WorldWideScience

Sample records for purified inactivated vaqta

  1. Strong purifying selection at genes escaping X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chungoo; Carrel, Laura; Makova, Kateryna D

    2010-11-01

    To achieve dosage balance of X-linked genes between mammalian males and females, one female X chromosome becomes inactivated. However, approximately 15% of genes on this inactivated chromosome escape X chromosome inactivation (XCI). Here, using a chromosome-wide analysis of primate X-linked orthologs, we test a hypothesis that such genes evolve under a unique selective pressure. We find that escape genes are subject to stronger purifying selection than inactivated genes and that positive selection does not significantly affect the evolution of these genes. The strength of selection does not differ between escape genes with similar versus different expression levels in males versus females. Intriguingly, escape genes possessing Y homologs evolve under the strongest purifying selection. We also found evidence of stronger conservation in gene expression levels in escape than inactivated genes. We hypothesize that divergence in function and expression between X and Y gametologs is driving such strong purifying selection for escape genes.

  2. Thermal inactivation kinetics of partially purified mango pectin methylesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Alonso DÍAZ-CRUZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kinetic parameters of thermal inactivation of pectin methylesterase (PME in a partially purified mango enzyme extract were determined. The PME of mango partially purified by salting out showed different patterns of thermal inactivation, indicating the presence of a thermostable fraction at 70 °C and a thermolabile fraction at lower temperatures. The inactivation of the thermostable fraction exhibited a linear behavior that yielded a z-value of 9.44 °C and an activation energy (Ea of 245.6 kJ mol-1 K-1 using the Arrhenius model. The thermostable mango PME fraction represented 17% of total crude enzyme extract, which emphasizes the importance of residual enzyme activity after heat treatment.

  3. 75 FR 6211 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Purified Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... prevention of dengue infection and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) by immunization with attenuated... Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a Common 30 Nucleotide Deletion in the 3'-UTR of Dengue... applications: (1) E-120-2001/0, Whitehead et al., ``Development of Mutations Useful for Attenuating...

  4. A purified Palythoa venom fraction delays sodium current inactivation in sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Vivas, Oscar; Román-González, Sergio A; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E; Sánchez-Puig, Nuria; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid (Phylum Cnidaria, class Anthozoa) commonly found in shallow waters of coral reefs along the Mexican Atlantic coast. Little is known on the pharmacological and biochemical properties of the venom components of this animal group. Toxin peptides from other cnidarian venoms, like sea anemones, target sodium and potassium voltage-gated channels. In this study, we tested the activity of a low molecular weight fraction from the venom of P. caribaeorum on voltage-gated sodium channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. Our results showed that this fraction delays tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channel inactivation indicated by a reversible 2-fold increase of the current at the decay. A peptide responsible for this activity was isolated and characterized. Its sequence showed that it does not resemble any previously reported toxin. Together, these results evidence the presence of neurotoxins in P. caribaeorum that act on sodium channels.

  5. An adjuvanted, tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine candidate induces long-lasting and protective antibody responses against dengue challenge in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development.

  6. Experimental investigation of integrated air purifying technology for bioaerosol removal and inactivation in central air-conditioning system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xiaohong; LIU Hongmin; YE Xiaojiang; LI Kejun; WANG Ruzhu; ZHAO Liping; Lisa. X. Xu; CHEN Yazhu; JIN Xinqiao; GU Bo; BAI Jingfeng

    2004-01-01

    In this research, high voltage static electricity and ultraviolet technologies were integrated to an air purifying device which can be used to trap and kill airborne bacteria and viruses in central air-conditioning systems. An experimental platform was built to mimic the central air system, in which the efficacy of the newly built device was examined. In addition to the standard physical and chemical tests, bacteriophages were used to simulate airborne viruses in the experimental system. The bacteriophage suspension was aerosolized into the air with ultrasonic wave atomization. The result showed that more than 86% removal efficiency of micro-particles (<10 micron in diameter) were removed after the device was in operation in a building and more than 95% of bacteriophages in the experimental system. It is concluded that the integrated air purifier is suitable for controlling air quality and preventing virus transmission through the central air system.

  7. Purifying Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor); Hurst, Janet (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of purifying a nanomaterial and the resultant purified nanomaterial in which a salt, such as ferric chloride, at or near its liquid phase temperature, is used to penetrate and wet the internal surfaces of a nanomaterial to dissolve impurities that may be present, for example, from processes used in the manufacture of the nanomaterial.

  8. Purified Humanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The aim of the Leicester Conference is to help managers by way of experiential learning to acquire the prerequisites to influence effectively organizational change. For some time there has been an ongoing debate on the innovative potential of social psychological experiments...... and techniques. This article discusses the analytical possibilities of the notion “purified humanism” as part of an alternative analysis of the effective mechanisms of a widely used social psychological experiment. The article unfolds a number of ideas in relation to the socio-material provocations and maneuvers...

  9. Purified humanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The aim of the Leicester Conference is to help managers by way of experiential learning to acquire the prerequisites to influence effectively organizational change. For some time there has been an ongoing debate on the innovative potential of social psychological experiments...... and culturally specific attitudes in relation to leadership and the question of authority among participants. Keywords: The Leicester Conference, experiential learning, authority, socio-materiality, social techniques...... and techniques. This article discusses the analytical possibilities of the notion “purified humanism” as part of an alternative analysis of the effective mechanisms of a widely used social psychological experiment. The article unfolds a number of ideas in relation to the socio-material provocations and maneuvers...

  10. Handbook of purified gases

    CERN Document Server

    Schoen, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Technical gases are used in almost every field of industry, science and medicine and also as a means of control by government authorities and institutions and are regarded as indispensable means of assistance. In this complete handbook of purified gases the physical foundations of purified gases and mixtures as well as their manufacturing, purification, analysis, storage, handling and transport are presented in a comprehensive way. This important reference work is accompanied with a large number of Data Sheets dedicated to the most important purified gases.  

  11. Purified water quality study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinka, H.; Jackowski, P.

    2000-04-03

    Argonne National Laboratory (HEP) is examining the use of purified water for the detection medium in cosmic ray sensors. These sensors are to be deployed in a remote location in Argentina. The purpose of this study is to provide information and preliminary analysis of available water treatment options and associated costs. This information, along with the technical requirements of the sensors, will allow the project team to determine the required water quality to meet the overall project goals.

  12. 高强度紫外线空气净化装置对空气中细菌杀灭效能的试验研究%Efficacy of high intensity ultraviolet light air purifier on inactivation of bacterial aerosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾海泉; 潘欣; 张宗兴; 张金明; 徐火炬; 祁建城

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the UV radiation intensity and the ozone generation of UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO ultraviolet light air purifier and the Inactivation Efficiency of the device on bacterial aerosol in the flowing air stream which passes through the device just one time.METHODS The 254nm irradiance at the point 1 meter away from a single lamp of UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO was measured with UVC 254 dose measurer; when UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO ran the ozone generation of the device was detected with GD 80 ozone meter; UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO was installed in the test duct and bacterial aerosol was generated at the upstream of the test duct.Then bacterial aerosol was sampled through the upstream and downstream sampling probes respectively, based on which the inactivation efficiency of UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO on bacterial aerosol in the flowing air stream which passed through the device just one time was assessed.RESULTS The 254nm UV radiation intensity at the point 1 meter away from a single lamp of UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO was 95μw/cm2 ; ozone was not detected with GD 80 ozone meter when UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO ran; The inactivation Efficiency of UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO on bacterial aerosol in the flowing air stream which passes through the device was 99.38% , 98.00% and 91.50% on the condition that the air flow rate through the duct was 1500m3/h, 2000m3/h and 2500m3/h respectively.CONCLUSION UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO is a kind of high intensity ultraviolet light air purifier which can inactivate bacteria that fly through the device and dose not generate ozone.It can be used for indoor air instantaneous decontamination when the device is mounted in the duct of air conditioner or ventilator.%目的 检测高强度紫外线空气净化装置UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO的紫外光线强度、臭氧产生量及其对一次性通过气流中白色葡萄球菌的杀灭效率.方法 通过UVC 254紫外线辐照仪检测距离UV Bio-Wall QUATTRO单只灯管1 m处254 nm紫外光强度;通过GD 80臭氧检测仪检测UV Bio

  13. Natural Air Purifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    NASA environmental research has led to a plant-based air filtering system. Dr. B.C. Wolverton, a former NASA engineer who developed a biological filtering system for space life support, served as a consultant to Terra Firma Environmental. The company is marketing the BioFilter, a natural air purifier that combines activated carbon and other filter media with living plants and microorganisms. The filter material traps and holds indoor pollutants; plant roots and microorganisms then convert the pollutants into food for the plant. Most non-flowering house plants will work. After pollutants have been removed, the cleansed air is returned to the room through slits in the planter. Terra Firma is currently developing a filter that will also disinfect the air.

  14. Device for purifying drilling mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surkov, V.T.; Dorosh, M.M.; Khariv, I.Yu.; Makedonov, N.I.

    1982-01-01

    A device is proposed for purifying drilling mud which includes a dynamic filter made in the form of a spiral-shaped tube with input and output sleeves, and a container for purified solution with outlet sleeve. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to simplify the design, the spiral-shaped tube is perforated from the inside and is installed in the container for the purified solution.

  15. AN OVERVIEW ON BLOOD PURIFIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabia Chauhan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Blood is a connective tissue which protects us from different problems. Without blood body cannot functions at all and blood doesn’t purify itself. When blood does not purifies itself that times kidney, liver and lymphatic system work together that they help’s to purifiers the blood. Causes which are included in blood impurities are modern life style, junk food, alcohol etc. If the blood becomes impure it causes different problems e.g. acne, rashes, allergic etc. There is not any proper synthetic medication for blood impurities. Only herbal formulations are used for the blood purifier. In this review article we discussed about the market formulations and the different plants which are used in them with their different activities which are helpful in purifies the blood and also protects from other problems.

  16. Inactivation Data.xlsx

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data set is a spreadsheet that contains results of inactivation experiments that were conducted to to determine the effectiveness of chlorine in inactivating B....

  17. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nims, Raymond; Plavsic, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses) display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus) are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses. PMID:24276023

  18. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Nims

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses.

  19. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.T.

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  20. Conotoxins Are Purified and Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ A group of CAS scientists have succeeded in purifying many conotoxins and cloning more than 100 new genes from six species of cone snails living in waters off the coast of the South China Sea, paving the way for the development of new drugs to relieve neuropathic pains. The work has been honored with a first prize from the 2005 Awards for S&T Progress in Shanghai.

  1. The inactivating and mutagenic effect of hydroxylamine on bacteriophage φX174

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, J.H. van de; Arkel, G.A. van

    1965-01-01

    The inactivation of bacteriophage ΦXI74 by the mutagenic agents nitrous acid and ultraviolet irradiation proceeds according to a single-hit kinetics. However, treatment of purified ΦXI74 by hydroxylamine (HA) at pH 6 and 25° results in an inactivation that is not strictly exponential. The inactivati

  2. Methods for Purifying Enzymes for Mycoremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullings, Kenneth W. (Inventor); DeSimone, Julia C. (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A process for purifying laccase from an ectomycorrhizal fruiting body is disclosed. The process includes steps of homogenization, sonication, centrifugation, filtration, affinity chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. Purified laccase can also be separated into isomers.

  3. Evaluation of a portable air purifier.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, J.C.; Lilly, H. A.; Wilkins, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    A portable air purifier significantly reduced mal odour in a small room. If the atmosphere was deliberately contaminated with Serratia marcescens the unit rapidly removed this organism. However, if incorrectly sited, the purifier could disperse organisms into the atmosphere.

  4. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gominet, M.; Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G.; Darbord, J. C.

    2007-11-01

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  5. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gominet, M. [Ionisos, ZI les Chatinieres, F01120 Dagneux (France); Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France); Darbord, J.C. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France)], E-mail: darbord@pharmacie.univ-paris5.fr

    2007-11-15

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  6. [Nourseothricin (streptothricin) inactivated by plasmid pIE 636-encoded acetyltransferase: detection of N-acetyl-beta-lysine in the inactivated product].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, G

    1985-12-01

    Nourseothricin (streptothricin) can be inactivated by an acetyl transferase synthesized by E. coli strains containing plasmid pIE 636. Nourseothricin inactivated in the presence of 14C-acetyl-coenzyme A was purified and submitted to partial acidic hydrolysis. By electrophoresis of the hydrolysate a 14C-containing substance moving only slowly towards the cathode could be isolated. This substance after complete hydrolysis yields only unlabelled beta-lysine.

  7. Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

    2012-07-24

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

  8. Ceramic materials purified by experimental method

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Crystalline ceramic materials are purified for use as high-temperature electrical insulators. Any impurities migrate to the cathode when a dc voltage is applied across the material while it is heated in an inert gas atmosphere.

  9. Hydrazine inactivates bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne; Plett, G. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Barengoltz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary Protection places requirements on the maximum number of viable bacterial spores that may be delivered by a spacecraft to another solar system body. Therefore, for such space missions, the spores that may be found in hydrazine are of concern. A proposed change in processing procedures that eliminated a 0.2 um filtration step propmpted this study to ensure microbial contamination issue existed, especially since no information was found in the literature to substantiate bacterial spore inactivation by hydrazine.

  10. Inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine.

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, D; Hoff, J C

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine were studied at 5 degrees C with a purified preparation of single virions and a preparation of cell-associated virions. Inactivation of the virus preparations with chlorine and chlorine dioxide was studied at pH 6 and 10. The monochloramine studies were done at pH 8. With 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter at pH 6, more than 4 logs (99.99%) of the single virions were inactivated in less than 15 s...

  11. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Marimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT. The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1 was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs.

  12. Protection against Japanese encephalitis by inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, C H; Nisalak, A; Sangawhipa, N; Jatanasen, S; Laorakapongse, T; Innis, B L; Kotchasenee, S; Gingrich, J B; Latendresse, J; Fukai, K

    1988-09-01

    Encephalitis caused by Japanese encephalitis virus occurs in annual epidemics throughout Asia, making it the principal cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in the world. No currently available vaccine has demonstrated efficacy in preventing this disease in a controlled trial. We performed a placebo-controlled, blinded, randomized trial in a northern Thai province, with two doses of monovalent (Nakayama strain) or bivalent (Nakayama plus Beijing strains) inactivated, purified Japanese encephalitis vaccine made from whole virus derived from mouse brain. We examined the effect of these vaccines on the incidence and severity of Japanese encephalitis and dengue hemorrhagic fever, a disease caused by a closely related flavivirus. Between November 1984 and March 1985, 65,224 children received two doses of monovalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 21,628), bivalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 22,080), or tetanus toxoid placebo (n = 21,516), with only minor side effects. The cumulative attack rate for encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus was 51 per 100,000 in the placebo group and 5 per 100,000 in each vaccine group. The efficacy in both vaccine groups combined was 91 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 70 to 97 percent). Attack rates for dengue hemorrhagic fever declined, but not significantly. The severity of cases of dengue was also reduced. We conclude that two doses of inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine, either monovalent or bivalent, protect against encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus and may have a limited beneficial effect on the severity of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  13. Strawberry pectin methylesterase (PME): purification, characterization, thermal and high-pressure inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly-Nguyen, Binh; Van Loey, Ann M; Fachin, Diana; Verlent, Isabel; Duvetter, Thomas; Vu, Son T; Smout, Chantal; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2002-01-01

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) was extracted from strawberries (Fragaria ananassa, cv Elsanta) and purified by affinity chromatography on a CNBr-Sepharose 4B-PME-inhibitor column. A single protein and PME activity peak was obtained. A biochemical characterization in terms of molecular mass, pI, and kinetic parameters of strawberry PME was performed. In a second step, the thermal and high-pressure stability of the enzyme was studied. Isothermal and combined isothermal-isobaric inactivation of purified strawberry PME could be described by a fractional-conversion model. Purified strawberry PME is much more stable toward high-pressure treatments in comparison to those from oranges and bananas.

  14. Bacteria that purify sludge; Des bacteries epuratrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peignen-Seraline, P.; Manem, J. [Cirsee, Lyonnaise des Eaux, 92 - Nanterre (France)

    1997-03-01

    Inherent in water purification processes, the formation of sludges is intensively studied. Recently, original bacteria have been observed by searchers: some of them purify water making ``tassels``, others separate them and some of them even participate in the elimination of the first. This research study is described into details and will probably be used in the future at the industrial scale. (O.M.)

  15. IPV v2.0 : upgrading the established inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.

    2014-01-01

    The first vaccine against poliovirus (PV), the causative agent of poliomyelitis, was developed in the 1950s by Jonas Salk. The vaccine (IPV) consists of an injected dose of purified and inactivated wild-type PVs (all three serotypes). Soon after this discovery, at the Rijks Instituut voor de

  16. IPV v2.0 : upgrading the established inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.

    2014-01-01

    The first vaccine against poliovirus (PV), the causative agent of poliomyelitis, was developed in the 1950s by Jonas Salk. The vaccine (IPV) consists of an injected dose of purified and inactivated wild-type PVs (all three serotypes). Soon after this discovery, at the Rijks Instituut voor de Volksge

  17. IPV v2.0 : upgrading the established inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.

    2014-01-01

    The first vaccine against poliovirus (PV), the causative agent of poliomyelitis, was developed in the 1950s by Jonas Salk. The vaccine (IPV) consists of an injected dose of purified and inactivated wild-type PVs (all three serotypes). Soon after this discovery, at the Rijks Instituut voor de Volksge

  18. Dynamics of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Loos (Friedemann)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Dosage compensation evolved to account for the difference in expression of sex chromosome-linked genes. In mammals dosage compensation is achieved by inactivation of one X chromosome during early female embryogenesis in a process called X chromosome inactivation (XCI).

  19. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  20. Why CLEAN when you can PURIFY?

    CERN Document Server

    Carrillo, Rafael E; Wiaux, Yves

    2013-01-01

    We extend previously proposed radio-interferometric imaging approaches based on convex optimization to handle continuous visibilities and large-scale optimization problems. We propose a general algorithmic framework based on the simultaneous-direction method of multipliers to solve sparse imaging problems. The algorithm offers a parallel implementation structure, thus providing a significant gain in terms of speed and scalability to very high dimensions. We implement various state-of-the-art sparsity regularization priors, including our recent average sparsity approach SARA, in a new imaging software dubbed PURIFY. We evaluate through realistic simulations the performance of the software in terms of reconstruction quality and computational speed. Simulation results confirm both the superiority of SARA for continuous Fourier measurements and the fact that the new algorithmic structure offers a promising path to handle large-scale problems. Code is available at https://github.com/basp-group/purify

  1. Steroidogenesis in amlodipine treated purified Leydig cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif, Rabia, E-mail: rabialatif08@hotmail.com [Department of Physiology, Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa, E-mail: drmustafa786@gmail.com [Department of Physiology, Wah Medical College, Wah (Pakistan); Hameed, Waqas, E-mail: waqham@hotmail.com [Department of Physiology, Rehman Medical College, Peshawar (Pakistan); Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: professormaslam@yahoo.com [Department of Physiology, Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-01-01

    Drugs have been shown to adversely affect male fertility and recently anti-hypertensive drugs were added to the list. The anti-fertility effects of amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker, are well-illustrated in in vivo experiments but lack an in vitro proof. The present study was designed to experimentally elucidate the effects of amlodipine on Leydig cell steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in vitro. Leydig cells of Sprague–Dawley rats were isolated and purified by Percoll. Cells were incubated for 3 h with/without amlodipine in the presence/absence of LH, dbcAMP, Pregnenolone and 25-Hydroxycholesterol. Cytosolic calcium was measured in purified Leydig cells by fluorometric technique. The results showed significantly reduced (P < 0.05) steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in amlodipine exposed rats. The site of amlodipine induced steroidogenic inhibition seems to be prior to the formation of Pregnenolone at the level of StAR protein. -- Highlights: ► Inhibition of steroidogenesis in isolated and purified Leydig cells by amlodipine. ► Site of inhibition was before Pregnenolone formation, at the level of StAR protein. ► Inhibition of LH stimulated rise in cytosolic calcium by amlodipine.

  2. Utilization of purified cellulose in fiber studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, M H; Liaw, E T

    1990-01-01

    Purified cellulose-type fiber products are widely used in experimental nutrition. Their use in a broad spectrum of studies may potentially lead to the acceptance of the misconception that the various commercially available cellulose products are equivalent. In this paper we have attempted to show that this is not the case. The comparative structural data of Table 2 and the compositional data of Olsen et al provide examples which indicate that purified cellulose preparations should not necessarily be considered equivalent. Unfortunately, our current lack of understanding of how fibers are metabolized and how they may affect specific physiological parameters makes it difficult to determine which, if any, of the measurable structural and chemical properties will be of relevance for a given in vivo study. At present, it appears that researchers utilizing/evaluating the consequences of consuming a purified cellulose-type fiber would be prudent to provide at least a limited amount of data on the properties of the cellulose preparation used in their studies. The characterization of the cellulose product may be done by a variety of methods depending on the expertise of the laboratory. The methods and results discussed in this paper provide an example of the type of information which may be obtained from an in vitro characterization of cellulose products.

  3. Some Properties of Purified and Non-purified Rumen Tissue Arginase in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    ERİŞİR, Mine; OZAN, Sema Temizer

    1998-01-01

    Some biochemical properties of purified and non-purified rumen tissue arginase were compared. Homogenization, heating, treatment with aceton, precipitation with ammonium sulfate, dialysis, several centrifugations, gel filtration on sephadex G-200 processes were utilized in the purification procedure of the enzyme. It was found that pre-incubation temperature (60 °C) of arginase and Km (4mM) to its substrate, L-arginine, did not change before and after purification. While pre-incubation peri...

  4. Air Purifiers Eliminate Pathogens, Preserve Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA-funded researchers produced an ethylene reduction device for a plant growth unit. KES Science & Technology Inc., a Kennesaw, Georgia-based company specializing in sustaining perishable foods, licensed the ethylene scrubbing technology. KES partnered with Akida Holdings, of Jacksonville, Florida, which now markets the NASA-developed technology as AiroCide. According to the company, it is the only air purifier that completely destroys airborne bacteria, mold, fungi, mycotoxins, viruses, volatile organic compounds (like ethylene), and odors. What?s more, the devices have no filters that need changing and produce no harmful byproducts, such as the ozone created by some filtration systems.

  5. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  6. Study on soot purifying of molding shop in coking factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Duo-song; ZHANG Hui; BAI Xiang-yu

    2006-01-01

    Exhaust gas in molding shop was complicated in component and characteristic in Iow thickness asphalt smoke, mass steam-gas and dust. It was difficult to purify the soot with common purifier. So we must consider them roundly and develop new multifunction purifier. PFP multifunction soot purifier was made on the base of design optimization and was installed at Shenhuo Coking Factory in 2004. The combined effects of multi- mechanism in purifier make purifying ratio keep in high level. The remove ratio of smut reaches at 92.8%, and asphalt smoke at 83.7%.

  7. Ozone Air Purifiers: Can They Improve Asthma Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... daughter has asthma. Would she benefit from an ozone air purifier in her room? Answers from James ... Li, M.D., Ph.D. Despite manufacturers' claims, ozone air purifiers don't remove asthma triggers from ...

  8. Isolating and Purifying Clostridium difficile Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adrianne N.; McBride, Shonna M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability for the obligate anaerobe, Clostridium difficile, to form a metabolically dormant spore is critical for the survival of this organism outside of the host. This spore form is resistant to a myriad of environmental stresses, including heat, desiccation and exposure to disinfectants and antimicrobials. These intrinsic properties of spores allow C. difficile to survive long-term in an oxygenated environment, to be easily transmitted from host-to-host and to persist within the host following antibiotic treatment. Because of the importance of the spore form to the C. difficile lifecycle and treatment and prevention of C. difficile infection (CDI), the isolation and purification of spores are necessary to study the mechanisms of sporulation and germination, investigate spore properties and resistances, and for use in animal models of CDI. This chapter provides basic protocols, in vitro growth conditions and additional considerations for purifying C. difficile spores for a variety of downstream applications. PMID:27507337

  9. Preparation, characterization and preliminary in vivo studies of inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Lin; CHANG Guohui; LI Shuangli; ZHANG Xumin; CHEN Xishu; YU Jun; CHEN Ze; WANG Jian; QIN Ede; ZHU Qingyu; YU Man; DING Zhifen; SHI Huiying; CHENG Xiaojie; WANG Caiping

    2003-01-01

    A large quantity of SARS-CoV virus was proliferated in Vero cells, inactivated with β-propiolactone, then purified by Sepharose 4FF column chromatography to prepare inactivated vaccine. The vaccine was identified by Western blot, mass spectrographic analysis, ELISA and electron microscopy. The vaccine with or without aluminum hydroxide adjuvant was inoculated into female BALB/c mice at different dosages. The result showed that the antibodies to SARS-CoV were induced in the mice. The antibody levels induced by the vaccine with aluminum hydroxide were higher than those without aluminum hydroxide.

  10. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  11. INACTIVATION OF HEPATITIS A VIRUS AND MS2 BY OZONE AND OZONE-HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN BUFFERED WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection of drinking water by chlorine is a primary means of preventing the transmission of waterborne disease, and its efficacy is well-established. The comparative inactivation of highly purified hepatitis A virus (HAV) and MS2 by 1 mg water/L, 2.0 and 0.4 mg ozone/L plus 0...

  12. INACTIVATION OF HEPATITIS A VIRUS AND MS2 BY OZONE AND OZONE-HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN BUFFERED WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection of drinking water by chlorine is a primary means of preventing the transmission of waterborne disease, and its efficacy is well-established. The comparative inactivation of highly purified hepatitis A virus (HAV) and MS2 by 1 mg water/L, 2.0 and 0.4 mg ozone/L plus 0...

  13. Strong Constraint on Human Genes Escaping X-Inactivation Is Modulated by their Expression Level and Breadth in Both Sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavney, Andrea; Arbiza, Leonardo; Clark, Andrew G; Keinan, Alon

    2016-02-01

    In eutherian mammals, X-linked gene expression is normalized between XX females and XY males through the process of X chromosome inactivation (XCI). XCI results in silencing of transcription from one ChrX homolog per female cell. However, approximately 25% of human ChrX genes escape XCI to some extent and exhibit biallelic expression in females. The evolutionary basis of this phenomenon is not entirely clear, but high sequence conservation of XCI escapers suggests that purifying selection may directly or indirectly drive XCI escape at these loci. One hypothesis is that this signal results from contributions to developmental and physiological sex differences, but presently there is limited evidence supporting this model in humans. Another potential driver of this signal is selection for high and/or broad gene expression in both sexes, which are strong predictors of reduced nucleotide substitution rates in mammalian genes. Here, we compared purifying selection and gene expression patterns of human XCI escapers with those of X-inactivated genes in both sexes. When we accounted for the functional status of each ChrX gene's Y-linked homolog (or "gametolog"), we observed that XCI escapers exhibit greater degrees of purifying selection in the human lineage than X-inactivated genes, as well as higher and broader gene expression than X-inactivated genes across tissues in both sexes. These results highlight a significant role for gene expression in both sexes in driving purifying selection on XCI escapers, and emphasize these genes' potential importance in human disease.

  14. Single molecule DNA compaction by purified histones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAN ShiYong; WANG XiaoLing; FU WenBo; WANG WeiChi; LI Ming

    2008-01-01

    The compaction of single DNA molecules by purified histones is studied using magnetic tweezers, The compaction rate increases rapidly when the histone concentration is increased from 0.002 to 0.2 mmol/L, and saturates when the concentration is beyond 0.2 mmol/L, The time course of compaction is exponential at low histone concentrations. It becomes sigmoidal at high concentrations. Cooperativity between the histones bound to DNA is proposed to be responsible for the transition. The histones are loaded onto DNA randomly at low concentrations. They tend to bind DNA cooperatively at high con-centrations because the structural torsions of DNA induced by the bound histones become overlapping so that the binding of one histone facilitates the binding of others. Under very large forces, the com-pacted histone-DNA complex can be disrupted in a discrete manner with a step size of ~60 nm. But the histones cannot be completely stripped off DNA, as is revealed by the lowered B-S transition plateau of the histone-bound DNA.

  15. The molecular form of acetylcholinesterase as determined by irradiation inactivation (Short Communication)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, S. R.; Ellory, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The molecular size of acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus and erythrocyte `ghosts' was estimated in both membrane-bound and purified preparations by irradiation inactivation. Results suggest that the form of the enzyme in the membrane is a monomer of molecular weight approx. 75000 and that multiple forms of the enzyme observed in solubilized preparations are aggregates of this monomer. PMID:4821394

  16. Studies on an inactivated vaccine against rabies virus in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, F; Franchi, P M; Lelli, R

    2006-01-01

    An inactivated vaccine against rabies virus was prepared from the attenuated ATCC PV-12 viral rabbit Pasteur strain. The virus was grown on Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK21) cells, and the supernatant was purified by filtration and inactivated with beta-propriolactone. The inactivated product was checked according to the NHI and European Pharmacopoeia methods. Part of the product was then lyophilised and the other part was adjuvanted with Al(OH)3. Both parts were used to vaccinate and boost groups of horses, cattle and sheep at different intervals. Their immunogenicity was compared with a similar commercial product. Blood samples were collected on a regular basis and the antibody titre was determined by the Fluorescence Antibody Virus Neutralisation (FAVN) test. No significant differences were found between species after both inoculations even though the immune response increased in intensity and duration after the booster dose in all the animals tested and was stronger and lasted longer with the adjuvanted aliquot.

  17. Several properties of the partially purified proteinase inhibitor in eggplant exocarp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, M; Ibuki, F; Yamada, M; Tashiro, M; Miyoshi, M

    1975-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor was isolated and partially purified from the exocarp of eggplant, Solanum melongena L., by means of acetate buffer extraction, heat treatment, salting-out and column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. This preparation showed inhibitory activities on various proteinases; trypsin [EC 3.4.4.4] and Pronase were strongly inhibited while alpha-chymotrypsin [EC 3.4.4.5] and Nagarse were weakly inhibited. The inhibitor was a protein substance, and, therefore, it was gradually inactivated by the long-time incubation with Pronase. The inhibition mode was non-competitive on trypsin and competitive on Pronase on the basis of Lineweaver-Burk plots. The investigations on the inhibition behavior in the co-existence of two kinds of proteinases suggested that the inhibitor was not of multi-headed type.

  18. Inactivating effects of the lactoperoxidase system on bacterial lyases involved in oral malodour production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Manabu; Shin, Kouichirou; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Hironaka, Shouji

    2015-10-01

    The main components of oral malodour have been identified as volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), including hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH). The lactoperoxidase (LPO) system (consisting of LPO, glucose oxidase, glucose and thiocyanate) was previously shown to exhibit antimicrobial activities against some oral bacteria in vitro and suppressive effects on VSCs in mouth air in a clinical trial. Here, we examined the in vitro effects of the LPO system on the activities of the bacterial lyases involved in the production of VSCs by oral anaerobes. The exposure of crude bacterial extracts of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis or purified methionine γ-lyase to the LPO system resulted in the inactivation of their lyase activities through l-cysteine and l-methionine, which was linked to the production of H(2)S and CH(3)SH, respectively. The exposure of living F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis cells to the LPO system resulted in the suppression of cell numbers and lyase activities. The inactivation of the crude bacterial extracts of F. nucleatum and purified methionine γ-lyase by the LPO system was partly recovered by the addition of DTT. Therefore, the LPO system may inactivate bacterial lyases including methionine γ-lyase by reacting with the free cysteine residues of lyases. These results suggested that the LPO system suppresses the production of VSCs not only through its antimicrobial effects, but also by its inactivating effects on the bacterial lyases of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis.

  19. Tomato fruit cell wall : I. Use of purified tomato polygalacturonase and pectinmethylesterase to identify developmental changes in pectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J L; Nevins, D J

    1989-11-01

    Cell wall isolation procedures were evaluated to determine their effect on the total pectin content and the degree of methylesterification of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) fruit cell walls. Water homogenates liberate substantial amounts of buffer soluble uronic acid, 5.2 milligrams uronic acid/100 milligrams wall. Solubilization appears to be a consequence of autohydrolysis mediated by polygalacturonase II, isoenzymes A and B, since the uronic acid release from the wall residue can be suppressed by homogenization in the presence of 50% ethanol followed by heating. The extent of methylesterification in heat-inactivated cell walls, 94 mole%, was significantly greater than with water homogenates, 56 mole%. The results suggest that autohydrolysis, mediated by cell wall-associated enzymes, accounts for the solubilization of tomato fruit pectin in vitro. Endogenous enzymes also account for a decrease in the methylesterification during the cell wall preparation. The heat-inactivated cell wall preparation was superior to the other methods studied since it reduces beta-elimination during heating and inactivates constitutive enzymes that may modify pectin structure. This heat-inactivated cell wall preparation was used in subsequent enzymatic analysis of the pectin structure. Purified tomato fruit polygalacturonase and partially purified pectinmethylesterase were used to assess changes in constitutive substrates during tomato fruit ripening. Polygalacturonase treatment of heat-inactivated cell walls from mature green and breaker stages released 14% of the uronic acid. The extent of the release of polyuronides by polygalacturonase was fruit development stage dependent. At the turning stage, 21% of the pectin fraction was released, a value which increased to a maximum of 28% of the uronides at the red ripe stage. Pretreatment of the walls with purified tomato pectinesterase rendered walls from all ripening stages equally susceptible to polygalacturonase. Quantitatively

  20. Bacterial inactivation of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Erin L; Canova, Marc J; Radhi, Inas J; Koteva, Kalinka; Kireeva, Inga; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard D

    2012-10-26

    Microbes are exposed to compounds produced by members of their ecological niche, including molecules with antibiotic or antineoplastic activities. As a result, even bacteria that do not produce such compounds can harbor the genetic machinery to inactivate or degrade these molecules. Here, we investigated environmental actinomycetes for their ability to inactivate doxorubicin, an aminoglycosylated anthracycline anticancer drug. One strain, Streptomyces WAC04685, inactivates doxorubicin via a deglycosylation mechanism. Activity-based purification of the enzymes responsible for drug inactivation identified the NADH dehydrogenase component of respiratory electron transport complex I, which was confirmed by gene inactivation studies. A mechanism where reduction of the quinone ring of the anthracycline by NADH dehydrogenase leads to deglycosylation is proposed. This work adds anticancer drug inactivation to the enzymatic inactivation portfolio of actinomycetes and offers possibilities for novel applications in drug detoxification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inactivated Schmallenberg virus prototype vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernike, Kerstin; Nikolin, Veljko M; Hechinger, Silke; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2013-08-02

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a novel Orthobunyavirus, is an insect-transmitted pathogen and was first described in Europe in 2011. SBV causes a mild transient disease in adult ruminants, but severe foetal malformation and stillbirth were observed after an infection of naive cows and ewes, which is responsible for considerable economic losses. The virus is now widely distributed in Europe, and no vaccines were available to stop transmission and spread. In the present study, 16 calves and 25 sheep, the major target species of SBV infection, were vaccinated twice 3 weeks apart with one of 5 newly developed, inactivated vaccine candidates. Six calves and 5 sheep were kept as unvaccinated controls. All animals were clinically, serologically and virologically examined before and after challenge infection. Immunisation with the inactivated preparations resulted in a neutralising antibody response three weeks after the second vaccination without any side effects. The number of animals that seroconverted in each group and the strength of the antibody response were dependent on the cell line used for virus growth and on the viral titre prior to inactivation. Four vaccine prototypes completely prevented RNAemia after challenge infection, a fifth candidate reduced RNAemia considerably. Although further evaluations e.g. regarding duration of immunity will be necessary, the newly developed vaccines are promising candidates for the prevention of SBV-infection and could be a valuable tool in SBV control strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  3. Membrane purifier prototype for hydrogen purification from towngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, A.; Boyd, T.; Gulamhusein, A.; Grace, J.R.; Lim, C.J. [Membrane Reactor Technologies Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    A prototype membrane purifier designed to purify hydrogen from towngas was described. The purifier was developed as a result of growing demands for metallic membrane purifiers. This paper provided details of a simulation conducted to observe the membrane's ability to purify towngas. The purifier was comprised of a cast-pressured vessel and a membrane module stack able to accommodate up to 6 palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) alloy membrane modules. Performance of the purifier was tested with both a hydrogen and a hydrogen and nitrogen oxide (N{sub 2}) mixture at 400 degrees C under various operating conditions. Results of the study showed that the purifier remained stable during temperature cycling. The hydrogen permeation rate followed Sievert's law in the tested temperature range. The hydrogen permeation rate increased when towngas flow rates and feeding pressures were increased. Hydrogen diffusion through the alloy membrane determined permeation rates through the membrane modules. No N{sub 2} leaks were detected using the mixtures. 1 ref., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  4. Copper ions inactivate S-ade-nosylhomocysteine hydrolase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) hydrolase isan enzyme that regulates biomethylation and some otherphysiological processes. Recombinant AdoHcy hydrolase wasoverexpressed in E. coli JM109 and purified with ion ex-change and gel filtration chromatographies. The effects ofcopper ions (Cu2+) on the activity of AdoHcy hydrolase wereinvestigated and the results showed that Cu2+ inhibited theenzyme's activity by a concentration and time-dependentprocess. The inhibition constant (Ki) and the apparent rateconstant (kapp) were calculated to be (14 + 4) nmol @ L-1 and(1.08 + 0.15) min-1, respectively. The existence of the naturalsubstrate Ado could to some extent prevent Cu2+ from inac-tivating the enzyme, suggesting that copper ions possiblycould compete with the natural substrate on enzyme's sub-strate binding site. Further studies on the mechanism of in-hibition are being carried out.

  5. Functional reconstitution of the voltage-regulated sodium channel purified from electroplax of Electrophorus electricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The voltage-regulated NA channel is responsible for the depolarization of the excitable cell membrane during the normal action potential. This research has focused on the functional properties of the Na channel, purified from detergent extracts of electroplax membranes of the electric eel, and reconstituted into vesicles of defined phospholipid. These properties were assessed by measuring neurotoxin-modulated ion flux into the reconstituted membrane vesicles and by recording the single-channel currents of the purified channel by the patch-clamp method. The binding of tritiated tetrodotoxin (TTX) was employed as a marker for the purification of the channel. Two high-resolution fractionation steps, based on molecular charge and protein size, were used to obtain a preparation that is 80% homogeneous for a large peptide of 270,000 daltons. Radiotracer /sup 22/Na/sup +/ influx into the vesicles was stimulated by veratridine and by batrachotoxin (BTX) at concentrations of 100 ..mu..M and 5 ..mu..M, respectively. The stimulation by BTX was greater than that by veratridine, and can be as much as 16-fold over control influx levels. The stimulated influx is blocked by TTX with a K/sub i/ of 35 nM, and by local anesthetics in the normal pharmacological range. Large multilamellar vesicles prepared with a freeze-thaw step are suitable for single-channel recording techniques. When excised patches of the reconstituted membranes were voltage-clamped in the absence of activating neurotoxins, voltage-dependent single-channel currents were recorded. These displayed properties similar to those from native membranes of nerve and muscle. These results indicate that the protein purified on the basis of TTX binding is a functional Na channel possessing these functional domains: the ion-selective channel, the voltage sensors controlling activation and inactivation, and the sites of action of TTX, alkaloid neurotoxins, and local anesthetics.

  6. 75 FR 73035 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland; Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... International Trade Administration Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland; Notice of Final Results of... order on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Finland. See Purified Carboxymethylcellulose from Finland... order covering purified carboxymethylcellulose from Finland. See Preliminary Results. The...

  7. Platelet-Derived Short-Chain Polyphosphates Enhance the Inactivation of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor by Activated Coagulation Factor XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I.; Ivanov, Ivan S.; Gailani, David; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Factor (F) XI supports both normal human hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Activated FXI (FXIa) promotes thrombin generation by enzymatic activation of FXI, FIX, FX, and FV, and inactivation of alpha tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPIα), in vitro. Some of these reactions are now known to be enhanced by short-chain polyphosphates (SCP) derived from activated platelets. These SCPs act as a cofactor for the activation of FXI and FV by thrombin and FXIa, respectively. Since SCPs have been shown to inhibit the anticoagulant function of TFPIα, we herein investigated whether SCPs could serve as cofactors for the proteolytic inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa, further promoting the efficiency of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation to generate thrombin. Methods and Results Purified soluble SCP was prepared by size-fractionation of sodium polyphosphate. TFPIα proteolysis was analyzed by western blot. TFPIα activity was measured as inhibition of FX activation and activity in coagulation and chromogenic assays. SCPs significantly accelerated the rate of inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa in both purified systems and in recalcified plasma. Moreover, platelet-derived SCP accelerated the rate of inactivation of platelet-derived TFPIα by FXIa. TFPIα activity was not affected by SCP in recalcified FXI-depleted plasma. Conclusions Our data suggest that SCP is a cofactor for TFPIα inactivation by FXIa, thus, expanding the range of hemostatic FXIa substrates that may be affected by the cofactor functions of platelet-derived SCP. PMID:27764259

  8. Study of gas purifiers for the CMS RPC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Benussi, L; Colafranceschi, S; Fabbri, F L; Felli, F; Ferrini, M; Giardoni, M; Greci, T; Paolozzi, A; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Russo, A; Saviano, G; Buontempo, S; Cimmino, A; de Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Baesso, P; Belli, G; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Guida, R; Sharma, A

    2012-01-01

    The CMS RPC muon detector utilizes a gas recirculation system called closed loop (CL) to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. A systematic study of CL gas purifiers has been carried out over 400 days between July 2008 and August 2009 at CERN in a low-radiation test area, with the use of RPC chambers with currents monitoring, and gas analysis sampling points. The study aimed to fully clarify the presence of pollutants, the chemistry of purifiers used in the CL, and the regeneration procedure. Preliminary results on contaminants release and purifier characterization are reported.

  9. X-chromosome inactivation and escape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christine M. Disteche; Joel B. Berletch

    2015-12-01

    X-chromosome inactivation, which was discovered by Mary Lyon in 1961 results in random silencing of one X chromosome in female mammals. This review is dedicated to Mary Lyon, who passed away last year. She predicted many of the features of X inactivation, for e.g., the existence of an X inactivation center, the role of L1 elements in spreading of silencing and the existence of genes that escape X inactivation. Starting from her published work here we summarize advances in the field.

  10. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  11. Immunodiffusion Studies of Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Ushimi, Chuzo

    1971-01-01

    Antigenicity of purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus was examined by immunodiffusion against sera obtained from horses experimentally infected with EIA virus. The purified virus reacted with the infected horse serum, and virus-specific precipitating antibody was demonstrated. Furthermore, it was found that purified EIA virus reacted against the serum of horses infected with all strains of EIA virus which were antigenically different from one another. From the result, group-specific components of the virus rather than strain-specific ones were considered to be involved in the reaction. Serological reactivity was lost by adding antiserum from the infected horse to the antigen. The precipitating antibody usually appeared in the serum 1 to 2 weeks after the first febrile attack of EIA and remained for a longer period. Some characteristics of the purified antigen and specificity of the reaction for EIA are described. Images PMID:16557982

  12. Roles of singlet oxygen and triplet excited state of dissolved organic matter formed by different organic matters in bacteriophage MS2 inactivation

    KAUST Repository

    Rosado-Lausell, Sahid L.

    2013-09-01

    Inactivation of bacteriophage MS2 by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and triplet excited state of dissolved organic matter (3DOM*) produced by irradiation of natural and synthetic sensitizers with simulated sunlight of wavelengths greater than 320nm was investigated. Natural sensitizers included purified DOM isolates obtained from wastewater and river waters, and water samples collected from Singapore River, Stamford Canal, and Marina Bay Reservoir in Singapore. Linear correlations were found between MS2 inactivation rate constants (kobs) and the photo-induced reaction rate constants of 2,4,6-trimethylphenol (TMP), a probe compound shown to react mainly with 3DOM*. Linear correlations between MS2 kobs and singlet oxygen (1O2) concentrations were also found for both purified DOM isolates and natural water samples. These correlations, along with data from quenching experiments and experiments with synthetic sensitizers, Rose Bengal (RB), 3\\'-methoxyacetophenone (3\\'-MAP), and nitrite (NO2-), suggest that 1O2, 3DOM*, and hydroxyl radicals (•OH) could inactivate bacteriophage MS2. Linear correlations between MS2 kobs and Specific Ultraviolet Absorption determined at 254nm (SUVA254) were also found for both purified DOM isolates and natural samples. These results suggest the potential use of TMP as a chemical probe and SUVA254 as an indicator for virus inactivation in natural and purified DOM water samples. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Study of gas purifiers in the CMS RPC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saviano, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    The CMS RPC muon detector utilizes a gas recirculation system (Closed Loop) to cope with high gas mixture volumes and costs. A systematic study of Closed Loop gas purifiers has been carried out in 2008 and 2009 at the ISR experimental area of CERN, with the use of RPC chambers with currents monitoring, and gas analysis sampling points. Results on contaminants release and purifier characterization are presented

  14. Isolation, purifi cation and characterisation of transglutaminase from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud El-Hofi

    2014-09-01

    inactivated at 85°C. The rosemary TGase was stimulated at 2-6 rnM CaCl2 concentrations while it lost about 5-20% from its activity by increasing CaCl2 concentration. Sodium chloride (2-14% shows no noticeable inhibition of the purified TGase activity. Mg+2, Ba+2 were acivited by the purified TGase while it was str ongly inhibited by Fe+2, moderately by Cir2 and Mn+2. Conclusion. This paper reports on the purification and characterisation of TGase from newly isolated plant, rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaves. Finding results of the TGase properties make this enzyme a good candidate for application in the food industry. However, additional work is required to increase activity yield during extraction and purification for commercial scale of TGase from this plant.  

  15. Characterization of an AM404 Analogue, N-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)arachidonoylamide, as a Substrate and Inactivator of Prostaglandin Endoperoxide Synthase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)arachidonoylamide (AM404) is an inhibitor of endocannabinoid inactivation that has been used in cellular and animal studies. AM404 is a derivative of arachidonic acid and has been reported to inhibit arachidonate oxygenation by prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase-1 and -2 (PGHS-1 and -2, respectively). While examining the structural requirements for inhibition of PGHS, we discovered that the meta isomer of AM404, N-(3-hydroxyphenyl)arachidonoylamide (3-HPAA), is a substrate for purified PGHS. PGHS-2 efficiently oxygenated 3-HPAA to prostaglandin and hydroxyeicosatetraenoate products. No oxidation of the phenolamide moiety was observed. 3-HPAA appeared to be converted by PGHS-1 in a similar manner; however, conversion was less efficient than that by PGHS-2. PGHS-2 was selectively, dose-dependently, and irreversibly inactivated in the presence of 3-HPAA. Complete inactivation of PGHS-2 was achieved with 10 μM 3-HPAA. Preliminary characterization revealed that 3-HPAA inactivation did not result from covalent modification of PGHS-2 or damage to the heme moiety. These studies provide additional insight into the structural requirements for substrate metabolism and inactivation of PGHS and report the first metabolism-dependent, selective inactivator of PGHS-2. PMID:19928795

  16. Characterization of an AM404 analogue, N-(3-hydroxyphenyl)arachidonoylamide, as a substrate and inactivator of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turman, Melissa V; Kingsley, Philip J; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2009-12-29

    N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)arachidonoylamide (AM404) is an inhibitor of endocannabinoid inactivation that has been used in cellular and animal studies. AM404 is a derivative of arachidonic acid and has been reported to inhibit arachidonate oxygenation by prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase-1 and -2 (PGHS-1 and -2, respectively). While examining the structural requirements for inhibition of PGHS, we discovered that the meta isomer of AM404, N-(3-hydroxyphenyl)arachidonoylamide (3-HPAA), is a substrate for purified PGHS. PGHS-2 efficiently oxygenated 3-HPAA to prostaglandin and hydroxyeicosatetraenoate products. No oxidation of the phenolamide moiety was observed. 3-HPAA appeared to be converted by PGHS-1 in a similar manner; however, conversion was less efficient than that by PGHS-2. PGHS-2 was selectively, dose-dependently, and irreversibly inactivated in the presence of 3-HPAA. Complete inactivation of PGHS-2 was achieved with 10 muM 3-HPAA. Preliminary characterization revealed that 3-HPAA inactivation did not result from covalent modification of PGHS-2 or damage to the heme moiety. These studies provide additional insight into the structural requirements for substrate metabolism and inactivation of PGHS and report the first metabolism-dependent, selective inactivator of PGHS-2.

  17. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  18. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  19. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  20. Interference of the low-pH inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain HSZP with the early shutoff function of superinfecting HSV-1 strain KOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, J; Kúdelová, M; Rajcáni, J

    1999-03-01

    In former studies, we described that the HSZP strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was defective with respect to the early shutoff of host protein synthesis but was effective at interfering with the early shutoff function of the HSV-1 strain KOS, even when heat-inactivated or neutralized by antibody. However, the HSZP strain failed to interfere when inactivated with zinc ions or purified from cells treated with 2-deoxy-D-glucose. In this study, we provide evidence that the ability of the purified low-pH inactivated (citrate buffer, pH 3.0) and gel-filtered (Sephadex G-25) HSZP virions to adsorb host cells was not significantly affected. However, their ability to induce interference with the early shutoff function of the superinfecting HSV-1 strain KOS was restricted. In comparison with native virus, up to eight times more low-pH inactivated HSZP virions were needed to interfere with the shutoff by strain KOS. The interference was not due to exclusion of strain KOS by HSZP at the level of adsorption and/or penetration. The restriction was partially overcome by treatment of the cells with polyethylene glycol after adsorption of the low-pH inactivated HSZP virions. This observation indicates that the direct fusion of the virion envelope of low-pH inactivated HSZP with the plasma cell membrane was predominantly hampered.

  1. Chlorine Dioxide Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts and Bacterial Spore Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauret, Christian P.; Radziminski, Chris Z.; Lepuil, Michael; Creason, Robin; Andrews, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum, which is resistant to chlorine concentrations typically used in water treatment, is recognized as a significant waterborne pathogen. Recent studies have demonstrated that chlorine dioxide is a more efficient disinfectant than free chlorine against Cryptosporidium oocysts. It is not known, however, if oocysts from different suppliers are equally sensitive to chlorine dioxide. This study used both a most-probable-number–cell culture infectivity assay and in vitro excystation to evaluate chlorine dioxide inactivation kinetics in laboratory water at pH 8 and 21°C. The two viability methods produced significantly different results (P < 0.05). Products of disinfectant concentration and contact time (Ct values) of 1,000 mg · min/liter were needed to inactivate approximately 0.5 log10 and 2.0 log10 units (99% inactivation) of C. parvum as measured by in vitro excystation and cell infectivity, respectively, suggesting that excystation is not an adequate viability assay. Purified oocysts originating from three different suppliers were evaluated and showed marked differences with respect to their resistance to inactivation when using chlorine dioxide. Ct values of 75, 550, and 1,000 mg · min/liter were required to achieve approximately 2.0 log10 units of inactivation with oocysts from different sources. Finally, the study compared the relationship between easily measured indicators, including Bacillus subtilis (aerobic) spores and Clostridium sporogenes (anaerobic) spores, and C. parvum oocysts. The bacterial spores were found to be more sensitive to chlorine dioxide than C. parvum oocysts and therefore could not be used as direct indicators of C. parvum inactivation for this disinfectant. In conclusion, it is suggested that future studies address issues such as oocyst purification protocols and the genetic diversity of C. parvum, since these factors might affect oocyst disinfection sensitivity. PMID:11425712

  2. Chlorine dioxide inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and bacterial spore indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauret, C P; Radziminski, C Z; Lepuil, M; Creason, R; Andrews, R C

    2001-07-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum, which is resistant to chlorine concentrations typically used in water treatment, is recognized as a significant waterborne pathogen. Recent studies have demonstrated that chlorine dioxide is a more efficient disinfectant than free chlorine against Cryptosporidium oocysts. It is not known, however, if oocysts from different suppliers are equally sensitive to chlorine dioxide. This study used both a most-probable-number-cell culture infectivity assay and in vitro excystation to evaluate chlorine dioxide inactivation kinetics in laboratory water at pH 8 and 21 degrees C. The two viability methods produced significantly different results (P < 0.05). Products of disinfectant concentration and contact time (Ct values) of 1,000 mg. min/liter were needed to inactivate approximately 0.5 log(10) and 2.0 log(10) units (99% inactivation) of C. parvum as measured by in vitro excystation and cell infectivity, respectively, suggesting that excystation is not an adequate viability assay. Purified oocysts originating from three different suppliers were evaluated and showed marked differences with respect to their resistance to inactivation when using chlorine dioxide. Ct values of 75, 550, and 1,000 mg. min/liter were required to achieve approximately 2.0 log(10) units of inactivation with oocysts from different sources. Finally, the study compared the relationship between easily measured indicators, including Bacillus subtilis (aerobic) spores and Clostridium sporogenes (anaerobic) spores, and C. parvum oocysts. The bacterial spores were found to be more sensitive to chlorine dioxide than C. parvum oocysts and therefore could not be used as direct indicators of C. parvum inactivation for this disinfectant. In conclusion, it is suggested that future studies address issues such as oocyst purification protocols and the genetic diversity of C. parvum, since these factors might affect oocyst disinfection sensitivity.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of cucurmosin, a ribosome-inactivating protein from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M; Ye, X; Cai, J; Lin, Y

    2000-05-01

    Cucurmosin, a ribosome-inactivating protein purified from pumpkin, the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata, has been crystallized using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) and have unit-cell parameters a = 41.91, b = 59. 48, c = 98.78 A. There is one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The diffraction data to 3.0 A resolution were collected on a MAR Research image-plate detector.

  4. Effect of formaldehyde inactivation on poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Thomas; Dunn, Glynis; Eastwood, David; Minor, Philip D; Martin, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Inactivated polio vaccines, which have been used in many countries for more than 50 years, are produced by treating live poliovirus (PV) with formaldehyde. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying virus inactivation are not well understood. Infection by PV is initiated by virus binding to specific cell receptors, which results in viral particles undergoing sequential conformational changes that generate altered structural forms (135S and 80S particles) and leads to virus cell entry. We have analyzed the ability of inactivated PV to bind to the human poliovirus receptor (hPVR) using various techniques such as ultracentrifugation, fluorescence-activated cell sorting flow cytometry and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The results showed that although retaining the ability to bind to hPVR, inactivated PV bound less efficiently in comparison to live PV. We also found that inactivated PV showed resistance to structural conversion in vitro, as judged by measuring changes in antigenicity, the ability to bind to hPVR, and viral RNA release at high temperature. Furthermore, viral RNA from inactivated PV was shown to be modified, since cDNA yields obtained by RT-PCR amplification were severely reduced and no infectious virus was recovered after RNA transfection into susceptible cells. Importance: This study represents a novel insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for poliovirus inactivation. We show that inactivation with formaldehyde has an effect on early steps of viral replication as it reduces the ability of PV to bind to hPVR, decreases the sensitivity of PV to convert to 135S particles, and abolishes the infectivity of its viral RNA. These changes are likely responsible for the loss of infectivity shown by PV following inactivation. Techniques used in this study represent new approaches for the characterization of inactivated PV products and could be useful in developing improved methods for the production and quality control testing of

  5. Destruction of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus by heat treatment and rapid detection of virus inactivation by RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Nam, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Myung; Yim, Kyu-Ock; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2003-12-31

    Heat treatment is commonly used to control viral contamination of seeds. To study virus inactivation, virus was purified from seeds contaminated with Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) after various heat treatments. CGMMV particles were observed to be physically disrupted by high temperature. Analysis of viral RNA revealed that the 5' and 3' termini of the genome were protected whereas regions between 2-2.5, 3.2-3.7 and 4-4.8 kb from the 5' terminus were not. Heat inactivation of virus on seeds was confirmed by RT-PCR using primers for a heat-sensitive region. The RT-PCR approach developed here may prove preferable to time- and labor-intensive bioassays for assessing virus heat inactivation.

  6. Control of aerosol contaminants in indoor air: combining the particle concentration reduction with microbial inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin; Honda, Takeshi; Kim, Ki Youn; Toivola, Mika; Rao, K S Ramchander; Reponen, Tiina

    2007-01-15

    An indoor air purification technique, which combines unipolar ion emission and photocatalytic oxidation (promoted by a specially designed RCI cell), was investigated in two test chambers, 2.75 m3 and 24.3 m3, using nonbiological and biological challenge aerosols. The reduction in particle concentration was measured size selectively in real-time, and the Air Cleaning Factor and the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) were determined. While testing with virions and bacteria, bioaerosol samples were collected and analyzed, and the microorganism survival rate was determined as a function of exposure time. We observed that the aerosol concentration decreased approximately 10 to approximately 100 times more rapidly when the purifier operated as compared to the natural decay. The data suggest that the tested portable unit operating in approximately 25 m3 non-ventilated room is capable to provide CADR-values more than twice as great than the conventional closed-loop HVAC system with a rating 8 filter. The particle removal occurred due to unipolar ion emission, while the inactivation of viable airborne microorganisms was associated with photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 90% of initially viable MS2 viruses were inactivated resulting from 10 to 60 min exposure to the photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 75% of viable B. subtilis spores were inactivated in 10 min, and about 90% or greater after 30 min. The biological and chemical mechanisms that led to the inactivation of stress-resistant airborne viruses and bacterial spores were reviewed.

  7. The inactivation of hepatitis A virus and other model viruses by UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battigelli, D.A.; Sobsey, M.D.; Lobe, D.C. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet light is an attractive alternative to chemical disinfection of water, but little is known about its ability to inactivate important waterborne pathogens such as hepatitis A virus. Therefore, the sensitivity of HAV strain HM-175, coxsackievirus type B-5, rotavirus strain SA-11, and bacteriophages MS2 and [phi]X174 to ultraviolet radiation of 254 nm wavelength in phosphate buffered water was determined. Purified stocks of the viruses were combined and exposed to collimated UV radiation in a stirred reactor for a total dose of up to 40 mW sec/cm[sup 2]. Virus survival kinetics were determined from samples removed at dose intervals. The results of these experiments indicate that UV radiation can effectively inactivate viruses of public health concern in drinking water. (author).

  8. Comparative study on the mechanisms of rotavirus inactivation by sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.L. (Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes a comparative study on the effects of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate on purified rotavirus SA-11 particles. Both chemicals readily inactivated rotavirus at quite low concentrations and under very mild conditions. In addition, both agents modified the viral capsid and prevented the adsorption of inactivated virions to cells. Capsid damage by ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused a shift in the densities of rotavirions from about l.35 to about 1.37 g/ml and a reduction in their sedimentation coefficients. Sodium dodcyl sulfate, on the other hand, did not detectably alter either of these physical properties of rotavirions. Both agents caused some alteration of the isoelectric points of the virions. Finally, analysis of rotavirus proteins showed that ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused the loss of two protein peaks from the electrophoretic pattern of virions but sodium dodecyl sulfate caused the loss of only one of these same protein peaks.

  9. 76 FR 29194 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Mexico and Sweden: Revocation of Antidumping Duty Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... International Trade Administration Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Mexico and Sweden: Revocation of... duty orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Mexico and Sweden. Pursuant to section 751(c) of... of the existing antidumping duty orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Mexico and...

  10. 75 FR 57815 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... COMMISSION Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden AGENCY: United... antidumping duty orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden... antidumping duty orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden...

  11. 76 FR 29191 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland and the Netherlands: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... International Trade Administration Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland and the Netherlands... from Finland and the Netherlands would likely lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping and... orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose (purified CMC) from Finland and the Netherlands. See Notice...

  12. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-08-22

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  13. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  14. Purified guar galactomannan as an improved pharmaceutical excipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, M S; Friend, D R

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess certain pharmaceutical attributes of guar galactomannan, a hydrocolloid polysaccharide obtained from the endosperm of the leguminous plant Cyamopsis tetragonolobus (L.), following purification using both literature procedures and new processes. Experiments were performed to measure viscosity, hydration rate, tablet hardness, and dissolution profiles of guar galactomannan both before and after purification. The viscosity of an aqueous 1% purified galactomannan solution is typically 40-50% higher than its unpurified guar galactomannan precursor. The hydration rate of an aqueous 1% purified galactomannan solution increases by 100% after purification. These physicochemical changes resulted in improvements in pharmaceutical properties such as better stir speed independence in both tablet and capsule dissolution profiles and improved tablet hardness. For instance, time to 50% dissolution of ranitidine HCl from capsules containing unpurified guar gum was 0.4 and 1.8 hr at 20 and 40 rpm, respectively, using USP Apparatus II. Using the same amount of purified guar gum and the same conditions (20 and 40 rpm), these values were increased to 2.9 and 3.8 hr, respectively. These data demonstrate a reduced effect of changing agitation conditions and the need for less guar gum to sustain the release of a water-soluble drug. Tablet hardness of purified guar gum (particle size < 75 microns) was about 7 kP and the same unpurified guar gum of equal particle size and hydration gave a hardness of less than 1 kP.

  15. Partial characterization of hog renin purified by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, C; Ménard, J; Sicard, P; Corvol, P

    1976-05-01

    A method has been set up to purify renin on a large scale by affinity chromatography using Pepstatin, a potent inhibitor of renin, as a ligand. Pepstatin was covalently coupled to Sepharose via six different spacer 'arms'. The Sepharose-hexamethylenediamino-Pepstatin appeared to be the better derivative for renin purification even at a concentration as low as 160 nmol of Pepstatin/ml of moist gel. Renin was extracted from 100 kg of hog kidneys and semi-purified by ammonium sulfate precipitations and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The active fraction (48.5 g of proteins) was applied on a 500-ml affinity column. Renin was eluted in the starting buffer containing 6 M urea. Renin was purified 120-fold by the affinity chromatography step with a 79% recovery. Physico-chemical characterization of highly purified renin was performed. Isoelectrofocusing on a pH gradient from 3 to 6 showed a major peak with an isoelectric point (pI) of 4.95 and a minor peak (pI = 4.70). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, pH 7.8, at different gel concentrations, showed a single peak of renin activity which was found in the major protein band. Molecular size estimated on agarose-acrylamide gel filtration was 40 000. All these physical parameters were similar before and after purification.

  16. Influence of a highly purified senna extract on colonic epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkom, B A; Karrenbeld, A; van Der Sluis, T; Koudstaal, J; de Vries, E G; Kleibeuker, J H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic use of sennoside laxatives often causes pseudomelanosis coli. A recent study suggested that pseudomelanosis coli is associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk. A single high dose of highly purified senna extract increased proliferation rate and reduced crypt length in th

  17. Mechanical Properties, Purifying Techniques and Processing Methods of Metal Yttrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The mechanical properties of metal yttrium such as strength, plasticity, hardness and elasticity were introduced. The purifying techniques of yttrium were discussed in detail. The processing methods for metal yttrium including extruding, forging, rolling, wiredrawing and welding were also introduced. Finally, the potential use of yttrium and its alloys were prospected.

  18. Strong Purifying Selection in Transmission of Mammalian Mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James Bruce; Freyer, Christoph; Elson, Joanna L; Wredenberg, Anna; Cansu, Zekiye; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2008-01-01

    There is an intense debate concerning whether selection or demographics has been most important in shaping the sequence variation observed in modern human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Purifying selection is thought to be important in shaping mtDNA sequence evolution, but the strength of this selection has been debated, mainly due to the threshold effect of pathogenic mtDNA mutations and an observed excess of new mtDNA mutations in human population data. We experimentally addressed this issue by studying the maternal transmission of random mtDNA mutations in mtDNA mutator mice expressing a proofreading-deficient mitochondrial DNA polymerase. We report a rapid and strong elimination of nonsynonymous changes in protein-coding genes; the hallmark of purifying selection. There are striking similarities between the mutational patterns in our experimental mouse system and human mtDNA polymorphisms. These data show strong purifying selection against mutations within mtDNA protein-coding genes. To our knowledge, our study presents the first direct experimental observations of the fate of random mtDNA mutations in the mammalian germ line and demonstrates the importance of purifying selection in shaping mitochondrial sequence diversity. PMID:18232733

  19. Highly thermostable xylanase purified from Rhizomucor miehei NRL 3169.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzi, E M

    2011-03-01

    A thermostable xylanase was purified and characterized from the thermophilic fungus Rhizomucor miehei (Cooney & Emerson) Schipper. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, sephadex G-100 gel filtration and diethylaminoethyl cellulose anion exchange chromatography with a 29.1-fold. The enzyme was highly active within a range of pH from 5.0 to 6.5. The optimum temperature of the purified enzyme was 75°C. The enzyme showed high thermal stability at 70°C and 75°C and the half-life of the xylanase at 90°C was 30 min. Km and Vmax values at 50°C of the purified enzyme were 0.055 mg/ml and 113.5 μmol min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ respectively. The enzyme was activated by Ca²+, Cu²+, K+ and Na+. On the other hand, Ag²+, Hg²+, Ba²+, and Zn²+ inhibited the enzyme. The molecular weight of the xylanase was estimated to be 27 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The present study is among the first works to examine and describe a secreted highly thermostable endoxylanase from the Rhizomucor miehei fungus. This enzyme displays a number of biochemical properties that make it a potentially strong candidate for industrial and commercial application in pulp bleaching.

  20. Inactivation of jack bean urease by allicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkiewicz, Adam; Zaborska, Wiesława; Sepioł, Janusz; Góra, Maciej; Zaborska, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Allicin--diallyl thiosulfinate--is the main biologically active component of freshly crushed garlic. Allicin was synthesized as described elsewhere and was tested for its inhibitory ability against jack bean urease in 20 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0 at 22 degrees C. The results indicate that allicin is an enzymatic inactivator. The loss of urease activity was irreversible, time- and concentration dependent and the kinetics of the inactivation was biphasic; each phase, obeyed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The rate constants for inactivation were measured for the fast and slow phases and for several concentrations of allicin. Thiol reagents, and competitive inhibitor (boric acid) protected the enzyme from loss of enzymatic activity. The studies demonstrate that urease inactivation results from the reaction between allicin and the SH-group, situated in the urease active site (Cys592).

  1. Photosensitizers mediated photodynamic inactivation against virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Lukasz; Skupin-Mrugalska, Paulina; Mielcarek, Jadwiga; Goslinski, Tomasz; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Viruses cause many diseases in humans from the rather innocent common cold to more serious or chronic, life-threatening infections. The long-term side effects, sometimes low effectiveness of standard pharmacotherapy and the emergence of drug resistance require a search for new alternative or complementary antiviral therapeutic approaches. One new approach to inactivate microorganisms is photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). PACT has evolved as a potential method to inactivate viruses. The great challenge for PACT is to develop a methodology enabling the effective inactivation of viruses while leaving the host cells as untouched as possible. This review aims to provide some main directions of antiviral PACT, taking into account different photosensitizers, which have been widely investigated as potential antiviral agents. In addition, several aspects concerning PACT as a tool to assure viral inactivation in human blood products will be addressed.

  2. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  3. Inactivation of Viruses by Benzalkonium Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. A.; Froelich, E. J.

    1964-01-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (as Roccal or Zephiran) was found to inactivate influenza, measles, canine distemper, rabies, fowl laryngotracheitis, vaccinia, Semliki Forest, feline pneumonitis, meningopneumonitis, and herpes simplex viruses after 10 min of exposure at 30 C or at room temperature. Poliovirus and encephalomyocarditis virus were not inactivated under the same conditions. It was concluded that all viruses tested were sensitive except members of the picorna group. The literature was reviewed. PMID:4288740

  4. Microbiological stability of homeopathic medicines using purified water as vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Teresa Cegalla

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homeopathic medicines are prepared in homeopathic pharmacies. This leads to freedom of prescription but requires more knowledge of the clinicians to achieve the best results. Preparations made of purified water receive a validity of 24 hours, but there are prescriptions for up to 30 days. This contradiction raises tensions among physicians, pharmacists and patients. Aims: to evaluate the increase in microbiological contamination in homeopathic medicines using purified water as vehicle compared with the microbiological stability of purified water. Contribute to the quality of homeopathic medicine and treatment. Methodology: daily microbiological analysis for one week to assess the growth of heterotrophic bacteria, Pseudomonas, yeasts and molds. The reference used was the USP 32/NF 27 and the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia 5th edition. Results: there was a higher growth of microorganisms on the medicine, compared with purified water. From the 2nd day on, this growth has been beyond the legal limits. Discussion: medicines for oral use are not sterile preparations, but they must remain stable during its shelf life. Our results indicate that contamination occurs from the earliest days of use. This shows the need to change the prescription in relation of the vehicle, to ensure hygiene and avoid potential contamination of the patient. It is necessary to prevent conflict of information between pharmacists and patients, and the contradiction of the doctor's advice, besides the potential risk of responsibility to be attributed to the pharmacy. It is necessary to promote a discussion between pharmacists and clinicians, to spread this information for those that prescribe. Conclusion: there was an increased of microbiological contamination of the medicines dispensed in purified water, which harms the quality of homeopathic medicine and homeopathic treatment.

  5. Inactivation of human myeloperoxidase by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Furtmüller, Paul G; Hofbauer, Stefan; Paton, Louise N; Obinger, Christian; Kettle, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    Human myeloperoxidase (MPO) uses hydrogen peroxide generated by the oxidative burst of neutrophils to produce an array of antimicrobial oxidants. During this process MPO is irreversibly inactivated. This study focused on the unknown role of hydrogen peroxide in this process. When treated with low concentrations of H2O2 in the absence of reducing substrates, there was a rapid loss of up to 35% of its peroxidase activity. Inactivation is proposed to occur via oxidation reactions of Compound I with the prosthetic group or amino acid residues. At higher concentrations hydrogen peroxide acts as a suicide substrate with a rate constant of inactivation of 3.9 × 10(-3) s(-1). Treatment of MPO with high H2O2 concentrations resulted in complete inactivation, Compound III formation, destruction of the heme groups, release of their iron, and detachment of the small polypeptide chain of MPO. Ten of the protein's methionine residues were oxidized and the thermal stability of the protein decreased. Inactivation by high concentrations of H2O2 is proposed to occur via the generation of reactive oxidants when H2O2 reacts with Compound III. These mechanisms of inactivation may occur inside neutrophil phagosomes when reducing substrates for MPO become limiting and could be exploited when designing pharmacological inhibitors.

  6. Inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in food matrices: high pressure processing, photodynamic inactivation and pressure-assisted photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A.; Couceiro, J.; Bonifácio, D.; Martins, C.; Almeida, A.; Neves, M. G. P. M. S.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Saraiva, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Traditional food processing methods frequently depend on the application of high temperature. However, heat may cause undesirable changes in food properties and often has a negative impact on nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics. Therefore, reducing the microbial load without compromising the desirable properties of food products is still a technological challenge. High-pressure processing (HPP) can be classified as a cold pasteurization technique, since it is a non-thermal food preservation method that uses hydrostatic pressure to inactivate spoilage microorganisms. At the same time, it increases shelf life and retains the original features of food. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is also regarded as promising approach for the decontamination of food matrices. In this case, the inactivation of bacterial cells is achieved by the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygens species (ROS) produced from the combined interaction of a photosensitizer molecule, light and oxygen. This short review examines some recent developments on the application of HPP and PDI with food-grade photosensitizers for the inactivation of listeriae, taken as a food pathogen model. The results of a proof-of-concept trial of the use of high-pressure as a coadjutant to increase the efficiency of photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores is also addressed.

  7. Properties of purified recombinant human polyamine oxidase, PAOh1/SMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlin; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Devereux, Wendy; Hacker, Amy; Frydman, Benjamin; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2003-05-16

    The discovery of an inducible oxidase whose apparent substrate preference is spermine indicates that polyamine catabolism is more complex than that originally proposed. To facilitate the study of this enzyme, the purification and characterization of the recombinant human PAOh1/SMO polyamine oxidase are reported. Purified PAOh1/SMO oxidizes both spermine (K(m)=1.6 microM) and N(1)-acetylspermine (K(m)=51 microM), but does not oxidize spermidine. The purified human enzyme also does not oxidize eight representative antitumor polyamine analogues; however, specific oligamine analogues were found to be potent inhibitors of the oxidation of spermine by PAOh1/SMO. The results of these studies are consistent with the hypothesis that PAOh1/SMO represents a new addition to the polyamine metabolic pathway that may represent a new target for antineoplastic drug development.

  8. 42 CFR 84.171 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.171 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components. (a) Each non-powered air-purifying particulate...

  9. 42 CFR 84.170 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.170 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description. (a) Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators utilize the wearer's...

  10. Isolation of Microorganisms Able To Metabolize Purified Natural Rubber

    OpenAIRE

    Heisey, R. M.; Papadatos, S

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria able to grow on purified natural rubber in the absence of other organic carbon sources were isolated from soil. Ten isolates reduced the weight of vulcanized rubber from latex gloves by >10% in 6 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed the ability of the microorganisms to colonize, penetrate, and dramatically alter the physical structure of the rubber. The rubber-metabolizing bacteria were identified on the basis of fatty acid profiles and cell wall characteristics. Seve...

  11. Survey of Air Purifier Market Acceptance in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, air cleaner products have drawn a wide attention due to the extensive concern of air pollution in China. The study aims at research market acceptance of air purifiers. Meanwhile, an outlook of present market and competitive environment were introduced for driving forces of the research as background knowledge. In this thesis, a theoretical framework was designed to express the theory of customer acceptance, which provided theoretical support for the analysis process in th...

  12. Proteomic analysis of purified Newcastle disease virus particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Xiangpeng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Newcastle disease virus (NDV is an enveloped RNA virus, bearing severe economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Previous virion proteomic studies have shown that enveloped viruses carry multiple host cellular proteins both internally and externally during their life cycle. To address whether it also occurred during NDV infection, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of highly purified NDV La Sota strain particles. Results In addition to five viral structural proteins, we detected thirty cellular proteins associated with purified NDV La Sota particles. The identified cellular proteins comprised several functional categories, including cytoskeleton proteins, annexins, molecular chaperones, chromatin modifying proteins, enzymes-binding proteins, calcium-binding proteins and signal transduction-associated proteins. Among these, three host proteins have not been previously reported in virions of other virus families, including two signal transduction-associated proteins (syntenin and Ras small GTPase and one tumor-associated protein (tumor protein D52. The presence of five selected cellular proteins (i.e., β-actin, tubulin, annexin A2, heat shock protein Hsp90 and ezrin associated with the purified NDV particles was validated by Western blot or immunogold labeling assays. Conclusions The current study presented the first standard proteomic profile of NDV. The results demonstrated the incorporation of cellular proteins in NDV particles, which provides valuable information for elucidating viral infection and pathogenesis.

  13. Proteomic analysis of purified coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Dingming

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV is the coronavirus of domestic chickens causing major economic losses to the poultry industry. Because of the complexity of the IBV life cycle and the small number of viral structural proteins, important virus-host relationships likely remain to be discovered. Toward this goal, we performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis fractionation coupled to mass spectrometry identification approaches to perform a comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified IBV particles. Results Apart from the virus-encoded structural proteins, we detected 60 host proteins in the purified virions which can be grouped into several functional categories including intracellular trafficking proteins (20%, molecular chaperone (18%, macromolcular biosynthesis proteins (17%, cytoskeletal proteins (15%, signal transport proteins (15%, protein degradation (8%, chromosome associated proteins (2%, ribosomal proteins (2%, and other function proteins (3%. Interestingly, 21 of the total host proteins have not been reported to be present in virions of other virus families, such as major vault protein, TENP protein, ovalbumin, and scavenger receptor protein. Following identification of the host proteins by proteomic methods, the presence of 4 proteins in the purified IBV preparation was verified by western blotting and immunogold labeling detection. Conclusions The results present the first standard proteomic profile of IBV and may facilitate the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms.

  14. Inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage with ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, O.E.; Bogdanov, M.V.; Kazantseva, V.A.; Gabrilevskaia, L.N.; Kodkind, G.K.H.

    The study of ozone inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage showed the presence in sewage of suspensions of organic origin and bacterial flora to influence the rate of inactivation. The inactivation rate of poliomyelitis virus in sewage free from organic suspension and bacterial flora was significantly higher than that in sewage containing such suspension and bacterial flora. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses was found not to depend upon the protein and salt composition and pH of sewage or strain appurtenance of viruses. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses directly depended upon the dose of ozone and time of contact with it. Differences in the resistance of different types of poliomyelitis virus, ECHO and Coxsackie viruses to the effect of ozone are likely exist. These differences are manifested within the range of relatively small doses of ozone. E. coli is more resistant to ozone than entero-viruses. The results of laboratory studies were used to choose the regimen of sanitation of urban sewage to be used in technological cycles of industrial enterprises.

  15. Genes that escape from X inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berletch, Joel B; Yang, Fan; Xu, Jun; Carrel, Laura; Disteche, Christine M

    2011-08-01

    To achieve a balanced gene expression dosage between males (XY) and females (XX), mammals have evolved a compensatory mechanism to randomly inactivate one of the female X chromosomes. Despite this chromosome-wide silencing, a number of genes escape X inactivation: in women about 15% of X-linked genes are bi-allelically expressed and in mice, about 3%. Expression from the inactive X allele varies from a few percent of that from the active allele to near equal expression. While most genes have a stable inactivation pattern, a subset of genes exhibit tissue-specific differences in escape from X inactivation. Escape genes appear to be protected from the repressive chromatin modifications associated with X inactivation. Differences in the identity and distribution of escape genes between species and tissues suggest a role for these genes in the evolution of sex differences in specific phenotypes. The higher expression of escape genes in females than in males implies that they may have female-specific roles and may be responsible for some of the phenotypes observed in X aneuploidy.

  16. White spot syndrome virus inactivation study by using gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidareh, Marzieh; Sedeh, Farahnaz Motamedi; Soltani, Mehdi; Rajabifar, Saeed; Afsharnasab, Mohammad; Dashtiannasab, Aghil

    2014-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). White spot syndrome virus is a pathogen of major economic importance in cultured penaeid shrimp industries. White spot disease can cause mortalities reaching 100% within 3-10 days of gross signs appearing. During the period of culture, immunostimulant agents and vaccines may provide potential methods to protect shrimps from opportunistic and pathogenic microrganisms. In this study, firstly, WSSV was isolated from infected shrimp and then multiplied in crayfish. WSSV was purified from the infected crayfish haemolymph by sucrose gradient and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In vivo virus titration was performed in shrimp, Penaeus semisulcatus. The LD50 of live virus stock was calculated 10 5.4/mL. Shrimp post-larvae (1-2 g) were treated with gamma-irradiated (different doses) WSSV (100 to 10-4 dilutions) for a period of 10 days. The dose/survival curve for irradiated and un-irradiated WSSV was drawn; the optimum dose range for inactivation of WSSV and unaltered antigenicity was obtained 14-15 kGy. This preliminary information suggests that shrimp appear to benefit from treatment with gammairradiated WSSV especially at 14-15 KGy.

  17. SOYBEAN (GLYCINE MAX UREASE: STEADY STATE KINETICS, STABILITY AND THERMAL INACTIVATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The soybean (Glycine max urease was characterized with respect to kinetic parameters, stability studies and thermal inactivation. The stability temperature and stability pH of the purified urease was found to be 4 °C and 7.6, respectively. The optimum pH and optimum temperature were 7.0 oC and 65 oC, respectively. The energy of activation (Ea was 15.40 kJ/mol. Further, the Km and Vmax were determined by Lineweaver Burk plot and the values were 2.70 ± 0.10 mM and 2.85 x102 µmol NH3/min/mg protein,respectively. Thermal inactivation studies at 65 oC, revealed the mono-phasic kinetics, which indicated the loss in activity in single phase. However, at higher temperatures (70 oC, 75 oC and 77 oC, the kinetic pattern was mainly bi-phasic. At 80 oC, there was complete loss in activity thereby showing the denaturation of enzyme. Thermal inactivation studies strongly support the oligomeric nature of urease.

  18. Inactivation of the Scrapie agent by ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Wade, W.F.; German, T.L.; Marsh, R.F. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA). Dept. of Veterinary Science)

    1985-04-01

    The sensitivity of the scrapie agent to u.v. inactivation was found to be related to the purity of the tissue preparation. Scrapie infectivity associated with membrane vesicles was unaffected when irradiated with 10/sup 4/ J/m/sup 2/. Irradiation of more highly purified preparations from detergent-extracted CsCl gradient fractions reduced scrapie infectivity from 10sup(7.8) log/sub 10/ LD/sub 50/ per ml to as low as 10sup(4.5). Sensitivity of membrane-associated scrapie infectivity to inactivation by u.v. irradiation could be increased by addition of chlorpromazine, a phenthiazine antipsychotic which penetrates lipid bilayers and induces single-strand breaks in nucleic acids under irradiation. Chlorpromazine without irradiation, and a semiquinone protein-binding radical of chlorpromazine, failed to decrease scrapie infectivity by themselves. A closely related phenthiazine antipsychotic, trifluoperazine, which does not bind to nucleic acids, did not reduce scapie infectivity. These findings suggest that the target of u.v. radiation for inactivation of scrapie infectivity in the presence of chlorpromazine is an essential nucleic acid.

  19. Kinetic Analysis of Guanidine Hydrochloride Inactivation of β-Galactosidase in the Presence of Galactose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles O. Nwamba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of purified β-Galactosidase was done with GdnHCl in the absence and presence of varying [galactose] at 50°C and at pH 4.5. Lineweaver-Burk plots of initial velocity data, in the presence and absence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl and galactose, were used to determine the relevant and max values, with p-nitrophenyl β-D-galactopyranoside (pNPG as substrate, S. Plots of ln([]∞−[] against time in the presence of GdnHCl yielded the inactivation rate constant, A. Plots of A versus [S] at different galactose concentrations were straight lines that became increasingly less steep as the [galactose] increased, showing that A was dependent on [S]. Slopes and intercepts of the 1/[]∞ versus 1/[] yielded +0 and ′+0, the microscopic rate constants for the free enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex, respectively. Plots of +0 and ′+0 versus [galactose] showed that galactose protected the free enzyme as well as the enzyme-substrate complex (only at the lowest and highest [galactose] against GdnHCl inactivation. In the absence of galactose, GdnHCl exhibited some degree of non-competitive inhibition. In the presence of GdnHCl, galactose exhibited competitive inhibition at the lower [galactose] of 5 mM which changed to non-competitive as the [galactose] increased. The implications of our findings are further discussed.

  20. Humoral immune responses in rabbits induced by an experimental inactivated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus vaccine prepared from F69 strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张传海; 郭中敏; 郑焕英; 陆家海; 王一飞; 鄢心革; 赵勇; 杜雄威; 张欣; 方苓; 凌文华; 戚树源; 余新炳; 钟南山

    2004-01-01

    Background The etiologic agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been confirmed to be a novel coronavirus (CoV), namely SARS-CoV. Developing safe and effective SARS-CoV vaccines is essential for us to prevent the possible reemergence of its epidemic. Previous experiences indicate that inactivated vaccine is conventional and more hopeful to be successfully developed. Immunogenicity evaluation of an experimental inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine in rabbits was conducted and reported in this paper.Methods The large-scale cultured SARS-CoV F69 strain was inactivated with 0.4% formaldehyde and purified, then used as the immunogen combined with Freund's adjuvant. Eight adult New Zealand rabbits were immunized four times with this experimental inactivated vaccine. Twelve sets of rabbit serum were sampled from the third day to the seventy-fourth day after the first vaccination. The titers of specific anti-SARS-CoV IgG antibody were determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the neutralizing antibody titers were detected with micro-cytopathic effect neutralization test.Conclusions The inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine made from F69 strain owns strong immunogenicity, and the cross neutralization response between the two different SARS-CoV strains gives a hint of the similar neutralizing epitopes, which provide stable bases for the development of inactivated SARS-CoV vaccines.

  1. Ferromagnetic Levan Composite: An Affinity Matrix to Purify Lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Angeli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and inexpensive procedure used magnetite and levan to synthesize a composite recovered by a magnetic field. Lectins from Canavalia ensiformis (Con A and Cratylia mollis (Cramoll 1 and Cramoll 1,4 did bind specifically to composite. The magnetic property of derivative favored washing out contaminating proteins and recovery of pure lectins with glucose elution. Cramoll 1 was purified by this affinity binding procedure in two steps instead of a previous three-step protocol with ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion exchange chromatography through a CM-cellulose column.

  2. Inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Yonetamari, Kenta; Tokumitsu, Yusuke; Yonemori, Seiya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-08-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals is measured. This study aims to evaluate the bactericidal effects of OH radicals produced by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma widely used for plasma medicine; however, in this study, OH radicals are produced by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of water vapor instead of plasma to allow the production of OH radicals with almost no other reactive species. A 172 nm VUV light from a Xe2 excimer lamp irradiates a He-H2O mixture flowing in a quartz tube to photodissociate H2O to produce OH, H, O, HO2, H2O2, and O3. The produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) flow out of the quartz tube nozzle to the bacteria on an agar plate and cause inactivation. The inactivation by OH radicals among the six ROS is observed by properly setting the experimental conditions with the help of simulations calculating the ROS densities. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals causes visible inactivation.

  3. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value ar

  4. Inactivation of Effector Caspases through Nondegradative Polyubiquitylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Mark; Broemer, Meike; Tenev, Tencho;

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated inactivation of caspases has long been postulated to contribute to the regulation of apoptosis. However, detailed mechanisms and functional consequences of caspase ubiquitylation have not been demonstrated. Here we show that the Drosophila Inhibitor of Apoptosis 1, DIAP1, block...

  5. Temperature Tolerance and Inactivation of Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Jang S; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2015-11-01

    In late 2013, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was introduced to the New World and large outbreaks occurred in the Caribbean islands causing over a million suspected and over 20,000 laboratory-confirmed cases. Serological analysis is an essential component for the diagnosis of CHIKV infection together with virus isolation and detection of viral nucleic acid. Demonstrating virus neutralizing by serum antibodies in a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) is the gold standard of all serological diagnostic assays. Prior to the testing, heat inactivation of serum at 56°C for 30 min is required for the inactivation of complement activity and adventitious viruses. The presence of adventitious contaminating viruses may interfere with the results by leading to a higher number of plaques on the monolayers and subsequent false-negative results. This procedure is widely accepted for the inactivation of flaviviruses and alphaviruses. In this study, the thermostability of CHIKV was evaluated. Heat inactivation at 56°C for 30 min was demonstrated to be insufficient for the complete removal of infectious CHIKV virions present in the samples. This thermotolerance of CHIKV could compromise the accuracy of serum tests, and therefore longer treatment for greater than 120 min is recommended.

  6. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Schoenmakers (Sam); E. Wassenaar (Evelyne); J.W. Hoogerbrugge (Jos); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); W.M. Baarends (Willy)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDuring meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (Z

  7. Sex chromosome inactivation in the male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2009-10-01

    Mammalian females have two X chromosomes, while males have only one X plus a Y chromosome. In order to balance X-linked gene dosage between the sexes, one X chromosome undergoes inactivation during development of female embryos. This process has been termed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Inactivation of the single X chromosome also occurs in the male, but is transient and is confined to the late stages of first meiotic prophase during spermatogenesis. This phenomenon has been termed meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). A substantial portion ( approximately 15-25%) of X-linked mRNA-encoding genes escapes XCI in female somatic cells. While no mRNA genes are known to escape MSCI in males, approximately 80% of X-linked miRNA genes have been shown to escape this process. Recent results have led to the proposal that the RNA interference mechanism may be involved in regulating XCI in female cells. We suggest that some MSCI-escaping miRNAs may play a similar role in regulating MSCI in male germ cells.

  8. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  9. Creating and purifying an observation instrument using the generalizability theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rodríguez-Naveiras

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The control of quality of data it is one of the most relevant aspects in observational researches. The Generalizability Theory (GT provides a method of analysis that allows us to isolate the various sources of error measurement. At the same time, it helps us to determine the extent to which various factors can change and analyze the effect on the generalizability coefficient. In the work shown here, there are two studies aimed to creating and purifying an observation instrument, Observation Protocol in the Teaching Functions (Protocolo de Funciones Docentes, PROFUNDO, v1 and v2, for behavioral assessment which has been carried out by instructors in a social-affective out-of-school program. The reliability and homogeneity studies are carried out once the instrument has been created and purified. The reliability study will be done through the GT method taking both codes (c and agents (a as differential facets in. The generalization will be done through observers using a crossed multi-faceted design (A × O × C. In the homogeneity study the generalization facet will be done through codes using the same design that the reliability study.

  10. Synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using purified URAK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Venkataraman; Umamaheshwaran, Paneer Selvam; Guhan, Kandasamy; Nanthini, Raja Amrisa; Krithiga, Bhaskar; Jaithoon, Nagoor Meeran Hasika; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2011-09-01

    This study aims at developing a new eco-friendly process for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using purified URAK. URAK is a fibrinolytic enzyme produced by Bacillus cereus NK1. The enzyme was purified and used for the synthesis of AuNPs and AgNPs. The enzyme produced AgNPs when incubated with 1 mM AgNO3 for 24 h and AuNPs when incubated with 1 mM HAuCl4 for 60 h. But when NaOH was added, the synthesis was rapid and occurred within 5 min for AgNPs and 12 h for AuNPs. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by a peak at 440 nm and 550 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. TEM analysis showed that AgNPs of the size 60 nm and AuNPs of size 20 nm were synthesized. XRD confirmed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles and AFM showed the morphology of the nanoparticle to be spherical. FT-IR showed that protein was responsible for the synthesis of the nanoparticles. This process is highly simple, versatile and produces AgNPs and AuNPs in environmental friendly manner. Moreover, the synthesized nanoparticles were found to contain immobilized enzyme. Also, URAK was tested on RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line and was found to be non-cytotoxic until 100 μg/ml.

  11. A Purified Recombinant Lipopeptide as Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chyi Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic lipopeptides have been widely used as vaccine adjuvants to enhance immune responses. The present study demonstrated that the tryptic N-terminal fragment of the lipoprotein rlipo-D1E3 (lipo-Nter induces superior antitumor effects compared to a synthetic lipopeptide. The lipo-Nter was purified and formulated with protein or peptide vaccines to determine if lipo-Nter could be used as a novel adjuvant and could induce antitumor immunity in a cervical cancer model. Purified lipo-Nter activated the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs, leading to the secretion of TNF-α through TLR2/6 but not TLR1/2. A recombinant mutant HPV16 E7 (rE7m protein was mixed with lipo-Nter to immunize the mice; the anti-E7 antibody titers were increased, and the T helper cells were skewed toward the Th1 fate (increased IL-2 and decreased IL-5 secretion. Single-dose injection of rE7m and lipo-Nter inhibited tumor growth, but the injection of rE7m alone did not. Accordingly, lipo-Nter also enhanced the antitumor immunity of the E7-derived peptide but not the synthetic lipopeptide (Pam3CSK4. We demonstrated that the lipo-Nter of a bacterial-derived recombinant lipoprotein is a novel adjuvant that could be used for the development of a new generation of vaccines.

  12. Life cycle assessment comparison of photocatalytic coating and air purifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichá, Marie; Žilka, Miroslav; Stieberová, Barbora; Freiberg, František

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a comparison of 2 very different options for removal of undesirable microorganisms and airborne pollutants from the indoor environment of hospitals, schools, homes, and other enclosed spaces using air purifiers and photocatalytic coatings based on nano titanium dioxide (TiO2 ). Both products were assessed by life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology from cradle-to-grave. The assessment also includes comparison of 2 different nano TiO2 production technologies, one by continuous hydrothermal synthesis and the other by a sulfate process. Results of the study showed a relatively large contribution of photocatalytic coatings to reducing the effects of selected indices in comparison with an air purifier, regardless of which nano TiO2 production method is used. Although the impacts of the sulfate process are significantly lower compared to those of hydrothermal synthesis when viewed in terms of production alone, taken in the context of the entire product life cycle, the net difference becomes less significant. The study has been elaborated within the Sustainable Hydrothermal Manufacturing of Nanomaterials (SHYMAN) project, which aims to develop competitive and sustainable continuous nanoparticle (NP) production technology based on supercritical hydrothermal synthesis. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:478-485. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. Production and Immobilization of Partially Purified Lipase From Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafei, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular lipase from Penicillium chrysogenum produced maximal activity 225 U/mL after four days at pH 6.5. It was partially purified 4.1 fold by ammonium sulphate precipitation (70%. The enzyme was immobilized on various carriers viz. alginate, k-carrageenan and polyacrylamide gel. The immobilization yield of enzyme immobilized in kcarrageenan and polyacrylamide gel (63.41% and 48.93% respectively was low in comparison to that immobilized with alginate (81.57%. Different concentrations of alginate were tried to study their effect on lipase production. Maximum immobilization yield was observed with 3% alginate. The optimal pH of the partially purified lipase was 7.5 and the optimum temperature was 35 °C. At 60 °C the immobilized enzyme retained 62.79% of its activity. Broader pH tolerance and higher heat stability could be achieved by this method. Immobilized lipase retained 72.09% relative activity after six hydrolysis cycles.

  14. Tea derived galloylated polyphenols cross-link purified gastrointestinal mucins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Georgiades

    Full Text Available Polyphenols derived from tea are thought to be important for human health. We show using a combination of particle tracking microrheology and small-angle neutron scattering that polyphenols acts as cross-linkers for purified gastrointestinal mucin, derived from the stomach and the duodenum. Both naturally derived purified polyphenols, and green and black tea extracts are shown to act as cross-linkers. The main active cross-linking component is found to be the galloylated forms of catechins. The viscosity, elasticity and relaxation time of the mucin solutions experience an order of magnitude change in value upon addition of the polyphenol cross-linkers. Similarly small-angle neutron scattering experiments demonstrate a sol-gel transition with the addition of polyphenols, with a large increase in the scattering at low angles, which is attributed to the formation of large scale (>10 nm heterogeneities during gelation. Cross-linking of mucins by polyphenols is thus expected to have an impact on the physicochemical environment of both the stomach and duodenum; polyphenols are expected to modulate the barrier properties of mucus, nutrient absorption through mucus and the viscoelastic microenvironments of intestinal bacteria.

  15. Magnetism for understanding catalyst analysis of purified carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellouard, Christine; Mercier, Guillaume; Cahen, Sébastien; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Gleize, Jérôme; Lamura, Gianrico; Hérold, Claire; Vigolo, Brigitte

    2016-08-01

    The precise quantification of catalyst residues in purified carbon nanotubes is often a major issue in view of any fundamental and/or applicative studies. More importantly, since the best CNTs are successfully grown with magnetic catalysts, their quantification becomes strictly necessary to better understand intrinsic properties of CNT. For these reasons, we have deeply analyzed the catalyst content remained in nickel-yttrium arc-discharge single walled carbon nanotubes purified by both a chlorine-gas phase and a standard acid-based treatment. The study focuses on Ni analysis which has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, and magnetic measurements. In the case of the acid-based treatment, all quantifications result in a decrease of the nanocrystallized Ni by a factor of two. In the case of the halogen gas treatment, analysis and quantification of Ni content is less straightforward: a huge difference appears between X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry results. Thanks to magnetic measurements, this disagreement is explained by the presence of Ni2+ ions, belonging to NiCl2 formed during the Cl-based purification process. In particular, NiCl2 compound appears under different magnetic/crystalline phases: paramagnetic or diamagnetic, or well intercalated in between carbon sheets with an ordered magnetic phase at low temperature.

  16. Radiation-induced inactivation of enzymes - Molecular mechanism based on inactivation of dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Gerszon, Joanna; Puchala, Mieczyslaw; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2016-11-01

    Proteins, which have enzymatic activities play a fundamental role in the cell due to participation in most of biological processes. Oxidative-induced damage of enzymes often have marked effects on cellular processes, which in consequence determine cell functioning and survival. In this review, we focused on the radiation-induced inactivation of enzymes with particular emphasis on the inactivation of dehydrogenases. For a better understanding of this issue, the efficiency of products of water radiolysis (•OH, O2•- and H2O2) in enzyme inactivation has been analysed. Reactions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with amino acids present in the active site of enzymes appear to have the greatest impact on enzyme inactivation.

  17. Simulation of Na channel inactivation by thiazine dyes

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Some dyes of the methylene blue family serve as artificial inactivators of the sodium channels when present inside squid axons at a concentration of approximately 0.1 mM. The dyes restore a semblance of inactivation after normal inactivation has been destroyed by pronase. In fibers that inactivate normally, the dyes hasten the decay of sodium current. Many dye-blocked channels conduct transiently on exit of the dye molecule after repolarization to the holding potential. In contrast, normally ...

  18. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli phage by pulsed electric field treatment and analysis of inactivation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Takanori; Yoshida, Tomoki; Sakai, Kazuki; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    Inactivation of bacteriophage by pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment, one of the effective procedures for bacteria nonthermal inactivation, was studied. Model phage particles Escherichia coli bacteriophages M13mp18 and λ phage, were successfully inactivated by PEF treatment. The survival ratios of both bacteriophages decreased depending on the PEF treatment time when applied peak voltage was 5 or 7 kV, and the survival ratios after 12 min PEF treatment were 10-4 - 10-5. Electrophoresis analyses of biological molecules of inactivated λ phage detected no degradation of total protein and genomic DNA. These results suggested that the factor of phage inactivation by PEF treatment was not based on the degradation of protein or DNA, but on the destruction of phage particle structure. Sensitivity of E. coli phage to PEF treatment was compared with that of E. coli cell. Phage and MV1184 cell were treated with same condition PEF at 5 kV, respectively. After 12 min treatment, the survival ration of λ phage and MV1184 were 4.0 × 10-5 and 1.7 × 10-3, respectively. The survival ratio of phage was lower than that of MV1184. E. coli cell is more tolerant to inactivation with PEF treatment than coli phage.

  20. Bim nuclear translocation and inactivation by viral interferon regulatory factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Bong Choi

    Full Text Available Viral replication efficiency is in large part governed by the ability of viruses to counteract pro-apoptotic signals induced by infection of the host cell. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 uses several strategies to block the host's innate antiviral defenses via interference with interferon and apoptotic signaling. Contributors include the four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs 1-4, which function in dominant negative fashion to block cellular IRF activities in addition to targeting IRF signaling-induced proteins such as p53 and inhibiting other inducers of apoptosis such as TGFbeta receptor-activated Smad transcription factors. Here we identify direct targeting by vIRF-1 of BH3-only pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bim, a key negative regulator of HHV-8 replication, to effect its inactivation via nuclear translocation. vIRF-1-mediated relocalization of Bim was identified in transfected cells, by both immunofluorescence assay and western analysis of fractionated cell extracts. Also, co-localization of vIRF-1 and Bim was detected in nuclei of lytically infected endothelial cells. In vitro co-precipitation assays using purified vIRF-1 and Bim revealed direct interaction between the proteins, and Bim-binding residues of vIRF-1 were mapped by deletion and point mutagenesis. Generation and experimental utilization of Bim-refractory vIRF-1 variants revealed the importance of vIRF-1:Bim interaction, specifically, in pro-replication and anti-apoptotic activity of vIRF-1. Furthermore, blocking of the interaction with cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the Bim-binding region of vIRF-1 confirmed the relevance of vIRF-1:Bim association to vIRF-1 pro-replication activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IRF protein that interacts with a Bcl-2 family member and of nuclear sequestration of Bim or any other member of the family as a means of inactivation. The data presented reveal a novel mechanism utilized by a virus to control

  1. 75 FR 61700 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, the Netherlands, and Sweden: Final Results of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... International Trade Administration Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, the Netherlands, and Sweden... purified carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) from, inter alia, Finland, the Netherlands, and Sweden, pursuant to... (120-day) sunset reviews of the Finland, the Netherlands, and Sweden antidumping duty orders...

  2. 75 FR 39207 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland: Extension of Time Limit for... 30, 2010. See Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland: Extension of Time Limit for...

  3. 77 FR 14733 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland and the Netherlands: Extension of Time Limit for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland and the Netherlands: Extension..., inter alia, purified carboxymethylcellulose from Finland and the Netherlands covering the period July...

  4. Effects of Bacterial Inactivation Methods on Downstream Proteomic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Andy; Merkley, Eric D.; Clowers, Brian H.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2015-05-01

    Inactivation of pathogenic microbial samples is often necessary for the protection of researchers and to comply with local and federal regulations. By its nature, biological inactivation causes changes to microbial samples, potentially affecting observed experimental results. While inactivation induced damage to materials such as DNA has been evaluated, the effect of various inactivation strategies on proteomic data, to our knowledge, has not been discussed. To this end, we inactivated samples of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli by autoclave, ethanol, or irradiation treatment to determine how inactivation changes liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry data quality as well as apparent protein content of cells. Proteomic datasets obtained from aliquots of samples inactivated by different methods were highly similar, with Pearson correlation coefficients ranging from 0.822 to 0.985 and 0.816 to 0.985 for E. coli and Y. pestis, respectively, suggesting that inactivation had only slight impacts on the set of proteins identified. In addition, spectral quality metrics such as distributions of various database search algorithm scores remained constant across inactivation methods, indicating that inactivation does not appreciably degrade spectral quality. Though overall changes resulting from inactivation were small, there were detectable trends. For example, one-sided Fischer exact tests determined that periplasmic proteins decrease in observed abundance after sample inactivation by autoclaving (α = 1.71x10-2 for E. coli, α = 4.97x10-4 for Y. pestis) and irradiation (α = 9.43x10-7 for E. coli, α = 1.21x10-5 for Y. pestis) when compared to controls that were not inactivated. Based on our data, if sample inactivation is necessary, we recommend inactivation with ethanol treatment with secondary preference given to irradiation.

  5. X-ray diffraction study of highly purified human ceruloplasmin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samygina, V. R.; Sokolov, A. V.; Pulina, M. O.; Bartunik, H. D.; Vasil'Ev, V. B.

    2008-07-01

    The three-dimensional structure of ceruloplasmin (CP) with unoccupied labile metal-binding sites and the structure of CP containing Ni2+ in the labile sites were solved for the first time at 2.6 and 2.95 Å resolution, respectively. Crystallization was performed with the use of storage-stable CP, which was prepared in the presence of proteinase inhibitors and purified from (pre)proteinases. Ceruloplasmin with Ni2+ crystallized in the orthorhombic space group, which had been earlier unknown for CP. Ceruloplasmin with the unoccupied labile sites crystallized in the trigonal crystal form. The differences in intermolecular contacts observed in the trigonal and orthorhombic crystal structures of CP are considered. The conformational changes attendant upon Ni2+ binding are described. It was suggested that the labile sites are multifunctional and can both bind metal ions potentially toxic to organisms and be involved in electron transfer from substrates to the active site.

  6. A method for purifying butyric crude oil fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saskovets, V.V.; Gayle, A.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Semenov, L.V.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    In a method for purification of butyric fractions of oil through extraction by a selective solvent, in order to increase the output and to improve the quality of the purified oil, 2,5-dimethyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole of the cited formula, or its mixture with 80 to 90 percent furfural is used as the selective solvent. The solvent is produced through a reaction between hydrazine and an acetic anhydride. The solvent is a colorless liquid with a weak characteristic smell, and is easily dissolved in water with a boiling point of 178 degrees and density at 4-20/sup 0/ of 1.0963. The solvent is thermally stable: after boiling at 220 degrees, its viscosity is essentially the same.

  7. Using ion exchange chromatography to purify a recombinantly expressed protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEX) separates molecules by their surface charge, a property that can vary vastly between different proteins. There are two types of IEX, cation exhange and anion exchange chromatography. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors for anion exchange chromatography of a recombinantly expressed protein having a pI of 4.9 and containing two cysteine residues and one tryptophan residue, using an FPLC system. Prior to anion exchange, the protein had been salted out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and partially purified via hydrophobic interaction chromatography (see Salting out of proteins using ammonium sulfate precipitation and Use and Application of Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography for Protein Purification). Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment.

  8. Robust sparse image reconstruction of radio interferometric observations with PURIFY

    CERN Document Server

    Pratley, Luke; d'Avezac, Mayeul; Carrillo, Rafael E; Onose, Alexandru; Wiaux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation radio interferometers, such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will revolutionise our understanding of the universe through their unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. However, to realise these goals significant challenges in image and data processing need to be overcome. The standard methods in radio interferometry for reconstructing images, such as CLEAN and its variants, have served the community well over the last few decades and have survived largely because they are pragmatic. However, they produce reconstructed interferometric images that are limited in quality and they are not scalable for big data. In this work we apply and evaluate alternative interferometric reconstruction methods that make use of state-of-the-art sparse image reconstruction algorithms motivated by compressive sensing, which have been implemented in the PURIFY software package. In particular, we implement and apply the proximal alternating direction method of multipliers (P-ADMM) algorithm presented in a recen...

  9. Techniques applicable for purifying Chironex fleckeri (box-jellyfish) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, I; Burnett, J W

    1990-01-01

    A survey of several techniques to isolate a purified lethal factor from the tentacles of Chironex fleckeri was completed. Heterologous band patterns were obtained from specific eluates after gel filtration, ion exchange, immunoaffinity and hydrophobic chromatography. SDS-PAGE revealed a dense band at 24,000 mol. wt in many of these fractions. Isoelectric focusing of the crude venom resulted in considerable loss of activity but indicated significant purification in the fractions having a pI of 5.2-6.8. These fractions were also immunologically active against sera from a convalescing post-evenomation patient. The primary difficulties encountered in jellyfish venom purification are the lack of stability and the tendency of the active toxins to adhere to each other and to various support matrices.

  10. Are whole extracts and purified glucosinolates from cruciferous vegetables antioxidants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, G W; Lambert, N; Chambers, S J; Wanigatunga, S; Heaney, R K; Plumb, J A; Aruoma, O I; Halliwell, B; Miller, N J; Williamson, G

    1996-07-01

    Fruits and vegetables contain several classes of compounds that can potentially contribute to antioxidant activity, including vitamins, simple and complex phenolics, sulphur-containing compounds and glucosinolates. The glucosinolates are found in high concentration in many cruciferous vegetables, and it is well established that their breakdown products induce endogenous antioxidant defences such as quinone reductase and glutathione S-transferase in cells and in vivo. Despite the anticarcinogenic effect of these compounds in animal models, the direct antioxidant properties of this class of compounds have not been systematically studied. We therefore examined the free radical-scavenging properties of representative extracts and of purified glucosinolates from cruciferous vegetables, by measuring their effect on ascorbate- or NADPH/iron-induced peroxidation of human liver microsomes, ascorbate/iron-induced peroxidation on phospholipid liposomes, iron chelation and hydroxyl radical scavenging using the deoxyribose assay, total antioxidant potential using ABTS (2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulphonate)) and the bleomycin assay. Most of the extracts from cruciferous vegetables exhibited some antioxidant properties, although extracts from cooked Brussels sprouts increased the rate of microsomal lipid peroxidation. The effects in these assays were dependent upon processing and species of crucifer, and the glucosinolate content appeared to play a minor role in these effects, since purified glucosinolates exhibited only weak antioxidant properties. The total antioxidant activities of extracts from cooked and autolysed Brussels sprouts were identical within experimental error. This is probably due to the content of phenolics which is unaltered by autolysis, despite the differences between these samples in other assays especially NADPH-iron-induced lipid peroxidation of human liver microsomes. The results demonstrate that glucosinolates are unlikely to account for

  11. Neutral semi-purified glycerin in starting pigs feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gomez Gallego

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycerin is a major co-product resulting from biodiesel production, and it has been proposed as a highenergy source for use in swine diets. However, it is necessary to determine the nutritional value of neutral semi-purified glycerin (NSPG. In this study two experiments were carried out to determine the nutritional value, evaluated the performance and economic feasibility of starting piglets fed on neutral semi-purified glycerin. A digestibility trial (Experiment I was conducted using 30 crossbred barrows with an initial average body weight of 42.91±1.58 kg. The glycerin levels used in the digestibility assay were 4, 8, 12 and 16% of the basal diet (corn + soybean meal based. The digestible energy (DE and metabolizable (ME energy values of glycerin were estimated by regression of DE and ME (kcal/kg intake associated with glycerin vs. glycerin intake (kg. The values (as-fed-basis of DE and ME (kcal/ kg obtained were 3,298 and 2,531, respectively. In Experiment II, 100 piglets (50 gilts and 50 barrows with BW = 15.14±0.06 to 30.28±0.65 were allotted in a randomized design using four inclusion levels (3.5, 7.0, 10.5 and 14% of NSPG. There were ten replicates with two piglets per experimental unit. Additionally, a control diet containing no glycerin (0% was formulated. The results show it is feasible to use up to 14% NSPG in piglet feed without impairing performance and plasma chemistry.

  12. Magnetism for understanding catalyst analysis of purified carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellouard, Christine; Mercier, Guillaume; Cahen, Sébastien; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Medjahdi, Ghouti [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gleize, Jérôme [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Approche Multi-échelle de Milieux Complexes-Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz (France); Lamura, Gianrico [CNR-SPIN – Dipartimento di Fisica, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Hérold, Claire [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Vigolo, Brigitte, E-mail: Brigitte.Vigolo@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2016-08-01

    The precise quantification of catalyst residues in purified carbon nanotubes is often a major issue in view of any fundamental and/or applicative studies. More importantly, since the best CNTs are successfully grown with magnetic catalysts, their quantification becomes strictly necessary to better understand intrinsic properties of CNT. For these reasons, we have deeply analyzed the catalyst content remained in nickel–yttrium arc-discharge single walled carbon nanotubes purified by both a chlorine-gas phase and a standard acid-based treatment. The study focuses on Ni analysis which has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, and magnetic measurements. In the case of the acid-based treatment, all quantifications result in a decrease of the nanocrystallized Ni by a factor of two. In the case of the halogen gas treatment, analysis and quantification of Ni content is less straightforward: a huge difference appears between X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry results. Thanks to magnetic measurements, this disagreement is explained by the presence of Ni{sup 2+} ions, belonging to NiCl{sub 2} formed during the Cl-based purification process. In particular, NiCl{sub 2} compound appears under different magnetic/crystalline phases: paramagnetic or diamagnetic, or well intercalated in between carbon sheets with an ordered magnetic phase at low temperature. - Highlights: • Cl-gas treatment of Ni catalyst of carbon nanotubes leads to NiCl{sub 2} residue. • Magnetic measurements show the transformation of Ni{sup 0} in Ni{sup 2+}through a purification process. • High temperature Cl treatment removes 75% of metallic impurities. • Cl-purification yields to an amount of metal of 1.5% in arc-discharge CNT samples.

  13. PA28, an activator of the 20 S proteasome, is inactivated by proteolytic modification at its carboxyl terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C P; Willy, P J; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N

    1993-10-25

    PA28, a protein activator of the 20 S proteasome, was previously identified in soluble extracts of bovine red blood cells (Ma, C.-P., Slaughter, C. A., and DeMartino, G. N. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 10515-10523). To determine whether this regulatory protein is as widely distributed as the proteasome, PA28 content and activity were examined in various eukaryotic tissues by immunoblot analysis and by functional assays of tissue extracts. PA28 protein was present in all sources examined. PA28 activity, however, was not detected in many of these sources, including those with the highest level of PA28 protein. To determine the biochemical basis of this result, PA28 was purified from extracts of rat liver, which had high levels of PA28 protein but no PA28 activity. The resulting purified PA28 had no detectable activity but had native and subunit molecular weights indistinguishable from the active PA28 of bovine red blood cells. Using the inactivation of purified PA28 as an assay, a protein that inactivated PA28 without altering its apparent molecular weight on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was identified, purified, and characterized from bovine liver. It had biochemical and catalytic characteristics similar to those of lysosomal carboxypeptidase B. When leupeptin, an inhibitor of lysosomal carboxypeptidase B, was included in the buffers used for the preparation of PA28, PA28 activity was detected in tissues which otherwise failed to demonstrate this activity. A similar result was obtained when extracts were prepared in a manner that minimized disruption of lysosomes. Other carboxypeptidases such as carboxypeptidase Y and pancreatic carboxypeptidase B also inactivated PA28 without altering its apparent molecular weight. Active PA28 binds to the proteasome to form a protease-activator complex that can be isolated after velocity sedimentation centrifugation through glycerol density gradients. Carboxypeptidase-inactivated PA28 failed to form such a complex

  14. Nucleotide sequence of cDNA coding for dianthin 30, a ribosome inactivating protein from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legname, G; Bellosta, P; Gromo, G; Modena, D; Keen, J N; Roberts, L M; Lord, J M

    1991-08-27

    Rabbit antibodies raised against dianthin 30, a ribosome inactivating protein from carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) leaves, were used to identify a full length dianthin precursor cDNA clone from a lambda gt11 expression library. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of purified dianthin 30 and dianthin 32 confirmed that the clone encoded dianthin 30. The cDNA was 1153 basepairs in length and encoded a precursor protein of 293 amino acid residues. The first 23 N-terminal amino acids of the precursor represented the signal sequence. The protein contained a carboxy-terminal region which, by analogy with barley lectin, may contain a vacuolar targeting signal.

  15. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and... DEVICES Special Use Respirators § 84.254 Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests. (a... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl...

  16. 42 CFR 84.179 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.179 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification. (a) The respirator manufacturer, as part of...

  17. Measurement of Ozone Emission and Particle Removal Rates from Portable Air Purifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Stephen A.; Walser, Maggie L.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laux, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Portable air purifiers are popular consumer items, especially in areas with poor air quality. Unfortunately, most users of these air purifiers have minimal understanding of the factors affecting their efficiency in typical indoor settings. Emission of the air pollutant ozone (O[subscript 3]) by certain air purifiers is of particular concern. In an…

  18. Inactivation of Microorganisms by Gamma Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    L’inactivation cbimique (ex :formald6hyde) et thermique (ex :autoclave) peut atre utilis~e dans la pr6paration des antig~nes mais la structure d’antig~ne...change overtime. Due to 60Co having a half life of 5.24 years, the time required to achieve the initial central dose rate (kGy/hr) at 0.00 years from

  19. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Hoogerbrugge, Jos W; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2009-05-01

    During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW), whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  20. Inactivating CUX1 mutations promote tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for cancer genetics is to determine which low frequency somatic mutations are drivers of tumorigenesis. Here we interrogate the genomes of 7,651 diverse human cancers to identify novel drivers and find inactivating mutations in the homeodomain transcription factor CUX1 (cut-like homeobox 1) in ~1-5% of tumors. Meta-analysis of CUX1 mutational status in 2,519 cases of myeloid malignancies reveals disruptive mutations associated with poor survival, highlighting the clinical si...

  1. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  2. Rapid inactivation of SARS-like coronaviruses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapil, Sanjay (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Oberst, R. D. (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David; Souza, Caroline Ann; Williams, Cecelia Victoria

    2004-03-01

    Chemical disinfection and inactivation of viruses is largely understudied, but is very important especially in the case of highly infectious viruses. The purpose of this LDRD was to determine the efficacy of the Sandia National Laboratories developed decontamination formulations against Bovine Coronavirus (BCV) as a surrogate for the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans. The outbreak of SARS in late 2002 resulted from a highly infectious virus that was able to survive and remain infectious for extended periods. For this study, preliminary testing with Escherichia coli MS-2 (MS-2) and Escherichia coli T4 (T4) bacteriophages was conducted to develop virucidal methodology for verifying the inactivation after treatment with the test formulations following AOAC germicidal methodologies. After the determination of various experimental parameters (i.e. exposure, concentration) of the formulations, final testing was conducted on BCV. All experiments were conducted with various organic challenges (horse serum, bovine feces, compost) for results that more accurately represent field use condition. The MS-2 and T4 were slightly more resistant than BCV and required a 2 minute exposure while BCV was completely inactivated after a 1 minute exposure. These results were also consistent for the testing conducted in the presence of the various organic challenges indicating that the test formulations are highly effective for real world application.

  3. Developmental regulation of X-chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    With the emergence of sex-determination by sex chromosomes, which differ in composition and number between males and females, appeared the need to equalize X-chromosomal gene dosage between the sexes. Mammals have devised the strategy of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), in which one of the two X-chromosomes is rendered transcriptionally silent in females. In the mouse, the best-studied model organism with respect to XCI, this inactivation process occurs in different forms, imprinted and random, interspersed by periods of X-chromosome reactivation (XCR), which is needed to switch between the different modes of XCI. In this review, I describe the recent advances with respect to the developmental control of XCI and XCR and in particular their link to differentiation and pluripotency. Furthermore, I review the mechanisms, which influence the timing and choice, with which one of the two X-chromosomes is chosen for inactivation during random XCI. This has an impact on how females are mosaics with regard to which X-chromosome is active in different cells, which has implications on the severity of diseases caused by X-linked mutations.

  4. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods for the production of arbovirus antigens inactivated by binary ethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Teck F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods have been developed and standardised for the safe and reproducible production of inactivated arbovirus antigens which are appropriate for use in diagnostic serological applications. Methods To optimise the maximum titre of growth during the propagation of arboviruses, the multiplicity of infection and choice of cell line were investigated using stocks of Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus grown in both mosquito and mammalian cell lines. To standardise and improve the efficacy of the inactivation of arboviral suspensions, stocks of Ross River virus, Barmah Forest virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus and Alfuy virus were chemically inactivated using binary ethylenimine at a final concentration of 3 mM. Aliquots were then taken at hourly intervals and crude inactivation rates were determined for each virus using a plaque assay. To ensure complete inactivation, the same aliquots were each passaged 3 times in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells and the presence of viral growth was detected using an immunofluorescent assay. For larger quantities of viral suspensions, centrifugation on an isopycnic sucrose density gradient or cross-flow filtration was used to produce concentrated, pure antigens or partially concentrated, semi-purified antigens respectively. Results The results of the propagation experiments suggested that the maximum viral titres obtained for both Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus were affected by the incubation period and choice of cell line, rather than the use of different multiplicity of infection values. Results of the binary ethylenimine inactivation trial suggested that standardised periods of 5 or 8 hours would be suitable to ensure effective and complete inactivation for a number of different arboviral antigens. Conclusion Two methods used to prepare inactivated arbovirus antigens have been

  5. Cloning and expression of antiviral/ribosome-inactivating protein from Bougainvillea xbuttiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Kapoor, Harish C; Lodha, Madan L

    2008-03-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding ribosome-inactivating/antiviral protein (RIP/AVP)from the leaves of Bougainvillea x buttiana was isolated. The cDNA consisted of 1364 nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF)of 960 nucleotides encoding a 35.49 kDa protein of 319 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence has a putative active domain conserved in RIPs/AVPs and shows a varying phylogenetic relationship to the RIPs from other plant species. The deduced protein has been designated BBAP1 (Bougainvillea x buttiana antiviral protein1). The ORF was cloned into an expression vector and expressed in E.coli as a fusion protein of approximately 78 kDa. The cleaved and purified recombinant BBAP1 exhibited ribosome-inhibiting rRNA N-glycosidase activity,and imparted a high level of resistance against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).

  6. Cloning and expression of antiviral/ribosome-inactivating protein from Bougainvillea xbuttiana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nandlal Choudhary; Harish C Kapoor; Madan L Lodha

    2008-03-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding ribosome-inactivating/antiviral protein (RIP/AVP) from the leaves of Bougainvillea xbuttiana was isolated. The cDNA consisted of 1364 nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) of 960 nucleotides encoding a 35.49 kDa protein of 319 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence has a putative active domain conserved in RIPs/AVPs and shows a varying phylogenetic relationship to the RIPs from other plant species. The deduced protein has been designated BBAP1 (Bougainvillea xbuttiana antiviral protein1). The ORF was cloned into an expression vector and expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein of ∼78 kDa. The cleaved and purified recombinant BBAP1 exhibited ribosome-inhibiting rRNA -glycosidase activity, and imparted a high level of resistance against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).

  7. Comparing the efficacy of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone in the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum in water from Parana State, Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Juliana Tracz; Costa, Adriana Oliveira; de Oliveira Silva, Márcia Benedita; Schuchard, Wagner; Osaki, Silvia Cristina; de Castro, Edilene Alcântara; Paulino, Rosangela Clara; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz

    2008-12-01

    In the present work, assays were performed to compare the efficacy of hypochlorous acid, chlorine dioxide, and ozone in the inactivation of Cryptosporidium oocyst in public water supply from Brazilian South conditions. Experiments were carried out in samples containing 2 x 10(4) oocysts/ml of C. parvum purified from feces of experimentally contaminated calves. An in vitro excystation method was used to evaluate oocysts' viability and to determine the inactivation rates of hypochlorous acid at 2 ppm, chlorine dioxide at 1, 2, and 5 ppm, and ozone at the doses of 0.18, 0.24, 0.36, 0.48, and 1.44 mg/l. By using hypochlorous acid, the maximum inactivation rate obtained was 49.04% after 120 min. Chlorine dioxide at 5 ppm inactivated 90.56% of oocysts after 90 min of contact. Ozone was the most effective product, rendering an inactivation of 100% with the concentration of 24 mg/l. Resistance of Cryptosporidium to the usual disinfectants and the need for more effective water treatments to prevent waterborne diseases in Brazil are discussed in this manuscript.

  8. Permeation of Calcium through Purified Connexin 26 Hemichannels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Mariana C.; Figueroa, Vania; Zoghbi, Maria E.; Saéz, Juan C.; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2012-01-01

    Gap junction channels communicate the cytoplasms of two cells and are formed by head to head association of two hemichannels, one from each of the cells. Gap junction channels and hemichannels are permeable to ions and hydrophilic molecules of up to Mr 1,000, including second messengers and metabolites. Intercellular Ca2+ signaling can occur by movement of a number of second messengers, including Ca2+, through gap junction channels, or by a paracrine pathway that involves activation of purinergic receptors in neighboring cells following ATP release through hemichannels. Understanding Ca2+ permeation through Cx26 hemichannels is important to assess the role of gap junction channels and hemichannels in health and disease. In this context, it is possible that increased Ca2+ influx through hemichannels under ischemic conditions contributes to cell damage. Previous studies suggest Ca2+ permeation through hemichannels, based on indirect arguments. Here, we demonstrate for the first time hemichannel permeability to Ca2+ by measuring Ca2+ transport through purified Cx26 hemichannels reconstituted in liposomes. We trapped the low affinity Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent probe Fluo-5N into the liposomes and followed the increases in intraliposomal [Ca2+] in response to an imposed [Ca2+] gradient. We show that Ca2+ does move through Cx26 hemichannels and that the permeability of the hemichannels to Ca2+ is high, similar to that for Na+. We suggest that hemichannels can be a significant pathway for Ca2+ influx into cells under conditions such as ischemia. PMID:23048025

  9. [Activity of purified diosmin in the treatment of hemorrhoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, G; Catanzaro, M; Ferrara, A; Ferrari, P

    2000-01-01

    Several theories on the etio-pathogenesis and physio-pathology of hemorrhoids have been up to now proposed. From the fisio-pathological viewpoint, particular importance is retained by the vascular factor, which in its turn is influenced by mechanical and sphinceric factors, that impair the venous back-flow. In the evidence of an hemorrhoidal crisis, characterized by local oedema, pain and bleeding, the use of bioflavonoid drugs is deemed to be the first choice. We investigated the use of purified diosmin, given at a dose of two 450 mg tablets bid for the first 7 days, then at 1 tablet bid for up to 2 months, in a group of 66 patients suffering from primitive hemorrhoids of grade 1-4. Our results confirmed diosmin efficacy in decreasing both pain and bleeding: reduction rates of 79% and 67%, respectively, were reached in the first treatment week. In the second week, figures were 98% and 86%, respectively. Diosmin tolerability was excellent: this characteristic makes the drug very easy to handle by the general practitioner and also useful to the proctologist in the preparation of patient to further treatments.

  10. Purified and synthetic Alzheimer's amyloid beta (Aβ) prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Jan; Watts, Joel C; Mensinger, Zachary L; Oehler, Abby; Grillo, Sunny K; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B; Giles, Kurt

    2012-07-03

    The aggregation and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be central events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inoculation of brain homogenates containing Aβ aggregates into susceptible transgenic mice accelerated Aβ deposition, suggesting that Aβ aggregates are capable of self-propagation and hence might be prions. Recently, we demonstrated that Aβ deposition can be monitored in live mice using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Here, we use BLI to probe the ability of Aβ aggregates to self-propagate following inoculation into bigenic mice. We report compelling evidence that Aβ aggregates are prions by demonstrating widespread cerebral β-amyloidosis induced by inoculation of either purified Aβ aggregates derived from brain or aggregates composed of synthetic Aβ. Although synthetic Aβ aggregates were sufficient to induce Aβ deposition in vivo, they exhibited lower specific biological activity compared with brain-derived Aβ aggregates. Our results create an experimental paradigm that should lead to identification of self-propagating Aβ conformations, which could represent novel targets for interrupting the spread of Aβ deposition in AD patients.

  11. Common Wet Chemical Agents for Purifying Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasel Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification and functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are challenging but vital for their effective applications in various fields including water purification technologies, optoelectronics, biosensors, fuel cells, and electrode arrays. The currently available purification techniques, often complicated and time consuming, yielded shortened and curled MWCNTs that are not suitable for applications in certain fields such as membrane technologies, hybrid catalysis, optoelectronics, and sensor developments. Here we described the H2O2 synergy on the actions of HCl and KOH in purifying and functionalizing pristine MWCNTs. The method (HCl/H2O2 showed 100% purification yield as compared to HCl and KOH/H2O2 with purification yields 93.46 and 3.92%, respectively. We probed the findings using transmission electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscope, Raman spectroscope, thermal gravimetric analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction. The study is a new avenue for simple, rapid, low cost, and scalable purification of pristine MWCNTs for application in versatile fields.

  12. Widespread purifying selection on RNA structure in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin A; Gesell, Tanja; Stadler, Peter F; Mattick, John S

    2013-09-01

    Evolutionarily conserved RNA secondary structures are a robust indicator of purifying selection and, consequently, molecular function. Evaluating their genome-wide occurrence through comparative genomics has consistently been plagued by high false-positive rates and divergent predictions. We present a novel benchmarking pipeline aimed at calibrating the precision of genome-wide scans for consensus RNA structure prediction. The benchmarking data obtained from two refined structure prediction algorithms, RNAz and SISSIz, were then analyzed to fine-tune the parameters of an optimized workflow for genomic sliding window screens. When applied to consistency-based multiple genome alignments of 35 mammals, our approach confidently identifies >4 million evolutionarily constrained RNA structures using a conservative sensitivity threshold that entails historically low false discovery rates for such analyses (5-22%). These predictions comprise 13.6% of the human genome, 88% of which fall outside any known sequence-constrained element, suggesting that a large proportion of the mammalian genome is functional. As an example, our findings identify both known and novel conserved RNA structure motifs in the long noncoding RNA MALAT1. This study provides an extensive set of functional transcriptomic annotations that will assist researchers in uncovering the precise mechanisms underlying the developmental ontologies of higher eukaryotes.

  13. PURIFIED WASTE FCC CATALYST AS A CEMENT REPLACEMENT MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danute Vaiciukyniene

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are commonly used in the fluid catalytic cracking process. Zeolite polluted with oil products and became waste after some time used. The quantity of this waste inevitably rises by expanding rapidly oil industry. The composition of these catalysts depends on the manufacturer and on the process that is going to be used. The main factors retarding hydration process of cement systems and modifying them strength are organic compounds impurities in the waste FCC catalyst. The present paper shows the results of using purified waste FCC catalyst (pFCC from Lithuania oil refinery, as Portland cement replacement material. For this purpose, the purification of waste FCC catalyst (FCC samples was treated with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most powerful oxidizers known. By acting of waste with H2O2 it can eliminate the aforementioned waste deficiency, and the obtained product becomes one of the most promising ingredients, in new advanced building materials. Hardened cement paste samples with FCC or pFCC were formed. It was observed that the pFCC blended cements developed higher strength, after 28 days, compared to the samples with FCC or reference samples. Typical content of Portland cement substituting does not exceed 30 % of mass of Portland cement in samples. Reducing the consumption of Portland cement with utilizing waste materials is preferred for reasons of environmental protection.

  14. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Sayed Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese peroxidase (MnP was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH42SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81UmL-1, specific activity 78 U mg-1 with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4-5 and the optimum temperature was 25 ºC. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn2+,Cu2+,Ca2+ and K+ and inhibited by Hg+2 and Cd+2.H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1. The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90% was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL-1 enzyme activities.

  15. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL(-1), specific activity 78 U mg(-1) with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4-5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Ca(2+) and K(+) and inhibited by Hg(+2) and Cd(+2). H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL(-1) enzyme activities.

  16. Synaptosomal protein synthesis in P2 and Ficoll purified fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Bruno, Annapaola; Crispino, Marianna; Giuditta, Antonio

    2012-01-30

    Cytoplasmic protein synthesis of brain synaptosomes has generally been determined in the Ficoll purified fraction which contains fewer contaminating mitochondria, microsomes and myelin fragments than the parent P2 fraction. Using a highly selective assay of this activity we have compared the total translation activity and the specific activity of the proteins synthesized by either fraction in control rats and in rats trained for a two-way active avoidance task. In control rats the specific activity remained essentially the same in both fractions but in trained rats the value of the Ficoll fraction was markedly lower (38.5%) than in the P2 fraction. Furthermore, the total translation activity of the Ficoll fraction was 30% lower than in the P2 fraction in control rats and 62% lower in trained rats. These decrements indicate that a large proportion of active synaptosomes present in the P2 fraction is not recovered in the Ficoll fraction, notably in rats undergoing plastic brain changes. We conclude that cytoplasmic protein synthesis of brain synaptosomes is better preserved in the P2 fraction.

  17. Purifying effect of new flux on magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高洪涛; 吴国华; 丁文江; 朱燕萍

    2004-01-01

    A new flux which can remove both Fe and non-metallic inclusions in magnesium alloy was introduced.The Fe content of the magnesium alloy can be decreased greatly from 0. 062% to lower than 0. 005% (degree of AZ91D) after being purified by this new flux. The optimum addition of B2O3 in the flux is 0. 58 % by Gaussian Curve Fitting. Corrosion rate was measured after the specimen being immersed in 5 % NaCl solution for 3 d. The resuits show that the corrosion rate of the magnesium alloy after purification by the new flux is only 0.3 mg · cm-2 ·d-1. On the other hand, non-metallic inclusions in the magnesium alloy decrease with increasing addition of JDMJ in the new flux. Average volume fraction of the non-metallic inclusions in the magnesium alloy decreases from 1.52 % to 1.08%, which leads to improvement in the mechanical properties of the magnesium alloy by 30%. The mechanisms of Fe reduction and non-metallic inclusion-removing in magnesium melt by purification with the new flux were also revealed.

  18. Biological characterization of purified macrophage-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dias-Baruffi

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently described the purification of a 54 kDa acidic protein, identified as macrophage-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MNCF. This protein causes in vitro chemotaxis as well as in vivo neutrophil migration even in animals treated with dexamethasone. This in vivo chemotactic activity of MNCF in animals pretreated with dexamethasone is an uncommon characteristic which discriminates MNCF from known chemotactic cytokines. MNCF is released in the supernatant by macrophage monolayers stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In the present study, we describe some biological characteristics of homogenous purified MNCF. When assayed in vitro, MNCF gave a bell-shaped dose–response curve. This in vitro activity was shown to be caused by haptotaxis. Unlike N-formyl-methionylleucyl- phenylalanine (FMLP or interleukin 8 (IL-8, the chemotactic activity of MNCF in vivo and in vitro, was inhibited by preincubation with D-galactose but not with D-mannose. In contrast with IL-8, MNCF did not bind to heparin and antiserum against IL-8 was ineffective in inhibiting its chemotactic activity. These data indicate that MNCF induces neutrophil migration through a carbohydrate recognition property, but by a mechanism different from that of the known chemokines. It is suggested that MNCF may be an important mediator in the recruitment of neutrophils via the formation of a substrate bound chemotactic gradient (haptotaxis in the inflamed tissues.

  19. Characterization of fructose 6 phosphate phosphoketolases purified from Bifidobacterium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, J P; Crociani, J; Ballongue, J

    1995-07-01

    Fructose 6 phosphate phosphoketolases (F6PPKs) were purified from Bifidobacterium longum BB536, B. dentium ATCC 27534, B. globosum ATCC 25864, and Bifidobacterium animalis ATCC 25527. Concerning ions (Cu++, Zn++, Ca++, Mg++, Fe++, Co++, Mn++) and common enzyme inhibitors (fructose, ammonium sulfate, iodoacetate, and parachloromercuribenzoic acid), no difference appeared between the enzymes. Cu++, parachloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB), and mercuric acetate induced high enzymatic inhibition. The study of pCMB demonstrated a noncompetitive inhibition. Additional results showed that the sulfhydryl group was not involved in catalytic reaction. Photooxidation experiments and determination of ionizable group pKas (5.16-7.17) suggested the presence of one or more histidines necessary for the catalytic reaction and explained the inhibition observed with pCMB. In light of the noncompetitive inhibition, this group was not directly involved in substrate binding. Determination of Km demonstrated that the affinities for fructose 6 phosphate in the case of animal and human origin strains were close. In addition, the same enzymatic efficiency (Kcat/Km) was obtained for each strain. The F6PPK activity was regulated by sodium pyrophosphate, ATP, and especially by ADP.

  20. Characterisation of the 1st SSI purified MBL standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Inga; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is of importance in innate immunity. MBL-deficiency, the most common immune defect, is significant in several clinical contexts. The request for MBL diagnostic is increasing, hence we developed a high-purity MBL standard assigned with a traceable value. MET...... purified MBL standard has been produced, and assigned the value 192.6 microg MBL/ml, traceable to an accurate realisation of the unit.......BACKGROUND: Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is of importance in innate immunity. MBL-deficiency, the most common immune defect, is significant in several clinical contexts. The request for MBL diagnostic is increasing, hence we developed a high-purity MBL standard assigned with a traceable value....... METHODS AND RESULTS: The standard material was produced from human plasma; and the protein concentration determined by amino acid analysis after a preceding desalting. The standard value was assessed by two series of sub-sample analyses from nine vials by the grand mean: 235.7 microg protein/ml (range 191...

  1. Analysis of cavitation effect for water purifier using electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Ko, Han Seo; Lee, Seung Ho

    2015-11-01

    Water is a limited and vital resource, so it should not be wasted by pollution. A development of new water purification technology is urgent nowadays since the original and biological treatments are not sufficient. The microbubble-aided method was investigated for removal of algal in this study since it overcomes demerits of the existing purification technologies. Thus, the cavitation effect in a venturi-type tube using the electrolysis was analyzed. Ruthenium-coated titanium plates were used as electrodes. Optimum electrode interval and applied power were determined for the electrolysis. Then, the optimized electrodes were installed in the venturi-type tube for generating cavitation. The cavitation effect could be enhanced without any byproduct by the bubbly flow induced by the electrolysis. The optimum mass flow rate and current were determined for the cavitation with the electrolysis. Finally, the visualization techniques were used to count the cell number of algal and microbubbles for the confirmation of the performance. As a result, the energy saving and high efficient water purifier was fabricated in this study. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. 2013R1A2A2A01068653).

  2. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × timereaction) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, Ea, induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (CODMn) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and CODMn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex.

  3. Blueberry polyphenol oxidase: Characterization and the kinetics of thermal and high pressure activation and inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Buckow, Roman; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2015-12-01

    Partially purified blueberry polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in Mcllvaine buffer (pH=3.6, typical pH of blueberry juice) was subjected to processing at isothermal-isobaric conditions at temperatures from 30 to 80 °C and pressure from 0.1 to 700 MPa. High pressure processing at 30-50 °C at all pressures studied caused irreversible PPO activity increase with a maximum of 6.1 fold increase at 500 MPa and 30 °C. Treatments at mild pressure-mild temperature conditions (0.1-400 MPa, 60 °C) also caused up to 3 fold PPO activity increase. Initial activity increase followed by a decrease occurred at relatively high pressure-mild temperature (400-600 MPa, 60 °C) and mild pressure-high temperature (0.1-400 MPa, 70-80 °C) combinations. At temperatures higher than 76 °C, monotonic decrease in PPO activity occurred at 0.1 MPa and pressures higher than 500 MPa. The activation/inactivation kinetics of the enzyme was successfully modelled assuming consecutive reactions in series with activation followed by inactivation.

  4. Virus inactivation by protein denaturants used in affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Peter L; Lloyd, David

    2007-10-01

    Virus inactivation by a number of protein denaturants commonly used in gel affinity chromatography for protein elution and gel recycling has been investigated. The enveloped viruses Sindbis, herpes simplex-1 and vaccinia, and the non-enveloped virus polio-1 were effectively inactivated by 0.5 M sodium hydroxide, 6 M guanidinium thiocyanate, 8 M urea and 70% ethanol. However, pH 2.6, 3 M sodium thiocyanate, 6 M guanidinium chloride and 20% ethanol, while effectively inactivating the enveloped viruses, did not inactivate polio-1. These studies demonstrate that protein denaturants are generally effective for virus inactivation but with the limitation that only some may inactivate non-enveloped viruses. The use of protein denaturants, together with virus reduction steps in the manufacturing process should ensure that viral cross contamination between manufacturing batches of therapeutic biological products is prevented and the safety of the product ensured.

  5. Inactivation of the olfactory marker protein (OMP) gene in river dolphins and other odontocete cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2017-04-01

    Various toothed whales (Odontoceti) are unique among mammals in lacking olfactory bulbs as adults and are thought to be anosmic (lacking the olfactory sense). At the molecular level, toothed whales have high percentages of pseudogenic olfactory receptor genes, but species that have been investigated to date retain an intact copy of the olfactory marker protein gene (OMP), which is highly expressed in olfactory receptor neurons and may regulate the temporal resolution of olfactory responses. One hypothesis for the retention of intact OMP in diverse odontocete lineages is that this gene is pleiotropic with additional functions that are unrelated to olfaction. Recent expression studies provide some support for this hypothesis. Here, we report OMP sequences for representatives of all extant cetacean families and provide the first molecular evidence for inactivation of this gene in vertebrates. Specifically, OMP exhibits independent inactivating mutations in six different odontocete lineages: four river dolphin genera (Platanista, Lipotes, Pontoporia, Inia), sperm whale (Physeter), and harbor porpoise (Phocoena). These results suggest that the only essential role of OMP that is maintained by natural selection is in olfaction, although a non-olfactory role for OMP cannot be ruled out for lineages that retain an intact copy of this gene. Available genome sequences from cetaceans and close outgroups provide evidence of inactivating mutations in two additional genes (CNGA2, CNGA4), which imply further pseudogenization events in the olfactory cascade of odontocetes. Selection analyses demonstrate that evolutionary constraints on all three genes (OMP, CNGA2, CNGA4) have been greatly reduced in Odontoceti, but retain a signature of purifying selection on the stem Cetacea branch and in Mysticeti (baleen whales). This pattern is compatible with the 'echolocation-priority' hypothesis for the evolution of OMP, which posits that negative selection was maintained in the common

  6. Development of a Microwave Regenerative Sorbent-Based Hydrogen Purifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Dewberry, Ross H.; McCurry, Bryan D.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a Microwave Regenerative Sorbent-based Hydrogen Purifier (MRSHP). This unique microwave powered technology was developed for the purification of a hydrogen stream produced by the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA). The PPA is a hydrogen recovery (from methane) post processor for NASA's Sabatier-based carbon dioxide reduction process. Embodied in the Carbon dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA), currently aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Sabatier reaction employs hydrogen to catalytically recover oxygen, in the form of water, from respiratory carbon dioxide produced by the crew. This same approach is base-lined for future service in the Air Revitalization system on extended missions into deep space where resupply is not practical. Accordingly, manned exploration to Mars may only become feasible with further closure of the air loop as afforded by the greater hydrogen recovery permitted by the PPA with subsequent hydrogen purification. By utilizing the well-known high sorbate loading capacity of molecular sieve 13x, coupled with microwave dielectric heating phenomenon, MRSHP technology is employed as a regenerative filter for a contaminated hydrogen gas stream. By design, freshly regenerated molecular sieve 13x contained in the MRSHP will remove contaminants from the effluent of a 1-CM scale PPA for several hours prior to breakthrough. By reversing flow and pulling a relative vacuum the MRSHP prototype then uses 2.45 GHz microwave power, applied through a novel coaxial antenna array, to rapidly heat the sorbent bed and drive off the contaminants in a short duration vacuum/thermal contaminant desorption step. Finally, following rapid cooling via room temperature cold plates, the MRSHP is again ready to serve as a hydrogen filter.

  7. Correcting for purifying selection: an improved human mitochondrial molecular clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Pedro; Ermini, Luca; Thomson, Noel; Mormina, Maru; Rito, Teresa; Röhl, Arne; Salas, Antonio; Oppenheimer, Stephen; Macaulay, Vincent; Richards, Martin B

    2009-06-01

    There is currently no calibration available for the whole human mtDNA genome, incorporating both coding and control regions. Furthermore, as several authors have pointed out recently, linear molecular clocks that incorporate selectable characters are in any case problematic. We here confirm a modest effect of purifying selection on the mtDNA coding region and propose an improved molecular clock for dating human mtDNA, based on a worldwide phylogeny of > 2000 complete mtDNA genomes and calibrating against recent evidence for the divergence time of humans and chimpanzees. We focus on a time-dependent mutation rate based on the entire mtDNA genome and supported by a neutral clock based on synonymous mutations alone. We show that the corrected rate is further corroborated by archaeological dating for the settlement of the Canary Islands and Remote Oceania and also, given certain phylogeographic assumptions, by the timing of the first modern human settlement of Europe and resettlement after the Last Glacial Maximum. The corrected rate yields an age of modern human expansion in the Americas at approximately 15 kya that-unlike the uncorrected clock-matches the archaeological evidence, but continues to indicate an out-of-Africa dispersal at around 55-70 kya, 5-20 ky before any clear archaeological record, suggesting the need for archaeological research efforts focusing on this time window. We also present improved rates for the mtDNA control region, and the first comprehensive estimates of positional mutation rates for human mtDNA, which are essential for defining mutation models in phylogenetic analyses.

  8. Positive and purifying selection on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nadia D; Koerich, Leonardo B; Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Clark, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    Y chromosomes, with their reduced effective population size, lack of recombination, and male-limited transmission, present a unique collection of constraints for the operation of natural selection. Male-limited transmission may greatly increase the efficacy of selection for male-beneficial mutations, but the reduced effective size also inflates the role of random genetic drift. Together, these defining features of the Y chromosome are expected to influence rates and patterns of molecular evolution on the Y as compared with X-linked or autosomal loci. Here, we use sequence data from 11 genes in 9 Drosophila species to gain insight into the efficacy of natural selection on the Drosophila Y relative to the rest of the genome. Drosophila is an ideal system for assessing the consequences of Y-linkage for molecular evolution in part because the gene content of Drosophila Y chromosomes is highly dynamic, with orthologous genes being Y-linked in some species whereas autosomal in others. Our results confirm the expectation that the efficacy of natural selection at weakly selected sites is reduced on the Y chromosome. In contrast, purifying selection on the Y chromosome for strongly deleterious mutations does not appear to be compromised. Finally, we find evidence of recurrent positive selection for 4 of the 11 genes studied here. Our results thus highlight the variable nature of the mode and impact of natural selection on the Drosophila Y chromosome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Fat lowers fat: purified phospholipids as emerging therapies for dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2013-04-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor. In spite of the proven efficacy of statin drugs in reducing CHD burden, there is still much room for the discovery of novel therapeutic agents to address the considerable residual cardiovascular risk that remains after treatment with currently available medications. In particular, there is an urgent demand for drugs capable of boosting the concentration and/or function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), thereby promoting reverse cholesterol transport. Phospholipids are naturally occurring fats that play indispensible role in human health via their structural, energy storage, signal transduction and metabolic functions. Supplementation with either purified or mixed preparations of bioactive phospholipids has been reported to ameliorate a range of nutritional and cardiovascular disorders. Moreover, several lines of evidence have supported the efficacy of dietary phospholipids in reducing serum and hepatic contents of cholesterol and triglycerides, while increasing HDL-C and apo A-I levels. These beneficial effects of phospholipids could be attributed to their ability in reducing intestinal cholesterol absorption, enhancing biliary cholesterol excretion and modulating the expression and activity of transcriptional factors and enzymes that are involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Given their extreme safety and biocompatibility, dietary supplementation with phospholipid preparations, in particular phosphatidylinositol, appears as a novel and effective strategy that could be used as an alternative or adjunctive therapy to the current medications. The present review outlines the in-vitro, in-vivo and clinical findings on the anti-dyslipidemic effects of three most abundant phospholipids in the human body and diet namely phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol.

  10. Purifier-integrated methanol reformer for fuel cell vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaesung; Kim, Il-soo; Choi, Keun-Sup

    We developed a compact, 3-kW, purifier-integrated modular reformer which becomes the building block of full-scale 30-kW or 50-kW methanol fuel processors for fuel cell vehicles. Our proprietary technologies regarding hydrogen purification by composite metal membrane and catalytic combustion by washcoated wire-mesh catalyst were combined with the conventional methanol steam-reforming technology, resulting in higher conversion, excellent quality of product hydrogen, and better thermal efficiency than any other systems using preferential oxidation. In this system, steam reforming, hydrogen purification, and catalytic combustion all take place in a single reactor so that the whole system is compact and easy to operate. Hydrogen from the module is ultrahigh pure (99.9999% or better), hence there is no power degradation of PEMFC stack due to contamination by CO. Also, since only pure hydrogen is supplied to the anode of the PEMFC stack, 100% hydrogen utilization is possible in the stack. The module produces 2.3 Nm 3/h of hydrogen, which is equivalent to 3 kW when PEMFC has 43% efficiency. Thermal efficiency (HHV of product H 2/HHV of MeOH in) of the module is 89% and the power density of the module is 0.77 kW/l. This work was conducted in cooperation with Hyundai Motor Company in the form of a Korean national project. Currently the module is under test with an actual fuel cell stack in order to verify its performance. Sooner or later a full-scale 30-kW system will be constructed by connecting these modules in series and parallel and will serve as the fuel processor for the Korean first fuel cell hybrid vehicle.

  11. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  12. Inactivation of virus in solution by cold atmospheric pressure plasma: identification of chemical inactivation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Hamada A.; Gangal, Urvashi; Youssef, Mohammed M.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) inactivates bacteria and virus through in situ production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). While the bactericidal and virucidal efficiency of plasmas is well established, there is limited knowledge about the chemistry leading to the pathogen inactivation. This article describes a chemical analysis of the CAP reactive chemistry involved in the inactivation of feline calicivirus. We used a remote radio frequency CAP produced in varying gas mixtures leading to different plasma-induced chemistries. A study of the effects of selected scavengers complemented with positive control measurements of relevant RONS reveal two distinctive pathways based on singlet oxygen and peroxynitrous acid. The first mechanism is favored in the presence of oxygen and the second in the presence of air when a significant pH reduction is induced in the solution by the plasma. Additionally, smaller effects of the H2O2, O3 and \\text{NO}2- produced were also found. Identification of singlet oxygen-mediated 2-imidazolone/2-oxo-His (His  +14 Da)—an oxidative modification of His 262 comprising the capsid protein of feline calicivirus links the plasma induced singlet oxygen chemistry to viral inactivation.

  13. Modeling the pressure inactivation dynamics of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli, as a model microorganism, was treated in phosphate-buffered saline under high hydrostatic pressure between 100 and 300 MPa, and the inactivation dynamics was investigated from the viewpoint of predictive microbiology. Inactivation data were curve fitted by typical predictive models: logistic, Gompertz and Weibull functions. Weibull function described the inactivation curve the best. Two parameters of Weibull function were calculated for each holding pressure and their dependence on holding pressure was obtained by interpolation. With the interpolated parameters, inactivation curves were simulated and compared with the experimental data sets.

  14. Balsamin, a novel ribosome-inactivating protein from the seeds of Balsam apple Momordica balsamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Inderdeep; Yadav, Santosh K; Hariprasad, Gururao; Gupta, R C; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Batra, Janendra K; Puri, Munish

    2012-08-01

    Plant seeds, a rich source of proteins, are considered important for their application as functional ingredients in a food system. A novel ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), balsamin was purified from the seeds of Balsam apple, Momordica balsamina. Balsamin was purified by ion exchange chromatography on CM Sepharose and gel filtration on superdex-75. It has a molecular weight of 28 kDa as shown by SDS-PAGE analysis. Balsamin inhibits protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate-based cell free translation assay with an IC(50) of 90.6 ng ml(-1). It has RNA N-glycosidase activity and releases a 400-base long fragment termed the Endo fragment from 28S rRNA in the same manner as does saporin-6 from Saponaria officinalis. The N-terminal sequence analysis of the first 12 amino acids of balsamin revealed that it shares 83% similarity with type I RIP α-MMC from Momordica charantia and 50% similarity with β-MMC (from Momordica charantia), bryodin I (from Bryonia dioica) and luffin a (from Luffa cylindrica). Balsamin was further characterized by mass spectrometry. CD spectroscopic studies indicate that secondary structure of balsamin contains helix (23.5%), β-strand (24.6%), turn (20%) and random coil (31.9%). Thus RIPs activity expressed in vegetables like Momordica sp. advocates its usage in diet.

  15. FEF inactivation with improved optogenetic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Leah; Pino, Erica N; Boyden, Edward S; Desimone, Robert

    2016-11-15

    Optogenetic methods have been highly effective for suppressing neural activity and modulating behavior in rodents, but effects have been much smaller in primates, which have much larger brains. Here, we present a suite of technologies to use optogenetics effectively in primates and apply these tools to a classic question in oculomotor control. First, we measured light absorption and heat propagation in vivo, optimized the conditions for using the red-light-shifted halorhodopsin Jaws in primates, and developed a large-volume illuminator to maximize light delivery with minimal heating and tissue displacement. Together, these advances allowed for nearly universal neuronal inactivation across more than 10 mm(3) of the cortex. Using these tools, we demonstrated large behavioral changes (i.e., up to several fold increases in error rate) with relatively low light power densities (≤100 mW/mm(2)) in the frontal eye field (FEF). Pharmacological inactivation studies have shown that the FEF is critical for executing saccades to remembered locations. FEF neurons increase their firing rate during the three epochs of the memory-guided saccade task: visual stimulus presentation, the delay interval, and motor preparation. It is unclear from earlier work, however, whether FEF activity during each epoch is necessary for memory-guided saccade execution. By harnessing the temporal specificity of optogenetics, we found that FEF contributes to memory-guided eye movements during every epoch of the memory-guided saccade task (the visual, delay, and motor periods).

  16. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Plants Inhibiting Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inderdeep Kaur; R C Gupta; Munish Puri

    2011-01-01

    Many plants contain ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with N-glycosidase activity,which depurinate large ribosomal RNA and arrest protein synthesis.RIPs so far tested inhibit replication of mRNA as well as DNA viruses and these proteins,isolated from plants,are found to be effective against a broad range of viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),hepatitis B virus (HBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV).Most of the research work related to RIPs has been focused on antiviral activity against HIV; however,the exact mechanism of antiviral activity is still not clear.The mechanism of antiviral activity was thought to follow inactivation of the host cell ribosome,leading to inhibition of viral protein translation and host cell death.Enzymatic activity of RIPs is not hmited to depurination of the large rRNA,in addition they can depurinate viral DNA as well as RNA.Recently,Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ clinical trials have demonstrated the potential use of RIPs for treating patients with HIV disease.The aim of this review is to focus on various RIPs from plants associated with anti-HIV activity.

  17. Optimization of freeze drying conditions for purified pectinase from mango (Mangifera indica cv. Chokanan) peel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehrnoush, Amid; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Yazid, Abdul Manap Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) along with central composite design (CCD) was applied to optimize the freeze drying conditions for purified pectinase from mango (Mangifera indica cv. Chokanan) peel...

  18. Hypolipidemic activities of xanthorrhizol purified from centrifugal TLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Seok Fang; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Kassim, Nur Kartinee; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Sa'ariwijaya, Mohd Shazrul Fazry; Tee, Thiam Tsui; Cheah, Yew Hoong

    2016-09-23

    Hyperlipidemia is defined as the presence of either hypertriglyceridemia or hypercholesterolemia, which could cause atherosclerosis. Although hyperlipidemia can be treated by hypolipidemic drugs, they are limited due to lack of effectiveness and safety. Previous studies demonstrated that xanthorrhizol (XNT) isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhizza Roxb. reduced the levels of free fatty acid and triglyceride in vivo. However, its ability to inhibit cholesterol uptake in HT29 colon cells and adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells are yet to be reported. In this study, XNT purified from centrifugal TLC demonstrated 98.3% purity, indicating it could be an alternative purification method. The IC50 values of XNT were 30.81 ± 0.78 μg/mL in HT29 cells and 35.07 ± 0.24 μg/mL in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, respectively. Cholesterol uptake inhibition study using HT29 colon cells showed that XNT (15 μg/mL) significantly inhibited the fluorescent cholesterol analogue NBD uptake by up to 27 ± 3.1% relative to control. On the other hand, higher concentration of XNT (50 μg/mL) significantly suppressed the growth of 3T3-L1 adipocytes (5.9 ± 0.58%) compared to 3T3-L1 preadipocytes (81.31 ± 0.55%). XNT was found to impede adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner from 3.125 to 12.5 μg/mL, where 12.5 μg/mL significantly suppressed 36.13 ± 2.1% of lipid accumulation. We postulate that inhibition of cholesterol uptake, adipogenesis, preadipocyte and adipocyte number may be utilized as treatment modalities to reduce the prevalence of lipidemia. To conclude, XNT could be a potential hypolipidemic agent to improve cardiovascular health in the future. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Properties of serine: glyoxylate aminotransferase purified from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Kendziorek; Andrzej Paszkowski

    2008-01-01

    The photorespiratory enzyme L-serine: glyoxylate aminotransferase (SGAT; EC 2.6.1.45) was purified from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. The final enzyme was approximately 80% pure as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with silver staining. The identity of the enzyme was confirmed by LC/MS/MS analysis.The molecular mass estimated by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-150 under non-denaturing conditions, mass spectrometry (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization/time of flight technique) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was 82.4 kDa,42.0 kDa, and 39.8 kDa, respectively, indicating dimer as the active form. The optimum Ph value was 9.2. The enzyme activity was inhibited by aminooxyacetate and β-chloro-L-alanine both compounds reacting with the carbonyl group of pyridoxal phosphate. The enzyme's transaminating activity with L-alanine and glyoxylate as substrates was approximately 55% of that observed with L-serine and glyoxylate, The lower Km value (1.25 Mm) for L-alanine, compared with that of other plant SGATs, and the kcat/Km(Ala) ratio being approximately 2-fold higher than kcat/Km(Ser) suggested that, during photorespiration, Ala and Ser are used by Arabidopsis SGAT with equal efficiency as amino group donors for glyoxylate. The equilibrium constant (Keq), derived from the Haldane relation, for the transamination reaction between L-serine and glyoxylate with the formation of hydroxypyruvate and glycine was 79.1, strongly favoring glycine synthesis. However, it was accompanied by a low Km value of 2.83 Mm for glycine. A comparison of some kinetic properties of the studied enzymes with the recombinant Arabidopsis SGATs previously obtained revealed substantial differences. The ratio of the velocity of the transamination reaction with L-alanine and glyoxylate as substrates versus that with L-serine and glyoxylate was 1:1.8 for the native enzyme, whereas it was 1: 7 for the recombinant SGAT

  20. [Effects of hydroxyl radicals on purified angiotensin I converting enzyme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, B; Nirina, L B; Grima, M; Ingert, C; Coquard, C; Barthelmebs, M; Imbs, J L

    1998-08-01

    Somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a protein which contains two similar domains (N and C), each possessing a functional active site. The relationship between ACE, its natural substrates and oxygen free radicals is starting to be explored. On one hand, superoxide anions production is induced by angiotensin II and on the other hand, activated polynuclear neutrophils, through free radicals generation, alter endothelial ACE activity. In this study, we examined the impact of hydroxyl radicals (.OH) on purified ACE. .OH were produced using a generator: 2,2'-azo-bis 2-amidinopropane (GRH) provided by Lara-Spiral (Fr). GRH (3 mM), in a time-dependent fashion, inhibited ACE activity. When ACE was co-incubated for 4 h with GRH, its activity decreased by 70%. Addition of dimethylthiourea (DMTU: 0.03 to 1 mM) or mannitol + methionine (20/10 mM), two sets of .OH scavengers, produced a dose-dependent protection on ACE activity. To examine whether oxidation of thiol groups in the ACE molecule could be involved in the action of GRH, the effects of thiol reducing agents: mercaptoethanol and dithiotreitol (DTT) were investigated. These compounds produced a dose-dependent and significant protection; with 100% protection at 0.2 and 0.3 mM for mercaptoethanol and at 0.1 mM for DTT. The hydrolysis of two natural and domain-specific substrates were also explored. The hydrolysis of angiotensin I preferentially cleaved by the C domain was significantly (p GRH [in nmol angio II formed/min/nmol of ACE, n = 4; 35.9 +/- 0.6 (control), 15.5 +/- 2.8 (GRH : 0.3 mM), 15.1 +/- 0.5 (1), 10.9 +/- 0.6 (3)]. The hydrolysis of the hemoregulatory peptide (hp), preferential substrate for the N domain was not affected by GRH at 0.3 mM and inhibited by 28% (not significant) by 1 mM GRH [in nmol ph hydrolized/min/nmol ACE, n = 4; 12.6 +/- 1.9 (control), 14.9 (GRH : 0.3 mM), 8.3 +/- 4.0 (1). These results demonstrated that .OH affect ACE activity and could suggest a privileged impact of GRH on the

  1. Nonrandom X chromosome inactivation in natural killer cells from obligate carriers of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengler, G.S.; Parolini, O.; Conley, M.E. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States) St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)); Allen, R.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, H. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States))

    1993-01-15

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, markedly reduced numbers of T cells, absent mitogen responses, decreased numbers of NK cells, and normal or elevated numbers of B cells. The abnormalities in the NK cell and B cell lineages could be attributed to dependence of these cell lineages on T cells or T cell-derived factors, or to expression of the XSCID gene defect in these cell lineages. In past experiments, the authors have examined X chromosome inactivation patterns in T cells and cultured B cells from female obligate carriers of XSCID and have found that both cell lineages demonstrate nonrandom X chromosome inactivation. This indicates that the gene defect is intrinsic to both of these cell lineages. In the present experiments, a polymerase chain reaction technique was used to evaluate X chromosome inactivation patterns in highly purified populations of freshly isolated NK cells, B cells, CD4[sup +] cells, and CD8[sup +] cells from three obligate carriers of XSCID. All four lymphoid cell populations from these three women exhibited exclusive use of a single X as the active X. In contrast, both X chromosomes were used as the active X in neutrophils and monocytes. These findings indicate that the XSCID gene is expressed in the NK cell lineage as well as in T cells and B cells. This observation makes it highly unlikely that the XSCID gene is involved in Ag receptor gene rearrangements. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  2. The assessment of efficacy of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus inactivated vaccine based on the viral quantity and inactivation methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Hyunil; Kim, Hye Kwon; Jung, Jung Ho; Choi, Yoo Jung; Kim, Jiho; Um, Chang Gyu; Hyun, Su Bin; Shin, Sungho; Lee, Byeongchun; Jang, Goo; Kang, Bo Kyu; Moon, Hyoung Joon; Song, Dae Sub

    2011-01-01

    ...). Although inactivated PRRSV vaccines are preferred for their safety, they are weak at inducing humoral immune responses and controlling field PRRSV infection, especially when heterologous viruses are involved...

  3. Studies on Purification of Methamidophos Monoclonal Antibodies and Comoarative Immunoactivity of Purified Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU-QING ZHAO; YUAN-MING SUN; CHUN-YAN ZHANG; XIAO-YU HUANG; HOU-RUI ZHANG; ZHEN-YU ZHU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To purify Methamidophos (Met) monoclonal antibodies with two methods andcompare immune activity of purified antibodies. Method Caprylic acid ammonium sulphateprecipition (CAASP) method and Sepharose protein-A (SPA) affinity chromatography method wereused to purify Met monoclonal antibodies, UV spectrum scanning was used to determine proteincontent and recovery of purified antibodies, sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to analyze the purity of purified antibodies, and enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine immune activity of purified antibodies.Results Antibody protein content and recovery rate with CAASP method were 7.62 mg/mL and8.05% respectively, antibody protein content and recovery rate with SPA method were 6.45 mg/mLand 5.52% respectively. Purity of antibodies purified by SPA method was higher than that by CAASPmethod. The half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) of antibodies purified by SPA to Met was181.26 μg/mL, and the linear working range and the limit of quantification (LOD) were 2.43-3896.01μg/mL and 1.03 μg/mL, respectively. The IC50 of antibodies purified by CAASP to Met was 352.82μg/mL, and the linear working range and LOD were 10.91-11412.29 ug/mL and 3.42 μg/mL,respectively. Conclusion Antibodies purified by SPA method are better than those by CAASPmethod, and Met monoclonal antibodies purified by SPA method can be used to prepare gold-labelledtesting paper for analyzing Met residue in vegetable and drink water.

  4. Scale down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.; Oever, van 't R.; Vinke, C.M.; Spiekstra, A.; Wijffels, R.H.; Pol, van der L.A.; Bakker, W.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production pro

  5. Mechanisms of Escherichia coli inactivation by several disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min; Kim, Jaeeun; Kim, Jee Yeon; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate dominant mechanisms of inactivation, i.e. surface attack versus intracellular attack, during application of common water disinfectants such as ozone, chlorine dioxide, free chlorine and UV irradiation. Escherichia coli was used as a representative microorganism. During cell inactivation, protein release, lipid peroxidation, cell permeability change, damage in intracellular enzyme and morphological change were comparatively examined. For the same level of cell inactivation by chemical disinfectants, cell surface damage was more pronounced with strong oxidant such as ozone while damage in inner cell components was more apparent with weaker oxidant such as free chlorine. Chlorine dioxide showed the inactivation mechanism between these two disinfectants. The results suggest that the mechanism of cell inactivation is primarily related to the reactivity of chemical disinfectant. In contrast to chemical disinfectants, cell inactivation by UV occurred without any changes measurable with the methods employed. Understanding the differences in inactivation mechanisms presented herein is critical to identify rate-limiting steps involved in the inactivation process as well as to develop more effective disinfection strategies.

  6. Scale down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.; Oever, van 't R.; Vinke, C.M.; Spiekstra, A.; Wijffels, R.H.; Pol, van der L.A.; Bakker, W.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production pro

  7. Scale down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.; Oever, van 't R.; Vinke, C.M.; Spiekstra, A.; Wijffels, R.H.; Pol, van der L.A.; Bakker, W.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production

  8. Characterization of crude and purified pumpkin seed oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsaknis, John

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Oil from hulled pumpkin seeds (Cucurbita pepo and Cucurbita Maxima was extracted with hot petroleum ether, and then it was degummed, neutralized and bleached, consecutively Physical and chemical characteristics of crude and purified oils were determined. Density, refractive index, viscosity and peroxide value were not affected by purification, while decreases in acidity, colour, unsaponifiable, E1%1cm 232, and oxidative stability, and increases in smoke point and E1%1cm 270 were observed. Purification did not affect the fatty acid and sterol profiles. GLC analysis for the fatty acid composition of the seed oil showed that the predominant unsaturates were linoleic (42% and oleic (38%, while the major saturates were palmitic (12,7% and stearic (6%. Only α-tocopherol was detected at a level of 126 mg/kg, which reduced to 78 mg/kg after purification. The main sterols of pumpkin seed oil unsaponifiable were Δ7.22,25 -stigmastatrien-3β-ol, α-spinasterol, Δ7,25_stigmastadienol and Δ7-avenasterol, followed by stigmasterol, 24-methylcholest-7-enol and Δ7-stigmastenol, and also trace to minor amounts of cholesterol, brassicasterol, campesterol, sitostanol, Δ5-avenasterol, erythrodiol and uvaol were found.

    Aceite de semillas de calabaza descascarada (Cucurbita pepo YCucurbita maxima fue extraído con éter de petróleo caliente, y luego desgomado, neutralizado y decolorado consecutivamente. Las características físicas y químicas de aceites crudo y purificado fueron determinadas. La densidad, el índice de refracción, la viscosidad y el índice de peróxido no se afectaron por la purificación, mientras que se observó una disminución en la acidez, color, insaponificable, E1%1cm 232, y estabilidad oxidativa, y un aumento en el punto de humo y de E1%1cm270. La purificaci

  9. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  10. Pathogen Inactivation of red cells: challenges and opportunities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen J. Wagner

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Virus inactivation methods for blood have been explored as a means to further reduce the risk from tested agents and to decrease the risk of emerging or variant agents for whom no deferral or effective screening methods are available. Although inactivation methods promise to reduce transfusion-related infectious disease risk, these methods are not perfect. Most techniques for pathogen reduction will not kill bacterial spores, or inactivate bacterial endotoxin, prion protein, or certain non-enveloped viruses whose tightly packed capsid proteins prevent access of the virucidal agent to its nucleic acid target. In addition,various inactivation methods have been known to decrease blood cell yield, affect blood cell recovery or survival, and may pose risk to recipients or blood center workers. My presentation today will review two methods for pathogen inactivation of red cells.

  11. Factors affecting cellulose hydrolysis based on inactivation of adsorbed enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhuoliang; Berson, R Eric

    2014-09-01

    The rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose reaction is known to decrease significantly as the reaction proceeds. Factors such as reaction temperature, time, and surface area of substrate that affect cellulose conversion were analyzed relative to their role in a mechanistic model based on first order inactivation of adsorbed cellulases. The activation energies for the hydrolytic step and inactivation step were very close in magnitude: 16.3 kcal mol(-1) for hydrolysis and 18.0 kcal mol(-1) for inactivation, respectively. Therefore, increasing reaction temperature would cause a significant increase in the inactivation rate in addition to the catalytic reaction rate. Vmax,app was only 20% or less of the value at 72 h compared to at 2h as a result of inactivation of adsorbed cellulases, suggesting prolonged hydrolysis is not an efficient way to improve cellulose hydrolysis. Hydrolysis rate increased with corresponding increases in available substrate surface binding area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Inactivation of T4 phage in water environment using proteinase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Yang, Qing-xiang; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Zhu, Chun-fang

    2004-09-01

    The inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to viruses was investigated by using T4 phage as a model virus. The results showed that the inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to T4 phage was obvious. In the optimum conditions and 67.5 u/mL concentration, the inactivation rate of proteinase K to T4 phage in sterilized water and in sewage achieved 99.4% and 49.4% respectively in an hour, and achieved >99.9% and 81.1% in three hours. The inactivation rate of the industrial proteinase 1398 to T4 phage in sterilized water achieved 74.4% in an hour. The effects of pH and temperature on the inactivation effectiveness was not evident.

  13. Inactivation of Chikungunya virus by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Anuj

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthropod borne alphavirus of the family Togaviridae. CHIKV is a reemerging virus for which there is no safe prophylactic vaccine. A live attenuated strain of CHIKV, CHIK181/25, was previously demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in humans, however, it showed residual virulence causing transient arthralgia. Findings In this study, we demonstrate the complete inactivation of CHIKV181/25 by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide (INA. No cytopathic effect and virus replication was observed in cells infected with the INA-inactivated CHIKV. However, a reduction in the INA-inactivated CHIK virus-antibody binding capacity was observed by western blot analysis. Conclusion INA completely inactivated CHIKV and can further be explored for developing an inactivated-CHIKV vaccine.

  14. Enzymatic synthesis of L-tryptophan by Enterobacter aerogenes tryptophanase highly expressed in Escherichia coli, and some properties of the purified enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, K; Yokota, A; Tomita, F

    1995-10-01

    We constructed two plasmids that have a strong tac promoter and a structural gene for tryptophanase of Enterobacter aerogenes SM-18 (pKT901EA) or Escherichia coli K-12 (pKT951EC). The tryptophanase activity of E. coli JM109 transformed with pKT901EA (JM109/pKT901EA) was inducible with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside, and 3.6 times higher than that of E. aerogenes SM-18. Cells of JM109/pKT901EA induced for tryptophanase synthesized L-tryptophan from indole, ammonia, and pyruvate more efficiently than E. aerogenes SM-18. Although JM109/pKT951EC expressed a similar level of tryptophanase activity to that of JM109/pKT901EA, the synthesis of L-tryptophan by the cells of JM109/pKT951EC did not proceed well compared with JM109/pKT901EA. Tryptophanases from E. aerogenes and E. coli K-12 were purified, and their properties were investigated. The purified E. aerogenes tryptophanase showed higher stability against heat inactivation than E. coli tryptophanase.

  15. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun [Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, Korea University Graduate School of Medicine, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chaeseung [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungho [Department of Life Science, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Dae Ryong [Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-020 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Junseo, E-mail: ohjs@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, Korea University Graduate School of Medicine, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I-III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin{sup domain} {sup III} (R-III) and albumin{sup domain} {sup I}-RBP-albumin{sup III} (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises

  16. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts.

  17. Inactivation of microbes using ultrasound: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyasena, P; Mohareb, E; McKellar, R C

    2003-11-01

    Alternative methods for pasteurization and sterilization are gaining importance, due to increased consumer demand for new methods of food processing that have a reduced impact on nutritional content and overall food quality. Ultrasound processing or sonication is one of the alternative technologies that has shown promise in the food industry. Sonication alone is not very effective in killing bacteria in food; however, the use of ultrasound coupled with pressure and/or heat is promising. Thermosonic (heat plus sonication), manosonic (pressure plus sonication), and manothermosonic (heat and pressure plus sonication) treatments are likely the best methods to inactivate microbes, as they are more energy-efficient and effective in killing microorganisms. Ultrasonic processing is still in its infancy and requires a great deal of future research in order to develop the technology on an industrial scale, and to more fully elucidate the effect of ultrasound on the properties of foods.

  18. Esterase resistant to inactivation by heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    El, Dorry Hamza

    2014-09-25

    EstATII is an esterase that a halotolerant, thermophilic and resistant to a spectrum of heavy metals including toxic concentration of metals. It was isolated from the lowest convective layer of the Atlantis II Red Sea brine pool. The Atlantis II brine pool is an extreme environment that possesses multiple harsh conditions such as; high temperature, salinity, pH and high concentration of metals, including toxic heavy metals. A fosmid metagenomic library using DNA isolated from the lowest convective layer this pool was used to identify EstATII. Polynucleotides encoding EstATII and similar esterases are disclosed and can be used to make EstATII. EstATII or compositions or apparatuses that contain it may be used in various processes employing lipases/esterases especially when these processes are performed under harsh conditions that inactivate other kinds of lipases or esterases.

  19. Ion channels to inactivate neurons in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J L Hodge

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are the determinants of excitability; therefore, manipulation of their levels and properties provides an opportunity for the investigator to modulate neuronal and circuit function. There are a number of ways to suppress electrical activity in Drosophila neurons, for instance, over-expression of potassium channels (i.e. Shaker Kv1, Shaw Kv3, Kir2.1 and DORK that are open at resting membrane potential. This will result in increased potassium efflux and membrane hyperpolarisation setting resting membrane potential below the threshold required to fire action potentials. Alternatively over-expression of other channels, pumps or co-transporters that result in a hyperpolarised membrane potential will also prevent firing. Lastly, neurons can be inactivated by, disrupting or reducing the level of functional voltage-gated sodium (Nav1 paralytic or calcium (Cav2 cacophony channels that mediate the depolarisation phase of action potentials. Similarly, strategies involving the opposite channel manipulation should allow net depolarisation and hyperexcitation in a given neuron. These changes in ion channel expression can be brought about by the versatile transgenic (i.e. Gal4/UAS based systems available in Drosophila allowing fine temporal and spatial control of (channel transgene expression. These systems are making it possible to electrically inactivate (or hyperexcite any neuron or neural circuit in the fly brain, and much like an exquisite lesion experiment, potentially elucidate whatever interesting behaviour or phenotype each network mediates. These techniques are now being used in Drosophila to reprogram electrical activity of well-defined circuits and bring about robust and easily quantifiable changes in behaviour, allowing different models and hypotheses to be rapidly tested.

  20. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Marieke; Vosters, Sanne; Merkx, Gerard; D'Hauwers, Kathleen; Wansink, Derick G; Ramos, Liliana; de Boer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  1. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke de Vries

    Full Text Available In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI, which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  2. Pressure-Inactivated Virus: A Promising Alternative for Vaccine Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jerson L; Barroso, Shana P C; Mendes, Ygara S; Dumard, Carlos H; Santos, Patricia S; Gomes, Andre M O; Oliveira, Andréa C

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many applications in diverse scientific fields with various purposes have examined pressure as a thermodynamic parameter. Pressure studies on viruses have direct biotechnological applications. Currently, most studies that involve viral inactivation by HHP are found in the area of food engineering and focus on the inactivation of foodborne viruses. Nevertheless, studies of viral inactivation for other purposes have also been conducted. HHP has been shown to be efficient in the inactivation of many viruses of clinical importance and the use of HHP approach has been proposed for the development of animal and human vaccines. Several studies have demonstrated that pressure can result in virus inactivation while preserving immunogenic properties. Viruses contain several components that can be susceptible to the effects of pressure. HHP has been a valuable tool for assessing viral structure function relationships because the viral structure is highly dependent on protein-protein interactions. In the case of small icosahedral viruses, incremental increases in pressure produce a progressive decrease in the folding structure when moving from assembled capsids to ribonucleoprotein intermediates (in RNA viruses), free dissociated units (dimers and/or monomers) and denatured monomers. High pressure inactivates enveloped viruses by trapping their particles in a fusion-like intermediate state. The fusogenic state, which is characterized by a smaller viral volume, is the final conformation promoted by HHP, in contrast with the metastable native state, which is characterized by a larger volume. The combined effects of high pressure with other factors, such as low or subzero temperature, pH and agents in sub-denaturing conditions (urea), have been a formidable tool in the assessment of the component's structure, as well as pathogen inactivation. HHP is a technology for the production of inactivated vaccines that are free of chemicals, safe and capable of inducing

  3. Comparison of different application strategies of divergicin M35 for inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked wild salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, I; Desbiens, M; Kheadr, E; Lacroix, C; Fliss, I

    2009-12-01

    Cold-smoked salmon treated with divergicin M35-producing Carnobacterium divergens M35, C. divergens ATCC 35677 (a non-producer of bacteriocin), purified divergicin M35 or supernatants of C. divergens M35 culture in snow crab hepatopancreas (SCH) medium or MRS broth was challenged with Listeria monocytogenes (up to 10(3) CFU/g). Samples were stored at 4 degrees C for up to four weeks. L. monocytogenes, total bacterial and lactic acid bacterial counts were determined along with changes in total volatile base nitrogen (TVBN) and biogenic amine production as well as texture, color and odor. A 2.6 log CFU/g reduction in L. monocytogenes was obtained for up to 10 days of storage in samples treated with C. divergens M35. Purified divergicin M35 (50 microg/g), SCH supernatant or MRS supernatant brought reductions of 1 log CFU/g at the beginning of storage. However, the anti-listerial activity of the supernatants lasted for 15 days compared to 3 days for purified divergicin M35. Color and texture were affected little in samples containing C. divergens M35 compared to un-inoculated samples. TVBN and biogenic amine production, particularly tyramine, remained below the maximum acceptable level in fish appreciation. These results clearly show the potential of C. divergens M35 culture as well as divergicin M35 bio-ingredient for application to the inactivation of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat seafood.

  4. An experimental study on the anti-Ehrlich ascites carcinoma effect of purified toad venom extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the anti-Ehrlich ascites carcinoma effect of purified toad venom extract and its mechanism. Mouse model of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma was established with cisplatin as the control to observe the inhibitory effect of purified toad venom extract on malignant peritoneal effusion in mice. The results showed that compared with the control group, ascites volume, number of tumour cells and tumour cell viability decreased and ascites inhibition rate reached over 50% in each treatment group, and with the increase of the dose, incidence of ascites showed a downward trend. The number of tumour cells in ascites and tumour cell viability in the purified toad venom high-dose group were lower than those of the cisplatin group. Compared with the model group, survival time was prolonged in varying degrees in the purified toad venom groups and cisplatin group. The study concluded that purified extract of toad venom has an anti-Ehrlich ascites carcinoma effect.

  5. Kinetic analysis of competition between aerosol particle removal and generation by ionization air purifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawa, Ahmad; Russell, Ashley R; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2007-04-01

    Ionization air purifiers are increasingly used to remove aerosol particles from indoor air. However, certain ionization air purifiers also emit ozone. Reactions between the emitted ozone and unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOC) commonly found in indoor air produce additional respirable aerosol particles in the ultrafine (air purifiers under conditions of a typical residential building. This model predicts that certain widely used ionization air purifiers may actually increase the mass concentration of fine and ultrafine particulates in the presence of common unsaturated VOC, such as limonene contained in many household cleaning products. This prediction is supported by an explicit observation of ultrafine particle nucleation events caused by the addition of D-limonene to a ventilated office room equipped with a common ionization air purifier.

  6. Kinetic modelling of enzyme inactivation Kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F was studied. It was established, by making use of kinetic modelling, that heat inactivation in the temperature range 35 - 70 °C was most likely caused by intermolecular autoproteolysis, where unfolded

  7. Sunlight inactivation of viruses in open-water unit process treatment wetlands: modeling endogenous and exogenous inactivation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Andrea I; Nguyen, Mi T; Schilling, Iris E; Wenk, Jannis; Nelson, Kara L

    2015-03-03

    Sunlight inactivation is an important mode of disinfection for viruses in surface waters. In constructed wetlands, for example, open-water cells can be used to promote sunlight disinfection and remove pathogenic viruses from wastewater. To aid in the design of these systems, we developed predictive models of virus attenuation that account for endogenous and exogenous sunlight-mediated inactivation mechanisms. Inactivation rate models were developed for two viruses, MS2 and poliovirus type 3; laboratory- and field-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the models' ability to estimate inactivation rates in a pilot-scale, open-water, unit-process wetland cell. Endogenous inactivation rates were modeled using either photoaction spectra or total, incident UVB irradiance. Exogenous inactivation rates were modeled on the basis of virus susceptibilities to singlet oxygen. Results from both laboratory- and field-scale experiments showed good agreement between measured and modeled inactivation rates. The modeling approach presented here can be applied to any sunlit surface water and utilizes easily measured inputs such as depth, solar irradiance, water matrix absorbance, singlet oxygen concentration, and the virus-specific apparent second-order rate constant with singlet oxygen (k2). Interestingly, the MS2 k2 in the open-water wetland was found to be significantly larger than k2 observed in other waters in previous studies. Examples of how the model can be used to design and optimize natural treatment systems for virus inactivation are provided.

  8. Selective inactivation by 21-chlorinated steroids of rabbit liver and adrenal microsomal cytochromes P-450 involved in progesterone hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, J; Jaw, J Y; Balfour, C; Mash, E A; Johnson, E F

    1988-08-01

    The inactivation by 21-chlorinated steroids of rabbit liver cytochromes P-450 involved in the hydroxylation of progesterone has been investigated in intact microsomes encompassing two phenotypes of 21-hydroxylase activity, two phenotypes of 16 alpha-hydroxylase activity, and three phenotypes of 6 beta-hydroxylase activity. In liver microsomes from outbred New Zealand White male rabbits exhibiting a high content of cytochrome P-450 1, 21,21-dichloropregnenolone caused a time- and NADPH-dependent loss of 21-hydroxylase activity. This loss of activity exhibited a number of characteristics of mechanism-based inactivation, including irreversibility, saturation with increasing inhibitor concentrations, and protection by substrate, and was also documented with purified P-450 1 in a reconstituted system. 21,21-Dichloropregnenolone caused no time-dependent loss of 6 beta-hydroxylase activity in microsomes from the New Zealand White rabbits or from control or rifampicin-treated rabbits of the inbred B/J strain. In contrast, in the microsomes from the B/J rabbits, some inactivation of the 16 alpha-hydroxylase was observed (k = 0.04 min-1), regardless of the rifampicin treatment. The other two compounds tested, 21-chloropregnenolone and 21,21-dichloroprogesterone, were less effective than the dichloropregnenolone as inactivators of cytochrome P-450 1. On the other hand, 21,21-dichloroprogesterone, but not 21,21-dichloropregneolone, caused a rapid time-dependent loss of 21-hydroxylase activity in rabbit adrenal microsomes. The results indicate that the introduction of a dichloromethyl group into a substrate bearing a methyl group normally hydroxylated by only one or a few forms of cytochrome P-450 may be a rational means of designing selective inhibitors of the enzyme.

  9. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/Co gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/Co radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. We found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  10. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  11. Virus-specific thermostability and heat inactivation profiles of alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Lee; Huang, Yan-Jang S; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hettenbach, Susan M; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2016-08-01

    Serological diagnosis is a critical component for disease surveillance and is important to address the increase in incidence and disease burden of alphaviruses, such as the chikungunya (CHIKV) and Ross River (RRV) viruses. The gold standard for serological diagnosis is the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), which demonstrates the neutralizing capacity of serum samples after the removal of complement activity and adventitious viruses. This procedure is normally performed following inactivation of the virus at 56°C for 30min. Although this protocol has been widely accepted for the inactivation of envelope RNA viruses, recent studies have demonstrated that prolonged heat inactivation is required to completely inactivate two alphaviruses, Western equine encephalitis virus and CHIKV. Incomplete inactivation of viruses poses a laboratory biosafety risk and can also lead to spurious test results. Despite its importance in ensuring the safety of laboratory personnel as well as test integrity, systematic investigation on the thermostability of alphaviruses has not been performed. In this study, the temperature tolerance and heat inactivation profiles of RRV, Barmah Forest, and o'nyong-nyong viruses were determined. Variations in thermostability were observed within the Semliki forest serocomplex. Therefore, evidence-based heat inactivation procedures for alphaviruses are recommended.

  12. X chromosome inactivation and X-linked mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, H.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1996-07-12

    The expression of X-linked genes in females heterozygous for X-linked defects can be modulated by epigenetic control mechanisms that constitute the X chromosome inactivation pathway. At least four different effects have been found to influence, in females, the phenotypic expression of genes responsible for X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, non-random X inactivation, due either to stochastic or genetic factors, can result in tissues in which one cell type (for example, that in which the X chromosome carrying a mutant XLMR gene is active) dominates, instead of the normal mosaic cell population expected as a result of random X inactivation. Second, skewed inactivation of the normal X in individuals carrying a deletion of part of the X chromosome has been documented in a number of mentally retarded females. Third, functional disomy of X-linked genes that are expressed inappropriately due to the absence of X inactivation has been found in mentally retarded females with structurally abnormal X chromosomes that do not contain the X inactivation center. And fourth, dose-dependent overexpression of X-linked genes that normally {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} X inactivation may account for the mental and developmental delay associated with increasing numbers of otherwise inactive X chromosomes in individuals with X chromosome aneuploidy. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a novel ribosome-inactivating protein from root cultures of pokeweed and its mechanism of secretion from roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Wook; Lawrence, Christopher B; Linden, James C; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2002-09-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins are N-glycosidases that remove a specific adenine from the sarcin/ricin loop of the large rRNA, thus arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. In the present study, a novel type I ribosome-inactivating protein, termed PAP-H, was purified from Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed hairy roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana). The protein was purified by anion- and cation-exchange chromatography. PAP-H has a molecular mass of 29.5 kD as detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its isoelectric point was determined to be 7.8. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ribosomes incubated with PAP-H released the 360-nucleotide diagnostic fragment from the 26S rRNA upon aniline treatment, an indication of its ribosome-inactivating activity. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, PAP-H was found to be located in the cell walls of hairy roots and root border cells. PAP-H was determined to be constitutively secreted as part of the root exudates, with its secretion enhanced by a mechanism mediated by ethylene induction. Purified PAP-H did not show in vitro antifungal activity against soil-borne fungi. In contrast, root exudates containing PAP-H as well as additional chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase, and protease activities did inhibit the growth of soil-borne fungi. We found that PAP-H depurinates fungal ribosomes in vitro and in vivo, suggesting an additive mechanism that enables PAP-H to penetrate fungal cells.

  14. [Removal of formaldehyde with novel packed air purifier and its computational simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-hua; Wang, Kun; Zhao, Qing-liang; Zhang, Li-wei; Yuan, Chung-shin

    2008-09-01

    A novel air purifier was designed for the removal of indoor formaldehyde. The air purifier was filled with glass beads (3 mm) coated with TiO2. The removal efficiency of this air purifier was examined in an airtight room. The results showed that 87.0%-93.8% of the formaldehyde was removed for the initial formaldehyde concentration of 0.727-1.815 mg/m3. The reaction rate equation of the air purifier was developed. The simulation of single device of the air purifier suggested the uniformity of the air flow in the device. Besides, a mathematical model to simulate the variation of formaldehyde in a room was constructed, in which there was continuous formaldehyde emission source and the air purifier was operated. The simulation result was also proved by the experimental data. The results revealed that using the air purifier at intervals could steadily keep the formaldehyde concentration below the National Air Quality Standard of China, i.e. 0.1 mg/m3.

  15. Ribosome-inactivating proteins in edible plants and purification and characterization of a new ribosome-inactivating protein from Cucurbita moschata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Luigi; Polito, Letizia; Bolognesi, Andrea; Ciani, Marialibera; Pelosi, Emanuele; Farini, Valentina; Jha, Ajay K; Sharma, Neelam; Vivanco, Jorge M; Chambery, Angela; Parente, Augusto; Stirpe, Fiorenzo

    2006-05-01

    The basic protein fraction of tissue extracts from 40 edible plants inhibited cell-free protein synthesis and released adenine from herring sperm DNA, thus having adenine glycosylase activity. This suggested the presence of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) in the plant extracts. This indication was further strengthened by the presence of the two activities after a partial chromatographic purification of three extracts, including that from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato), which had very low activity. From the extract of Cucurbita moschata (pumpkin), the most active one, a glycoprotein of 30,665 Da was purified which had the properties of a RIP, in that (i) it inhibited protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate with IC50 (concentration giving 50% inhibition) 0.035 nM (1.08 ng ml(-1)) and by HeLa, HT29 and JM cells with IC50 in the 100 nM range, (ii) deadenylated hsDNA and other polynucleotidic substrates, and (iii) depurinated yeast rRNA at a concentration of 0.1 ng ml(-1), all values being comparable to those of other RIPs. The C. moschata RIP gave a weak cross-reaction only with an antiserum against dianthin 32, but not with antisera against other RIPs, and had superoxide dismutase, antifungal and antibacterial activities.

  16. Mechanisms of inactivation of poliovirus by chlorine dioxide and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, M.E.; O'Brien, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide and iodine inactivated poliovirus more efficiently at pH 10.0 than at pH 6.0. Sedimentation analyses of viruses inactivated by chlorine dioxide and iodine at pH 10.9 showed that viral RNA separated from the capsids, resulting in the conversion of virions from 156S structures to 80S particles. The RNAs release from both chlorine dioxide- and iodine-inactivated viruses cosedimented with intact 35S viral RNA. Both chlorine dioxide and iodine reacted with the capsid proteins of p...

  17. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  18. Inactivation of the biofilm by the air plasma containing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi; Yasuoka Takeuchi lab Team

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factory and medical facilities. Inactivation of biofilm has the method of making it react to chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone. Although inactivation by chemicals has the problem that hazardous property of a residual substance and hydrogen peroxide have slow reaction velocity. We achieved advanced oxidation process (AOP) with air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were able to be generated selectively by adjusting the amount of water supplied to the plasma. We inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in five minutes with OH radicals generated by using hydrogen peroxide and ozone.

  19. Design of the Helium Purifier for IHEP-ADS Helium Purification System

    CERN Document Server

    Jianqin, Zhang; Zhuo, Zhang; Rui, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Helium Purification System is an important sub-system in the Accelerator Driven Subcritical System of the Institute of High Energy Physics(IHEP ADS). The purifier is designed to work at the temperature of 77K. The purifier will work in a flow rate of 5g/s at 20MPa in continuous operation of 12 hours. The oil and moisture are removed by coalescing filters and a dryer, while nitrogen and oxygen are condensed by a phase separator and then adsorbed in several activated carbon adsorption cylinders. After purification, the purified helium has an impurity content of less than 5ppm.

  20. EXTRACTION KINETICS OF YTTRIUM WITH PURIFIED CYANEX 923 FROM NITRATE MEDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Tong; Y.G. Wang; J.H. Lei; D.Q. Li; P. Tang

    2003-01-01

    Mass transfer and extraction kinetics of yttrium with the purified Cyanex 923 in nheptane from nitrate medium have been investigated by using a constant interfacial cell with laminar flow at 298K. The interfacial adsorption properties of purified Cyanex 923-heptane-0. 20mol/L (H, Na)NO3 were studied at 298K. The experimental results show that the mass transfer is controlled by diffusion and the chemical reactions are carried out in the interfacial zone. The extraction rates of yttrium were measured at different chemical compositions by varying ionic strength, pH values and the purified Cyanex 923 concentrations. The initial extraction rate equations were obtained.

  1. Cellufine sulfate column chromatography as a simple, rapid, and effective method to purify dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-08-01

    Conventional method to purify/concentrate dengue virus (DENV) is time-consuming with low virus recovery yield. Herein, we applied cellufine sulfate column chromatography to purify/concentrate DENV based on the mimicry between heparan sulfate and DENV envelope protein. Comparative analysis demonstrated that this new method offered higher purity (as determined by less contamination of bovine serum albumin) and recovery yield (as determined by greater infectivity). Moreover, overall duration used for cellufine sulfate column chromatography to purify/concentrate DENV was approximately 1/20 of that of conventional method. Therefore, cellufine sulfate column chromatography serves as a simple, rapid, and effective alternative method for DENV purification/concentration.

  2. Corrugated waveguide mode purifier for TEM output in a dual-mode operation overmoded coaxial millimeter-wave generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhen; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Dian

    2017-01-01

    A coaxial corrugated waveguide mode purifier is designed for a dual-mode operation overmoded coaxial millimeter-wave generator. With the purifier, the mixed TEM and TM01 modes output are purified into a pure TEM mode. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation shows that the purifier would not decrease the total output power of the generator, and plays an independent role to the upstream structure. Effects of mode composition ratio and phase difference on the purification ability of the purifier are also researched by both electromagnetism and PIC simulations, which show that the purifier has a certain tolerance for both the mode composition ratio and phase difference.

  3. NVC-422 inactivates Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekle, Andreas; Yoon, Jungjoo; Zuck, Meghan; Najafi, Ramin; Wang, Lu; Shiau, Timothy; Francavilla, Charles; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Eitzinger, Christian; Nagl, Markus; Anderson, Mark; Debabov, Dmitri

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens have specific virulence factors (e.g., toxins) that contribute significantly to the virulence and infectivity of microorganisms within the human hosts. Virulence factors are molecules expressed by pathogens that enable colonization, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression, obtaining nutrients from the host or gaining entry into host cells. They can cause pathogenesis by inhibiting or stimulating certain host functions. For example, in systemic Staphylococcus aureus infections, virulence factors such as toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) cause sepsis or toxic shock by uncontrolled stimulation of T lymphocytes and by triggering a cytokine storm. In vitro, these superantigens stimulate the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the release of many cytokines. NVC-422 (N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine) is a broad-spectrum, fast-acting topical anti-infective agent against microbial pathogens, including antibiotic-resistant microbes. Using mass spectrometry, we demonstrate here that NVC-422 oxidizes methionine residues of TSST-1, SEA, SEB, and exfoliative toxin A (ETA). Exposure of virulence factors to 0.1% NVC-422 for 1 h prevented TSST-1-, SEA-, SEB-, and ETA-induced cell proliferation and cytokine release. Moreover, NVC-422 also delayed and reduced the protein A- and clumping factor-associated agglutination of S. aureus cultures. These results show that, in addition to its well-described direct microbicidal activity, NVC-422 can inactivate S. aureus virulence factors through rapid oxidation of methionines.

  4. Photothermal inactivation of bacteria on plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Greggy M.; Ibañez de Santi Ferrara, Felipe; Zhao, Fusheng; Rodrigues, Debora F.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Hospital-acquired bacterial infections are frequently associated with the pathogenic biofilms on surfaces of devices and instruments used in medical procedures. The utilization of thermal plasmonic agents is an innovative approach for sterilizing hospital equipment and for in vivo therapeutic treatment of bacterial infection. A photothermal inactivation technique via array of nanoporous gold disks (NPGDs) has been developed by irradiating near infrared (NIR) light onto deposited bacterial cells (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Exiguobacterium AT1B) on the surface of metal nanostructure. The physical and photothermal properties of the NPGD substrate were investigated using topographical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermographic infrared imaging. Bacterial viability studies on NPGD substrates irradiated with and without NIR light were evaluated using a fluorescence-based two-component stain assay. The results show that the heat generated from the NPGD substrate promotes high cell death counts (~100%) at short exposure durations (<25 s) even for thermally-resistant bacterial strains. The photothermal effects on NPGD substrate can lead to point-of-care applications.

  5. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here.

  6. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibranovski, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    In several different taxa, there is indubitable evidence of transcriptional silencing of the X and Y chromosomes in male meiotic cells of spermatogenesis. However, the so called meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been recently a hot bed for debate in Drosophila melanogaster. This review covers cytological and genetic observations, data from transgenic constructs with testis-specific promoters, global expression profiles obtained from mutant, wild-type, larvae and adult testes as well as from cells of different stages of spermatogenesis. There is no dispute on that D. melanogaster spermatogenesis presents a down-regulation of X chromosome that does not result from the lack of dosage compensation. However, the issue is currently focused on the level of reduction of X-linked expression, the precise time it occurs and how many genes are affected. The deep examination of data and experiments in this review exposes the limitations intrinsic to the methods of studying MSCI in D. melanogaster. The current methods do not allow us to affirm anything else than the X chromosome down-regulation in meiosis (MSCI). Therefore, conclusion about level, degree or precise timing is inadequate until new approaches are implemented to know the details of MSCI or other processes involved for D. melanogaster model.

  7. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  8. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  9. Application of electrolysis to inactivation of antibacterials in clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takashi; Hirose, Jun; Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hiro, Naoki; Kondo, Fumitake; Tamai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Sano, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    Contamination of surface water by antibacterial pharmaceuticals (antibacterials) from clinical settings may affect aquatic organisms, plants growth, and environmental floral bacteria. One of the methods to decrease the contamination is inactivation of antibacterials before being discharged to the sewage system. Recently, we reported the novel method based on electrolysis for detoxifying wastewater containing antineoplastics. In the present study, to clarify whether the electrolysis method is applicable to the inactivation of antibacterials, we electrolyzed solutions of 10 groups of individual antibacterials including amikacin sulfate (AMK) and a mixture (MIX) of some commercial antibacterials commonly prescribed at hospitals, and measured their antibacterial activities. AMK was inactivated in its antibacterial activities and its concentration decreased by electrolysis in a time-dependent manner. Eighty to ninety-nine percent of almost all antibacterials and MIX were inactivated within 6h of electrolysis. Additionally, cytotoxicity was not detected in any of the electrolyzed solutions of antibacterials and MIX by the Molt-4-based cytotoxicity test.

  10. Conjugated Polymers/DNA Hybrid Materials for Protein Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Likun; Zhang, Jiangyan; Xu, Huiming; Geng, Hao; Cheng, Yongqiang

    2016-09-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful tool for analyzing protein functions due to the high degree of spatial and temporal resolution. In this work, we demonstrate a CALI approach based on conjugated polymers (CPs)/DNA hybrid material for protein inactivation. The target protein is conjugated with single-stranded DNA in advance. Single-stranded DNA can form CPs/DNA hybrid material with cationic CPs via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Through the formation of CPs/DNA hybrid material, the target protein that is conjugated with DNA is brought into close proximity to CPs. Under irradiation, CPs harvest light and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in the inactivation of the adjacent target protein. This approach can efficiently inactivate any target protein which is conjugated with DNA and has good specificity and universality, providing a new strategy for studies of protein function and adjustment of protein activity.

  11. Inactivation of protozoan parasites in food, water, and environmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Ortega, Ynes R

    2006-11-01

    Protozoan parasites can survive under ambient and refrigerated storage conditions when associated with a range of substrates. Consequently, various treatments have been used to inactivate protozoan parasites (Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Cyclospora) in food, water, and environmental systems. Physical treatments that affect survival or removal of protozoan parasites include freezing, heating, filtration, sedimentation, UV light, irradiation, high pressure, and ultrasound. Ozone is a more effective chemical disinfectant than chlorine or chlorine dioxide for inactivation of protozoan parasites in water systems. However, sequential inactivation treatments can optimize existing treatments through synergistic effects. Careful selection of methods to evaluate inactivation treatments is needed because many studies that have employed vital dye stains and in vitro excystation have produced underestimations of the effectiveness of these treatments.

  12. Biocontrol interventions for inactivation of foodborne pathogens on produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-harvest interventions for control of foodborne pathogens on minimally processed foods are crucial for food safety. Biocontrol interventions have the primary objective of developing novel antagonists in combinations with physical and chemical interventions to inactivate pathogenic microbes. Ther...

  13. Pulsed ultra-violet inactivation spectrum of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T; Macgregor, S J; Anderson, J G; Woolsey, G A

    2005-08-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli is examined using ultra-violet (UV) radiation from a pulsed xenon flashlamp. The light from the discharge has a broadband emission spectrum extending from the UV to the infrared region with a rich UV content. The flashlamp provides high-energy UV output using a small number of short-duration pulses (30 micros). The flashlamp is used with a monochromator to investigate the wavelength sensitivity of E. coli to inactivation by the pulsed UV light. Using 8 nm wide pulses of UV radiation, the most efficient inactivation is found to occur at around 270 nm and no inactivation is observed above 300 nm. A pyroelectric detector allows the energy dose to be determined at each wavelength, and a peak value for E. coli population reduction of 0.43 log per mJ/cm(2) is measured at 270 nm. The results are compared with the published data available for continuous UV light sources.

  14. Pulsed UV‐light inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamont, Y; Rzeżutka, A; Anderson, J.G; MacGregor, S.J; Given, M.J; Deppe, C; Cook, N

    2007-01-01

    .... Significance and Impact of the Study:  Pulsed UV‐light treatment proved successful in the inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus, and represents an alternative to continuous‐wave UV treatment.

  15. Characterisation of the effects of robustoxin, the lethal neurotoxin from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus, on sodium channel activation and inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, G M; Walsh, R; Little, M J; Tyler, M I

    1998-06-01

    The present study investigates the actions of robustoxin (atracotoxin-Ar1) purified from the venom of the male Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus on sodium channel gating. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques the study assessed the actions of robustoxin on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) and tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Similar to the closely related funnel-web spider toxin versutoxin (delta-atracotoxin-Hv1) from Hadronyche versuta, robustoxin had no effect on TTX-R sodium currents but exerted potent effects on TTX-S sodium currents. The main action of robustoxin was a concentration-dependent slowing or removal of TTX-S sodium current inactivation. This steady-state current was maintained during long-lasting depolarisations at all test potentials. Robustoxin (30 nM) also caused a 13-mV hyperpolarising shift in the voltage midpoint of steady-state sodium channel inactivation (h infinity) leading to a reduced peak current at a holding potential of -80 mV. Moreover there was a steady-state or non-inactivating component present (18% of maximal sodium current) at prepulse potentials that normally inactivate all TTX-S sodium channels (more depolarised than -40 mV). In addition robustoxin produced a significant increase in the repriming kinetics of the sodium channel when channels returned to the resting state following activation. This increase in the rate of recovery of sodium current appears to explain the use-dependent effects on peak sodium current amplitude at high stimulation frequencies. Finally 30 nM robustoxin caused an 11-mV hyperpolarising shift in the voltage dependence of the channel but did not markedly modify tail current kinetics. These actions suggest that robustoxin inhibits conversion of the open state to the inactivated state of TTX-S sodium channels, thus allowing a fraction of the sodium current to remain at membrane potentials at which inactivation is normally complete. Given the recent

  16. Novel tubular and crystalline structures in purified preparations of Newcastle disease virus. Brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowans, E J; McNulty, M S

    1979-01-01

    Hitherto undescribed tubular and crystalline structures were detected by negative contrast electron microscopy in purified preparations of Newcastle disease virus. It is suggested that these are viral in origin and are composed of aggregates of viral glycoprotein.

  17. Experimental studies on removal of airborne haloanisoles by non-thermal plasma air purifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Hallam, David; Bermúdez, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to test the performance of non-thermal plasma air purifiers on its removal effectiveness of two haloanisoles – 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) and 2,4,6-Tribromoanisole (TBA). TCA and TBA are the two major compounds found in wine cellars that can contaminate wine...... to produce unpalatable mouldy and musty tastes. The test was first conducted in a climate chamber. The plasma air purifier was installed in a test rig developed for the testing and challenged by airflow with certain concentrations of TCA and TBA. Air samples upstream and downstream of the air purifier...... was collected by Tenax tubes and the concentration of TCA and TBA were analyzed by thermal desorption GC–MS. The results showed that the plasma air purifier was effective on removing TCA and TBA with a single pass efficiency of better than 82%. The effect was further validated in a wine cellar under a realistic...

  18. Lipohypertrophy and lipoatrophy complicating treatment with highly purified bovine and porcine insulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, P G; Jowett, N I; Kurinczuk, J J; Peck, R W; Hearnshaw, J R

    1988-11-01

    Lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy were the most frequently reported local complications of conventional insulin therapy. Early reports following the introduction of highly purified insulins suggested a reduction in the frequency of lipohypertrophy and lipoatrophy. Since highly purified insulins have been in common usage for 10 years, the present frequency of these complications was assessed in a study of 281 insulin treated diabetics. Lipohypertrophy was recorded in 76 (27.1%) patients including 3 with associated lipoatrophy. Lipoatrophy was found in 7 (2.5%) cases (3 porcine and 4 bovine insulin treated), 4 of which had only ever used highly purified insulins. Despite the introduction of highly purified insulins, lipohypertrophy and lipoatrophy remain prevalent in insulin treated patients. This common complication may be limited by routinely inspecting injection sites.

  19. A novel, inducible, citral lyase purified from spores of Penicillium digitatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolken, W.A.M.; Loo, W.J.V. van; Tramper, J.; Werf, M.J. van der

    2002-01-01

    A novel lyase, combining hydratase and aldolase activity, that converts citral into methylheptenone and acetaldehyde, was purified from spores of Penicillium digitatum. Remarkably, citral lyase activity was induced 118-fold by incubating nongerminating spores with the substrate, citral. This cofacto

  20. Integrated Microchannel Reformer/Hydrogen Purifier for Fuel Cell Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) and Colorado School of Mines (CSM) propose to develop an integrated hydrogen generator and purifier system for conversion of in-situ...

  1. 76 FR 3159 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Revised schedule for the subject reviews. DATES:...

  2. A novel, inducible, citral lyase purified from spores of Penicillium digitatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolken, W.A.M.; Loo, W.J.V. van; Tramper, J.; Werf, M.J. van der

    2002-01-01

    A novel lyase, combining hydratase and aldolase activity, that converts citral into methylheptenone and acetaldehyde, was purified from spores of Penicillium digitatum. Remarkably, citral lyase activity was induced 118-fold by incubating nongerminating spores with the substrate, citral. This

  3. 75 FR 3444 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import Administration,...

  4. Integrated Microchannel Reformer/Hydrogen Purifier for Fuel Cell Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) supported by Lockheed Martin and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) propose to develop an integrated hydrogen generator and purifier...

  5. Effect of an inactivated paratuberculosis vaccine on the intradermal testing of goats for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Christophe; Mercier, Pascale; Pellet, Marie-Pierre; Vialard, Jaquemine

    2012-03-01

    The effect of an inactivated paratuberculosis vaccine on the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in goats was investigated in a herd with a history of clinical paratuberculosis but which was free of TB. Cohorts of animals in 2006, 2008 and 2009, were vaccinated once at 1 month of age, and 50% of the 2006 cohort served as unvaccinated controls. The goats were aged 8 months, 20 months and 3.5 years old at the time of the survey. All animals were assessed using a single intradermal injection of bovine tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) (SID test), or using both bovine and avian PPD (CID test). An interferon (IFN)-γ assay using both bovine and avian PPD was carried out on the 2006 cohort and was interpreted according to three different 'cut-off' points. No unvaccinated (control) animals tested positive to any of the assays, confirming that the herd was TB-free. The SID test had a low specificity in vaccinated animals at 8 and 20 months of age, whereas the CID test demonstrated 100% specificity in animals ≥20 months-old. The specificity of IFN-γ assay was less than maximal for vaccinated animals 3.5 years old as small numbers of false positives were detected, although this depended on the chosen cut-off point. The study findings demonstrate that the use of an inactivated paratuberculosis vaccine in goats <1 month-old in a TB-free herd does not result in false positives to a CID test for TB when performed in animals ≥20 months-old. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Efficacy and safety studies on an inactivated vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Emidio, B; Nicolussi, P; Patta, C; Ronchi, G F; Monaco, F; Savini, G; Ciarelli, A; Caporale, V

    2004-01-01

    An inactivated vaccine was produced from an Italian field isolate of bluetongue virus serotype 2 (BTV-2) with a titre of 10(7.8)TCID50/ml. The virus was purified through a molecular cut cassette membrane, inactivated with beta-propriolactone and emulsified with ISA 206 (Seppic) adjuvant. The vaccine was then tested for sterility, toxicity and safety in laboratory and target animals according to European Pharmacopoeia standards. Immunogenicity was assessed by inoculating subcutaneously 10 sheep and 10 goats each with 2 ml of the vaccine and 10 bovines each with 5 ml of the vaccine. A booster dose was inoculated after 14 days and no side-effects were reported following vaccination. Fourteen days after the booster dose, all vaccinated animals developed virus neutralising (VN) bluetongue (BT) antibody titres that on day 60 post vaccination ranged between 1/20 and 1/1 280. After one year, goats still had high VN antibody titres. Sheep were challenged 138 days after vaccination by subcutaneously inoculating 1 ml of 10(5.6)TCID50/ml of an Italian field isolate of BTV serotype 2; four unvaccinated animals were also inoculated and used as controls. Starting from day 6 post challenge, control animals developed a fever, with temperature ranging from 39.9 degrees C to 40.6 degrees C and lasting 48 h on average. BTV-2 was also isolated from the blood of control animals between days 4 and 20 post challenge. Conversely, neither fever nor viraemia were detected in the vaccinated animals that were challenged. A new trial with a larger number of animals, including all target species, has been planned and is in progress.

  7. Inactivation of Ascaris suum by Short-Chain Fatty Acids▿

    OpenAIRE

    Butkus, Michael A.; Hughes, Kelly T.; Bowman, Dwight D; Liotta, Janice L.; Jenkins, Michael B.; Labare, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Ascaris suum eggs were inactivated in distilled water and digested sludge by butanoic, pentanoic, and hexanoic acids. The fatty acids (short-chain fatty acids [SCFA]) were effective only when protonated and at sufficient concentrations. The conjugate bases were not effective at the concentrations evaluated. Predictions from an inhibition model (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) based on quantitative structure-activity relationships were congruent with inactivation data.

  8. An Experiment with Air Purifiers in Delhi during Winter 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Sangita

    2016-01-01

    Particulate pollution has important consequences for human health, and is an issue of global concern. Outdoor air pollution has become a cause for alarm in India in particular because recent data suggest that ambient pollution levels in Indian cities are some of the highest in the world. We study the number of particles between 0.5μm and 2.5μm indoors while using affordable air purifiers in the highly polluted city of Delhi. Though substantial reductions in indoor number concentrations are observed during air purifier use, indoor air quality while using an air purifier is frequently worse than in cities with moderate pollution, and often worse than levels observed even in polluted cities. When outdoor pollution levels are higher, on average, indoor pollution levels while using an air purifier are also higher. Moreover, the ratio of indoor air quality during air purifier use to two comparison measures of air quality without an air purifier are also positively correlated with outdoor pollution levels, suggesting that as ambient air quality worsens there are diminishing returns to improvements in indoor air quality during air purifier use. The findings of this study indicate that although the most affordable air purifiers currently available are associated with significant improvements in the indoor environment, they are not a replacement for public action in regions like Delhi. Although private solutions may serve as a stopgap, reducing ambient air pollution must be a public health and policy priority in any region where air pollution is as high as Delhi’s during the winter. PMID:27978542

  9. Cost and Operational Effectiveness Analysis (COEA) for the Lightweight Water Purifier (LWP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    requirement for a Lightweight Water Purifier (LWP). Data and information from this COEA is intended to support a Milestone Decision Review ( MDR I/I1) planned... MDR ) with suitable information and analysis to enable them to: (1) Select from among the designated Lightweight Water Purifier (LWP) alternatives and...Service field water quality standards contained in Technical Bulletin, Medical ( TB MED 577). The LWP falls within the Combat Service Support (CSS

  10. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... pig. The requirements for general safety for inactivated influenza vaccine shall not be considered...

  11. Pathogen inactivation technologies for cellular blood components: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenke, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays patients receiving blood components are exposed to much less transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases than three decades before when among others HIV was identified as causative agent for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the transmission by blood or coagulation factors became evident. Since that time the implementation of measures for risk prevention and safety precaution was socially and politically accepted. Currently emerging pathogens like arboviruses and the well-known bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates still remain major concerns of blood safety with important clinical consequences, but very rarely with fatal outcome for the blood recipient. In contrast to the well-established pathogen inactivation strategies for fresh frozen plasma using the solvent-detergent procedure or methylene blue and visible light, the bench-to-bedside translation of novel pathogen inactivation technologies for cell-containing blood components such as platelets and red blood cells are still underway. This review summarizes the pharmacological/toxicological assessment and the inactivation efficacy against viruses, bacteria, and protozoa of each of the currently available pathogen inactivation technologies and highlights the impact of the results obtained from several randomized clinical trials and hemovigilance data. Until now in some European countries pathogen inactivation technologies are in in routine use for single-donor plasma and platelets. The invention and adaption of pathogen inactivation technologies for red blood cell units and whole blood donations suggest the universal applicability of these technologies and foster a paradigm shift in the manufacturing of safe blood.

  12. High pressure inactivation of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Sanelle; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-05-01

    Brettanomyces bruxellensis ("Brett") is a major spoilage concern for the wine industry worldwide, leading to undesirable sensory properties. Sulphur dioxide, is currently the preferred method for wine preservation. However, due to its negative effects on consumers, the use of new alternative non-thermal technologies are increasingly being investigated. The aim of this study was to determine and model the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) conditions and yeast strain on the inactivation of "Brett" in Cabernet Sauvignon wine. Processing at 200 MPa for 3 min resulted in 5.8 log reductions. However higher pressure is recommended to achieve high throughput in the wine industry, for example >6.0 log reductions were achieved after 400 MPa for 5 s. The inactivation of B. bruxellensis is pressure and time dependent, with increased treatment time and pressure leading to increased yeast inactivation. It was also found that yeast strain had a significant effect on HPP inactivation, with AWRI 1499 being the most resistant strain. The Weibull model successfully described the HPP "Brett" inactivation. HPP is a viable alternative for the inactivation of B. bruxellensis in wine, with the potential to reduce the industry's reliance on sulphur dioxide.

  13. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, Remko M; Schutyser, Maarten A I

    2017-06-15

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during baking at 175 or 205°C. In the wheat flour/water system, the thermostability of β-galactosidase increased with decreased moisture content, and a kinetic model was accurately fitted to the corresponding inactivation data (R(2)=0.99). Interestingly, the residual enzyme activity in the bread crust (about 30%) was hundredfold higher than that in the crumb (about 0.3%) after baking, despite the higher temperature in the crust throughout baking. This result suggested that the reduced moisture content in the crust increased the thermostability of the enzyme. Subsequently, the kinetic model reasonably predicted the enzyme inactivation in the crumb using the same parameters derived from the wheat flour/water system. However, the model predicted a lower residual enzyme activity in the crust compared with the experimental result, which indicated that the structure of the crust may influence the enzyme inactivation mechanism during baking. The results reported can provide a quantitative understanding of the thermal inactivation kinetics of enzyme during baking, which is essential to better retain enzymatic activity in bakery products supplemented with heat-sensitive enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and Mechanism of Tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA Aminotransferase Inactivators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Hoang V.; Hawker, Dustin D.; Wu, Rui; Doud, Emma; Widom, Julia; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Kelleher, Neil L.; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-04-08

    Low levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease, Huntingtons disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the bloodbrain barrier and inhibit the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a pi-pi interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded (SO)-O-...=C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  15. Thermal Inactivation of Feline Calicivirus in Pet Food Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, J; Patel, M; Knight, A I; Corley, D; Gibson, G; Schaaf, J; Moulin, J; Zuber, S

    2015-12-01

    Extrusion is the most common manufacturing process used to produce heat-treated dry dog and cat food (pet food) for domestic use and international trade. Due to reoccurring outbreaks of notifiable terrestrial animal diseases and their impact on international trade, experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the effectiveness of heat-treated extruded pet food on virus inactivation. The impact of extrusion processing in a pet food matrix on virus inactivation has not been previously reported and very few inactivation studies have examined the thermal inactivation of viruses in complex food matrices. The feline calicivirus vaccine strain FCV F-9 was used as a surrogate model RNA virus pathogen. Small-scale heat inactivation experiments using animal-derived pet food raw materials showed that a > 4 log10 reduction (log10 R) in infectivity occurred at 70 °C prior to reaching the minimum extrusion manufacturing operating temperature of 100 °C. As anticipated, small-scale pressure studies at extrusion pressure (1.6 MPa) showed no apparent effect on FCV F-9 inactivation. Additionally, FCV F-9 was shown not to survive the acidic conditions used to produce pet food palatants of animal origin that are typically used as a coating after the extrusion process.

  16. Pathogen Inactivation Technologies for Cellular Blood Components: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nowadays patients receiving blood components are exposed to much less transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases than three decades before when among others HIV was identified as causative agent for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the transmission by blood or coagulation factors became evident. Since that time the implementation of measures for risk prevention and safety precaution was socially and politically accepted. Currently emerging pathogens like arboviruses and the well-known bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates still remain major concerns of blood safety with important clinical consequences, but very rarely with fatal outcome for the blood recipient. In contrast to the well-established pathogen inactivation strategies for fresh frozen plasma using the solvent-detergent procedure or methylene blue and visible light, the bench-to-bedside translation of novel pathogen inactivation technologies for cell-containing blood components such as platelets and red blood cells are still underway. This review summarizes the pharmacological/toxicological assessment and the inactivation efficacy against viruses, bacteria, and protozoa of each of the currently available pathogen inactivation technologies and highlights the impact of the results obtained from several randomized clinical trials and hemovigilance data. Until now in some European countries pathogen inactivation technologies are in in routine use for single-donor plasma and platelets. The invention and adaption of pathogen inactivation technologies for red blood cell units and whole blood donations suggest the universal applicability of these technologies and foster a paradigm shift in the manufacturing of safe blood. PMID:25254027

  17. Trans-inactivation: Repression in a wrong place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatskikh, Aleksei S; Abramov, Yuriy A; Lavrov, Sergey A

    2016-08-19

    Trans-inactivation is the repression of genes on a normal chromosome under the influence of a rearranged homologous chromosome demonstrating the position effect variegation (PEV). This phenomenon was studied in detail on the example of brown(Dominant) allele causing the repression of wild-type brown gene on the opposite chromosome. We have investigated another trans-inactivation-inducing chromosome rearrangement, In(2)A4 inversion. In both cases, brown(Dominant) and In(2)A4, the repression seems to be the result of dragging of the euchromatic region of the normal chromosome into the heterochromatic environment. It was found that cis-inactivation (classical PEV) and trans-inactivation show different patterns of distribution along the chromosome and respond differently to PEV modifying genes. It appears that the causative mechanism of trans-inactivation is de novo heterochromatin assembly on euchromatic sequences dragged into the heterochromatic nuclear compartment. Trans-inactivation turns out to be the result of a combination of heterochromatin-induced position effect and the somatic interphase chromosome pairing that is widespread in Diptera.

  18. Kinetic analysis of Legionella inactivation using ozone in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Li, Kunquan; Zhou, Yan; Li, Xuebin; Tao, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Legionella inactivation using ozone was studied in wastewater using kinetic analysis and modeling. The experimental results indicate that the relationship between the ozone concentration, germ concentration, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be used to predict variations in germ and COD concentrations. The ozone reaction with COD and inactivation of Legionella occurred simultaneously, but the reaction with COD likely occurred at a higher rate than the inactivation, as COD is more easily oxidized by ozone than Legionella. Higher initial COD concentrations resulted in a lower inactivation rate and higher lnN/N0. Higher temperature led to a higher inactivation efficiency. The relationship of the initial O3 concentration and Legionella inactivation rate was not linear, and thus, the Ct value required for a 99.99% reduction was not constant. The initial O3 concentration was more important than the contact time, and a reduction of the initial O3 concentration could not be compensated by increasing the contact time. The Ct values were compared over a narrow range of initial concentrations; the Ct values could only be contrasted when the initial O3 concentrations were very similar. A higher initial O3 concentration led to a higher inflection point value for the lnN/N0 vs C0t curve. Energy consumption using a plasma corona was lower than when using boron-doped diamond electrodes.

  19. [Diurnal variations in purifying-tanks when use Pontederia cordata treating the Malodorous River water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-jun; Lu, Xiao-ming; Lu, Shao-yong; Jin, Xiang-can; Huang, Min-sheng; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Feng

    2009-12-01

    Aquatic plants (Ponsederie cordaza) were waked in two purifying-tanks to investigate the effects of illumination intensity and aeration on diurnal variations of Chla, SP, POD of Ponsederia cordaza and pH, DO, COD, NH4+ -N, TP of water from purifying-tanks when treating the malodorous river water at seven different times, another blank purifying-tank was set as a control. Comparative studies and correlation analysis of these different indicators were carried out to improve the plants working efficiency and provide scientific basis for optimal operation of plant purifying-tanks. Results showed that all indicators affected by changes of light, TP shows best correlation coefficient Cr = 0.93, p tank;aeration is necessary as diurnal average of DO shows an increase of 0.13 mg/L by treatment of plant meanwhile 1.8 mg/L by plant with aeration,purifying-tanks with aeration got 7.1%, 6.3% higher removing rates of COD, NH4+ -N and 38% less TP removing rate than non-aeration plant purifying-tanks (p tanks.

  20. Effect of Purified Mushroom Tyrosinase on Melanin Content and Melanogenic Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Uddin Zaidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian melanocytes, melanosome is a highly specialized organelle where melanin is synthesized. Melanin synthesis is controlled by tyrosinase, the vital enzyme in melanogenic pathway. The present investigation is based on an effect of purified mushroom tyrosinase of Agaricus bisporus on B16F10 melanocytes for the melanin production via blocking pigment cell machinery. Using B16F10 melanocytes showed that the stimulation of melanogenesis by purified tyrosinase is due to increased tyrosinase absorption. Cellular tyrosinase activity and melanin content in B16F10 melanocytes were increased by purified tyrosinase in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis revealed that cellular tyrosinase levels were enhanced after treatment with purified tyrosinase for 48 hours. Furthermore, tyrosinase induced phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB in a dose-dependent manner. The purified tyrosinase-mediated increase of tyrosinase activity was significantly attenuated by H89, LY294002, Ro-32-0432, and PD98059, cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitors. The results indicate that purified tyrosinase can be used as contestant for the treatment of vitiligous skin conditions.

  1. Effect of Purified Mushroom Tyrosinase on Melanin Content and Melanogenic Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayesha S.

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian melanocytes, melanosome is a highly specialized organelle where melanin is synthesized. Melanin synthesis is controlled by tyrosinase, the vital enzyme in melanogenic pathway. The present investigation is based on an effect of purified mushroom tyrosinase of Agaricus bisporus on B16F10 melanocytes for the melanin production via blocking pigment cell machinery. Using B16F10 melanocytes showed that the stimulation of melanogenesis by purified tyrosinase is due to increased tyrosinase absorption. Cellular tyrosinase activity and melanin content in B16F10 melanocytes were increased by purified tyrosinase in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis revealed that cellular tyrosinase levels were enhanced after treatment with purified tyrosinase for 48 hours. Furthermore, tyrosinase induced phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) in a dose-dependent manner. The purified tyrosinase-mediated increase of tyrosinase activity was significantly attenuated by H89, LY294002, Ro-32-0432, and PD98059, cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitors. The results indicate that purified tyrosinase can be used as contestant for the treatment of vitiligous skin conditions. PMID:27699070

  2. Can a photocatalytic air purifier be used to improve the perceived air quality indoors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub; Wargocki, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on perceived air quality(PAQ) was examined in rooms polluted by typical sources of indoor pollution.The rooms were ventilated at three different outdoor air supply rates. The air quality was assessed by a sensory panel when the purifier was in operation...... that the photocatalytic air purifier can supplement ventilation when the indoor air is polluted by building- related sources, but should not be used in spaces where human bioeffluents constitute the main source of pollution.......The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on perceived air quality(PAQ) was examined in rooms polluted by typical sources of indoor pollution.The rooms were ventilated at three different outdoor air supply rates. The air quality was assessed by a sensory panel when the purifier was in operation...... monitors. The effect cor-responded to approximately doubling the outdoor air supply rate. Operation of the purifier significantly worsened the PAQ in rooms with human bioeffluents, probably due to incomplete oxidation of alcohols which are one of the main pollutants emitted by humans. Present results show...

  3. Dimerization capacities of FGF2 purified with or without heparin-affinity chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Platonova

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2 is a pleiotropic growth factor exhibiting a variety of biological activities. In this article, we studied the capacity of FGF2 purified with or without heparin affinity chromatography to self-associate. Analyzing the NMR HSQC spectra for different FGF2 concentrations, heparin-affinity purified FGF2 showed perturbations that indicate dimerization and are a higher-order oligomerization state. HSQC perturbation observed with different FGF2 concentrations revealed a heparin-binding site and two dimer interfaces. Thus, with increasing protein concentrations, FGF2 monomers make contacts with each other and form dimers or higher order oligomers. On the contrary, FGF2 purified with ion-exchange chromatography did not show similar perturbation indicating that self-association of FGF2 is eliminated if purification is done without heparin-affinity chromatography. The HSQC spectra of heparin-affinity purified FGF2 can be reproduced to some extent by adding heparin tetra-saccharide to ion exchange chromatography purified FGF2. Heparin-affinity purified FGF2 bound to acceptor and donor beads in a tagged form using His-tagged or GST-tagged proteins, also dimerized in the AlphaScreen™ assay. This assay was further validated using different experimental conditions and competitors. The assay constitutes an interesting tool to study dimerization of other FGF forms as well.

  4. Viral inactivation in hemotherapy: systematic review on inactivators with action on nucleic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marial Sobral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on the photoinactivators used in hemotherapy, with action on viral genomes. The SciELO, Science Direct, PubMed and Lilacs databases were searched for articles. The inclusion criterion was that these should be articles on inactivators with action on genetic material that had been published between 2000 and 2010. The key words used in identifying such articles were "hemovigilance", "viral inactivation", "photodynamics", "chemoprevention" and "transfusion safety". Twenty-four articles on viral photoinactivation were found with the main photoinactivators covered being: methylene blue, amotosalen HCl, S-303 frangible anchor linker effector (FRALE, riboflavin and inactin. The results showed that methylene blue has currently been studied least, because it diminishes coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Riboflavin has been studied most because it is a photoinactivator of endogenous origin and has few collateral effects. Amotosalen HCl is effective for platelets and is also used on plasma, but may cause changes both to plasma and to platelets, although these are not significant for hemostasis. S-303 FRALE may lead to neoantigens in erythrocytes and is less indicated for red-cell treatment; in such cases, PEN 110 is recommended. Thus, none of the methods for pathogen reduction is effective for all classes of agents and for all blood components, but despite the high cost, these photoinactivators may diminish the risk of blood-transmitted diseases.

  5. Genetic control of X inactivation and processes leading to X-inactivation skewing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmont, J.W. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The chromosomal basis of sex determination (i.e., XX in females, XY in males) results in an inequality of gene copy number and content between males and females. In humans (and other mammals) the potential imbalance of gene expression from the two X chromosomes in females is resolved by inactivating one X in all the somatic tissues. Beginning in the late blastocyst stage of embryonic development, one of the two X chromosomes is globally down-regulated in each somatic cell, resulting in expression from only one allele at the vast majority of X-encoded loci. While the paternal X is selectively inactive in the extraembryonic tissues (vide infra), in the embryo proper the process of X inactivation is random between the maternal and paternal X chromosomes. The result is that most females have mosaic expression of maternal and paternal alleles of X chromosome loci. The mean contribution from each chromosome is 50%, but because the process is generally random, a normal female may vary considerably from the mean. 67 refs., 1 fig.

  6. p70S6 kinase signals cell survival as well as growth, inactivating the pro-apoptotic molecule BAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harada, H; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M

    2001-01-01

    Cytokines often deliver simultaneous, yet distinct, cell growth and cell survival signals. The 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) is known to regulate cell growth by inducing protein synthesis components. We purified membrane-based p70S6K as a kinase responsible for site......-specific phosphorylation of BAD, which inactivates this proapoptotic molecule. Rapamycin inhibited mitochondrial-based p70S6K, which prevented phosphorylation of Ser-136 on BAD and blocked cell survival induced by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Moreover, IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of BAD Ser-136 was abolished...... in p70S6K-deficient cells. Thus, p70S6K is itself a dual pathway kinase, signaling cell survival as well as growth through differential substrates which include mitochondrial BAD and the ribosomal subunit S6, respectively....

  7. Inactivation of respiratory syncytial virus by zinc finger reactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalova, Marina S; Prince, Gregory A; Blanco, Jorge C G

    2010-01-26

    Infectivity of retroviruses such as HIV-1 and MuLV can be abrogated by compounds targeting zinc finger motif in viral nucleocapsid protein (NC), involved in controlling the processivity of reverse transcription and virus infectivity. Although a member of a different viral family (Pneumoviridae), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) contains a zinc finger protein M2-1 also involved in control of viral polymerase processivity. Given the functional similarity between the two proteins, it was possible that zinc finger-reactive compounds inactivating retroviruses would have a similar effect against RSV by targeting RSV M2-1 protein. Moreover, inactivation of RSV through modification of an internal protein could yield a safer whole virus vaccine than that produced by RSV inactivation with formalin which modifies surface proteins. Three compounds were evaluated for their ability to reduce RSV infectivity: 2,2'-dithiodipyridine (AT-2), tetraethylthiuram disulfide and tetramethylthiuram disulfide. All three were capable of inactivating RSV, with AT-2 being the most potent. The mechanism of action of AT-2 was analyzed and it was found that AT-2 treatment indeed results in the modification of RSV M2-1. Altered intramolecular disulfide bond formation in M2-1 protein of AT-2-treated RSV virions might have been responsible for abrogation of RSV infectivity. AT-2-inactivated RSV was found to be moderately immunogenic in the cotton rats S.hispidus and did not cause a vaccine-enhancement seen in animals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV. Increasing immunogenicity of AT-2-inactivated RSV by adjuvant (Ribi), however, led to vaccine-enhanced disease. This work presents evidence that compounds that inactivate retroviruses by targeting the zinc finger motif in their nucleocapsid proteins are also effective against RSV. AT-2-inactivated RSV vaccine is not strongly immunogenic in the absence of adjuvants. In the adjuvanted form, however, vaccine induces immunopathologic response. The

  8. Inactivation of respiratory syncytial virus by zinc finger reactive compounds

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    Prince Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectivity of retroviruses such as HIV-1 and MuLV can be abrogated by compounds targeting zinc finger motif in viral nucleocapsid protein (NC, involved in controlling the processivity of reverse transcription and virus infectivity. Although a member of a different viral family (Pneumoviridae, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV contains a zinc finger protein M2-1 also involved in control of viral polymerase processivity. Given the functional similarity between the two proteins, it was possible that zinc finger-reactive compounds inactivating retroviruses would have a similar effect against RSV by targeting RSV M2-1 protein. Moreover, inactivation of RSV through modification of an internal protein could yield a safer whole virus vaccine than that produced by RSV inactivation with formalin which modifies surface proteins. Results Three compounds were evaluated for their ability to reduce RSV infectivity: 2,2'-dithiodipyridine (AT-2, tetraethylthiuram disulfide and tetramethylthiuram disulfide. All three were capable of inactivating RSV, with AT-2 being the most potent. The mechanism of action of AT-2 was analyzed and it was found that AT-2 treatment indeed results in the modification of RSV M2-1. Altered intramolecular disulfide bond formation in M2-1 protein of AT-2-treated RSV virions might have been responsible for abrogation of RSV infectivity. AT-2-inactivated RSV was found to be moderately immunogenic in the cotton rats S.hispidus and did not cause a vaccine-enhancement seen in animals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV. Increasing immunogenicity of AT-2-inactivated RSV by adjuvant (Ribi, however, led to vaccine-enhanced disease. Conclusions This work presents evidence that compounds that inactivate retroviruses by targeting the zinc finger motif in their nucleocapsid proteins are also effective against RSV. AT-2-inactivated RSV vaccine is not strongly immunogenic in the absence of adjuvants. In the adjuvanted form

  9. Evaluation of the effect of inactivation by microwave and autoclave in homeopathic medicines

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    Carlos Moacir Bonato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Brazilian Pharmacopoeia defines the sterilization process as a "method" intended to remove or destroy all forms of life, animal or plant, macroscopic or microscopic, saprophytic or not, present in the product concerned, without ensuring the complete inactivation of toxins or cellular enzymes. Microwaves are electromagnetic waves with frequencies ranging between 300MHz (300x106 Hz and 300 GHz (300x109 Hz and wavelengths from 1 m to 1 mm[1]. They are waves that lie within the region between TV waves and the infrared region within the spectrum of electromagnetic waves. According to the Technical Standards Textbook for Homeopathic Pharmacy, glass tubes may be reused after washed with running and purified water and inactivated by autoclaving at 120oC for 30 minutes or by a dry air buffer at 180oC for 30 minutes or at 140oC for 1 hour [2]. Aims: Current experiment evaluates the influence of ultra-diluted Sulphur with and without inactivation by autoclaving and microwaving for certain variables in the germination and growth of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench - cv TX623B. Methodology: Ten milliliters of Sulphur in homeopathic dinamizations (proposed by Hering - DH 9DH, 18DH and 30DH inactivated by microwave and by autoclave heat, and control with water, were added to petri dishes in which 20 sorghum seeds were distributed. The experiment was conducted in a growth chamber (BOD at 25oC and during a 16-h photoperiod. Double-blind methodology to avoid researcher’s possible interferences or trends, coupled to statistic treatment at the end of the experiment, was employed. Data underwent variance analysis and means were compared by Scott-Knott’s test at 5% probability. Results: Homeopathy Sulphur changed the evaluated parameters of 9DH, 18 DH and 30 DH dinamizations when compared to control (water. Differences existed with regard to effects of the different microwave-treated (M9DH, M18DH, M30DH and

  10. Caspase inhibitors of the P35 family are more active when purified from yeast than bacteria.

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    Ingo L Brand

    Full Text Available Many insect viruses express caspase inhibitors of the P35 superfamily, which prevent defensive host apoptosis to enable viral propagation. The prototypical P35 family member, AcP35 from Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, has been extensively studied. Bacterially purified AcP35 has been previously shown to inhibit caspases from insect, mammalian and nematode species. This inhibition occurs via a pseudosubstrate mechanism involving caspase-mediated cleavage of a "reactive site loop" within the P35 protein, which ultimately leaves cleaved P35 covalently bound to the caspase's active site. We observed that AcP35 purifed from Saccharomyces cerevisae inhibited caspase activity more efficiently than AcP35 purified from Escherichia coli. This differential potency was more dramatic for another P35 family member, MaviP35, which inhibited human caspase 3 almost 300-fold more potently when purified from yeast than bacteria. Biophysical assays revealed that MaviP35 proteins produced in bacteria and yeast had similar primary and secondary structures. However, bacterially produced MaviP35 possessed greater thermal stability and propensity to form higher order oligomers than its counterpart purified from yeast. Caspase 3 could process yeast-purified MaviP35, but failed to detectably cleave bacterially purified MaviP35. These data suggest that bacterially produced P35 proteins adopt subtly different conformations from their yeast-expressed counterparts, which hinder caspase access to the reactive site loop to reduce the potency of caspase inhibition, and promote aggregation. These data highlight the differential caspase inhibition by recombinant P35 proteins purified from different sources, and caution that analyses of bacterially produced P35 family members (and perhaps other types of proteins may underestimate their activity.

  11. Polio inactivated vaccine costs into routine childhood immunization in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Vicentine, Margarete Paganotti; Gryninger, Lígia Castelloni Figueiredo; Soárez, Patricia Coelho de; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the costs of vaccination regimens for introducing inactivated polio vaccine in routine immunization in Brazil. METHODS A cost analysis was conducted for vaccines in five vaccination regimens, including inactivated polio vaccine, compared with the oral polio vaccine-only regimen. The costs of the vaccines were estimated for routine use and for the "National Immunization Days", during when the oral polio vaccine is administered to children aged less than five years, independent of their vaccine status, and the strategic stock of inactivated polio vaccine. The presented estimated costs are of 2011. RESULTS The annual costs of the oral vaccine-only program (routine and two National Immunization Days) were estimated at US$19,873,170. The incremental costs of inclusion of the inactivated vaccine depended on the number of vaccine doses, presentation of the vaccine (bottles with single dose or ten doses), and number of "National Immunization Days" carried out. The cost of the regimen adopted with two doses of inactivated vaccine followed by three doses of oral vaccine and one "National Immunization Day" was estimated at US$29,653,539. The concomitant replacement of the DTPw/Hib and HepB vaccines with the pentavalent vaccine enabled the introduction of the inactivated polio without increasing the number of injections or number of visits needed to complete the vaccination. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of the inactivated vaccine increased the annual costs of the polio vaccines by 49.2% compared with the oral vaccine-only regimen. This increase represented 1.13% of the expenditure of the National Immunization Program on the purchase of vaccines in 2011.

  12. Effects of BmKNJX11, a bioactive polypeptide purified from Buthus martensi Karsch, on sodium channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

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    Wang, Xi-Jie; An, Shan-Shan; Cheng, Hong; Xu, San-Hua; Cheng, Jie; Lu, Wei; Gao, Rong; Xiao, Hang

    2009-01-01

    A long-chain polypeptide BmKNJX11 was purified from the venom of Asian scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch (BmK) by a combination of gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecular mass was found to be 7036.85 Da by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The first 15 N-terminal amino acid sequence of BmKNJX11 was determined to be GRDAY IADSE NCTYT by Edman degradation. With whole cell recording, BmKNJX11 inhibited tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels (TTX-S VGSC) in freshly isolated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. At a concentration of 40 mug/ml BmKNJX11 lowered the activation threshold and produced negative shifting of TTX-S sodium current (I(Na)) activation curve. In addition, BmKNJX11 induced shifting of the steady-state inactivation curve to the left, delayed the recovery of TTX-S I(Na) from inactivation, and also reduced the fraction of available sodium channels. These results suggested that BmKNJX11 might exert effects on VGSC by binding to a specific site. Considering that TTX-S VGSC expressed in DRG neurons play a critical role in nociceptive transmission, the interaction of BmKNJX11 with TTX-S VGSC might lead to a change in excitability of nociceptive afferent fibers, which may be involved in the observed peripheral pain expression.

  13. ERADIKASI POLIO DAN IPV (INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE

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    Gendrowahyuhono Gendrowahyuhono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the year 1988, World Health Organization (WHO claims that polio viruses should be eradicated after year 2000. However, until year 2010 the world have not been free from polio viruses circulation. So many effort had been achieved and it is estimated that the world will be free from polio virus after the year 2013. Control of poliomyelitis in Indonesia has been commenced since 1982 with routine immunization of polio program and the National Immunization Days (NID has been commenced since 1995,1996,2005 and 2006. When the world is free from polio virus, WHO suggests several alternative effort to maintain the world free from polio viruses : I stop the OPV (Oral Polio Vaccine and no polio immunization, 2 stop OPV and stock pile mOPV (monovalent OPV, 3 use OPV and IPV (Inactivated Polio Vaccine in a certain times, 4 use IPV only in a certain times. IPV has been used routinely in develop countries but has not been used in the developing countries. Several studies in development countries has been conducted, but had not been done in the developing countries. Indonesia collaboration with WHO has conducted the study of IPV in Yogyakarta Province since year 2002 until year 2010. The overall aim of the study is to compile the necessary data that will inform global and national decision-making regarding future polio immunization policies for the OPV cessation era. The data generated from the study will be particularly important to make decisions regarding optimal IPV use in developing tropical countries. It is unlikely that this data can be assembled through other means than through this study. The tentative result of the study shows that OPV immunization coverage in the year 2004 is 99% in four district and 93 % in the Yogyakarta city. Environment surveillance shows that there are 65.7% polio virus detected from 137 sewage samples pre IPV swich, and 4.8% polio virus detected from 83 sewage samples post IPV swich. Survey polio antibody serologis shows

  14. Identification of the heme-modified peptides from cumene hydroperoxide-inactivated cytochrome P450 3A4.

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    He, K; Bornheim, L M; Falick, A M; Maltby, D; Yin, H; Correia, M A

    1998-12-15

    Cumene hydroperoxide-mediated (CuOOH-mediated) inactivation of cytochromes P450 (CYPs) results in destruction of their prosthetic heme to reactive fragments that irreversibly bind to the protein. We have attempted to characterize this process structurally, using purified, 14C-heme labeled, recombinant human liver P450 3A4 as the target of CuOOH-mediated inactivation, and a battery of protein characterization approaches [chemical (CNBr) and proteolytic (lysylendopeptidase-C) digestion, HPLC-peptide mapping, microEdman sequencing, and mass spectrometric analyses]. The heme-peptide adducts isolated after CNBr/lysylendopeptidase-C digestion of the CuOOH-inactivated P450 3A4 pertain to two distinct P450 3A4 active site domains. One of the peptides isolated corresponds to the proximal helix L/Cys-region peptide 429-450 domain and the others to the K-region (peptide 359-386 domain). Although the precise residue(s) targeted remain to be identified, we have narrowed down the region of attack to within a 17 amino acid peptide (429-445) stretch of the 55-amino acid proximal helix L/Cys domain. Furthermore, although the exact structures of the heme-modifying fragments and the nature of the adduction remain to be established conclusively, the incremental masses of approximately 302 and 314 Da detected by electrospray mass spectrometric analyses of the heme-modified peptides are consistent with a dipyrrolic heme fragment comprised of either pyrrole ring A-D or B-C, a known soluble product of peroxidative heme degradation, as a modifying species.

  15. 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Stimulates Breast Cancer by Dihydrotestosterone Inactivation in Addition to Estradiol Production

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    Aka, Juliette A.; Mazumdar, Mausumi; Chen, Chang-Qing; Poirier, Donald; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    2010-01-01

    The active estrogen estradiol (E2) stimulates breast cancer cell (BCC) growth, whereas the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) has shown an antiproliferative effect. The principal product synthesized by the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17β-HSD1) is E2, although we have demonstrated that the purified enzyme also inactivates DHT. However, the direct roles of 17β-HSD1 in sex-hormone regulation and BCC proliferation have not been completely established. Here, we show that 17β-HSD1 inhibition suppresses DHT catabolism by 19%, whereas knockdown of the gene expression increases the concentration of DHT by 41% in the T47D BCC line. The 17β-HSD1/DHT complex crystal structure reveals that DHT binds in both normal and reverse modes, but the latter mode leading to O3 reduction is preferred with stronger interactions. Using RNA interference and an inhibitor of 17β-HSD1, we demonstrate that 17β-HSD1 expression is negatively correlated to DHT levels in BCC but positively correlated to estrone reduction, E2 levels, and cell proliferation. 17β-HSD1 inhibition reduces DHT inactivation, increasing the antiproliferative effect by DHT in T47D cells after 8 d treatment. Thus, 17β-HSD1 up-regulates BCC growth by a dual action on estradiol synthesis and DHT inactivation. We have further demonstrated that 17β-HSD1 can enhance the E2-induced expression of the endogenous estrogen-responsive gene pS2, providing an important information regarding the modulation of the estrogen responsiveness by 17β-HSD1 that may also contribute to BCC growth. These results strongly support the rationale for inhibiting 17β-HSD1 in breast cancer therapy to eliminate estrogen activation via the sulfatase pathway while avoiding the deprivation of DHT. PMID:20172961

  16. Effectiveness of highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin in intra-uterine insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, Els; Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Timmermans, Adriana J; Schats, Roel; Hompes, Peter G A

    2011-02-01

    In assisted reproductive techniques it is important to find a balance between high pregnancy and acceptable multiple pregnancy rates. In IVF treatment, stimulation with highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) results in comparable or even higher pregnancy rates at lower oocyte yields compared to recombinant FSH. Since highly purified hMG contains LH activity, a number of the advantages of highly purified hMG may be attributed to this LH activity. In IUI treatment the effectiveness of highly purified hMG has been barely investigated. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of highly purified hMG in IUI patients treated with a mild stimulation protocol. In this retrospective study 378 patients were included, receiving 1400 IUI cycles between January 2006 and December 2007. Patients were first treated with three subsequent natural cycles without controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, followed by three subsequent cycles stimulated with highly purified hMG. Primary outcomes were ongoing pregnancy rate and multifollicular growth. Secondary outcomes were multiple pregnancy and miscarriage rates. Primary and secondary outcomes were expressed in percentages with associated 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Differences in the outcomes between natural and stimulated cycles were calculated using χ(2) tests. Statistical differences were determined at P < 0.05. Ongoing pregnancy rates increased from 6% (95%CI 4.7-7.7) per natural cycle to 7.4% (95%CI 5.2-10.3) per highly purified hMG stimulated cycle (p = 0.34). The highest ongoing pregnancy rate was observed in the fifth treatment cycle (10.8% (95%CI 6.6-17)), which is significantly higher than the ongoing pregnancy rate in the unstimulated group (p = 0.03). In the highly purified hMG group three (9.7% (95%CI 3.3-24.9)) of the ongoing pregnancies were twin pregnancies, in the unstimulated group there was one (1.7% (95%CI 0.3-9.0)) twin pregnancy (p = 0.08). Our results indicate that mild stimulation

  17. Performance Evaluation of Insulating Firebricks Produced from Hydrometallurgically Purified Termite Hill Clay Reinforced with Alumina

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    D.O. Folorunso

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance of insulating firebricks produced from hydrometallurgically purified termite hill clay admixed with varying percentages of alumina cement has been qualitatively evaluated. A large quantity of termite hill clay was mined from a location on the campus of The Federal University of Technology, Akure (FUTA, Nigeria. The bulk of clay was washed in water, the deleterious shafts decanted, the slurry dried in sun for three days and later in the oven at 90 °C for eight hours. The dried clay was then crushed and ground to a fine size of 100 µm, being the average particle size upon the sieve size analysis. Sieved clay was purified hydrometallurgically at a predetermined condition; 1.6 mol/dm3 of oxalic acid at 90 °C for 150 min. and 200 rev/min agitation. Raw and purified clays were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Purified clay samples containing 5 – 20 % alumina were again fired at varying temperatures of 900 °C, 1100 °C, 1300 °C and 1500 °C and tested for some important refractory properties such as permanent linear change, modulus of rupture and permeability. Sample (purified clay + 10 % alumina fired at 1500 °C that exhibited the best combination of these properties was examined under scanning electron microscope to see the effect of heat and analyzed chemically using the X-ray fluorescence machine to know the precise compositions.

  18. COMPARITIVE STUDY OF RASAMANIKYA (AN AYURVEDIC FORMULATION WITH PURIFIED HARTALA (ORPIMENT

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    Madhamshetty Hariprasad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hartala (Orpiment is being in practice widely in Ayurvedic formulations in spite of its toxic nature. Rasamanikya is the drug prepared from only Hartala is proved to be much effective in various disorders like Vata-rakta (Gout, Kushtha (Skin disorders, Shwasa (Bronchial asthma, etc. This study was undertaken to understand the basic difference between these two forms of Arsenic. One is Hartala (As2S3 and Rasamanikya (As2S2. The study includes -1. Purification of Hartala (Orpiment 2. Preparation of Rasamanikya. and 3. Comparison of purified Hartala and Rasamanikya. Hartala purified with help of Juice of Kushmand i.e. Benincasa hispida Linn. by dolayantra (process of steaming Method. Rasamanikya prepared by four different methods and compared to get most standard product.On chemical analysis it was found that Arsenic percentage was highest in Rasamanikya prepared by electric bulb method and least when prepared in Abhraka patra samput. The percentage of Sulphur was found to be high when prepared in Abhrakapatra samput and least in Sharav Samput method. On comparing Purified Hartala and Rasamanikya it was found that there was reduction in bulk density, moisture content and ash value from purified Hartala to Rasamanikya. It shows that preparation of Rasamanikya from purified Hartala is its conversation in to easily absorbable and more potent form. On ESCA analysis it was found that there is no elemental arsenic present in both samples which is toxic in nature, but in the form of sulphide complex form.

  19. Evaluating purifying selection in the mitochondrial DNA of various mammalian species.

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    Pedro Soares

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, the circular DNA molecule inside the mitochondria of all eukaryotic cells, has been shown to be under the effect of purifying selection in several species. Traditional testing of purifying selection has been based simply on ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations, without considering the relative age of each mutation, which can be determined by phylogenetic analysis of this non-recombining molecule. The incorporation of a mutation time-ordering from phylogeny and of predicted pathogenicity scores for nonsynonymous mutations allow a quantitative evaluation of the effects of purifying selection in human mtDNA. Here, by using this additional information, we show that purifying selection undoubtedly acts upon the mtDNA of other mammalian species/genera, namely Bos sp., Canis lupus, Mus musculus, Orcinus orca, Pan sp. and Sus scrofa. The effects of purifying selection were comparable in all species, leading to a significant major proportion of nonsynonymous variants with higher pathogenicity scores in the younger branches of the tree. We also derive recalibrated mutation rates for age estimates of ancestors of these various species and proposed a correction curve in order to take into account the effects of selection. Understanding this selection is fundamental to evolutionary studies and to the identification of deleterious mutations.

  20. Quantification of ozone levels in indoor environments generated by ionization and ozonolysis air purifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britigan, Nicole; Alshawa, Ahmad; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2006-05-01

    Indoor air purifiers are advertised as safe household products for health-conscious individuals, especially for those suffering from allergies and asthma. However, certain air purifiers produce ozone (O3) during operation, either intentionally or as a byproduct of air ionization. This is a serious concern, because O3 is a criteria air pollutant regulated by health-related federal and state standards. Several types of air purifiers were tested for their ability to produce ozone in various indoor environments at 40-50% relative humidity, including office rooms, bathrooms, bedrooms, and cars. O3 levels generated by personal wearable air purifiers were also tested. In many cases, O3 concentrations were well in excess of public and/or industrial safety levels established by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, California Air Resources Board, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Simple kinetic equations were obtained that can predict the steady-state level of O3 in a room from the O3 emission rate of the air purifier and the first-order decay rate of O3 in the room. The additivity of O3 levels generated by independent O3 generators was experimentally demonstrated.

  1. [An easy way to purify the inclusion body protein with high purity from prokaryotic expression cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhong, Qin-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sen; Dong, Hui-Fen

    2011-10-01

    To clone partial ORF of SjBMP and to construct the recombinant SjBMP-pET-28a(+) plasmids, and then to transform them into the competent cells E. coli BL21 (DE3), finally a positive clone was used to be induced by IPTG. The bacterial aggregates with target protein expressed as inclusion bodies were purified by the methods of Ni(2+)-NTA affinity purification under denaturation condition and SDS-PAGE gel extraction. The purified protein was used to immune rabbits and make antiserum against the SjBMP, and the antiserum were then used to identify the rSjBMP by Western blotting. The target protein obtained by Ni(2+)-NTA Agarose affinity purification was not pure with unspecific proteins, but the protein further purified by SDS-PAGE gel extraction and the dialysis bag horizontal electrophoresis was quite pure, and the recovery rate was more than 11.0%. Meanwhile, Western blotting was used to identify the recombinant SjBMP protein by antiserum, only a specific single strip appeared, which suggested the protein purified by this method kept its antigenicity, and could be used for common immunological studies. Therefore, the SDS-PAGE gel extraction combining with electroosmosis and dialysis recycling are good and easy to purify the inclusion body proteins.

  2. Development of a log-quadratic model to describe microbial inactivation, illustrated by thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum.

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    Stone, G; Chapman, B; Lovell, D

    2009-11-01

    In the commercial food industry, demonstration of microbiological safety and thermal process equivalence often involves a mathematical framework that assumes log-linear inactivation kinetics and invokes concepts of decimal reduction time (D(T)), z values, and accumulated lethality. However, many microbes, particularly spores, exhibit inactivation kinetics that are not log linear. This has led to alternative modeling approaches, such as the biphasic and Weibull models, that relax strong log-linear assumptions. Using a statistical framework, we developed a novel log-quadratic model, which approximates the biphasic and Weibull models and provides additional physiological interpretability. As a statistical linear model, the log-quadratic model is relatively simple to fit and straightforwardly provides confidence intervals for its fitted values. It allows a D(T)-like value to be derived, even from data that exhibit obvious "tailing." We also showed how existing models of non-log-linear microbial inactivation, such as the Weibull model, can fit into a statistical linear model framework that dramatically simplifies their solution. We applied the log-quadratic model to thermal inactivation data for the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum and evaluated its merits compared with those of popular previously described approaches. The log-quadratic model was used as the basis of a secondary model that can capture the dependence of microbial inactivation kinetics on temperature. This model, in turn, was linked to models of spore inactivation of Sapru et al. and Rodriguez et al. that posit different physiological states for spores within a population. We believe that the log-quadratic model provides a useful framework in which to test vitalistic and mechanistic hypotheses of inactivation by thermal and other processes.

  3. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide tablets on inactivation of cryptosporidium oocysts.

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    Murphy, Jennifer L; Haas, Charles N; Arrowood, Michael J; Hlavsa, Michele C; Beach, Michael J; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-05-20

    The ability of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) to achieve 2-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in drinking water has been documented. No studies have specifically addressed the effects of ClO2 on C. parvum oocyst infectivity in chlorinated recreational water venues (e.g., pools). The aim of this research was to determine the efficacy of ClO2 as an alternative to existing hyperchlorination protocols that are used to achieve a 3-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in such venues. To obtain a 3-log inactivation of C. parvum Iowa oocysts, contact times of 105 and 128 min for a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 2.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. Contact times of 294 and 857 min for a solution containing 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 3.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. The hyperchlorination control (21 mg/L free chlorine only) required 455 min for a 3-log inactivation. Use of a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 and solutions containing 5 or 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with the addition of free chlorine appears to be a promising alternative to hyperchlorination for inactivating Cryptosporidium in chlorinated recreational water venues, but further studies are required to evaluate safety constraints on use.

  4. Resistance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE prions to inactivation.

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    Kurt Giles

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Distinct prion strains often exhibit different incubation periods and patterns of neuropathological lesions. Strain characteristics are generally retained upon intraspecies transmission, but may change on transmission to another species. We investigated the inactivation of two related prions strains: BSE prions from cattle and mouse-passaged BSE prions, termed 301V. Inactivation was manipulated by exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, variations in pH, and different temperatures. Infectivity was measured using transgenic mouse lines that are highly susceptible to either BSE or 301V prions. Bioassays demonstrated that BSE prions are up to 1,000-fold more resistant to inactivation than 301V prions while Western immunoblotting showed that short acidic SDS treatments reduced protease-resistant PrP(Sc from BSE prions and 301V prions at similar rates. Our findings argue that despite being derived from BSE prions, mouse 301V prions are not necessarily a reliable model for cattle BSE prions. Extending these comparisons to human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and hamster Sc237 prions, we found that BSE prions were 10- and 10(6-fold more resistant to inactivation, respectively. Our studies contend that any prion inactivation procedures must be validated by bioassay against the prion strain for which they are intended to be used.

  5. Resistance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions to inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V; Beckwith, Robyn; Seoanes, Rose; Peretz, David; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2008-11-01

    Distinct prion strains often exhibit different incubation periods and patterns of neuropathological lesions. Strain characteristics are generally retained upon intraspecies transmission, but may change on transmission to another species. We investigated the inactivation of two related prions strains: BSE prions from cattle and mouse-passaged BSE prions, termed 301V. Inactivation was manipulated by exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), variations in pH, and different temperatures. Infectivity was measured using transgenic mouse lines that are highly susceptible to either BSE or 301V prions. Bioassays demonstrated that BSE prions are up to 1,000-fold more resistant to inactivation than 301V prions while Western immunoblotting showed that short acidic SDS treatments reduced protease-resistant PrP(Sc) from BSE prions and 301V prions at similar rates. Our findings argue that despite being derived from BSE prions, mouse 301V prions are not necessarily a reliable model for cattle BSE prions. Extending these comparisons to human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and hamster Sc237 prions, we found that BSE prions were 10- and 10(6)-fold more resistant to inactivation, respectively. Our studies contend that any prion inactivation procedures must be validated by bioassay against the prion strain for which they are intended to be used.

  6. Methodological Studies on Plasma Endotoxin Level and Endotoxin Inactivation Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚国相; 杨乃发; 薛新波; 赵玉沛; 蒋朱明

    2004-01-01

    To establish stable methods for detecting plasma endotoxin level and endotoxin inactivation capacity in a normal population and general surgical patients and evaluate their perioperative changes, 50 healthy people and 50 patients receiving gastrointestinal operation were enrolled, their plasma endotoxin levels and plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity were assayed. Our results showed that plasma endotoxin levels were 0.044±0.009 EU/ml in the normal population and 0.044±0.023 EU/ml in the preoperative patients. Endotoxin level peaked 3 h after the operation (0.223±0.041 EU/ml), and then decreased rapidly on the first day after the operation (0.134±0.164EU/ml). Endotoxin inactivation capacity also had the same time course as endotoxin level. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and infection induced another elevation in the time course. It is concluded that establishing the endotoxin standard curve by using pyrogenic free water is better than by using plasma. Plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity can be used as an indirect indicator of postoperative immune depression. Plasma endotoxin level and endotoxin inactivation capacity peaked shortly after operation, indicating surgical stress is closely related with the changes.

  7. Thermal inactivation of the wine spoilage yeasts Dekkera/Brettanomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, José António; Neves, Filipe; Campos, Francisco; Hogg, Tim

    2005-10-25

    The heat resistance of three strains of Dekkera/Brettanomyces (Dekkera anomala PYCC 5,153, Dekkera bruxellensis PYCC 4,801 and Dekkera/Brettanomyces 093) was evaluated at different temperatures between 32.5 and 55 degrees C. Thermal inactivation tests were performed in tartrate buffer solution (pH 4.0) and in wines. In the studies employing buffer as the heating menstruum, measurable thermal inactivation began only at temperatures of 50 degrees C. When heating was performed in wine, significant inactivation begins at 35 degrees C. Subsequent thermal inactivation tests were performed in buffer at various levels of pH, ethanol concentration, and various phenolic acids. Results from experiments in buffer with added ethanol suggest that the greater heat sensitivity shown in wines can be largely attributed to ethanol, although potentiation of this effect might be due to the phenolic content, particularly from ferulic acid. In the range of pH values tested (2.5-4.5), this factor had no influence in the heat inactivation kinetics. Relevant data, in the form of D and Z values calculated in the various environments, potentially useful for the establishment of regimes of thermal control of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts in wine and contaminated equipment is presented.

  8. Preparation and Primary Application of Monoclonal Antibodies against a Novel Ribosome-inactivating Protein Moschatin from Pumpkin Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Chuan XIA; Wei-Guo HU; Xin-Xiu YANG; Feng LI; Zu-Chuan ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    Plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) have multiple biological functions, and have beenwidely used in the studies on biomedical and agronomic applications. Moschatin is a novel single-chain RIPrecently purified from pumpkin seeds, and it has been successfully applied to construct the immunotoxin thatcan selectively kill the cultured human melanoma cells. Six stable strains of hybridomas (2H8, 4A8, 5B6,6F8, 4H 10 and 6C2) that can secrete high specific monoclonal antibodies against Moschatin have beensuccessfully prepared using hybridoma technique. The isotypes of these monoclonal antibodies areIgG1, IgG1, IgG1, IgG1, IgG2a and IgM. Their affinity constants were determined to be 1.42×108, 2.71×108,8.72×107, 2.06×108, 1.36×108 and 1.51×108M-1 in a sequent order, measured by non-competitive ELISA.The monoclonal antibody 4A8 has been used to detect Moschatin in Western blot. An immunoaffinity gel,which consisted ofa monoclonal antibody 4H10 and Sepharose 4B, was prepared and used to purify Moschatinfrom pumpkin seeds crude extract.

  9. Preparation and Primary Application of Monoclonal Antibodies against a Novel Ribosome-inactivating Protein Moschatin from Pumpkin Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-ChuanXIA; Wei-GuoHU; Xin-XiuYANG; FengLI; Zu-ChuanZHANG

    2004-01-01

    Plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) have multiple biological functions, and have beenwidely used in the studies on biomedical and agronomic applications. Moschatin is a novel single-chain RIPrecently purified from pumpkin seeds, and it has been successfully applied to construct the immunotoxin thatcan selectively kill the cultured human melanoma cells. Six stable strains of hybridomas (2H8, 4A8, 5B6,6F8, 4H10 and 6C2) that can secrete high specific monoclonal antibodies against Moschatin have beensuccessfully prepared using hybridoma technique. The isotypes of these monoclonal antibodies areIgG1, IgG1, IgG1, IgG1, IgG2a and IgM. Their affinity constants were determined to be 1.42×108, 2.71×108,8.72×07, 2.06×l08, 1.36×108 and 1.51×108 M-1 in a sequent order, measured by non-competitive ELISA.The monoclonal antibody 4A8 has been used to detect Moschatin in Western blot. An immunoaffinity gel,which consisted ofa monoclonal antibody 4H 10 and Sepharose 4B, was prepared and used to purify Moschatinfrom pumpkin seeds crude extract.

  10. A bichaperone (Hsp70-Hsp78) system restores mitochondrial DNA synthesis following thermal inactivation of Mip1p polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaniuk, Aleksandra; Liberek, Krzysztof; Marszalek, Jaroslaw

    2002-08-02

    Mitochondrial DNA synthesis is a thermosensitive process in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that restoration of mtDNA synthesis following heat treatment of cells is dependent on reactivation of the mtDNA polymerase Mip1p through the action of a mitochondrial bichaperone system consisting of the Hsp70 system and the Hsp78 oligomeric protein. mtDNA synthesis was inefficiently restored after heat shock in yeast lacking either functional component of the bichaperone system. Furthermore, the activity of purified Mip1p was also thermosensitive; however, the purified components of the mitochondrial bichaperone system (Ssc1p, Mdj1p, Mge1p, and Hsp78p) were able to protect its activity under moderate heat shock conditions as well as to reactivate thermally inactivated Mip1p. Interestingly, the reactivation of endogenous Mip1p contributed more significantly to the restoration of mtDNA synthesis than did import of newly synthesized Mip1p from the cytosol. These observations suggest an important link between function of mitochondrial chaperones and the propagation of mitochondrial genomes under ever-changing environmental conditions.

  11. The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on indoor air quality quantified using different measuring methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Wargocki, Pawel; Skorek-Osikowska, A.;

    2010-01-01

    The effect on indoor air quality of an air purifier based on photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) was determined by different measuring techniques: sensory assessments of air quality made by human subjects, Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and chromatographic methods (Gas...... Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography with UV detection). The experiment was conducted in a simulated office, ventilated with 0.6 h(-1), 2.5 h(-1) and 6 h(-1), in the presence of additional pollution sources (carpet, chipboard and linoleum). At the lowest air change rate......, additional measurements were made with no pollution sources present in the office. All conditions were tested with the photocatalytic air purifier turned on and off. The results show that operation of the air purifier in the presence of pollutants emitted by building materials and furniture improves indoor...

  12. Electrorefiner system for recovering purified metal from impure nuclear feed material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, John F.; Williamson, Mark A.; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G.; Willit, James L.; Barnes, Laurel A.; Blaskovitz, Robert J.

    2015-10-06

    An electrorefiner system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a vessel configured to maintain a molten salt electrolyte and configured to receive a plurality of alternately arranged cathode and anode assemblies. The anode assemblies are configured to hold an impure nuclear feed material. Upon application of the power system, the impure nuclear feed material is anodically dissolved and a purified metal is deposited on the cathode rods of the cathode assemblies. A scraper is configured to dislodge the purified metal deposited on the cathode rods. A conveyor system is disposed at a bottom of the vessel and configured to remove the dislodged purified metal from the vessel.

  13. Immunogenicity of a purified fragment of 17D yellow fever envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandriss, M W; Schlesinger, J J; Walsh, E E

    1990-06-01

    Information on the immunogenic properties of purified flavivirus proteins may be useful in the development of recombinant or synthetic peptide vaccines. Using a monoclonal antibody, an attempt was made to purify the envelope (E) protein of 17D yellow fever virus (17D YF) by affinity chromatography. The purified material could not be identified as intact E protein but it did bear antigenic determinants of E as determined by selective reactivity with anti-E monoclonal antibodies. Rabbits immunized with this material produced antibodies that neutralized 17D YF and dengue-2 viruses in comparable titers, indicating that cross-reactive antigenic determinants were preserved. Immunization of mice resulted in protection against intracerebral challenge with 17D YF.

  14. Purifying selection, drift, and reversible mutation with arbitrarily high mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Brian; Jain, Kavita

    2014-12-01

    Some species exhibit very high levels of DNA sequence variability; there is also evidence for the existence of heritable epigenetic variants that experience state changes at a much higher rate than sequence variants. In both cases, the resulting high diversity levels within a population (hyperdiversity) mean that standard population genetics methods are not trustworthy. We analyze a population genetics model that incorporates purifying selection, reversible mutations, and genetic drift, assuming a stationary population size. We derive analytical results for both population parameters and sample statistics and discuss their implications for studies of natural genetic and epigenetic variation. In particular, we find that (1) many more intermediate-frequency variants are expected than under standard models, even with moderately strong purifying selection, and (2) rates of evolution under purifying selection may be close to, or even exceed, neutral rates. These findings are related to empirical studies of sequence and epigenetic variation.

  15. Decolorization of Remazol Brilliant Blue R by a purified laccase of Polyporus brumalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyewon; Lee, Sungsuk; Ryu, Sunhwa; Choi, Hyoung T

    2012-01-01

    A white rot basidiomycete Polyporus brumalis has been reported to induce two laccase genes under degradation conditions of dibutylphthalate. When this fungus was grown in a minimal medium, one laccase enzyme was detected by the native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A laccase was purified through ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography, and the estimated molecular weight was 70 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature of the purified laccase was pH 4.0 and 20 °C, respectively. The K (m) value of the enzyme was 685.0 μM, and the V (max) was 0.147 ODmin(-1) unit(-1) for o-tolidine. Purified laccase showed effective decolorization of a dye, Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR), without any laccase mediator. However, this effect was reduced by a laccase inhibitor, kojic acid, which confirmed that the laccase was directly involved in the decolorization of RBBR.

  16. Establishment of water quality index (Na+, Ca2+) for purified water reused to zinc electrolysis process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Li-yuan; XIAO Hai-juan; WANG Yun-yan; PEI Fei; SHU Yu-de; ZHANG Jin-long

    2009-01-01

    The effects of Na+ and Ca2+ in the purified water on the conductivity of zinc electrolyte and the current efficiency of zinc electrolysis were studied by the alternating current bridge method and the simulated electrolysis experiments, and the water quality index of reused water was established. The results show that the conductivity of the solution and the current efficiency decrease as these two kinds of positive ions are added in the electrolyte. The effect of Ca2+ is much more remarkable than that of Na+. ρ(Na+)≤ 8 g/L and ρ(Ca2+)≤20 mg/L are the quality indexes in the zinc electrolysis process and the concentrations of Na+ and Ca2+ in the purified water reused to the process should be less than the limited values, i.e. the water quality index of the purified water should be controlled by its reused amount.

  17. Degradation of volatile organic compounds in a non-thermal plasma air purifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Stefan; Jecklin, Matthias C; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-03-01

    The degradation of volatile organic compounds in a commercially available non-thermal plasma based air purifying system was investigated. Several studies exist that interrogate the degradation of VOCs in closed air systems using a non-thermal plasma combined with a heterogeneous catalyst. For the first time, however, our study was performed under realistic conditions (normal indoor air, 297.5K and 12.5 g m(-3) water content) on an open system, in the absence of an auxiliary catalyst, and using standard operating air flow rates (up to 320 L min(-1)). Cyclohexene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylene isomers were nebulized and guided through the plasma air purifier. The degradation products were trapped by activated charcoal tubes or silica gel tubes, and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Degradation efficiencies of 11+/-1.6% for cyclohexene, air purifier.

  18. Studying the fate of non-volatile organic compounds in a commercial plasma air purifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Stefan [ETH Zürich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Seiler, Cornelia; Gerecke, Andreas C. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology (EMPA), CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Hächler, Herbert [University of Zürich, Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene, National Centre for Enteropathogenic Bacteria and Listeria (NENT), CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Hilbi, Hubert [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Max von Pettenkofer-Institut, D-80336 München (Germany); Frey, Joachim [University of Bern, Institute for Veterinary Bacteriology, CH-3001 Bern (Switzerland); Weidmann, Simon; Meier, Lukas; Berchtold, Christian [ETH Zürich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Zenobi, Renato, E-mail: zenobi@org.chem.ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Degradation of environmental toxins, a protein, and bioparticles were studied. • A commercial air purifier based on a cold plasma was used. • Passage through the device reduced the concentration of the compounds/particles. • Deposition inside the plasma air purifier was the main removal process. -- Abstract: Degradation of non-volatile organic compounds–environmental toxins (methyltriclosane and phenanthrene), bovine serum albumin, as well as bioparticles (Legionella pneumophila, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus anthracis)–in a commercially available plasma air purifier based on a cold plasma was studied in detail, focusing on its efficiency and on the resulting degradation products. This system is capable of handling air flow velocities of up to 3.0 m s{sup −1} (3200 L min{sup −1}), much higher than other plasma-based reactors described in the literature, which generally are limited to air flow rates below 10 L min{sup −1}. Mass balance studies consistently indicated a reduction in concentration of the compounds/particles after passage through the plasma air purifier, 31% for phenanthrene, 17% for methyltriclosane, and 80% for bovine serum albumin. L. pneumophila did not survive passage through the plasma air purifier, and cell counts of aerosolized spores of B. subtilis and B. anthracis were reduced by 26- and 15-fold, depending on whether it was run at 10 Hz or 50 Hz, respectively. However rather than chemical degradation, deposition on the inner surfaces of the plasma air purifier occured. Our interpretation is that putative “degradation” efficiencies were largely due to electrostatic precipitation rather than to decomposition into smaller molecules.

  19. Extraction and characterization of highly purified collagen from bovine pericardium for potential bioengineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Maria Helena, E-mail: mariahelena.santos@gmail.com [Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri-UFVJM, Diamantina/MG 39100-000 (Brazil); Center for Assessment and Development of Biomaterials-BioMat, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri-UFVJM, Diamantina/MG 39100-000 (Brazil); Silva, Rafael M.; Dumont, Vitor C. [Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri-UFVJM, Diamantina/MG 39100-000 (Brazil); Center for Assessment and Development of Biomaterials-BioMat, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri-UFVJM, Diamantina/MG 39100-000 (Brazil); Neves, Juliana S. [Center for Assessment and Development of Biomaterials-BioMat, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri-UFVJM, Diamantina/MG 39100-000 (Brazil); Mansur, Herman S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais-UFMG, Belo Horizonte/MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Heneine, Luiz Guilherme D. [Department of Health Science, Ezequiel Dias Foundation-FUNED, Belo Horizonte/MG 30510-010 (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    Bovine pericardium is widely used as a raw material in bioengineering as a source of collagen, a fundamental structural molecule. The physical, chemical, and biocompatibility characteristics of these natural fibers enable their broad use in several areas of the health sciences. For these applications, it is important to obtain collagen of the highest possible purity. The lack of a method to produce these pure biocompatible materials using simple and economically feasible techniques presents a major challenge to their production on an industrial scale. This study aimed to extract, purify, and characterize the type I collagen protein originating from bovine pericardium, considered to be an abundant tissue resource. The pericardium tissue was collected from male animals at slaughter age. Pieces of bovine pericardium were enzymatically digested, followed by a novel protocol developed for protein purification using ion-exchange chromatography. The material was extensively characterized by electrophoresis, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed a purified material with morphological properties and chemical functionalities compatible with type I collagen and similar to a highly purified commercial collagen. Thus, an innovative and relatively simple processing method was developed to extract and purify type I collagen from bovine tissue with potential applications as a biomaterial for regenerative tissue engineering. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Type I collagen was obtained from bovine pericardium, an abundant tissue resource. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple and feasible processing technique was developed to purify bovine collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The appropriate process may be performed on industrial scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pure collagen presented appropriate morphological and molecular characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purify

  20. A Con A- purified hydatid glycoprotein fraction effectively diagnoses human hydatidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Manal M; Maher, Kesmat M; Rabia, Ibrahim; Helmy, Ahmed H; El-Adawi, Azza I; Mousa, Mousa A; Mahgoub, Abeer M

    2006-12-01

    Diagnosis and quantification of Echinococcus granulosus infection in man and animal hosts are centralized to feasible control. This study included 93 serum samples, 25 sure positive hydatid cases confirmed surgically, 7 suspected cases diagnosed by indirect haemagglutination IHA and 41 cases other parasitic infections (15 S. mansoni, 8 Fasciola, 7 Ascaris, 5 H. nana & 6 Ancylostoma) diagnosed by microscopic examination and were negative by ELISA and/or IHA for anti-hydatid antibody. Twenty negative serum samples served as healthy controls. Six types of hydatid fluid antigens (crude, host-free & Con-A purified) of human and camel origin were subjected to electrophoretic separation (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting (EITB). The anti-hydatid IgG was detected in sera of the different groups for evaluation of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic efficacy of each type of antigens. Detection of circulating hydatid antigen (CAg) was performed using anti rabbit hyperimmune sera raised against Con-A purified either human or camel hydatid antigen. SDS-PAGE revealed several bands ranging from 55-185 kDa with 10 kDa band shared by all antigens. The specific bands revealed by EITB for Con-A purified camel and human antigens were at 80, 110 & 55, 110 kDa respectively. ELISA highest sensitivity (96.9%) was by using host-free Con-A purified glycoprotein fraction of human hydatid antigen. Highest specificity (98.4%) was recorded upon use of either Con-A purified camel or human antigen with 94.5% & 97.7% diagnostic efficacy respectively. Detection of circulating antigen by polyclonal antibodies against Con-A purified human hydatid antigen revealed 91.8% specificity.

  1. Use of a sentinel system for field measurements of Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation in soil and animal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M B; Walker, M J; Bowman, D D; Anthony, L C; Ghiorse, W C

    1999-05-01

    A small-volume sentinel chamber was developed to assess the effects of environmental stresses on survival of sucrose-Percoll-purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil and animal wastes. Chambers were tested for their ability to equilibrate with external chemical and moisture conditions. Sentinel oocysts were then exposed to stresses of the external environment that affected their viability (potential infectivity), as indicated by results of a dye permeability assay. Preliminary laboratory experiments indicated that temperatures between 35 and 50 degrees C and decreases in soil water potential (-0.003 to -3.20 MPa) increased oocyst inactivation rates. The effects of two common animal waste management practices on oocyst survival were investigated on three dairy farms in Delaware County, N.Y., within the New York City watershed: (i) piling wastes from dairy youngstock (including neonatal calves) and (ii) spreading wastes as a soil amendment on an agricultural field. Sentinel containers filled with air-dried and sieved (2-mm mesh) youngstock waste or field soil were wetted and inoculated with 2 million oocysts in an aqueous suspension and then placed in waste piles on two different farms and in soil within a cropped field on one farm. Controls consisted of purified oocysts in either phosphate-buffered saline or distilled water contained in sealed microcentrifuge tubes. Two microdata loggers recorded the ambient temperature at each field site. Sentinel experiments were conducted during the fall and winter (1996 to 1997) and winter (1998). Sentinel containers and controls were removed at 2- to 4-week intervals, and oocysts were extracted and tested by the dye permeability assay. The proportions of potentially infective oocysts exposed to the soil and waste pile material decreased more rapidly than their counterpart controls exposed to buffer or water, indicating that factors other than temperature affected oocyst inactivation in the waste piles and soil. The

  2. Photodynamic inactivation of prions by disulfonated hydroxyaluminium phthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janouskova, Olga; Rakusan, Jan; Karaskova, Marie; Holada, Karel

    2012-11-01

    Sulfonated phthalocyanines (Pcs) are cyclic tetrapyrroles that constitute a group of photosensitizers. In the presence of visible light and diatomic oxygen, Pcs produce singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species that have known degradation effects on lipids, proteins and/or nucleic acids. Pcs have been used successfully in the treatment of bacterial, yeast and fungal infections, but their use in the photodynamic inactivation of prions has never been reported. Here, we evaluated the photodynamic activity of the disodium salt of disulfonated hydroxyaluminium phthalocyanine (PcDS) against mouse-adapted scrapie RML prions in vitro. PcDS treatment of RML brain homogenate resulted in a time- and dose-dependent inactivation of prions. The photodynamic potential of Pcs offers a new way to inactivate prions using biodegradable compounds at room temperature and normal pressure, which could be useful for treating thermolabile materials and liquids.

  3. Combined ozone and ultraviolet inactivation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magbanua, Benjamin S; Savant, Gaurav; Truax, Dennis D

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of Escherichia coli inactivation using ozone and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, separately and simultaneously, was evaluated at 25 degrees C in buffered (pH 6.0, 7.0 and 8.0), demand-free media. While ozone was found to be a stronger disinfectant than UV radiation, using both simultaneously was more effective than using them individually. Inactivation kinetics was pseudo first-order for the three treatment processes, while the disinfection rate was a linear function of the disinfectant dose. The synergism observed in microbial inactivation when the disinfectant processes were combined was illustrated by estimates of kinetic model parameters. This synergy was attributed to the generation of hydroxyl radicals via ozone photolysis. Subsequently, dosage calculations, as based on disinfectant level and exposure time, indicated that the simultaneous use of UV and ozone could substantially reduce their individual doses.

  4. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornecker, Jacey L; Samollow, Paul B; Robinson, Edward S; Vandeberg, John L; McCarrey, John R

    2007-11-01

    In eutherian mammals, the X and Y chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis in males. However, following fertilization, both the paternally (Xp) and maternally (Xm) inherited X chromosomes are active in the inner cell mass of the female blastocyst, and then random inactivation of one X chromosome occurs in each cell, leading to a mosaic pattern of X-chromosome activity in adult female tissues. In contrast, marsupial females show a nonrandom pattern of X chromosome activity, with repression of the Xp in all somatic tissues. Here, we show that MSCI also occurs during spermatogenesis in marsupials in a manner similar to, but more stable than that in eutherians. These findings support the suggestion that MSCI may have provided the basis for an early dosage compensation mechanism in mammals based solely on gametogenic events, and that random X-chromosome inactivation during embryogenesis may have evolved subsequently in eutherian mammals.

  5. Advances in the development of inactivated virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Fausto; El-Bacha, Tatiana; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2006-11-01

    Vaccine discovery stands out as one of the public health interventions that has achieved the greatest impact in world's health. Vaccination is the most effective means of disease prevention, especially for viral infections. Starting with the use of smallpox vaccine by Jenner in the late 1700s, the technology for vaccine development has seen numerous advances. Currently, vaccines available for human viral illness are based on live attenuated (e.g. measles, mumps, and rubella), inactivated (e.g. hepatitis A) and recombinant (e.g. hepatitis B) viruses. Among these, inactivated vaccines are known for their easy production and safety. The present article reviews the literature and patents related to the mechanisms used for viral inactivation, mainly chemical and physical procedures, including the novel strategies that are currently being explored and that have been recently patent protected.

  6. Immunization with heat-inactivated Staphylococcus aureus induced an antibody response mediated by IgG1 and IgG2 in patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Romo, Gina Stella; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Misael; Donis-Hernandez, Felipe Raul; Zendejas-Buitron, Victor Manuel; Pedroza-Gonzalez, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Currently Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant pathogen isolated from the respiratory tract of patients with recurrent tonsillitis. Because of an increase in multi-drug resistant strains of S. aureus, there is a pressing need for effective treatments and preventive approaches to reduce the risk of invasive and life-threatening infections. A preventive vaccine against S. aureus would have a tremendous clinical impact. However, multiple clinical trials have failed to identify an agent that can induce protective responses. Most trials have been based on subunit vaccines using one or a few purified antigens, which may not be enough to confer protection. Here, the impact of a whole-cell vaccine comprised of heat-inactivated S. aureus was investigated in patients with RT. The vaccine was well tolerated and had no significant local or systemic reactions. Immunization with heat-inactivated S. aureus elicited a significant antibody response characterized by production of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies and, to a lesser extent, of IgA antibodies. Notably, this response was associated with an important decrease in the incidence of tonsillitis and bacterial colonization of the oropharyngeal mucosa. Our results show that whole-cell inactivated S. aureus is safe and capable of evoking specific antibody responses in patients with recurrent tonsillitis. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. The assessment of efficacy of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus inactivated vaccine based on the viral quantity and inactivation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunil; Kim, Hye Kwon; Jung, Jung Ho; Choi, Yoo Jung; Kim, Jiho; Um, Chang Gyu; Hyun, Su Bin; Shin, Sungho; Lee, Byeongchun; Jang, Goo; Kang, Bo Kyu; Moon, Hyoung Joon; Song, Dae Sub

    2011-06-27

    There have been many efforts to develop efficient vaccines for the control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Although inactivated PRRSV vaccines are preferred for their safety, they are weak at inducing humoral immune responses and controlling field PRRSV infection, especially when heterologous viruses are involved. In all groups, the sample to positive (S/P) ratio of IDEXX ELISA and the virus neutralization (VN) titer remained negative until challenge. While viremia did not reduce in the vaccinated groups, the IDEXX-ELISA-specific immunoglobulin G increased more rapidly and to significantly greater levels 7 days after the challenge in all the vaccinated groups compared to the non-vaccinated groups (p vaccine-inoculated and binary ethylenimine (BEI)-inactivated groups 22 days after challenge (p inactivated vaccines tested in this study provided weak memory responses with sequential challenge without any obvious active immune responses in the vaccinated pigs. The inactivated vaccine failed to show the humoral immunity, but it showed different immune response after the challenge compared to mock group. Although the 106 PFU/mL-vaccinated and BEI-inactivated groups showed significantly greater VN titers 22 days after challenge, all the groups were already negative for viremia.

  8. Affinity-purified human interleukin I is cytotoxic to isolated islets of Langerhans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Bendtzen, K; Nerup, J

    1986-01-01

    . These effects were dose-dependent and reproducible when using three different Interleukin-1 preparations. Highly purified human Interleukin-2, Lymphotoxin, Leucocyte Migration Inhibitory Factor and Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor were ineffective. These findings suggest that Interleukin-1 may play......Addition of highly purified human Interleukin-1 to the culture medium of isolated rat islets of Langerhans for 6 days led to 88% inhibition of glucose-induced insulin-release, reduction of islet contents of insulin and glucagon to 31% and 8% respectively, and disintegration of the islets...

  9. Oxidative Stability of Dispersions Prepared from Purified Marine Phospholipid and the Role of α-Tocopherol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline P.

    2012-01-01

    the investigation of nonenzymatic browning in purified marine PL dispersions. Dispersions were prepared by high-pressure homogenizer. The oxidative and hydrolytic stabilities of dispersions were investigated by determination of hydroperoxides, secondary volatile oxidation products, and free fatty acids......, respectively, during 32 days of storage at 2 °C. Nonenzymatic browning was investigated through measurement of Strecker aldehydes, color changes, and pyrrole content. Dispersions containing α-tocopherol or higher levels of purified marine PL showed a lower increment of volatiles after 32 days storage...

  10. Extraction Kinetics of Lanthanum with Purified Cyanex 923 from Nitrate Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TongHui; LiDe-qian; WangYi-ge; LeiJia-heng

    2003-01-01

    Solvent extraction kinetics of lanthanum with purified Cyanex 923 in heptane from nitrate medium was investigated by using a constant interlacial cell with laminar flow at 303 K. The effects of stirring speed, temperature and specific interlace on the extraction rate were studied. The experimental results showed that the extraction apparent activation energy was 32. 0 kJ· mo1-1 and the extraction process was controlled by both chemical reaction and diffusion. The extraction rates were measured at different chemical compositions by varying ionic strength, pH value and the concentration of purified Cyanex 923. The initial extraction rate equation was obtained.

  11. Extraction Kinetics of Lanthanum with Purified Cyanex 923 from Nitrate Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Jia-heng

    2003-01-01

    Solvent extraction kinetics of lanthanum with purified Cyanex 923 in heptane from nitrate medium was investigated by using a constant interfacial cell with laminar flow at 303 K. The effects of stirring speed, temperature and specific interface on the extraction rate were studied. The experimental results showed that the extraction apparent activawas controlled by both chemical reaction and diffusion. The extraction rates were measured at different chemical compositions by varying ionic strength, pH value and the concentration of purified Cyanex 923. The initial extraction rate equation was obtained.

  12. Two-dimensional crystallization and preliminary electron crystallographic result of partially purified Fo from porcine mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    After removal of cytoplasmic sector F1 from submitochondrial particles of FoF1-ATP synthase complex with guanidine hydrochloride, the transmembrane sector Fo was specifically extracted from the stripped membranes in the presence of detergent CHAPS and partially purified.Two-dimensional crystals were produced by the reconstitution of the partially purified Fo into asolectin and microdialysis. The obtained crystals are able to diffract to 2 nm. The projection map of the negatively stained crystal shows that the crystal has p4212 symmetry, lattice constant, a = b = 14.4nm. A unit cell contains four Fo molecules.

  13. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Yong-Bing; Song Li; Zhang Chun-Yu; Wang Li; Fu Pan-Ming; Zhang Zhi-Guo; Xie Si-Shen; Wang Guo-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved optical transmissions in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films are measured at a temperature of 200K. The signal of the purified sample shows a crossover from photobleaching to photoabsorption. The former and the latter are interpreted as the state filling and the red shift of the π-plasmon,respectively. The signal of the as-grown sample can be perfectly fitted by a single-exponential with a time constant of 232fs. The disappearance of the negative component in the as-grown sample is attributed to the charge transfer between the semiconducting nanotubes and the impurities.

  14. Design of the Helium Purifier for IHEP-ADS Helium Purification System

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Helium Purification System is an important sub-system in the Accelerator Driven Subcritical System of the Institute of High Energy Physics(IHEP ADS). The purifier is designed to work at the temperature of 77K. The purifier will work in a flow rate of 5g/s at 20MPa in continuous operation of 12 hours. The oil and moisture are removed by coalescing filters and a dryer, while nitrogen and oxygen are condensed by a phase separator and then adsorbed in several activated carbon adsorption cylinders...

  15. Genes that escape X-inactivation in humans have high intraspecific variability in expression, are associated with mental impairment but are not slow evolving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Jiang, Min; Zhu, Yufei; Hu, Landian; Urrutia, Araxi O; Kong, Xiangyin; Hurst, Laurence D

    2013-12-01

    In female mammals most X-linked genes are subject to X-inactivation. However, in humans some X-linked genes escape silencing, these escapees being candidates for the phenotypic aberrations seen in polyX karyotypes. These escape genes have been reported to be under stronger purifying selection than other X-linked genes. Although it is known that escape from X-inactivation is much more common in humans than in mice, systematic assays of escape in humans have to date employed only interspecies somatic cell hybrids. Here we provide the first systematic next-generation sequencing analysis of escape in a human cell line. We analyzed RNA and genotype sequencing data obtained from B lymphocyte cell lines derived from Europeans (CEU) and Yorubans (YRI). By replicated detection of heterozygosis in the transcriptome, we identified 114 escaping genes, including 76 not previously known to be escapees. The newly described escape genes cluster on the X chromosome in the same chromosomal regions as the previously known escapees. There is an excess of escaping genes associated with mental retardation, consistent with this being a common phenotype of polyX phenotypes. We find both differences between populations and between individuals in the propensity to escape. Indeed, we provide the first evidence for there being both hyper- and hypo-escapee females in the human population, consistent with the highly variable phenotypic presentation of polyX karyotypes. Considering also prior data, we reclassify genes as being always, never, and sometimes escape genes. We fail to replicate the prior claim that genes that escape X-inactivation are under stronger purifying selection than others.

  16. Genetic architecture of skewed X inactivation in the laboratory mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Calaway

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is the mammalian mechanism of dosage compensation that balances X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Early during female development, each cell of the embryo proper independently inactivates one of its two parental X-chromosomes. In mice, the choice of which X chromosome is inactivated is affected by the genotype of a cis-acting locus, the X-chromosome controlling element (Xce. Xce has been localized to a 1.9 Mb interval within the X-inactivation center (Xic, yet its molecular identity and mechanism of action remain unknown. We combined genotype and sequence data for mouse stocks with detailed phenotyping of ten inbred strains and with the development of a statistical model that incorporates phenotyping data from multiple sources to disentangle sources of XCI phenotypic variance in natural female populations on X inactivation. We have reduced the Xce candidate 10-fold to a 176 kb region located approximately 500 kb proximal to Xist. We propose that structural variation in this interval explains the presence of multiple functional Xce alleles in the genus Mus. We have identified a new allele, Xce(e present in Mus musculus and a possible sixth functional allele in Mus spicilegus. We have also confirmed a parent-of-origin effect on X inactivation choice and provide evidence that maternal inheritance magnifies the skewing associated with strong Xce alleles. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 155 laboratory strains and wild mice we conclude that Xce(a is either a derived allele that arose concurrently with the domestication of fancy mice but prior the derivation of most classical inbred strains or a rare allele in the wild. Furthermore, we have found that despite the presence of multiple haplotypes in the wild Mus musculus domesticus has only one functional Xce allele, Xce(b. Lastly, we conclude that each mouse taxa examined has a different functional Xce allele.

  17. Development of inactivated-local isolate vaccine for infectious bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darminto

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis (IB is an acute highly contagious viral respiratory disease of poultry caused by coronavirus. The disease causes high mortality in young chicks, reduce body weight gain in broilers and remarkable drop in egg production. IB can only be controlled by vaccination, but due to the antigenic variation among serotypes of IB viruses, the effective IB vaccine should be prepared from local isolates. The aim of this research is to develop inactivated IB vaccine derived from local IB isolates. Local isolates of IB viruses designated as I-37, I-269 and PTS-III were propagated respectively in specific pathogen free (SPF chicken eggs, the viruses then were inactivated by formaline at final concentration of 1:1,000. Subsequently, the inactivated viruses were mixed and emulsified in oil emulsion adjuvant with sorbitant mono-oleic as an emulsifier. The vaccine then was tested for its safety, potency and efficacy in broiler chickens. Birds inoculated twice with a two-week interval by inactivated vaccine did not show any adverse reaction, either systemic or local reaction. The inoculated birds developed antibody responses with high titre, while antibody of the control birds remain negative. In addition, efficacy test which was conducted in broilers demonstrated that birds vaccinated by live-commercial vaccine and boosted three weeks later by Balitvet inactivated vaccine showed high level of antibody production which provided high level of protection against challenged virus (76% against I-37, 92% against I-269 and 68% against PTS-III challenge viruses. From this study, it can be concluded that inactivated local IB vaccine is considered to be safe, potent and efficacious. The vaccine stimulates high titre of antibody responses, which provide high level of protection against challenged viruses.

  18. Evaluation of viral clearance in the production of HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles purified from insect cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hye-Sung; Shin, Jin-Ho; Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Young-Lim; Bae, Jei-Jun; Kim, Byoung-Guk; Ryu, Seung-Rel; Kim, Soon-Nam; Min, Hong-Ki; Kim, Hong-Jin; Park, Sue-Nie

    2006-12-01

    Biopharmaceutical products produced from cell cultures have a potential for viral contamination from cell sources or from adventitious introduction during production. The objective of this study was to assess viral clearance in the production of insect cell-derived recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 type L1 virus-like particles (VLPs). We selected Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and minute virus of mice (MVM) as relevant viruses to achieve the aim of this study. A downstream process for the production of purified HPV-16 L1 VLPs consisted of detergent lysis of harvested cells, sonication, sucrose cushion centrifugation, and cesium chloride (CsCl) equilibrium density centrifugation. The capacity of each purification/treatment step to clear viruses was expressed as reduction factor by measuring the difference in log virus infectivity of sample pools before and after each process. As a result, detergent treatment (0.5% v/v, Nonidet P-40/phosphate-buffered saline) was effective for inactivating enveloped viruses such as JEV and BVDV, but no significant reduction ( or = 4.40 log(10) reductions). Given the study conditions we used, overall cumulative reduction factors for clearance of JEV, BVDV, and MVM were > or = 10.50, > or = 9.20, and > or = 6.40 log(10) in 150 ml of starting cell cultures, respectively.

  19. Lymphocyte activation by purified HLA-DR molecules fused into autochthonous "stimulating cells".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Abikar, K; Rode, H N; Gordon, J

    1985-08-01

    Affinity-purified Ia molecules derived from the Daudi cell line were reconstituted into vesicles with Sendai virus envelope glycoproteins. These vesicles inserted into human peripheral leukocytes could induce stimulation of autologous lymphocytes, as measured by thymidine uptake, 6 days later. It is suggested that this method could provide a means to study allostimulation at the molecular level.

  20. Specific activity and isotope abundances of strontium in purified strontium-82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, J. M.; Medvedev, D. G.; Mausner, L. F.

    2015-11-12

    A linear accelerator was used to irradiate a rubidium chloride target with protons to produce strontium-82 (Sr-82), and the Sr-82 was purified by ion exchange chromatography. The amount of strontium associated with the purified Sr-82 was determined by either: ICP-OES or method B which consisted of a summation of strontium quantified by gamma spectroscopy and ICP-MS. The summation method agreed within 10% to the ICP-OES for the total mass of strontium and the subsequent specific activities were determined to be 0.25–0.52 TBq mg-1. Method B was used to determine the isotope abundances by weight% of the purified Sr-82, and the abundances were: Sr-82 (10–20.7%), Sr-83 (0–0.05%), Sr-84 (35–48.5%), Sr-85 (16–25%), Sr-86 (12.5–23%), Sr-87 (0%), and Sr-88 (0–10%). The purified strontium contained mass amounts of Sr-82, Sr-84, Sr-85, Sr-86, and Sr-88 in abundances not associated with natural abundance, and 90% of the strontium was produced by the proton irradiation. A comparison of ICP-OES and method B for the analysis of Sr-82 indicated analysis by ICP-OES would be easier to determine total mass of strontium and comply with regulatory requirements. An ICP-OES analytical method for Sr-82 analysis was established and validated according to regulatory guidelines.

  1. Using Air-Purifying Respirators. Module 9. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on using air-purifying respirators. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) describing how air flows through an…

  2. Adsorptive Separation and Recovery of Organic Compounds from Purified Terephthalic Acid Plant Effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachane, P.K.; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Pangarkar, V.G.

    2003-01-01

    Several organic impurities formed in the p-xylene oxidation process for manufacture of terephthalic acid are carried into the aqueous effluent from the crystallization section of PTA plant of crystallizers for purified terephthalic acid (PTA). These compounds impose a burden on the effluent treatmen

  3. Characterization of partially purified milk-clotting enzyme from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Assia I A M; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Hamid, Omer I A

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to extract milk-clotting enzyme from sunflower seeds and to determine its potentiality for manufacturing white soft cheese from cows and goats milk. The seeds were blended and extracted using two types of buffers and milk-clotting and proteolytic activities were evaluated. The enzyme was partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation techniques. Results indicated that sunflower seeds extracted with 5% NaCl in 50 mmol/L acetate buffer, pH 5.0, had the highest milk-clotting activity (MCA) and lowest coagulation time compared to that extracted with only acetate buffer (pH 5.0). Ammonium sulfate at 30-50% saturation purified the enzyme to 4.3 folds with MCA of 241.0 U/mL and final enzyme yield of 10.9%. The partially purified enzyme was characterized by SDS-PAGE that showed two bands with molecular weight of 120 and 62 kDa. When compared with other plant enzymes, the partially purified sunflower enzyme was found to have higher milk-clotting activity and lower proteolytic activity. Also, both milk sources and enzyme types significantly affected the cheese yield and curd formation time. The cheese made from cow milk using sunflower enzyme had higher yield compared to that obtained using commercial rennet, whereas the opposite was observed when using goat milk.

  4. 76 FR 27663 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ..., Netherlands and Sweden Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five-year... purified carboxymethylcellulose from Mexico and Sweden would not be likely to lead to continuation or... subject imports from Finland, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Sweden would not be likely to lead...

  5. Lymphocyte response to purified Plasmodium falciparum antigens during and after malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Jepsen, S; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocyte response to affinity purified soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens from in vitro cultures was studied in seven patients with acute falciparum malaria, on eight occasions, and in 15 persons having had malaria, at various times post infection, on 24 occasions. During...

  6. Effect of streamer plasma air purifier on sbs symptoms and performance of office work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.J.; Fang, Lei; Wargocki, Pawel;

    2011-01-01

    level of air pollution. Intensity of SBS symptoms were indicated using visual-analogue scales. Subjects’ performance was evaluated with several computer tasks. The results show that operation of the air purifiers improved perceived air quality and reduced the odor intensity of indoor air. Eye dryness...

  7. Extraction and characterization of highly purified collagen from bovine pericardium for potential bioengineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Helena; Silva, Rafael M; Dumont, Vitor C; Neves, Juliana S; Mansur, Herman S; Heneine, Luiz Guilherme D

    2013-03-01

    Bovine pericardium is widely used as a raw material in bioengineering as a source of collagen, a fundamental structural molecule. The physical, chemical, and biocompatibility characteristics of these natural fibers enable their broad use in several areas of the health sciences. For these applications, it is important to obtain collagen of the highest possible purity. The lack of a method to produce these pure biocompatible materials using simple and economically feasible techniques presents a major challenge to their production on an industrial scale. This study aimed to extract, purify, and characterize the type I collagen protein originating from bovine pericardium, considered to be an abundant tissue resource. The pericardium tissue was collected from male animals at slaughter age. Pieces of bovine pericardium were enzymatically digested, followed by a novel protocol developed for protein purification using ion-exchange chromatography. The material was extensively characterized by electrophoresis, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed a purified material with morphological properties and chemical functionalities compatible with type I collagen and similar to a highly purified commercial collagen. Thus, an innovative and relatively simple processing method was developed to extract and purify type I collagen from bovine tissue with potential applications as a biomaterial for regenerative tissue engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ni2+-PAA Adsorbent for Purifying 6His-OmpTS Recombinant Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Functional Ni2+-polyacrylic acid (Ni2+-PAA) adsorbent has been prepared for metal chelate affinity chromatography. DNA elements coding for adjacent histidines were fused to the Aeromonas hydrophila ompTS gene. Subsequent expression in E. coli resulted in the production of hybrid protein 6His-OmpTS that could be purified by Ni2+-PAA affinity chromatography.

  9. [Serodiagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni using an egg extract semi-purified by precipitation with ammonium sulfate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, S A; Sauneron, M F; Tribouley-Duret, J; Tribouley, J

    1986-01-01

    Fifty one sera from bilharziosis patients and thirty control sera were examined with a Schistosoma mansoni egg antigen purified by precipitation with ammonium sulphate at 50% saturation. Sensitivity and specificity were good and showed a good correlation with results obtained by MSA1 antigen, but antigen tested is far more easier to prepare than MSA1.

  10. Biological properties of purified recombinant HCV particles with an epitope-tagged envelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hitoshi; Akazawa, Daisuke [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Toray Industries, Inc., Kanagawa (Japan); Kato, Takanobu; Date, Tomoko [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Shirakura, Masayuki [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Toray Industries, Inc., Kanagawa (Japan); Nakamura, Noriko; Mochizuki, Hidenori [Toray Industries, Inc., Kanagawa (Japan); Tanaka-Kaneko, Keiko; Sata, Tetsutaro [Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuhito [Department of Clinical Molecular Informative Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Mizokami, Masashi [Research Center for Hepatitis and Immunology, Kohnodai Hospital, International Medical Center of Japan, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Tetsuro [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Wakita, Takaji, E-mail: wakita@nih.go.jp [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-05-14

    To establish a simple system for purification of recombinant infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles, we designed a chimeric J6/JFH-1 virus with a FLAG (FL)-epitope-tagged sequence at the N-terminal region of the E2 hypervariable region-1 (HVR1) gene (J6/JFH-1/1FL). We found that introduction of an adaptive mutation at the potential N-glycosylation site (E2N151K) leads to efficient production of the chimeric virus. This finding suggests the involvement of glycosylation at Asn within the envelope protein(s) in HCV morphogenesis. To further analyze the biological properties of the purified recombinant HCV particles, we developed a strategy for large-scale production and purification of recombinant J6/JFH-1/1FL/E2N151K. Infectious particles were purified from the culture medium of J6/JFH-1/1FL/E2N151K-infected Huh-7 cells using anti-FLAG affinity chromatography in combination with ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy of the purified particles using negative staining showed spherical particle structures with a diameter of 40-60 nm and spike-like projections. Purified HCV particle-immunization induced both an anti-E2 and an anti-FLAG antibody response in immunized mice. This strategy may contribute to future detailed analysis of HCV particle structure and to HCV vaccine development.

  11. Adsorptive Separation and Recovery of Organic Compounds from Purified Terephthalic Acid Plant Effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachane, P.K.; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Pangarkar, V.G.

    2003-01-01

    Several organic impurities formed in the p-xylene oxidation process for manufacture of terephthalic acid are carried into the aqueous effluent from the crystallization section of PTA plant of crystallizers for purified terephthalic acid (PTA). These compounds impose a burden on the effluent treatmen

  12. A Method for Purifying Obligate Intracellular Coxiella burnetii that Employs Digitonin Lysis of Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Diane C.; Beare, Paul A.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Howe, Dale; Heinzen, Robert. A.

    2008-01-01

    Purification of the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii requires physical disruption of infected cells. Here we describe a gentle and safe digitonin lysis procedure to release C. burnetii from infected cells. The purity, yield, and infectivity of digitonin-prepped organisms are comparable to that of organisms purified using cell lysis by sonication. PMID:18242746

  13. The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on indoor air quality quantified using different measuring methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolarik, Barbara [Technical University of Denmark, International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Danish Building Research Institute (SBi), Department of Construction and Health, Dr Neergaards Vej 15, 2970 Hoersholm (Denmark); Wargocki, Pawel [Technical University of Denmark, International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Skorek-Osikowska, Anna [Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Wisthaler, Armin [Institute of Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    The effect on indoor air quality of an air purifier based on photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) was determined by different measuring techniques: sensory assessments of air quality made by human subjects, Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and chromatographic methods (Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography with UV detection). The experiment was conducted in a simulated office, ventilated with 0.6 h{sup -1}, 2.5 h{sup -1} and 6 h{sup -1}, in the presence of additional pollution sources (carpet, chipboard and linoleum). At the lowest air change rate, additional measurements were made with no pollution sources present in the office. All conditions were tested with the photocatalytic air purifier turned on and off. The results show that operation of the air purifier in the presence of pollutants emitted by building materials and furniture improves indoor air quality, as documented by sensory assessments made by human subjects. It also reduces concentrations of many chemical compounds present in the air as documented by the PTR-MS technique. For the lowest ventilation, results from measurements using the chromatographic methods have similar tendency, however many of the 50 compounds that were targeted for analysis were not detected at all, independent of whether the purifier was on or off. For the two conditions with higher ventilation the results were inconclusive. (author)

  14. Genetic analysis of Mycobacterium avium complex strains used for producing purified protein derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semret, M.; Bakker, D.; Smart, N.; Olsen, I.; Haslov, K.; Behr, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    For over a century, purified protein derivatives (PPD) have been used to detect mycobacterial infections in humans and livestock. Among these, reagents to detect infections by Mycobacterium avium complex organisms have been produced, but the utility of these reagents has not been clearly established

  15. Protease Activities of Semi-purified Pseudomonas fluorescensin Protein Degradation of Pasteurized Milk at Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatik Khusniati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein on stored milks spoiled due to protease activities of Pseudomonas fluorescens. To know protease effect on milks, protease activities of semi-purified P. fluorescens on protein degradation in stored pasteurized milks were detected. Protease was semi-purified by ethanol 70%. Protease activities were detected by modified Lowry method, protein degradation by formol titration, and protein content by Kjeldahl method. Milk storage' times were conducted on 0 day (4 days before expired date up to 12 days (8 days after expired date. The results show that the longer the storage times the higher protease activities and protein degradation of milks. At storage 12 days, protease activities on control were 0.2556 Unit/mL (skim and 0.2116 Unit/mL (whole, and on inoculated milk (crude was 2.2044 Unit/mL (skim and 1.5378 Unit/mL (whole; while on inoculated milk (semi-purified was 3.5355 Unit/mL (skim and 1.6778 Unit/mL (whole, respectively. The decrease of inoculated milk' homogeneous were faster than that of control. Protein degradation on control, inoculated skim milks (crude and semi-purified on 12 days were 4.48%, 7.28% and 7.62%, while that on whole milks were 3.81%, 7.28% and 6.04%, respectively. Based on protease, protein degradation and homogeneous, it can be concluded that skim milk spoiled faster than whole milk.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of crude and semi-purified fractions of Warburgia ugandensis against some pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yibeltal Merawie; Samuel Sahile; Feleke Moges; Azamal Husen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate in vitro antimicrobial activities of leaves and heartwood crude and semi-purified fractions of Warburgia ugandensis (Canellaceae) (W. ugandensis) on some pathogens.Methods:were prepared. Six bacteria [Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), Escherichia coli (E. coli),Pseudomonas aeruginosa Crude and semi-purified fractions of the leaves and heartwood of W. ugandensis (P. aeruginosa), Shigella boydii (S. boydii), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus pneumonia] and one fungus (Candida albicans) were tested by agar well diffusion and broth dilution method to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Results: S. boydii and S. aureus were found to be the most susceptible bacterial isolated in agar well diffusion and broth dilution method of both the crude and petroleum ether extracts, while K. pneumoniae was the most resistant bacterium isolated under the same condition except in chloroform fraction. K. pneumoniae had shown MIC value of 10 mg/mL in the leaves and heartwood in both the crude and petroleum ether extract. S. boydii and S. aureus had shown the MIC value of 1.0 mg/mL in the crude extract for the both leaves and heartwood; Whereas the petroleum ether semi-purified fraction had shown 0.5 mg/mL in the heartwood. In the crude extract, E. coli and P. aeruginosa exhibits similar MIC value of 1.75 mg/mL. In semi purified petroleum ether extract, E. coli had MIC value of 1.0 mg/mL; Whereas P. aeruginosa had shown no change in crude extract. Candida albicans revealed equal MIC value of 1.0 mg/mL for the both crude and semi-purified fractions of the leaves and heartwood.Conclusions:The crude and semi-purified fractions of W. ugandensis have considerable effect on pathogens. Semi-purified petroleum ether fraction has better antimicrobial activity in both agar well diffusion and broth dilution method. This study further shows the potential of W.ugandensis for further study in order to be use as a modern drug.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of crude and semi-purified fractions of Warburgia ugandensis against some pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibeltal Merawie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate in vitro antimicrobial activities of leaves and heartwood crude and semi-purified fractions of Warburgia ugandensis (Canellaceae (W. ugandensis on some pathogens. Methods: Crude and semi-purified fractions of the leaves and heartwood of W. ugandensis were prepared. Six bacteria [Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae, Escherichia coli (E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa, Shigella boydii (S. boydii, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and Streptococcus pneumonia] and one fungus (Candida albicans were tested by agar well diffusion and broth dilution method to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Results: S. boydii and S. aureus were found to be the most susceptible bacterial isolated in agar well diffusion and broth dilution method of both the crude and petroleum ether extracts, while K. pneumoniae was the most resistant bacterium isolated under the same condition except in chloroform fraction. K. pneumoniae had shown MIC value of 10 mg/mL in the leaves and heartwood in both the crude and petroleum ether extract. S. boydii and S. aureus had shown the MIC value of 1.0 mg/mL in the crude extract for the both leaves and heartwood; Whereas the petroleum ether semi-purified fraction had shown 0.5 mg/mL in the heartwood. In the crude extract, E. coli and P. aeruginosa exhibits similar MIC value of 1.75 mg/mL. In semi purified petroleum ether extract, E. coli had MIC value of 1.0 mg/mL; Whereas P. aeruginosa had shown no change in crude extract. Candida albicans revealed equal MIC value of 1.0 mg/mL for the both crude and semi-purified fractions of the leaves and heartwood. Conclusions: The crude and semi-purified fractions of W. ugandensis have considerable effect on pathogens. Semi-purified petroleum ether fraction has better antimicrobial activity in both agar well diffusion and broth dilution method. This study further shows the potential of W. ugandensis for further study in order to be use as a modern

  18. Production of a Purified Marine Neurotoxin and Demonstration of its Binding Affinity to Ion Channel Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-10

    Saxitoxin Conotoxins 2 Batrachotoxin Persistent activation Veratrum alkaloids Grayanotoxins 3 a- scorpion toxins Inhibit inactivation sea anemone... toxins 4 b- scorpion toxins Shift activation 5 Brevetoxins Shift activation and Ciguatoxin Inhibit J.nactivation Baden 1989 5 The objectives of this study...includes 1) demonstration of dinoflagellate toxin binding to synaptosome ion ch nnels 2) investigation of the effects of maitotoxin on the binding of

  19. Oral administration of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis reduces the response of farmed red deer to avian and bovine tuberculin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Vladimir; González-Barrio, David; Lima-Barbero, José Francisco; Ortiz, José Antonio; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Garrido, Joseba M; Sevilla, Iker A; Alberdi, Pilar; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Orally delivered mycobacterial antigens may not sensitize the immunized animals causing a positive tuberculin skin test response. As the first step to address this critical issue, we characterized the response of farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus) to orally delivered heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis. Thirty-two adult red deer hinds from a farm known to be free of tuberculosis (TB) were randomly assigned to two different treatment groups, immunized (n=24) and control (n=8). Immunized hinds were dosed orally with 2 ml of PBS containing 6 × 10(6) heat-inactivated M. bovis. The mean skin test response of immunized deer to both avian purified protein derivative (aPPD) and bovine PPD (bPPD) was consistently lower in immunized than in control hinds. One year after immunization, immunized hinds had a significant reduction in the skin test response to aPPD and in the ELISA antibody levels against both aPPD and bPPD (24-36% reduction; P<0.05). By contrast, no significant change was observed in the skin test response to phytohaemagglutinin, or in the ELISA antibody levels against the M. bovis specific antigen MPB70. The mRNA levels for C3, IFN-γ and IL-1β and serum protein levels for IFN-γ and IL-1β did not vary between immunized and control deer. However, serum C3 protein levels were significantly higher (P=0.001) in immunized than in control deer six months after immunization. These results confirm that oral heat-inactivated M. bovis does not sensitize farmed red deer and therefore does not cause false-positive responses in the tuberculin skin test. The absence of sensitization in orally immunized deer opens the possibility of testing the vaccine in deer and possibly other ruminants without the risk of causing false-positive reactions in TB-tests. This study also provided the first evidence that orally-delivered inactivated mycobacterial antigens elicit some kind of immune response in a ruminant.

  20. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  1. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y S; Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate at neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants. PMID:2160222

  2. Modeling Radiation Effectiveness for Inactivation of Bacillus Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    EFFECTIVENESS FOR INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS SPORES Emily A. Knight, B.A., M.S. Major, USAF Committee Membership: Dr. William P. Baker Chair Dr. Larry W...linked to food poisoning and causes gastrointestinal diseases with symptoms ranging from mild nausea to frequent vomiting . However, as described above

  3. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by dense phase carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungmin; Jeong, Jin-Seong; Kim, Jaeeun; Lee, Youn-Woo; Yoon, Jeyong

    2009-01-01

    Dense phase carbon dioxide (DPCD) is one of the most promising techniques available to control microorganisms as a non-thermal disinfection method. However, no study on the efficiency of biofilm disinfection using DPCD has been reported. The efficiency of DPCD in inactivating Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm, which is known to have high antimicrobial resistance, was thus investigated. P. aeruginosa biofilm, which was not immersed in water but was completely wet, was found to be more effectively inactivated by DPCD treatment, achieving a 6-log reduction within 7 min. The inactivation efficiency increased modestly with increasing pressure and temperature. This study also reports that the water-unimmersed condition is one of the most important operating parameters in achieving efficient biofilm control by DPCD treatment. In addition, observations by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that DPCD treatment not only inactivated biofilm cells on the glass coupons but also caused detachment of the biofilm following weakening of its structure as a result of the DPCD treatment; this is an added benefit of DPCD treatment.

  4. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, G.A.; Kapila, S.; Kelkar, V.B.; Negi, S.; Modi, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The survival of certain bacterial cultures suspended in sewage sludge and exposed to gamma-radiation was studied. The inactivation patterns of most of the organisms were significantly different when irradiation was performed using sewage samples collected in the summer and monsoon seasons. The summer sample collected from the anaerobic digester afforded significant protection to both Gram negative and Gram positive organisms. This was evident by the increase in dose required to bring about a 6 log cycle reduction in viable count of the bacterial cultures, when suspended in sewage samples instead of phosphate buffer. The observations made using monsoon digester samples were quite different. This sewage sludge greatly enhanced inactivation by gamma-radiation in most cases. The effects of certain chemicals on the inactivation patterns of two organisms - Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexneri - were examined. Arsenate, mercury and lead salts sensitised S. typhi, while barium acetate and sodium sulphide protected this culture against gamma-radiation. In the case of Sh. flexneri, barium acetate and iodacetamide proved to be radioprotectors. The effects of some chemicals on the inactivation pattern of Sh. flexneri cells irradiated in sludge are also discussed.

  5. Inactivation of enveloped virus by laser-driven protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Chapa, Travis; Beatty, Wandy; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Yu, Dong; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-12-01

    Ultrafast lasers in the visible and near-infrared range have emerged as a potential new method for pathogen reduction of blood products and pharmaceuticals. However, the mechanism of enveloped virus inactivation by this method is unknown. We report the inactivation as well as the molecular and structural effects caused by visible (425 nm) femtosecond laser irradiation on murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), an enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus. Our results show that laser irradiation (1) caused a 5-log reduction in MCMV titer, (2) did not cause significant changes to the global structure of MCMV virions including membrane and capsid, as assessed by electron microscopy, (3) produced no evidence of double-strand breaks or crosslinking in MCMV genomic DNA, and (4) caused selective aggregation of viral capsid and tegument proteins. We propose a model in which ultrafast laser irradiation induces partial unfolding of viral proteins by disrupting hydrogen bonds and/or hydrophobic interactions, leading to aggregation of closely associated viral proteins and inactivation of the virus. These results provide new insight into the inactivation of enveloped viruses by visible femtosecond lasers at the molecular level, and help pave the way for the development of a new ultrafast laser technology for pathogen reduction.

  6. Detecting inactivated endospores in fluorescence microscopy using propidium monoazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Alexander; Mahnert, Alexander; Weber, Christina; Haberer, Klaus; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2012-04-01

    The differentiation between living and dead bacterial endospores is crucial in many research areas of microbiology. The identification of inactivated, non-pathogenic Bacillus anthracis spores is one reason why improvement of decontamination protocols is so desirable. Another field interested in spore viability is planetary protection, a sub-discipline of astrobiology that estimates the bioburden of spacecraft prior to launch in order to avoid interplanetary cross-contamination. We developed a dedicated, rapid and cost-effective method for identifying bacterial endospores that have been inactivated and consequently show a compromised spore wall. This novel protocol is culture-independent and is based on fluorescence microscopy and propidium monoazide (PMA) as a fluorescent marker, which is suggested to bind to DNA of spores with compromised spore coat, cortex and membranes based on our results. Inactivated preparations (treated with wet heat, irradiation, ultracentrifugation) showed a significant increase in spores that were PMA stained in their core; moreover, Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus safensis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus seemed to be best suited for this technique, as the spore cores of all these endospores could be positively stained after inactivation. Lastly, we describe an additional counter-staining protocol and provide an example of the application of the coupled staining methods for planetary protection purposes. The introduction of this novel protocol is expected to provide an initial insight into the various possible future applications of PMA as a non-viability marker for spores in, for example, B. anthracis-related studies, food microbiology and astrobiology.

  7. Inactivation of VHSV by Percolation and Salt Under Experimental Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Jørgensen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    At the moment the only legal method in Denmark to sanitize wastewater from fish cutting plants is by percolation. To evaluate the inactivation effect of percolation on VHSV an experimental examination was initiated. A column packed with gravel as top- and bottom layer (total of 22 cm) and a mid l...

  8. Structural mechanism of C-type inactivation in K+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, Luis G.; Jogini, Vishwanath; Cortes, D. Marien; Perozo, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Interconversion between conductive and non-conductive forms of the K+ channel selectivity filter underlies a variety of gating events, from flicker transitions (μs) to C-type inactivation (ms-s). Here, we report the crystal structure of the K+ channel KcsA in its Open-Inactivated conformation and investigate the mechanism of C-type inactivation gating at the selectivity filter from channels “trapped” in a series of partially open conformations. Five conformer classes were identified with openings ranging, from 12 Å in closed KcsA (Cα-Cα distances at T112) to 32 Å when fully open. They revealed a remarkable correlation between the degree of gate opening and the conformation and ion occupancy of the selectivity filter. We show that a gradual filter backbone reorientation leads first, to a loss of the S2 ion binding site and a subsequent loss of the S3 binding site, presumably abrogating ion conduction. These structures suggest a molecular basis for C-type inactivation in K+ channels. PMID:20613835

  9. Relationship between inactivation of p16 gene and gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Hai Zhao; Tie-Chen Li; Liang-Hui Shi; Ya-Bin Xia; Lin-Ming Lu; Wen-Bin Huang; Hui-Lan Sun; Yi-Sheng Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between inactivation of p16 gene and gastric carcinoma, and the mechanism of inactivation of p16 gene in gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: 40 fresh tumor tissue specimens were taken from primary gastric cancer patients. Expression of P16protein was detected by immunohistochemical method.Deletion and point mutation of p16 gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing,respectively.RESULTS: The frequency of loss of P16 protein expression in the gastric cancer tissue, adjacent nontumor tissue, and distal normal tissue was 77.5 %(31/40), 55.0 %(22/40),and 17.5 % (7/40), respectively (P<0.005). Homozygous deletion of exon 1 and exon 3 was observed in two and three cases, respectively, giving an overall frequency of homozygous deletion of 12.5 %. All five cases had diffuse type gastric carcinoma. No p16 gene point mutation was detected.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a close correlation between inactivation of p16 gene and gastric carcinoma.Further investigations are needed to testify the mechanism of inactivation of p16 gene in gastric carcinogenesis.

  10. Skewed X inactivation in Lesch-Nyhan disease carrier females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G

    2017-09-14

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) ratios of normal females can range from a highly skewed ratio of 0:100 to a 50:50 ratio. In several X-linked disorders, female carriers present skewed X inactivation. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency is an X-linked disorder. Males are affected and present with the complete Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) or with a partial phenotype (Lesch-Nyhan variant, LNV). Female carriers are usually asymptomatic. The aim of the present study was to analyze the XCI pattern of HPRT-deficiency carrier females. As a group, 75% of HPRT-deficiency carrier females presented skewed XCI. Moreover, skewed XCI is significantly more frequent in LND carriers (83%) than in LNV (0-50%, depending on the phenotype severity). The ratios of the preferentially inactivated allele of carrier females were significantly higher than the ratios of the preferentially inactivated allele of noncarrier females (89.4±15, n=52 vs 65.2±12, n=52; P<0.0001). For carrier diagnosis, the presence of skewed XCI presents a sensitivity of 75% with a specificity of 85%. In LND families, the presence of skewed XCI is more sensitive for carrier diagnosis than in LNV families; however, we believe that this test is not accurate for carrier diagnostic purposes.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 14 September 2017; doi:10.1038/jhg.2017.88.

  11. Pathogen inactivation in cellular blood products by photodynamic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trannoy, Laurence Liliane

    2010-01-01

    The safety of blood transfusion can be increased by introducing methods that eliminate blood-borne pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. In this thesis, the use of photodynamic treatment (PDT) to inactivate pathogens in cellular blood products is described. Various photosensitizers, from phenothia

  12. Inactivation and Removal of Free-Living Amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are ubiquitous protozoan that are predominantly harmless to humans. There are a few genera that cause disease in humans, Balamuthia, Naegleria, and Acanthamoeba. These organisms are not easily removed by physical means or inactivated by chemic...

  13. Capillary isoelectric focusing of native and inactivated microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horká, M; Kubícek, O; Růzicka, F; Holá, V; Malinovská, I; Slais, K

    2007-07-06

    The research of microorganisms includes the development of methods for the inactivation of viruses and other microbes. It also means to efficiently eliminate the infectivity of microorganisms without damage of their integrity and structure. According to the results of the last 5 years the capillary electromigration techniques appear to be very perspective for the comparison of the methods applicable for inactivation in the diagnostics and study of the pathogens. In this paper we suggest the capillary isoelectric focusing of the model microorganisms, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans and bacteriophage PhiX 174, native or inactivated by different procedures. UV detection and fluorometric detection for the dynamically modified microbes by pyrenebutanoate on the basis of the non-ionogenic tenside were used here. Isoelectric points of native and/or dynamically modified microorganisms and other properties were compared with those obtained after microorganisms inactivation. The segmental injection of the sample pulse enabled the reproducible and efficient capillary isoelectric focusing in different pH gradients. The low-molecular-weight pI markers were used for tracing of the pH gradient.

  14. Structural mechanism of C-type inactivation in K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, Luis G; Jogini, Vishwanath; Cortes, D Marien; Perozo, Eduardo

    2010-07-08

    Interconversion between conductive and non-conductive forms of the K(+) channel selectivity filter underlies a variety of gating events, from flicker transitions (at the microsecond timescale) to C-type inactivation (millisecond to second timescale). Here we report the crystal structure of the Streptomyces lividans K(+) channel KcsA in its open-inactivated conformation and investigate the mechanism of C-type inactivation gating at the selectivity filter from channels 'trapped' in a series of partially open conformations. Five conformer classes were identified with openings ranging from 12 A in closed KcsA (Calpha-Calpha distances at Thr 112) to 32 A when fully open. They revealed a remarkable correlation between the degree of gate opening and the conformation and ion occupancy of the selectivity filter. We show that a gradual filter backbone reorientation leads first to a loss of the S2 ion binding site and a subsequent loss of the S3 binding site, presumably abrogating ion conduction. These structures indicate a molecular basis for C-type inactivation in K(+) channels.

  15. Inactivation of Ascaris suum by short-chain fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaris suum eggs were inactivated in distilled water and digested sludge by butanoic, pentanoic and hexanoic acids. The fatty acids (FA) were only effective when protonated and at sufficient concentration. The conjugate bases were not effective at the concentrations evaluated. Predictions from an ...

  16. LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVIOLET STUDIES FOR INACTIVATION OF GIARDIA MURIS CYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysts of Giardia muris were inactivated using a low pressure ultravolet (UV) light source. Cyst viability was detemined by both in vitro excystation and animal infectivity. Cyst doeses were counted using a flow cytometer for the animal infectivity experiments. Using in vitro excy...

  17. LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVEIOLET STUDIES FOR INACTIVATION OF GIARDIA MURIS CYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysts of Giardia muris were inactivated using a low pressure ultravolet (UV) light source. Cyst viability was detemined by both in vitro excystation and animal infectivity. Cyst doeses were counted using a flow cytometer for the animal infectivity experiments. Using in vitro excy...

  18. X chromosome inactivation is initiated in human preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Ilse M; Laven, Joop S E; Stevens, Mary; Jonkers, Iris; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Gribnau, Joost; van Doorninck, J Hikke

    2009-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is the mammalian mechanism that compensates for the difference in gene dosage between XX females and XY males. Genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms induce transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome in female cells. In mouse embryos, XCI is initiated at the

  19. 40 CFR 141.720 - Inactivation toolbox components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, and virus treatment credits for ultraviolet (UV) light reactors by achieving the... unfiltered systems. UV Dose Table for Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, and Virus Inactivation Credit Log credit Cryptosporidium UV dose (mJ/cm2) Giardia lamblia UV dose (mJ/cm2) VirusUV dose (mJ/cm2) (i) 0.5 1...

  20. Drying of liquid food droplets. Enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerdink, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the drying of liquid food droplets is studied from three different points of view: drying kinetics, enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion. Mathematical models are developed and validated experimentally.Drying experiments are performed with suspended droplets and with free f

  1. Behavior modification after inactivation of cerebellar dentate nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Todd C; Villatoro, Lee; Arneson, Tom; Ahuja, Brittany; Voss, Stephanie; Swain, Rodney A

    2012-08-01

    Effort-based decision making occurs when subjects are given a choice between a reward available at a high response cost and a reward available at a low response cost and is altered in individuals with disorders such as autism or particular patterns of brain injury. The current study explored the relationship between effort-based decision making and reinforcement characteristics in the T maze. This was done using both normal animals and animals with bilateral inactivation of the cerebellar dentate nuclei. Rats chose between alternatives in which one arm contained high-density reinforcement (HR) and the other arm contained low-density reinforcement (LR). During training, the HR arm was obstructed and the point at which the animal no longer worked for reinforcement (breaking point) was determined. The cerebellar dentate nuclei were then transiently inactivated and once again breaking points were assessed. The results indicated that inactivation of the dentate nucleus disrupted effort-based decision making. Additionally, altering both the palatability and the magnitude of the reinforcement were assessed in an attempt to reestablish the original preinactivation breaking point. It was hypothesized that an increase in the strength or magnitude of the reinforcement would promote an increase in the breaking point of the animal even when the cerebellum was inactivated. The results indicated that with both strategies animals effectively reestablished original breaking points. The results of this study will inform the current literature regarding the modification of behavior after brain injury and further the understanding of the behavioral deficits associated with cerebellar dysfunction.

  2. Inactivation of Chironomid Larvae with Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xin-bin; CUI Fu-yi

    2008-01-01

    Chironomid larvae propagate prolifically in eutrophic water body and they cannot be exterminated by conventional disinfection process.The inactivation effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on Chironomid larvae were investigated and some boundary values in practice were determined under conditions of various oxidant dosage,organic precursor concentration and pH value.In addition,removal effect of differmt pre-oxidation combined with coagulation process on Chironomid larvae in law water was evaluated.It was found that chlorine dioxide possessed better inactivation effect than chlorine.Complete inactivation of Chironomid larvae in raw water was resulted by 1.5mg/L of chlorine dioxide with 30min of contact time. Additionally,the ocgallic precursor concentration,pH value had little influence on the inactivation effect.The coagulation jar test showed that Chironomid larvae in the raw water could be completely ronxwed by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation in combination with the omgulation process at chlorine dioxide dosage of 0.8 mg/L.

  3. Delipidation of a hepadnavirus: Viral inactivation and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cham, B E; Vickery, K; Tohidi-Esfahani, R; Cossart, Y

    2006-10-01

    Many viruses including HIV, hepatitis C and hepatitis B, have an outer lipid envelope which maintains inserted viral peptides in the "correct" functional conformation and orientation. Disruption of the lipid envelope by most solvents destroys infectivity and often results in a loss of antigenicity. This communication outlines a novel approach to viral inactivation by specific solvent delipidation which modifies the whole virion rendering it non-infective, but antigenic. Duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) was delipidated using a diisopropylether (DIPE) and butanol mixture and residual infectivity tested by inoculation into day-old ducks. Delipidation completely inactivated the DHBV (p vaccinate ducks. Three doses of delipidated DHBV induced anti-DHBs antibody production and prevented high dose challenge infection in five out of six ducks. In comparison, five of six ducks vaccinated with undelipidated DHBV and four of four ducks vaccinated with glutaraldehyde inactivated DHBV were unprotected (p inactivated DHBV, viral antigens were retained in an appropriate form to induce immunity. Delipidation of enveloped viruses with specific organic solvents has potential as the basis for development of vaccines.

  4. Inactivation of dairy manure-borne pathogens by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Anaerobic digestion of animal manure has the potential to inactivate enteric pathogens, thereby reducing exposures to livestock and humans when the products of digestion are disposed by land-spreading or irrigation or returned to livestock uses such as bedding. Data on digester effectiv...

  5. Microwave inactivation of Escherichia coli in healthcare waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonuci, L R S; Paschoalatto, C F P R; Pisani, R

    2008-01-01

    Public healthcare wastes from the city of Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil, pre-sterilised in an autoclave, were inoculated with 5 x 10(5) microorganisms of the species Escherichia coli in vegetative form for microwave processing on a laboratory scale. An analysis was made of the influence of radiation exposure time (15, 25, 30 and 40 min) and power per waste mass unit (60, 80 and 100 W/kg) on the percentage of inactivation of the microorganisms at an incoming waste moisture level of 50%. The experimental results were adjusted based on Chick's law. The activation energies and the Arrhenius pre-exponential factors were determined by the least squares method. The kinetic parameters obtained allow one to predict the degree of inactivation achieved with E. coli in typical healthcare waste, based on the radiation exposure time and temperature. For example, the waste disinfection time required for the inactivation level equivalent to 4Log 10 was estimated to range from 48 to 53 min for wastes processed at 100 W/kg and at temperatures of 90-105 degrees C, respectively. Thus, under the operational conditions of the equipment currently used in Ribeirão Preto, the process of inactivation is probably ineffective, since the exposure time to radiation is only 30 min at the average power of approximately 80 W/kg.

  6. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.html CDC review information for Inactivated Influenza VIS: ...

  7. Optimization of ohmic heating applications for pectin methylesterase inactivation in orange juice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Demirdöven, Aslıhan; Baysal, Taner

    Ohmic heating (OH) which is among to electro-thermal methods and helps to inactivate microorganisms and enzymes was used in this study as thermal treatment on orange juice production for pectin methylesterase (PME) inactivation...

  8. Ecology and thermal inactivation of microbes in and on interplanetary space vehicle components. [bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, A. L.; Campbell, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Almost 600 articles and books published since 1960 about microbial and viral inactivation are listed. This bibliography is presented to facilitate literature reviews on chemical, heat, and radiation inactivation of microorganisms and viral particles.

  9. Status of the database on microorganism inactivation in environmental media (DIMEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms is the essential component of their environmental fate which needs to be considered in environmental microbiology models. Existing data from a large number of inactivation experiments are dispersed across numerous publications with varying avai...

  10. X inactivation in Rett syndrome: A preliminary study showing partial preferential inactivation of paternal X with the M27{beta} probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, P.; Abbadi, N.; Gilgenkrantz, S. [Laboratoire de Genetique, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    1994-04-15

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a severe progressive neurological disorder occurring exclusively in females. Most cases are sporadic. The few familial cases (less than 1%) cannot be explained by a simple mode of inheritance. Several hypotheses have been proposed: X-linked male lethal mutation, maternal uniparental disomy, fresh mutation on the X chromosome, involvement of mitochondrial DNA and differential inactivation with metabolic interference of X-borne alleles. The authors have examined the pattern of X inactivation in 10 affected girls who were selected according to the clinical criteria previously described and accepted by the French Rett Scientific Committee. The X inactivation pattern was studied by analysis of methylation at the hypervariable locus DXS255 with the M27{beta} probe. The results show a more-or-less skewed inactivation of paternal X in 8 Rett females, and 2 cases of symmetrical inactivation. In control girls, inactivation was symmetrical cases and the maternal X has been preferentially inactivated in the other 2 cases. In no case was a total skewed inactivation observed. Though there was clear evidence for a preferential paternal X inactivation that was statistically significant further studies are necessary to establish a relationship between X inactivation pattern and Rett syndrome.

  11. Autologous aldrithiol-2-inactivated HIV-1 combined with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-poly-L-lysine carboxymethylcellulose as a vaccine platform for therapeutic dendritic cell immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth; Spadaccia, Meredith; Sabado, Rachel; Chertova, Elena; Bess, Julian; Trubey, Charles Mac; Holman, Rose Marie; Salazar, Andres; Lifson, Jeffrey; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2015-01-03

    Therapeutic interventions for HIV-1 that successfully augment adaptive immunity to promote killing of infected cells may be a requisite component of strategies to reduce latent cellular reservoirs. Adoptive immunotherapies utilizing autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that have been activated and antigen loaded ex vivo may serve to circumvent defects in DC function that are present during HIV infection in order to enhance adaptive immune responses. Here we detail the clinical preparation of DCs loaded with autologous aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-inactivated HIV that have been potently activated with the viral mimic, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-poly-l-lysine carboxymethylcellulose (Poly-ICLC). HIV is first propagated from CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected donors and then rendered non-replicative by chemical inactivation with aldrithiol-2 (AT-2), purified, and quantified. Viral inactivation is confirmed through measurement of Tat-regulated β-galactosidase reporter gene expression following infection of TZM-bl cells. In-process testing for sterility, mycoplasma, LPS, adventitious agents, and removal of AT-2 is performed on viral preparations. Autologous DCs are generated and pulsed with autologous AT-2-inactivated virus and simultaneously stimulated with Poly-ICLC to constitute the final DC vaccine product. Phenotypic identity, maturation, and induction of HIV-specific adaptive immune responses are confirmed via flow cytometric analysis of DCs and cocultured autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Lot release criteria for the DC vaccine have been defined in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) guidelines. The demonstrated feasibility of this approach has resulted in approval by the FDA for investigational use in antiretroviral (ART) suppressed individuals. We discuss how this optimized DC formulation may enhance the quality of anti-HIV adaptive responses beyond what has been previously observed during DC immunotherapy trials for HIV infection.

  12. Autologous Aldrithiol-2-Inactivated HIV-1 Combined with Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid–poly-L-lysine carboxymethylcellulose as a Vaccine Platform for Therapeutic Dendritic Cell Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILLER, Elizabeth; SPADACCIA, Meredith; SABADO, Rachel; CHERTOVA, Elena; BESS, Julian; Mac TRUBEY, Charles; HOLMAN, Rose Marie; SALAZAR, Andres; LIFSON, Jeffrey; BHARDWAJ, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions for HIV-1 that successfully augment adaptive immunity to promote killing of infected cells may be a requisite component of strategies to reduce latent cellular reservoirs. Adoptive immunotherapies utilizing autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that have been activated and antigen loaded ex vivo may serve to circumvent defects in DC function that are present during HIV infection in order to enhance adaptive immune responses. Here we detail the clinical preparation of DCs loaded with autologous Aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-inactivated HIV that have been potently activated with the viral mimic, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid–poly-L-lysine carboxymethylcellulose (Poly-ICLC). HIV is first propagated from CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected donors and then rendered non-replicative by chemical inactivation with aldrithiol-2 (AT-2), purified, and quantified. Viral inactivation is confirmed through measurement of Tat-regulated β-galactosidase reporter gene expression following infection of TZM-bl cells. In-process testing for sterility, mycoplasma, LPS, adventitious agents, and removal of AT-2 is performed on viral preparations. Autologous DCs are generated and pulsed with autologous AT-2-inactivated virus and simultaneously stimulated with Poly-ICLC to constitute the final DC vaccine product. Phenotypic identity, maturation, and induction of HIV-specific adaptive immune responses are confirmed via flow cytometric analysis of DCs and cocultured autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Lot release criteria for the DC vaccine have been defined in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) guidelines. The demonstrated feasibility of this approach has resulted in approval by the FDA for investigational use in antiretroviral (ART) suppressed individuals. We discuss how this optimized DC formulation may enhance the quality of anti-HIV adaptive responses beyond what has been previously observed during DC immunotherapy trials for HIV infection. PMID

  13. Inactivation of RNA Viruses by Gamma Irradiation: A Study on Mitigating Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Effective inactivation of biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogens is vital in order to study these agents safely. Gamma irradiation is a commonly used method for the inactivation of BSL-4 viruses, which among other advantages, facilitates the study of inactivated yet morphologically intact virions. The reported values for susceptibility of viruses to inactivation by gamma irradiation are sometimes inconsistent, likely due to differences in experimental protocols. We analyzed the effects of common...

  14. Studies on the inactivation of human parvovirus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Sally A; Tuke, Philip W; Miyagawa, Eiji; Blümel, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is a novel parvovirus, which like parvovirus B19 (B19V) can be a contaminant of plasma pools used to prepare plasma-derived medicinal products. Inactivation studies of B19V have shown that it is more sensitive to virus inactivation strategies than animal parvoviruses. However, inactivation of PARV4 has not yet been specifically addressed. Treatment of parvoviruses by heat or low-pH conditions causes externalization of the virus genome. Using nuclease treatment combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, the extent of virus DNA externalization was used as an indirect measure of the inactivation of PARV4, B19V, and minute virus of mice (MVM) by pasteurization of albumin and by low-pH treatment. Infectivity studies were performed in parallel for B19V and MVM. PARV4 showed greater resistance to pasteurization and low-pH treatment than B19V, although PARV4 was not as resistant as MVM. There was a 2- to 3-log reduction of encapsidated PARV4 DNA after pasteurization and low-pH treatment. In contrast, B19V was effectively inactivated while MVM was stable under these conditions. Divalent cations were found to have a stabilizing effect on PARV4 capsids. In the absence of divalent cations, even at neutral pH, there was a reduction of PARV4 titer, an effect not observed for B19V or MVM. In the case of heat treatment and incubation at low pH, PARV4 shows intermediate resistance when compared to B19V and MVM. Divalent cations seem important for stabilizing PARV4 virus particles. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Inactivation Effect of Antibiotic-Resistant Gene Using Chlorine Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Furukawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the inactivation effects on the antibiotic-resistance gene (vanA of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE using chlorination, a disinfection method widely used in various water treatment facilities. Suspensions of VRE were prepared by adding VRE to phosphate-buffered saline, or the sterilized secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. The inactivation experiments were carried out at several chlorine concentrations and stirring time. Enterococci concentration and presence of vanA were determined. The enterococci concentration decreased as chlorine concentrations and stirring times increased, with more than 7.0 log reduction occurring under the following conditions: 40 min stirring at 0.5 mg Cl2/L, 20 min stirring at 1.0 mg Cl2/L, and 3 min stirring at 3.0 mg Cl2/L. In the inactivation experiment using VRE suspended in secondary effluent, the culturable enterococci required much higher chlorine concentration and longer treatment time for complete disinfection than the cases of suspension of VRE. However, vanA was detected in all chlorinated suspensions of VRE, even in samples where no enterococcal colonies were present on the medium agar plate. The chlorine disinfection was not able to destroy antibiotic-resistance genes, though it can inactivate and decrease bacterial counts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB. Therefore, it was suggested that remaining ARB and/or antibiotic-resistance gene in inactivated bacterial cells after chlorine disinfection tank could be discharged into water environments.

  16. Shear induced inactivation of a-amylase in a plain shear field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der M.E.; Iersel, van D.G.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed shearing device was used to study shear-induced inactivation of thermostable alpha-amylase in a plain shear field, under conditions comparable to extrusion. The results show that the inactivation can be described well with a first-order process, in which the inactivation energy lar

  17. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement C3b inactivator immunological test... Systems § 866.5260 Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group...

  18. Shear induced inactivation of a-amylase in a plain shear field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der M.E.; Iersel, van D.G.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed shearing device was used to study shear-induced inactivation of thermostable alpha-amylase in a plain shear field, under conditions comparable to extrusion. The results show that the inactivation can be described well with a first-order process, in which the inactivation energy

  19. The assessment of efficacy of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus inactivated vaccine based on the viral quantity and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Byeongchun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been many efforts to develop efficient vaccines for the control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. Although inactivated PRRSV vaccines are preferred for their safety, they are weak at inducing humoral immune responses and controlling field PRRSV infection, especially when heterologous viruses are involved. Results In all groups, the sample to positive (S/P ratio of IDEXX ELISA and the virus neutralization (VN titer remained negative until challenge. While viremia did not reduce in the vaccinated groups, the IDEXX-ELISA-specific immunoglobulin G increased more rapidly and to significantly greater levels 7 days after the challenge in all the vaccinated groups compared to the non-vaccinated groups (p 6 PFU/mL PRRSV vaccine-inoculated and binary ethylenimine (BEI-inactivated groups 22 days after challenge (p Conclusions The inactivated vaccine failed to show the humoral immunity, but it showed different immune response after the challenge compared to mock group. Although the 106 PFU/mL-vaccinated and BEI-inactivated groups showed significantly greater VN titers 22 days after challenge, all the groups were already negative for viremia.

  20. Inactivation of L. plantarum in a PEF microreactor The effect of pulse width and temperature on the inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.; Esveld, D.C.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Boom, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum by pulsed electric fields (PEF) in a microfluidic reactor. The microreactor has the specific advantage that the field intensity can be extremely high with accurate control and measurement of the pulse shape, combined with good

  1. Transient inactivation of myostatin induces muscle hypertrophy and overcompensatory growth in zebrafish via inactivation of the SMAD signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Pino, Katherine; Navarro, Cristina; Delgado, Iselys; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is the main negative regulator of muscle growth and development in vertebrates. In fish, little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind how MSTN inactivation triggers skeletal muscle enhancement, particularly regarding the signaling pathways involved in this process. Moreover, there have not been reports on the biotechnological applications of MSTN and its signal transduction. In this context, zebrafish underwent compensatory growth using fasting and refeeding trials, and MSTN activity was inactivated with dominant negative LAPD76A recombinant proteins during the refeeding period, when a rapid, compensatory muscle growth was observed. Treated fish displayed an overcompensation of growth characterized by higher muscle hypertrophy and growth performance than constantly fed, control fish. Treatment with LAPD76A recombinant proteins triggered inactivation of the SMAD signaling pathway in skeletal muscle, the main signal transduction used by MSTN to achieve its biological actions. Therefore, transient inactivation of MSTN during the compensatory growth of zebrafish led to a decrease in the SMAD signaling pathway in muscle, triggering muscle hypertrophy and finally improving growth performance, thus, zebrafish achieved an overcompensation of growth. The present study shows an attractive strategy for improving muscle growth in a fish species by mixing a classical strategy, such as compensatory growth, and a biotechnological approach, such as the use of recombinant proteins for inhibiting the biological actions of MSTN. The mix of both strategies may represent a method that could be applied in order to improve growth in commercial fish of interest for aquaculture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidative stress inactivates cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise R Hondorp

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In nature, Escherichia coli are exposed to harsh and non-ideal growth environments-nutrients may be limiting, and cells are often challenged by oxidative stress. For E. coli cells confronting these realities, there appears to be a link between oxidative stress, methionine availability, and the enzyme that catalyzes the final step of methionine biosynthesis, cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE. We found that E. coli cells subjected to transient oxidative stress during growth in minimal medium develop a methionine auxotrophy, which can be traced to an effect on MetE. Further experiments demonstrated that the purified enzyme is inactivated by oxidized glutathione (GSSG at a rate that correlates with protein oxidation. The unique site of oxidation was identified by selectively cleaving N-terminally to each reduced cysteine and analyzing the results by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Stoichiometric glutathionylation of MetE by GSSG occurs at cysteine 645, which is strategically located at the entrance to the active site. Direct evidence of MetE oxidation in vivo was obtained from thiol-trapping experiments in two different E. coli strains that contain highly oxidizing cytoplasmic environments. Moreover, MetE is completely oxidized in wild-type E. coli treated with the thiol-oxidizing agent diamide; reduced enzyme reappears just prior to the cells resuming normal growth. We argue that for E. coli experiencing oxidizing conditions in minimal medium, MetE is readily inactivated, resulting in cellular methionine limitation. Glutathionylation of the protein provides a strategy to modulate in vivo activity of the enzyme while protecting the active site from further damage, in an easily reversible manner. While glutathionylation of proteins is a fairly common mode of redox regulation in eukaryotes, very few proteins in E. coli are known to be modified in this manner. Our results are complementary to the independent findings of Leichert

  3. Purifying selection in mitochondria, free-living and obligate intracellular proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popadin Konstantin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of elimination of slightly deleterious mutations depends mainly on drift and recombination frequency. Here we analyze the influence of these two factors on the strength of the purifying selection in mitochondrial and proteobacterial orthologous genes taking into account the differences in the organism lifestyles. Results (I We found that the probability of fixation of nonsynonymous substitutions (Kn/Ks in mitochondria is significantly lower compared to obligate intracellular bacteria and even marginally significantly lower compared to free-living bacteria. The comparison of bacteria of different lifestyles demonstrates more effective elimination of slightly deleterious mutations in (II free-living bacteria as compared to obligate intracellular species and in (III obligate intracellular parasites as compared to obligate intracellular symbionts. (IV Finally, we observed that the level of the purifying selection (i.e. 1-Kn/Ks increases with the density of mobile elements in bacterial genomes. Conclusion This study shows that the comparison of patterns of molecular evolution of orthologous genes between ecologically different groups of organisms allow to elucidate the genetic consequences of their various lifestyles. Comparing the strength of the purifying selection among proteobacteria with different lifestyles we obtained results, which are in concordance with theoretical expectations: (II low effective population size and level of recombination in obligate intracellular proteobacteria lead to less effective elimination of mutations compared to free-living relatives; (III rare horizontal transmissions, i.e. effectively zero recombination level in symbiotic obligate intracellular bacteria leads to less effective purifying selection than in parasitic obligate intracellular bacteria; (IV the increased frequency of recombination in bacterial genomes with high mobile element density leads to a more effective

  4. Biological and Histological Studies of Purified Product from Streptomyces janthinus M7 Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik Zahira S.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen clinical samples were taken out from patients suffering cancer, these patients being under the treatment with radio- and/or chemotherapy. The samples were used for the isolation of bacterial cells surrounding tumor; the samples were collected from Center of Cancer Therapy, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. The clinical bacterial isolates were purified and identified according to Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology ninth edition (1994. The bacterial isolates were found to be Klebsiella oxytoca m1; Enterobacter cancerogenus m2; P. aeruginosa m3; Citrobacter diversus m4; Enterobacter agglomerans m5; Klebsiella oxytoca m6; Enterobacter dissolvens m7; Serratia fonticola m8; Escherichia coli m9; Citrobacter freundii m10; Staphylococcus aureus m11; Escherichia coli m12; P. aeruginosa m13; Staphylococcus aureus m14; and Bacillus cereus m15. In the present study both primary and secondary screening methods were used to screen the antibacterial activity of St. janthinus M7 against fifteen clinical bacterial isolates. The St. janthinus M7 showed an increase in antibacterial activity against all the tested human bacterial pathogens. In this study Gamma irradiation at dose levels (0.5 and 1.5 kGy was used for the enhancement of the antibacterial activity of Streptomyces strain against the clinical isolates. Several commercial antibiotic discs (Doxorubicin, Augmentin, Norfloxacin, Ofloxacin, Oxacillin, and Cefazolin were used for comparing their antimicrobial activity with purified product. The results declared a significant increase in the antibacterial activity in most cases. The physiochemical properties of the purified product were carried out for determination of Rf, empirical formula, M.W, and chemical structure of product and then analyzed by thin layer chromatography, elemental analysis, UV, Mass, and NMR. The result exhibited brown color, one spot, Rf (0.76, M.W (473, while it recorded 270 nm in UV region and the calculated

  5. A cross-species comparison of escape from X inactivation in Eutheria: implications for evolution of X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nadaf, Shafagh; Deakin, Janine E; Gilbert, Clément; Robinson, Terence J; Graves, Jennifer A M; Waters, Paul D

    2012-02-01

    Sex chromosome dosage compensation in both eutherian and marsupial mammals is achieved by X chromosome inactivation (XCI)--transcriptional repression that silences one of the two X chromosomes in the somatic cells of females. We recently used RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to show, in individual nuclei, that marsupial X inactivation (in the absence of XIST) occurs on a gene-by-gene basis, and that escape from inactivation is stochastic and independent of gene location. In the absence of similar data from fibroblast cell lines of eutherian representatives, a meaningful comparison is lacking. We therefore used RNA-FISH to examine XCI in fibroblast cell lines obtained from three distantly related eutherian model species: African savannah elephant (Loxodonta africana), mouse (Mus musculus) and human (Homo sapiens). We show that, unlike the orthologous marsupial X, inactivation of the X conserved region (XCR) in eutherians generally is complete. Two-colour RNA-FISH on female human, mouse and elephant interphase nuclei showed that XCR loci have monoallelic expression in almost all nuclei. However, we found that many loci located in the evolutionarily distinct recently added region (XAR) displayed reproducible locus-specific frequencies of nuclei with either one or two active X alleles. We propose that marsupial XCI retains features of an ancient incomplete silencing mechanism that was augmented by the evolution of the XIST gene that progressively stabilized the eutherian XCR. In contrast, the recently added region of the eutherian X displays an incomplete inactivation profile similar to that observed on the evolutionarily distinct marsupial X and the independently evolved monotreme X chromosomes.

  6. Hypoglycemic effect of cooked Lupinus mutabilis and its purified alkaloids in subjects with type-2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldeón, M E; Castro, J; Villacrés, E; Narváez, L; Fornasini, M

    2012-01-01

    Developing countries are experiencing an epidemic of chronic non-communicable chronic diseases with high socio-economic costs. Studies of traditional foods with beneficial health properties could contribute to diminish these problems. Legumes rich in proteins like Lupinus mutabilis decreases blood glucose and improves insulin sensitivity in animals and humans. We report the results of a phase II clinical trial conducted to assess the role of cooked L. mutabilis and its purified alkaloids on blood glucose and insulin in volunteers with diabetes. Results indicate that consumption of cooked L. mutabilis or its purified alkaloids decreased blood glucose and insulin levels. The decreases in serum glucose concentrations from base line to 90 minutes were statistically significant within both treatment groups; however, there were not differences between groups. Serum insulin levels were also decreased in both groups however the differences were not statistically significant. None of the volunteers in either group presented side effects.

  7. Determining inhibition effects of some aromatic compounds on peroxidase enzyme purified from white and red cabbage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öztekin, Aykut, E-mail: aoztekin@agri.edu.tr [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey); Agri Ibrahim Cecen University Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 04100-Agri (Turkey); Almaz, Züleyha, E-mail: zturkoglu-2344@hotmail.com [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey); Mus Alparslan University Faculty of Sciences, Department of Moleculer Biology, 49250-Mus (Turkey); Özdemir, Hasan, E-mail: hozdemir@atauni.edu.tr [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Peroxidases (E.C.1.11.1.7) catalyze the one electron oxidation of wide range of substrates. They are used in synthesis reaction, removal of peroxide from industrial wastes, clinical biochemistry and immunoassays. In this study, the white cabbage (Brassica Oleracea var. capitata f. alba) and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra) peroxidase enzymes were purified for investigation of inhibitory effect of some aromatic compounds on these enzymes. IC{sub 50} values and Ki constants were calculated for the molecules of 6-Amino nicotinic hydrazide, 6-Amino-5-bromo nicotinic hydrazide, 2-Amino-5-hydroxy benzohydrazide, 4-Amino-3-hydroxy benzohydrazide on purified enzymes and inhibition type of these molecules were determined. (This research was supported by Ataturk University. Project Number: BAP-2015/98).

  8. Studies on Acetone Powder and Purified Rhus Laccase Immobilized on Zirconium Chloride for Oxidation of Phenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhus laccase was isolated and purified from acetone powder obtained from the exudates of Chinese lacquer trees (Rhus vernicifera from the Jianshi region, Hubei province of China. There are two blue bands appearing on CM-sephadex C-50 chromatography column, and each band corresponding to Rhus laccase 1 and 2, the former being the major constituent, and each had an average molecular weight of approximately 110 kDa. The purified and crude Rhus laccases were immobilized on zirconium chloride in ammonium chloride solution, and the kinetic properties of free and immobilized Rhus laccase, such as activity, molecular weight, optimum pH, and thermostability, were examined. In addition, the behaviors on catalytic oxidation of phenols also were conducted.

  9. Characterization of purified bacterial cellulose focused on its use on paper restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara M; Carbajo, José M; Quintana, Ester; Ibarra, David; Gomez, Nuria; Ladero, Miguel; Eugenio, M Eugenia; Villar, Juan C

    2015-02-13

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) synthesized by Gluconacetobacter sucrofermentans CECT 7291 seems to be a good option for the restoration of degraded paper. In this work BC layers are cultivated and purified by two different methods: an alkaline treatment when the culture media contains ethanol and a thermal treatment if the media is free from ethanol. The main goal of these tests was the characterization of BC layers measured in terms of tear and burst indexes, optical properties, SEM, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, degree of polymerization, static and dynamic contact angles, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The BC layers were also evaluated in the same terms after an aging treatment. Results showed that BC has got high crystallinity index, low internal porosity, good mechanical properties and high stability over time, especially when purified by the alkaline treatment. These features make BC an adequate candidate for degraded paper reinforcement.

  10. Directed growth of graphene nanomesh in purified argon via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haibin; Fu, Can; Shen, Xia; Yang, Wenchao; Guo, Pengfei; Lu, Yang; Luo, Yongsong; Yu, Benhai; Wang, Xiaoge; Wang, Chunlei; Xu, Junqi; Liu, Jiangfeng; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Guanghou; Wan, Jianguo

    2017-06-01

    Graphene nanomeshes (GNMs), new graphene nanostructures with tunable bandgaps, are potential building blocks for future electronic or photonic devices, and energy storage and conversion materials. In previous works, GNMs have been successfully prepared on Cu foils by the H2 etching effect. In this paper, we investigated the effect of Ar on the preparation of GNMs, and how the mean density and shape of them vary with growth time. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the typical hexagonal structure of GNM. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that large copper oxide nanoparticles produced by oxidization in purified Ar can play an essential catalytic role in preparing GNMs. Then, we exhibited the key reaction details for each growth process and proposed a growth mechanism of GNMs in purified Ar.

  11. Development and evaluation of semi-purified diets for fiber related studies in Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihe emampour

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to develop and evaluate a semi-purified diet suitable for fiber related studies without negative impacts on performance, serum biochemistry and intestinal morphology of growing Japanese quails. Total of 144 Japanese quail chicks were used in a factorial arrangement using completely randomized design with 6 treatments, 4 replicates of 6 quails in each replicate. The levels of dietary crude fiber (3.37%, 1.18% and 0.08%, respectively viz. high, medium and low crude fiber diets. The dietary supplementation levels of a commercial feed additive concentrate fiber-Arbocel were considered 0 and 3 %. The medium crude fiber semi-purified diet produced acceptable growth performances comparable to conventional high crude fiber diet. Serum triglyceride concentration was influenced by the levels of dietary crude fiber and the highest level was related to low crude fiber diet which was significantly different from high crude fiber diet (P

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Fistulin: A Protease Inhibitor Purified from the Leaves of Cassia fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulpandi, I; Sangeetha, R

    2012-01-01

    Plant protease inhibitors (PPIs) are one of the important components of a plant's defense machinery. PPIs are active against the insects and microbes which invade the plant. Cassia species possess anti-insecticidal and antimicrobial properties and this study was aimed at investigating the antibacterial efficacy of a PPI present in the leaves of Cassia fistula. A PPI, fistulin, was isolated from the leaves of C. fistula and purified by gel filtration chromatography. The antibacterial activity of the purified fistulin was studied against five bacterial strains, namely, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The PPI was found to be very active against S. aureus, E. coli, B. subtilis, and K. pneumonia, and its efficacy was comparable to the standard drug, streptomycin sulphate.

  13. Determining inhibition effects of some aromatic compounds on peroxidase enzyme purified from white and red cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztekin, Aykut; Almaz, Züleyha; Özdemir, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    Peroxidases (E.C.1.11.1.7) catalyze the one electron oxidation of wide range of substrates. They are used in synthesis reaction, removal of peroxide from industrial wastes, clinical biochemistry and immunoassays. In this study, the white cabbage (Brassica Oleracea var. capitata f. alba) and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra) peroxidase enzymes were purified for investigation of inhibitory effect of some aromatic compounds on these enzymes. IC50 values and Ki constants were calculated for the molecules of 6-Amino nicotinic hydrazide, 6-Amino-5-bromo nicotinic hydrazide, 2-Amino-5-hydroxy benzohydrazide, 4-Amino-3-hydroxy benzohydrazide on purified enzymes and inhibition type of these molecules were determined. (This research was supported by Ataturk University. Project Number: BAP-2015/98).

  14. Measuring the effect of photocatalytic purifiers on indoor air hydrocarbons and carbonyl pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disdier, Jean; Pichat, Pierre; Mas, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory tests of photocatalytic air purifiers are usually performed with a single pollutant, in the parts per million by volume domain and at airflow rates air: from 9-15.5 to 12.5-18 for methanal, from 1.5-3 to 8-11.5 for ethanal, and from 4.5-19 to 8-26.5 for propanone with the prototype used; these unprecedented results do not exclude using photocatalysis to treat air, but they illustrate that improvement is needed. Because these tests are time-consuming, preliminary tests are useful; results obtained with a 225-L closed-loop, airtight, photocatalytic reactor with an external turbine enabling the ambient air inside the reactor to be circulated through the purifier device at 15-450 m3/hr flow rates are reported.

  15. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of polysaccharide purified from aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis) gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kim, Seo Young; Kim, Yoon Taek; Kim, Eun-A; Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Seok-Chun; Wijesinghe, W A J P; Samarakoon, Kalpa W; Kim, Young-Sun; Cho, Jin Hun; Jang, Hyeang-Su; Jeon, You-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antioxidant potentials of a polysaccharide isolated from aloe vera gel were investigated. Enzymatic extracts were prepared from aloe vera gel by using ten digestive enzymes including five carbohydrases and five proteases. Among them, the highest yield was obtained with the Viscozyme extract and the same extract showed the best radical scavenging activity. An active polysaccharide was purified from the Viscozyme extract using ethanol-added separation and anion exchange chromatography. Purified aloe vera polysaccharide (APS) strongly scavenged radicals including DPPH, hydroxyl and alkyl radicals. In addition, APS showed a protective effect against AAPH-induced oxidative stress and cell death in Vero cells as well as in the in vivo zebrafish model. In this study, it is proved that both the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant potentials of APS could be further utilized in relevant industrial applications.

  16. Behavioral inspiratory inhibition: inactivated and activated respiratory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, J

    1989-11-01

    1. Eleven adult cats were trained to stop inspiration in response to a conditioning stimulus. The conditioning stimuli were presented at the onset of inspiration at intervals of approximately 20-30 s. Intratracheal pressures, diaphragmatic activity, and the extracellular activity of single medullary respiratory neurons were recorded while the animals performed this response. 2. Inactivation of the diaphragm to the conditioning stimuli occurred at latencies that varied from 40 to 110 ms and averaged 74 +/- 32 (SD) ms. 3. The subjects of this report are 38 inspiratory neurons that were inactivated and 19 cells that were activated when inspiration was stopped behaviorally. These cells were located in the region of n. ambiguus and the ventrolateral n. of tractus solitarius. 4. The inspiratory cells that were inactivated behaviorally had the following characteristics: 1) Most had an augmenting inspiratory profile with (n = 14) or without (n = 9) postinspiratory activity. Other types were inspiratory throughout (n = 5), decrementing inspiratory (n = 3), tonic inspiratory (n = 4), early inspiratory (n = 2), and expiratory-inspiratory (n = 1). 2) Their mean discharge rate was 39 +/- 2.7 (SE) Hz. 3) The latency of their inactivation in response to the task averaged 81 +/- 4.9 (SE) ms, and 4) Their activity corresponded closely to breathing not only during the behavioral response but also during eupnea (eta 2 = 0.62 +/- 0.04, mean +/- SE) and respiratory acts such as sneezing, sniffing, meowing, and purring. 5. The cells that were activated when inspiration was stopped behaviorally had the following characteristics. 1) As a group, they had discharge profiles related to every phase of the respiratory cycle. 2) They were recorded in the same region as, and often simultaneously with, respiratory cells that were inactivated. 3) Their activity patterns were highly variable such that the signal strength and consistency of the respiratory component of that activity were weak (eta 2

  17. Assessing the functionality of viral entry-associated domains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus during inactivation procedures, a potential tool to optimize inactivated vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delrue, Iris; Delputte, Peter L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2009-01-01

    .... Currently, vaccines based on inactivated PRRSV provide limited protection of pigs against infection, most likely because viral epitopes associated with the induction of neutralizing antibodies...

  18. A purified nucleoprotein fragment of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitnik-Elson, P; Elson, D; Abramowitz, R

    1979-02-27

    A '13 S' nucleoprotein fragment was isolated from a nuclease digest of Escherichia coli 30-S ribosomal subunits and purified to gel electrophoretic homogeneity. It contained two polynucleotides, of about 1.1 . 10(5) and 2.5 . 10(4) daltons, which separated when the fragment was deproteinized. The major protein components were S4, S7 and S9/11, with S15, S16, S18, S19 and S20 present in reduced amount.

  19. Purifying selection, drift and reversible mutation with arbitrarily high mutation rates

    OpenAIRE

    Charlesworth, Brian; Jain, Kavita

    2014-01-01

    Some species exhibit very high levels of DNA sequence variability; there is also evidence for the existence of heritable epigenetic variants that experience state changes at a much higher rate than sequence variants. In both cases, the resulting high diversity levels within a population (hyperdiversity) mean that standard population genetics methods are not trustworthy. We analyze a population genetics model that incorporates purifying selection, reversible mutations, and genetic drift, assum...

  20. The Experience of Implementation of Innovative Technology of Quarry Waste Water Purifying in Kuzbass Open Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesin, Yu V.; Hellmer, M. C.

    2016-08-01

    Among all industries in Kuzbass (Western Siberia, Russia) the coal industry provides the most environmental threat. However, the construction of new and maintenance of existing open pit mines do not often correspond to the tasks of improving the environmental safety of surface mining. So the article describes the use of innovative quarry waste water purifying technology implemented in Kuzbass open pit mine «Shestaki». This technology is based on using artificial filter arrays made of overburden rock.

  1. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase purified from an alkaline-stressed bacterial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rety, Stephane; Deschamps, Patrick; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Tryptophanase is a bacterial enzyme involved in the degradation of tryptophan to indole, pyruvate and ammonia, which are compounds that are essential for bacterial survival. Tryptophanase is often overexpressed in stressed cultures. Large amounts of endogenous tryptophanase were purified from Escherichia coli BL21 strain overexpressing another recombinant protein. Tryptophanase was crystallized in space group P6522 in the apo form without pyridoxal 5'-phosphate bound in the active site.

  2. Reconstitution of highly purified saxitoxin-sensitive Na+-channels into planar lipid bilayers.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanke, W.; Boheim, G; Barhanin, J; Pauron, D; Lazdunski, M

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified Na+-channels isolated from rat brain have been reconstituted into virtually solvent-free planar lipid bilayer membranes. Two different types of electrically excitable channels were detected in the absence of any neurotoxins. The activity of both channels was blocked by saxitoxin. The first channel type is highly selective for Na+ over K+ (approximately 10:1), it shows a bursting behavior, a conductance of 25 pS in Na+-Ringer and undergoes continuous opening and closing events ...

  3. Adsorptive Separation and Recovery of Organic Compounds from Purified Terephthalic Acid Plant Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Khachane, P.K.; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Versteeg, G. F.; Pangarkar, V.G.

    2003-01-01

    Several organic impurities formed in the p-xylene oxidation process for manufacture of terephthalic acid are carried into the aqueous effluent from the crystallization section of PTA plant of crystallizers for purified terephthalic acid (PTA). These compounds impose a burden on the effluent treatment plant. Due to the presence of these impurities the recycle of aqueous effluent from crystallization section of PTA plant to the PTA crystallizer is not possible. The aim of this study is to check...

  4. Biological and Histological Studies of Purified Product from Streptomyces janthinus M7 Metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Tawfik Zahira S.; El Shikh Hussein H.; Haroun Bakry M.; Yassin Mohamed M.; El Sonbty Sawsan M.; Aman Gaber Zaki; Mahmoud Abd Alwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen clinical samples were taken out from patients suffering cancer, these patients being under the treatment with radio- and/or chemotherapy. The samples were used for the isolation of bacterial cells surrounding tumor; the samples were collected from Center of Cancer Therapy, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. The clinical bacterial isolates were purified and identified according to Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology ninth edition (1994). The bacterial isolates were found to ...

  5. Inactivation of kanamycin, neomycin, and streptomycin by enzymes obtained in cells of Pseudomonas aeruginoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, O; Ogura, M; Tanaka, N; Umezawa, H

    1968-09-01

    Ten strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were disrupted and centrifuged. The supernatant fluids from centrifugation at 105,000 x g contained enzymes inactivating kanamycin, neomycin, and streptomycin in the presence of adenosine triphosphate. Kanamycin-inactivating enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulfate at 66% of saturated concentration, and the inactivated kanamycin was shown to be kanamycin-3'-phosphate in which the C-3 hydroxyl group of 6-amino-6-deoxy-d-glucose moiety was phosphorylated. This is identical with kanamycin inactivated by Escherichia coli carrying R factor. Streptomycin-inactivating enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulfate at 33% of saturated concentration.

  6. Inactivated virus vaccines from chemistry to prophylaxis: merits, risks and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, Iris; Verzele, Dieter; Madder, Annemieke; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this review is to make researchers aware of the benefits of an efficient quality control system for prediction of a developed vaccine's efficacy. Two major goals should be addressed when inactivating a virus for vaccine purposes: first, the infectious virus should be inactivated completely in order to be safe, and second, the viral epitopes important for the induction of protective immunity should be conserved after inactivation in order to have an antigen of high quality. Therefore, some problems associated with the virus inactivation process, such as virus aggregate formation, protein crosslinking, protein denaturation and degradation should be addressed before testing an inactivated vaccine in vivo.

  7. Taxol differentially modulates the dynamics of microtubules assembled from unfractionated and purified beta-tubulin isotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, W B; Wilson, L; Khan, I A; Luduena, R F; Jordan, M A

    1997-03-25

    Substoichiometric binding of taxol to tubulin in microtubules potently suppresses microtubule dynamics, which appears to be the most sensitive antiproliferative mechanism of taxol. To determine whether the beta-tubulin isotype composition of a microtubule can modulate sensitivity to taxol, we measured the effects of substoichiometric ratios of taxol bound to tubulin in microtubules on the dynamics of microtubules composed of purified alphabeta(II)-, alphabeta(III)-, or alphabeta(IV)-tubulin isotypes and compared the results with the effects of taxol on microtubules assembled from unfractionated tubulin. Substoichiometric ratios of bound taxol in microtubules assembled from purified beta-tubulin isotypes or unfractionated tubulin potently suppressed the shortening rates and the lengths shortened per shortening event. Correlation of the suppression of the shortening rate with the stoichiometry of bound taxol revealed that microtubules composed of purified alphabeta(II)-, alphabeta(III)-, and alphabeta(IV)-tubulin were, respectively, 1.6-, 7.4-, and 7.2-fold less sensitive to the effects of bound taxol than microtubules assembled from unfractionated tubulin. These results indicate that taxol differentially modulates microtubule dynamics depending upon the beta-tubulin isotype composition. The results are consistent with recent studies correlating taxol resistance in tumor cells with increased levels of beta(III0- and beta(IV)-tubulin expression and suggest that altered cellular expression of beta-tubulin isotypes can be an important mechanism by which tumor cells develop resistance to taxol.

  8. Purified and unpurified sodium channels from eel electroplax in planar lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Highly purified sodium channel protein from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, was reconstituted into liposomes and incorporated into planar bilayers made from neutral phospholipids dissolved in decane. The purest sodium channel preparations consisted of only the large, 260-kD tetrodotoxin (TTX)-binding polypeptide. For all preparations, batrachotoxin (BTX) induced long-lived single-channel currents (25 pS at 500 mM NaCl) that showed voltage-dependent activation and were blocked by TTX. This block was also voltage dependent, with negative potentials increasing block. The permeability ratios were 4.7 for Na+:K+ and 1.6 for Na+:Li+. The midpoint for steady state activation occurred around -70 mV and did not shift significantly when the NaCl concentration was increased from 50 to 1,000 mM. Veratridine-induced single-channel currents were about half the size of those activated by BTX. Unpurified, nonsolubilized sodium channels from E. electricus membrane fragments were also incorporated into planar bilayers. There were no detectable differences in the characteristics of unpurified and purified sodium channels, although membrane stability was considerably higher when purified material was used. Thus, in the eel, the large, 260-kD polypeptide alone is sufficient to demonstrate single-channel activity like that observed for mammalian sodium channel preparations in which smaller subunits have been found. PMID:2443607

  9. Microbial production of succinic acid using crude and purified glycerol from a Crotalaria juncea based biorefinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvra Sadhukhan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial conversion of crude and purified glycerol obtained in the process of biorefining Crotalaria juncea is carried out to produce succinic acid using Escherichia coli. Batch tests are performed for nine different substrate concentrations of commercial, purified and crude glycerol, in order to observe cell growth and substrate utilization rate. Inhibitory (Halden-Andrew, Aiba-Edward, Tessier type and Andrews as well as non-inhibitory (Monod, Moser and Tessier models are fitted to the relationship between specific growth rate and substrate concentration obtained from the growth curves. Considering the inhibition effect, Aiba-Edward model ranked 1 out of 7 in case of two samples and Haldane-Andrew model ranked 1 in case of one sample. Aiba-Edward model gave the best fitment for a large range of concentrations of all the three types of glycerol, crude, purified and laboratory grade. Maximum production of succinic acid is obtained from commercial glycerol at pH 7 and 37.5 °C.

  10. The antileukaemic cell cycle regulatory activities of swainsonine purified from Metarhizium anisopliae fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Digar; Kaur, Gurvinder

    2014-01-01

    Swainsonine is a Metarhizium secondary metabolite known differentially for its specific mannosidase inhibitory, toxic and therapeutic activities. Here, the standard and purified swainsonine from Metarhizium anisopliae fermentation broth were comparatively evaluated for their in situ antileukaemic activities in human promyelocytic cell line, HL-60. Both the standard (IC50 = 6.96 μM) and purified (IC50 = 9.50 μM) compounds inhibited the leukaemic cell proliferation without inflicting cell membrane disruption at 48 h of post-treatment incubation. The DNA cell cycle analysis showed approximately 48.81% and 60.72% of the treated cells arrested in the synthetic phase (S-phase) at 36 and 48 h, respectively, upon treatment with IC50 concentration of the purified swainsonine. However, only 29.62% of cells were arrested in S-phase with standard swainsonine at 48 h, suggesting the comprehensive action of certain other metabolites sharing the similar paradigm of antiproliferative properties in Metarhizium broth extract.

  11. Microbial production of succinic acid using crude and purified glycerol from a Crotalaria juncea based biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Suvra; Villa, Raffaella; Sarkar, Ujjaini

    2016-06-01

    Microbial conversion of crude and purified glycerol obtained in the process of biorefining Crotalaria juncea is carried out to produce succinic acid using Escherichia coli. Batch tests are performed for nine different substrate concentrations of commercial, purified and crude glycerol, in order to observe cell growth and substrate utilization rate. Inhibitory (Halden-Andrew, Aiba-Edward, Tessier type and Andrews) as well as non-inhibitory (Monod, Moser and Tessier) models are fitted to the relationship between specific growth rate and substrate concentration obtained from the growth curves. Considering the inhibition effect, Aiba-Edward model ranked 1 out of 7 in case of two samples and Haldane-Andrew model ranked 1 in case of one sample. Aiba-Edward model gave the best fitment for a large range of concentrations of all the three types of glycerol, crude, purified and laboratory grade. Maximum production of succinic acid is obtained from commercial glycerol at pH 7 and 37.5 °C.

  12. Long-term study of optimal gas purifiers for the RPC systems at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Altuntas, E; Glushkov, I; Guida, R; Hahn, F; Haider, S; Mandelli, B; Rouwette, S

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the impurities produced in the gas of heavily irradiated RPC chambers and the properties of possible purifiers for the closed-loop gas systems used in the LHC experiments. The goal is finding the operational conditions that will keep the RPC gas purity near the level of the fresh gas quality to ensure proper operation of the large RPC systems at high luminosity. The properties and performance of a large number of purifiers have been understood. On that basis, an optimal combination of different filters consisting of MS (MS) 5Å and 4Å, and a CuO catalyst R11 has been chosen and validated irradiating a set of RPCs at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) for several years. An important feature of this new filters configuration is the increase of the cycle duration for each purifier, which results in better stability and reduced downtime of the gas systems. If needed, it permits to comfortably increase the gas flow in the detectors during the high luminosity running at LHC.

  13. Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride To Purify Molten Salt Reactor Coolant and Heat Transfer Fluoride Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2017-05-02

    Abstract: The molten salt cooled nuclear reactor is included as one of the Generation IV reactor types. One of the challenges with the implementation of this reactor is purifying and maintaining the purity of the various molten fluoride salts that will be used as coolants. The method used for Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s molten salt experimental test reactor was to treat the coolant with a mixture of H2 and HF at 600°C. In this article we evaluate thermal NF3 treatment for purifying molten fluoride salt coolant candidates based on NF3’s 1) past use to purify fluoride salts, 2) other industrial uses, 3) commercial availability, 4) operational, chemical, and health hazards, 5) environmental effects and environmental risk management methods, 6) corrosive properties, and 7) thermodynamic potential to eliminate impurities that could arise due to exposure to water and oxygen. Our evaluation indicates that nitrogen trifluoride is a viable and safer alternative to the previous method.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of nano-sized CaCO3 in purified diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyaningsih, N. N.; Tresnasari, D. R.; Ramahwati, M. R.; Juwono, A. L.; Soejoko, D. S.; Astuti, D. A.

    2017-07-01

    The growth and development of animals depend strongly on the balanced nutrition in the diet. This research aims is to characterize the weight variations of nano-sized calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in purified diet that to be fed to animal model of rat. The nano-sized CaCO3 was prepared by milling the calcium carbonate particles for 20 hours at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm and resulting particle size in a range of 2-50 nm. Nano-sized CaCO3 added to purified diet to the four formulas that were identified as normal diet (N), deficiency calcium (DC), rich in calcium (RC), and poor calcium (PC) with containing in nano-sized CaCO3 much as 0.50 %, 0.00 %, 0.75 % and 0.25 % respectively. The nutritional content of the purified diet was proximate analyzed, it resulted as followed moisture, ash, fat, protein, crude fiber. The quantities of chemical element were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), it resulted iron, magnesium, potassium and calcium. The results showed that N diet (Ca: 16,914.29 ppm) were suggested for healthy rats and RC diet (Ca: 33,696.13 ppm) for conditioned osteoporosis rats. The crystalline phases of the samples that were examined by X-ray diffraction showed that crystalline phase increased with the increasing concentration of CaCO3.

  15. Inactivation of Clostridium difficile spores by microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Suvash Chandra; Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Singhakaew, Sombat; Ounjai, Puey; Janvilisri, Tavan

    2016-04-01

    Spores are a potent agent for Clostridium difficile transmission. Therefore, factors inhibiting spores have been of continued interest. In the present study, we investigated the influence of microwave irradiation in addition to conductive heating for C. difficile spore inactivation in aqueous suspension. The spores of 15 C. difficile isolates from different host origins were exposed to conductive heating and microwave irradiation. The complete inhibition of spore viability at 10(7) CFU/ml was encountered following microwave treatment at 800 W for 60 s, but was not observed in the conductive-heated spores at the same time-temperature exposure. The distinct patterns of ultrastructural alterations following microwave and conductive heat treatment were observed and the degree of damages by microwave was in the exposure time-dependent manner. Microwave would therefore be a simple and time-efficient tool to inactivate C. difficile spores, thus reducing the risk of C. difficile transmission.

  16. Cinnamomin-A Versatile Type Ⅱ Ribosome-inactivating Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong XU; Wang-Yi LIU

    2004-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins(RIPs)are a group of toxic proteins that can specifically act on the universally conserved sarcin/ricin domain(S/R domain)of the largest RNA in ribosome and thus irreversibly inactivate ribosome for protein synthesis.Cinnamomin is a multifunctional type Ⅱ RIP isolated in our laboratory from the mature seeds of the camphor tree.This protein has been extensively studied with regard to its purification,characteristics,structure and function,genetic expression,enzymatic mechanism,physiological role in seed cell and toxicity to cancer cells and insect larvae.The research results of cinnamomin obtained in our laboratory are summarized in this review.Understanding of cinnamomin and the relative new proteins will help expand our knowledge of RIPs and may accelerate theoretical study and the development of their potential applications.

  17. In situ studies of microbial inactivation during high pressure processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Jose Antonio; Schaffner, Donald W.; Cuitiño, Alberto M.; Karwe, Mukund V.

    2016-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has been shown to reduce microbial concentration in foods. The mechanisms of microbial inactivation by HPP have been associated with damage to cell membranes. The real-time response of bacteria to HPP was measured to elucidate the mechanisms of inactivation, which can aid in designing more effective processes. Different pressure cycling conditions were used to expose Enterobacter aerogenes cells to HPP. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a probe, which fluoresces after penetrating cells with damaged membranes and binding with nucleic acids. A HPP vessel with sapphire windows was used for measuring fluorescence in situ. Membrane damage was detected during pressurization and hold time, but not during depressurization. The drop in fluorescence was larger than expected after pressure cycles at higher pressure and longer times. This indicated possible reversible disassociation of ribosomes resulting in additional binding of PI to exposed RNA under pressure and its release after depressurization.

  18. Inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus in water by pulsed spark discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiansheng

    2017-09-04

    A pulsed spark plasma discharge system was developed and tested as an energy efficient water sterilization method. A 5 log10 reduction on Staphylococcus aureus concentration of 10(8) CFU/ml was obtained. Complete inactivation was achieved for concentration of 10(6) CFU/ml. Of the various factors generated by an underwater spark discharge, ultraviolet radiation plays a major role. The inactivation was completely suppressed by the addition of 30 mg/L of a soluble sunscreen, Benzophenone-9. Results obtained using the pulsed spark plasma discharge showed that this system has several advantages, such as high energy efficiency, absence of harmful by-products and portability, over the conventional sterilization methods.

  19. Polio endgame: the global introduction of inactivated polio vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish; Zipursky, Simona; Orenstein, Walt; Garon, Julie; Zaffran, Michel

    2015-05-01

    In 2013, the World Health Assembly endorsed a plan that calls for the ultimate withdrawal of oral polio vaccines (OPV) from all immunization programs globally. The withdrawal would begin in a phased manner with removal of the type 2 component of OPV in 2016 through a global switch from trivalent OPV to bivalent OPV (containing only types 1 and 3). To mitigate risks associated with immunity gaps after OPV type 2 withdrawal, the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts has recommended that all 126 OPV-only using countries introduce at least one dose of inactivated polio vaccine into routine immunization programs by end-2015, before the trivalent OPV-bivalent OPV switch. The introduction of inactivated polio vaccine would reduce risks of reintroduction of type 2 poliovirus by providing some level of seroprotection, facilitating interruption of transmission if outbreaks occur, and accelerating eradication by boosting immunity to types 1 and 3 polioviruses.

  20. Cell inactivation by diverse ions along their tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Kundrát, P; Hromcikova, H; Kundrat, Pavel; Lokajicek, Milos; Hromcikova, Hana

    2004-01-01

    Irradiation of cell monolayers by monoenergetic ions has made it possible to establish survival curves at individual values of linear energy transfer. The two-step model of radiobiological mechanism proposed recently by Judas and Lokajicek (Judas L., Lokajicek M., 2001: Cell inactivation by ionizing particles and the shapes of survival curves. J. Theor. Biol. 210 (1), 15-21., doi:10.1006/jtbi.2001.2283) has then enabled to show that some significant deviations from the generally used linear-quadratic model should exist at higher values of linear energy transfer, which has been also demonstrated experimentally. However, the new model has been expressed in the form being applicable rightfully to low-dose parts of survival curves only. It has been now reformulated to be applicable in analyses of whole survival curves. Inactivation probabilities after different numbers of particles traversing cell nuclei (chromosomal systems) may be then derived from experimental data. Analyses of published data obtained in irrad...

  1. Pulsed UV-light inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Y; Rzezutka, A; Anderson, J G; MacGregor, S J; Given, M J; Deppe, C; Cook, N

    2007-11-01

    To study the pulsed ultraviolet (UV) inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus. Viral suspensions of 2 ml volume were exposed to varying numbers of polychromatic light pulses emitted from a xenon flashlamp. Ten pulses produced an approximately 4 log(10) reduction in poliovirus titre, and no infectious poliovirus remained after 25 pulses. With adenovirus, 10 pulses resulted in an approximately 1 log(10) reduction in infectivity. Adenovirus required 100 pulses to produce an approximately 3 log(10) reduction in infectivity, and 200 pulses to produce a greater than 4 log(10) reduction. Adenovirus was more resistant to pulsed UV treatment than poliovirus although both viruses showed susceptibility to the treatment. Pulsed UV-light treatment proved successful in the inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus, and represents an alternative to continuous-wave UV treatment.

  2. Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation in neural development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Nico Stuurman; Guangshuo Ou

    2012-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) is a technique that uses photochemically-generated reactive oxygen species to acutely inactivate target proteins in living cells.Neural development includes highly dynamic cellular processes such as asymmetric cell division,migration,axon and dendrite outgrowth and synaptogenesis.Although many key molecules of neural development have been identified since the past decades,their spatiotemporal contributions to these cellular events are not well understood.CALI provides an appealing tool for elucidating the precise functions of these molecules during neural development.In this review,we summarize the principles of CALI,a recent microscopic setup to perform CALI experiments,and the application of CALI to the study of growth-cone motility and neuroblast asymmetric division.

  3. Photocatalytic inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum on nanostructured titanium dioxide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnotel, O; Verdoold, R; Dunlop, P S M; Snelling, W J; Lowery, C J; Dooley, J S G; Moore, J E; Byrne, J A

    2010-03-01

    Control of waterborne gastrointestinal parasites represents a major concern to water industries worldwide. In developed countries, pathogens in drinking water supplies are normally removed by sand filtration followed by chemical disinfection. Cryptosporidium spp. are generally resistant to common disinfection techniques and alternative control strategies are being sought. In the current study, the photocatalytic inactivation of C. parvum oocysts was shown to occur in buffer solution (78.4% after 180 min) and surface water (73.7% after 180 min). Viability was assessed by dye exclusion, excystation, direct examination of oocysts and a novel gene expression assay based on lactate dehydrogenase 1 (LDH1) expression levels. Collectively, this confirmed the inactivation of oocysts and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed cleavage at the suture line of oocyst cell walls, revealing large numbers of empty (ghost) cells after exposure to photocatalytic treatment.

  4. Auranofin inactivates Trichomonas vaginalis thioredoxin reductase and is effective against trichomonads in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Melissa; Yun, Jeong-Fil; Zhou, Bianhua; Le, Christine; Kehoe, Katelin; Le, Ryan; Hill, Ryan; Jongeward, Gregg; Debnath, Anjan; Zhang, Liangfang; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Eckmann, Lars; Land, Kirkwood M; Wrischnik, Lisa A

    2016-12-01

    Trichomoniasis, caused by the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common, non-viral, sexually transmitted infection in the world, but only two closely related nitro drugs are approved for its treatment. New antimicrobials against trichomoniasis remain an urgent need. Several organic gold compounds were tested for activity against T. vaginalis thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in cell-free systems as well as for activity against different trichomonads in vitro and in a murine infection model. The organic gold(I) compounds auranofin and chloro(diethylphenylphosphine)gold(I) inhibited TrxR in a concentration-dependent manner in assays with recombinant purified reductase and in cytoplasmic extracts of T. vaginalis transfected with a haemagglutinin epitope-tagged form of the reductase. Auranofin potently suppressed the growth of three independent clinical T. vaginalis isolates as well as several strains of another trichomonad (Tritrichomonas foetus) in a 24 h-assay, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 0.7-2.5 µM and minimum lethal concentrations of 2-6 µM. The drug also compromised the ability of the parasite to overcome oxidant stress, supporting the notion that auranofin acts, in part, by inactivating TrxR-dependent antioxidant defences. Chloro(diethylphenylphosphine)gold(I) was 10-fold less effective against T. vaginalis in vitro than auranofin. Oral administration of auranofin for 4 days cleared the parasites in a murine model of vaginal T. foetus infection without displaying any apparent adverse effects. The approved human drug auranofin may be a promising agent as an alternative treatment of trichomoniasis in cases when standard nitro drug therapies have failed.

  5. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmann Jörg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human norovirus (NoV causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes. Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces.

  6. Development of Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia Inactivated Vaccine( M1601 Strain)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao; Ping; He; Ying; Chu; Yuefeng; Gao; Pengcheng; Zhang; Xuan; Lu; Zhongxin

    2014-01-01

    Three batches of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia inactivated vaccine( M1601 strain) developed by the laboratory were studied from the aspects of safety,minimum immune dose,immunity duration and storage life. The results showed that the vaccine was safe to goats under different physiological conditions.Regardless of lambs or adult goats,the minimum immune dose was 3 m L,and the immunity duration and the storage life were 6 and 12 months,respectively.

  7. Dicentric chromosomes: unique models to study centromere function and inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaitlin M Stimpson; Matheny, Justyne E.; Sullivan, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are products of genome rearrangement that place two centromeres on the same chromosome. Depending on the organism, dicentric stability varies after formation. In humans, dicentrics occur naturally in a substantial portion of the population and usually segregate successfully in mitosis and meiosis. Their stability has been attributed to inactivation of one of the two centromeres, creating a functionally monocentric chromosome that can segregate normally during cell divisi...

  8. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X–autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencin...

  9. Thermal inactivation of eight Salmonella serotypes on dry corn flour.

    OpenAIRE

    Vancauwenberge, J E; Bothast, R J; Kwolek, W F

    1981-01-01

    Dry heat was used to inactivate Salmonella newington, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella cubana, Salmonella seftenberg, Salmonella thompson, and Salmonella tennessee in corn flour at 10 and 15% moisture. The flour was spray inoculated at 10(5) Salmonella cells per g and then stored at 49 degrees C (120 degrees F); viable Salmonella cells were counted on Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems) soy agar plates every 30 min for the first 4 h and then at 4-h ...

  10. Reversible Inactivation and Desiccation Tolerance of Silicified Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laidler, James J.; Shugart, Jessica A.; Cady, Sherry L.; Bahjat, Keith S.; Stedman, Kenneth M.

    2013-11-19

    Long-distance host-independent virus dispersal is poorly understood, especially for viruses found in isolated ecosystems. To demonstrate a possible dispersal mechanism, we show that bacteriophage T4, archaeal virus SSV-K and Vaccinia are reversibly inactivated by mineralization in silica under conditions similar to volcanic hot springs. By contrast, bacteriophage PRD1 is not silicified. Moreover silicification provides viruses with remarkable desiccation resistance, which could allow extensive aerial dispersal.

  11. Reversible inactivation and desiccation tolerance of silicified viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidler, James R; Shugart, Jessica A; Cady, Sherry L; Bahjat, Keith S; Stedman, Kenneth M

    2013-12-01

    Long-distance host-independent virus dispersal is poorly understood, especially for viruses found in isolated ecosystems. To demonstrate a possible dispersal mechanism, we show that bacteriophage T4, archaeal virus Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus Kamchatka, and vaccinia virus are reversibly inactivated by mineralization in silica under conditions similar to volcanic hot springs. In contrast, bacteriophage PRD1 is not silicified. Moreover, silicification provides viruses with remarkable desiccation resistance, which could allow extensive aerial dispersal.

  12. Fast- or slow-inactivated state preference of Na+ channel inhibitors: a simulation and experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Karoly

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sodium channels are one of the most intensively studied drug targets. Sodium channel inhibitors (e.g., local anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmics and analgesics exert their effect by stabilizing an inactivated conformation of the channels. Besides the fast-inactivated conformation, sodium channels have several distinct slow-inactivated conformational states. Stabilization of a slow-inactivated state has been proposed to be advantageous for certain therapeutic applications. Special voltage protocols are used to evoke slow inactivation of sodium channels. It is assumed that efficacy of a drug in these protocols indicates slow-inactivated state preference. We tested this assumption in simulations using four prototypical drug inhibitory mechanisms (fast or slow-inactivated state preference, with either fast or slow binding kinetics and a kinetic model for sodium channels. Unexpectedly, we found that efficacy in these protocols (e.g., a shift of the "steady-state slow inactivation curve", was not a reliable indicator of slow-inactivated state preference. Slowly associating fast-inactivated state-preferring drugs were indistinguishable from slow-inactivated state-preferring drugs. On the other hand, fast- and slow-inactivated state-preferring drugs tended to preferentially affect onset and recovery, respectively. The robustness of these observations was verified: i by performing a Monte Carlo study on the effects of randomly modifying model parameters, ii by testing the same drugs in a fundamentally different model and iii by an analysis of the effect of systematically changing drug-specific parameters. In patch clamp electrophysiology experiments we tested five sodium channel inhibitor drugs on native sodium channels of cultured hippocampal neurons. For lidocaine, phenytoin and carbamazepine our data indicate a preference for the fast-inactivated state, while the results for fluoxetine and desipramine are inconclusive. We suggest that

  13. Microbial inactivation and physicochemical properties of ultrasound processed pomegranate juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Çiğdem Uysal; Zorba, Nükhet Nilüfer Demirel; Özcan, Gülçin

    2015-03-01

    The effects of ultrasound treatment at various amplitudes (50, 75, and 100%) and times (0, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 min) on Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (a surrogate for E. coli O157:H7) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 2366 levels and physicochemical characteristics (monomeric anthocyanins, color values, total phenolics, pH, and soluble solids) were determined in pomegranate juice. More than a 5-log inactivation of E. coli ATCC 25922 and a 1.36-log inactivation of S. cerevisiae ATCC 2366 were achieved after 30 min of ultrasound treatment at 100% amplitude. The log-linear and Weibull models were successfully used to estimate the microbial inactivation as a function of ultrasound treatment time (R(2) > 0.97). No significant changes were observed in total phenolics, pH, and soluble solids of the treated juice (P > 0.05). The ultrasound treatment for up to 30 min resulted in more than 92 and 89% anthocyanin retention at 75 and 100% amplitude, respectively. The redness (a*) of the juice did not change significantly after the ultrasound treatment at amplitudes of 75 and 100% for up to 24 and 12 min, respectively. No significant changes in L* and b* values were observed after ultrasound treatment at all amplitudes and after up to 30 min of treatment for 50 and 75% amplitudes. Small differences in juice color were noted based on total color difference scores.

  14. Inactivation of respiratory syncytial virus by detergents and disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krilov, L R; Harkness, S H

    1993-07-01

    The activity of a number of detergents and disinfectants against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was evaluated in an in vitro assay system. Equal volumes of RSV and serial 10-fold dilutions of the test agents were mixed at 4 degrees C for 5 minutes. The RSV titer in each mixture was compared with that of untreated RSV alone. In 14 experiments with input RSV titers ranging from 2.6 x 10(3) to 2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units/ml, a 10-fold dilution of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (generic bleach) inactivated (> or = 3-log reduction in titer) the virus. With lower RSV titers inactivation was also observed at a 100-fold dilution of bleach. Fetal calf serum concentrations up to 50% as an organic load did not diminish the bleach effect. The degree of RSV inactivation was also defined for Lysol, povidone-iodine, Amphyl, Hibiclens, Osyl, ethanol and Listermint. The short contact time, the reproducible nature of the findings and the continued effectiveness with increasing organic loads all suggest that detergents and disinfectants can potentially play an important role in decreasing the spread of RSV infection.

  15. RHOA inactivation enhances Wnt signaling and promotes colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Macaya, Irati; Bazzocco, Sarah; Mazzolini, Rocco; Andretta, Elena; Dopeso, Higinio; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Bilić, Josipa; Cartón-García, Fernando; Nieto, Rocio; Suárez-López, Lucia; Afonso, Elsa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Cajal, Santiago Ramón y; Tabernero, Josep; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Mariadason, John M.; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small GTPase RHOA has strong oncogenic effects in many tumor types, although its role in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we show that RHOA inactivation contributes to colorectal cancer progression/metastasis, largely through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. RhoA inactivation in the murine intestine accelerates the tumorigenic process and in human colon cancer cells leads to the redistribution of β-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in increased proliferation, invasion and de-differentiation. In mice, RHOA inactivation contributes to colon cancer metastasis and reduced RHOA levels were observed at metastatic sites compared to primary human colon tumors. Therefore, we have identified a new mechanism of activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and characterized the role of RHOA as a novel tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. These results constitute a shift from the current paradigm and demonstrate that RHO GTPases can suppress tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:25413277

  16. Photodynamic inactivation of contaminated blood with Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Thaila Q.; Inada, Natalia M.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Blanco, Kate C.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    The presence of bacteria in the bloodstream can trigger a serious systemic inflammation and lead to sepsis that cause septic shock and death. Studies have shown an increase in the incidence of sepsis over the years and it is mainly due to the increased resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics, since these drugs are still sold and used improperly. The bacterial contamination of blood is also a risk to blood transfusions. Thus, bacteria inactivation in blood is being studied in order to increase the security of the blood supply. The purpose of this study was to decontaminate the blood using the photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Human blood samples in the presence of Photogem® were illuminated at an intensity of 30 mW/cm2, and light doses of 10 and 15 J/cm2. Blood counts were carried out for the quantitative evaluation and blood smears were prepared for qualitative and morphological evaluation by microscopy. The results showed normal viability values for the blood cells analyzed. The light doses showed minimal morphological changes in the membrane of red blood cells, but the irradiation in the presence of the photosensitizer caused hemolysis in red blood cells at the higher concentrations of the photosensitizer. Experiments with Staphylococcus aureus, one of the responsible of sepsis, showed 7 logs10 of photodynamic inactivation with 50 μg/mL and 15 J/cm2 and 1 log10 of this microorganism in a co-culture with blood.

  17. Activators and repressors: A balancing act for X-inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Leeanne; Panning, Barbara; Leung, Karen Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In early female embryos X-chromosome inactivation occurs concomitant with up regulation of the non-coding RNA, Xist, on the future inactive X-chromosome. Up regulation of Xist and coating of the future inactive X is sufficient to induce silencing. Therefore unlocking the mechanisms of X-chromosome inactivation requires thorough understanding of the transcriptional regulators, both activators and repressors, which control Xist. Mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which have two active X chromosomes, provide a tractable ex vivo model system for studying X-chromosome inactivation, since this process is triggered by differentiation signals in these cultured cells. Yet there are significant discrepancies found between ex vivo analyses in mouse embryonic stem cells and in vivo studies of early embryos. In this review we elaborate on potential models of how Xist is up regulated on a single X chromosome in female cells and how ex vivo and in vivo analyses enlighten our understanding of the activators and repressors that control this non-coding RNA gene.

  18. Inactivation of Bacillus Subtilis by Atomic Oxygen Radical Anion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Longchun; WANG Lian; YU Zhou; LV Xuanzhong; LI Quanxin

    2007-01-01

    UAtomic oxygen radical anion (O- ) is one of the most active oxygen species, and has extremely high oxidation ability toward small-molecules of hydrocarbons. However, to our knowledge, little is known about the effects of O- on cells of micro-organisms. This work showed that O- could quickly react with the Bacillus subtilis cells and seriously damage the cell walls a s well as their other contents, leading to a fast and irreversible inactivation. SEM micrographs revealed that the cell structures were dramatically destroyed by their exposure to O-. The inactivation efficiencies of B. subtilis depend on the O-- intensity, the initial population of cells and the treatment temperature, but not on the pH in the range of our investigation. For a cell concentration of 106 cfu/ml, the number of survived cells dropped from 106 cfu/ml to 103 cfu/ml after about five-minute irradiation by an O- flux in an intensity of 233 nA/cm2 under a dry argon environment (30 ℃, 1 atm, exposed size: 1.8 cm2). The inactivation mechanism of micro-organisms induced by O- is also discussed.

  19. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Tianhong; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: With the increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains, there is a pressing need for the development of alternative treatment for infections. Antimicrobial blue light (aBL) has provided a simple and effective approach. Methods: We first investigated the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) inactivation of USA300 LAClux (a communityacquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain) both in the planktonic and biofilm forms. The survival of the bacteria in suspensions was determined by serial dilution and that of the biofilm-embedded bacteria was determined by bioluminescence quantification. Using a mouse model of thermal burn infected with USA300 LAClux, we further assessed the effectiveness of aBL for treating localized infections. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time bacterial viability in vivo. Results: In vitro study showed that, for the planktonic counterpart of the bacteria or the 24-h-old biofilms, an irradiance of 55 mW/cm2 for 60 min resulted in a 4.61 log10 or 2.56 log10 inactivation, respectively. In vivo study using infected mouse burns demonstrated that a 2.56-log10 inactivation was achieved after 100-mW/cm2 irradiation for 62 min. Conclusions: aBL is a potential alternative approach for treating Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  20. Dicentric chromosomes: unique models to study centromere function and inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Matheny, Justyne E; Sullivan, Beth A

    2012-07-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are products of genome rearrangement that place two centromeres on the same chromosome. Depending on the organism, dicentric stability varies after formation. In humans, dicentrics occur naturally in a substantial portion of the population and usually segregate successfully in mitosis and meiosis. Their stability has been attributed to inactivation of one of the two centromeres, creating a functionally monocentric chromosome that can segregate normally during cell division. The molecular basis for centromere inactivation is not well understood, although studies in model organisms and in humans suggest that genomic and epigenetic mechanisms can be involved. Furthermore, constitutional dicentric chromosomes ascertained in patients presumably represent the most stable chromosomes, so the spectrum of dicentric fates, if it exists, is not entirely clear. Studies of engineered or induced dicentrics in budding yeast and plants have provided significant insight into the fate of dicentric chromosomes. And, more recently, studies have shown that dicentrics in humans can also undergo multiple fates after formation. Here, we discuss current experimental evidence from various organisms that has deepened our understanding of dicentric behavior and the intriguingly complex process of centromere inactivation.

  1. Thermal inactivation kinetics of hepatitis A virus in spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; Ye, Xiaofei; Harte, Federico; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-01-16

    Leafy vegetables have been recognized as important vehicles for the transmission of foodborne viral pathogens. To control hepatitis A viral foodborne illness outbreaks associated with mildly heated (e.g., blanched) leafy vegetables such as spinach, generation of adequate thermal processes is important both for consumers and the food industry. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the thermal inactivation behavior of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in spinach, and provide insights on HAV inactivation in spinach for future studies and industrial applications. The D-values calculated from the first-order model (50-72 °C) ranged from 34.40 ± 4.08 to 0.91 ± 0.12 min with a z-value of 13.92 ± 0.87 °C. The calculated activation energy value was 162 ± 11 kJ/mol. Using the information generated in the present study and the thermal parameters of industrial blanching conditions for spinach as a basis (100 °C for 120-180 s), the blanching of spinach in water at 100 °C for 120-180 s under atmospheric conditions will provide greater than 6 log reduction of HAV. The results of this study may be useful to the frozen food industry in designing blanching conditions for spinach to inactivate or control hepatitis A virus outbreaks. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Enteric virus removal inactivation by coal-based media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.; Chaudhuri, M. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-02-01

    Four coal-based media, viz. alum-pretreated or ferric hydroxide-impregnated Giridih bituminous coal and lignite (alum-GBC, Fe-GBC; alum-lignite and Fe-Lignite) were laboratory tested to assess their potential in removing/inactivating enteric viruses in water. Batch-sorption screening tests, employing a poliovirus-spiked canal water, indicated high poliovirus sorption by Fe-GBC and alum-GBC in a short contact time of 5 min. Based on the results of further batch-sorption tests, using silver incorporated media (alum/Ag-GBC, alum-GBC-Ag and Fe-GBC-Ag), as well as aesthetic water quality consideration and previous findings on removal of coliforms and turbidity, alum/Ag-GBC, alum-GBC and alum-GBC-AG were included in downflow column studies employing poliovirus-spiked canal water. All three media showed potential in removing/inactivating enteric viruses. In a separate column study employing a joint challenge of poliovirus and rotavirus, alum/Ag-GBC removed 59.3-86.5% of the viruses along with more than 99% reduction in indigenous heterotrophic bacteria. Alum/silver-pretreated bituminous coal medium appears promising for use in household water filters in rural areas of the developing world. However, improved medium preparation to further enhance its efficiency is needed; also, its efficacy in removing/inactivating indigenous enteric bacteria, viruses and protozoa has to be ensured and practicalities or economics of application need to be considered.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology and inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J. B.; Almeida, J.; Cole, K. D.; Reipa, V.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to detect spore contamination and inactivation is relevant to developing and determining decontamination strategy success for food and water safety. This study was conducted to develop a systematic comparison of nondestructive vibrational spectroscopy techniques (Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, SERS, and normal Raman) to determine indicators of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology (spore, vegetative, outgrown, germinated and inactivated spore forms). SERS was found to provide better resolution of commonly utilized signatures of spore physiology (dipicolinic acid at 1006 cm-1 and 1387 cm-1) compared to normal Raman and native fluorescence indigenous to vegetative and outgrown cell samples was quenched in SERS experiment. New features including carotenoid pigments (Raman features at 1142 cm-1, 1512 cm-1) were identified for spore cell forms. Pronounced changes in the low frequency region (300 cm-1 to 500 cm-1) in spore spectra occurred upon germination and inactivation (with both free chlorine and by autoclaving) which is relevant to guiding decontamination and detection strategies using Raman techniques.

  4. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-10-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X-autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Here, we report on the transcriptional down-regulation of genes within the unsynapsed region of the rearranged mouse chromosome 17, and on the subsequent disturbance of X chromosome inactivation. The partial transcriptional suppression of genes in the unsynapsed chromatin was most prominent prior to the mid-pachytene stage of primary spermatocytes. Later, during the mid-late pachytene, the rearranged autosomes colocalized with the XY body, and the X chromosome failed to undergo proper transcriptional silencing. Our findings provide direct evidence on the MSUC acting at the mRNA level, and implicate that autosomal asynapsis in meiosis may cause male sterility by interfering with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

  5. Inactivation of Salmonella during cocoa roasting and chocolate conching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Maristela da Silva do; Brum, Daniela Merlo; Pena, Pamela Oliveira; Berto, Maria Isabel; Efraim, Priscilla

    2012-10-15

    The high heat resistance of Salmonella in foods with low water activity raises particular issues for food safety, especially chocolate, where outbreak investigations indicate that few colony-forming units are necessary to cause salmonellosis. This study evaluated the efficiency of cocoa roasting and milk chocolate conching in the inactivation of Salmonella 5-strain suspension. Thermal resistance of Salmonella was greater in nibs compared to cocoa beans upon exposure at 110 to 130°C. The D-values in nibs were 1.8, 2.2 and 1.5-fold higher than those calculated for cocoa beans at 110, 120 and 130°C. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the matrices only at 140°C. Since in the conching of milk chocolate the inactivation curves showed rapid death in the first 180 min followed by a lower inactivation rate, and two D-values were calculated. For the first time interval (0-180 min) the D-values were 216.87, 102.27 and 50.99 min at 50, 60 and 70°C, respectively. The other D-values were determined from the second time interval (180-1440 min), 1076.76 min at 50°C, 481.94 min at 60°C and 702.23 min at 70°C. The results demonstrated that the type of matrix, the process temperature and the initial count influenced the Salmonella resistance.

  6. [Indications for fresh frozen plasma: evaluation of virus inactivating preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindur, G; Kiesewetter, H; Seyfert, U T; Wenzel, E

    1993-01-01

    When no specific factor concentrate is available fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) is indicated in the treatment of clinically relevant hemorrhagic diathesis. These disorders include congenital factor V and XI deficiencies, multiple factor defects, as disseminated intravascular coagulation and severe liver disease, and patients receiving massive transfusions, when bleeding occurs and severe abnormalities on coagulation testing are evident. FFP is beneficial when used with plasma exchange in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and related disorders. Various virucidal treatments including solvent-detergent (SD), photoactivated dyes (methylene blue) or pasteurization have been evolved to improve virus safety of human plasma. More extensive studies to demonstrate efficient virus inactivation in plasma have been performed with SD compared to other methods. On the other hand, the use of single-donor FFP in methylene blue treatment is possibly superior to pooled plasma which is processed according to the SD procedure. Pasteurization enables the inactivation not only of lipid-enveloped but also of non-lipid-enveloped viruses. Virucidal treatment of plasma may cause alterations in clotting factors, fibrinolysis and protease inhibitors; however, the currently achieved recovery of procoagulant activities is approximately comparable with that found in untreated FFP. The toxicity of virucidal additives is reported to be negligible since manufacturing includes a removal procedure (SD) or comparably low amounts (methylene blue) are used in inactivation treatment.

  7. Pulsed light inactivation of horseradish peroxidase and associated structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, José Antonio; Gómez-López, Vicente M

    2017-12-15

    Pulsed light (PL) is a non-thermal preservation method in which foods are subjected to one or several intense pulses of wide-spectrum light. Peroxidase (POD) is an enzyme that needs to be inactivated or inhibited because of its deleterious effects on the quality of fruits and vegetables. The feasibility of using PL to inactivate POD was tested and results explained based on measurements of UV-vis spectrum, far-UV circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence, and the phase-diagram method. PL reduced the activity of POD by more than 95% after applying 128Jcm(-2). There was observed a decrease in the Reinheitzahl value and ellipticity and an increase in tryptophan fluorescence at incremental fluences, as well as linear phase diagrams. The study indicates that the inactivation of POD by PL is an all-or-none process related to loss of helical structure, weak unfolding and ejection of the prostetic group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rho GTPase inactivation impairs lens growth and integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vasantha; Wawrousek, Eric; Tamm, Ernst R; Zigler, Samuel

    2002-02-01

    To elucidate the significance of Rho GTPase signaling on lens growth and structural integrity, we have selectively inactivated Rho GTPase in the ocular lens. To achieve this tissue-specific inactivation, a transgene encoding the C3-exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum has been expressed in mice under transcriptional control of the lens-specific alphaA-crystallin promoter. C3-exoenzyme is known to selectively inactivate all Rho GTPase isoforms by ADP-ribosylating an asparagine residue at position 41. Mice expressing the C3-exoenzyme transgene exhibited selective ocular defects, including cataract and microphthalmia. Extralenticular effects included ocular hemorrhage (blood accumulation in the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye) and abnormalities of the iris including focal attachments to lens and cornea (synechiae). C3-transgene expression was found only in the lens and not in the other ocular tissues as determined by RT-PCR analysis. Histologic examination of the eyes of C3 transgenic mice from two independent lines revealed extensive abnormalities of the lens, including defective fiber cell differentiation and elongation, ruptured posterior lens capsule, and thickened anterior lens capsule. Electron microscopic analysis of hemorrhaged C3 eyes showed abnormalities in the posterior hyaloid vessels. Collectively these data reveal the importance of Rho GTPase signaling in regulating lens growth and maintenance of lens transparency.

  9. Glucose 6-phosphate regulates hepatic glycogenolysis through inactivation of phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiston, Susan; Andersen, Birgitte; Agius, Loranne

    2003-06-01

    High glucose concentration suppresses hepatic glycogenolysis by allosteric inhibition and dephosphorylation (inactivation) of phosphorylase-a. The latter effect is attributed to a direct effect of glucose on the conformation of phosphorylase-a. Although glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), like glucose, stimulates dephosphorylation of phosphorylase-a by phosphorylase phosphatase, its physiological role in regulating glycogenolysis in intact hepatocytes has not been tested. We show in this study that metabolic conditions associated with an increase in G6P, including glucokinase overexpression and incubation with octanoate or dihydroxyacetone, cause inactivation of phosphorylase. The latter conditions also inhibit glycogenolysis. The activity of phosphorylase-a correlated inversely with the G6P concentration within the physiological range. The inhibition of glycogenolysis and inactivation of phosphorylase-a caused by 10 mmol/l glucose can be at least in part counteracted by inhibition of glucokinase with 5-thioglucose, which lowers G6P. In conclusion, metabolic conditions that alter the hepatic G6P content affect glycogen metabolism not only through regulation of glycogen synthase but also through regulation of the activation state of phosphorylase. Dysregulation of G6P in diabetes by changes in activity of glucokinase or glucose 6-phosphatase may be a contributing factor to impaired suppression of glycogenolysis by hyperglycemia.

  10. Microwave inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores in healthcare waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, E A; Nogueira, N G P; Innocentini, M D M; Pisani, R

    2010-11-01

    Public healthcare wastes from the region of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, pre-sterilized in an autoclave, were inoculated with spores of Bacillus atrophaeus for microwave processing on a laboratory scale. The influence of waste moisture (40%, 50% and 60% wet basis), presence of surfactant, power per unit mass of waste (100, 150 and 200 W/kg) and radiation exposure time (from 5 to 40 min) on the heating curves was investigated. The most favorable conditions for waste heating with respect to moisture and use of surfactant were then applied in an experimental analysis of the degree of inactivation of B. atrophaeus spores as a function of time and power per unit mass of waste. Based on Chick's and Arrhenius laws, the experimental results were adjusted by the least squares method to determine the activation energies (9203-5782 J/mol) and the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor (0.23 min(-1)). The kinetic parameters thus obtained enabled us to predict the degree of inactivation achieved for B. atrophaeus spores in typical healthcare waste. The activation energy was found to decrease as the power per waste mass increased, leading to the conclusion that, in addition to the thermal effect on the inactivation of B. atrophaeus spores, there was an effect inherent to radiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious blood-borne human parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Matthews, James Lester

    1995-05-01

    Blood-borne viruses and protozoan parasites that are infectious to humans pose risk world-wide of infection transmission through blood and blood product transfusion. Blood-borne infectious viruses include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-I), which causes AIDS; hepatitis C virus, which can cause chronic hepatitis; and cytomegalovirus, which can be dangerous to immunocompromised patients, e.g., the newborn, transplant recipients, and AIDS patients. Infectious blood-borne protozoan parasites include Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas' disease, endemic throughout Central and South America; the Trypanosoma species causing African sleeping sickness endemic in Central Africa; and Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malignant and increasingly drug- resistant human malaria prevalent throughout the tropics. Some researchers have focused on using photosensitizers to inactivate HIV-I and other viruses in whole blood, packed red cells, and platelet concentrates without compromising blood product function. Our group previously has reported photosensitized in vitro inactivation of P. falciparum and the mouse malaria organism Plasmodium berghei in whole blood using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and of T. cruzi using benzoporphyrin derivatives BPDMA and BPDDA, dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE), and hydroxyethylvinyldeuteroporphyrin (HEVD). These results suggest that continued investigation is warranted to evaluate the potential for photosensitized inactivation of blood-borne parasites in blood banking.

  12. Transient inactivation of orbitofrontal cortex blocks reinforcer devaluation in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Elizabeth A; DesJardin, Jacqueline T; Gale, Karen; Malkova, Ludise

    2011-10-19

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and its interactions with the basolateral amygdala (BLA) are critical for goal-directed behavior, especially for adapting to changes in reward value. Here we used a reinforcer devaluation paradigm to investigate the contribution of OFC to this behavior in four macaques. Subjects that had formed associations between objects and two different primary reinforcers (foods) were presented with choices of objects overlying the two different foods. When one of the two foods was devalued by selective satiation, the subjects shifted their choices toward the objects that represented the nonsated food reward (devaluation effect). Transient inactivation of OFC by infusions of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol into area 13 blocked the devaluation effect: the monkeys did not reduce their selection of objects associated with the devalued food. This effect was observed when OFC was inactivated during both satiation and the choice test, and during the choice test only. This supports our hypothesis that OFC activity is required during the postsatiety object choice period to guide the selection of objects. This finding sharply contrasts with the role of BLA in the same devaluation process (Wellman et al., 2005). Whereas activity in BLA was required during the selective satiation procedure, it was not necessary for guiding the subsequent object choice. Our results are the first to demonstrate that transient inactivation of OFC is sufficient to disrupt the devaluation effect, and to document a role for OFC distinct from that of BLA for the conditioned reinforcer devaluation process in monkeys.

  13. The loss of PGAM5 suppresses the mitochondrial degeneration caused by inactivation of PINK1 in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzuru Imai

    Full Text Available PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1, which is required for mitochondrial homeostasis, is a gene product responsible for early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD. Another early onset PD gene product, Parkin, has been suggested to function downstream of the PINK1 signalling pathway based on genetic studies in Drosophila. PINK1 is a serine/threonine kinase with a predicted mitochondrial target sequence and a probable transmembrane domain at the N-terminus, while Parkin is a RING-finger protein with ubiquitin-ligase (E3 activity. However, how PINK1 and Parkin regulate mitochondrial activity is largely unknown. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction between PINK1 and Parkin, we biochemically purified PINK1-binding proteins from human cultured cells and screened the genes encoding these binding proteins using Drosophila PINK1 (dPINK1 models to isolate a molecule(s involved in the PINK1 pathology. Here we report that a PINK1-binding mitochondrial protein, PGAM5, modulates the PINK1 pathway. Loss of Drosophila PGAM5 (dPGAM5 can suppress the muscle degeneration, motor defects, and shorter lifespan that result from dPINK1 inactivation and that can be attributed to mitochondrial degeneration. However, dPGAM5 inactivation fails to modulate the phenotypes of parkin mutant flies. Conversely, ectopic expression of dPGAM5 exacerbated the dPINK1 and Drosophila parkin (dParkin phenotypes. These results suggest that PGAM5 negatively regulates the PINK1 pathway related to maintenance of the mitochondria and, furthermore, that PGAM5 acts between PINK1 and Parkin, or functions independently of Parkin downstream of PINK1.

  14. Inactivation of murine norovirus on a range of copper alloy surfaces is accompanied by loss of capsid integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L; Summersgill, Emma N; Keevil, C William

    2015-02-01

    Norovirus is one of the most common causes of acute viral gastroenteritis. The virus is spread via the fecal-oral route, most commonly from infected food and water, but several outbreaks have originated from contamination of surfaces with infectious virus. In this study, a close surrogate of human norovirus causing gastrointestinal disease in mice, murine norovirus type 1 (MNV-1), retained infectivity for more than 2 weeks following contact with a range of surface materials, including Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE]), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), ceramic tiles, glass, silicone rubber, and stainless steel. Persistence was slightly prolonged on ceramic surfaces. A previous study in our laboratory observed that dry copper and copper alloy surfaces rapidly inactivated MNV-1 and destroyed the viral genome. In this new study, we have observed that a relatively small change in the percentage of copper, between 70 and 80% in copper nickels and 60 and 70% in brasses, had a significant influence on the ability of the alloy to inactivate norovirus. Nickel alone did not affect virus, but zinc did have some antiviral effect, which was synergistic with copper and resulted in an increased efficacy of brasses with lower percentages of copper. Electron microscopy of purified MNV-1 that had been exposed to copper and stainless steel surfaces suggested that a massive breakdown of the viral capsid had occurred on copper. In addition, MNV-1 that had been exposed to copper and treated with RNase demonstrated a reduction in viral gene copy number. This suggests that capsid integrity is compromised upon contact with copper, allowing copper ion access to the viral genome.

  15. Construction of Bordetella pertussis strains with enhanced production of genetically-inactivated Pertussis Toxin and Pertactin by unmarked allelic exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buasri Wasin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acellular Pertussis vaccines against whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis present a much-improved safety profile compared to the original vaccine of killed whole cells. The principal antigen of acellular Pertussis vaccine, Pertussis Toxin (PT, must be chemically inactivated to obtain the corresponding toxoid (PTd. This process, however, results in extensive denaturation of the antigen. The development of acellular Pertussis vaccines containing PTd or recombinant PT (rPT with inactivated S1, Filamentous Hemagglutinin (FHA, and Pertactin (PRN has shown that the yield of PRN was limiting, whereas FHA was overproduced. To improve antigen yields and process economics, we have constructed strains of Bordetella pertussis that produce enhanced levels of both rPT and PRN. Results Three recombinant strains of Bordetella pertussis were obtained by homologous recombination using an allelic exchange vector, pSS4245. In the first construct, the segment encoding PT subunit S1 was replaced by two mutations (R9K and E129G that removed PT toxicity and Bp-WWC strain was obtained. In the second construct, a second copy of the whole cluster of PT structural genes containing the above mutations was inserted elsewhere into the chromosome of Bp-WWC and the Bp-WWD strain was obtained. This strain generated increased amounts of rPT (3.77 ± 0.53 μg/mL compared to Bp-WWC (2.61 ± 0.16 μg/mL and wild type strain (2.2 μg/mL. In the third construct, a second copy of the prn gene was inserted into the chromosome of Bp-WWD to obtain Bp-WWE. Strain Bp-WWE produced PRN at 4.18 ± 1.02 μg/mL in the cell extract which was about two-fold higher than Bp-WWC (2.48 ± 0.10 μg/mL and Bp-WWD (2.31 ± 0.17 μg/mL. Purified PTd from Bp-WWD at 0.8-1.6 μg/well did not show any toxicity against Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell whereas purified PT from WT demonstrated a cell clustering endpoint at 2.6 pg/well. Conclusions We have constructed Bordetella

  16. Randomized Trials Comparing Inactivated Vaccine after Medium- or High-titer Measles Vaccine with Standard Titer Measles Vaccine after Inactivated Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Benn, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have suggested that girls have higher mortality if their most recent immunization is an inactivated vaccine rather than a live vaccine. We therefore reanalyzed 5 randomized trials of early measles vaccine (MV) in which it was possible to compare an inactivated va...

  17. Functional Analysis of a Type-I Ribosome Inactivating Protein Balsamin from Momordica balsamina with Anti-Microbial and DNase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajji, Parminder Kaur; Walder, Ken; Puri, Munish

    2016-09-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) have received considerable attention in biomedical research because of their unique activities towards tumor and virus-infected cells. We extracted balsamin, a type-I RIP, from Momordica balsamina. In the present study, a detailed investigation on DNase activity, antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity was conducted using purified balsamin. DNase-like activity of balsamin towards plasmid DNA was pH, incubation time and temperature dependent. Moreover, the presence of Mg(2+) (10-50 mM) influenced the DNA cleavage activity. Balsamin also demonstrated reducing power and a capacity to scavenge free radicals in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the protein exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli, which suggests potential utility of balsamin as a nutraceutical.

  18. Inactivation of pectin methylesterase by immobilized trypsins from cunner fish and bovine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Matos, Madyu; Simpson, Benjamin K

    2013-01-01

    Immobilized cunner fish trypsin was used to inactivate pectin methylesterase (PME). The effects of different reaction conditions (e.g., incubation time, PME concentration, and temperature) on PME inactivation and kinetics of inactivation were investigated. Temperature, incubation time, and PME concentration significantly affected the extent of PME inactivation. Generally, higher temperature, longer incubation time, and low PME concentration caused more PME inactivation. The immobilized fish trypsin had higher capacity to inactivate PME than immobilized bovine trypsin. The inactivation efficiency of the immobilized fish trypsin was about 20% higher than that of its bovine counterpart. However, PME inactivated by both trypsins regained partial activity during storage at 4°C, with immobilized fish trypsin-treated PME regaining more of its original activity than the immobilized bovine trypsin-treated PME. Heat-denatured PME was hydrolyzed more extensively by immobilized fish trypsin than by its bovine counterpart. The rate constants increased, whereas the D-values decreased with temperature for both immobilized fish and bovine trypsins. The inactivation rate constants of immobilized fish trypsin at all the temperatures investigated (i.e., 15-35°C) were higher than those of immobilized bovine trypsin. Furthermore, the activation energy (Ea ) of PME inactivation by immobilized fish trypsin was lower than that of immobilized bovine trypsin.

  19. Efficacies of inactivated vaccines against betanodavirus in grouper larvae (Epinephelus coioides) by bath immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Yu-Hsuan; Chi, Shau-Chi

    2008-03-10

    Betanodavirus is the pathogen of viral nervous necrosis (VNN) disease that has caused mass mortality among many species of marine fish at larval stage. In this study, the efficacy of inactivated betanodavirus was evaluated by bath-immunization and bath-challenge of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) at early larval stage. Two kinds of chemicals were used for inactivation of the virus, and the relative percent survival (RPS) values of 0.4mM binary ethylenimine (BEI)-inactivated vaccine was revealed to be 79-95, higher than that of 0.1-0.2% formalin-inactivated vaccines (39-43). Three lengths of bath immunization time were tested, and 20 min immersion of BEI-inactivated betanodavirus at a concentration of 10(6)TICD(50)/ml was sufficient to induce high protection (RPS > 75). Protection of the BEI-inactivated vaccine was evaluated at different time post immunization, and the peak of protection was observed 30 days post vaccination, and retained for at least 3 months. The efficacies of formalin-inactivated vaccines with or without encapsulation were compared, and the result revealed that the efficacy of formalin-inactivated vaccine could be significantly improved by nano-encapsulation (RPS = 85). All these data strongly suggested that bath immunization with nano-encapsulated formalin-inactivated or BEI-inactivated betanodavirus vaccines is an effective strategy to protect grouper larvae against VNN.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase: a purified enzyme for the mild hydrolysis of steroid sulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Bradley J; Waller, Christopher C; Ma, Paul; Li, Kunkun; Cawley, Adam T; Ollis, David L; McLeod, Malcolm D

    2015-10-01

    The hydrolysis of sulfate ester conjugates is frequently required prior to analysis for a range of analytical techniques including gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sulfate hydrolysis may be achieved with commercial crude arylsulfatase enzyme preparations such as that derived from Helix pomatia but these contain additional enzyme activities such as glucuronidase, oxidase, and reductase that make them unsuitable for many analytical applications. Strong acid can also be used to hydrolyze sulfate esters but this can lead to analyte degradation or increased matrix interference. In this work, the heterologously expressed and purified arylsulfatase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shown to promote the mild enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of a range of steroid sulfates. The substrate scope of this P. aeruginosa arylsulfatase hydrolysis is compared with commercial crude enzyme preparations such as that derived from H. pomatia. A detailed kinetic comparison is reported for selected examples. Hydrolysis in a urine matrix is demonstrated for dehydroepiandrosterone 3-sulfate and epiandrosterone 3-sulfate. The purified P. aeruginosa arylsulfatase contains only sulfatase activity allowing for the selective hydrolysis of sulfate esters in the presence of glucuronide conjugates as demonstrated in the short three-step chemoenzymatic synthesis of 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol 17-glucuronide (ADG, 1) from epiandrosterone 3-sulfate. The P. aeruginosa arylsulfatase is readily expressed and purified (0.9 g per L of culture) and thus provides a new and selective method for the hydrolysis of steroid sulfate esters in analytical sample preparation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Speech intelligibility while wearing full-facepiece air-purifying respirators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Karen M; Barker, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Intelligible speech communication while wearing air-purifying respirators is critical for law enforcement officers, particularly when they are communicating with each other or the public. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) requires a 70% overall performance rating to pass speech intelligibility certification for commercial chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear air-purifying respirators. However, the speech intelligibility of certified respirators is not reported and the impact on operational performance is unknown. The objective of this effort was to assess the speech intelligibility of 12 certified air-purifying respirators and to predict their impact on operational performance. The NIOSH respirator certification standard testing procedures were followed. Regression equations were fit to data from studies that examined the impact of degraded speech intelligibility on operational performance of simple and complex missions. The impact of the tested respirators on operational performance was estimated from these equations. Performance ratings observed for each respirator were: MSA Millennium (90%), 3M FR-M40 (88%), MSA Ultra Elite (87%), Scott M110 (86%), North 5400 (85%), Scott M120 (85%), Avon C50 (84%), Avon FM12 (84%), Survivair Optifit (81%), Drager CDR 4500 (81%), Peltor-AOSafety M-TAC (79%), and 3M FR-7800B (78%). The Millennium and FR-M40 had statistically significantly higher scores than the FR-7800B. The Millennium also scored significantly higher than the M-TAC. All of the tested respirators were predicted to have little impact on simple and complex mission performance times and on simple mission success rate. However, the regression equations showed that 75% of missions that require complex communications would be completed while wearing the Millennium, FR-M40, or Ultra Elite but that only 60% would be completed successfully while wearing the FR-7800B. These results suggest that some certified respirators may have

  2. Biochemical properties of gastrokine-1 purified from chicken gizzard smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Hnia

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: The potential role and function of gastrokine-1 (GNK1 in smooth muscle cells is investigated in this work by first establishing a preparative protocol to obtain this native protein from freshly dissected chicken gizzard. Some unexpected biochemical properties of gastrokine-1 were deduced by producing specific polyclonal antibody against the purified protein. We focused on the F-actin interaction with gastrokine-1 and the potential role and function in smooth muscle contractile properties. BACKGROUND: GNK1 is thought to provide mucosal protection in the superficial gastric epithelium. However, the actual role of gastrokine-1 with regards to its known decreased expression in gastric cancer is still unknown. Recently, trefoil factors (TFF were reported to have important roles in gastric epithelial regeneration and cell turnover, and could be involved in GNK1 interactions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role and function of GNK1 in smooth muscle cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From fresh chicken gizzard smooth muscle, an original purification procedure was used to purify a heat soluble 20 kDa protein that was sequenced and found to correspond to the gastrokine-1 protein sequence containing one BRICHOS domain and at least two or possibly three transmembrane regions. The purified protein was used to produce polyclonal antibody and highlighted the smooth muscle cell distribution and F-actin association of GNK1 through a few different methods. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether our data illustrate a broader distribution of gastrokine-1 in smooth muscle than only in the gastrointestinal epithelium, and the specific interaction with F-actin highlights and suggests a new role and function of GNK1 within smooth muscle cells. A potential role via TFF interaction in cell-cell adhesion and assembly of actin stress fibres is discussed.

  3. The respiratory burst oxidase of human neutrophils. Further studies of the purified enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, G A; DeLisle, D M; DeTogni, P; Gabig, T G; Magee, B H; Markert, M; Babior, B M

    1986-10-05

    A superoxide-forming oxidase from activated human neutrophil membranes was solubilized by two slightly different methods, then purified by "dye-affinity" chromatography. Kinetic studies of the purified preparations gave Vmax values of 5-10 mumol of O-2/min/mg of protein, and Km values for NADH and NADPH that were in reasonable agreement with values determined previously using particulate and crude solubilized preparations of the respiratory burst oxidase. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed prominent bands at 67, 48, and 32 kDa, together with some minor contaminants, whereas gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions gave a single major band that when eluted and re-electrophoresed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate showed bands at 67, 48, 32 kDa. We believe that all three bands represent oxidase components. The flavin content of the purified enzyme was 20.4 +/- 2.0 S.E. pmol of FAD/microgram of protein, whereas heme averaged 0.1 +/- 0.02 pmol/microgram and ubiquinone could not be detected. Assuming that the enzyme is composed of one 67-kDa subunit, one 48-kDa subunit, and one 32-kDa subunit (i.e. that its molecular mass is approximately 150 kDa), it can be calculated to have a turnover number of 700-1500 min-1, in agreement with a value reported previously for oxidase in a particulate O-2-forming system (Cross, A. R., Parkinson, J. F., and Jones, O. T. G. (1985) Biochem. J. 226, 881-884), and to contain the following quantities of redox carriers (mol/mol): FAD, 3.0; heme, 0.015; ubiquinone, less than 0.06. It remains to be determined whether this preparation represents the complete respiratory burst oxidase or is only the pyridine nucleotide dehydrogenating component of a more complex enzyme.

  4. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  5. Toxicity and immunogenicity of purified Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wising, Catharina; Svensson, Liselott A; Ahmed, Hinda J; Sundaeus, Vivianne; Ahlman, Karin; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Mölne, Lena; Lagergård, Teresa

    2002-08-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin of Haemophilus ducreyi (HdCDT) is a three-component toxin that induces the arrest of the mammalian cell cycle in the G2 phase. All of the individual gene products, CdtA, CdtB and CdtC, are required for toxic activity on cultured mammalian cells. The CdtB component alone exerts nuclease activity. The individual HdCDT components were purified by affinity chromatography or ion-exchange chromatography followed by gel-filtration. HdCDT was reconstituted and purified by the immobilization of a GST-CdtB fusion on a GSTrap column and the subsequent addition of cell sonicates from Escherichia coli recombinants that produced CdtA and CdtC. The purified HdCDT preparation contained all three CDT proteins, as detected by immuno-blotting, and had high cytotoxic activity (10(6)CPU/ml). Immunization of rabbits with the HdCDT complex and with the individual CdtA, CdtB and CdtC proteins elicited high titres of antibodies, as detected by ELISA. All of the immune sera had toxin-neutralizing activities. The pathological effects of the HdCDT complex were investigated in rabbits, since the proliferation of two rabbit cell lines, SIRC and RK-13, was inhibited by HdCDT. Intradermal injection of HdCDT (1, 10, 50 and 100microg protein) into naive rabbits resulted in dose-dependent skin reactions (erythema) about 24h after injection. Similar effects were not observed when the individual HdCDT proteins were injected. HdCDT injection into immune rabbits resulted in dose-dependent skin responses that were characterized by both erythema and oedema. Histological evaluation of the 24-h lesions in naive rabbits that were injected with HdCDT, revealed moderate levels of inflammatory cells, which were mainly granulocytes and macrophages, and dilatation of blood vessels. The skin reactions in HdCDT-injected immunized rabbits showed pronounced vascular changes and extensive infiltration of inflammatory cells, including eosinophils. All of the pathological changes healed

  6. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Robert A.; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M. (NCI); (Cornell); (CM); (NIST)

    2016-05-06

    Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactionsin vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particlesin vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interactionin vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization.

    Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our

  7. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes purified and cut using polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Yudasaka, M.; Koshio, A.; Jabs, C.; Ichihashi, T.; Iijima, S.

    2002-01-01

    Following on from our previous report that a monochlorobenzene solution of polymethylmethacrylate is useful for purifying and cutting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and thinning SWNT bundles, we show in this report that polymer and residual amorphous carbon can be removed by burning in oxygen gas. The SWNTs thus obtained had many holes (giving them a worm-eaten look) and were thermally unstable. Such severe damage caused by oxidation is unusual for SWNTs; we think that they were chemically damaged during ultrasonication in the monochlorobenzene solution of polymethylmethacrylate.

  8. Specific IgE response to purified and recombinant allergens in latex allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Siti AM

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, allergy to natural rubber latex has emerged as a major allergy among certain occupational groups and patients with underlying diseases. The sensitization and development of latex allergy has been attributed to exposure to products containing residual latex proteins. Although improved manufacturing procedures resulted in a considerable reduction of new cases, the potential risk for some patient groups is still great. In addition the prevalent cross-reactivity of latex proteins with other food allergens poses a major concern. A number of purified allergens and a few commercial kits are currently available, but no concerted effort was undertaken to evaluate them. Methods We studied 11 purified latex allergens, Hev b 1 to Hev b 10, and Hev b 13 along with several crude allergen extracts and two commercial ImmunoCAP assays to evaluate specific IgE antibody in the sera from latex allergic patients and controls. Health care workers and spina bifida patients with clinical symptoms of latex allergy, spina bifida patients without latex allergy, and non-atopic health care workers have been studied. Results The results suggest that Hev b 2, 5, 6, and 13 together identified over 80 percent health care workers with latex allergy, while Hev b 6 along with Hev b 1 or 3 detected specific IgE antibody in all sera studied from patients with spina bifida and latex allergy. The ImmunoCAP results using both Hev b 5 amplified and non-amplified closely agreed with the clinical diagnosis of latex allergy in health care workers and in spina bifida. Conclusion Although the purified allergens and crude extracts reacted diversely with IgE from different patient groups, the results indicated that use of certain combinations of purified recombinant antigens will be useful in commercial kits or in in-house assays for detecting specific IgE antibody in the sera. The results suggest that a combination of Hev b 2, 3, 5, 6, and 13 together

  9. Purified umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment in a case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christopher D; Wongsaisri, Pornpatcharin; Htut, Thein; Grossman, Terry

    2017-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiple organ system autoimmune disorder for which there is no known cure. We report a case of a young adult lady with SLE and Sjogren's with diagnostic and clinical resolution following purified umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and globulin component protein macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) therapy in a combined multidisciplinary integrative medicine protocol. Our patient had complete reversal of all clinical and laboratory markers. We recommend a prospective randomized double blind study to assess the sustained efficacy of MSC and GcMAF in the treatment of autoimmune connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus.

  10. New Method Developed To Purify Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable attention because of their remarkable mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivities. Use of these materials as primary or secondary reinforcements in polymers or ceramics could lead to new materials with significantly enhanced mechanical strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. Use of carbon-nanotube-reinforced materials in aerospace components will enable substantial reductions in component weight and improvements in durability and safety. Potential applications for single wall carbon nanotubes include lightweight components for vehicle structures and propulsion systems, fuel cell components (bipolar plates and electrodes) and battery electrodes, and ultra-lightweight materials for use in solar sails. A major barrier to the successful use of carbon nanotubes in these components is the need for methods to economically produce pure carbon nanotubes in large enough quantities to not only evaluate their suitability for certain applications but also produce actual components. Most carbon nanotube synthesis methods, including the HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) method developed by Smalley and others, employ metal catalysts that remain trapped in the final product. These catalyst impurities can affect nanotube properties and accelerate their decomposition. The development of techniques to remove most, if not all, of these impurities is essential to their successful use in practical applications. A new method has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to purify gram-scale quantities of single wall carbon nanotubes. This method, a modification of a gas phase purification technique previously reported by Smalley and others, uses a combination of high-temperature oxidations and repeated extractions with nitric and hydrochloric acid. This improved procedure significantly reduces the amount of impurities (catalyst and nonnanotube forms of carbon) within the nanotubes, increasing

  11. Induction of ovulation in rabbit does using purified nerve growth factor and camel seminal plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Masdeu, M.; García García, R. M.; Cardinali, R.; Millán, P.; Arias Álvarez, M.; C. Castellini; LORENZO, P. L.; Garcia Rebollar, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The presence of an ovulation-inducing factor (OIF) in the seminal plasma (SP) of several species with spontaneous and induced ovulation, including the rabbit, has been documented. Recent studies have demonstrated that the OIF in the SP of camels (SPCAM) is a nerve growth factor (β-NGF). The aim of this study was to determine if purified β-NGF from mouse submandibular glands or SPCAM could provoke ovulation induction in the rabbit doe. A total of 35 females were synchronized with 25 IU of equi...

  12. Ligand interaction with the purified serotonin transporter in solution and at the air/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faivre, V.; Manivet, P.; Callaway, J.C.; Morimoto, H.; Airaksinen, M.M.; Baszkin, A.; Launay, J.M.; Rosilio, V.

    2000-06-01

    The purified serotonin transporter (SERT) was spread at the air/water interface and the effects both of its surface density and of the temperature on its interfacial behavior were studied. The recorded isotherms evidenced the existence of a stable monolayer undergoing a lengthy rearrangement. SERT/ligand interactions appeared to be dependent on the nature of the studied molecules. Whereas an unrelated drug (chlorcyclizine) did not bind to the spread SERT, it interacted with its specific ligands. Compared to heterocyclic drugs, for which binding appeared to be concentration-dependent, a 'two-site' mechanism was evidenced for pinoline and imipramine.

  13. Scheme for purifying a general mixed entangled state and its linear optical implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董冬; 张延磊; 邹长铃; 邹旭波; 郭光灿

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for purification of a general mixed entangled state. In this scheme, we start from a large number of general mixed entangled states and end up, after local operation and classical communication, with a smaller number of Bell diagonal states with higher entanglement. In particular, the scheme can purify one maximally entangled state from two entangled pairs prepared in a class of mixed entangled state. Furthermore we propose a linear optical implementation of the present scheme with polarization beam splitters and photon detectors.

  14. Data on the identity and myristoylation state of recombinant, purified hippocalcin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Krishnan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this data article we report on the purity and post translation modification of bacterially expressed and purified recombinant hippocalcin (HPCA: a member of the neuronal calcium sensor protein family, whose functions are regulated by calcium. MALDI-TOF in source decay (ISD analysis was used to identify both the myristoylated or non-myristoylated forms of the protein. MALDI-TOF ISD data on the identity of the protein, amino acid sequence and myristoylation efficiency are provided. This data relates to the article “Single-Column Purification of the Tag-free, Recombinant Form of the Neuronal Calcium Sensor Protein, Hippocalcin Expressed in Eschericia coli” [1].

  15. Induction of apoptosis in purified animal and plant nuclei by Xenopus egg extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGZHENGFAN; SHANZHU; 等

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a cell-free system that can trigger the nuclei purified from mouse liver and suspensioncultured carrot cells to undergo apoptosis as defined by the formation of apoptotic bodies and nucleosomal DNA fragments.The effects of different divalent cations and cycloheximide on DNA cleavage in this system were assessed.The fact that nuclei of plant cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis in a cell-free animal system suggests that animals and plants share a common signal transduction pathway triggering in the initiation stage of apoptosis.

  16. Assessing the functionality of viral entry-associated domains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus during inactivation procedures, a potential tool to optimize inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, Iris; Delputte, Peter L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2009-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes severe economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. Currently, vaccines based on inactivated PRRSV provide limited protection of pigs against infection, most likely because viral epitopes associated with the induction of neutralizing antibodies are not or poorly conserved during inactivation. To analyze the effect of inactivation procedures on the interaction of PRRSV with receptors involved in virus entry, a new assay was set up in this study. Viral entry-associated domains are most likely important for the induction of neutralizing antibodies, since neutralizing antibodies block interaction of PRRSV with cellular receptors. To investigate the interaction of PRRSV with the cellular receptors upon different inactivation procedures, attachment to and internalization of inactivated PRRSV into macrophages were monitored. AT-2 could not inactivate PRRSV completely and is therefore not useful for vaccine development. PRRSV inactivated with ultraviolet light, binary ethyleneimine and gamma irradiation, which all mainly have an effect at the genomic level, showed no difference compared to control live virus at all levels of virus entry, whereas PRRSV treated with formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and pH changes, which all have a modifying effect on proteins, was not able to internalize into macrophages anymore. These results suggest that inactivation with methods with a main effect on the viral genome preserve PRRSV entry-associated domains and are useful for future development of an effective inactivated vaccine against PRRSV. Although PRRSV incubation at 37 degrees C can completely inactivate PRRSV with preservation of entry-associated domains, this method is not recommended for vaccine development, since the mechanism is yet unknown.

  17. Envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV purified with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin induce strong immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilljam, G

    1993-05-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography was used to purify in a single step the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. Envelope glycoproteins carry the major determinants essential for protection by the humoral immune response. The purification of these proteins has previously been a laborious procedure. The glycoproteins were purified by a one-step procedure to a high level of purity by using Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA). The purified glycoprotein had CD4-binding and antigenic reactivities. Strong immune responses to envelope proteins and peptides were seen in mice and primates after immunization with these preparations.

  18. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-01-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxi...

  19. Quantum filtering of a thermal master equation with a purified reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Mancini, Stefano; Wiseman, Howard M.; Serafini, Alessio

    2014-12-01

    We consider a system subject to a quantum optical master equation at finite temperature and study a class of conditional dynamics obtained by monitoring its totally or partially purified environment. More specifically, drawing from the notion that the thermal state of the environment may be regarded as the local state of a lossy and noisy two-mode squeezed state, we consider conditional dynamics ("unravellings") resulting from the homodyne detection of the two modes of such a state. Thus, we identify a class of unravellings parametrized by the loss rate suffered by the environmental two-mode state, which interpolate between direct detection of the environmental mode alone (occurring for total loss, whereby no correlation between the two environmental modes is left) and full access to the purification of the bath (occurring when no loss is acting and the two-mode state of the environment is pure). We hence show that, while direct detection of the bath is not able to reach the maximal steady-state squeezing allowed by general-dyne unravellings, such optimal values can be obtained when a fully purified bath is accessible. More generally we show that, within our framework, any degree of access to the bath purification improves the performance of filtering protocols in terms of achievable squeezing and entanglement.

  20. Decolorization of the textile dyes using purified banana pulp polyphenol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Umesh U; Dawkar, Vishal V; Jadhav, Mital U; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2011-04-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) purified using DEAE-cellulose and Biogel P-100 column chromatography from banana pulp showed 12.72-fold activity and 2.49% yield. The optimum temperature and pH were found to be 30 degrees C and 7.0, respectively for its activity. Catechol was found to be a suitable substrate for banana pulp PPO that showed V(max), 0.041 mM min(-1) and K(m), 1.6 mM. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sodium metabisulfite, citric acid, cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol at 10 mM concentration. The purified enzyme could decolorize (90%) Direct Red 5B (160 microg mL(-1)) dye within 48 h and Direct Blue GLL (400 microg mL(-1)) dye up to 85% within 90 h. The GC-MS analysis indicated the presence of 4-hydroxy-benzenesulfonic acid and Naphthalene-1,2,3,6-tetraol in the degradation products of Direct Red 5B, and 5-(4-Diazenyl-naphthalene-1-ylazo)-8-hydroxy-naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid and 2-(4-Diazenyl-naphthalene-1-ylazo)-benzenesulfonic acid in the degradation products of Direct Blue GLL.