein (VHDL. Previously, we have isolated a single storage protein receptor from the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, which binds both VHDL and arylphorin. The receptor protein is a basic, N-terminally blocked, ?80 kDa protein that is associated with fat body membranes. Microsequencing of proteolytic fragments of the isolated receptor protein revealed internal sequences that were used to clone the complete cDNA of the VHDL receptor by 3' and 5' RACE techniques. The receptor protein, when expressed in vitro via a suitable insect expression vector, reacted with antibodies against the native VHDL receptor and bound strongly to its ligand VHDL, thus confirming that the cloned cDNA represents indeed the previously purified VHDL receptor. The receptor protein and a second, similar protein also found associated with the fat body membrane show considerable homology to putative basic juvenile hormone suppressible proteins cloned previously from other Noctuid species. Sequence analysis revealed that the receptor is likely a peripheral membrane protein that may mediate the selective uptake of VHDL.

  19. Emerging putative associations between non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes in Neuropathic Pain. Added value from re-using microarray data.

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    Enrico Capobianco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of injured nerves is likely occurring in the peripheral nervous system, but not in the central nervous system. Although protein-coding gene expression has been assessed during nerve regeneration, little is currently known about the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. This leaves open questions about the potential effects of ncRNAs at transcriptome level. Due to the limited availability of human neuropathic pain data, we have identified the most comprehensive time-course gene expression profile referred to sciatic nerve injury, and studied in a rat model, using two neuronal tissues, namely dorsal root ganglion (DRG and sciatic nerve (SN. We have developed a methodology to identify differentially expressed bioentities starting from microarray probes, and re-purposing them to annotate ncRNAs, while analyzing the expression profiles of protein-coding genes. The approach is designed to reuse microarray data and perform first profiling and then meta-analysis through three main steps. First, we used contextual analysis to identify what we considered putative or potential protein coding targets for selected ncRNAs. Relevance was therefore assigned to differential expression of neighbor protein-coding genes, with neighborhood defined by a fixed genomic distance from long or antisense ncRNA loci, and of parent genes associated with pseudogenes. Second, connectivity among putative targets was used to build networks, in turn useful to conduct inference at interactomic scale. Last, network paths were annotated to assess relevance to neuropathic pain. We found significant differential expression in long-intergenic ncRNAs (32 lincRNAs in SN, and 8 in DRG, antisense RNA (31 asRNA in SN, and 12 in DRG and pseudogenes (456 in SN, 56 in DRG. In particular, contextual analysis centered on pseudogenes revealed some targets with known association to neurodegeneration and/or neurogenesis processes. While modules of the olfactory receptors were clearly

  20. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardiner Susan E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1 and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6 cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90. In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY

  1. Emerging Putative Associations between Non-Coding RNAs and Protein-Coding Genes in Neuropathic Pain: Added Value from Reusing Microarray Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Hemalatha B.; Tsinoremas, Nicholas F.; Capobianco, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of injured nerves is likely occurring in the peripheral nervous system, but not in the central nervous system. Although protein-coding gene expression has been assessed during nerve regeneration, little is currently known about the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). This leaves open questions about the potential effects of ncRNAs at transcriptome level. Due to the limited availability of human neuropathic pain (NP) data, we have identified the most comprehensive time-course gene expression profile referred to sciatic nerve (SN) injury and studied in a rat model using two neuronal tissues, namely dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and SN. We have developed a methodology to identify differentially expressed bioentities starting from microarray probes and repurposing them to annotate ncRNAs, while analyzing the expression profiles of protein-coding genes. The approach is designed to reuse microarray data and perform first profiling and then meta-analysis through three main steps. First, we used contextual analysis to identify what we considered putative or potential protein-coding targets for selected ncRNAs. Relevance was therefore assigned to differential expression of neighbor protein-coding genes, with neighborhood defined by a fixed genomic distance from long or antisense ncRNA loci, and of parental genes associated with pseudogenes. Second, connectivity among putative targets was used to build networks, in turn useful to conduct inference at interactomic scale. Last, network paths were annotated to assess relevance to NP. We found significant differential expression in long-intergenic ncRNAs (32 lincRNAs in SN and 8 in DRG), antisense RNA (31 asRNA in SN and 12 in DRG), and pseudogenes (456 in SN and 56 in DRG). In particular, contextual analysis centered on pseudogenes revealed some targets with known association to neurodegeneration and/or neurogenesis processes. While modules of the olfactory receptors were clearly identified in protein

  2. [The LDL receptor family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilinger, Melinda

    2002-12-29

    The members of the LDL receptor family are structurally related endocytic receptors. Our view on these receptors has considerably changed in recent years. Not only have new members of the family been identified, but also several interesting observations have been published concerning the biological function of these molecules. The LDL receptor family members are able to bind and internalize a plethora of ligands; as a consequence, they play important roles in diverse physiological processes. These receptors are key players in the lipoprotein metabolism, vitamin homeostasis, Ca2+ homeostasis, cell migration, and embryonic development. Until recently, LDL receptor family members were thought to be classic endocytic receptors that provide cells with metabolites on one hand, while regulating the concentration of their ligands in the extracellular fluids on the other hand. However, recent findings indicate that in addition to their cargo transport function, LDL receptor family members can act as signal transducers, playing important roles in the development of the central nervous system or the skeleton. Better understanding of physiological and pathophysiological functions of these molecules may open new avenues for the treatment or prevention of many disorders.

  3. Insights into the binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC agonist to its target human TAS2R38 bitter receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xevi Biarnés

    Full Text Available Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs. Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38 by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models.

  4. Insights into the binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC) agonist to its target human TAS2R38 bitter receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biarnés, Xevi; Marchiori, Alessandro; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Lanzara, Carmela; Gasparini, Paolo; Carloni, Paolo; Born, Stephan; Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-08-25

    Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs). Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38) by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM) helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i) residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii) W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii) W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models.

  5. Classical hallucinogens as antidepressants? A review of pharmacodynamics and putative clinical roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, David; Barnes, Georgina; Giaroli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Hallucinogens have been part of spiritual practice for millennia, but controversy surrounding their mind-manifesting effects led to their proscription by the mid-20th century, largely without evidence of harm or toxicity and despite nascent data suggesting therapeutic utility in treating depressive illnesses. This review explores their pharmacodynamic actions and the current limited data on their clinic effectiveness. These drugs appear to exert their psychedelic effects through their agonist or partial agonist activity at the serotonergic 5-HT2A receptor, though they also have affinity for other metabotropic serotonin receptors. Hallucinogen binding affects a wide range of intracellular signalling pathways, the precise nature of which remains incompletely understood. They alter the serotonergic tone of brainstem raphe nuclei that project through the brain; they interact with receptors in the prefrontal cortex altering connectivity patterns and intracellular functioning; and they disrupt inhibitory control of sensory input via the thalamus to the cortex. The serotonergic system has long been implicated in anxiety and depressive disorders, and is a major target of most existing antidepressants. Classical hallucinogens alter the functioning of this system, but not in the same way current medications do: whilst there are identified receptors and neurotransmitter pathways through which hallucinogens could therein produce therapeutic effects, the neurobiology of this remains speculative at this time. There is currently an extremely limited but growing literature on hallucinogen safety and clinical application. The drugs appear well tolerated by healthy controls and clinical populations, and the rapid tolerance to repeated administration might reduce the possibility of dependency. Clinical trials reported over the past decade have generally shown positive therapeutic potential, but they are notably few in number. Legislative policy has had a freezing effect on evaluation

  6. Classical hallucinogens as antidepressants? A review of pharmacodynamics and putative clinical roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, David; Barnes, Georgina; Giaroli, Giovanni; Tracy, Derek

    2014-08-01

    Hallucinogens have been part of spiritual practice for millennia, but controversy surrounding their mind-manifesting effects led to their proscription by the mid-20th century, largely without evidence of harm or toxicity and despite nascent data suggesting therapeutic utility in treating depressive illnesses. This review explores their pharmacodynamic actions and the current limited data on their clinic effectiveness. These drugs appear to exert their psychedelic effects through their agonist or partial agonist activity at the serotonergic 5-HT2A receptor, though they also have affinity for other metabotropic serotonin receptors. Hallucinogen binding affects a wide range of intracellular signalling pathways, the precise nature of which remains incompletely understood. They alter the serotonergic tone of brainstem raphe nuclei that project through the brain; they interact with receptors in the prefrontal cortex altering connectivity patterns and intracellular functioning; and they disrupt inhibitory control of sensory input via the thalamus to the cortex. The serotonergic system has long been implicated in anxiety and depressive disorders, and is a major target of most existing antidepressants. Classical hallucinogens alter the functioning of this system, but not in the same way current medications do: whilst there are identified receptors and neurotransmitter pathways through which hallucinogens could therein produce therapeutic effects, the neurobiology of this remains speculative at this time. There is currently an extremely limited but growing literature on hallucinogen safety and clinical application. The drugs appear well tolerated by healthy controls and clinical populations, and the rapid tolerance to repeated administration might reduce the possibility of dependency. Clinical trials reported over the past decade have generally shown positive therapeutic potential, but they are notably few in number. Legislative policy has had a freezing effect on evaluation

  7. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  8. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäntti, Maria H., E-mail: maria.jantti@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mandrika, Ilona, E-mail: ilona@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites Str. 1, Riga LV 1067 (Latvia); Kukkonen, Jyrki P., E-mail: jyrki.kukkonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  9. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart;

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  10. Flucloxacillin, still the empirical choice for putative Staphylococcus aureus infections in intensive care units in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, M.I.; Deurenberg, R.H.; Boumans, M.L.; Hoogkamp-Korstanje, J.A.A.; Beisser, P.S.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the usefulness of flucloxacillin as empirical therapy for putative Staphylococcus aureus infections in intensive care unit (ICU) patients in the Netherlands, the antibiotic resistance of S. aureus isolates from ICUs over a 13 year period was investigated. METHODS: From 1996

  11. A Synthetic Peptide with the Putative Iron Binding Motif of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Does Not Catalytically Oxidize Iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honarmand Ebrahimi, K.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II) binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the fer

  12. Enhancement of Cry19Aa Mosquitocidal Activity against Aedes aegypti by Mutations in the Putative Loop Regions of Domain II

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Mohd Amir F.; Donald H Dean

    2004-01-01

    Improvements in the mosquitocidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry19Aa were achieved by protein engineering of putative surface loop residues in domain II through rational design. The improvement of Aedes toxicity in Cry19Aa was 42,000-fold and did not affect its toxicity against Anopheles or Culex.

  13. Evidence for Conformational Protection of Nitrogenase against Oxygen in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus by a Putative FeSII Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Ureta, Alejandro; Nordlund, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms protecting nitrogenase in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus from damage by oxygen were studied. Evidence is provided suggesting that in G. diazotrophicus these mechanisms include respiratory protection as well as conformational protection in which a putative FeSII Shethna protein is involved.

  14. Evidence for conformational protection of nitrogenase against oxygen in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus by a putative FeSII protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureta, Alejandro; Nordlund, Stefan

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms protecting nitrogenase in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus from damage by oxygen were studied. Evidence is provided suggesting that in G. diazotrophicus these mechanisms include respiratory protection as well as conformational protection in which a putative FeSII Shethna protein is involved.

  15. Machine learning techniques to identify putative genes involved in nitrogen catabolite repression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Kevin; Godard, Patrice; André, Bruno; van Helden, Jacques; Bontempi, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    Background Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all life forms. Like most unicellular organisms, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae transports and catabolizes good nitrogen sources in preference to poor ones. Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) refers to this selection mechanism. All known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators. The ultimate goal is to infer the complete nitrogen catabolite pathways. Bioinformatics approaches offer the possibility to identify putative NCR genes and to discard uninteresting genes. Results We present a machine learning approach where the identification of putative NCR genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is formulated as a supervised two-class classification problem. Classifiers predict whether genes are NCR-sensitive or not from a large number of variables related to the GATA motif in the upstream non-coding sequences of the genes. The positive and negative training sets are composed of annotated NCR genes and manually-selected genes known to be insensitive to NCR, respectively. Different classifiers and variable selection methods are compared. We show that all classifiers make significant and biologically valid predictions by comparing these predictions to annotated and putative NCR genes, and by performing several negative controls. In particular, the inferred NCR genes significantly overlap with putative NCR genes identified in three genome-wide experimental and bioinformatics studies. Conclusion These results suggest that our approach can successfully identify potential NCR genes. Hence, the dimensionality of the problem of identifying all genes involved in NCR is drastically reduced. PMID:19091052

  16. A systematic review of amyloid-beta peptides as putative mediators of the association between affective disorders and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, L.; Heegaard, N. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Affective disorders are associated with an increased occurrence of cognitive deficits and have been linked to cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The putative molecular mechanisms involved in these associations are however not clear. The aim of this systematic review was to ...

  17. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2* Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue11The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  18. Promoter activity of a putative pollen monosaccharide transporter in Petunia hybrida and characterisation of a transposon insertion mutant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, D.; Busscher-Lange, J.; Tunen, van A.J.

    2006-01-01

    For the growth of the male reproductive cells of plants, the pollen, the presence of sufficient sucrose or monosaccharides is of vital importance. From Petunia hybrida a pollen-specific putative monosaccharide transporter designated PMT1 (for petunia monosaccharide transporter) has been identified p

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus westerdijkiae Reveals the Putative Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Ochratoxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabortti, Alolika; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a common mycotoxin that contaminates food and agricultural products. Sequencing of the complete genome of Aspergillus westerdijkiae, a major producer of OTA, reveals more than 50 biosynthetic gene clusters, including a putative OTA biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes a dozen of enzymes, transporters, and regulatory proteins. PMID:27635003

  20. Identification of Putative Molecular Markers Associated with Root Traits in Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaraja Achar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffea canephora exhibit poor root system and are very sensitive to drought stress that affects growth and production. Deeper root system has been largely empirical as better avoidance to soil water limitation in drought condition. The present study aimed to identify molecular markers linked to high root types in Coffea canephora using molecular markers. Contrasting parents, L1 valley with low root and S.3334 with high root type, were crossed, and 134 F1 individuals were phenotyped for root and associated physiological traits (29 traits and genotyped with 41 of the 320 RAPD and 9 of the 55 SSR polymorphic primers. Single marker analysis was deployed for detecting the association of markers linked to root associated traits by SAS software. There were 13 putative RAPD markers associated with root traits such as root length, secondary roots, root dry weight, and root to shoot ratio, in which root length associated marker OPS1850 showed high phenotypic variance of 6.86%. Two microsatellite markers linked to root length (CPCM13400 and root to shoot ratio (CM211300. Besides, 25 markers were associated with more than one trait and few of the markers were associated with positively related physiological traits and can be used in marker assisted trait selection.

  1. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  2. Evidence for positive selection in putative virulence factors within the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Matute

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most important prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Recently, the existence of three genetically isolated groups in P. brasiliensis was demonstrated, enabling comparative studies of molecular evolution among P. brasiliensis lineages. Thirty-two gene sequences coding for putative virulence factors were analyzed to determine whether they were under positive selection. Our maximum likelihood-based approach yielded evidence for selection in 12 genes that are involved in different cellular processes. An in-depth analysis of four of these genes showed them to be either antigenic or involved in pathogenesis. Here, we present evidence indicating that several replacement mutations in gp43 are under positive balancing selection. The other three genes (fks, cdc42