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Sample records for purex plant gaseous

  1. PUREX Plant deactivation mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project mission analysis is to define the problem to be addressed by the PUREX mission, and to lay the ground work for further system definition. The mission analysis is an important first step in the System Engineering (SE) process. This report presents the results of the PUREX Deactivation Project mission analysis. The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to prepare PUREX for Decontamination and Decommissioning within a five year time frame. This will be accomplished by establishing a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of the PUREX Plant, that can be preserved for a 10-year horizon. During deactivation, appropriate portions of the safety envelop will be maintained to ensure deactivation takes place in a safe and regulatory compliant manner

  2. A process to remove ammonia from PUREX plant effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Zirconium-clad nuclear fuel from the Hanford N-Reactor is reprocessed in the PUREX (Plutonium Uranium Extraction) Plant operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Comapny. Before dissolution, cladding is chemically removed from the fuel elements with a solution of ammonium fluoride-ammonium nitrate (AFAN). a solution batch with an ammonia equivalent of about 1,100 kg is added to each fuel batch of 10 metric tons. This paper reports on this decladding process, know as the 'Zirflex' process which produces waste streams containing ammonia and ammonium slats. Waste stream treatment, includes ammonia scrubbing, scrub solution evaporation, residual solids dissolution, and chemical neutralization. These processes produce secondary liquid and gaseous waste streams containing varying concentrations of ammonia and low-level concentrations of radionuclides. Until legislative restrictions were imposed in 1987, these secondary streams were released to the soil in a liquid disposal 'crib' and to the atmosphere

  3. PUREX Plant deactivation function analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate PUREX

  4. PUREX Plant aggregate area management study technical baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFord, D.H.; Carpenter, R.W.

    1995-05-01

    The PUREX aggregate area is made up of six operable units; 200-PO-1 through 200-PO-6 and consists of liquid and solid waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, PUREX Plant operations. This report describes PUREX and its waste sites, including cribs, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches and ditches, ponds, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, underground tank farms, and the lines and encasements that connect them. Each waste site in the aggregate area is described separately. Close relationships between waste units, such as overflow from one to another, are also discussed. This document provides a technical baseline of the aggregate area and results from an environmental investigation. This document is based upon review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, drawings and photographs, supplemented with site inspections and employee interviews. No intrusive field investigations or sampling were conducted

  5. Solvent distillation studies for a purex reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, C.; Guillaume, B.

    1990-01-01

    A distillation system has been developed for regeneration of Purex solvent and will be implemented for the first time in a reprocessing plant. The results are described and analyzed, with emphasis on laboratory experiments which were made with a radioactive plant solvent. Particularly the distillation provides a good separation of solvent degradation products, which was verified by measurements of interfacial tension and plutonium or ruthenium retention. 16 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Pretreatment of Hanford purex plant first-cycle waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, M.W.; Gerboth, D.M.; Peters, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    A process has been developed to pretreat neutralized, first-cycle high-level waste from the fuels reprocessing facility (PUREX Plant) at the Hanford Site. The process separates solids from the supernate liquid, which contains soluble salts. The solids, including most of the fission products and transuranic elements, may then be vitrified for disposal, while the low-level supernate stream may be processed into a less expensive grout waste form. The process also includes ion exchange treatment of the separated supernate stream to remove radiocesium. A flow sheet based on these operations was completed to support a planned demonstration of the process in the Hanford site B Plant canyon facility

  7. Advanced Purex process for the new French reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, M.; Ledermann, P.; Pradel, P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the main process innovations of the new Cogema reprocessing plants of La Hague (UP3 and UP2 800). Major improvements of process like the use of rotary dissolvers and annular columns, and also entirely new processes like solvent distillation and plutonium oxidizing dissolution, yield an advanced Purex process. The results of these innovations are significant improvements for throughput, end-products purification performances and waste minimization. They contribute also to limit personnel exposure. The main results of the first three years of operation are described. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs

  8. TBP and diluent mass balances in the PUREX Plant at Hanford, 1955--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sederburg, J.P.; Reddick, J.A.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop an estimate of the quantities of tributyl phosphate and diluent discharged in aqueous waste streams to the tank farms from the Hanford Purex Plant over its operating life. Purex was not the sole source of organics in the tank farms, but was a major contributor. Tributyl phosphate (TBP) and diluent, which changed from Shell E-2342 reg-sign to Soltrol-170 reg-sign and then to normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH), were organic chemicals used in the Purex solvent extraction process at Hanford to separate plutonium and uranium from spent nuclear fuels. This report is an estimate of the material balances for these chemicals in the Purex Plant at Hanford over its entire operating life. The Purex Plant had cold start up in November 1955 and shut down in 1990. It's process used a solution of 30 vol% TBP in diluent

  9. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, N.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD)

  10. Functional design criteria for the 242-A evaporator and PUREX [Plutonium-Uranium Extraction] Plant condensate interim retention basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cejka, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains the functional design criteria for a 26- million-gallon retention basin and 10 million gallons of temporary storage tanks. The basin and tanks will be used to store 242-A Evaporator process condensate, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process distillate discharge stream, and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate stream. Completion of the project will allow both the 242-A Evaporator and the PUREX Plant to restart. 4 refs

  11. Delisting strategy for the Hanford Site 242-A Evaporator PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes the strategy that the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office intends to use in preparing the delisting petition for the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility. Because the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility will not be operational until 1994, the delisting petition will be structured as an up-front petition based on the ''multiple waste treatment facility'' approach outline in the 1985 US Environmental Protection Agency's Petitions to Delist Hazardous Waste. The 242-A evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility effluent characterization data will not be available to support the delisting petition, because the delisting petition will be submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency before start-up of the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility. Therefore, the delisting petition will be based on data collected during the pilot plant testing for the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility. This pilot plant testing will be conducted on synthetic waste. The composition of the synthetic waste will be based on: (1) constituents of regulatory concern, and (2) on process knowledge. The pilot plant testing will be performed to determine the removal efficiencies of the process equipment at concentrations greater than reasonably could be expected in the actual waste. This strategy document also describes the logic used to develop the synthetic waste, to develop the pilot plant testing program, and to prepare the delisting petition. This strategy document also described how full-scale operating data will be collected during initial operation of the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility to verify information presented in the delisting petition

  12. Environmental report of Purex Plant and Uranium Oxide Plant - Hanford reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    A description of the site, program, and facilities is given. The data and calculations indicate that there will be no significant adverse environmental impact from the resumption of full-scale operations of the Purex and Uranium Oxide Plants. All significant pathways of radionuclides in Purex Plant effluents are evaluated. This includes submersion in the airborne effluent plumes, consumption of drinking water and foodstuffs irrigated with Columbia River water, ingestion of radioactive iodine through the cow-to-milk pathway, consumption of fish, and other less significant pathways. A summary of research and surveillance programs designed to assess the possible changes in the terresstrial and aquatic environments on or near the Hanford Reservation is presented. The nonradiological discharges to the environment of prinicpal interest are chemicals, sewage, and solid waste. These discharges will not lead to any significant adverse effects on the environment

  13. Ion exchange flowsheet for recovery of cesium from purex sludge supernatant at B Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Purex Sludge Supernatant (PSS) contains significant amounts of 137 Cs left after removal of strontium from fission product bearing Purex wastes. To remove cesium from PSS, an Ion Exchange Recovery system has been set up in Cells 17-21 at B Plant. The cesium that is recovered is stored within B Plant for eventual purification through the Cesium Purification process in Cell 38 and eventual encapsulation and storage in a powdered form at the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility. Cesium depleted waste streams from the Ion Exchange processes are transferred to underground storage

  14. Process specifications and standards for the 1970 thorium campaign in the Purex Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Cook, R.E.; Ritter, G.L.

    1970-01-01

    The process specifications and standards for thorium processing operations in the Purex Plant are presented. These specifications represent currently known limits within which plant processing conditions must be maintained to meet defined product requirements safely and with minimum effect on equipment service life. These specifications cover the general areas of feed, essential materials, and chemical hazards

  15. Criticality prevention specifications thorium--uranium-233 separations in the Purex Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheison, W.E.; Oberg, G.C.; Ritter, G.L.

    1970-01-01

    The specifications in this document define the limits or restrictions required to maintain an acceptably low probability of the occurrence of a nuclear chain reaction in the Purex Plant while processing irradiated thoria targets. These criticality prevention specifications do not stipulate the system, procedures, or mechanisms to permit operation within the limits or restrictions

  16. Chemical reactor for a PUREX reprocessing plant of 200Kg U/day capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveria Lopes, M.J. de.

    1974-03-01

    Dissolution of spent reactor fuels in Purex process is studied. Design of a chemical reactor for PWR elements, 3% enriched uranium dioxide with zircaloy cladding, for a 200Kg/day uranium plant is the main objective. Chop-leach process is employed and 7.5M nitric acid is used. Non-criticality was obtained by safe geometry and checked by spectrum homogeneous calculus and diffusion codes. Fuel cycle is considered and decladding and dissolution are treated more accurately

  17. Advance purex process for the new reprocessing plants in France and in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, M.

    1991-01-01

    In the early Eighties, Japanese utilities formed the Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co (JNFS), which is in charge of the construction and the operation of the first commercial reprocessing plant in Japan to be erected in Rokkasho Village, Aomori Prefecture. Following a thorough worldwide examination of available processes and technologies, JNFS selected the French technology developed for UP3 and UP2 800 for the plants' main facilities. For these three new plants, the 40-year old PUREX process which is used worldwide for spent fuel reprocessing, has been significantly improved. This paper describes some of the innovative features of the selected processes

  18. Interface control document between PUREX/UO3 Plant Transition and Solid Waste Disposal Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    This interface control document (ICD) between PUREX/UO 3 Plant Transition (PPT) and Solid Waste Disposal Division (SWD) establishes at a top level the functional responsibilities of each division where interfaces exist between the two divisions. Since the PUREX Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions operate autonomously, it is important that each division has a clear understanding of the other division's expectations regarding these interfaces. This ICD primarily deals with solid wastes generated by the PPT. In addition to delineating functional responsibilities, the ICD includes a baseline description of those wastes that will require management as part of the interface between the divisions. The baseline description of wastes includes waste volumes and timing for use in planning the proper waste management capabilities: the primary purpose of this ICD is to ensure defensibility of expected waste stream volumes and Characteristics for future waste management facilities. Waste descriptions must be as complete as-possible to ensure adequate treatment, storage, and disposal capability will exist. The ICD also facilitates integration of existing or planned waste management capabilities of the PUREX. Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions. The ICD does not impact or affect the existing processes or procedures for shipping, packaging, or approval for shipping wastes by generators to the Solid Waste Division

  19. Data processing software for purex plant process control laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansara, V.P.; Achuthan, P.V.; Sridhar, S.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhumwad, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    A software has been developed at the Fuel Reprocessing Division, Trombay to meet the data processing needs of the Control Laboratory of a reprocessing plant. During the normal plant operations contents of over one hundred process tanks have to be sampled and analysed for regular monitoring. In order to speed up the computation and the reporting of results as well as to obtain the process performance data over a period of time a software has been developed. The package has been sucessfully demonstrated and implemented at the Plutonium Plant, Trombay. This has been in continuous use since May 1987 with highly satisfactory performance. The software is a totally menu-driven package which can be used by the laboratory analysts with a few hours of training. The features include data validation involving source tank identification, the nature of the sample, the range of expected results, any duplication in sample numbering etc. Audio indication of deviations from the expected input or output values are given with an option to override in case of abnormal samples. The progress of analysis can be obtained for a given sample at any given time. Incorporated in the software is the help menu for quick reference of analytical protocol to be followed for a given tank/method. The computations for the determinations are carried out after obtaining input values on a screen-form. Th e results can be displayed on the monitor or obtained in the form of a hard copy i n any desired format. (author). 17 figs., 2 refs

  20. Pretreatment of Hanford PUREX Plant first-cycle waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, M.W.; Gerboth, D.M.; Peters, B.B.

    1987-04-01

    A process has been developed to pretreat neutralized, first-cycle high-level waste from the fuels reprocessing facility at the Hanford Site. The process separates solids from the supernate liquid, which contains soluble salts. The solids, including most of the fission products and transuranic elements, may then be vitrified for disposal, while the low-level supernate stream may be processed into a less expensive grout waste form. The process also includes ion exchange treatment of the separated supernate stream to remove radiocesium. A flow sheet based on these operations was completed to support a planned demonstration of the process in the Hanford Site B Plant canyon facility. 5 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Recent studies related to head-end fuel processing at the Hanford PUREX plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the results of studies addressing several problems in the head-end processing (decladding, metathesis, and core dissolution) of N Reactor fuel elements in the Hanford PUREX plant. These studies were conducted over 2 years: FY 1986 and FY 1987. The studies were divided into three major areas: 1) differences in head-end behavior of fuels having different histories, 2) suppression of /sup 106/Ru volatilization when the ammonia scrubber solution resulting from decladding is decontaminated by distillation prior to being discharged, and 3) suitability of flocculating agents for lowering the amount of transuranic (TRU) element-containing solids that accompany the decladding solution to waste. 16 refs., 43 figs.

  2. PUREX facility hazards assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities

  3. Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starks, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The following aspects of the Purex Process are discussed: head end dissolution, first solvent extraction cycle, second plutonium solvent extraction cycle, second uranium solvent extraction cycle, solvent recovery systems, primary recovery column for high activity waste, low activity waste, laboratory waste evaporation, vessel vent system, airflow and filtration, acid recovery unit, fume recovery, and discharges to seepage basin

  4. The Tricastin gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergalant, J.; Lebrun, C.; Leduc, C.; Perrault, M.

    1975-01-01

    The building of the EURODIF plant began just over a year ago. The documents on which this enterprise was based were already assembled, which allowed construction work to start without delay. A brief description of the equipment is given, together with an approach to the problems of planning and estimates. Mention is also made of running problems and those related to safety in operation. The present state of the project promises a successful outcome, regarding both the production start-up schedule and the respecting of the building estimate [fr

  5. Plant air systems safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Air System facilities and operations are reviewed for potential safety problems not covered by standard industrial safety procedures. Information is presented under the following section headings: facility and process description (general); air plant equipment; air distribution system; safety systems; accident analysis; plant air system safety overview; and conclusion

  6. Operational experience of gaseous effluent treatment at the Eurochemic reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenco, A.; Detilleux, E.

    1977-01-01

    The EUROCHEMIC fuel reprocessing plant applies the PUREX flow sheet. Two particular features of the plant influence gaseous and liquid effluents: chemical decanning and the ability to process a wide range of fuels, uranium metal or oxide, having an initial enrichment typical of power reactors (up to 5%) or material testing reactors (up to 93%). The ventilation circuits, treatment plant and monitoring equipment for gaseous releases are briefly described. No retention facilities for rare gases, tritium, or carbon-14 are provided. The releases are monitored for krypton-85, iodine-131, alpha and beta-gamma aerosols and tritium. Between 1966 and 1974 the plant processes about 200 tonnes of power reactor fuel, from which about 0.7 tonnes of plutonium and 1.5 tonnes of highly enriched uranium were separated. The most important points in the operation of the gas cleaning equipment are indicated: efficiency, operational reliability, incidents, etc.. Actual discharges as measured are compared with the limits set in the operation licence. Using the atmospheric diffusion coefficients, the dose commitment is estimated. The low level liquid effluents are passed, after neutralization, to the treatment plant of the Belgian nuclear center CEN/SCK. However, if the activity exceeds the limit set by the CEN/SCK, the effluents are concentrated by evaporation and stored on the EUROCHEMIC site. (orig.) [de

  7. Adaptation of U(IV) reductant to Savannah River Plant Purex processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orebaugh, E.G.

    1986-04-01

    Partitioning of uranium and plutonium in the Purex process requires the reduction of the extracted Pu(IV) to the less extractable Pu(III). This valence adjustment at SRP has historically been performed by the addition of ferrous ion, which eventually constitutes a major component of high-level waste solids requiring costly permanent disposal. Uranous nitrate, U(IV), is a kinetically fast reductant which may be substituted for Fe(II) without contributing to waste solids. This report documents U(IV) flowsheet development in the miniature mixer-settler equipment at SRL and provides an insight into the mechanisms responsible for the successful direct substitution of U(IV) for Fe(II) in 1B bank extractant. U(IV) will be the reductant of choice when its fast reduction kinetics are required in centrifugal-contactor-based processing. The flowsheets investigated here should transfer to such equipment with minimal modifications

  8. PUREX transition project case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.

    1996-01-01

    In December 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed that the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant be shut down and deactivated because it was no longer needed to support the nation's production of weapons-grade plutonium. The PUREX/UO 2 Deactivation Project will establish a safe and environmentally secure configuration for the facility and preserve that configuration for 10 years. The 10-year span is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents the estimated time needed to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on decontamination and decommissioning activities. Accomplishing the deactivation project involves many activities. Removing major hazards, such as excess chemicals, spent fuel, and residual plutonium are major goals of the project. The scope of the PUREX Transition Project is described within

  9. Freezer-sublimer for gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reti, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for freezing and subliming uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) as part of a gaseous diffusion plant from which a quantity of the UF 6 inventory is intermittently withdrawn and frozen to solidify it. A plurality of upright heat pipes holds a coolant and is arranged in a two compartment vessel, the lower compartment is exposed to UF 6 , the higher one serves for condensing the evaporated coolant by means of cooling water. In one embodiment, each pipe has a quantity of coolant such as freon, hermetically sealded therein. In the other embodiment, each pipe is sealed only at the lower end while the upper end communicates with a common vapor or cooling chamber which contains a water cooled condenser. The cooling water has a sufficiently low temperature to condense the evaporated coolant. The liquid coolant flows gravitationally downward to the lower end portion of the pipe. UF 6 gas is flowed into the tank where it contacts the finned outside surface of the heat pipes. Heat from the gas evaporates the coolant and the gas in turn is solidified on the exterior of the heat pipe sections in the tank. To recover UF 6 gas from the tank, the solidified UF 6 is sublimed by passing compressed UF 6 gas over the frozen UF 6 gas on the pipes or by externally heating the lower ends of the pipes sufficiently to evaporate the coolant therein above the subliming temperature of the UF 6 . The subliming UF 6 gas then condenses the coolant in the vertical heat pipes, so that it can gravitationally flow back to the lower end portions

  10. PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources

  11. PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources

  12. Treatment of Plants with Gaseous Ethylene and Gaseous Inhibitors of Ethylene Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark L; Kim, Joonyup; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2017-01-01

    The gaseous nature of ethylene affects not only its role in plant biology but also how you treat plants with the hormone. In many ways, it simplifies the treatment problem. Other hormones have to be made up in solution and applied to some part of the plant hoping the hormone will be taken up into the plant and translocated throughout the plant at the desired concentration. Because all plant cells are connected by an intercellular gas space the ethylene concentration you treat with is relatively quickly reached throughout the plant. In some instances, like mature fruit, treatment with ethylene initiates autocatalytic synthesis of ethylene. However, in most experiments, the exogenous ethylene concentration is saturating, usually >1 μL L -1 , and the synthesis of additional ethylene is inconsequential. Also facilitating ethylene research compared with other hormones is that there are inhibitors of ethylene action 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene) and 2,5-NBD (2,5-norbornadiene) that are also gases wherein you can achieve nearly 100% inhibition of ethylene action quickly and with few side effects. Inhibitors for other plant hormones are applied as a solution and their transport and concentration at the desired site is not always known and difficult to measure. Here, our focus is on how to treat plants and plant parts with the ethylene gas and the gaseous inhibitors of ethylene action.

  13. Laboratory plant for the separation of cesium from waste solutions of the PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.; Eckert, B.; Riemenschneider, J.; Mallon, C.; Mann, D.

    1983-01-01

    A laboratory plant for the separation of cesium from a fission product waste solution of the fuel reprocessing is described. The plant consists of two stages. In the first stage cesium is adsorbed on ammonium molybdatophosphate (AMP). Then the adsorbent is dissolved. From the solution cesium is adsorbed on a cationic ion exchanger in the second stage. Then AMP can be reproduced from this solution. For the elution of cesium in the second stage a NH 4 NO 3 solution (3 m) is used. Flow sheet, construction and the control device of the plant are described and the results of tests with a model solution are given. (author)

  14. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a mixed waste storage unit consisting of two underground railroad tunnels: Tunnel Number 1 designated 218-E-14 and Tunnel Number 2 designated 218-E-15. The two tunnels are connected by rail to the PUREX Plant and combine to provide storage space for 48 railroad cars (railcars). The PUREX Storage Tunnels provide a long-term storage location for equipment removed from the PUREX Plant. Transfers into the PUREX Storage Tunnels are made on an as-needed basis. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railcars and remotely transferred by rail into the PUREX Storage Tunnels. Railcars act as both a transport means and a storage platform for equipment placed into the tunnels. This report consists of part A and part B. Part A reports on amounts and locations of the mixed water. Part B permit application consists of the following: Facility Description and General Provisions; Waste Characteristics; Process Information; Groundwater Monitoring; Procedures to Prevent Hazards; Contingency Plan; Personnel Training; Exposure Information Report

  15. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.

    1983-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. All discharges for 1982 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. 1 figure

  16. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 1 is comprised of chapters on: background and description; environmental impacts of add-on gaseous diffusion plant; unavoidable adverse environmental effects; alternatives; relationship between short-term uses and long-term productivity; relationship of program to land-use plans, policies, and controls; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; cost-benefit analysis; and response to comment letters. (LK)

  17. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 1 is comprised of chapters on: background and description; environmental impacts of add-on gaseous diffusion plant; unavoidable adverse environmental effects; alternatives; relationship between short-term uses and long-term productivity; relationship of program to land-use plans, policies, and controls; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; cost-benefit analysis; and response to comment letters

  18. Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning deactivation thermal analysis of PUREX Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.W.; Gregonis, R.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Thermal analysis was performed for the proposed Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant exhaust system after deactivation. The purpose of the analysis was to determine if enough condensation will occur to plug or damage the filtration components. A heat transfer and fluid flow analysis was performed to evaluate the thermal characteristics of the underground duct system, the deep-bed glass fiber filter No. 2, and the high-efficiency particulate air filters in the fourth filter building. The analysis is based on extreme variations of air temperature, relative humidity, and dew point temperature using 15 years of Hanford Site weather data as a basis. The results will be used to evaluate the need for the electric heaters proposed for the canyon exhaust to prevent condensation. Results of the analysis indicate that a condition may exist in the underground ductwork where the duct temperature can lead or lag changes in the ambient air temperature. This condition may contribute to condensation on the inside surfaces of the underground exhaust duct. A worst case conservative analysis was performed assuming that all of the water is removed from the moist air over the inside surface of the concrete duct area in the fully developed turbulent boundary layer while the moist air in the free stream will not condense. The total moisture accumulated in 24 hours is negligible. Water puddling would not be expected. The results of the analyses agree with plant operating experiences. The filters were designed to resist high humidity and direct wetting, filter plugging caused by slight condensation in the upstream duct is not a concern. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 2. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 is comprised of appendices: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Existing Facilities; Ecology; Civic Involvement; Social Analysis; Population Projections; Toxicity of Air Pollutants to Biota at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and Assessment of Noise Effects of an Add-On to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  20. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 2. Appendices. [Appendices only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 is comprised of appendices: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Existing Facilities; Ecology; Civic Involvement; Social Analysis; Population Projections; Toxicity of Air Pollutants to Biota at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and Assessment of Noise Effects of an Add-On to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. (LK)

  1. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Environmental Report for 1990, is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  2. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  3. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials

  4. PUREX irradiated fuel recovery simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaquish, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses the application of IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) to assist environmental remediation efforts at the Department of Energy PUREX Plant at the Hanford Site. An IGRIP simulation was developed to plan, review, and verify proposed remediation activities. This simulation was designed to satisfy a number of unique purposes that each placed specific constraints and requirements on the design and implementation of the simulation. These purposes and their influence on the design of the simulation are presented. A discussion of several control code architectures for mechanical system simulations, including their advantages and limitations, is also presented

  5. Reliability study: maintenance facilities Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, B.E.; Sikorski, P.A.; Fankell, R.; Johnson, O.; Ferryman, D.S.; Miller, R.L.; Gearhart, E.C.; Rafferty, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    A reliability study of the maintenance facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has been completed. The reliability study team analyzed test data and made visual inspections of each component contributing to the overall operation of the facilities. The impacts of facilities and equipment failures were given consideration with regard to personnel safety, protection of government property, health physics, and environmental control. This study revealed that the maintenance facilities are generally in good condition. After evaluating the physical condition and technology status of the major components, the study team made several basic recommendations. Implementation of the recommendations proposed in this report will help assure reliable maintenance of the plant through the year 2000

  6. PUREX facility preclosure work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    This preclosure work plan presents a description of the PUREX Facility, the history of the waste managed, and addresses transition phase activities that position the PUREX Facility into a safe and environmentally secure configuration. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels (DOE/RL-90/24). Information concerning solid waste management units is discussed in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Appendix 2D)

  7. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1992 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: narrative, summaries, and conclusions (Part 1) and data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are to: (1) report 1992 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, (2) provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, (3) provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, (4) provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and (5) provide general information on plant quality assurance

  8. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

  9. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes

  10. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

  11. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program

  12. Buildup of 236U in the gaseous diffusion plant product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized projection of the average annual 236 U concentration that can be expected in future enriched uranium product from the US-ERDA gaseous diffusion plants when reprocessed fuels become available for cascade feeding is given. It is concluded that the buildup of 236 U is not an ever-increasing function, but approaches a limiting value. Projected concentrations result in only slight separative work losses and present no operational problem to ERDA in supplying light water reactor requirements. The use of recycle uranium from power reactor spent fuels will result in significant savings in natural uranium feed

  13. Purex process operation and performance, 1970 Thoria Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.R.; Walser, R.L.

    1977-03-01

    The Hanford Purex Plant fulfilled a 1970 commitment to the Atomic Energy Commission to produce 360 kilograms of high purity 233 U as uranyl nitrate solution. Overall plant performance during both 1970 and 1966 confirmed the suitability of Purex for processing thorium on a campaign basis. The 1970 processing campaign, including flushing operations, is discussed with particular emphasis on problem areas. Background information on the process and equipment used is also presented. The organizations and their designations described are those existing in 1970

  14. Control of technetium at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraceno, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Technetium-99 entered the gaseous diffusion complex as a volatile impurity in recycled uranium that was fed to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Subsequently, it entered the Oak Ridge and Portsmouth cascades as an impurity in Paducah product feed. Most of the technetium was adsorbed on cascade equipment in increasingly high concentrations as it moved up the cascade. Since the low energy beta radiation produced by technetium cannot penetrate cascade equipment, it presents no significant hazard to workers as long as it remains inside of equipment. However, when equipment that contains high concentrations of technetium is opened for maintenance or change-out, precautions are taken to ensure worker safety. Traps containing activated alumina are used at the plant vent streams to limit radioactive emissions as far as possible. Annual vent stream emissions have been well below DOE limits. To allow continued compliance, other potential trapping agents have been tested. Several that limit emissions more effectively than activated alumina have been found. Other traps containing magnesium fluoride are used in the upper cascade to reduce the technetium concentration. Waste solutions from decontamination can also contain technetium. These solutions must either be stored for controlled discharge or treated to remove the technetium. To allow the latter, an ion exchange facility is being installed for operation by the end of FY-1982. Liquid discharges at Portsmouth have usually been less than 5% of the DOE imposed limits

  15. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

  16. PUREX new substation ATR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the acceptance test report (ATR) for the New PUREX Main and Minisubstations. It covers the factory and vendor acceptance and commissioning test reports. Reports are presented for the Main 5 kV substation building, the building fire system, switchgear, and vacuum breaker; the minisubstation control building and switch gear; commissioning test; electrical system and loads inspection; electrical utilities transformer and cable; and relay setting changes based on operational experience

  17. Flowsheet for shear/leach processing of N Reactor fuel at PUREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enghusen, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    This document was originally prepared to support the restart of the PUREX plant using a new Shear/Leach head end process. However, the PUREX facility was shutdown and processing of the remaining N Reactor fuel is no longer considered an alternative for fuel disposition. This document is being issued for reference only to document the activities which were investigated to incorporate the shear/leach process in the PUREX plant

  18. Nitrogen-system safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Department of Energy has primary responsibility for the safety of operations at DOE-owned nuclear facilities. The guidelines for the analysis of credible accidents are outlined in DOE Order 5481.1. DOE has requested that existing plant facilities and operations be reviewed for potential safety problems not covered by standard industrial safety procedures. This review is being conducted by investigating individual facilities and documenting the results in Safety Study Reports which will be compiled to form the Existing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report which is scheduled for completion in September, 1984. This Safety Study documents the review of the Plant Nitrogen System facilities and operations and consists of Section 4.0, Facility and Process Description, and Section 5.0, Accident Analysis, of the Final Safety Analysis Report format. The existing nitrogen system consists of a Superior Air Products Company Type D Nitrogen Plant, nitrogen storage facilities, vaporization facilities and a distribution system. The system is designed to generate and distribute nitrogen gas used in the cascade for seal feed, buffer systems, and for servicing equipment when exceptionally low dew points are required. Gaseous nitrogen is also distributed to various process auxiliary buildings. The average usage is approximately 130,000 standard cubic feet per day

  19. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; McGinnis, B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm signal response time, sound wave frequency, and sound volume levels were made to demonstrate compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986. A steady-state alarm signal is produced within one-half second of obtaining a two-out-of-three detector trip. The fundamental alarm sound wave frequency is 440 hertz. The sound volume levels are greater than 10 decibels above background and ranged from 100 to 125 A-weighted decibels. The requirements of the standard were met; however the recommended maximum sound volume level of 115 dBA was exceeded. Emergency procedures require immediate evacuation upon initiation of a facility's radiation alarm. Comparison with standards for allowable time of exposure at different noise levels indicate that the elevated noise level at this location does not represent an occupational injury hazard. 8 refs., 5 figs

  20. Gaseous diffusion plant transition from DOE to external regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dann, R.K.; Crites, T.R.; Rahm-Crites, L.K.

    1997-01-01

    After many years of operation as government-owned/contractor-operated facilities, large portions of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, were leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). These facilities are now certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and subject to oversight by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The transition from DOE to NRC regulation was more difficult than expected. The original commitment was to achieve NRC certification in October 1995; however, considerably more time was required and transition-related costs escalated. The Oak Ridge Operations Office originally estimated the cost of transition at $60 million; $240 million has been spent to date. The DOE's experience in transitioning the GDPs to USEC operation with NRC oversight provides valuable lessons (both positive and negative) that could be applied to future transitions

  1. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This two-part environmental report is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials. 36 refs.

  2. PUREX Storage Tunnels waste analysis plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources

  3. Purex optimization by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, T.G.; McKibben, J.M.

    1980-08-01

    For the past 2 years computer simulation has been used to study the performance of several solvent extraction banks in the Purex facility at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina. Individual process parameters were varied about their normal base case values to determine their individual effects on concentration profiles and end-stream compositions. The data are presented in graphical form to show the extent to which product losses, decontamination factors, solvent extraction bank inventories of fissile materials, and other key properties are affected by process changes. Presented in this way, the data are useful for adapting flowsheet conditions to a particular feed material or product specification, and for evaluating nuclear safety as related to bank inventories

  4. Raffinate treatment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Raffinate solutions, which contain uranium, technetium, nitrates, and lesser amounts of heavy metals, are produced in the decontamination and uranium recovery operations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These solutions are presently being placed in temporary storage until three treatment facilities are constructed which will produce an environmentally acceptable effluent from the raffinate. These facilities are: (1) The Heavy Metals Precipitation Facility; (2) The Technetium Ion Exchange Facility; and (3) The Biodenitrification Pilot Plant. When the facilities are completed, the raffinate will be treated in 500 gallon batches. The first treatment is the heavy metals precipitation by caustic addition and filtering. The effluent proceeds to the ion exchange columns where the technetium is removed by adsorption onto a strongly basic, anion exchange resin which has been converted to the hydroxyl form. Following ion exchange, the solution is transported to the biodenitrification pilot plant. The biodenitrification column is a fluidized-bed using bacteria-laden coal particles as the denitrifying media. The resulting effluent should meet the limits established by the US EPA for all metals and nitrate. Technetium will be 98+% removed and the uranium concentration will be less than one milligram per liter. 13 references

  5. IAEA verification experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.M.; Subudhi, M.; Calvert, O.L.; Bonner, T.N.; Cherry, R.C.; Whiting, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    In April 1996, the United States (US) added the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the list of facilities eligible for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. At that time, the US proposed that the IAEA carry out a Verification Experiment at the plant with respect to the downblending of about 13 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the form of UF 6 . This material is part of the 226 metric tons of fissile material that President Clinton has declared to be excess to US national-security needs and which will be permanently withdrawn from the US nuclear stockpile. In September 1997, the IAEA agreed to carry out this experiment, and during the first three weeks of December 1997, the IAEA verified the design information concerning the downblending process. The plant has been subject to short-notice random inspections since December 17, 1997. This paper provides an overview of the Verification Experiment, the monitoring technologies used in the verification approach, and some of the experience gained to date

  6. Neptunium determination in PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, Neetika; Kar, Aishwarya S.; Tomar, B.S.; Pandey, M.P.; Umadevi, K.

    2016-10-01

    237 Np is one of the most important minor actinides present in nuclear spent fuel both from environmental and application point of view. The routing of neptunium to the particular stream of PUREX process is necessary for its separation and purification as 237 Np is the target nuclide for production of 238 Pu. The routing of neptunium to a particular PUREX stream will also help in better nuclear waste management, which in turn, will impart less bearing on the environment considering its long half life, alpha emitting properties and mobile nature. In order to route Neptunium to a particular stream of PUREX process, it is imperative to understand the distribution of neptunium in various process streams. Owing to high dose of actual samples, the neptunium distribution was studied using 239 Np tracer by simulating actual column conditions of PUREX streams in lab scale. The present study deals with neptunium determination in actual PUREX streams samples also. (author)

  7. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; D'Aquila, D.M.; McGinnis, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm system installed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant was tested extensively at critical facilities located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ability of the neutron scintillator radiation detection units to respond to a minimum accident of concern as defined in Standard ANSI/ANS-83.-1986 was demonstrated. Detector placement and the established trip point are based on shielding calculations performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and criticality specialists at the Portsmouth plant. Based on these experiments and calculations, a detector trip point of 5 mrad/h in air is used. Any credible criticality accident is expected to produce neutron radiation fields >5 mrad/h in air at one or more radiation alarm locations. Each radiation alarm location has a cluster of three detectors that employs a two-out-of-three alarm logic. Earlier work focused on testing the alarm logic latching circuitry. This work was directed toward measurements involving the actual audible alarm signal delivered

  8. Air sampling program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive air sampling program has been developed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for monitoring the concentrations of radioactive aerosols present in the atmosphere on plantsite as well as in the environs. The program is designed to minimize exposures of employees and the environment to airborne radioactive particulates. Five different air sampling systems, utilizing either filtration or impaction, are employed for measuring airborne alpha and beta-gamma activity produced from 235 U and 234 Th, respectively. Two of the systems have particle selection capabilities: a personal sampler with a 10-mm nylon cyclone eliminates most particles larger than about 10 microns in diameter; and an Annular Kinetic Impactor collects particulates greater than 0.4 microns in diameter which have a density greater than 12-15 gm/cm 3 . A Hi-Volume Air Sampler and an Eberline Model AIM-3 Scintillation Air Monitor are used in collecting short-term samples for assessing compliance with ''ceiling'' standards or peak concentration limits. A film-sort aperture IBM card system is utilized for continuous 8-hour samples. This sampling program has proven to be both practical and effective for assuring accurate monitoring of the airborne activity associated with plant operations

  9. Exposure to recycled uranium contaminants in gaseous diffusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Jeri L.; Yiin, James H.; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Apostoaei, A. Iulian

    2017-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study of health effects in a pooled cohort of gaseous diffusion plant workers, organ dose from internal exposure to uranium was evaluated. Due to the introduction of recycled uranium into the plants, there was also potential for exposure to radiologically significant levels of "9"9Tc, "2"3"7Np and "2"3"8","2"3"9Pu. In the evaluation of dose response, these radionuclide exposures could confound the effect of internal uranium. Using urine bioassay data for study subjects reported in facility records, intakes and absorbed dose to bone surface, red bone marrow and kidneys were estimated as these organs were associated with a priori outcomes of interest. Additionally, "9"9Tc intakes and doses were calculated using a new systemic model for technetium and compared to intakes and doses calculated using the current model recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Organ absorbed doses for the transuranics were significant compared to uranium doses; however, "9"9Tc doses calculated using the new systemic model were significant as well. Use of the new model resulted in an increase in "9"9Tc-related absorbed organ dose of a factor of 8 (red bone marrow) to 30 (bone surface). (authors)

  10. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for deactivation of the PUREX storage tunnel number 2; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Storage Tunnel Number 2 (hereafter referred to as the PUREX Tunnel) was built in 1964. Since that time, the PUREX Tunnel has been used for storage of radioactive and mixed waste. In 1991, the PUREX Plant ceased operations and was transitioned to deactivation. The PUREX Tunnel continued to receive PUREX Plant waste material for storage during transition activities. Before 1995, a decision was made to store radioactive and mixed waste in the PUREX Tunnel generated from other onsite sources, on a case-by-case basis. This notice of construction (NOC) describes the activities associated with the reactivation of the PUREX Tunnel ventilation system and the transfer of up to 3.5 million curies (MCi) of radioactive waste to the PUREX Tunnel from any location on the Hanford Site. The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.6 E-2 millirem (mrem). The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 1.9 E-5 mrem to the MEI. The following text provides information requirements of Appendix A of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 (requirements 1 through 18)

  11. 1997 project of the year, PUREX deactivation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    At the end of 1992, the PUREX and UO 3 plants were deemed no longer necessary for the defense needs of the United States. Although no longer necessary, they were very costly to maintain in their post-operation state. The DOE embarked on a deactivation strategy for these plants to reduce the costs of providing continuous surveillance of the facilities and their hazards. Deactivation of the PUREX and UO 3 plants was estimated to take 5 years and cost $222.5 million and result in an annual surveillance and maintenance cost of $2 million. Deactivation of the PUREX/UO 3 plants officially began on October 1, 1993. The deactivation was 15 months ahead of the original schedule and $75 million under the original cost estimate. The annual cost of surveillance and maintenance of the plants was reduced to less than $1 million

  12. Partnering efforts at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    Before individuals or agencies can effectively work together to solve common problems, they must first agree on exactly what those problems are and establish common goals and methods that will lead to mutually acceptable solutions. Then, they must make a conscientious effort to form a cohesive team that focuses on the established goals and deemphasize traditional roles, which may in some instances be considered adversarial. This kind of teamwork/partnering process can be more difficult, though not impossible, to achieve in cases where there are traditional (real or imagined) adversarial relationships between the parties, i.e. regulator vs. regulated. The US Department of Energy Site Office (DOE) at Paducah, Kentucky, the Kentucky Department of Environmental Protection (KDEP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA) have made t strides toward teamwork and partnering at DOE's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. They have accomplished this in a number of ways, which will be discussed in greater detail but first and foremost, the agencies agreed up front that they had mutual goals and interests. These goals are to protect public health and the environment in a cost-effective and timely manner, taking care to make the wisest use of public resources (tax dollars); to evaluate and minimize risks, and to achieve ''Win-Win'' for all parties concerned

  13. Bioavailability study for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.

    1996-08-01

    The overall purpose of this plan is to assess the bioavailability of metals in the continuous and intermittent outfalls. The results may be used to determine alternative metal limits that more appropriately measure the portion of metal present necessary for toxicity to aquatic life. These limits must remain protective of in-stream aquatic life; thus, the highest concentration of metal in the water will be determined concurrently with an assessment of acute or chronic toxicity on laboratory tests. Using the method developed by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW), biomonitoring results and chemical data will be used to recommend alternative metal limits for the outfalls of concern. The data will be used to meet the objectives of the study: (1) evaluate the toxicity of continuous outfalls and intermittent outfalls at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (2) determine the mean ratio of dissolved to Total Recoverable metal for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn in the continuous and intermittent outfalls; (3) determine whether the concentration of total recoverable metal discharged causes toxicity to fathead minnows and /or Ceriodaphnia; and (4) determine alternative metal limits for each metal of concern (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn).

  14. Innovative Decontamination Technology for Use in Gaseous Diffusion Plant Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.J.; Norton, C.J.; Fraikor, G.B.; Potter, G.L.; Chang, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    The results of bench scale tests demonstrated that TechXtract R RadPro TM technology (hereinafter referred to as RadPro R ) can provide 100% coverage of complex mockup gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) equipment and can decontaminate uranium (U) deposits with 98% to 99.99% efficiency. Deployment tests demonstrated RadPro R can be applied as foam, mist/fog, or steam, and fully cover the internal surfaces of complex mockup equipment, including large piping. Decontamination tests demonstrated that two formulations of RadPro R , one with neutron attenuators and one without neutron attenuators, could remove up to 99.99% of uranyl fluoride deposits, one of the most difficult to remove deposits in GDP equipment. These results were supplemented by results from previous tests conducted in 1994 that showed RadPro R could remove >97% of U and Tc-99 contamination from actual GDP components. Operational use of RadPro R at other DOE and commercial facilities also support these data. (authors)

  15. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 microg/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields

  16. DOE Richland readiness review for PUREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamorski, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    For ten months prior to the November 1983 startup of the Plutonium and URanium EXtraction (PUREX) Plant, the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office conducted an operational readiness review of the facility. This review was performed consistent with DOE and RL Order 5481.1 and in accordance with written plans prepared by the program and safety divisions. It involved personnel from five divisions within the office. The DOE review included two tasks: (1) overview and evaluation of the operating contractor's (Rockwell Hanford) readiness review for PUREX, and (2) independent assessment of 25 significant aspects of the startup effort. The RL reviews were coordinated by the program division and were phased in succession with the contractor's readiness review. As deficiencies or concerns were noted in the course of the review they were documented and required formal response from the contractor. Startup approval was given in three steps as the PUREX Plant began operation. A thorough review was performed and necessary documentation was prepared to support startup authorization in November 1983, before the scheduled startup date

  17. Biodenitrification of gaseous diffusion plant aqueous wastes: stirred bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 30 kilograms of nitrates per day are discarded in the raffinates (acid wastes) of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's X-705 Uranium Recovery and Decontamination Facility. A biodenitrification process employing continuous-flow, stirred-bed reactors has been successfully used to remove nitrates from similar acid wastes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Laboratory studies have been made at Portsmouth to characterize the X-705 raffinates and to test the stirred-bed biodenitrification process on such raffinates. Raffinates which had been previously characterized were pumped through continuous-flow, stirred-bed, laboratory-scale reactors. Tests were conducted over a period of 146 days and involved variations in composition, mixing requirements, and the fate of several metal ions in the raffinates. Tests results show that 20 weight percent nitrates were reduced to a target nitrate effluent concentration of 100 μg/ml with a 99.64 percent efficiency. However, the average denitrification rate achieved was only 33% of that demonstrated with the Y-12 stirred-bed system. These low rates were probably due to the toxic effects of heavy metal ions on the denitrifying bacteria. Also, most of the uranium in the raffinate feed remained in the biomass and calcite, which collected in the reactor. This could cause criticality problems. For these reasons, it was decided not to make use of the stirred-bed bioreactor at Portsmouth. Instead, the biodenitrification installation now planned will use fluidized bed columns whose performance will be the subject of a subsequent report

  18. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report is part of a dangerous waste permit application for the storage of wastes from the Purex process at Hanford. Appendices are presented on the following: construction drawings; HSW-5638, specifications for disposal facility for failed equipment, Project CA-1513-A; HWS-8262, specification for Purex equipment disposal, Project CGC 964; storage tunnel checklist; classification of residual tank heels in Purex storage tunnels; emergency plan for Purex facility; training course descriptions; and the Purex storage tunnels engineering study

  19. Prioritizing and scheduling Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant safeguards upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmunds, T.; Saleh, R.; Zevanove, S.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the Site Safeguards and Security Plan (SSSP), facilities are required to develop a Resource Plan (RP). The Resource Plan provides documentation and justification for the facility's planned upgrades, including the schedule, priority, and cost estimates for the safeguards and security upgrades. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) management has identified and obtained funding approval for a number of safeguards and security upgrades, including line-item construction projects. These upgrade projects were selected to address a variety of concerns identified in the PORTS vulnerability assessments and other reviews performed in support of the SSSP process. However, budgeting and scheduling constraints do not make it possible to simultaneously begin implementation of all of the upgrade projects. A formal methodology and analysis are needed to explicitly address the trade-offs between competing safeguards objectives, and to prioritize and schedule the upgrade projects to ensure that the maximum benefit can be realized in the shortest possible time frame. The purpose of this report is to describe the methodology developed to support these upgrade project scheduling decisions. The report also presents the results obtained from applying the methodology to a set of the upgrade projects selected by PORTS S ampersand S management. Data for the analysis are based on discussions with personnel familiar with the PORTS safeguards and security needs, the requirements for implementing these upgrades, and upgrade funding limitations. The analysis results presented here assume continued highly enriched uranium (HEU) operations at PORTS. However, the methodology developed is readily adaptable for the evaluation of other operational scenarios and other resource allocation issues relevant to PORTS

  20. Gaseous waste processing device in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takechi, Eisuke; Matsutoshi, Makoto.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To arrange the units of waste processing devices in a number one more than the number thereof required for a plurality of reactors, and to make it usable commonly as a preliminary waste processing device thereby to effectively use all the gaseous waste processing devices. Constitution: A gaseous waste processing device is constituted by an exhaust gas extractor, a first processing device, a second processing device and the like, which are all connected in series. Upon this occasion, devices from the exhaust gas extractor to the first processing device and valves, which are provided in each of reactors, are arranged in series, on one hand, but valves at the downstream side join one another by one pipeline, and are connected to a stack through a total gaseous waste processing device, on another. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. PUREX/UO3 deactivation project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO 3 ) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO 3 powder. Final UO 3 Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO 3 Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO 3 Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings

  2. Scheduling the maintenance of gaseous diffusion and electric power distribution plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, D.

    1990-01-01

    A computer aided scheduling applied to the maintenance of a uranium enrichment plant is presented. The plant exploits gaseous diffusion and electric power distribution plants, for which the operating conditions must be satisfied. The management and the execution of the maintenance actions are computer aided. Concerning the techniques, the cost, the safety and the scheduling actions were optimized [fr

  3. On the theory of gaseous transport to plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bache, D. H.

    Solutions of the convection-diffusion equations are developed to show the relationship between bulk transport parameters affecting gaseous transfer to plant canopies and local rates of transfer within the canopy. Foliage density is considered to be uniform and the drag coefficient of elements is specified by cd = γu- n with u as the local wind-speed and γ and n constants. Under conditions of high surface resistance, the bulk deposition velocity at the top of the canopy vg( h) approaches a limit defined by v g(h) = v̂gL p(1-ψ v̂gL p/u ∗) , where v̂g is the local deposition rate, Lp the effective foliage area, u ∗ the friction velocity and ψ a structure coefficient. From this, a criterion is proposed for defining the conditions in which the local resistances may be added in parallel. Comparisons with the external model for the bulk transport resistance rp = ra + rb + rc (where r p = 1/v g(h) and ra is a diffusive resistance between the apparent momentum sink and height h) shows that the bulk surface resistance r c = r̂s/L p( r̂s being a local surface resistance due to internal properties of the surface) and r b = overliner̂p-r a, appearing as an excess aerodynamic component; overliner̂p refers to the depth-averaged value of r̂p—the resistance to transfer through the laminar sublayer enveloping individual canopy elements. In conditions of zero surface resistance the bulk transport rate rp, o can be specified by r p,o/r a = E( r̂p/r̂∗) hq with E and q as constants, the term r̂p/r̂∗ referring to the resistances to mass and momentum transfer to canopy elements. A general expression is formulated for the sublayer Stanton number B -1  r bu ∗ at the extremes of high and zero surface resistance. In conditions of low surface resistance, it is shown that the terms rb + rc cannot be conveniently separated into equivalent aerodynamic and surface components as at the limit of high surface resistance. This conclusion is a departure from previous

  4. Purex process extraction cycles: a potential for progress today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boullis, B.; Germain, M.; Goumondy, J.P.; Rouyer, H.

    1994-12-31

    The Purex process very quickly and very widely supplanted the other concepts considered for nuclear fuel reprocessing after the presentation made at the Geneva Conference in 1955. The selectivity and radiolytic stability of tributylphosphate (T.B.P) clearly appeared to augur an extremely attractive process for completing the separation of valuable elements in the irradiated fuel. The concept has confirmed its validity, and subsequently its ability to adapt to changing requirements or constraints. Its industrial viability is in fact unquestioned today: Purex process is the basis of all the reprocessing plants in operation or planned throughout the world, and recent commissioning of the UP3 plant in France, in remarkable conditions, attests to such a level of maturity that one is tempted to ask the question: ``What remains to be proved, discovered or improved in the core of the Purex process?``. (authors). 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Purex process extraction cycles: a potential for progress today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boullis, B.; Germain, M.; Goumondy, J.P.; Rouyer, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Purex process very quickly and very widely supplanted the other concepts considered for nuclear fuel reprocessing after the presentation made at the Geneva Conference in 1955. The selectivity and radiolytic stability of tributylphosphate (T.B.P) clearly appeared to augur an extremely attractive process for completing the separation of valuable elements in the irradiated fuel. The concept has confirmed its validity, and subsequently its ability to adapt to changing requirements or constraints. Its industrial viability is in fact unquestioned today: Purex process is the basis of all the reprocessing plants in operation or planned throughout the world, and recent commissioning of the UP3 plant in France, in remarkable conditions, attests to such a level of maturity that one is tempted to ask the question: ''What remains to be proved, discovered or improved in the core of the Purex process?''. (authors). 7 refs., 4 tabs

  6. Alternatives for the disposition of PUREX organic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    This Supporting Document submits options and recommendations for final management of Tank 40 Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant organic solution per Tri-Party Agreement Milestorm Number M-80-00-T03. Hanford is deactivating the PUREX Plant for the US DOE. One the key element of this Deactivation is disposition of approximately 81,300 liters (21,500 gallons) of slightly radioactively contaminated organic solution to reduce risk to the environment, reduce cost of long-term storage, and assure regulatory compliance. An announcement in the Commerce Business Daily (CBD) on October 14, 1994 has resulted in the submission of proposals from two facilities capabLe of receiving and thermally destroying the solution. Total decomposition by thermal destruction is the recommended option for the disposition of the PUREX organic solution and WHC is evaluating the proposals from the two facilities

  7. Methodology for assessment of safety risk due to potential accidents in US gaseous diffusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.; O'Kain, D.U.

    1991-01-01

    Gaseous diffusion plants that operate in the United States represent a unique combination of nuclear and chemical hazards. Assessing and controlling the health, safety, and environmental risks that can result from natural phenomena events, process upset conditions, and operator errors require a unique methodology. Such a methodology has been developed for the diffusion plants and is being utilized to assess and control the risk of operating the plants. A summary of the methodology developed to assess the unique safety risks at the US gaseous diffusion plants is presented in this paper

  8. PUREX source Aggregate Area management study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the PUREX Plant Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE)Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations

  9. Monitoring of released radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, M.; Keta, S.; Nagai, S.; Kano, M.; Ishihara, N.; Moriyama, T.; Ogaki, K.; Noda, K.

    2009-01-01

    Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant started its active tests with spent fuel at the end of March 2006. When spent fuels are sheared and dissolved, radioactive gaseous effluent and radioactive liquid effluent such as krypton-85, tritium, etc. are released into the environment. In order to limit the public dose as low as reasonably achievable in an efficient way, RRP removes radioactive material by evaporation, rinsing, filtering, etc., and then releases it through the main stack and the sea discharge pipeline that allow to make dispersion and dilution very efficiently. Also, concerning the radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent to be released into the environment, the target values of annual release have been defined in the Safety Rule based on the estimated annual release evaluated at the safety review of RRP. By monitoring the radioactive material in gaseous exhaust and liquid effluent RRP controls it not to exceed the target values. RRP reprocessed 430 tUpr of spent fuel during Active Test (March 2006 to October 2008). In this report, we report about: The outline of gaseous and liquid effluent monitoring. The amount of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent during the active test. The performance of removal of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents. The impact on the public from radioactive effluents during the active test. (author)

  10. Purex process solvent: literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables.

  11. Purex process solvent: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables

  12. Handling of UF6 in U.S. gaseous diffusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legeay, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive systems analysis of UF 6 handling has been made in the three U.S. gaseous diffusion plants and has resulted in a significant impact on the equipment design and the operating procedures of these facilities. The equipment, facilities, and industrial practices in UF 6 handling operations as they existed in the early 1970's are reviewed with particular emphasis placed on the changes which have been implemented. The changes were applied to the systems and operating methods which evolved from the design, startup, and operation of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in 1945

  13. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 2. Draft environmental statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, W. H.

    1976-06-01

    The need for additional uranium enrichment facilities and the environmental impacts of the add-on gaseous diffusion plant proposed for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed. A detailed description of the proposed facilities is included and unavoidable adverse environmental effects, possible alternatives, and anticipated benefits from the proposed facilities are considered. The flora and fauna of the area are tabulated and possible effects of air and water pollution on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are postulated. The extent of anticipated noise impact on the vicinity and the anticipated extent of civic envolvement are discussed. (CH)

  14. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 2. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The need for additional uranium enrichment facilities and the environmental impacts of the add-on gaseous diffusion plant proposed for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed. A detailed description of the proposed facilities is included and unavoidable adverse environmental effects, possible alternatives, and anticipated benefits from the proposed facilities are considered. The flora and fauna of the area are tabulated and possible effects of air and water pollution on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are postulated. The extent of anticipated noise impact on the vicinity and the anticipated extent of civic envolvement are discussed

  15. Preliminary study of PCBs in raccoons living on or near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbrook, Richard S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Zoology. Cooperative Wildlife Research Lab. Kentucky Research Consortium for Energy and Environment

    2016-01-15

    The “Ecological Monitoring at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Historical Evaluation and Guidelines for Future Monitoring” report (Halbrook, et al. 2007) recommended the raccoon as a species for study at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This species was selected to fill data gaps in ecological resources and provide resource managers with knowledge that will be valuable in making decisions and implementing specific actions to safeguard ecological resources and reduce human exposure. The current paper reports results of a preliminary evaluation to establish protocols for collection of tissues and initial screening of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in raccoons collected near the PGDP. These data are useful in developing future more comprehensive studies.

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 11--20, 1990, over an 83-square-kilometer (32-square-mile) area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 91 meters (300 feet) with line spacings of 122 meters (400 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a set of United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from about 7 to 14 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) at 1 meter above the ground. Analysis of the data for man-made sources and for the uranium decay product, protactinium-234m ( 234m Pa), showed five sites within the boundaries of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant with elevated readings. Spectra obtained in the vicinity of the buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant showed the presence of 234m Pa, a uranium-238 ( 238 U) decay product. In addition, spectral analysis of the data obtained over the processing plant facility showed gamma activity indicative of uranium-235 ( 234 U). No other man-made gamma ray emitting radioactive material was detected, either on or off the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant property. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at five different locations within the survey boundlaries to support the aerial data

  17. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones

  18. 78 FR 66779 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-82,862] United States Enrichment..., applicable to workers of United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, including on... were engaged in the production of low enrichment uranium. The company reports that workers leased from...

  19. Hierarchical optimization in isotope separation-gaseous diffusion: plant, cascade, stage, principles, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guais, J. C.

    1975-09-01

    The large scale system represented by a gaseous diffusion plant model, and its hierarchical mathematical structure are the reasons for a decomposition method, minimizing the total cost of enrichment. This procedure has been used for years in the optimization problems of the french projects.

  20. Real Time Demonstration Project XRF Performance Evaluation Report for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant AOC 492

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Robert L [Argonne National Laboratory

    2008-04-03

    This activity was undertaken to demonstrate the applicability of market-available XRF instruments to quantify metal concentrations relative to background and risk-based action and no action levels in Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) soils. As such, the analysis below demonstrates the capabilities of the instruments relative to soil characterization applications at the PGDP.

  1. Hierarchical optimization in isotope separation. Gaseous diffusion: plant, cascade, stage. Principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guais, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The large scale system represented by a gaseous diffusion plant model, and its hierarchical mathematical structure are the reasons for a decomposition method, minimizing the total cost of enrichment. This procedure has been used for years in the optimization problems of the french projects [fr

  2. Purex pulse column designs for capacity factor of 3.0 to 3.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, G.L.

    1955-04-12

    This memorandum indicates the Purex-Plant pulse-column and pulse- generator revisions which would be required to assure an instantaneous capacity of 25 tons U/day with a 20% capacity safety margin under Purex HW {number_sign}3 Flowsheet conditions. (The use of the Purex HW {number_sign}4 Flowsheet (6) with the revised columns would be expected to increase the capacity to 29 or 30 tons U/day.) The indicated design changes are recorded here for study and for possible reference if need for increased production capacity should arise. No recommendation for adoption at this time is made.

  3. Decommissioning of the gaseous diffusion plant at BNFL Capenhurst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, S.G.; Bradbury, P.

    1992-01-01

    The history of the on-going dismantling and disposal program for the Capenhurst Diffusion Plant is described. Reference is made to the scale of the project and to the special techniques developed, particularly in the areas of size reduction, decontamination and protection of personnel and the environment. When the project is successfully concluded by the end of 1993 over 99% of the materials of construction of the plant will have been recycled to the environment as clean material. (author)

  4. Purex process operation and performance: 1970 thoria campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, R.L.

    1978-02-01

    The Hanford Purex Plant has demonstrated suitability for reprocessing irradiated thoria (ThO 2 ) target elements on a campaign basis. A 1965 process test and major production campaigns conducted in 1966 and 1970 recovered nitrate solution form products totaling approximately 565 tons of thorium and 820 kilograms of 233 U. The overall recoveries for the 1970 campaign based on reactor input data were 94.9 percent for thorium and 95.2 percent for uranium. The primary function of the Hanford Purex Plant is reprocessing of irradiated uranium fuel elements to separate and purify uranium, plutonium and neptunium. Converting the plant to thoria reprocessing required major process development work and equipment modifications. The operation and performance of the Plant during the 1970 thoria reprocessing campaign is discussed in this report. The discussion includes background information on the process and equipment, problems encountered, and changes recommended for future campaigns

  5. Purex: process and equipment performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Purex process is the solvent extraction system that uses tributyl phosphate as the extractant for separating uranium and plutonium from irradiated reactor fuels. Since the first flowsheet was proposed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1950, the process has endured for over 30 years with only minor modifications. The spread of the technology was rapid, and worldwide use or research on Purex-type processes was reported by the time of the 1955 Geneva Conference. The overall performance of the process has been so good that there are no serious contenders for replacing it soon. This paper presents: process description; equipment performance (mixer-settlers, pulse columns, rapid contactors); fission product decontamination; solvent effects (solvent degradation products); and partitioning of uranium and plutonium

  6. Lung Cancer Mortality among Uranium Gaseous Diffusion Plant Workers: A Cohort Study 1952–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LW Figgs

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: 9%–15% of all lung cancers are attributable to occupational exposures. Reports are disparate regarding elevated lung cancer mortality risk among workers employed at uranium gaseous diffusion plants. Objective: To investigate whether external radiation exposure is associated with lung cancer mortality risk among uranium gaseous diffusion workers. Methods: A cohort of 6820 nuclear industry workers employed from 1952 to 2003 at the Paducah uranium gaseous diffusion plant (PGDP was assembled. A job-specific exposure matrix (JEM was used to determine likely toxic metal exposure categories. In addition, radiation film badge dosimeters were used to monitor cumulative external ionizing radiation exposure. International Classification for Disease (ICD codes 9 and 10 were used to identify 147 lung cancer deaths. Logistic and proportional hazards regression were used to estimate lung cancer mortality risk. Results: Lung cancer mortality risk was elevated among workers who experienced external radiation >3.5 mrem and employment duration >12 years. Conclusion: Employees of uranium gaseous diffusion plants carry a higher risk of lung cancer mortality; the mortality is associated with increased radiation exposure and duration of employment.

  7. Recovery of energy in a gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergalant, Jacques; Guais, J.-C.; Perrault, Michel; Vignet, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Any energy recovery, even partial, goes in the direction of savings in energy and should be sought for. The Tricastin plant, now in the course of being built, will be able to deliver several hundreds of MW for the purpose of urban and agricultural heating. The new Coredif project will more completely integrate the valorization of calories in its definition (choice of temperatures, design of the heat exchangers, recovery cycles). In fact the recent evolution in energy costs renders the otpimization of a plant equipped with a heat recovery system (1 to 2% on the cost of the uranium produced) now economically worth-while. In the same way, the choice of the site of the future plant may be conditioned by the possible uses of calories in its vicinity [fr

  8. Simulation of gaseous emissions from electricity generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellhouse, G.M.; Whittington, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    In electricity supply networks, traditional dispatch algorithms are based on features such as economics and plant availability. Annual limits on emissions from fossil-fuelled stations are regarded as a restriction and set a ceiling on generation from particular stations. With the impending introduction of financial penalties on emissions, for example cal bon taxation, algorithms will have to be developed which allow the dispatch engineer to assess the cost in real-time of different generation options involving fossil-fuelled plants. Such an algorithm is described in this paper. (UK)

  9. Uranium isotope separation by gaseous diffusion and plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeon, Claude; Dumas, Maurice.

    1980-07-01

    This report constitutes a safety guide for operators of uranium isotope separation plants, and includes both aspects of safety and protection. Taking into account the complexity of safety problems raised at design and during operation of plants which require specialized guides, this report mainly considers both the protection of man, the environment and goods, and the principles of occupational safety. It does not claim to be comprehensive, but intends to state the general principles, the particular points related to the characteristics of the basic materials and processes, and to set forth a number of typical solutions suitable for various human and technical environments. It is based on the French experience gained during the last fifteen years [fr

  10. Control measurement system in purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, V.V.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependence of a bulk facility handling Purex Process on the control measurement system for evaluating the process performance needs hardly be emphasized. process control, Plant control, inventory control and quality control are the four components of the control measurement system. The scope and requirements of each component are different and the measurement methods are selected accordingly. However, each measurement system has six important elements. These are described in detail. The quality assurance programme carried out by the laboratory as a mechanism through which the quality of measurements is regularly tested and stated in quantitative terms is also explained in terms of internal and external quality assurance, with examples. Suggestions for making the control measurement system more responsive to the operational needs in future are also briefly discussed. (author)

  11. Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

    1998-06-16

    A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value. 6 figs.

  12. Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.E.; Netzer, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant the ambient atmosphere and all effluent streams are sampled and analyzed regularly for conformance to applicable environmental standards. Although neither the State of Ohio nor the federal government has established standards for fluorides in the ambient atmosphere or in vegetation, these parameters also are monitored because fluoride compounds are used extensively in the gaseous diffusion process. Radioactivity is measured in air, water, food, soil, and sediments; and radiation doses are calculated for the public. All public radiation doses are well within federal standards. Non-radioactive effluent parameters either comply with federal standards, or there are projects planned to allow compliance. A disposal facility to remove chromium from recirculating cooling water blowdown will begin operation in June 1976. Also, pH adjustment facilities for liquid effluents and electrostatic precipitators for a coal-fired steam plant are planned for the near future

  13. Long-range global warming impact of gaseous diffusion plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    1992-09-01

    The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is on the Montreal Protocol list of materials scheduled for production curtailment, a substitute must be found. In addition to physical cooling properties, the gaseous diffusion application imposes the unique requirement of chemical inertness to fluorinating agents. This has narrowed the selection of a near-term substitute to two fully fluorinated material, FC-318 and FC-3110, which are likely to be strong, long-lived greenhouse gases. In this document, calculations are presented showing, for a number of plausible scenarios of diffusion plant operation and coolant replacement strategy, the future course of coolant use, greenhouse gas emissions (including coolant and power-related indirect CO 2 emissions), and the consequent global temperature impacts of these scenarios

  14. Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation

  15. Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

  16. Development of on-line uranium enrichment monitor of gaseous UF6 for uranium enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xuesheng; Liu Guorong; Jin Huimin; Zhao Yonggang; Li Jinghuai; Hao Xueyuan; Ying Bin; Yu Zhaofei

    2013-01-01

    An on-line enrichment monitor was developed to measure the enrichment of UF 6 , flowing through the processing pipes in uranium enrichment plant. A Nal (Tl) detector was used to measure the count rates of the 185.7 keV γ-ray emitted from 235 U, and the total quantity of uranium was determined from thermodynamic characteristics of gaseous uranium hexafluoride. The results show that the maximum relative standard deviation is less than 1% when the measurement time is 120 s or more and the pressure is more than 2 kPa in the measurement chamber. Uranium enrichment of gaseous uranium hexafluoride in the output end of cascade can be monitored continuously by using the device. It should be effective for nuclear materials accountability verifications and materials balance verification at uranium enrichment plant. (authors)

  17. Data quality objectives for PUREX deactivation flushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    This Data Quality Objection (DQO) defines the sampling and analysis requirements necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated by WAC 173-303. Specifically, sampling and analysis requirements are identified for the flushing operations that are a major element of PUREX deactivation

  18. Introduction to the nuclear criticality safety evaluation of facility X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report is the first in a series of documents that will evaluate nuclear criticality safety in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. It provides an overview of the facility, categorizes its functions for future analysis, reviews existing NCS documentation, and explains the follow-on effort planned for X-705. A detailed breakdown of systems, subsystems, and operational areas is presented and cross-referenced to existing NCS documentation

  19. The new local control systems for operating gaseous diffusion plant units at Pierrelatte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacroix, C.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a local control network for operating gaseous diffusion plant units is presented. The objective of the control system up date was to replace all the information network hardware. The new generation HP1000 calculators and a network architecture were chosen. The validation tests performed in laboratory and in situ, and the management policies towards the personnel during the technical changes are summarized [fr

  20. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites

  1. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested

  2. Uranium deposit removal from the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant K-25 Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd, L.D.; Stinnett, E.C. Jr.; Hale, J.R.; Haire, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant went into operation as the first plant to separate uranium by the gaseous diffusion process. It was built during World War II as part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Project. Its war-time code name was K-25, which was also the name of the first uranium separation building constructed at the installation. The K-25 building was considered an engineering miracle at the time of its construction. Built in a U shape ∼1 mile long and 400 ft wide, it housed complex and unique separation equipment. Despite its size and complexity, it was made fully operational within <2 yr after construction began. The facility operated successfully for more than 20 yr until it was placed in a standby mode in 1964. It is now clear the K-25 gaseous diffusion plant will never again be used to enrich uranium. The U.S. Department of Energy, therefore, has initiated a decontamination and decommission program. This paper discusses various procedures and techniques for addressing critical mass, uranium deposits, and safeguards issues

  3. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 1. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    Subject to authorizing legislation and funding, ERDA will proceed with steps for additional uranium enrichment capacity at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio. This environmental statement was prepared by ERDA to cover this action. The statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and ERDA's implementing regulations, 10 CFR Chapter III, Part 711. The statement describes the reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic and technological costs and benefits of the construction and operation of the expanded enrichment plant and its reasonably available alternatives and their anticipated effects

  4. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 1. Draft environmental statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-01

    Subject to authorizing legislation and funding, ERDA will proceed with steps for additional uranium enrichment capacity at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio. This environmental statement was prepared by ERDA to cover this action. The statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and ERDA's implementing regulations, 10 CFR Chapter III, Part 711. The statement describes the reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic and technological costs and benefits of the construction and operation of the expanded enrichment plant and its reasonably available alternatives and their anticipated effects.

  5. Method for estimate the economic characteristics of an uranium enrichment plant by gaseous diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berault, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    To estimate the economic characteristics of an uranium enrichment plant by gaseous diffusion is to determine the prospective price of the separative work unit to which leads the concerned technology, and to collect the data allowing to ascertain that this price remains in the area of development of the prices forecasted by the other projects. The prospective price estimated by the promoter is the synthesis of the components of the go decision and which are a potential market and a comprehensive industrially proven plant design, including the basic economic and technical data of the project. Procedures for estimating these components and their synthesis, exclusive of financing problems are reviewed [fr

  6. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility`s life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994).

  7. PUREX/UO3 facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO 3 ) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility's life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994)

  8. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, E.N. III.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety

  9. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, E.N. III

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety.

  10. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  11. Cleanup operations at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant contaminated metal scrapyard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Cleanup operations at the contaminated metal storage yard located at the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Gaseous Diffusion Plant have been completed. The storage yard, in existence since the early 1970s, contained an estimated 35,000 tons of mixed-type metals spread over an area of roughly 30 acres. The overall cleanup program required removing the metal from the storage yard, sorting by specific metal types, and size reduction of specific types for future processing. This paper explains the methods and procedures used to accomplish this task

  12. Study of technetium uptake in vegetation in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Technetium-99 was measured in vegetation and soil collected on and near the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to obtain an estimate of the soil-to-vegetation concentration factors. The concentration factors appear to be lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 3.4 (Bq/kg dry wt. tissue per Bq/kg dry wt. soil) and a geometric standard deviation of 4.7. A dose commitment was calculated using a hypothetical 3.7 x 10 10 Bq Tc-99/year release and the actual CY-1981 concentration release of Tc-99. The radiological significance of Tc-99 in the terrestial food chain is substantially less than previously believed

  13. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of large cylinder cleaning operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.; Lutz, H.F.

    1995-06-01

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for large cylinder cleaning operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current cleaning procedures and required hardware/equipment is presented, and documentation for large cylinder cleaning operations is identified and described. Control parameters, design features, administrative controls, and safety systems relevant to nuclear criticality are discussed individually, followed by an overall assessment based on the Double Contingency Principle. Recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested, and issues for increased efficiency are presented

  14. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal

  15. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    An airborne radiological survey was conducted in July 1976. It was centered on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Two areas were surveyed: one 35 km 2 and the other 16 km 2 . Using Nal(Tl) scintillation detectors, measurements were made of the terrestrial gamma radiation over the areas with a series of north-south flight lines. The processed data indicated that on-site radioactivity was due to nuclear matterials currently or previously handled, processed, or stored. Off-site activities were found to be due wholly to the naturally occurring 40 K, the 238 U chain, and thorium chain gamma emitters

  16. Gaseous environment of plants and activity of enzymes of carbohydrate catabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.F.; Zemlyanukhin, A.A.; Igamberdiev, A.U.; Salam, A.M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors investigated the action of hypoxia and high CO 2 concentration in the atmosphere on activity of phosphofructokinase, aldolase, glucose phosphate isomerase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and isocitrate lyase in pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.), corn scutella (Zea mays L.), and hemp cotyledons (Cannabis sativa L.). The first 4-12h of hypoxia witnessed suppression of enzymes of the initial stages of glycolysis (glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphofructokinase)and activation of enzymes of its final stages (alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase) and enzymes linking glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase). An excess of CO 2 in the environment accelerated and amplified this effect. At the end of a 24-h period of anaerobic incubation, deviations of enzyme activity from the control were leveled in both gaseous environments. An exception was observed in the case of phosphofructokinase, whose activity increased markedly at this time in plants exposed to CO 2 . Changes in activity of the enzymes were coupled with changes in their kinetic parameters (apparent K m and V max values). The activity of isocitrate lyase was suppressed in both variants of hypoxic gaseous environments, a finding that does not agree with the hypothesis as to participation of the glyoxylate cycle in the metabolic response of plants to oxygen stress. Thus, temporary inhibition of the system of glycolysis and activation of the pentose phosphate pathway constituted the initial response of the plants to O 2 stress, and CO 2 intensified this metabolic response

  17. Preduction of the vibratory behaviour of a multistage gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descleve, P.; Bertaut, C.; Briot, P.

    1979-01-01

    A study has been made to predict the vibratory behaviour of the rotating machinery of a gaseous diffusion plant starting from the results obtained for a single machine. TRICASTIN gaseous diffusion plant uses several hundred of enrichment stages but only three different sizes of machine are used. Each individual machine is a vertical assembly of a compressor heat exchanger and diffusion barriers, this column is supported on four lugs on a concrete slab. This slab must accomodate thermal expansion and is placed on neoprene pads. Due to the compactness of the system the mass of concrete is relatively small. Typically the mass of a machine of the intermediate size is 84 T, the mass of associated concrete is 55 T. Furthermore this supporting slab is flexible, meaning that a dynamic analysis of the slab shows several frequencies below the compressor rotational speed. Extensive dynamic tests have been conducted on a machine supported on a rigid foundation. These tests have shown that the main source of mechanical excitation was caused at 50 Hz by the unbalance of the electrical motor rotor. Then the problem remained to predict the behaviour of a group of twenty machines in the plant itself. (orig.)

  18. Forefront of PUREX system engineering. Chemistry and engineering of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    The paper reports the activity of the research committee organized by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan on 'Ruthenium and Technetium Chemistry in the PUREX System', with focusing on basic behaviors of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium in the PUREX process, the principles of plant design, and behaviors during the final waste treatment. The scope of the work includes the following major topics: (1) basic solution and solid-state chemistry; (2) basic solution and solid-state chemistry of minor actinides in particular, Np; (3) partitioning chemistry in the PUREX system and environmental behavior of the components; (4) processes of recovery, purification, and utilization of rare metal fission products; (5) field data on plant design, operation, decontamination, and decommissioning; (6) numerical process simulations and process control technologies; (7) compilation of a data base for process chemistry and plant engineering. (S. Ohno)

  19. The Blend Down Monitoring System Demonstration at the Padijcah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, J.; Close, D.; Johnson, W. Jr.; Kerr, P.; March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Moss, C.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, R.; Wright, P.D.

    1999-01-01

    Agreements between the governments of the US and the Russian Federation for the US purchase of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons calls for the establishment of transparency measures to provide confidence that nuclear nonproliferation goals are being met. To meet these transparency goals, the agreements call for the installation of nonintrusive US instruments to monitor the down blending of HEU to LEU. The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) has been jointly developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to continuously monitor 235 U enrichments and mass flow rates at Russian blending facilities. Prior to its installation in Russian facilities, the BDMS was installed and operated in a UF 6 flow loop in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant simulating flow and enrichment conditions expected in a typical down-blending facility. A Russian delegation to the US witnessed the equipment demonstration in June, 1998. To conduct the demonstration in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the BDMS was required to meet stringent Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing, safety and operational requirements. The Paducah demonstration was an important milestone in achieving the operational certification for the BDMS use in Russian facilities

  20. Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

  1. Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows

  2. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals

  3. Decommissioning of the gaseous diffusion plant at BNF plc Capenhurst in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, D.W.; Cross, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1982, a gaseous diffusion plant located at the British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) site at Capenhurst in the United Kingdom, has been undergoing decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantling. By March 1994, the decontamination and decommissioning activities will be complete with 99% of the materials used to construct the plant recycled to the environment as clean material. This paper describes the history of the decontamination, decommissioning, dismantling, and disposal program. Reference is made to the scale of the project and to the special techniques developed, particularly in the areas of size reduction, decontamination, and protection of personnel and the environment. The quantities of material involved that require decontamination and release levels for recycling materials in the U.K. metals market are discussed

  4. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals

  5. A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L. [Safety and Reliability Optimization Services (SAROS), Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

  6. Novel gaseous ethylene binding inhibitor prevents ethylene effects in potted flowering plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serek, M.; Reid, M.S. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Horticulture); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1994-11-01

    A 6-hour fumigation of flowering Begonia xelatior hybrida Fotsch. Najada' and Rosa', B. xtuberhybrida Voss. Non-Stop', Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. Tropicana', and Rosa hybrida L. Victory Parade' plants with 1-MCP, (formerly designated as SIS-X), a gaseous nonreversible ethylene binding inhibitor, strongly inhibited exogenous ethylene effects such as bud and flower drop, leaf abscission, and accelerated flower senescence. The inhibitory effects of 1-MCP increased linearly with concentration, and at 20 nl-liter[sup [minus]1] this compound gave equal protection to that afforded by spraying the plants with a 0.5 STS mM solution. Chemical names used: 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), silver thiosulfate (STS).

  7. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND CANCER RISK FOR WORKERS AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAHR, DEBRA E.; ALDRICH, TIMOTHY E.; SEIDU, DAZAR; BRION, GAIL M.; TOLLERUD, DAVID J.; MULDOON, SUSAN; REINHART, NANCY; YOUSEEFAGHA, AHMED; MCKINNEY, PAUL; HUGHES, THERESE; CHAN, CAROLINE; RICE, CAROL; BREWER, DAVID E.; FREYBERG, RONALD W.; MOHLENKAMP, ADRIANE MOSER; HAHN, KRISTEN; HORNUNG, RICHARD; HO, MONA; DASTIDAR, ANIRUDDHA; FREITAS, SAMANTHA; SAMAN, DANIEL; RAVDAL, HEGE; SCUTCHFIELD, DOUGLAS; EGER, KENNETH J.; MINOR, STEVE

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) became operational in 1952; it is located in the western part of Kentucky. We conducted a mortality study for adverse health effects that workers may have suffered while working at the plant, including exposures to chemicals. Materials and Methods We studied a cohort of 6820 workers at the PGDP for the period 1953 to 2003; there were a total of 1672 deaths to cohort members. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a specific concern for this workforce; exposure to TCE occurred primarily in departments that clean the process equipment. The Life Table Analysis System (LTAS) program developed by NIOSH was used to calculate the standardized mortality ratios for the worker cohort and standardized rate ratio relative to exposure to TCE (the U.S. population is the referent for age-adjustment). LTAS calculated a significantly low overall SMR for these workers of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.72–0.79). A further review of three major cancers of interest to Kentucky produced significantly low SMR for trachea, bronchus, lung cancer (0.75, 95% CI: 0.72–0.79) and high SMR for Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (1.49, 95% CI: 1.02–2.10). Results No significant SMR was observed for leukemia and no significant SRRs were observed for any disease. Both the leukemia and lung cancer results were examined and determined to reflect regional mortality patterns. However, the Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma finding suggests a curious amplification when living cases are included with the mortality experience. Conclusions Further examination is recommended of this recurrent finding from all three U.S. Gaseous Diffusion plants. PMID:21468904

  8. Characterization of process holdup material at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.E.; Miller, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The cascade material balance area at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant is characterized by continuous, large, in-process inventories of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) and very large inputs and outputs of UF 6 over a complete range of 235 U enrichments. Monthly inventories are conducted to quantify the in-place material, but the inventory techniques are blind to material not in the gas phase. Material is removed from the gas phase by any one of four mechanisms: (1) freeze-outs which are the solidification of UF 6 , (2) inleakage of wet air which produces solid uranium oxyfluorides, (3) consumption of uranium through UF 6 reaction with internal metal surfaces, and (4) adsorption of UF 6 on internal surfaces. This presentation describes efforts to better characterize and, where possible, to eliminate or reduce the effects of these mechanisms on material accountability. Freeze-outs and wet air deposits occur under absormal operating conditions, and techniques are available to prevent, detect and reverse them. Consumption and adsorption occur under normal operating conditions and are more complex to manage, however, computer models have been developed to quantify monthly the net effects due to consumption and adsorption. These models have shown that consumption and adsorption effects on inventory differences are significant

  9. Development of NF3 Deposit Removal Technology for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; McNamara, B.K.; Rapko, B.M.; Edwards, M.K.; Kozelisky, A.E.; Daniel, R.C.; McSweeney, T.I.; Maharas, S.J.; Weaver, P.J.; Iwamasa, K.J.; Kefgen, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Battelle, Stoller, and WASTREN (BSW) team's efforts, to date, in support of the United States Department of Energy's plans to remove uranium and technetium deposits before decommissioning the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The BSW team investigated nitrogen trifluoride (NF 3 ) as a safer yet effective alternative gaseous treatment to the chlorine trifluoride (ClF 3 )-elemental fluorine (F 2 ) treatment currently used to remove uranium and technetium deposits from the uranium enrichment cascade. Both ClF 3 and F 2 are highly reactive, toxic, and hazardous gases, while NF 3 , although toxic [1], is no more harmful than moth balls [2]. BSW's laboratory thermo-analytical and laboratory-scale prototype studies with NF 3 established that thermal NF 3 can effectively remove likely and potential uranium (UO 2 F 2 and UF 4 ) and technetium deposits (a surrogate deposit material, TcO 2 , and pertechnetates) by conversion to volatile compounds. Our engineering evaluations suggest that NF 3 's effectiveness could be enhanced by combining with a lesser concentration of ClF 3 . BSW's and other's studies indicate compatibility with Portsmouth materials of construction (aluminum, copper, and nickel). (authors)

  10. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Anderson, R.E.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.; Vausher, A.L.

    1982-04-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant all effluent streams are sampled regularly and analyzed to assess compliance with applicable environmental standards. Radioactivity is measured in air, water, food, soil, and sediments; and radiation doses to the public are calculated. All public radiation doses from process effluents are well within Department of Energy and US EPA standards. Non-radioactive effluents either presently comply with federal standards or will comply upon completion of planned projects. The environmental impact of effluents from cleaning and decontamination operations has been reduced through flow reduction and improved chemical treatment. CY-1981 was the first full year under a new National Pollutant Discharge. Elimination System (NPDES) permit for liquid effluents; compliance with the permit's discharge limits did not present any significant problems. Engineering is proceeding on projects to be constructed through 1985 to further reduce the impact of liquid effluents. A new licensed sanitary landfill utilizing the area fill method went into operation in July 1981. Although neither the State of Ohio nor the federal government has established standards for fluoride in the atmosphere or in vegetation, fluorides are monitored because they are used extensively in the gaseous diffusion process

  11. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program

  12. Modelling of uranium/plutonium splitting in purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boullis, B.; Baron, P.

    1987-06-01

    A mathematical model simulating the highly complex uranium/plutonium splitting operation in PUREX process has been achieved by the french ''Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique''. The development of such a model, which includes transfer and redox reactions kinetics for all the species involved, required an important experimental work in the field of basis chemical data acquisition. The model has been successfully validated by comparison of its results with those of specific trials achieved (at laboratory scale), and with the available results of the french reprocessing units operation. It has then been used for the design of french new plants splitting operations

  13. An aerial radiological survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampoll-Ramirez, G.

    1994-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from August 10-16, 1993, over a 78-square-kilometer (30-square-mile) area of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The survey was performed at a nominal altitude of 46 meters (150 feet) with a line spacing of 76 meters (250 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level was prepared and overlaid on a set of United States Geological Survey topographic maps of the area and an aerial photograph of the plant. The terrestrial gamma exposure rates varied from about 7 to 14 microroentgens per hour at 1 meter above the ground. Protactinium-234m was observed at six sites within the boundaries of the plant. At a seventh site, only uranium-235 was observed. No other man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was present in a detectable quantity, either on or off the plant property. Soil sample and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within ± 7.5%

  14. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1994-03-01

    On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992.

  15. Validation of KENO V.a for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsher, H.D.; Fentiman, A.W.; Tayloe, R.W.; D'Aquila, D.

    1992-01-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KENO V.a is used to make criticality calculations for complex configurations and a wide range of 235 U enrichments. It is essential that the calculated critical conditions either accurately reflect the true critical state or that the bias from the true critical conditions are well known. Accordingly, a study has been initiated to validate KENO V.a over the ranges of parameters expected to be used when modeling equipment and processes at Portsmouth. Preliminary results of that study are reported in this paper. The ultimate goal of this study is to identify a set of data from existing critical experiments that will exercise all KENO V.a parameters commonly used by Portsmouth's criticality safety personnel. A second goal is to identify a relatively small subset of those experiments that may be run frequently to ensure that KENO V.a provides consistent results

  16. An in situ survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, R.A.

    1994-02-01

    An in situ survey of the area surrounding the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant was conducted between May 17 and 24, 1990. The survey consisted of in situ measurements and of ground sampling. A High Purity Germanium detector was used for the in situ measurements. The ground samples were taken to the, laboratory at EG ampersand G Energy Measurements, Inc., in Santa Barbara, California, for a radionuclide assay on a laboratory system. Results of the in situ measurements found evidence of naturally occurring radioisotopes, cesium-137 from international fallout, and some evidence of anomalous uranium-238. The soil sampling results show only the presence of naturally occurring radioisotopes, cesium-137, and also anomalous uranium-238

  17. Seismically-induced soil amplification at the DOE Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.W.; Haynes, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    A site-specific earthquake site response (soil amplification) study is being conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This study is pursuant to an upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report in accordance with requirements specified by DOE. The seismic hazard at PGDP is dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Site-specific synthetic earthquake records developed by others were applied independently to four soil columns with heights above baserock of about 325 ft. The results for the 1000-year earthquake event indicate that the site period is between 1.0 and 1.5 sec. Incident shear waves are amplified at periods of motion greater than 0.15 sec. The peak free-field horizontal acceleration, occurring at very low periods, is 0.28 g. 13 refs., 13 figs

  18. Seismically-induced soil amplification at the DOE Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.W.; Hynes, M.E.; Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    A site-specific earthquake site response (soil amplification) study is being conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This study is pursuant to an upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report in accordance with requirements specified by DOE. The seismic hazard at PGDP is dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Site-specific synthetic earthquake records developed by others were applied independently to four soil columns with heights above baserock of about 325 ft. The results for the 1000-year earthquake event indicate that the site period is between 1.0 and 1.5 sec. Incident shear waves are strongly amplified at periods of motion greater than 0.3 sec. The peak free-field horizontal acceleration, occurring at very low periods, is 0.28 g

  19. Local drainage analyses of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Local drainage analyses have been performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm having an approximate 10,000-yr recurrence interval. This review discusses the methods utilized to accomplish the analyses in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) design and evaluation guidelines, and summarizes trends, results, generalizations, and uncertainties applicable to other DOE facilities. Results indicate that some culverts may be undersized, and that the storm sewer system cannot drain the influx of precipitation from the base of buildings. Roofs have not been designed to sustain ponding when the primary drainage system is clogged. Some underground tunnels, building entrances, and ground level air intakes may require waterproofing

  20. Procedures for the retention of gaseous tritium released from a tritium enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutowski, H.; Bracha, M.

    1987-01-01

    General aim of the study is the comparison of two alternative processes for the retention of gaseous tritium which is released during normal operation and emergency operation in a tritium-enrichment-plant. Two processes for the retention of tritium were compared: 1. Oxidation-process. The hydrogen-gas containing HT will be burnt on an oxidation catalyst to H 2 O and HTO. In a subsequent step the water will be removed from the process by condensation, freezing and adsorption. 2. TROC-process (Tritium Removal by Organic Compounds). The tritium is added to an organic compound (acid) via catalyst. This reaction is irreversible and leads to solid products. (orig./RB) [de

  1. Meteorological effects of the mechanical-draft cooling towers of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical-draft cooling towers at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant dissipate about 2000 MW of heat. Downwash occurs about 40 percent of the time, when wind speeds exceed about 3 m/sec. An elevated cloud forms about 10 percent of the time. The length of the visible plume, which is typically 100 or 200 m, is satisfactorily modeled if it is assumed that the plumes from all the cells in a cooling-tower bank combine. The calculation of fog concentration is complicated by the fact that the moisture is not inert but is taking part in the energy exchanges of a thermodynamic system. Calculations of drift deposition agree fairly well with observations

  2. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1990 to November 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.

    1994-03-01

    On September 23, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, guiding plans for remediation, and protecting human health. In September 1992, a renewed permit was issued which requires toxicity monitoring of continuous and intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities. This report includes ESD/ORNL activities occurring from December 1990 to November 1992

  3. Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1995-06-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  4. Delisting efforts for mixed radioactive and chemically hazardous waste at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodpasture, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Presently, there are four hazardous wastes at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant that are candidates for the delisting from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste regulations. These candidates are the sludges from K-1407-B and C ponds, Central Neutralization Facility sludges, mixed sludges from Y-12 and the ash generated by the RCRA/Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. All of these hazardous wastes contain radioactive constituents as well as hazardous constituents. The delisting will be based upon the nonradioactive constituents. Whether the delisting petition is granted or not, the wastes will be handled according to the Department of Energy guidelines for radioactive wastes. The presentation discusses the methodologies for delisting these wastes and the rationale behind the processes

  5. Photochemical technique for reduction of uranium and subsequently plutonium in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.; Barker, J.J.; Gangwer, T.

    1976-09-01

    A photochemical modification of the Purex process is described in which a purified side stream of UO 2 ++ ion is reduced to U +4 outside the radioactive area of the reprocessing plant. The U +4 is then cycled back to step 2 of the Purex process to reduce the plutonium and effect separation within the partitioning column. This process is shown to be very energy efficient and compatible with existing conventional lamp technology. Preliminary cost estimates of the energy requirements for photon production are essentially negligible. Conceptual systems and photochemical reactor designs are presented. Potential benefits of this system are discussed

  6. PUREX exhaust ventilation system installation test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report validates the testing performed, the exceptions logged and resolved and certifies this portion of the SAMCONS has met all design and test criteria to perform as an operational system. The proper installation of the PUREX exhaust ventilation system components and wiring was systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of PUREX exhaust fan inlet, outlet, and vortex damper actuators and limit switches were verified, using special test equipment, to be correct and installed wiring connections were verified by operation of this equipment

  7. Determination of hydroxylamine in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertel, D.; Weindel, P.

    1984-05-01

    In PUREX process solutions hydroxylamine or HAN (hydrolammonium nitrate) respectively, can be oxidized specifically to give nitrous acid, HNO 2 , which by sybsequent GRIESS reaction forms the well-known reddish azo-dye. Its absorbance is spectrophotometrically measured at 520 nm and results in linear calibration graphs covering the analytical range of 10 -5 to 10 -6 M NH 2 OH. The influence of other reductants (N 2 H 4 , Pu-III) as well as of further PUREX main constituents like U-VI, HNO 3 etc. was checked-up and determined quantitatively. There are no analytical limitations in case of HAN concentrations > 10 -2 M. (orig.) [de

  8. Issues and recommendations related to replacement of CFC-114 at the uranium enrichment gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.L.; Banaghan, E.

    1993-01-01

    The operating uranium enrichment gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) in Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky, which are operated for the United States Department for Energy by Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES), currently use a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-114) as the primary process stream coolant. Due to recent legislation embodied in the Clean Air Act, the production of this and other related chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) are to be phased out with no production occurring after 1995. Since the plants lose approximately 500,000 pounds per year of this process stream coolant through various leaks, the GDPs are faced with the challenge of identifying a replacement coolant that will allow continued operation of the plants. MMES formed the CFC Task Team to identify and solve the various problems associated with identifying and implementing a replacement coolant. This report includes a review of the work performed by the CFC Task Team, and recommendations that were formulated based on this review and upon original work. The topics covered include; identifying a replacement coolant, coolant leak detection and repair efforts, coolant safety concerns, coolant level sensors, regulatory issues, and an analytical decision analysis

  9. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Program surveillance and maintenance plan, FY 1993--2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloesslin, W.

    1992-11-01

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs (ERWM). The objective of the ER Program is to provide PORTS the capability to meet applicable environmental regulations through facility development activities and site remedial actions. The WM Program supports the ER Program. The D ampersand D Program provides collective management of the sites within the plant which require decontamination and decommissioning, prioritizes those areas in terms of health, safety and environmental concerns, and implements the appropriate level of remedial action. The D ampersand D Program provides support to facilities which formerly served one or more of the many Plant functions. Program activities include (1) surveillance and maintenance of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning safe and orderly facility decommissioning; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost effective, and timely manner. In order to achieve the first objective, a formal plan which documents the surveillance and maintenance needs for each inactive facility has been prepared. This report provides this documentation for the PORTS facilities currently included in the D ampersand D Program and includes projected resource requirements for the planning period of FY 1993 through FY 2002

  10. French Regulatory Framework for the Recycling/Reuse of Nuclear Waste and the Dismantling of George Besse Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Themines, R., E-mail: robert.themines@areva.com [AREVA (France)

    2011-07-15

    The regulatory framework in France governing the management of materials containing low levels of radionuclides is described. The plans for the management of the materials arising from the dismantling of the Georges Besse Gaseous Diffusion Plant are described as an example of the application of the regulations. (author)

  11. PGDP [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant]-UF6 handling, sampling, analysis and associated QC/QA and safety related procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    This document is a compilation of Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant procedures on UF 6 handling, sampling, and analysis, along with associated QC/QA and safety related procedures. It was assembled for transmission by the US Department of Energy to the Korean Advanced Energy Institute as a part of the US-Korea technical exchange program

  12. Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

  13. Regional flood hazard assessment of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Regional flood-hazard assessments performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants are reviewed, compared, and contrasted to determine the relationship of probable maximum flood methodology with respect to US Department of Energy design and evaluation guidelines. The Paducah assessment was carried out using probable minimum flood methodology, while the Portsmouth assessment utilized probabilistic techniques. Results indicated that regional flooding along nearby rivers would not inundate either plant, and that the guidelines were satisfied. A comparison of results indicated that the probable minimum flood recurrence interval associated with the Paducah assessment exceeded the 10,000-year requirement of the guidelines, while recurrence intervals obtained in the Portsmouth assessment could be above or below 10,000 years depending on the choice of the probabilistic model used to perform the assessment. It was concluded, based on an analysis of two data points, that smaller watersheds driven by single event storms could be assessed using probabilistic techniques, while probable maximum flood methodology could be applied to larger drainage basins flooded by storm sequences

  14. Determination of operating limits for radionuclides for a proposed landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Kocher, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The operating limits for radionuclides in sanitary and industrial wastes were determined for a proposed landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky. These limits, which may be very small but nonzero, are not mandated by law or regulation but are needed for rational operation. The approach was based on analyses of the potential contamination of groundwater at the plant boundary and the potential exposure to radioactivity of an intruder at the landfill after closure. The groundwater analysis includes (1) a source model describing the disposal of waste and the release of radionuclides from waste to the groundwater, (2) site-specific groundwater flow and contaminant transport calculations, and (3) calculations of operating limits from the dose limit and conversion factors. The intruder analysis includes pathways through ingestion of contaminated vegetables and soil, external exposure to contaminated soil, and inhalation of suspended activity from contaminated soil particles. In both analyses, a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) was adopted. The intended application of the results is to refine the radiological monitoring standards employed by the PGDP Health Physics personnel to determine what constitutes radioactive wastes, with concurrence of the Commonwealth of Kentucky

  15. Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes

  16. Environmental program audit: Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Roane County, Tennessee. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.M.; Waller, R.

    1985-01-01

    An environmental audit of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) was conducted by a team of NUS scientists and engineers during the week of June 3 through June 7, 1985. ORGDP is owned by the Department of Energy and operated by Martin-Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. To enrich uranium feedstocks for nuclear fuels. The team evaluated ORGDP in terms of compliance with environmental regulations and DOE Orders, the adequacy of pollution control equipment, the effectiveness of environmental monitoring, and the application of quality control procedures to environmental programs. The audit was conducted by observing operations, inspecting facilities, evaluating analysis and monitoring techniques, reviewing reports and data, and interviewing personnel. Overall, the ORGDP environmental program appears to be well structured and has attempted to address all areas of air, water, and land media likely to be affected by the operations of the facility. The plant management is knowledgeable about environmental concerns and has established clear, well-defined goals to address these areas. An adequate professional staff is available to manage the environmental program

  17. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    Disconnecting the criticality alarm permanently in June 1996 signified that the hazards in the PUREX (plutonium-uranium extraction) plant had been so removed and reduced that criticality was no longer a credible event. Turning off the PUREX criticality alarm also marked a salient point in a historic deactivation project, 1 year before its anticipated conclusion. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project began in October 1993 as a 5-year, $222.5- million project. As a result of innovations implemented during 1994 and 1995, the project schedule was shortened by over a year, with concomitant savings. In 1994, the innovations included arranging to send contaminated nitric acid from the PUREX Plant to British Nuclear Fuels, Limited (BNFL) for reuse and sending metal solutions containing plutonium and uranium from PUREX to the Hanford Site tank farms. These two steps saved the project $36.9- million. In 1995, reductions in overhead rate, work scope, and budget, along with curtailed capital equipment expenditures, reduced the cost another $25.6 million. These savings were achieved by using activity-based cost estimating and applying technical schedule enhancements. In 1996, a series of changes brought about under the general concept of ``reengineering`` reduced the cost approximately another $15 million, and moved the completion date to May 1997. With the total savings projected at about $75 million, or 33.7 percent of the originally projected cost, understanding how the changes came about, what decisions were made, and why they were made becomes important. At the same time sweeping changes in the cultural of the Hanford Site were taking place. These changes included shifting employee relations and work structures, introducing new philosophies and methods in maintaining safety and complying with regulations, using electronic technology to manage information, and, adopting new methods and bases for evaluating progress. Because these changes helped generate cost savings and were

  18. Continuous plutonium(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination process. [From product streams from Redox, Purex, or Recuplex solvent extraction plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beede, R L

    1956-09-27

    A continuous plutonium (IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination process has been developed. Continuous and batch decomposition of the oxalate in the filtrates has been demonstrated. The processes have been demonstrated in prototype equipment. Plutonium (IV) oxalate was precipitated continuously at room temperature by the concurrent addition of plutonium (IV) nitrate feed and oxalic acid into the pan of a modified rotary drum filter. The plutonium (IV) oxalate was calcined to plutonium dioxide, which could be readily hydrofluorinated. Continuous decomposition of the oxalate in synthetic plutonium (IV) oxalate filtrates containing plutonium (IV) oxalate solids was demonstrated using co-current flow in a U-shaped reactor. Feeds containing from 10 to 100 g/1 Pu, as plutonium (IV) nitrate, and 1.0 to 6.5 M HNO/sub 3/, respectively, can be processed. One molar oxalic acid is used as the precipitant. Temperatures of 20 to 35/sup 0/C for the precipitation and filtration are satisfactory. Plutonium (IV) oxalate can be calcined at 300 to 400/sup 0/C in a screw-type drier-calciner to plutonium dioxide and hydrofluorinated at 450 to 550/sup 0/C. Plutonium dioxide exceeding purity requirements has been produced in the prototype equipment. Advantages of continuous precipitation and filtration are: uniform plutonium (IV) oxalate, improved filtration characteristics, elimination of heating and cooling facilities, and higher capacities through a single unit. Advantages of the screw-type drier-calciner are the continuous production of an oxide satisfactory for feed for the proposed plant vibrating tube hydrofluorinator, and ease of coupling continuous precipitation and filtration to this proposed hydrofluorinator. Continuous decomposition of oxalate in filtrates offers advantages in decreasing filtrate storage requirements when coupled to a filtrate concentrator. (JGB)

  19. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1997-06-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  20. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent 235 U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF 6 cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF 6 packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4

  1. LANMAS alpha configured for Sandia National Laboratories and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woychick, M.R.; Bracey, J.T.; Kern, E.A.; Alvarado, A.

    1993-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Westinghouse Hanford Company have been working jointly for the past 2 years to develop LANMAS (Local Area Network Material Accountability System), the next generation of a US Department of Energy nuclear material accountability system. LANMAS is being designed to reflect the broad-based needs of the US Department of Energy's Material Control ampersand Accountability and Nuclear Materials Management communities, and its developers believe that significant cost savings can be achieved by implementing LANMAS complex-wide, where feasible. LANMAS is being designed so that it is transportable to appropriate US Department of Energy sites. To accomplish this, LANMAS will be configurable to local site work culture. Many US Department of Energy sites are interested in the LANMAS project, and several have participated in its development; some have committed resources. The original LANMAS project team included representatives from the Hanford Site and Los Alamos. As of June 1993, the following sites have also supported the project: Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque; Sandia National Laboratory Livermore; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory; and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. In addition, LANMAS is being targeted as a candidate for the US Department of Energy Complex 21, a project designed to restructure the nation's nuclear weapons complex

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) and surrounding area in Paducah, Kentucky, was conducted during May 15--25, 1990. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the PGDP and surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) along a series of parallel lines 107 meters (350 feet) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 62 square kilometers (24 square miles), bordered on the north by the Ohio River. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 5 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). Protactinium-234m, a radioisotope indicative of uranium-238, was detected at several facilities at the PGDR. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within ±15%

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

  4. Martin Marietta Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant comprehensive earthquake emergency management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Recognizing the value of a proactive, integrated approach to earthquake preparedness planning, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. initiated a contract in June 1989 with Murray State University, Murray, Kentucky, to develop a comprehensive earthquake management program for their Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky. The overall purpose of the program is to mitigate the loss of life and property in the event of a major destructive earthquake. The program includes four distinct (yet integrated) components: an emergency management plan, with emphasis on the catastrophic earthquake; an Emergency Operations Center Duty Roster Manual; an Integrated Automated Emergency Management Information System (IAEMIS); and a series of five training program modules. The PLAN itself is comprised of four separate volumes: Volume I -- Chapters 1--3; Volume II -- Chapters 4--6, Volume III -- Chapter 7, and Volume IV -- 23 Appendices. The EOC Manual (which includes 15 mutual aid agreements) is designated as Chapter 7 in the PLAN and is a ''stand alone'' document numbered as Volume III. This document, Volume I, provides an introduction, summary and recommendations, and the emergency operations center direction and control

  5. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January-December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). A plan for the biological monitoring of the receiving streams was implemented in 1987 and consisted of ecological surveys, toxicity monitoring of effluents and receiving streams, evaluation of bioaccumulation of trace contaminants in biota, and supplemental chemical characterization of effluents. Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in (1) identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, and (3) guiding plans for remediation and protecting human health. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish. With the exception of the benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys, this report focuses on activities from January to December 1997

  6. Operating experience with aluminum bearings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1975-01-01

    Considerable operating experience has been gained at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant over the last 15 years in the use of aluminum bearings in process related and auxiliary equipment. All of this experience has been excellent and, in several cases, the use of this type of bearing material has solved significant operating problems. Aluminum 850-T101 alloy was first used as a bearing material in purge cascade (PC-9) centrifugal compressors where a fatigue problem was being experienced with babbitt-type bearings. Good experience in this application led to the extended use of this bearing material in other equipment including process related as well as auxiliary equipment. Since 1961 aluminum bearings have been installed in approximately 21 Type PC-9 (centrifugal), 97 Type 9 (centrifugal), 262 Type X-29 (axial), and 101 Type 31 (axial) compressors, and 3 speed increasers in the X-330 Evacuation Booster Station. Based on successful operation of these bearings, continued and expanded use of aluminum bearings is recommended as a means of obtaining a high fatigue resistant bearing at a cost lower than that for babbitt-type bearings. (U.S.)

  7. Proposed sale of radioactively contaminated nickel ingots located at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to sell 8,500 radioactively contaminated nickel ingots (9.350 short tons), currently in open storage at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), to Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (SEG) for decontamination and resale on the international market. SEG would take ownership of the ingots when they are loaded for transport by truck to its facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. SEG would receive approximately 200 short tons per month over approximately 48 months (an average of 180 ingots per month). The nickel decontamination process specified in SEG's technical proposal is considered the best available technology and has been demonstrated in prototype at SEG. The resultant metal for resale would have contamination levels between 0.3 and 20 becquerel per gram (Bq/g). The health hazards associated with release of the decontaminated nickel are minimal. The activity concentration of the end product would be further reduced when the nickel is combined with other metals to make stainless steel. Low-level radioactive waste from the SEG decontamination process, estimated to be approximately 382 m 3 (12,730 ft), would be shipped to a licensed commercial or DOE disposal facility. If the waste were packaged in 0.23 m 3 -(7.5 ft 3 -) capacity drums, approximately 1,500 to 1,900 drums would be transported over the 48-month contract period. Impacts from the construction of decontamination facilities and the selected site are minimal

  8. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). A plan for the biological monitoring of the receiving streams was implemented in 1987 and consisted of ecological surveys, toxicity monitoring of effluents and receiving streams, evaluation of bioaccumulation of trace contaminants in biota, and supplemental chemical characterization of effluents. Beginning in fall 1991, the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The BMP has been continued because it has proven to be extremely valuable in (1) identifying those effluents with the potential for adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assessing the ecological health of receiving streams, and (3) guiding plans for remediation and protecting human health. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish. With the exception of the benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys, this report focuses on activities from January to December 1997.

  9. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  10. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate

  11. Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socolof, M.L.; McCold, L.N.; Saylor, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Three gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium maintain a large inventory of chlorofluorocarbon-114 (CFC-114) as a coolant. To address the continued use of CFC-114, an ozone-depleting substance, the US Department of Energy (DOE) considered introducing perfluorocarbons (PFCs) by the end of 1995. These PFCs would not contribute to stratospheric ozone depletion but would be larger contributors to global warming than would CFC-114. The paper reports the results of an assessment of the global impacts of four alternatives for modifying GDP coolant system operations over a three-year period beginning in 1996. The overall contribution of GDP coolant releases to impacts on ozone depletion and global warming were quantified by parameters referred to as ozone-depletion impact and global-warming impact. The analysis showed that these parameters could be used as surrogates for predicting global impacts to all resources and could provide a framework for assessing environmental impacts of a permanent coolant replacement, eliminating the need for subsequent resource-specific analyses

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs

  13. Martin Marietta Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant comprehensive earthquake emergency management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Recognizing the value of a proactive, integrated approach to earthquake preparedness planning, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. initiated a contract in June 1989 with Murray State University, Murray, Kentucky, to develop a comprehensive earthquake management program for their Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky (PGDP -- Subcontract No. 19P-JV649V). The overall purpose of the program is to mitigate the loss of life and property in the event of a major destructive earthquake. The program includes four distinct (yet integrated) components: an emergency management plan, with emphasis on the catastrophic earthquake; an Emergency Operations Center Duty Roster Manual; an Integrated Automated Emergency Management Information System (IAEMIS); and a series of five training program modules. The PLAN itself is comprised of four separate volumes: Volume I -- Chapters 1--3; Volume II -- Chapters 4--6, Volume III -- Chapter 7, and Volume IV -- 23 Appendices. The EOC Manual (which includes 15 mutual aid agreements) is designated as Chapter 7 in the PLAN and is a ''stand alone'' document numbered as Volume III. This document, Volume II, discusses methodology, engineering and environmental analyses, and operational procedures

  14. Martin Marietta Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant comprehensive earthquake emergency management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Recognizing the value of a proactive, integrated approach to earthquake preparedness planning, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc, initiated a contract in June 1989 with Murray State University, Murray, Kentucky, to develop a comprehensive earthquake management program for their Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky (PGDP--Subcontract No. 19P-JV649V). The overall purpose of the program is to mitigate the loss of life and property in the event of a major destructive earthquake. The program includes four distinct (yet integrated) components: (1) an emergency management plan, with emphasis on the catas trophic earthquake, (2) an Emergency Operations Center Duty Roster Manual, (3) an Integrated Automated Emergency Management Information System (IAEMIS), and (4) a series of five training program modules. The PLAN itself is comprised of four separate volumes: Volume I--Chapters 1--3; Volume II--Chapters 4--6, Volume III--Chapter 7, and Volume IV--23 Appendices. The EOC Manual (which includes 15 mutual aid agreements) is designated as Chapter 7 in the PLAN and is a ''stand alone'' document numbered as Volume III. This document, Volume IV contains the appendices to this report

  15. Examination of vegetation around a nuclear plant emitting gaseous fluorides in order to detect fluorine pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teulon, Francoise; Bonnaventure, J. P.

    1971-08-01

    Fluorine pollution (chronic or occasional) around a plant rejecting gaseous fluoride effluents can be detected from vegetation samples by chemical analysis. Systematic monitoring allows the effects and gravity of the pollution to be estimated. The analytical method used consists of a double distillation (in phosphoric acid and perchloric acid) followed by a spectro-colorimetric analysis (alizarine-complexon-lanthane). This method of control allows both the efficiency of the trapping installations and also the appearance of effluents at unexpected places to be checked, In the event of an accident it is possible to determine the advisability of prohibiting the consumption of locally grown produce by humans or fodder by cattle. Research conducted in order to determine the relation between visible, damage to certain vegetables (tomatoes, haricot beans and sorghum) and their fluorine contents demonstrated that such a relation appears above all at the level of the leaves; chemical analysis may thus be used to confirm or reject information obtained on the basis of visual evidence [fr

  16. Application of a Kalman filter to UF6 gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-03-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UF 6 in gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a bias is introduced into the weight derivative signal because a refrigerant is circulated through a shell-and-tube heat exchanger inside the freezer/sublimer. The weight of the refrigerant is included in the weight measured by the weigh cell. If the circulation rate of the refrigerent is not steady state, a bias exists. Measurements of upstream pressure, vessel pressure, and output to the system control valve are available to the control system. Thus, if the flow through the control valve is characterized properly by the measurements, a Kalman filter can be used in conjunction with these auxiliary inputs and the weigh cell input to overcome the noise and bias problem and provide an improve estimate of flow rate. A discussion of the development and the current status of a Kalman filter used for this application is given. 5 refs

  17. Martin Marietta Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant comprehensive earthquake emergency management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Recognizing the value of a proactive, integrated approach to earthquake preparedness planning, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. initiated a contract in June 1989 with Murray State University, Murray, Kentucky, to develop a comprehensive earthquake management program for their Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky (PGDP -- Subcontract No. 19P-JV649V). The overall purpose of the program is to mitigate the loss of life and property in the event of a major destructive earthquake. The program includes four distinct (yet integrated) components: (1) an emergency management plan with emphasis on the catas trophic earthquake; (2) an Emergency Operations Center Duty Roster Manual; (3) an Integrated Automated Emergency Management Information System (IAEMIS); and (4) a series of five training program modules. The PLAN itself is comprised of four separate volumes: Volume I -- Chapters 1--3; Volume II -- Chapters 4--6; Volume III -- Chapter 7; and Volume IV -- 23 Appendices. The EOC Manual (which includes 15 mutual aid agreements) is designated as Chapter 7 in the PLAN and is this document numbered as Volume III

  18. Assessment and interpretation of cross- and down-hole seismograms at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staub, W.P.; Wang, J.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Selfridge, R.J. (Automated Sciences Group, (United States))

    1991-09-01

    This paper is an assessment and interpretation of cross-and down-hole seismograms recorded at four sites in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Arrival times of shear (S-) and compressional (P-) waves are recorded on these seismograms in milliseconds. Together with known distances between energy sources and seismometers lowered into boreholes, these arrival times are used to calculate S- and P-wave velocities in unconsolidated soils and sediments that overlie bedrock approximately 320 ft beneath PGDP. The soil columns are modified after an earlier draft by ERC Environmental and Energy Services Company (ERCE), 1990. In addition to S- and P- wave velocity estimates from this paper, the soil columns contain ERCE's lithologic and other geotechnical data for unconsolidated soils and sediments from the surface to bedrock. Soil columns for Sites 1 through 4 and a site location map are in Plates 1 through 5 of Appendix 6. The velocities in the four columns are input parameters for the SHAKE computer program, a nationally recognized computer model that simulates ground response of unconsolidated materials to earthquake generated seismic waves. The results of the SHAKE simulation are combined with predicted ground responses on rock foundations (caused by a given design earthquake) to predict ground responses of facilities with foundations placed on unconsolidated materials. 3 refs.

  19. Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January - December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1997-06-01

    On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate

  20. Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Cooling tower drift studies at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, F.G.; Hanna, S.R.; Parr, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    The transfer and fate of chromium from cooling tower drift to terrestrial ecosystems were quantified at the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment facility at Paducah, Kentucky. Chromium concentrations in plant materials (fescue grass) decreased with increasing distance from the cooing tower, ranging from 251 +- 19 ppM at 15 meters to 0.52 +- 0.07 ppM at 1500 meters. The site of drift contamination, size characteristics, and elemental content of drift particles were determined using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis capabilities. Results indicate that elemental content in drift water (mineral residue) may not be equivalent to the content in the recirculating cooling water of the tower. This hypothesis is contrary to basic assumptions in calculating drift emissions. A laboratory study simulating throughfall from 1 to 6 inches of rain suggested that there are more exchange sites associated with litter than live foliage. Leachate from each one inch throughfall simulant removed 3% of the drift mass from litter compared to 7 to 9% from live foliage. Results suggest that differences in retention are related to chemical properties of the drift rather than physical lodging of the particle residue. To determine the potential for movement of drift-derived chromium to surface streams, soil--water samplers (wells) were placed along a distance gradient to Little Bayou Creek. Samples from two depths following rainstorms revealed the absence of vertical or horizontal movement with maximum concentrations of 0.13 ppb at 50 meters from the tower. Preliminary model estimates of drift deposition are compared to depositionmeasurements. Isopleths of the predicted deposition are useful to identify areas of maximum drift transport in the environs of the gaseous diffusion plant

  2. Structural inspection and wind analysis of redwood cooling towers at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, T.; Solack, T.; Hortel, J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the plant upgrade program, structural analyses and field inspections were performed on four redwood cooling towers at the DOE Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant located in Piketon, Ohio. The cooling towers are categorized as important hazard facilities. The loadings are derived from UCRL-15910 according to the pertinent hazard category. In addition to the seismic and wind loadings, the wood cooling towers are constantly subject to adverse environmental effects such as elevated temperature, chemical attack, icing and snow load, and motor vibrations. A thorough structural evaluation for all load combinations was performed for each of the cooling towers based on the structural code requirements of the Cooling Tower Institute and National Forest Products Association. Most stress criteria are unique for the redwood material. This evaluation was performed using finite element techniques on the global structural integrity and supplemented by hand calculations on the individual connection joints. Overloaded wood structural members and joints are identified by the analysis. The rectangular tower structure sits on a concrete basin that span across 60 ft by 200 ft. A major part of the cooling towers upgrading program involved field inspections of the individual cells of each tower. The primary purpose of these inspections was to identify any existing structural damage or deficiencies such as failed members, degraded wood, and deficiencies resulting from poor construction practice. Inspection of 40 cells identified some generic deficiencies that mostly are consistent with the analytical finding. Based on the analysis, some effective but inexpensive upgrading techniques were developed and recommended to bring the cooling towers into compliance with current DOE requirements

  3. Testing and economical evaluation of U(IV) in Purex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoisington, J.E.; Hsu, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    The use of uranous nitrate, U(IV), as a plutonium reductant in the Purex solvent extraction process could significantly reduce the waste generation at the Savannah River Plant. The current reductant is a ferrous sulfamate (FS)/hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) mixture. The iron and sulfate in the FS are major contributors to waste generation. The U(IV) reductant oxidizes to U(VI) producing no waste. The Savannah River Laboratory has developed an efficient electrochemical cell for U(IV) production and has demonstrated the effectiveness of U(IV) as a plutonium reductant. Plant tests and economic analyses are currently being conducted to determine the cost effectiveness of U(IV) implementation. The results of recent studies are presented

  4. Zirconium behaviour in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, J.

    1982-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of zirconium, as fission product, in TBP/diluent- HNO 3 -H 2 O systems, simulating Purex solutions, is studied. The main purpose is to attain an increasing in the zirconium decontamination factor by adjusting the extraction parameters. Equilibrium diagram, TBP concentration, aqueous:organic ratio, salting-out effects and, uranium loading in the organic phase were the main factors studied. All these experiments had been made with zirconium in the 10 - 2 - 10 - 3 concentration range. The extractant degradation products influence uppon the zirconium behaviour was also verified. With the obtained data it was possible to introduce some modification in the standard Purex flow-sheet in order to obtain the uranium product with higher zirconium decontamination. (Author) [pt

  5. Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.K.

    1995-03-01

    Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location

  6. Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location.

  7. Modeling and analyses of postulated UF6 release accidents in gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.; Carter, J.C.; Dyer, R.H.

    1995-10-01

    Computer models have been developed to simulate the transient behavior of aerosols and vapors as a result of a postulated accident involving the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant. UF 6 undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H 2 O) in the air to form hydrogen fluoride (HF) and radioactive uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ). As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, this study evaluated source terms consisting of UO 2 F 2 as well as HF during a postulated UF 6 release accident in a process building. In the postulated accident scenario, ∼7900 kg (17,500 lb) of hot UF 6 vapor is released over a 5 min period from the process piping into the atmosphere of a large process building. UO 2 F 2 mainly remains as airborne-solid particles (aerosols), and HF is in a vapor form. Some UO 2 F 2 aerosols are removed from the air flow due to gravitational settling. The HF and the remaining UO 2 F 2 are mixed with air and exhausted through the building ventilation system. The MELCOR computer code was selected for simulating aerosols and vapor transport in the process building. MELCOR model was first used to develop a single volume representation of a process building and its results were compared with those from past lumped parameter models specifically developed for studying UF 6 release accidents. Preliminary results indicate that MELCOR predicted results (using a lumped formulation) are comparable with those from previously developed models

  8. In Situ Chemical Oxidation Through Lance Permeation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.Z.

    2003-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation through lance permeation (ISCO-LP) is an emerging remediation technology in which chemical oxidants (such as potassium or sodium permanganate) are delivered to the subsurface using vertical lance-like injectors. It is applicable to sites with oxidizable contaminants such as chlorinated solvents and fuel hydrocarbons. Because vertical lance injections can be deployed at relatively close spacing, ISCO-LP potentially can be used to clean-up contamination in low-permeability media. This document provides information that can help potential users determine whether ISCO-LP would apply to a particular environmental management problem. It contains a general description of the technology (Section 2), performance data from a field demonstration (Section 3), an assessment of technology applicability (Section 4), a summary of cost elements (Section 5), and a list of regulatory, environmental safety and health issues (Section 6). It is patterned after the Innovative Technology Summary Reports (ITSR) published by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology under the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA). As in the previously published ITSRs, the technology described in this report was developed through funding from SCFA. Most of the information contained in this report was obtained from a field demonstration of ISCO-LP conducted in July-August 2000 at DOE's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The field test was not completed due to an accident that caused a field worker serious injuries. Although performance assessment data are very limited, the field test highlighted important health and safety issues that must be considered by site managers and technology vendors interested in implementing ISCO-LP

  9. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). Uranium hexafluoride enriched greater than 1.0 wt percent 235 U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 and 178, or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF 6 cylinders/overpacks. International shipments typically are not made using dedicated trailers, and numerous trailers have been received at PORTS with improperly and potentially dangerously secured overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF 6 packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS; and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations

  10. A new concept for product refining in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Bauder, U.; Marquardt, R.

    1986-01-01

    In actual Purex plants the products are refined in additional solvent extraction cycles. Crystallization of uranyl and plutonyl nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solution is proposed as a potentially simpler product refining concept. Suitable crystallization conditions are being investigated in the laboratory using simulated and actual process solutions. A thorough removal of mother liquor is an essential purification step and well washed crystals usually contain less than 1% of an individual impurity. Crystallization simultaneously comprises a product concentration step. Hexavalent uranium can be separated from lower-valent plutonium. An outline of an integrated processing concept is given. Product refining by crystallization is compact; recycling of mother liquor plus wash acid prevents product loss and the generation of additional waste streams. (orig.) [de

  11. Advanced Purex process and waste minimization at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, H.; Nouguier, H.; Bernard, C.; Runge, S.

    1993-01-01

    After a brief recall of the different aspects of the commercial irradiated fuel reprocessing, this paper presents the achievements of the recently commissioned UP3 plant at La Hague. The advanced Purex process implemented with a total waste management results in important waste volume minimization, so that the total volume of high-level and transuranic waste is lower than what it would be in a once-through cycle. Moreover, further minimization is still possible, based on an improved waste management. Cogema has launched the necessary program, which will lead to an overall volume of HLW and TRU wastes of less than 1 m 3 /t by the end of the decade, the maximum possible activity being concentrated in the glass

  12. On-line vibration and analysis system at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herricks, D.M.; Strunk, W.D.

    1987-11-01

    The enrichment facility in Paducah, KY uses a unique hard-wired vibration monitoring and analysis system for gaseous diffusion equipment. The axial flow and centrifugal flow compressors used in uranium enrichment range in size from 6 feet in diameter to less than one foot in diameter. These compressors must operate smoothly and safely, without breech of containment, since the working fluid of gaseous diffusion is gaseous UF 6 . The condition of 1925 compressors is monitored by use of the 2500 point vibration analysis system. Since the failure mechanisms of the compressors are well known and documented, only one accelerometer per machine is needed for most machines. The system is completely automated and can generate spectra or broadband levels in either acceleration or velocity units. Levels are stored for historical review. The analyst can, via a custom telecommunications link, view and analyze data from all monitored points with an office PC. 4 figs

  13. Regulatory Support of Treatment of Savannah River Site Purex Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, L.T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the support given by federal and state regulatory agencies to Savannah River Site (SRS) during the treatment of an organic liquid mixed waste from the Plutonium Extraction (Purex) process. The support from these agencies allowed (SRS) to overcome several technical and regulatory barriers and treat the Purex waste such that it met LDR treatment standards. (authors)

  14. 78 FR 65389 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ..., USEC notified the NRC of its decision to permanently cease uranium enrichment activities at the PGDP... Accession Nos. ML13105A010 and ML13176A151, respectively. NRC's PDR: You may examine and purchase copies of... in Paducah, Kentucky, using the gaseous [[Page 65390

  15. APPLICATION OF THE LASAGNA(trademark) SOIL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY AT THE DOE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Barry D.; Tarantino, Joseph J. P. E.

    2003-01-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the Department of Energy (DOE), has been enriching uranium since the early 1950s. The enrichment process involves electrical and mechanical components that require periodic cleaning. The primary cleaning agent was trichloroethene (TCE) until the late 1980s. Historical documentation indicates that a mixture of TCE and dry ice were used at PGDP for testing the integrity of steel cylinders, which stored depleted uranium. TCE and dry ice were contained in a below-ground pit and used during the integrity testing. TCE seeped from the pit and contaminated the surrounding soil. The Lasagna(trademark) technology was identified in the Record of Decision (ROD) as the selected alternative for remediation of the cylinder testing site. A public-private consortium formed in 1992 (including DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection, Monsanto, DuPont, and General Electric) developed the Lasagna(trademark) technology. This innovative technology employs electrokinetics to remediate soil contaminated with organics and is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils. This technology uses direct current to move water through the soil faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods. Electrokinetics moves contaminants in soil pore water through treatment zones comprised of iron filings, where the contaminants are decomposed to basic chemical compounds such as ethane. After three years of development in the laboratory, the consortium field tested the Lasagna(trademark) process in several phases. CDM installed and operated Phase I, the trial installation and field test of a 150-square-foot area selected for a 120-day run in 1995. Approximately 98 percent of the TCE was removed. CDM then installed and operated the next phase (IIa), a year-long test on a 600-square-foot site. Completed in July 1997, this test removed 75 percent of the total volume of TCE down to a

  16. Uranium decontamination in Purex second plutonium cycle: An example of solvent extraction modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    The existing Purex flowsheet used in the second plutonium cycle at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) does not remove uranium from the plutonium stream. To develop new flowsheets for the Purex second plutonium cycle, computer simulation using SEPHIS was used. SEPHIS is an ORNL-developed solvent extraction simulation code. Box-Wilson experimental design was used to select the minimum set of process conditions simulated. The calculated results were plotted into three-dimensional response surfaces by SAS/Graph (statistical analysis systems). These surfaces provide a broad and complete overview of the responses. Specific ranges of key variables were then investigated. The second series of process simulations identified flowsheets that provide high uranium decontamination while meeting all other key process requirements. The proposed flowsheet consists of modifying the existing 2B bank flowsheet by relocating the feed, increasing the extractant acidity, and adding a scrub stream. The nuclear safety issue was also examined

  17. Application of biomass for the sorption of radionuclides from low level Purex aqueous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanujam, A; Gopalakrishnan, V; Dhami, P S; Kannan, R [Fuel Reprocessing Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Udupa, S R; Salvi, N A [Bio-Organic Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1997-05-01

    Microbial biomass have been found to be good biological adsorbents for radioactive nuclides such as uranium and thorium with comparatively easy desorption and recovery. Based on this, sorption studies have been carried out to assess the feasibility of using biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) for the removal of radionuclides present in Purex low level waste streams. Biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) appears effective for the removal of actinides and fission products from low level Purex plant waste/effluent solutions. Maximum sorption for uranium and plutonium is observed at 6-7 pH whereas for Am, Eu, Pm, Ce and Zr the sorption is maximum at pH 2 with high D values and fast kinetics in both cases. Sorption for Ru and Cs are negligible. Sorbed nuclides are recoverable by elution with 1 M HNO{sub 3}, on once through basis. The method can be used for treating the evaporator condensates from the plant and the hold-up delay tank solution. The sodium nitrate salt concentration in the aqueous solution beyond 0.14 M seriously affects the metal uptake. The results from column experiments indicate a limited loading capacity in terms of mg of Am/U/Pu etc. per gm of RA. However, as the Purex low level effluents contain only trace level activities whose absolute ionic concentrations are much lower, the capacities observed with the present form of biomass may still be satisfactory. 15 refs., 12 tabs.

  18. Application of biomass for the sorption of radionuclides from low level Purex aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanujam, A.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Dhami, P.S.; Kannan, R.; Udupa, S.R.; Salvi, N.A.

    1997-05-01

    Microbial biomass have been found to be good biological adsorbents for radioactive nuclides such as uranium and thorium with comparatively easy desorption and recovery. Based on this, sorption studies have been carried out to assess the feasibility of using biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) for the removal of radionuclides present in Purex low level waste streams. Biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) appears effective for the removal of actinides and fission products from low level Purex plant waste/effluent solutions. Maximum sorption for uranium and plutonium is observed at 6-7 pH whereas for Am, Eu, Pm, Ce and Zr the sorption is maximum at pH 2 with high D values and fast kinetics in both cases. Sorption for Ru and Cs are negligible. Sorbed nuclides are recoverable by elution with 1 M HNO 3 , on once through basis. The method can be used for treating the evaporator condensates from the plant and the hold-up delay tank solution. The sodium nitrate salt concentration in the aqueous solution beyond 0.14 M seriously affects the metal uptake. The results from column experiments indicate a limited loading capacity in terms of mg of Am/U/Pu etc. per gm of RA. However, as the Purex low level effluents contain only trace level activities whose absolute ionic concentrations are much lower, the capacities observed with the present form of biomass may still be satisfactory

  19. Hazards classification determination for PUREX fuel transfer to K-Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, E.N. III.

    1995-01-01

    The PUREX Plant presently contains 2.9 metric tons of an aluminum clad Single Pass Reactor (SPR) fuel which is stored under water in four open top buckets in the PUREX slug storage basin. The PUREX dissolver cells contain approximately 0.5 metric tons of zirconium clad N Reactor fuel which was inadvertently placed into the process cell during charging operations. The dissolver N reactor elements will be recovered from the process floors using new crane operated tools. When the fuel shipment(s) is scheduled, the cask cars will be positioned into the PUREX rail tunnel and the overhead door will be opened. All the SPR fuel will be loaded into two cask rail cars inside four casks. The N Reactor fuel will be loaded into a separate rail car inside two or three casks. The car loading is initiated by opening the rail car lid and removing the cask lids. Prior to loading the canisters of N Reactor fuel, the canisters will be refilled with water (as needed) and a lid will be installed. The baskets of SPR fuel or canisters of N Reactor fuel will then be loaded into the casks. The lids to the casks will then be reinstalled and the car lids closed. The rail cars will then be decontaminated as necessary. The cask cars will be shipped either in two shipments or a combined single shipment using the rail route between PUREX and the K Basins. At the basin, the cask car will be positioned in the loadout area. The cask car lid will be opened and a single cask moved into the loadout pit, which is a lowered section of the basin. The cask lid is removed while the cask is lower into the pit. The fuel is then removed from the cask and stored in the basin. The cask is then removed, the lid reinstalled during removal, and the cask replaced into the cask car. This document identifies the hazard classification of the Fuel Transfer from the PUREX facility to K-Basins

  20. Concept of a large-capacity irradiated-fuel-reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, C.; Couture, J.; Issel, W.; Mamelle, J.

    The processing of LWR fuels in recent years has run into difficulties due to the adaptation of the Purex process to these fuels with a high irradiation rate. This has led to development of new technological techniques. High-capacity plants should, in the future, limit their discharge of liquid and gaseous effluents to values comparable to those of nuclear electric stations. Investment costs necessary for processing the effluents and for temporary storage of the wastes are part of the total cost of these plants. However, the investments remain within acceptable limits. The 1500-ton/year plant presented is an example of what can be done in the 1980's

  1. An interim report to the manager of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from the Paducah Environmental Advisory Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Paducah Environmental Advisory Committee was formed as: (1) an outgrowth of other Environmental Advisory Committees already in existence at Oak Ridge and other Martin Marietta Energy Systems plants; (2) a result of public concern following significant nuclear incidents at Bhopal and Chernobyl; (3) a result of the new direction and commitment of the management of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant following contract acquisition by Martin Marietta Energy Systems; and (4) a means of reducing and/or preventing local and/or public concern regarding the activities of and potential risks created by PGDP. This report discusses the following issues and concerns of the Committee arrived at through a series of meetings: (1) groundwater monitoring; (2) long-range tails storage; C-404, scrap yrads, and PCB and TCE cleanup; nuclear criticality plan and alarm systems; documentation of historical data regarding hazardous waste burial grounds; dosimeter badges; and asbestos handling and removal

  2. An interim report to the manager of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from the Paducah Environmental Advisory Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, G.D.

    1987-10-01

    The Paducah Environmental Advisory Committee was formed as: (1) an outgrowth of other Environmental Advisory Committees already in existence at Oak Ridge and other Martin Marietta Energy Systems plants; (2) a result of public concern following significant nuclear incidents at Bhopal and Chernobyl; (3) a result of the new direction and commitment of the management of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant following contract acquisition by Martin Marietta Energy Systems; and (4) a means of reducing and/or preventing local and/or public concern regarding the activities of and potential risks created by PGDP. This report discusses the following issues and concerns of the Committee arrived at through a series of meetings: (1) groundwater monitoring; (2) long-range tails storage; C-404, scrap yrads, and PCB and TCE cleanup; nuclear criticality plan and alarm systems; documentation of historical data regarding hazardous waste burial grounds; dosimeter badges; and asbestos handling and removal

  3. Long-term mortality study of workers occupationally exposed to metallic nickel at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbold, J.H. Jr.; Tompkins, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether mortality from respiratory cancer among workers occupationally exposed to metallic nickel at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) differed from that of workers at the same plant with no record of occupational exposure to metallic nickel or any nickel compound. A cohort of 814 nickel-exposed workers and one of 1600' controls were identified. The members of both cohorts had a minimum follow-up period of 19 years. Mortality from respiratory cancer and from other causes was examined in both groups. The data showed no evidence of an increased risk of mortality due to respiratory cancer among the nickel-exposed workers. The exposed cohort experienced lower mortality than the controls, both in deaths due to respiratory cancer and in deaths due to all causes, although neither of these differences was statistically significant

  4. Concentration transients in a gaseous diffusion plant (1961); Cinetique des concentrations dans une usine de separation isotopique (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, R; Bilous, O [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    Concentration transients are examined in the case of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium isotope separation. An application is made for a plant built with two rectifying cascades of different sizes and a stripping cascade. Transients are calculated for a change in the feed concentration, the transport and also for shutdown of a group of separating stages in one of the cascades. (authors) [French] On examine l'evolution des concentrations dans une usine de separation isotopique de l'uranium basee sur le procede de diffusion gazeuse et formee de cascades carrees. Une application est faite pour une installation formee de deux cascades enrichissantes de tailles differentes et d'une cascade appauvrissante. On calcule en particulier les regimes transitoires apres variation de la concentration d'alimentation, du transport et apres mise hors circuit d'un groupe d'etages dans l'une des cascades. (auteurs)

  5. The Mailbox Computer System for the IAEA verification experiment on HEU downblending at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, A.L.; Gordon, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    IN APRIL 1996, THE UNITED STATES (US) ADDED THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT TO THE LIST OF FACILITIES ELIGIBLE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS. AT THAT TIME, THE US PROPOSED THAT THE IAEA CARRY OUT A ''VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT'' AT THE PLANT WITH RESPECT TO DOOWNBLENDING OF ABOUT 13 METRIC TONS OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) IN THE FORM OF URANIUM HEXAFLUROIDE (UF6). DURING THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1997 THROUGH JULY 1998, THE IAEA CARRIED OUT THE REQUESTED VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT. THE VERIFICATION APPROACH USED FOR THIS EXPERIMENT INCLUDED, AMONG OTHER MEASURES, THE ENTRY OF PROCESS-OPERATIONAL DATA BY THE FACILITY OPERATOR ON A NEAR-REAL-TIME BASIS INTO A ''MAILBOX'' COMPUTER LOCATED WITHIN A TAMPER-INDICATING ENCLOSURE SEALED BY THE IAEA

  6. Engineering Phase 2 and Phase 3 certification programs -- PUREX deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the training programs required to become a Phase 2 and Phase 3 certified engineer at PUREX during deactivation. With the change in mission, the PUREX engineering/certification training program is being revamped as discussed below. The revised program will be administered by PUREX Technical Training using existing courses and training materials. The program will comply with the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) order 5480.20A, ''Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.''

  7. Engineering Phase 2 and Phase 3 certification programs -- PUREX deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-12-13

    This document describes the training programs required to become a Phase 2 and Phase 3 certified engineer at PUREX during deactivation. With the change in mission, the PUREX engineering/certification training program is being revamped as discussed below. The revised program will be administered by PUREX Technical Training using existing courses and training materials. The program will comply with the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) order 5480.20A, ``Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.``

  8. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3

  9. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

  10. Calculation code revised MIXSET for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonda, Kozo; Oka, Koichiro; Fukuda, Shoji.

    1979-02-01

    Revised MIXSET is a FORTRAN IV calculation code developed to simulate steady and transient behaviors of the Purex extraction process and calculate the optimum operating condition of the process. Revised MIXSET includes all the functions of MIXSET code as shown below. a) Maximum chemical system of eight components can be handled with or without mutual dependence of the distribution of components. b) The flowrate and concentration of feed can be renewed successively at any state, transient or steady, for searching optimum operating conditions. c) Optimum inputs of feed concentrations and flowrates can be calculated to satisfy both of specification and recovery rate of a product. d) Radioactive decay reactions can be handled on each component. Besides these functions, the following chemical reactions concerned in Purex process are newly-included in Revised MIXSET code and the quantitative changes of components such as H + , U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), NH 2 OH, N 2 H 4 can be simulated. 1st Gr. (i) reduction of Pu(IV); U 4+ + 2Pu 4+ + 2H 2 O → UO 2 2+ + 2Pu 3+ + 4H + . (ii) oxidation of Pu(III); 2Pu 3+ + 3H + + NO 3 - → 2Pu 4+ + HNO 2 + H 2 O. (iii) oxidation of U(IV); U 4+ + NO 3 - + H 2 O → UO 2 2+ + H + + HNO 2 2U 4+ + O 2 + 2H 2 O → 2UO 2 2+ + 4H + . (iv) decomposition of HNO 2 ; HNO 2 + N 2 H 5 + → HN 3 + 2H 2 O + H + . (author)

  11. Gamma radiological surveys of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, 1990-1993, and overview of data processing and analysis by the Environmental Restoration Remote Sensing Program, Fiscal Year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyre, J.L.; Moll, B.W.; King, A.L.

    1996-06-01

    Three gamma radiological surveys have been conducted under auspices of the ER Remote Sensing Program: (1) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (1992), (2) Clinch River (1992), and (3) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) (1993). In addition, the Remote Sensing Program has acquired the results of earlier surveys at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) (1990) and PORTS (1990). These radiological surveys provide data for characterization and long-term monitoring of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contamination areas since many of the radioactive materials processed or handled on the ORR, PGDP, and PORTS are direct gamma radiation emitters or have gamma emitting daughter radionuclides. High resolution airborne gamma radiation surveys require a helicopter outfitted with one or two detector pods, a computer-based data acquisition system, and an accurate navigational positioning system for relating collected data to ground location. Sensors measure the ground-level gamma energy spectrum in the 38 to 3,026 KeV range. Analysis can provide gamma emission strength in counts per second for either gross or total man-made gamma emissions. Gross count gamma radiation includes natural background radiation from terrestrial sources (radionuclides present in small amounts in the earth's soil and bedrock), from radon gas, and from cosmic rays from outer space as well as radiation from man-made radionuclides. Man-made count gamma data include only the portion of the gross count that can be directly attributed to gamma rays from man-made radionuclides. Interpretation of the gamma energy spectra can make possible the determination of which specific radioisotopes contribute to the observed man-made gamma radiation, either as direct or as indirect (i.e., daughter) gamma energy from specific radionuclides (e.g., cesium-137, cobalt-60, uranium-238)

  12. Model, parameter and code of environmental dispersion of gaseous effluent under normal operation from nuclear power plant with 600 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Erbang; Gao Zhanrong

    1998-06-01

    The model of environmental dispersion of gaseous effluence under normal operation from a nuclear power plant with 600 MWe is established to give a mathematical expression of annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor under mixing release condition based on quality assessment of radiological environment for 30 years of Chinese nuclear industry. In calculation, the impact from calm and other following factors have been taken into account: mixing layer, dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and buildings. The doses caused from the following exposure pathways are also given by this model: external exposure from immersion cloud and ground deposition, internal exposure due to inhalation and ingestion. The code is named as ROULEA. It contains four modules, i.e. INPUT, ANRTRI, CHIQV and DOSE for calculating 4-dimension joint frequency, annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor and doses

  13. Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Corey R.; Geist, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF 6 spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing 238 U from those containing the lighter 235 U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF 6 gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

  14. Depletion of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury by plant uptake at Mt. Changbai, Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Fu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There exists observational evidence that gaseous elemental mercury (GEM can be readily removed from the atmosphere via chemical oxidation followed by deposition in the polar and sub-polar regions, free troposphere, lower stratosphere, and marine boundary layer under specific environmental conditions. Here we report GEM depletions in a temperate mixed forest at Mt. Changbai, Northeast China. The strong depletions occurred predominantly at night during the leaf-growing season and in the absence of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM enrichment (GOM  <  3 pg m−3. Vertical gradients of decreasing GEM concentrations from layers above to under forest canopy suggest in situ loss of GEM to forest canopy at Mt. Changbai. Foliar GEM flux measurements showed that the foliage of two predominant tree species is a net sink of GEM at night, with a mean flux of −1.8 ± 0.3 ng m2 h−1 over Fraxinus mandshurica (deciduous tree species and −0.1 ± 0.2 ng m2 h−1 over Pinus Koraiensis (evergreen tree species. Daily integrated GEM δ202Hg, Δ199Hg, and Δ200Hg at Mt. Changbai during 8–18 July 2013 ranged from −0.34 to 0.91 ‰, from −0.11 to −0.04 ‰ and from −0.06 to 0.01 ‰, respectively. A large positive shift in GEM δ202Hg occurred during the strong GEM depletion events, whereas Δ199Hg and Δ200Hg remained essentially unchanged. The observational findings and box model results show that uptake of GEM by forest canopy plays a predominant role in the GEM depletion at Mt. Changbai forest. Such depletion events of GEM are likely to be a widespread phenomenon, suggesting that the forest ecosystem represents one of the largest sinks ( ∼ 1930 Mg of atmospheric Hg on a global scale.

  15. Dispositions taken in France to limit gaseous releases from PWR power plants in abnormal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collinet, J.; Guieu, S.; Mulcey, P.

    1989-12-01

    The implementation of France's major nuclear programme - 56 PWR units in service or under construction - has gone hand in hand with the development of an original philosophy in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core of deterministic safety philosophy current in the seventies, which has been wholly retained and, in some instances, refined, a range of complements has been made to include consideration of a number of additional situations based on a probabilistic approach. This has resulted in a better coherence for safety and a reduction of the severe accident probability. Furthermore, the establishment of emergency plans has enabled the Safety Authorities and the utility to adopt a coherent and logical approach to severe accidents, with the aim of better achieving defence in depth. This has resulted in the provision of certain additional measures intended to further reduce the consequences of severe accidents. In a accordance with the safety philosophy, adopted in France for nuclear PWR power stations, filtration systems have been specified and installed to limit the radiological consequences of consecutive gaseous emissions, on the one hand, in accidents taken into account in the design and, on the other hand, in accidents liable to jeopardize the integrity of the containment

  16. Dispersion of UO2F2 aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.; Carter, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF 6 is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H 2 O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO 2 F 2 aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area

  17. Colorimetric determination of reducing normality in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.

    1983-07-01

    Adjustment of the valence state of plutonium from extractable Pu(IV) to nonextractable Pu(III) in the Purex process is accomplished by addition of reductants such as Fe(II), hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), or U(IV). To implement on-line monitoring of this reduction step for improved process control at the Savannah River Plant, a simple colorimetric method for determining excess reductant (reducing normality) was developed. The method is based on formation of a colored complex of Fe(II) with FerroZine (Hach Chemical Company). The concentration of Fe(II) is determined directly. The concentration of HAN or U(IV), in addition to Fe(II), is determined indirectly as Fe(II), produced through reduction of Fe(III). Experimental conditions for a HAN-Fe(III) reaction of known stoichiometry were established. The effect of hydrazine, which stabilizes U(IV), was also determined. Real-time measurements of color development were made that simulated on-line performance. A laboratory analytical procedure is included. 5 references, 8 figures

  18. Removal ratio of gaseous toluene and xylene transported from air to root zone via the stem by indoor plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K J; Kim, H J; Khalekuzzaman, M; Yoo, E H; Jung, H H; Jang, H S

    2016-04-01

    This work was designed to investigate the removal efficiency as well as the ratios of toluene and xylene transported from air to root zone via the stem and by direct diffusion from the air into the medium. Indoor plants (Schefflera actinophylla and Ficus benghalensis) were placed in a sealed test chamber. Shoot or root zone were sealed with a Teflon bag, and gaseous toluene and xylene were exposed. Removal efficiency of toluene and total xylene (m, p, o) was 13.3 and 7.0 μg·m(-3)·m(-2) leaf area over a 24-h period in S. actinophylla, and was 13.0 and 7.3 μg·m(-3)·m(-2) leaf area in F. benghalensis. Gaseous toluene and xylene in a chamber were absorbed through leaf and transported via the stem, and finally reached to root zone, and also transported by direct diffusion from the air into the medium. Toluene and xylene transported via the stem was decreased with time after exposure. Xylene transported via the stem was higher than that by direct diffusion from the air into the medium over a 24-h period. The ratios of toluene transported via the stem versus direct diffusion from the air into the medium were 46.3 and 53.7% in S. actinophylla, and 46.9 and 53.1% in F. benghalensis, for an average of 47 and 53% for both species. The ratios of m,p-xylene transported over 3 to 9 h via the stem versus direct diffusion from the air into the medium was 58.5 and 41.5% in S. actinophylla, and 60.7 and 39.3% in F. benghalensis, for an average of 60 and 40% for both species, whereas the ratios of o-xylene transported via the stem versus direct diffusion from the air into the medium were 61 and 39%. Both S. actinophylla and F. benghalensis removed toluene and xylene from the air. The ratios of toluene and xylene transported from air to root zone via the stem were 47 and 60 %, respectively. This result suggests that root zone is a significant contributor to gaseous toluene and xylene removal, and transported via the stem plays an important role in this process.

  19. Calculation code MIXSET for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonda, Kozo; Fukuda, Shoji.

    1977-09-01

    MIXSET is a FORTRAN IV calculation code for Purex process that simulate the dynamic behavior of solvent extraction processes in mixer-settlers. Two options permit terminating dynamic phase by time or by achieving steady state. These options also permit continuing calculation successively using new inputs from a arbitrary phase. A third option permits artificial rapid close to steady state and a fourth option permits searching optimum input to satisfy both of specification and recovery rate of product. MIXSET handles maximum chemical system of eight components with or without mutual dependence of the distribution of the components. The chemical system in MIXSET includes chemical reactions and/or decaying reaction. Distribution data can be supplied by third-power polynominal equations or tables, and kinetic data by tables or given constants. The fluctuation of the interfacial level height in settler is converted into the flow rate changes of organic and aqueous stream to follow dynamic behavior of extraction process in detail. MIXSET can be applied to flowsheet study, start up and/or shut down procedure study and real time process management in countercurrent solvent extraction processes. (auth.)

  20. Handling and treatment of low-level radioactive wastes from gaseous diffusion plants in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, J.F.; Behrend, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Gaseous diffusion plants in the United States of America currently generate very small quantities of low-level radioactive wastes. These wastes consist primarily of airborne effluent solid trapping media and liquid scrubber solutions, liquid effluent treatment sludges, waste oils and solvents, scrap metals and conventional combustible wastes such as floor sweepings, cleaning rags and shoe covers. In addition to waste emanating from current operations, large quantities of scrap metal generated during the Cascade Improvement Program are stored above ground at each of the diffusion plants. The radionuclides of primary concern are uranium and 99 Tc. Current radioactive waste treatment consists of uranium dissolution in weak acids followed by chemical precipitation and/or solvent extraction for uranium recovery. Current disposal operations consist of above ground storage of scrap metals, shallow land burial of inorganic solids and incineration of combustible wastes. With increased emphasis on reducing the potential for off-site radiological dose, several new treatment and disposal options are being studied and new projects are being planned. One project of particular interest involves the installation of a high temperature incinerator to thermally degrade hazardous organic wastes contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes. Other technologies being studied include fixation of uranium-bearing sludges in concrete before burial, decontamination of scrap metals by smelting and use of specially engineered centralized burial grounds. (author)

  1. Nuclear criticality safety controls for uranium deposits during D and D at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Jollay, L.J. III; Dahl, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management has issued a challenge to complete DOE environmental cleanup within a decade. The response for Oak Ridge facilities is in accordance with the DOE ten-year plan which calls for completion of > 95% of environmental management work by the year 2006. This will result in a 99% risk reduction and in a significant savings in base line costs in waste management (legacy waste); remedial action (groundwater, soil, etc.); and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). It is assumed that there will be long-term institutional control of cascade equipment, i.e., there will be no walk away from sites, and that there will be firm radioactivity release limits by 1999 for recycle metals. An integral part of these plants is the removal of uranium deposits which pose nuclear criticality safety concerns in the shut down of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. DOE has initiated the Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program to improve nuclear criticality safety by removing the larger uranium deposits from unfavorable geometry equipment. Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements have identified the location of these deposits. The objective of the K-25 Site Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program is to remove and place uranium deposits into safe geometry storage containers to meet the double contingency principle. Each step of the removal process results in safer conditions where multiple controls are present. Upon completion of the Program, nuclear criticality risks will be greatly reduced

  2. Final environmental impact assessment of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site, Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    This document considers: the need for uranium enrichment facilities; site location; plant description; and describes the power generating facilities in light of its existing environment. The impacts from continuing operations are compared with alternatives of shutdown, relocation, and alternative power systems. (PSB)

  3. Generic report on health effects for the US Gaseous Diffusion Plants. Sect. 8, Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, R.A.; Emler, V.S.

    1984-06-01

    Toxic substances present in uranium enrichment plants include uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), hydrogen fluoride (HF), uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ), chlorine (Cl 2 ), chlorine trifluoride (ClF 3 ), fluorine (F 2 ), uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ), and technetium (Tc). The current knowledge of the expected health effects of acute exposures to these substances is described. 10 references, 2 figures, 6 tables

  4. Gaseous nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Gaseous nebulae are large, tenuous clouds of ionized gas that are associated with hot stars and that emit visible light because of the energy that they receive from the ultraviolet radiation of the stars. Examples include H II regions, planetary nebulae, and nova/supernova remnants. The emphasis is on the physical processes that occur in gaseous nebulae as opposed to a study of the objects themselves. The introduction discusses thermodynamic vs. steady-state equilibrium and excitation conditions in a dilute radiation field. Subsequent sections take up important atomic processes in gaseous nebulae (particle--particle collision rates, radiative interaction rates, cross sections), the ionization equilibrium (sizes of H II regions, ionization of the heavier elements), kinetic temperature and energy balance (heating of the electrons, cooling of the electrons), and the spectra of gaseous nebulae (line fluxes in nebulae). 7 figures, 5 tables

  5. Recycle of radioactive scrap metal from the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25 Site)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, R.W. [DOE-Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The scale of the metal available for reuse at the plant includes 22 million pounds of Ni, 17 million pounds of Al, 47 million pounds of copper, and 835 million pounds of steels. In addition there is a wide range of industrial equipment and other items of value. The author describes small bench scale and pilot plant scale efforts made at treating metal for decontamination and fabrication into cast stock or specialized containers for reuse within the DOE complex or release. These projects show that much of the material can be cleaned or chemically decontaminated to a level where it can be free released to various markets. Of the remaining metals, much of it can be cast into products which can be absorbed within the DOE complex.

  6. Formation of the gaseous phase of impurity elements from coal combustion at a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizil'shtein, L.Ya.; Levchenko, S.V.; Peretyakt'ko, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    Data are reported on the distribution of impurity elements in their principal carriers: organic matter, iron sulfides, and clays. Tests with high-temperature combustion of coals and argillites indicate that elements associated with clay minerals largely remain in ash and slag. They do not pass to the gas phase - a factor to be considered in assessment of environmental impact from thermal power plants and specification of toxic concentration levels of impurity elements in coal

  7. PUREX SAMCONS uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Acceptance Test Procedure validates the operation of the UPS, all alarming and display functions and the ability of the UPS to supply power to the SAMCONS as designed. The proper installation of the PUREX SAMCONS Trailer UPS components and wiring will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of the SAMCONS computer UPS will be verified by performance of a timed functional load test, and verification of associated alarms and trouble indications. This test procedure will be performed in the SAMCONS Trailer and will include verification of receipt of alarms at the SAMCONS computer stations. This test may be performed at any time after the completion of HNF-SD-CP-ATP-083, PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Acceptance Test Procedure, when computer display and alarm functions have been proven to operate correctly

  8. A development and an application of Mixset-X computer code for simulating the Purex solvent extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shida, M.; Naito, M.; Suto, T.; Omori, E.; Nojiri, T.

    2001-01-01

    MIXSET is a FORTRAN code developed to simulate the Purex solvent extraction system using mixer-settler extractors. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been developing the MIXSET code since the years 1970 to analyze the behavior of nuclides in the solvent extraction processes in Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). This paper describes the history of MIXSET code development, the features of the latest version, called MIXSET-X and the application of the code for safety evaluation work. (author)

  9. Reliability study: steam generation and distribution system, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, F.E.; Davis, E.L.; Dent, J.T.; Walters, D.E.; West, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    A reliability study for determining the ability of the Steam Generation and Distribution System to provide reliable and adequate service through the year 2000 has been completed. This study includes an evaluation of the X-600 Steam Plant and the steam distribution system. The Steam Generation and Distribution System is in good overall condition, but to maintain this condition, the reliability study team made twelve recommendations. Eight of the recommendations are for repair or replacement of existing equipment and have a total estimated cost of $540,000. The other four recommendations are for additional testing, new procedure implementation, or continued investigations

  10. Gaseous release of radioactive iodine from decaying plants. I. Release following foliar and root uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, Arsene; Grauby, Andre

    1975-12-01

    Iodine uptake by plants is a significant link in the contamination of the food chain. Long half-live iodine was studied considering foliar and root uptake, loss by rain scavenging, residue decay or outgassing in order to assess two aspects of the problem: the importance of outgassing and the effect of the route of transfer on iodine losses. It appeared that iodine release was a function of the vegetal type, there were differences according to the pattern of absorption (via leaf or root) and the processes of iodine release were usually related to biochemical mechanisms [fr

  11. PUREX/UO3 facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status

  12. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  13. Determination of the response function for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm system neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; Brown, A.S.; Dobelbower, M.C.; Woollard, J.E.

    1997-03-01

    Neutron-sensitive radiation detectors are used in the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's (PORTS) criticality accident alarm system (CAAS). The CAAS is composed of numerous detectors, electronics, and logic units. It uses a telemetry system to sound building evacuation horns and to provide remote alarm status in a central control facility. The ANSI Standard for a CAAS uses a free-in-air dose rate to define the detection criteria for a minimum accident-of-concern. Previously, the free-in-air absorbed dose rate from neutrons was used for determining the areal coverge of criticality detection within PORTS buildings handling fissile materials. However, the free-in-air dose rate does not accurately reflect the response of the neutron detectors in use at PORTS. Because the cost of placing additional CAAS detectors in areas of questionable coverage (based on a free-in-air absorbed dose rate) is high, the actual response function for the CAAS neutron detectors was determined. This report, which is organized into three major sections, discusses how the actual response function for the PORTS CAAS neutron detectors was determined. The CAAS neutron detectors are described in Section 2. The model of the detector system developed to facilitate calculation of the response function is discussed in Section 3. The results of the calculations, including confirmatory measurements with neutron sources, are given in Section 4

  14. Computational fluid dynamics tracking of UF6 reaction products release into a gaseous diffusion plant cell housing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed using CFDS-FLOW3D Version 3.3 to model the transport of aerosol products formed during a release of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process building. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a one-dimensional (1-D) analysis of aerosol/vapor transport following such an hypothesized severe accident is being performed. The objective of this study is to supplement the 1-D analysis with more detailed 3-D results. Specifically, the goal is to quantify the distribution of aerosol passing out of the process building during the hypothetical accident. This work demonstrates a useful role for CFD in large 3-D problems, where some experimental data are available for calibrating key parameters and the desired results are global (total time-integrated aerosol flow rates across a few boundary surfaces) as opposed to local velocities, temperatures, or heat transfer coefficients

  15. Salicylic acid confers salt tolerance in potato plants by improving water relations, gaseous exchange, antioxidant activities and osmoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faried, Hafiz Nazar; Ayyub, Chaudhary Muhammad; Amjad, Muhammad; Ahmed, Rashid; Wattoo, Fahad Masoud; Butt, Madiha; Bashir, Mohsin; Shaheen, Muhammad Rashid; Waqas, Muhammad Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Potato is an important vegetable; however, salt stress drastically affects its growth and yield. A pot experiment was therefore conducted to assess salicylic acid efficacy in improving performance of potato cultivars, grown under salt stress (50 mmol L -1 ). Salicylic acid at 0.5 mmol L -1 was sprayed on to potato plants after 1 week of salinity application. Salt stress effects were ameliorated by salicylic acid effectively in both the studied cultivars. N-Y LARA proved more responsive to salicylic acid application than 720-110 NARC, which confirmed genetic variation between cultivars. Salicylic acid scavenged reactive oxygen species by improving antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases) and regulating osmotic adjustment (proline, phenolic contents), which led to enhanced water relation and gaseous exchange attributes, and thereby increased potassium availability and reduced sodium content in potato leaves. Moreover, potato tuber yield showed a positive correlation with potassium content, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities. Salt tolerance efficacy of salicylic acid is authenticated in improving potato crop performance under salt stress. Salicylic acid effect was more pronounced in N-Y LARA, reflecting greater tolerance than 720-110 NARC, which was confirmed as a susceptible cultivar. Hence salicylic acid at 0.5 mmol L -1 and cultivation of N-Y LARA may be recommended in saline soil. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Cooling tower drift studies at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, F. G.; Hanna, S. R.; Parr, P. D.

    1978-12-01

    The transfer and fate of chromium from cooling tower drift to terrestrial ecosystems were quantified with concentrations in plant materials (fescue grass) decreasing with increasing distance from the cooling tower. Results indicate that elemental content in drift water (mineral residue) may not be equivalent to the content in the recirculating cooling water of the tower. This hypothesis is contrary to basic assumptions in calculating drift emissions. Results suggest that differences in retention in litter and foliage are related to chemical properties of the drift rather than physical lodging of the particle residue. To determine the potential for movement of drift-derived chromium to surface streams, soil-water samplers (wells) were placed along a distance gradient to Little Bayou Creek. Preliminary model estimates of drift deposition are compared to deposition measurements.

  17. Cooling tower drift studies at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant. [Transport of drift-derived chromium in terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, F.G.; Hanna, S.R.; Parr, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    The transfer and fate of chromium from cooling tower drift to terrestrial ecosystems were quantified at the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment facility at Paducah, Kentucky. Chromium concentrations in plant materials (fescue grass) decreased with increasing distance from the cooing tower, ranging from 251 +- 19 ppM at 15 meters to 0.52 +- 0.07 ppM at 1500 meters. The site of drift contamination, size characteristics, and elemental content of drift particles were determined using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis capabilities. Results indicate that elemental content in drift water (mineral residue) may not be equivalent to the content in the recirculating cooling water of the tower. This hypothesis is contrary to basic assumptions in calculating drift emissions. A laboratory study simulating throughfall from 1 to 6 inches of rain suggested that there are more exchange sites associated with litter than live foliage. Leachate from each one inch throughfall simulant removed 3% of the drift mass from litter compared to 7 to 9% from live foliage. Results suggest that differences in retention are related to chemical properties of the drift rather than physical lodging of the particle residue. To determine the potential for movement of drift-derived chromium to surface streams, soil--water samplers (wells) were placed along a distance gradient to Little Bayou Creek. Samples from two depths following rainstorms revealed the absence of vertical or horizontal movement with maximum concentrations of 0.13 ppb at 50 meters from the tower. Preliminary model estimates of drift deposition are compared to depositionmeasurements. Isopleths of the predicted deposition are useful to identify areas of maximum drift transport in the environs of the gaseous diffusion plant.

  18. Deposition velocity of gaseous organic iodine from the atmosphere to rice plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Shigeo-Uchida; Sumiya, Misako; Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1996-01-01

    To obtain parameter values for the assessment of 129 I transfer from the atmosphere to rice, deposition of CH 3 I to rice plants has been studied. The mass normalized deposition velocity (V D ) of CH 3 I for rough (unhulled) rice was 0.00048 cm 3 g -1 s -1 , which is about 1/300 of that of I 2 . Translocation of iodine, deposited as CH 3 I on leaves and stems, to rice grain was negligibly small. Distribution of iodine between hull and inner part of the grain was found to depend also on the chemical forms of atmospheric iodine to be deposited. The ratio of the iodine distribution in a grain exposed to CH 3 I was as follows: rough rice: brown rice (hulled rice):polished rice = 1.0:0.49:0.38. The distribution ratio in polished grains for CH 3 I exposed rice was about 20 times higher than that for I 2 . 22 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  19. Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct

  20. Studies in support of an SNM cutoff agreement: The PUREX exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanbro, W.D.; Libby, R.; Segal, J.

    1995-01-01

    On September 23, 1993, President Clinton, in a speech before the United Nations General Assembly, called for an international agreement banning the production of plutonium and highly enriched uranium for nuclear explosive purposes. A major element of any verification regime for such an agreement would probably involve inspections of reprocessing plants in Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty weapons states. Many of these are large facilities built in the 1950s with no thought that they would be subject to international inspection. To learn about some of the problems that might be involved in the inspection of such large, old facilities, the Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation, sponsored a mock inspection exercise at the PUREX plant on the Hanford Site. This exercise examined a series of alternatives for inspections of the PUREX as a model for this type of facility at other locations. A series of conclusions were developed that can be used to guide the development of verification regimes for a cutoff agreement at reprocessing facilities

  1. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  2. Sampling and Analysis Plan for PUREX canyon vessel flushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalobos, C.N.

    1995-01-01

    A sampling and analysis plan is necessary to provide direction for the sampling and analytical activities determined by the data quality objectives. This document defines the sampling and analysis necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated pursuant to Washington Administrative Code 173-303

  3. Some plutonium IV polymers properties in Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoazec, H.; Pasquiou, J.Y.; Germain, M.

    1990-01-01

    The metabolism of plutonium polymers in fuel reprocessing using the Purex process with tributylphosphate as solvent, and its practical consequence in real operation conditions are examined. Precipitation with dibutylphosphoric acid, a solvent degradation product, occurs both in extraction and stripping units when polymers are present. (author)

  4. Waste Feed Delivery Purex Process Connector Design Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRACKENBURY, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    The pressure retaining capability of the PUREX process connector is documented. A context is provided for the connector's current use within existing Projects. Previous testing and structural analyses campaigns are outlined. The deficient condition of the current inventory of connectors and assembly wrenches is highlighted. A brief history of the connector is provided. A bibliography of pertinent references is included

  5. Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

  6. Improved iodine and tritium control in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Schmieder, H.; Roesch, W.; Weirich, F.

    1981-01-01

    During spent fuel processing, iodine and tritium are distributed in many aqueous, organic and gaseous process streams, which complicates their control. Small modifications of conventional purex flow sheets, compatible with processing in the headend and the first extraction cycle are necessary to confine the iodine and the tritium to smaller plant areas. The plant area connected to the dissolver off-gas (DOG) system is suited to confine the iodine and the plant area connected to the first aqueous cycle is suited to confine the tritium. A more clear and convenient iodine and tritium control will be achieved. Relevant process steps have been studied on a lab or a pilot plant scale using I-123 and H-3 tracer

  7. PUREX (SAMCONS) uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) provides for testing and verifying the proper operation of the control panel alarms and trouble functions, the 6roper functioning of the AC inverter, ability of the battery supply to maintain the SAMCONS load for a minimum of two hours , and proper interaction with the SAMCONS Video graphic displays for alarm displays

  8. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997

  9. Analog simulation of concentration transients in a gaseous diffusion plant (1961); Etude sur simulateur des regimes transitoires des concentrations dans une installation de diffusion gazeuse (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delarousse, P; Trouve, C; Jacques, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A finite difference system is used to describe concentration transients in a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium isotope separation. The equipment used in this study is described and examples are given to illustrate the problems which have been solved with it. (authors) [French] Le comportement transitoire d'une cascade de diffusion gazeuse est represente de facon approchee par un systeme differentiel aux differences. On decrit le materiel analogique original qui a permis de simuler ce systeme. Une serie d'exemples illustre les differents problemes qui ont ete resolus au moyen de cet appareil. (auteurs)

  10. COMBINED GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION TECHNIQUES TO IDENTIFY BURIED WASTE IN AN UNCONTROLLED LANDFILL AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Peter T.; Starmer, R. John

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of the investigation was to confirm the presence and determine the location of a cache of 30 to 60 buried 55-gallon drums that were allegedly dumped along the course of the pre-existing, northsouth diversion ditch (NSDD) adjacent to permitted landfills at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky. The ditch had been rerouted and was being filled and re-graded at the time of the alleged dumping. Historic information and interviews with individuals associated with alleged dumping activities indicated that the drums were dumped prior to the addition of other fill materials. In addition, materials alleged to have been dumped in the ditch, such as buried roofing materials, roof flashing, metal pins, tar substances, fly ash, and concrete rubble complicated data interpretation. Some clean fill materials have been placed over the site and graded. This is an environment that is extremely complicated in terms of past waste dumping activities, construction practices and miscellaneous landfill operations. The combination of site knowledge gained from interviews and research of existing site maps, variable frequency EM data, classical total magnetic field data and optimized GPR lead to success where a simpler less focused approach by other investigators using EM-31 and EM-61 electromagnetic methods and unfocused ground penetrating radar (GPR)did not produce results and defined no real anomalies. A variable frequency electromagnetic conductivity unit was used to collect the EM data at 3,030 Hz, 5,070 Hz, 8,430 Hz, and 14,010 Hz. Both in-phase and quadrature components were recorded at each station point. These results provided depth estimates for targets and some information on the subsurface conditions. A standard magnetometer was used to conduct the magnetic survey that showed the locations and extent of buried metal, the approximate volume of ferrous metal present within a particular area, and allowed estimation of approximate target depths. The GPR

  11. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2012-08-28

    Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that

  12. COMBINED GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION TECHNIQUES TO IDENTIFY BURIED WASTE IN AN UNCONTROLLED LANDFILL AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Peter T.; Starmer, R. John

    2003-02-27

    The primary objective of the investigation was to confirm the presence and determine the location of a cache of 30 to 60 buried 55-gallon drums that were allegedly dumped along the course of the pre-existing, northsouth diversion ditch (NSDD) adjacent to permitted landfills at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky. The ditch had been rerouted and was being filled and re-graded at the time of the alleged dumping. Historic information and interviews with individuals associated with alleged dumping activities indicated that the drums were dumped prior to the addition of other fill materials. In addition, materials alleged to have been dumped in the ditch, such as buried roofing materials, roof flashing, metal pins, tar substances, fly ash, and concrete rubble complicated data interpretation. Some clean fill materials have been placed over the site and graded. This is an environment that is extremely complicated in terms of past waste dumping activities, construction practices and miscellaneous landfill operations. The combination of site knowledge gained from interviews and research of existing site maps, variable frequency EM data, classical total magnetic field data and optimized GPR lead to success where a simpler less focused approach by other investigators using EM-31 and EM-61 electromagnetic methods and unfocused ground penetrating radar (GPR)did not produce results and defined no real anomalies. A variable frequency electromagnetic conductivity unit was used to collect the EM data at 3,030 Hz, 5,070 Hz, 8,430 Hz, and 14,010 Hz. Both in-phase and quadrature components were recorded at each station point. These results provided depth estimates for targets and some information on the subsurface conditions. A standard magnetometer was used to conduct the magnetic survey that showed the locations and extent of buried metal, the approximate volume of ferrous metal present within a particular area, and allowed estimation of approximate target depths. The GPR

  13. Counter-current extraction studies for the recovery of neptunium by the Purex process. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, N.; Nadkarni, M. N.; Kumar, S. V.; Kartha, P. K.S.; Sonavane, R. R.; Ramaniah, M. V.; Patil, S. K.

    1974-07-01

    It is proposed to recover neptunium-237, along with uranium and plutonium, during the fuel reprocessing in the PREFRE plant at Tarapur. Counter-current extraction studies, relevant to the code contamination (HA) and partitioning (IA) cycles of the purex process, were carried out to arrive at suitable chemical flowsheet conditions which would enable the co-extraction of neptunium along with uranium and plutonium. The results of the studies carried out using a laboratory mixer-settler unit and synthetic mixtures of neptunium and uranium are reported here. Based on these results, the chemical flowsheet conditions are proposed for the co-extraction of neptunium even if it exists as Np(V) in the aqueous feed solution. (auth)

  14. Alkaline hydrolysis process for treatment and disposal of Purex solvent waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, C.; Venkatesh, K.A.; Wattal, P.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.; Kartha, P.K.S.; Tripathi, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of spent Purex solvent (30% TBP-70% n-dodecane mixture) from reprocessing plants by alkaline hydrolysis process was investigated using inactive 30% TBP solvent as well as actual radioactive spent solvent. Complete conversion of TBP to water-soluble reaction products was achieved in 7 hours reaction time at 130 deg C using 50%(w/v) NaOH solution at NaOH to TBP mole ratio of 3:2. Addition of water to the product mixture resulted in the complete separation of diluent containing less than 2 and 8 Bg./ml. of α and β activity respectively. Silica gel and alumina were found effective for purification of the separated diluent. Aqueous phase containing most of the original radioactivity was found compatible with cement matrix for further conditioning and disposal. (author). 17 refs., 10 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Plutonium-uranium separation in the Purex process using mixtures of hydroxylamine nitrate and ferrous sulfamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.M.; Chostner, D.F.; Orebaugh, E.G.

    1983-11-01

    Laboratory studies, followed by plant operation, established that a mixture of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) and ferrous sulfamate (FS) is superior to FS used alone as a reductant for plutonium in the Purex first cycle. FS usage has been reduced by about 70% (from 0.12 to 0.04M) compared to the pre-1978 period. This reduced the volume of neutralized waste due to FS by 194 liters/metric ton of uranium (MTU) processed. The new flowsheet also gives lower plutonium losses to waste and at least comparable fission product decontamination. To achieve satisfactory performance at this low concentration of FS, the acidity in the 1B mixer-settler was reduced by using a split-scrub - a low acid scrub in stage one and a higher acid scrub in stage three - to remove acid from the solvent exiting the 1A centrifugal contactor. 8 references, 14 figures, 1 table

  16. EURODIF company - Tricastin gaseous diffusion plant. Requests following the safety re-evaluation of the facility after 20 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This decision from the French authority of nuclear safety (ASN) concerns the safety reevaluation of the EURODIF plant ('Georges Besse plant') of the Tricastin site at Pierrelatte (France) which uses the gaseous diffusion process to separate the uranium isotopes. Since the last safety reevaluation in 1988, several points have been improved: reduction of the frequency and importance of uranium hexafluoride leaks (control of the pitting corrosion in the exchangers), no incident linked with exo-thermal reactions or explosions, a mastery of the exposure to ionizing radiations etc.. On the other hand, several points need improvement: the prevention of criticality risks, the earthquake resistance of some structures, and the integration of some accident scenarios (aircraft crash, UF 6 leak) in the emergency plan to avoid the fast release of toxic materials in the environment. These points are detailed in the document. (J.S.)

  17. Consolidation of the EXAm process: towards the reprocessing of a concentrated PUREX raffinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanel, V.; Bollesteros, M.J.; Marie, C.; Montuir, M.; Pacary, V.; Antegnard, F.; Costenoble, S.; Boyer-Deslys, V. [CEA Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry and Processes Department, Bagnols-sur-Ceze, F-30207 (France)

    2016-07-01

    Recycling americium alone from the spent fuel is an important issue currently studied for the future nuclear cycle (Generation IV systems) as Am is one of the main contributors to the long-term radiotoxicity and heat power of final waste. The solvent extraction process called EXAm has been developed by the CEA to enable the recovery of Am alone from a PUREX raffinate (with U, Np and Pu already removed). A mixture of DMDOHEMA and HDEHP diluted in TPH is used as the solvent and the Am/Cm selectivity is improved using TEDGA as a selective complexing agent to maintain Cm and the heavier lanthanides in the acidic aqueous phase (HNO{sub 3} 5-6 M). Americium is then selectively stripped from the light lanthanides at low acidity (pH 2.5-3) with a poly-aminocarboxylic acid (DTPA). An additional step is necessary before Am recovery, in order to strip molybdenum which would otherwise be complexed by DTPA and contaminate the Am raffinate. In order to make the process and its associated future plant more compact, the objective is now to adapt the EXAm process to a concentrated raffinate. With a concentrated PUREX raffinate, the process operates under conditions close to saturation both for the solvent and complexing agent TEDGA during the Am extraction step. Consequently, some changes were needed to adapt the flowsheet to higher concentrations of cations. Before the test on a real PUREX raffinate in the CBP shielded line at ATALANTE (at the end of 2015), the EXAm flowsheet had to be consolidated and achievable target performances ensured. A series of experiments and tests was performed: on laboratory scale (batch experiments), to identify the good operating conditions and to simulate the main phenomena involved (2010-2014); first on an inactive surrogate feed solution at G1 facility (2011-2013), and then on a surrogate feed solution with trace amounts of americium and curium (spiked test) in the C17 shielded line at ATALANTE (2014). (authors)

  18. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Geun C; Choi, Hye K; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 μM and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR) gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved SA and JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen.

  19. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geun Cheol eSong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 M and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through SA, JA, and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen.

  20. Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C4F8O, n-C4F10 and c-C4F8 in selected gaseous diffusion plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes is under way. This report summarizes studies directed at estimating the chemical and thermal stability of three candidate coolants, c-C 4 F 8 O, n-C 4 F 10 and c-C 4 4F 8 , in a few specific environments to be found in gaseous diffusion plant operations

  1. Retention of gaseous isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarbro, O.O.; Mailen, J.C.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Retention of gaseous fission products during fuel reprocessing has, in the past, been limited to a modest retention of 131 I when processing fuels decayed less than about 180 days. The projected rapid growth of the nuclear power industry along with a desire to minimize environmental effects is leading to the reassessment of requirements for retention of gaseous fission products, including 131 I, 129 I, 85 Kr, 3 H, and 14 C. Starting in the late 1960s, a significant part of the LMFBR reprocessing development program has been devoted to understanding the behavior of gaseous fission products in plant process and effluent streams and the development of advanced systems for their removal. Systems for iodine control include methods for evolving up to 99% of the iodine from dissolver solutions to minimize its introduction and distribution throughout downstream equipment. An aqueous scrubbing system (Iodox) using 20 M HNO 3 as the scrubbing media effectively removes all significant iodine forms from off-gas streams while handling the kilogram quantities of iodine present in head-end and dissolver off-gas streams. Silver zeolite is very effective for removing iodine forms at low concentration from the larger-volume plant off-gas streams. Removal of iodine from plant liquid effluents by solid sorbents either prior to or following final vaporization appears feasible. Krypton is effectively released during dissolution and can be removed from the relatively small volume head-end and dissolver off-gas stream. Two methods appear applicable for removal and concentration of krypton: (1) selective absorption in fluorocarbons, and (2) cryogenic absorption in liquid nitrogen. The fluorocarbon absorption process appears to be rather tolerant of the normal contaminants (H 2 O, CO 2 , NOsub(x), and organics) present in typical reprocessing plant off-gas whereas the cryogenic system requires an extensive feed gas pretreatment system. Retention of tritium in a reprocessing plant is

  2. Automated analysis for large amount gaseous fission product gamma-scanning spectra from nuclear power plant and its data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weihua Zhang; Kurt Ungar; Ian Hoffman; Ryan Lawrie; Jarmo Ala-Heikkila

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Linssi database and UniSampo/Shaman software, an automated analysis platform has been setup for the analysis of large amounts of gamma-spectra from the primary coolant monitoring systems of a CANDU reactor. Thus, a database inventory of gaseous and volatile fission products in the primary coolant of a CANDU reactor has been established. This database is comprised of 15,000 spectra of radioisotope analysis records. Records from the database inventory were retrieved by a specifically designed data-mining module and subjected to further analysis. Results from the analysis were subsequently used to identify the reactor coolant half-life of 135 Xe and 133 Xe, as well as the correlations of 135 Xe and 88 Kr activities. (author)

  3. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report

  4. Environmental investigations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, McCracken County, Kentucky. Volume 1 - Executive summary. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This report details the results of four studies into environmental and cultural resources on and near the Department of Energy's (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) located in Western Kentucky in McCracken County, approximately 10 miles west of Paducah, KY. The area investigated includes the PGDP facility proper, additional area owned by DOE under use permit to the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), area owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky that is administered by the WKWMA, area owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Metropolis Lake State Nature preserve and some privately held land. DOE requested the assistance and support of the US Army Engineer District, Nashville (CEORN) in conducting various environmental investigations of the area. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) provided technical support to the CEORN for environmental investigations of (1) wetland resources, (2) threatened or endangered species and habitats, and (3) cultural resources. A floodplain investigation was conducted by CEORN

  5. Assessment of the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration of technetium-99 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site in Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, B.; McDonald, J.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Clausen, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    This short report summarizes the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration/transport of 99 Tc at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site in Paducah, Kentucky. Limited data suggest that inorganic colloidal materials (e.g., aluminosilicate clay minerals) may not play a significant role in the retention and transport of Tc. Studies by size fractionation reveal that both Tc and natural organic matter (NOM) are largely present in the -8 mol/L or parts per billion), regardless of the redox conditions, Tc will stay in solution phase as TC(IV) or Tc(VII). The mechanisms of adsorption/association vs precipitation must be understood under reduced and low Tc conditions so that strategic plans for remediation of Tc contaminated soils and groundwaters can be developed

  6. A study of the annual doses to man from routine gaseous effluent releases of the Philippine Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 (PNPP-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriel, M.C.J.

    1983-01-01

    Individual and population integrated doses from radioactive gaseous releases of the Philippine Nuclear Power Plant 1 (PNPP-1) were calculated using a modified GASPAR Code. Input data consisted of meteorological and site data gathered from the PNPP-1 Final Analysis Report (FASR) population and agricultural data from the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) and the National Census and Statistics Office (NCSO). Usage factors were calculated based on Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI) recommended dietary allowances for Filipinos. Results of population integrated dose calculations were used in identifying the critical nuclides, the critical body organs, and the critical pathway. Results from individual dose calculation were used in determining compliance with the dose limits set forth in Appendix D of Part 7 Code of Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) regulations. (Author). 23 tabs.; 5 figs

  7. Beta-ray depth dose in tissue equivalent material due to gaseous radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schadt, W.W.

    1978-01-01

    The magnitude of the absorbed dose to skin from beta particles emitted by the radionuclides in gaseous effluents from boiling water nuclear power reactors is investigated in this dissertation. Using the radionuclide release patterns of F. Brutschy and the beta dosimetry methods of M. Berger, an equation is derived which gives the dose rate in rads per day when the total radionuclide concentration is one microcurie per gram of air. The coefficients in the equation are presented for a wide range of reactor gas hold-up times (48 minutes to 6 days) and plume environmental transit time (0.5 to 60 minutes). The beta dose rates at the skin surface are found to range from 3.9 to 26.7 rads per day. An upper limit of the relative standard deviation in the dose rate is estimated to be 30 percent. The techniques used to develop the equation are applied to data from the Millstone Nuclear Power Station obtained during the summer of 1972. The beta dose at a site 1.7 miles from the reactor is determined to have been 675 millirads per year at the skin surface and 476 millirads per year at a depth of 200 micrometers. At a site 5.1 miles from the reactor these dose rates were 138 and 100 millirads per year respectively

  8. An advanced purex process based on salt-free reductants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hui; Ye, Guoan; Tang, Hongbin; Zheng, Weifang; Li, Gaoliang; Lin, Rushan [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China). Dept. of Radiochemistry

    2014-04-01

    An advanced plutonium and uranium recovery process has been established based on two organic reductants, N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHAN) and methylhydrazine (MH), as U/Pu separation reagents. This Advanced Purex process based on Organic Reductants (APOR) is composed of three cycles, including U/Pu co-decontamination/separation cycle, uranium purification cycle and plutonium purification cycle. Using DMHAN and MH as plutonium stripping reagents in the U/Pu co-decontamination/separation cycle and plutonium purification cycle, the APOR process exhibits high performance with following highlights: (1) the process is much simpler because of the elimination of Tc scrubbing operation and the supplement extraction operation, (2) high efficiency of U/Pu separation can be achieved in the first cycle, (3) plutonium product solution of high concentration can be obtained in the Pu purification cycle with a simple extraction operation instead of circumfluent extraction or evaporation of the plutonium solution. (orig.)

  9. Development of Metal-Organic Framework for Gaseous Plant Hormone Encapsulation To Manage Ripening of Climacteric Produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Boce; Luo, Yaguang; Kanyuck, Kelsey; Bauchan, Gary; Mowery, Joseph; Zavalij, Peter

    2016-06-29

    Controlled ripening of climacteric fruits, such as bananas and avocados, is a critical step to provide consumers with high-quality products while reducing postharvest losses. Prior to ripening, these fruits can be stored for an extended period of time but are usually not suitable for consumption. However, once ripening is initiated, they undergo irreversible changes that lead to rapid quality loss and decay if not consumed within a short window of time. Therefore, technologies to slow the ripening process after its onset or to stimulate ripening immediately before consumption are in high demand. In this study, we developed a solid porous metal-organic framework (MOF) to encapsulate gaseous ethylene for subsequent release. We evaluated the feasibility of this technology for on-demand stimulated ripening of bananas and avocados. Copper terephthalate (CuTPA) MOF was synthesized via a solvothermal method and loaded with ethylene gas. Its crystalline structure and chemical composition were characterized by X-ray diffraction crystallography, porosity by N2 and ethylene isotherms, and morphology by electron microscopy. The MOF loaded with ethylene (MOF-ethylene) was placed inside sealed containers with preclimacteric bananas and avocados and stored at 16 °C. The headspace gas composition and fruit color and texture were monitored periodically. Results showed that this CuTPA MOF is highly porous, with a total pore volume of 0.39 cm(3)/g. A 50 mg portion of MOF-ethylene can absorb and release up to 654 μL/L of ethylene in a 4 L container. MOF-ethylene significantly accelerated the ripening-related color and firmness changes of treated bananas and avocados. This result suggests that MOF-ethylene technology could be used for postharvest application to stimulate ripening just before the point of consumption.

  10. Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used

  11. Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A.

    1992-03-01

    Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms ''applicable'' and ''relevant and appropriate'' is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed

  12. Premises and solutions regarding a global approach of gaseous pollutants emissions from the fossil fuel power plants in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutuianu, O.; Fulger, E.D.; Vieru, A.; Feher, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the present state of RENEL (Romanian Electricity Authority) - controlled thermal power plants from the point of view of technical aspects, utilized fuels and pollutant emissions. National and international regulations are also analyzed as well as their implications concerning the management of pollutant atmospheric emissions of the plants of RENEL. Starting from these premises the paper points out the advantage of global approach of pollution problems and offers solutions already implemented by RENEL. This global approach will result in an optimization of costs implied in pollutant emission limitations as the most efficient solution were found and applied. Having in view this treatment of the pollution problems, RENEL has submitted to the Ministry of the Industries and to the Ministry of Waters, Forests and Environmental Protection a 'Convention on the limitation of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x emissions produced in the thermal power plants of RENEL'. (author)

  13. Treatment of Radioactive Gaseous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Radioactive waste, with widely varying characteristics, is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. The waste needs to be treated and conditioned as necessary to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Although radioactive gaseous radioactive waste does not constitute the main waste flow stream at nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste processing facilities, it represents a major source for potential direct environmental impact. Effective control and management of gaseous waste in both normal and accidental conditions is therefore one of the main issues of nuclear fuel cycle and waste processing facility design and operation. One of the duties of an operator is to take measures to avoid or to optimize the generation and management of radioactive waste to minimize the overall environmental impact. This includes ensuring that gaseous and liquid radioactive releases to the environment are within authorized limits, and that doses to the public and the effects on the environment are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Responsibilities of the regulatory body include the removal of radioactive materials within authorized practices from any further regulatory control — known as clearance — and the control of discharges — releases of gaseous radioactive material that originate from regulated nuclear facilities during normal operation to the environment within authorized limits. These issues, and others, are addressed in IAEA Safety Standards Series Nos RS-G-1.7, WS-G-2.3 and NS-G-3.2. Special systems should be designed and constructed to ensure proper isolation of areas within nuclear facilities that contain gaseous radioactive substances. Such systems consist of two basic subsystems. The first subsystem is for the supply of clean air to the facility, and the second subsystem is for the collection, cleanup and

  14. Absorption column working study for iodine formed in spent fuel reprocessing plant gaseous effluents: hydrodynamic and mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignau, B.

    1986-09-01

    The hydrodynamic and matter transfer parameters has been studied on absorption columns destined to trap iodine issued of spent fuel reprocessing plants. These columns have different packing - Raschig rings (glass, ceramic, PVC, steel) - Berl saddles (ceramic) - Weaved metallic thread (steel). The effect of dimension and of packing structure on gas pressure drop and on liquid holdup has been evaluated. The partial transfer coefficients of I 2 -Air-NaOH system has been the object of an experimental study. This system can be simulated by CO 2 -Air-NaOH system [fr

  15. Second order transient effects in a gaseous diffusion plant; Effets transitoires du second ordre dans une installation de separation isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouligand, O M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Perturbations applied to various parameters of an isotope separation plant indices an average effect on production. This effect is determined for a finite cascade over infinite reservoir. Perturbations on product flow rate and inter-stage transports are considered. (author) [French] Les fluctuations des divers parametres d'une installation de separation isotopique alterent la moyenne temporelle de la concentration du produit enrichi, Cet effet peut etre calcule dans le cas d'une cascade constante alimentee a sa base par un reservoir infini pour des fluctuations qui affectent les capacites des etages et le debit de production. (auteur)

  16. Environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding environs during 1986: Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakes, T.W.; Wiehle, W.E.; Valentine, B.L.

    1987-04-01

    This report provides monitoring data for the installation and surrounding environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; provides detailed information about the installation; provides detailed information on input and assumption used in all calculations; integrates monitoring data and related studies in one document to pull together, highlight, and summarize the information contained in many documents; provides trend analyses, where possible, to indicate increases and decreases in environmental conditions; and provides general information on the plant site and quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE reservation and PORTS are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, identify trends, provide information for the public, and contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and the environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 68 refs., 203 figs., 112 tabs

  17. Gaseous diffusion -- the enrichment workhorse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, J.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Construction of the first large-scale gaseous diffusion facility was started as part of the Manhattan Project in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in 1943. This facility, code named ''K-25,'' began operation in January 1945 and was fully on stream by September 1945. Four additional process buildings were later added in Oak Ridge as the demand for enriched uranium escalated. New gaseous diffusion plants were constructed at Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, during this period. The three gaseous diffusion plants were the ''workhorses'' which provided the entire enriched uranium demand for the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. As the demand for enriched uranium for military purposes decreased during the early 1960s, power to the diffusion plants was curtailed to reduce production. During the 1960s, as plans for the nuclear power industry were formulated, the role of the diffusion plants gradually changed from providing highly-enriched uranium for the military to providing low-enriched uranium for power reactors

  18. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houk, T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3{1/2} year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc{sup 99}) (activities up to 926 pCi/L).

  19. Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

  20. Dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for groundwater contaminant plume delineation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smuin, D.R.; Morti, E.E.; Zutman, J.L.; Pickering, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Dual wall reverse circulation (DWRC) drilling was used to drill 48 borings during a groundwater contaminant investigation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. This method was selected as an alternative to conventional hollow stem auger drilling for a number of reasons, including the expectation of minimizing waste, increasing the drilling rate, and reducing the potential for cross contamination of aquifers. Groundwater samples were collected from several water-bearing zones during drilling of each borehole. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds using a field gas chromatograph. This approach allowed the investigation to be directed using near-real-time data. Use of downhole geophysical logging, in conjunction with lithologic descriptions of borehole cuttings, resulted in excellent correlation of the geology in the vicinity of the contaminant plume. The total volume of cuttings generated using the DWRC drilling method was less than half of what would have been produced by hollow stem augering; however, the cuttings were recovered in slurry form and had to be dewatered prior to disposal. The drilling rate was very rapid, often approaching 10 ft/min; however, frequent breaks to perform groundwater sampling resulted in an average drilling rate of < 1 ft/min. The time required for groundwater sampling could be shortened by changing the sampling methodology. Analytical results indicated that the drilling method successfully isolated the various water bearing zones and no cross contamination resulted from the investigation

  1. Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K.; Whiting, N.; Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R.

    1998-01-01

    As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany

  2. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J.; Houk, T.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3 1/2 year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc 99 ) (activities up to 926 pCi/L)

  3. Application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter and evaluation of previous pumping tests at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report, June 15, 1992--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S.C.; Julian, S.C.; Neton, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Multi-well pumping tests have been concluded at wells MW79, MW108, and PW1 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to determine the hydraulic properties of the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). Soil cores suggest that the RGA consists of a thin sandy facies (2 to 6 feet) at the top of a thicker (> 10 feet) gravelly facies. Previous analyses have not considered any permeability contrast between the two facies. To assess the accuracy of this assumption, TVA personnel conducted borehole flowmeter tests at wells MW108 and PW1. Well MW79 could not be tested. The high K sand unit is probably 10 times more permeable than comparable zone in the gravelly portion of the RGA. Previous analyses of the three multi-well aquifer tests do not use the same conceptual aquifer model. Data analysis for one pumping test assumed that leakance was significant. Data analysis for another pumping test assumed that a geologic boundary was significant. By collectively analyzing all three tests with the borehole flowmeter results, the inconsistency among the three pumping tests can be explained. Disparity exists because each pumping test had a different placement of observation wells relative to the high K zone delineating by flowmeter testing.

  4. Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances

  5. Increased Suicide Risk among Workers following Toxic Metal Exposure at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant From 1952 to 2003: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LW Figgs

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suicide is a problem worldwide and occupation is an important risk factor. In the last decade, 55 200 deaths in the US were attributed to occupational risk factors. Objective: To determine if toxic metal exposure was associated with suicide risk among Paducah gaseous diffusion plant (PGDP workers. Methods: We assembled a cohort of 6820 nuclear industry workers employed from 1952 to 2003. A job-specific exposure matrix (JEM was used to determine metal exposure likelihood. Uranium exposure was also assessed by urinalysis. All suicide/self-injury International Classification for Disease (ICD codes were used to identify suicides. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR, odds ratios (OR, and hazard ratios (HR were used to estimate suicide risk. Results: PGDP suicide victims typically were younger white men. Within exposure likelihood categories, several suicide SMRs were typically elevated for several metals. Only beryllium exposure likelihood was associated with an increased HR. Uranium urine concentration was associated with an elevated suicide risk after stratification by urinalysis frequency. Conclusion: Suicide risk is associated with uranium exposure.

  6. Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Eaton, L.A.; Martin, J.A.; McDonald, E.P.; Etnier, E.L.

    1992-02-01

    Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1990 (CERCLA) specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) has not at this time been proposed for inclusion on the US Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List, under Sect. I of an administrative consent order signed by DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency on September 29, 1989, effective October 4, 1989, any necessary response actions at PORTS stipulated in the administrative consent order must be performed in a manner consistent with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and CERCLA. Section 121 of CERCLA calls for the preparation of a draft listing of all ARARs. This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PORTS. A description of the terms ''applicable'' and ''relevant and appropriate'' is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARs. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Ohio are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Clean Water Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous waste cleanup, are discussed

  7. Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, W.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances

  8. Modification and expansion of X-7725A Waste Accountability Facility for storage of polychlorinated biphenyl wastes at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) must manage wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in accordance with Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requirements and as prescribed in a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). PCB-containing wastes are currently stored in the PORTS process buildings where they are generated. DOE proposes to modify and expand the Waste Accountability facility (X-7725A) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio, to provide a central storage location for these wastes. The proposed action is needed to eliminate the fire and safety hazards presented by the wastes. In this EA, DOE considers four alternatives: (1) no action, which requires storing wastes in limited storage areas in existing facilities; (2) modifying and expanding the X-7725A waste accountability facility; (3) constructing a new PCB waste storage building; and (4) shipping PCB wastes to the K-25 TSCA incinerator. If no action is taken, PCB-contaminated would continue to be stored in Bldgs X-326, X-330, and X-333. As TSCA cleanup activities continue, the quantity of stored waste would increase, which would subsequently cause congestion in the three process buildings and increase fire and safety hazards. The preferred alternative is to modify and expand Bldg. X-7725A to store wastes generated by TSCA compliance activities. Construction, which could begin as early as April 1996, would last approximately five to seven months, with a total peak work force of 70

  9. Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, W.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

  10. Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} in Selected Gaseous Diffusion Plant Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-01

    As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes in under way. One issue concerning a primary candidate, c-C4F8, is the possibility that it might produce the highly toxic perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in high temperature environments. This study was commissioned to determine the likelihood and severity of decomposition under two specific high temperature thermal environments, namely the use of a flame test for the presence of coolant vapors and welding in the presence of coolant vapors. The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate available data to provide information that will allow the technical and industrial hygiene staff at the GDPs to perform appropriate safety evaluations and to determine the need for field testing or experimental work. The scope of this study included a literature search and an evaluation of the information developed therefrom. Part of that evaluation consists of chemical kinetics modeling of coolant decomposition in the two operational environments. The general conclusions are that PFIB formation is unlikely in either situation but that it cannot be ruled out completely under extreme conditions. The presence of oxygen, moisture, and combustion products will tend to lead to formation of oxidation products (COF2, CO, CO2, and HF) rather than PFIB.

  11. Evaluation of gaseous emissions produced in the tests on the demonstration plant for sludge drying and incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotito, V.; Spinosa, L.; Antonacci, R.; Mininni, G.

    2001-01-01

    Incineration is a valid alternative to other more diffused disposal systems (agricultural use, landfill), when they cannot be applied due to high pollutants concentrations or other unforeseeable constraints. However, it can cause severe air pollution by inorganic (heavy metals) and organic (PAHs, PCDDs, PCDFs) pollutants, particulate, NO x , CO and acidic compounds; this fact has raised public concern about incineration and has hindered a wider application of this practice. Water Research Institute of Italian National Research Council realised a demonstration plant mainly consisting of a fluidized bed furnace, a rotary kiln furnace, a dryer with heat recovery section, particulate and acidic compounds removal apparatuses, and set up a research programme to demonstrate that incineration is a safe operation and can comply the relevant legislation, as far as organic and inorganic micropollutants are concerned. A total of 40 tests were carried out (30 with the fluidized bed furnace and 10 with rotary kiln one) treating dewatered sludges (in many cases with the addition of high chlorinated compounds and Cu salts) or dried ones, under different operating conditions (furnace temperature, after-burner temperature, chlorine concentration). Particulate concentrations, and consequently heavy metals concentrations, at the stack resulted in any case under legal limits. As far as conventional pollutants are concerned, only HCl and CO overcame sometimes standards, mainly due to temporary operating up-sets. PAHs concentration resulted quite constant, thus demonstrating that tests were operated in steady-state and satisfactory conditions. Also dioxins and furans overcame sometimes standards, but no correlation was found with more severe tests conditions; it happened when plant up-set conditions occurred. Operation resulted quite satisfactory, but dryer operation required constant operators attention. In rotary kiln furnace a build up of solidified ashes occurred in counter

  12. Study of metabolism of hydrazoic acid in the purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violet, A.

    1988-03-01

    The transfer of HN 3 between different phases has been studied - It has been found that the transfer of HN 3 from aqueous solution of the reprocessing to gaz phase is a physical mechanism of desorbtion. - The limiting phenomena of the transfer of HN 3 fromt the organic to the gaseous phase, is the decomplexation of this specy with tributyl phosphate (TBP). - Chemical reactions of hydrazoic acid occurring with nitrogen oxides in the gaseous flow has shown that it is rapidly destroyed in the presence of nitrogen dioxide [fr

  13. Fission products control by gamma spectrometry in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Maria Augusta

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with a radiometric method for fission products analysisby gamma spectrometry. This method will be applied for fission productscontrol at the irradiated material processing facility, under construction inthe Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, SP, Brazil. Countinggeometry was defined taking into account the activities of process solutionsto be analysed, the remotely operated aliquotation device of analytical celland the available detection system. Natural and 19,91% enriched uraniumsamples were irradiated at IEAR-1 reactor in order to simulate thecomposition of Purex process solutions. After a short decay time, the sampleswere dissolved with HNO 3 and then, conditioned in standard flasks withdefined geometry. The spectra were obtained by a Ge(Li) semiconductordetector and analysed by the GELIGAM software system, losing a floppy-diskconnected to a PDP-11/05 computer. Libraries were prepared and calibrationswere made with standard sources to fit the programs to the analysis offission products in irradiated uranium solutions. It was possible to choosethe best program to be used in routine analysis with the obtained data.(author)

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite in simulated Purex Process solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, I.daC. de; Matsuda, H T; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1984-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for nitrite determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is presented, utilizing the Griess reagent for the formation of the coloured azocompound with an absorption maximum at 525 nm. Molar absortivity was 36,262 and the sensitivity of the method 10/sup -6/M for nitrite. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 2 to 30..mu..g NO/sup -//sub 2//25 ml in cells of 1 cm optical path. The method can be used in the presence of uranium up to limits of an U/NO/sup -//sub 2/ ratio of 150. Test solutions were prepared to simulate composition and concentrations as obtained by irradiating standard fuel with a neutro flux of 3.2 x 10/sup 13/ n.s/sup -1/.cm/sup -2/, with a burn-up value of 33,000 Mwd/T and cooling time of two years. Nitrite determinations in these solutions were accurate within limits of 5%.

  15. Calculation code PULCO for Purex process in pulsed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonda, Kozo; Matsuda, Teruo

    1982-03-01

    The calculation code PULCO, which can simulate the Purex process using a pulsed column as an extractor, has been developed. The PULCO is based on the fundamental concept of mass transfer that the mass transfer within a pulsed column occurs through the interface of liquid drops and continuous phase fluid, and is the calculation code different from conventional ones, by which various phenomena such as the generation of liquid drops, their rising and falling, and the unification of liquid drops actually occurring in a pulsed column are exactly reflected and can be correctly simulated. In the PULCO, the actually measured values of the fundamental quantities representing the extraction behavior of liquid drops in a pulsed column are incorporated, such as the mass transfer coefficient of each component, the diameter and velocity of liquid drops in a pulsed column, the holdup of dispersed phase, and axial turbulent flow diffusion coefficient. The verification of the results calculated with the PULCO was carried out by installing a pulsed column of 50 mm inside diameter and 2 m length with 40 plate stage in a glove box for unirradiated uranium-plutonium mixed system. The results of the calculation and test were in good agreement, and the validity of the PULCO was confirmed. (Kako, I.)

  16. Fisson product control by gamma spectrometry in Purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Maria A.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    A radiometric method for fission product analysis by gamma spectrometry, to be applied for fission product control at an irradiated material processing facility, is described. Counting geometry was defined taking into account the activities of process solutions to be analysed, the remotely operated aliquotation device of the analytical cell and the available detection system. Natural and 19,91% enriched uranium samples were irradiated in order to simulate the composition of Purex process solutions. After a short decay time the samples were dissolved with HNO 3 and then conditioned in standard flasks with defined geometry. The spectra were obtained by a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector and analysed by the GELIGAM software system, using a floppy-disk connected to a PDP-11/05 computer. Libraries were prepared and calibrations were made with standard sources to fit the analysis of fission products in irradiated uranium solutions. It was possible to choose the best program to be used in routine analysis with the obtained data. (Author) [pt

  17. Purex process modelling - do we really need speciation data?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.J.; May, I.

    2001-01-01

    The design of reprocessing flowsheets has become a complex process requiring sophisticated simulation models, containing both chemical and engineering features. Probably the most basic chemical data needed is the distribution of process species between solvent and aqueous phases at equilibrium, which is described by mathematical algorithms. These algorithms have been constructed from experimentally determined distribution coefficients over a wide range of conditions. Distribution algorithms can either be empirical fits of the data or semi-empirical equations, which describe extraction as functions of process variables such as temperature, activity coefficients, uranium loading, etc. Speciation data is not strictly needed in the accumulation of distribution coefficients, which are simple ratios of analyte concentration in the solvent phase to that in the aqueous phase. However, as we construct process models of increasing complexity, speciation data becomes much more important both to raise confidence in the model and to understand the process chemistry at a more fundamental level. UV/vis/NIR spectrophotometry has been our most commonly used speciation method since it is a well-established method for the analysis of actinide ion oxidation states in solution at typical process concentrations. However, with the increasing availability to actinide science of more sophisticated techniques (e.g. NMR; EXAFS) complementary structural information can often be obtained. This paper will, through examples, show how we have used spectrophotometry as a primary tool in distribution and kinetic experiments to obtain data for process models, which are then validated through counter-current flowsheet trials. It will also discuss how spectrophotometry and other speciation methods are allowing us to study the link between molecular structure and extraction behaviour, showing how speciation data really is important in PUREX process modelling. (authors)

  18. Effect of di-butyl phosphate on flash point of PUREX solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastav, Ravi Kant; Kumar, Shekhar; Balasubramonian, S.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Natarajan, R.

    2015-01-01

    30% Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in a aliphatic diluent is used as a solvent for PUREX process. This diluent is essentially equivalent to commercial dodecane. The radiolytic and acidic degradation of TBP forms di-butyl phosphate (DBP) which is detrimental to the performance of the solvent during nuclear fuel reprocessing operations. To study the possible effect of DBP on the flashpoint of PUREX solvent, synthetic solutions were made by adding DBP and flashpoints of resultant mixtures were determined with an automatic flashpoint tester as per ASTM procedures. Experimental results indicated virtually no effect of DBP on flash point of PUREX solvent in the concentration ranges of 0-16 g/L DBP. (author)

  19. Disposition of PUREX contaminated nitric acid the role of stakeholder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Duncan, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    What does the United States space shuttle and the Hanford PUREX facility's contaminated nitric acid have in common. Both are reusable. The PUREX Transition Project has achieved success and, minimized project expenses and waste generation by looking at excess chemicals not as waste but as reusable substitutes for commercially available raw materials. This philosophy has helped PUREX personnel to reuse or recycle more than 2.5 million pounds of excess chemicals, a portion of which is the slightly contaminated nitric acid. After extensive public review, the first shipment of contaminated acid was made in May 1995. Removal of the acid was completed on November 6, 1995 when the fiftieth shipment left the Hanford site. This activity, which avoided dispositioning the contaminated acid as a waste, generated significantly more public input and concern than was expected. One of the lessons learned from this process is to not underestimate public perceptions regarding the reuse of contaminated materials

  20. Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, D.P.

    1993-12-01

    Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified

  1. Gaseous poison injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Sugisaki, Toshihiko; Inada, Ikuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly control the chain reaction due to thermal neutrons in a reactor core by using gaseous poisons as back-up means for control rod drives. Constitution: Gaseous poisons having a large neutron absorption cross section are used as back-up means for control rod drives. Upon failure of control rod insertion, the gaseous poisons are injected into the lower portion of the reactor core to control the reactor power. As the gaseous poisons, vapors at a high temperature and a higher pressure than that of the coolants in the reactor core are injected to control the reactor power due to the void effects. Since the gaseous poisons thus employed rapidly reach the reactor core and form gas bubbles therein, the deccelerating effect of the thermal neutrons is decreased to reduce the chain reaction. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Development of gaseous photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sugiyama, H.; Okada, T.

    2014-01-01

    We have been developing gaseous photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with alkali photocathode combined with micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs). The potential advantage of the gaseous PMT is that it can achieve a very large effective area with adequate position and timing resolutions. In addition, it will be easily operated under a very high magnetic field, compared with the conventional vacuum-based PMT. To evaluate the gaseous PMTs filled with Ne and Ar based gas mixture, we have developed gaseous PMTs with an alkali photocathode combined with MPGDs such as a glass capillary plate, GEM, and Micromegas detector. We describe the recent development of the gaseous PMTs, particularly the production of the photocathode, gas gain, ion and photon feedbacks, quantum efficiency, and the characteristics in the magnetic field environment. (author)

  3. Evaluation of consequence due to higher hydrazine content in partitioning stream of PUREX process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, K. Suresh [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Special Nuclear Recycle Facility

    2016-07-01

    Hydrazine nitrate is being used as a stabilizer for U(IV) as well as Pu(III) during partitioning of Pu in PUREX process by scavenging the nitrous acid present along with nitric acid. As hydrazine hydrate as well as its salts have been successfully used for scrubbing of degradation products of TBP to aqueous phase, experiments were conducted to evaluate the consequence of hydrazine content during Pu partitioning. It was observed that higher amount of hydrazine nitrate along with uranous nitrate in the partitioning stream of PUREX process leads to build up of DBP in aqueous phase and resulted in precipitation of Pu.

  4. Control of radio-iodine at the German reprocessing plant WAK during operation and after shutdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, F.J.; Herrmann, B.; Kuhn, K.D. [Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (Germany)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    During 20 years of operation 207 metric tons of oxide fuel from nuclear power reactors with 19 kg of iodine-129 had been reprocessed in the WAK plant near Karlsruhe. In January 1991 the WAK Plant was shut down. During operation iodine releases of the plant as well as the iodine distribution over the liquid and gaseous process streams had been determined. Most of the iodine is evolved into the dissolver off-gas in volatile form. The remainder is dispersed over many aqueous, organic and especially gaseous process and waste streams. After shut down of the plant in January 1991, iodine measurements in the off-gas streams have been continued up to now. Whereas the iodine-129 concentration in the dissolver off-gas dropped during six months after shutdown by three orders of magnitude, the iodine concentrations in the vessel ventilation system of the PUREX process and the cell vent system decreased only by a factor of 10 during the same period. Iodine-129 releases of the liquid high active waste storage tanks did not decrease distinctly. The removal efficiencies of the silver impregnated iodine filters in the different off-gas streams of the WAK plant depend on the iodine concentration in the off-gas. The reason of the observed dependence of the DF on the iodine-129 concentration might be due to the presence of organic iodine compounds which are difficult to remove. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Behavior of mercury and iodine during vitrification of simulated alkaline Purex waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holton, L.K.

    1981-09-01

    Current plans indicate that the high-level wastes stored at the Savannah River Plant will be solidified by vitrification. The behavior of mercury and iodine during the vitrification process is of concern because: mercury is present in the waste in high concentrations (0.1 to 2.8 wt%); mercury will react with iodine and the other halogens present in the waste during vitrification and; the mercury compounds formed will be volatilized from the vitrification process placing a high particulate load in the vitrification system off-gas. Twelve experiments were completed to study the behavior of mercury during vitrification of simulated SRP Purex waste. The mercury was completely volatized from the vitrification system in all experiments. The mercury reacted with iodine, chlorine and oxygen to form a fine particulate solid. Quantitative recovery of mercury compounds formed in the vitrification system off-gas was not possible due to high (37 to 90%) deposition of solids in the off-gas piping. The behavior of mercury and iodine was most strongly influenced by the vitrification system atmosphere. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was low (< 1 vol%); iodine retention in the glass product was 27 to 55%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 75 to 85 wt%, and a small quantity of metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was high (20 vol%), iodide retention in the glass product was 3 to 15%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 60 to 80 wt%, and very little metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution

  6. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil

  7. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil

  8. ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

    2008-01-01

    The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., 99 Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the

  9. A Technical Assessment Of The Current Water Policy Boundary At U.S. Department Of Energy, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2012-01-01

    In 1988, groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99) was identified in samples collected from residential water wells withdrawing groundwater from the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) north of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) facility. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided temporary drinking water supplies to approximately 100 potentially affected residents by initially supplying bottled water, water tanks, and water-treatment systems, and then by extending municipal water lines, all at no cost, to those persons whose wells could be affected by contaminated groundwater. The Water Policy boundary was established in 1993. In the Policy, DOE agreed to pay the reasonable monthly cost of water for homes and businesses and, in exchange, many of the land owners signed license agreements committing to cease using the groundwater via rural water wells. In 2012, DOE requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), managing contractor of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), provide an independent assessment of the quality and quantity of the existing groundwater monitoring data and determine if there is sufficient information to support a modification to the boundary of the current Water Policy. As a result of the assessment, ORAU concludes that sufficient groundwater monitoring data exists to determine that a shrinkage and/or shift of the plume(s) responsible for the initial development of this policy has occurred. Specifically, there is compelling evidence that the TCE plume is undergoing shrinkage due to natural attenuation and associated degradation. The plume shrinkage (and migration) has also been augmented in local areas where large volumes of groundwater were recovered by pump-and treat remedial systems along the eastern and western boundaries of the Northwest Plume, and in other areas where pump-and-treat systems have been deployed by DOE to remove source contaminants. The

  10. Legal provisions governing gaseous effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.

    1985-01-01

    This contribution explains the main provisions governing radiological monitoring of gaseous effluents from LWR type nuclear power plants. KTA rule 1503.1 defines the measuring methods and tasks to be fulfilled by reactor operators in order to safeguard due monitoring and accounting of radioactive substances in the plants' gaseous effluents. The routine measurements are checked by a supervisory programme by an independent expert. The routine controls include analysis of filter samples, comparative measurement of radioactive noble gases, interlaboratory comparisons, and comparative evaluation of measured values. (DG) [de

  11. Integrating safety and health during deactiviation: With lessons learned from PUREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes an integrated safety and health approach used during facility deactivation activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility in Hanford, Washington. Resulting safety and health improvements and the potential, complex-wide application of this approach are discussed in this report through a description of its components and the impacts, or lessons-learned, of its use during the PUREX deactivation project. As a means of developing and implementing the integrated safety and health approach, the PUREX technical partnership was established in 1993 among the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5); the Office of Environmental Management's Offices of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) and Compliance and Program Coordination (EM-20); the DOE Richland Operations Office; and the Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is believed that this report will provide guidance for instituting an integrated safety and health approach not only for deactivation activities, but for decommissioning and other clean-up activities as well. This confidence is based largely upon the rationality of the approach, often termed as common sense, and the measurable safety and health and project performance results that application of the approach produced during actual deactivation work at the PUREX Facility

  12. Production and remediation of low sludge simulated Purex waste glasses, 2: Effects of sludge oxide additions on glass durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Glass produced during the Purex 4 campaigns of the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) and the 774 Research Melter contained a lower fraction of sludge components than targeted by the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Purex 4 glass was more durable than the benchmark (EA) glass, but was less durable than most other simulated SRS high-level waste glasses. Further, the measured durability of Purex 4 glass was not as well correlated with the durability predicted from the DWPF process control algorithm, probably because the algorithm was developed to predict the durability of SRS high-level waste glasses with higher sludge content than Purex 4. A melter run, designated Purex 4 Remediation, was performed using the 774 Research Melter to determine if the initial PCCS target composition determined for Purex 4 would produce acceptable glass whose durability could be accurately modeled by the DWPF glass durability algorithm. Reagent grade oxides and carbonates were added to Purex 4 melter feed stock to simulate a higher sludge loading. Each canister of glass produced was sampled and the glass durability was determined by the Product Consistency Test method. This document details the durability data and subsequent analysis

  13. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

  14. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs

  15. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs

  17. Purex Process Improvements for Pu and NP Control in Total Actinide Recycle Flowsheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkett, J.E.; Carrott, M.J.; Crooks, G.; Fox, O.D.; Maher, C.J.; Taylor, R.J.; Woodhead, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Significant improvements are required in the Purex process to optimise it for Advanced Fuel Cycles. Two key challenges we have identified are, firstly, developing more efficient methods for U/Pu separations especially at elevated Pu concentrations and, secondly, improving recovery, control and routing of Np in a modified Purex process. A series of Purex-like flowsheets for improved Pu separations based on hydroxamic acids and are reported. Purex-like flowsheets have been tested on a glovebox-housed 30-stage miniature centrifugal contactor train. A series of trials have been performed to demonstrate the processing of feeds with varying Pu contents ranging from 7 - 40% by weight. These flowsheets have demonstrated hydroxamic acids are excellent reagents for complexant stripping of Pu being able to achieve high decontamination factors (DF) on both the U and Pu product streams and co - recover Np with Pu. The advantages of a complexant-based approach are shown to be especially relevant when AFC scenarios are considered, where the Pu content of the fuel is expected to b e significantly higher. Recent results towards modifying the Purex process to improve recovery and control of Np in short residence time contactors are reported. Work on the development of chemical and process models to describe the complicated behaviour of Np under primary separation conditions (i.e. the HA extraction contactor) is described. To test the performance of the model a series of experiments were performed including testing of flowsheets on a fume-hood housed miniature centrifugal contactor train. The flowsheet was designed to emulate the conditions of a primar y separations contactor with the Np split between the U-solvent product and aqueous raffinate. In terms of Np routing the process model showed good agreement with flowsheet trial however much further work is required to fully understand this complex system. (authors)

  18. A compound refining system for separation of gaseous fission products incorporated in a reprocessing pilot plant for spent fuel from neclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    In the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute, a gas treatment experimental apparatus was installed to the SU-2 type experimental facility. The purpose is to solve variety of problems in the separation, collection and subsequent treatment for gaseous fission products and highly volatile fission products in spent fuel reprocessing. The experimental apparatus has the functions as follows: the measurement of air flow such as flow rate, pressure, total γ activity and krypton-85 content, preliminary air flow cleaning and drying removing aerosol, hydrogen fluoride and nitrogen oxide, and the trapping and analysis of gaseous fission products and highly volatile fission products in air flow. For the collection of these two types of fission products, a liquid absorbent and a solid adsorbent are used in series arrangement. (J.P.N.)

  19. Air pollution with gaseous emissions and methods for their removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, Venceslav; Boycheva, Sylvia; Fidancevska, Emilija

    2009-01-01

    Information concerning gaseous pollutants generated in the atmosphere, as a result of fuel incineration processes in thermal power and industrial plants, was summarized. The main methods and technologies for flue gases purification from the most ecologically hazardous pollutants are comparatively discussed. Keywords: gaseous pollutants, aerosols, flue gas purification systems and technologies, air ecology control

  20. Preliminary Results of Reductive Dechlorination Conducted at the X-749/X-120 Area of the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieske, D. E.; Baird, D. R.; Lawson, N. E.

    2006-01-01

    Reductive dechlorination is being implemented at the X-749/X-120 trichloroethene (TCE) plume South Barrier Wall containment site at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The purpose of this paper is to present the effectiveness of the reductive dechlorination at PORTS. Reductive dechlorination is an in situ remediation technology that utilizes existing subsurface microbes to biologically degrade volatile organic compounds in groundwater. Monitoring in the barrier wall area reveals the presence of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) injected in the spring of 2004 in two groundwater monitoring wells closest to the injection points. Oxidation/reduction potential in these two wells has decreased steadily since injection, but has not yet reached optimal reducing levels for TCE degradation. Monitoring the effectiveness of the injection is hampered by near-stagnant groundwater flow due in part to the South Barrier Wall. The X-749/X-120 TCE groundwater plume lies beneath approximately 91 acres in the southern portion of PORTS, and extends southward threatening to cross the DOE property boundary. A 1,077-foot long subsurface bentonite barrier wall was installed in 1993 at the southern DOE property boundary to restrict movement of contaminated groundwater from traveling off-site until other remedial technologies could be implemented. In 2003, TCE was detected on the south side of the barrier wall (but still within DOE property) above drinking water standards of 5 micrograms per liter. Monitoring has also detected TCE in groundwater beyond the western edge of the barrier wall. In the spring of 2004, DOE initiated the injection of a reductive dechlorination compound known as Hydrogen Release Compound-extended release formula (HRC-X) into the subsurface using direct push technology (DPT). The HRC-X was injected within the saturated zone from the top of bedrock to 10 feet above bedrock as the probe was withdrawn from the push. A total of 180 DPT

  1. Uranium enrichment by the gaseous diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    After a brief description of the process and technology (principle, stage constitution, cascade constitution, and description of a plant), the author gives the history of gaseous diffusion and describes the existing facilities. Among the different enrichment processes contemplated in the USA during and after the last world war, gaseous diffusion has been the only one to be developed industrially on a wide scale in the USA, then in the UK, in the USSR and in France. The large existing capacities in the USA provided the country with a good starting base for the development of a light-water nuclear power plant programme, the success of which led to a shortfall in production means. France and the USA, possessing the necessary know-how, have been able to undertake the realization of two industrial programmes: the CIP-CUP programme in the USA and the Eurodif project in France. Current plans still call for the construction of several plants by 1990. Can the gaseous diffusion process meet this challenge. Technically, there is no doubt about it. Economically, this process is mainly characterized by large energy consumption and the necessity to build large plants. This leads to a large investment, at least for the first plant. Other processes have been developed with a view to reducing both energy and capital needs. However, in spite of continuous studies and technological progress, no process has yet proved competitive. Large increments in capacities are still expected to come from gaseous diffusion, and several projects taking into account the improvements in flexibility, automatization, reliability and reduced investment, are analysed in the paper. Combining new facilities with existing plants has already proved to be of great interest. This situation explains why gaseous diffusion is being further investigated and new processes are being studied. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Proposed New LLW Disposal Activity: Disposal of Aqueous PUREX Waste Stream in the Saltstone Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The Aqueous PUREX waste stream from Tanks 33 and 35, which have been blended in Tank 34, has been identified for possible processing through the Saltstone Processing Facility for disposal in the Saltstone Disposal Facility

  3. EURODIF: the uranium enrichment by gaseous diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougeau, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    During the seventies the nuclear power programme had an extremely rapid growth rate which entailed to increase the world uranium enrichment capacity. EURODIF is the largest undertaking in this field. This multinational joint venture built and now operates and enrichment plant using the gaseous diffusion process at Tricastin (France). This plant is delivering low enriched uranium since two years and has contracted about 110 million SWU's till 1990. Description, current activity and prospects are given in the paper. (Author) [pt

  4. The determination of Pu-241 by liquid scintillation counting in gaseous effluents of an incineration facility, FERAB, and the Karlsruhe Nuclear Reprocessing Plant, WAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, J.M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1983-03-01

    Although the concentration of Pu-241 in nuclear fuel to be reprocessed is high, there are only few results published about the emission of Pu-241 with gaseous and liquid effluents. Nearly no information is available, too, about the environmental contamination of nuclear installations by Pu-241. Therefore a procedure was developed to measure Pu-241 by liquid scintillation counting. Sample preparation was performed by electroplating of plutonium on stainless steel planchets. To correct the selfabsorption the linear dependence of counting efficiency in the liquid scintillation counter and the resolution in the α-spectrometer was used. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns, M.I.; Lorenzo, D.S.; Vejvoda, E.J.; Duncan, D.R.

    1993-04-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic wastes, now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site, are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 7% of the transuranic waste to be retrieved for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has been generated at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by PUREX using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The PUREX Plant is currently operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy and is now in standby status while being prepared for permanent shutdown. The PUREX Plant is a collection of facilities that has been used primarily to separate plutonium for nuclear weapons from spent fuel that had been irradiated in the Hanford Site's defense reactors. Originally designed to reprocess aluminum-clad uranium fuel, the plant was modified to reprocess zirconium alloy clad fuel elements from the Hanford Site's N Reactor. PUREX has provided plutonium for research reactor development, safety programs, and defense. In addition, the PUREX was used to recover slightly enriched uranium for recycling into fuel for use in reactors that generate electricity and plutonium. Section 2.0 provides further details of the PUREX's physical plant and its operations. The PUREX Plant functions that generate solid waste are as follows: processing operations, laboratory analyses and supporting activities. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these activities are discussed in detail

  6. Separation of radio cesium from PUREX feed solution by sorption on composite ammonium molybdo phosphate (AMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, I.J.; Achuthan, P.V.; Jain, S.; Janardanan, C.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Wattal, P.K.; Ramanujam, A.

    2001-01-01

    Composite AMP exchanger was developed and evaluated for separation of radio cesium from dissolver solutions of PUREX process using a column experiment. The composite shows excellent sorption of radio cesium from dissolver solutions without any loss of plutonium and uranium. The removal of radio cesium from dissolver solutions will help in lowering the degradation of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in the solvent extraction process and will also help in reducing the radiation related problems. (author)

  7. Gaseous waste processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Masanobu; Uchiyama, Yoshio; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Kimura, Masahiro; Kawabe, Ken-ichi.

    1992-01-01

    Gaseous waste recombiners 'A' and 'B' are connected in series and three-way valves are disposed at the upstream and the downstream of the recombiners A and B, and bypass lines are disposed to the recombiners A and B, respectively. An opening/closing controller for the three-way valves is interlocked with a hydrogen densitometer disposed to a hydrogen injection line. Hydrogen gas and oxygen gas generated by radiolysis in the reactor are extracted from a main condenser and caused to flow into a gaseous waste processing system. Gaseous wastes are introduced together with overheated steams to the recombiner A upon injection of hydrogen. Both of the bypass lines of the recombiners A and B are closed, and recombining reaction for the increased hydrogen gas is processed by the recombiners A and B connected in series. In an operation mode not conducting hydrogen injection, it is passed through the bypass line of the recombiner A and processed by the recombiner B. With such procedures, the increase of gaseous wastes due to hydrogen injection can be coped with existent facilities. (I.N.)

  8. A method of neptunium recovery into the product stream of the Purex 1st codecontamination step for LWR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboya, Takao; Nemoto, Shinichi; Hoshino, Tadaya; Segawa, Takeshi

    1973-01-01

    An improved nitrous acid method was applied for recovering neptunium in spent fuel. Counter-current solvent extraction has been performed to find out its recovery conditions. The nitrous acid in the form of sodium salt solution was fed to the 1st stage of extraction section, and hydrazine nitrate was fed to some stages near feed point. Flow rate and the concentration of additives were altered for finding out optimum condition. Laboratory scale mixer-settlers having 6 ml of mixing volume and 17 ml of settling volume for each stage were used. The nitrous acid method was improved so that the reduction reaction in scrub section can be eliminated by the decomposition of the nitrous acid using a reagent such as sulfamic acid, urea, or hydrazine. In operation, the feed rate of the nitrous acid was about 3 mM/hr, and about 61% of neptunium charged was discharged in the product stream of Purex-1st codecontamination step designed for the LWR fuel reprocessing plant of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The calculated value of Δx/x for extraction section agreed with the experimental value, where Δx is the quantity of oxidation, and x is the inventory for neptunium in each stage. In conclusion, the improved nitrous acid method is effective for the neptunium discharge in product stream, and the difference of neptunium extraction between estimate and experiment is caused by some of reduction reaction in scrub section. (Iwakiri, K.)

  9. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Tadao.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a radioactive gaseous waste processing device used in BWR power plants. A heater is disposed to the lower portion of a dryer for dehydrating radioactive off gases. Further, a thermometer is disposed to a coolant return pipeway on the exit side of the cooling portion of the dryer and signals sent from the thermometer are inputted to an automatic temperature controller. If the load on the dryer is reduced, the value of the thermometer is lowered than a set value, then an output signal corresponding to the change is supplied from the automatic temperature controller to the heater to forcively apply loads to the dryer. Therefore, defrosting can be conducted completely without operating a refrigerator, and the refrigerator can be maintained under a constant load by applying a dummy load when the load in the dryer is reduced. (I.N.)

  10. Gaseous diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, G.A.; Shacter, J.

    1978-01-01

    A gaseous diffusion system is described comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of the diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof

  11. National Gas Survey. Synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The supply-Technical Advisory Task Force-Synthesized Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuels considered coal, hydrocarbon liquids, oil shales, tar sands, and bioconvertible materials as potential feedstocks for gaseous fuels. Current status of process technology for each feedstock was reviewed, economic evaluations including sensitivity analysis were made, and constraints for establishment of a synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels industry considered. Process technology is presently available to manufacture gaseous hydrocarbon fuels from each of the feedstocks. In 1975 there were eleven liquid feedstock SNG plants in the United States having a capacity of 1.1 billion SCFD. There can be no contribution of SNG before 1982 from plants using feedstocks other than liquids because there are no plants in operation or under construction as of 1977. Costs for SNG are higher than current regulated prices for U.S. natural gas. Because of large reserves, coal is a prime feedstock candidate although there are major constraints in the area of coal leases, mining and water permits, and others. Commercial technology is available and several new gasification processes are under development. Oil shale is also a feedstock in large supply and commercial process technology is available. There are siting and permit constraints, and water availability may limit the ultimate size of an oil shale processing industry. Under projected conditions, bioconvertible materials are not expected to support the production of large quantities of pipeline quality gas during the next decade. Production of low or medium Btu gas from municipal solid wastes can be expected to be developed in urban areas in conjunction with savings in disposal costs. In the economic evaluations presented, the most significant factor for liquid feedstock plants is the anticipated cost of feedstock and fuel. The economic viability of plants using other feedstocks is primarily dependent upon capital requirements.

  12. Production and remediation of low-sludge, simulated Purex waste glasses, 1: Effects of sludge oxide additions on melter operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Glass produced during the Purex 4 campaigns of the Integrated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter System (IDMS) and the 774 Research Melter contained a lower fraction of sludge components than targeted by the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Purex 4 glass was more durable than the benchmark (EA) glass, but less durable than most simulated SRS high-level waste glasses. Also, Purex 4 glass was considerably less durable than predicted by the algorithm which will be used to control production of DWPF glass. A melter run was performed using the 774 Research Melter to determine if the initial PCCS target composition determined for Purex 4 would produce acceptable glass whose durability could be accurately modeled by Hydration Thermodynamics. Reagent grade oxides and carbonates were added to Purex 4 melter feed stock to simulate a higher sludge loading. Each canister of glass produced was sampled and the composition, crystallinity, and durability was determined. This document details the melter operation and composition and crystallinity analyses

  13. Theme 1: fuel cycle and waste management. 1.3 the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. 1.3.1. thermal recycle of plutonium ''Ongoing industrialization of Purex'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakem, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Purex process has been developed over many years from a process supporting military programmes in the years 1940 with the emphasis on production of a single product to today sophisticated large scale commercial plants designed to separate Uranium and Plutonium as high quality products. The plants have been designed, and are operated so as to discharge minimal aerial and liquid effluents whilst at the same time minimising arisings of liquid and solid waste. The scope of the facilities includes treatment of such wastes to create a form that is suitable for interim storage prior to final disposal. Typical of such plants are Thorp at Sellafield and UP3 at Cap La Hague, where plutonium dioxide is separated for the production of Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX). The paper demonstrates the practical application of improvements to the Purex process at an industrial scale with the constraints imposed by technical, regulatory and commercial requirements. Successful examples will be addressed which illustrate the logical progression from technical concept, strategic decision and option taking, front end engineering definition, design and initial safety approval, regulatory approval leading to effective plant implementation and proving. (author)

  14. Uranous nitrate production for purex process applications using PtO2 catalyst and H2/H2-gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasa Rao, K.; Shyamali, R.; Narayan, C.V.; Patil, A.R.; Jambunathan, U.; Ramanujam, A.; Kansara, V.P.

    2003-04-01

    In the Purex process of spent fuel reprocessing. the twin objectives- decontamination and partitioning are achieved by extracting uranium (VI) and plutonium (IV) together in the solvent 30% TBP-dodecane and then selectively reducing Pu (IV) to Pu (III) in which valency it is least extractable in the solvent. Uranous nitrate stabilized with hydrazine nitrate is the widely employed partitioning agent. The conventional method of producing U(IV) is by the electrolytic reduction of uranyl nitrate with hydrazine nitrate as uranous ion stabilizer. Tre percentage conversion of U(VI) to U(IV) obtained in this method is 50 -60 %. The use of this solution as partitioning agent leads not only to the dilution of the plutonium product but also to increase in uranium processing load by each externally fed uranous nitrate batch. Also the oxide coating of the anode, TSIA (Titanium Substrate Insoluble Anode) wears out after a certain period of operation. This necessitates recoating which is quite cumbersome considering the amount of the decontamination involved. An alternative to the conventional electrolytic method of reduction of uranyl nitrate to uranous nitrate was explored at FRD laboratory .The studies have revealed that near 100% uranous nitrate can be produced by reducing uranyl nitrate with H 2 gas or H 2 (8%)- Ar/N 2 gas mixture in presence of PtO 2 catalyst. This report describes the laboratory scale studies carried out to optimize the various parameters. Based on these studies reduction of uranyl nitrate on a pilot plant scale was carried out. The design and operation of the reductor column and also the various studies carried out in the pilot plant studies are discussed. Near 100% conversion of uranyl nitrate to uranous nitrate and also the redundancy of supply of electrical energy make this process a viable alternative to the existing electrolytic method. (author)

  15. Effect of Entrainment and Overflow Occurrences on Concentration Profile in PUREX Flow Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Ishii, Junichi; Matsumoto, Shiro

    2003-01-01

    A deviation in the operational condition of a mixer settler and a centrifugal contactor causes an entrainment or an overflow, which affects the concentration profile. Although there has been no quantitative study about the effect of such abnormal flows on the concentration profile, the occurrence of such abnormal flows has been severely restricted for a PUREX flow sheet. However, the restriction of abnormal flows can be relaxed when the effect of such flows is limited within the allowable range such that the concentration of the product does not deviate from its specification. This relaxation could serve to benefit a continuous operation under a certain degree of deviation from the operational condition and a smaller design load of a solvent extractor. From this viewpoint, the relationship between the magnitude of abnormal flows and the effect of them on the process was studied quantitatively using a specially developed code in a wide range of PUREX flow sheet conditions, and the possibility of this relaxation was investigated. The results showed that the effect of the abnormal flow on the concentration in the organic outflow or aqueous raffinate was dominated by the leakage fraction under normal conditions regardless of each specific flow sheet condition. The common correlations were found between the leakage fraction of uranium and plutonium under the occurrence of abnormal flows and that under no abnormal flow for the stripping and extracting conditions, respectively. Comparing the given correlations and the usual specification of the leakage fraction of uranium and plutonium suggested that the restriction of the abnormal flows could be relaxed for a usual PUREX flow sheet

  16. Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DODD, E.N.

    1999-01-01

    This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2

  17. Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DODD, E.N.

    1999-05-12

    This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2

  18. Chemical processing of HTR fuels applying either THOREX or PUREX flow sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, E; Merz, E [Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Chemische Technologie der Nuklearen Entsorgung, Juelich (Germany)

    1985-07-01

    Two fuel cycles are considered for utilization in high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTRs): the high-enriched thorium-uranium (HEU 93% U-235) and the low-enriched uranium (LEU 8-12% U-235) fuel concept. For both fuel compositions suitable reprocessing procedures are required which are capable to separate the actinides thorium, uranium and plutonium from fission products and from each other. In any case, the processes under consideration utilize Tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) together with a straight-chain paraffinic diluent (C{sub 8}-C{sub 14}, to day usually dodecane) as extractant in an aqueous nitrate system; most commonly, the related processes are known by the acronyms PUREX and THOREX. The PUREX process has become the reprocessing procedure quite generally used for all fuel types containing natural, slightly or highly enriched uranium together with lower or higher contents of plutonium. The THOREX process on the other hand has been developed to separate thorium, uranium and fission products from thorium based irradiated fuel. Generally, the utilization of the thorium fuel cycle is most attractive for High Temperature Reactors. On the other hand, the strong recommendation of INFCE to abandon the use of high-enriched uranium for nuclear energy applications virtually rules out the thorium fuel cycle, since economic utilization of thorium as a fertile material requires the use of high-enriched U-235. Thus, it was decided in the Federal Republic of Germany to switch over, at least for the foreseeable future, to the low enrichment uranium-plutonium fuel cycle, well aware of its economic shortcomings. In this paper various THOREX flowsheets as well as a PUREX variant suitable for LEU fuel reprocessing are described. Both processes have in common that the main stream is always presented by the fertile material, that means thorium and U-238, respectively.

  19. Gaseous isotope correlation technique for safeguards at reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Michiaki.

    1988-03-01

    The isotope correlation technique based on gaseous stable fission products can be used as a means of verifying the input measurement to fuel reprocessing plants. This paper reviews the theoretical background of the gaseous fission product isotope correlation technique. The correlations considered are those between burnup and various isotopic ratios of Kr and Xe nuclides. The feasibility of gaseous ICT application to Pu input accountancy of reprocessing facilities is also discussed. The technique offers the possibility of in situ measurement verification by the inspector. (author). 16 refs, 7 figs

  20. Uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium separation by the Purex process using hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhaowu; He Jianyu; Zhang Zefu; Zhang Yu; Zhu Jianmin; Zhen Weifang

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxyurea dissolved in nitric acid can strip plutonium and neptunium from tri-butyl phosphate efficiently and has little influence on the uranium distribution between the two phases. Simulating the 1B contactor of the Purex process by hydroxyurea with nitric acid solution as a stripping agent, the separation factors of uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium can reach values as high as 4.7 x 10 4 and 260, respectively. This indicates that hydroxyurea is a promising salt free agent for uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium separations. (author)

  1. Standardization of a method to study the distribution of Americium in purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dapolikar, T.T.; Pant, D.K.; Kapur, H.N.; Kumar, Rajendra; Dubey, K.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work the distribution of Americium in PUREX process is investigated in various process streams. For this purpose a method has been standardized for the determination of Am in process samples. The method involves extraction of Am with associated actinides using 30% TRPO-NPH at 0.3M HNO 3 followed by selective stripping of Am from the organic phase into aqueous phase at 6M HNO 3 . The assay of aqueous phase for Am content is carried out by alpha radiometry. The investigation has revealed that 100% Am follows the HLLW route. (author)

  2. Destruction of nitric acid in purex process streams by formaldehyde treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.V.; Nadkarni, M.N.; Mayankutty, P.C.; Pillai, N.S.; Shinde, S.S.

    1974-01-01

    Efficiency of destruction of nitric acid in purex process streams with formaldehyde has been studied as a function of initial acidity, uranium concentration, rate of addition of formaldehyde and temperature in the range 6 - 0.5M acid. Guidelines are suggested for the accurate calculations of the volume of formaldehyde needed to effect the required change of acidity at 100degC. Sodium nitrite has been established as a 'key' to initiate the reaction and water as an effective scrubber for collecting the acid fumes emanating from the reaction vessel. (author)

  3. Safety aspects of the design of a PWR gaseous radwaste treatment system using hydrogen recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glibert, R.; Nuyt, G.; Herin, S.; Fossion, P.

    1978-01-01

    PWR Gaseous radwaste treatment system is essential for the reduction of impact on environment of the nuclear power plants. Decay tank system has been used for the retention of the radioactive gaseous fission products generated in the primary coolant. The use of a system combining decay tanks and hydrogen recombiner units is described in this paper. Accent is put on the safety aspects of this gaseous radwaste treatment facilitystudied by BN for a Belgian Power Plant. (author)

  4. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  5. Transfer of gaseous iodine to Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yuji; Ohmomo, Yoichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Transfer rates of gaseous elemental iodine and methyliodide from atmosphere to Tradescantia were investigated in relation to supposed genetic mutation due to radioactive iodine released from nuclear facilities. The estimated transfer rate of elemental iodine to the young buds of Tradescantia, which was given as the ratio of iodine uptake rate per unit weight of the plant to the concentration of the element in the air, was approximately 7 x 10 -2 cm 3 /g.sec, about 30 to 40 times higher than that of methyliodide. The contribution of direct deposition of elemental iodine was suggested to be significant, although methyliodide was mainly absorbed by respiration through stomata of the plant. (author)

  6. Removal of fission product ruthenium from purex process solutions: thiourea as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floh, B.; Abrao, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for the treatment of spent uranium fuel is presented. It is based on the Purex Process using thiourea to increase the ruthenium decontamination factor. Thiourea exhibits a strong tendency for the formation of coordination compounds in acidic media. This tendency serves as a basis to transform nitrosyl-ruthenium species into Ru /SC(NH)(NH 2 )/ 2+ and Ru /SC(NH)(NH 2 )/ 3 complexes which are unextractable by TBP-varsol. The best conditions for the ruthenium-thiourea complex formation were found to be: thiourea-ruthenium ratio (mass/mass) close to 42, at 75 0 C, 30 minutes reaction time and aging period of 60 minutes. The ruthenium decontamination factor for a single uranium extraction are ca. 80-100, not interfering with extraction of actinides. These values are rather high in comparison to those obtained using the conventional Purex Process (e.g. F.D. sub(Ru)=10). By this reason the method developed here is suitable for the treatment of spent uranium fuels. Thiourea (100g/l) scrubbing experiments of ruthenium, partially co-extracted with actinides, confirmed the possibility of its removal from the extract. A decontamination greater than 83,5% for ruthenium as fission product is obtained in two stages with this procedure. (Author) [pt

  7. Stability and modification of passive films of new PUREX-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.W.; Siemensmeyer, B.; Patzelt, T.

    1991-10-01

    The valve metals Ti, Zr and others and their alloys can be used in nitric acid solutions of the Purex process. They are protected by passive films which are stable at least at low temperatures and concentrations. Electrochemical investigations and corrosion tests are applied to check improvements of the materials. Niobium can be used to substitute the very expensive tantalum. Electrochemical and analytical investigations show the formation of the corrosion stable oxide film. Special problems are treated, such as the stability of welded joints or the influence of radioactive irradiation. α-radiation and hot atoms are simulated by ion implantation, β- and γ-radiation are simulated by laser light. In both types of experiments no decrease of stability is indicated. The alloy Ti5Ta is more stable than Ti, but it is not as good as Ta. Other alloys of Ti were investigated, but they are not suitable for the Purex process. New protection layers are tested. With respect to their preparation as well as their corrosion stability, ANOF-films are promising, but TiN-films are not stable enough. (orig.) With 71 refs., 7 tabs., 71 figs [de

  8. PUBG; purex solvent extraction process model. [IBM3033; CDC CYBER175; FORTRAN IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldard, J.F.; Beyerlein, A.L.

    PUBG is a chemical model of the Purex solvent extraction system, by which plutonium and uranium are recovered from spent nuclear fuel rods. The system comprises a number of mixer-settler banks. This discrete stage structure is the basis of the algorithms used in PUBG. The stages are connected to provide for countercurrent flow of the aqueous and organic phases. PUBG uses the common convention that has the aqueous phase enter at the lowest numbered stage and exit at the highest one; the organic phase flows oppositely. The volumes of the mixers are smaller than those of the settlers. The mixers generate a fine dispersion of one phase in the other. The high interfacial area is intended to provide for rapid mass transfer of the plutonium and uranium from one phase to the other. The separation of this dispersion back into the two phases occurs in the settlers. The species considered by PUBG are Hydrogen (1+), Plutonium (4+), Uranyl Oxide (2+), Plutonium (3+), Nitrate Anion, and reductant in the aqueous phase and Hydrogen (1+), Uranyl Oxide (2+), Plutonium (4+), and TBP (tri-n-butylphosphate) in the organic phase. The reductant used in the Purex process is either Uranium (4+) or HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate).IBM3033;CDC CYBER175; FORTRAN IV; OS/MVS or OS/MVT (IBM3033), NOS 1.3 (CDC CYBER175); The IBM3033 version requires 150K bytes of memory for execution; 62,000 (octal) words are required by the CDC CYBER175 version..

  9. Cement waste form qualification report: WVDP [West Valley Demonstration Project] PUREX decontaminated supernatant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVay, C.W.; Stimmel, J.R.; Marchetti, S.

    1988-08-01

    This report provides a summary of work performed to develop a cement-based, low-level waste formulation suitable for the solidification of decontaminated high-level waste liquid produced as a by-product of PUREX spent fuel reprocessing. The resultant waste form is suitable for interim storage and is intended for ultimate disposal as low-level Class C waste; it also meets the stability requirements of the NRC Branch Technical Position on Waste Form Qualification, May 1983 and the requirements of 10 CFR 61. A recipe was developed utilizing only Portland Type I cement based on an inorganic salts simulant of the PUREX supernatant. The qualified recipe was tested full scale in the production facility and was observed to produce a product with entrained air, low density, and lower-than-expected compressive strength. Further laboratory scale testing with actual decontaminated supernatant revealed that set retarders were present in the supernatant, precluding setting of the product and allowing the production of ''bleed water.'' Calcium nitrate and sodium silicate were added to overcome the set retarding effect and produced a final product with improved performance when compared to the original formulation. This report describes the qualification process and qualification test results for the final product formulation. 7 refs., 38 figs., 21 tabs

  10. Plutonium Plant, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, J.S.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    The journey of Indian nuclear fuel reprocessing started with the commissioning of Plutonium Plant (PP) at Trombay on 22"n"d January, 1965 with an aim to reprocess the spent fuel from research reactor CIRUS. The basic process chosen for the plant was Plutonium Uranium Reduction EXtraction (PUREX) process. In seventies, the plant was subjected to major design modifications and replacement of hardware, which later met the additional demand from research reactor DHRUVA. The augmented plutonium plant has been operating since 1983. Experience gained from this plant was very much helpful to design future reprocessing plant in the country

  11. Base case industrial reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This paper briefly describes an industrial scale plant for reprocessing thermal oxide fuel. This description was used as a base case by the Group for their later assessments and for comparing actual national plans for reprocessing plants. The plant described uses the Purex process and assumes an annual throughput of 1000 t/U. The maintenance, safety and safeguards philosophy is described. An indication of the construction schedule and capital and operating costs is also given

  12. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, Annex 2: Chemical-technology study of the modified 'Purex' process Chemical and radiochemical control analyses; Prerada isluzenog nuklearnog goriva, Prilog 2: Hemijsko tehnolosko ispitivanje modifikovanog 'purex' procesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za hemiju visoke aktivnosti, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-12-15

    The objective of this task was testing of the modified purex process in the constructed separation cell, and verification of the reliability and efficiency of the process. Extractors used were 1BX, 1BS and 1C. testing was done with syntetic solutions.

  13. Gossip: Gaseous pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffeman, E. N.

    2007-12-01

    Several years ago a revolutionary miniature TPC was developed using a pixel chip with a Micromegas foil spanned over it. To overcome the mechanical stability problems and improve the positioning accuracy while spanning a foil on top of a small readout chip a process has been developed in which a Micromegas-like grid is applied on a CMOS wafer in a post-processing step. This aluminum grid is supported on insulating pillars that are created by etching after the grid has been made. The energy resolution (measured on the absorption of the X-rays from a 55Fe source) was remarkably good. Several geometries have since been tested and we now believe that a Gas On Slimmed Silicon Pixel chip' (Gossip) may be realized. The drift region of such a gaseous pixel detector would be reduced to a millimeter. Such a detector is potentially very radiation hard (SLHC vertexing) but aging and sparking must be eliminated.

  14. Gossip: Gaseous pixels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffeman, E.N. [Nikhef, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: d77@nikhef.nl

    2007-12-01

    Several years ago a revolutionary miniature TPC was developed using a pixel chip with a Micromegas foil spanned over it. To overcome the mechanical stability problems and improve the positioning accuracy while spanning a foil on top of a small readout chip a process has been developed in which a Micromegas-like grid is applied on a CMOS wafer in a post-processing step. This aluminum grid is supported on insulating pillars that are created by etching after the grid has been made. The energy resolution (measured on the absorption of the X-rays from a {sup 55}Fe source) was remarkably good. Several geometries have since been tested and we now believe that a Gas On Slimmed Silicon Pixel chip' (Gossip) may be realized. The drift region of such a gaseous pixel detector would be reduced to a millimeter. Such a detector is potentially very radiation hard (SLHC vertexing) but aging and sparking must be eliminated.

  15. Gossip: Gaseous pixels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffeman, E.N.

    2007-01-01

    Several years ago a revolutionary miniature TPC was developed using a pixel chip with a Micromegas foil spanned over it. To overcome the mechanical stability problems and improve the positioning accuracy while spanning a foil on top of a small readout chip a process has been developed in which a Micromegas-like grid is applied on a CMOS wafer in a post-processing step. This aluminum grid is supported on insulating pillars that are created by etching after the grid has been made. The energy resolution (measured on the absorption of the X-rays from a 55 Fe source) was remarkably good. Several geometries have since been tested and we now believe that a Gas On Slimmed Silicon Pixel chip' (Gossip) may be realized. The drift region of such a gaseous pixel detector would be reduced to a millimeter. Such a detector is potentially very radiation hard (SLHC vertexing) but aging and sparking must be eliminated

  16. Hydrogenating gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolardot, P L.F.

    1930-08-06

    Gaseous hydrocarbons obtained by the destructive distillation of carbonaceous materials are simultaneously desulfurized and hydrogenated by passing them at 350 to 500/sup 0/C, mixed with carbon monoxide and water vapor over lime mixed with metallic oxides present in sufficient amount to absorb the carbon dioxide as it is formed. Oxides of iron, copper, silver, cobalt, and metals of the rare earths may be used and are mixed with the lime to form a filling material of small pieces filling the reaction vessel which may have walls metallized with copper and zinc dust. The products are condensed and fixed with absorbents, e.g. oils, activated carbon, silica gels. The metallic masses may be regenerated by a hot air stream and by heating in inert gases.

  17. Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact

  18. Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact.

  19. Removal of radionuclides from radioactive effluents of Purex origin using biomass banana pith as sorbant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Kannan, R.; Das, S.K.; Naik, P.W.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Kansra, V.P.; Balu, K.

    1998-06-01

    Investigations have been carried out on the applicability of dried banana pith (inner stem) for the sorption of various radionuclides viz. U, Pu, 241 Am, 144 Ce, 147 Pm, 152+154 Eu and 137 Cs which are generally present at trace level in Purex process waste effluents. The sorption of trivalent radionuclides as well as tetravalent plutonium was found to be high at pH 2, whereas sorption of uranium was found to be maximum at pH 6. Cesium was not found to be sorbed. 241 Am sorption was investigated in detail as a representative element of trivalent actinides and fission products to study the general trend. Though its sorption was kinetically slow, near-quantitative sorption was observed on prolonged contact. 241 Am sorption was studied in presence of NaNO 3 (up to 1 M) and Nd(III) up to 500 mg/l. Whereas no significant change in distribution ratios (D) was observed in the presence of NaNO 3 , it increased with neodymium concentration in the range tested. This indicates the effectiveness of the biomass as sorbent even in presence of sodium salts. Sorbed metal ions could be recovered by leaching with 2 M nitric acid. The dried biomass samples prepared from different sources were found to be stable for months and gave similar results on testing. The biomass was tested for its applicability for sorbing radionuclides present in Purex evaporator condensate and diluted high level waste solution on once through basis. The sorption capacity of banana pith for trivalent actinide-lanthanide is in the range of 60 mg/g banana pith. The results indicate that the biomass can be used effectively for the treatment of Purex Waste effluents for the removal of strontium, tri- and tetravalent actinides and fission products. The biomass was also tested for the sorption of toxic metal ions viz. Sr, Hg, Pb, Cr, Cd, and As from a nitrate solution at pH 2 and 4. D values followed the order Hg>Sr>Cd>Pb at pH 2, with Cr and As showing no uptake. These results indicate the potential of this

  20. Gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi.

    1992-01-01

    In a gaseous waste processing device, if activated carbon is charged uniformly to a holdup tower, the amount of radioactive rare gases held in a first tower at the uppermost stream is increased to greater than that in other towers at the downstream since the radioactive rare gases decay in the form of an exponential function. Then in the present invention, the entire length of a plurality of activated carbon holdup towers connected in series is made longer than that of the towers in the downstream. As a result, since the amount of radioactive rare gases held in each of the holdup towers is made uniform, even if any one of connecting pipelines is ruptured, the amount of radioactive rare gases flown out is uniform. Only the body length of the holdup tower is changed because it is economical in view of the design and the manufacture of the vessel, and the cross section of the portion in which activated carbons are filled is made identical to keep the optimum flow rate of the rare gases. Thus, the radioactivity releasing amount can be minimized upon occurrence of an accident. (N.H.)

  1. On the identification of complexing radiolysis products in the Purex system. (20%TBP - Dodecane - HNO3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.; Baumgartner, F.; Steiglitz, L.

    1978-09-01

    The lifetime of the extraction system TBP Dodecane-aqueous HNO. In the Purex process is limited by radiolytic and hydrolytic decomposition of the extracting and diluting agent which is indicated by an increased retention of fission products, especially zirconium. In this work, the radiolytically formed complexing agents responsible for this are enriched (molecular distillation) and separated in several fractions by liquid chromatography. The chemical composition of these fractions was identified by a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, supplemented by infra-red spectroscopy. As for doubtful complexing agents, they are mainly long-chain phosphoric acid esters, and, to a lesser extent, the existence of polycarbonyl compounds is suspected. The high molecular weight components of the phosphate ester fraction could be separated by gas chromatography and identified as oligomeric phosphate esters. (author)

  2. Potentiometric determination of uranium in simulated Purex Process solutions by acidiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, V.H.; Matsuda, H.T.; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1983-01-01

    A potentiometric methods for sequential free acidity and uranium determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is described. An oxalate solution or a mixture of fluoride-oxalate pellets were used as complexing agent for free titration. Following this first equivalent point, uranium is determined-by indirect titration of H + liberated in the peruanate reaction. Some elements present in the standard fuel elements with a burn-up of 33.000 Mwd/t, neutron flux of 3,2 x 10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 and cooling time of two years were considered as interfering elements in uranium analyses. As a substitute of Pu-IV, Th(NO 3 ) 4 solution was used. The method can be applied to aqueous and organic (TBP/diluent) solutions with 2% precision and 2% accuracy. (Autor) [pt

  3. The study of reductive reextraction of plutonium in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poczynajlo, A.

    1985-01-01

    The methods of separation of U and Pu in the Purex process and the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of Pu(4) reductants are discussed. The kinetic equation of the process of reductive reextraction of plutonium for the first order reaction with respect to Pu(4) is derived. The kinetics of plutonium reextraction with the use of uranium (4), ascorbic acid and other reductants has been studied. The necessity of application of the stoichiometric excess of reductant has been explained by simultaneously occured reoxidation process of plutonium. The method of calculation of the steady- state plutonium concentration profiles has been elaborated for counter-current separation of U and Pu in multistage contactor. 90 refs., 20 tabs., 29 figs. (author)

  4. Potentiometric determination of uranium in simulated Purex Process solutions by acidiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, V H; Matsuda, H T; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1984-01-01

    A potentiometric methods for sequential free acidity and uranium determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is described. An oxalate solution or a mixture of fluoride-oxalate pellets were used as complexing agent for free titration. Following this first equivalent point, uranium is determined-by indirect titration of H/sup +/ liberated in the peruanate reaction. Some elements present in the standard fuel elements with a burn-up of 33.000 Mwd/t, neutron flux of 3,2 x 10/sup 13/n.cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/ and cooling time of two years were considered as interfering elements in uranium analyses. As a substitute of Pu-IV, Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ solution was used. The method can be applied to aqueous and organic (TBP/diluent) solutions with 2% precision and 2% accuracy. (Autor).

  5. Separation of neptunium from uranium and plutonium in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolarik, Z.; Schuler, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of removing neptunium from the Purex process in the first extraction cycle was investigated. Butyraldehyde was found to reduce Np(VI) to Np(V), but not Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Up to 99.7% Np can be separated from uranium and plutonium in the 1A extractor or, much more favourably, in an additional partitioning extractor. Hydroxylamine nitrate can be used for reducing Np(VI) to Np(V) in a uranium purification cycle at a high U concentration in the feed solution. Here the decontamination factor for Np can be as high as 2300 and is lowered if iron is present in the feed. (author)

  6. Counter-current extraction studies for the recovery of neptunium by the Purex process. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, N.; Nadkarni, M. N.; Kumar, S. V.; Kartha, P. K.S.; Sonavane, R. R.; Ramaniah, M. V.; Patil, S. K.

    1974-07-01

    Counter-extraction experiments were carried out under the conditions relevant to the partitioning column (IBX) in the purex process to know the path of neptunium present as Np (VI) the organic phase during the partitioning step. The results obtained show that when ferrous sulphamates is used as the reducing agent, most of the neptunium continues to remain with uranium in the organic stream while with hydrazine stabilized uranous nitrate as the reducing agent, a major fraction of neptunium follows the aqueous stream. Mixer-settler experiments were also carried out under the conditions relevant to the uranium purification cycle (2D) to establish the conditions for forcing neptunium to the aqueous raffinate or for partitioning it from uranium if both neptunium and uranium are co-extracted in this cycle and the results obtained are reported here. (auth)

  7. The Necessary and Sufficient Closure Process Completion Report for Purex FacilitySurveillance and Maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerald, J.W.

    1997-10-01

    This document completes the U.S. Department of Energy Closure Process for Necessary and Sufficient Sets of Standards process for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction facility located at the Hanford Site in Washington State. This documentation is provided to support the Work Smart Standards set identified for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of PUREX. This report is organized into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the following sections: Section 1: Provides an introduction for the document Section 2: Provides a basis for initiating the N ampersand S process Section 3: Defines the work and hazards to be addressed Section 4: Identifies the N ampersand S set of standards and requirements Section 5: Provides the justification for adequacy of the work smart standards Section 6: Shows the criteria and qualifications of the teams Section 7: Describes the stakeholder participation and concerns Section 8: Provides a list of references used within the document

  8. The isolation of lutetium from gadolinium contained in Purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, D.T.; Vick, D.O.; May, M.P.; Walker, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    A chemical separation procedure has been devised to isolate Lu from Purex dissolver solutions containing the neutron poison, Gd. The isolation procedure involves the removal of U and >Pu from a dissolver solution using tributylphosphate solvent extraction. If required, solvent extraction using di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid can be employed to further purify the sample be removing alkali and alkali earth elements. Finally, Lu is chromatographically separated from Gd and rare earth fission products on a Dowex 50W-X8 resin column using an alpha-hydroxyisobutyrate eluant. The success of the chemical separation procedure has been demonstrated in the quantitative recovery of as little as 1.4 ng Lu from solutions containing a 5000-fold excess of Gd. Additionally, Lu has been isolated from synthetic dissolver samples containing U, Ba, Cs, and Gd. Thermal emission MS data indicated that the Lu fraction of the synthetic sample was free of Gd interference

  9. DIST: a computer code system for calculation of distribution ratios of solutes in the purex system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachimori, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-05-01

    Purex is a solvent extraction process for reprocessing the spent nuclear fuel using tri n-butylphosphate (TBP). A computer code system DIST has been developed to calculate distribution ratios for the major solutes in the Purex process. The DIST system is composed of database storing experimental distribution data of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(VI), HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 2}: DISTEX and of Zr(IV), Tc(VII): DISTEXFP and calculation programs to calculate distribution ratios of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(VI), HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 2}(DIST1), and Zr(IV), Tc(VII)(DITS2). The DIST1 and DIST2 determine, by the best-fit procedures, the most appropriate values of many parameters put on empirical equations by using the DISTEX data which fulfill the assigned conditions and are applied to calculate distribution ratios of the respective solutes. Approximately 5,000 data were stored in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP. In the present report, the following items are described, 1) specific features of DIST1 and DIST2 codes and the examples of calculation 2) explanation of databases, DISTEX, DISTEXFP and a program DISTIN, which manages the data in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP by functions as input, search, correction and delete. and at the annex, 3) programs of DIST1, DIST2, and figure-drawing programs DIST1G and DIST2G 4) user manual for DISTIN. 5) source programs of DIST1 and DIST2. 6) the experimental data stored in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP. (author). 122 refs.

  10. Gaseous radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To prevent explosion of hydrogen gas within gaseous radioactive waste by removing the hydrogen gas by means of a hydrogen absorber. Structure: A coolant extracted from a reactor cooling system is sprayed by nozzle into a gaseous phase (hydrogen) portion within a tank, thus causing slipping of radioactive rare gas. The gaseous radioactive waste rich in hydrogen, which is purged in the tank, is forced by a waste gas compressor into a hydrogen occlusion device. The hydrogen occlusion device is filled with hydrogen occluding agents such as Mg, Mg-Ni alloy, V-Nb alloy, La-Ni alloy and so forth, and hydrogen in the waste gas is removed through reaction to produce hydrogen metal. The gaseous radioactive waste, which is deprived of hydrogen and reduced in volume, is stored in an attenuation tank. The hydrogen stored in the hydrogen absorber is released and used again as purge gas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  11. Dielectrophoretic separation of gaseous isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for the separation of gaseous isotopes by electrophoresis assisted by convective countercurrent flow and to an apparatus for use in the process. The invention is especially applicable to heavy water separation from steam; however, it is to be understood that the invention is broadly applicable to the separation of gaseous isotopes having different dipole moments and/or different molecular weights. (author)

  12. Monitoring of releases from an irradiated fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1978-01-01

    At its UP 2 plant, the La Hague facility reprocesses irradiated fuel by the PUREX process. The fuel stems from graphite/gas, natural-uranium reactors and pressurized or boiling water enriched-uranium reactors. The gaseous effluents are collected and purified by high-efficiency washing and filtration. After purification the gas stream is discharged into the atmosphere by a single stack, 100m high and 6m in diameter, located at a high point on the site (184m). The radionuclides released into the air are: krypton-85, iodine-129 and -131, and tritium. The liquid effluents are collected by drainage systems, which transfer them to the effluent treatment station in the case of active or suspect solutions. Active solutions undergo treatment by chemical and physical processes. After purification the waste water is released into the sea by an underwater drainage system 5km long, which brings the outlet point into the middle of a tidal current 2km offshore. The radionuclides contained in the purified waste water are fission products originating from irradiated fuels in only slightly variable proportions, in which ruthenium-rhodium-106 predominates. Traces of the transuranium elements are also found in these solutions

  13. Analytical control of reducing agents on uranium/plutonium partitioning at purex process; Controle analitico dos agentes redutores na particao uranio/plutonio no processo purex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Izilda da Cruz de

    1995-07-01

    Spectrophotometric methods for uranium (IV), hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and its decomposition product hydrazoic acid(HN{sub 3}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2} OH) determinations were developed aiming their applications for the process control of CELESTE I installation at IPEN/CNEN-SP. These compounds are normally present in the U/Pu partitioning phase of the spent nuclear treatment via PUREX process. The direct spectrophotometry was used for uranium (IV) analysis in nitric acid-hydrazine solutions based on the absorption measurement at 648 nm. The azomethine compound formed by reaction of hydrazine and p-dimethylamine benzaldehyde with maximum absorption at 457 nm was the basis for the specific analytical method for hydrazine determination. The hydrazoic acid analysis was performed indirectly by its conversion into ferric azide complex with maximum absorption at 465 nm. The hydroxylamine detection was accomplished based on its selective oxidation to nitrous acid which is easily analyzed by the reaction with Griess reagent. The resulted azocompound gas a maximum absorption at 520 nm. The sensibility of 1,4x10{sup -6}M for U(IV) with 0,8% of precision, 1,6x10{sup -6}M for hydrazine with 0,8% of precision, 2,3x10{sup -6}M hydrazoic acid with 0,9% of precision and 2,5x10{sup -6}M for hydroxylamine with 0,8% of precision were achieved. The interference studies have shown that each reducing agent can be determined in the presence of each other without any interference. Uranium(VI) and plutonium have also shown no interference in these analysis. The established methods were adapted to run inside glove-boxes by using an optical fiber colorimetry and applied to process control of the CELESTE I installation. The results pointed out that the methods are reliable and safety in order to provide just-in-time information about process conditions. (author)

  14. Independent Technical Review Of The Focused Feasibility Study And Proposed Plan For Designated Solid Waste Management Units Contributing To The Southwest Groundwater Plume At The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  15. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  16. Tc-99 Decontamination From Heat Treated Gaseous Diffusion Membrane -Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duignan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-03-13

    Uranium gaseous diffusion cascades represent a significant environmental challenge to dismantle, containerize and dispose as low-level radioactive waste. Baseline technologies rely on manual manipulations involving direct access to technetium-contaminated piping and materials. There is a potential to utilize novel thermal decontamination technologies to remove the technetium and allow for on-site disposal of the very large uranium converters. Technetium entered these gaseous diffusion cascades as a hexafluoride complex in the same fashion as uranium. Technetium, as the isotope Tc-99, is an impurity that follows uranium in the first cycle of the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) process. The technetium speciation or exact form in the gas diffusion cascades is not well defined. Several forms of Tc-99 compounds, mostly the fluorinated technetium compounds with varying degrees of volatility have been speculated by the scientific community to be present in these cascades. Therefore, there may be a possibility of using thermal desorption, which is independent of the technetium oxidation states, to perform an in situ removal of the technetium as a volatile species and trap the radionuclide on sorbent traps which could be disposed as low-level waste.

  17. Nuclear criticality safety aspects of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in the diffusion cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffer, J.E. [Parallax, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This paper determines the nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in the current Gaseous Diffusion Cascade and auxiliary systems. The actual plant safety system settings for pressure trip points are used to determine the maximum amount of HF moderation in the process gas, as well as the corresponding atomic number densities. These inputs are used in KENO V.a criticality safety models which are sized to the actual plant equipment. The ENO V.a calculation results confirm nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in plant operations..

  18. Nuclear criticality safety aspects of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) in the diffusion cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    This paper determines the nuclear safety of gaseous UF 6 in the current Gaseous Diffusion Cascade and auxiliary systems. The actual plant safety system settings for pressure trip points are used to determine the maximum amount of HF moderation in the process gas, as well as the corresponding atomic number densities. These inputs are used in KENO V.a criticality safety models which are sized to the actual plant equipment. The ENO V.a calculation results confirm nuclear safety of gaseous UF 6 in plant operations

  19. An introduction to technetium in the gaseous diffusion cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, D.W.

    1996-09-01

    The radioisotope technetium-99 ( 99 Tc) was introduced into the gaseous diffusion plants (GDP) as a contaminant in uranium that had been reprocessed from spent nuclear reactor fuel. 99 Tc is a product of the nuclear fission of uranium-235 ( 235 U). The significantly higher emitted radioactivity of 99 Tc generates concern in the enrichment complex and warrants increased attention (1) to the control of all site emissions, (2) to worker exposures and contamination control when process equipment requires disassembly and decontamination, and (3) to product purity when the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) product is marketed to the private sector. A total of 101,268 metric tons of RU (∼96% of the total) was fed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) between FY1953 and FY1976. An additional 5600 metric tons of RU from the government reactors were fed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), plus an approximate 500 tons of foreign reactor returns. Only a small amount of RU was fed directly at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The slightly enriched PGDP product was then fed to either the ORGDP or PORTS cascades for final enrichment. Bailey estimated in 1988 that of the 606 kg of Tc received at PGDP from RU, 121 kg was subsequently re-fed to ORGDP and 85 kg re-fed to PORTS

  20. Prefiltration of gaseous effluents in plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot, G.; Pourprix, M.

    1991-01-01

    The dismantling techniques and mainly the thermal cutting tools can create large amounts of airbone dust, possibly contaminated in the case of the cutting of radioactive materials. Among the secondary solid emissions, the aerosols constitute the most mobile part which can disseminate contamination in the cell where the cutting operation takes place and in the ventilation ducts up to the HEPA filters. An optimised prefiltration coupled with a captation device at the aerosol generating source allows to avoid the dissemination of the contamination, to increase the life of HEPA filters and thus to reduce the amount of solid wastes. The object in this work was to select one or several cleaning devices, selection that can be done from the knowledge of the physico-chemical characteristics of the gas and aerosols to deal with, the available cleaning devices and the implied facility

  1. Gaseous emissions from coal stockpiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Stockpiled coal undergoes atmospheric oxidation and desorption processes during open air storage. These processes release gases to the environment which may effect health and safety by their toxicity and flammability. In extreme cases, this could lead to a fire. This report discusses gaseous emissions from coal stockpiles. It covers gas emission mechanisms, and gas sampling and testing methods, before examining in more detail the principal gases that have been emitted. It concludes that there is limited research in this area and more data are needed to evaluate the risks of gaseous emissions. Some methods used to prevent coal self-heating and spontaneous combustion can be applied to reduce emissions from coal stockpiles.

  2. Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This document provides a plan for implementing surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) activities to ensure the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility is maintained in a safe, environmentally secure, and cost-effective manner until subsequent closure during the final disposition phase of decommissioning. This plan has been prepared in accordance with the guidelines provided in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) Decommissioning Resource Manual (DOE/EM-0246) (DOE 1995), and Section 8.6 of TPA change form P-08-97-01 to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology, et al. 1996). Specific objectives of the S ampersand M program are: Ensure adequate containment of remaining radioactive and hazardous material. Provide security control for access into the facility and physical safety to surveillance personnel. Maintain the facility in a manner that will minimize potential hazards to the public, the environment, and surveillance personnel. Provide a plan for the identification and compliance with applicable environmental, safety, health, safeguards, and security requirements

  3. NMR characterization of segmental dynamics in poly(alkyl methacrylate) using CODEX and PUREX exchange techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker-Guedes, Fabio; Azevedo, Eduardo R. de; Bonagamba, Tito J.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Slow side group dynamics in a series of five poly(alkyl methacrylate)s with varying side group sizes (PMAA, PMMA, PEMA, PiBMA, and PcHMA, with -H, -CH 3 , -CH 2 CH 3 , -CH 2 CH(CH 3 ) 2 , and -cyclohexyl alkyl substituents, respectively) have been studied quantitatively by center band-only detection of exchange (CODEX) and pure exchange (PUREX) 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Flips and small-angle motions of the ester groups associated with the β-relaxation are observed distinctly, and the fraction of slowly flipping groups has been measured with 3% precision. In PMMA, 34% of side groups flip, while the fraction is 31% in PEMA at 25 C. Even the large isobutyl ether and cyclohexylester side groups can flip in the glassy state, although the flipping fraction is reduced to 22% and ∼10%, respectively. In poly methacrylic acid, no slow side group flips are detected. In PMMA, the flipping fraction is temperature-independent between 25 C and 80 C, while in Pemal it increases continuously from 31 to 60% between 25 C and 60 C. A similar doubling is also observed in Pi BMA. (author)

  4. Investigation on clean-up of Zr and HDBP in PUREX process with UDMH oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Youzhi; Wang Xuanjun; Li Zhengli; Liu Xiangxuan

    2007-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the interracial crud formation is related to the complex formation of Zr with degradation products of TBP, such as DBP and MBP, in PUREX process, especially in the first cycle. The crud seriously deteriorates the operation of extraction column and therefore must be properly cleared up. Various clear up methods were studied and those with salt-free washing agents were recently focused. In this paper a new scrubbing agent 1,1- dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) oxalate was proposed, the optimized experimental conditions were described, and the possible mechanism was discussed. The influence of different factors, including reaction temperature, UDMH oxalate concentration, organic-to-aqueous phase ratio, and free UDMH concentration, on the decontamination factors were examined with simulated Zr- and/or DBP-loaded solvents. The optical experimental parameters are found as follows: temperature 40-60 degree C, phase ratio V (o) /V (a) =1, concentration of UDMH oxalate solution 0.4-0.6 mol/L. Especialy some UDMH was added into the UDMH oxalate queues solution to make the concentration of free UDMH 0.2-0.3 mol/L. Under these conditions, the decontaminator factor of Zr from the corresponding simulated solvent with UDMH oxalate is up to 143, slightly higher than that with sodium carbonate. The decontamination factor of HDBP from the corresponding simulated solvent with UDMH oxalate is up to 100, similar to sodium carbonate. (authors)

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of dissolved tri n-butyl phosphate in aqueous streams of Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, S.; Velavendan, P.; Pandey, N.K.; Ahmed, M.K.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Natarajan, R.

    2012-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method is developed for the determination of dissolved tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) in aqueous streams of Purex process used in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The method is based on the formation of phosphomolybdate with added ammonium molybdate followed by reduction with hydrazine sulphate in acid medium. Orthophosphate and molybdate ions combine in acidic solution to give molybdophosphoric (phosphomolybdic) acid, which upon selective reduction (with hydrazinium sulphate) produces a blue colour, due to molybdenum blue. The intensity of blue colour is proportional to the amount of phosphate. If the acidity at the time of reduction is 0.5 M in sulphuric acid and hydrazinium sulphate is the reductant, the resulting blue complex exhibits maximum absorption at 810-840 nm. The system obeys Lambert-Beer's law at 830 nm in the concentration range of 0.1-1.0 μg/mol of phosphate. Molar Absorptivity was determined to be 3.1 x 10 4 L mol -1 cm -1 at 830 nm. The results obtained are reproducible with standard deviation of 1 % and relative error less than 2 % and are in good agreement with those obtained by ion chromatographic technique. (author)

  6. Simplified nuclear fuel reprocessing flowsheet: a single-cycle Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montuir, M.; Dinh, B.; Baron, P.

    2004-01-01

    A simplified flowsheet with only one purification cycle instead of three is proposed for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel using the Purex process. A single-cycle flowsheet minimizes the process equipment required, the number of control points before transfer between process units, and the solvent and effluent quantities. For the uranium stream, an alpha barrier is used to strip any residual contaminants (Np, Th, Pu) from the uranium-loaded solvent. This additional step eliminates the need for a second uranium cycle. For the plutonium stream, an additional βγ co-decontamination step and a higher plutonium concentration are required before the oxalate conversion step; a plutonium 'half-cycle' is added downstream. The unloaded solvent from this half-cycle is returned to the selective plutonium stripping step, allowing significant plutonium half-cycle losses. It should be possible to reduce the number of stages in the half-cycle extraction step by recycling the raffinate to the upstream separation process. (authors)

  7. Characteristics and mechanism of explosive reactions of Purex solvents with Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Teijiro [Radiation Application Development Association, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Takada, Junichi; Koike, Tadao; Tsukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Koji [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ida, Masaaki [JGC PLANTECH CO., LTD (Japan); Nakagiri, Naotaka [JGC Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, Gunji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    This investigation was undertaken to make clear the energetic properties and mechanism of explosive decomposition of Purex solvent systems (TBP/n-Dodecane/HNO{sub 3}) by Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures using a calorimetric technique (DSC, ARC) and a chromatographic technique (GC, GC/MS). The measurement of exothermic events of solvent-HNO{sub 3} reactions using DSC with a stainless steel sealed cell showed distinct two peaks with maxima at around 170 and 320degC, respectively. The peak at around 170degC was mainly attributed to the reactions of dealkylation products (n-butyl nitrate) of TBP and the solvent with nitric acid, and the peak at around 320degC was attributed to the exothermic decomposition of nitrated dodecanes formed in the foregoing exothermic reaction of dodecane with nitric acid. By using the data obtained in ARC experiments, activation energies of 123.2 and 152.5 kJ/mol were determined for the exothermic reaction of TBP with nitric acid and for the exothermic pyrolysis of n-butyl nitrate, respectively. Some possible pathways were considered for the explosive decomposition of TBP by nitric acid at elevated temperatures. (author)

  8. Dielectrophoretic separation of gaseous isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.B.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous isotopes are separated from a mixture in a vertically elongated chamber by subjecting the mixture to a nonuniform transverse electric field. Dielectrophoretic separation of the isotopes is effected, producing a transverse temperature gradient in the chamber, thereby enhancing the separation by convective countercurrent flow. In the example given, the process and apparatus are applied to the production of heavy water from steam

  9. Stress corrosion in gaseous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, Dominique.

    1980-06-01

    The combined influences of a stress and a gaseous environment on materials can lead to brittleness and to unexpected delayed failure by stress corrosion cracking, fatigue cracking and creep. The most important parameters affering the material, the environment, the chemical reaction and the stress are emphasized and experimental works are described. Some trends for further research are given [fr

  10. Examination of vegetation around a nuclear plant emitting gaseous fluorides in order to detect fluorine pollution; Utilisation des vegetaux pour detecter la pollution fluoree autour d'une usine susceptible d'emettre des effluents gazeux fluores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teulon, Francoise; Bonnaventure, J. P. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Centre de Pierrelatte, Section de Protection contre les Radiations (France)

    1971-08-15

    Fluorine pollution (chronic or occasional) around a plant rejecting gaseous fluoride effluents can be detected from vegetation samples by chemical analysis. Systematic monitoring allows the effects and gravity of the pollution to be estimated. The analytical method used consists of a double distillation (in phosphoric acid and perchloric acid) followed by a spectro-colorimetric analysis (alizarine-complexon-lanthane). This method of control allows both the efficiency of the trapping installations and also the appearance of effluents at unexpected places to be checked, In the event of an accident it is possible to determine the advisability of prohibiting the consumption of locally grown produce by humans or fodder by cattle. Research conducted in order to determine the relation between visible, damage to certain vegetables (tomatoes, haricot beans and sorghum) and their fluorine contents demonstrated that such a relation appears above all at the level of the leaves; chemical analysis may thus be used to confirm or reject information obtained on the basis of visual evidence [French] La detection d'une pollution fluoree (chronique ou accidentelle) autour d'une usine susceptible d'emettre des effluents gazeux fluores peut etre avantageusement realisee par un reseau de prelevements vegetaux suivis de dosages chimiques. Une surveillance systematique permet une evaluation des consequences et du degre de gravite de la pollution. La methode d'analyse consiste en une double distillation (dans l'acide phosphorique et l'acide perchlorique) suivie d'une spectrocolorimetrie (alizarine-complexon-lanthane). Ce mode de controle permet non seulement de verifier si les installations de piegeage sont efficaces mais egalement de localiser des points d'emission imprevus. En cas d'accident, on peut egalement juger de l'opportunite d'interdire la consommation des legumes par les habitants ou du fourrage par le betail des environs. Enfin, des etudes experimentales ont ete realisees pour

  11. TC-99 Decontaminant from heat treated gaseous diffusion membrane -Phase I, Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duignan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-01

    Uranium gaseous diffusion cascades represent a significant environmental challenge to dismantle, containerize and dispose as low-level radioactive waste. Baseline technologies rely on manual manipulations involving direct access to technetium-contaminated piping and materials. There is a potential to utilize novel decontamination technologies to remove the technetium and allow for on-site disposal of the very large uranium converters. Technetium entered these gaseous diffusion cascades as a hexafluoride complex in the same fashion as uranium. Technetium, as the isotope Tc-99, is an impurity that follows uranium in the first cycle of the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) process. The technetium speciation or exact form in the gaseous diffusion cascades is not well defined. Several forms of Tc-99 compounds, mostly the fluorinated technetium compounds with varying degrees of volatility have been speculated by the scientific community to be present in these cascades. Therefore, there may be a possibility of using thermal or leaching desorption, which is independent of the technetium oxidation states, to perform an insitu removal of the technetium as a volatile species and trap the radionuclide on sorbent traps which could be disposed as low-level waste. Based on the positive results of the first part of this work1 the use of steam as a thermal decontamination agent was further explored with a second piece of used barrier material from a different location. This new series of tests included exposing more of the material surface to the flow of high temperature steam through the change in the reactor design, subjecting it to alternating periods of stream and vacuum, as well as determining if a lower temperature steam, i.e., 121°C (250°F) would be effective, too. Along with these methods, one other simpler method involving the leaching of the Tc-99 contaminated barrier material with a 1.0 M aqueous solution of ammonium carbonate, with and without sonication, was

  12. Microbial production of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hideo

    1987-10-20

    Microbial production of ethylene, isobutane and a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture was described. Microbial ethylene production was studied with Penicillium digitatum IFO 9372 and a novel pathway of the ethylene biosynthesis through alpha-ketoglutarate was proposed. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 1102 was selected for the microbial production of isobutane and the interesting actions of L-leucine and L-phenylalanine for the isobutane production were found. It was finally presented about the microbial production of a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture with Rhizopus japonicus IFO 4758 was described. A gas mixture was produced through a chemical reaction of SH compounds and some cellular component such as squalene under aerobic conditions. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 41 refs)

  13. Electron beam gaseous pollutants treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Emission of gaseous pollutants, mostly during combustion of fossil fuels, creates a threat to the environment. New, economical technologies are needed for flue gas treatment. A physico-chemical basis of the process using electron beam for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds are presented in this report. Development of the process and its upscaling has been discussed. (author)

  14. Analytical control of reducing agents on uranium/plutonium partitioning at purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Izilda da Cruz de

    1995-01-01

    Spectrophotometric methods for uranium (IV), hydrazine (N 2 H 4 ) and its decomposition product hydrazoic acid(HN 3 ), and hydroxylamine (NH 2 OH) determinations were developed aiming their applications for the process control of CELESTE I installation at IPEN/CNEN-SP. These compounds are normally present in the U/Pu partitioning phase of the spent nuclear treatment via PUREX process. The direct spectrophotometry was used for uranium (IV) analysis in nitric acid-hydrazine solutions based on the absorption measurement at 648 nm. The azomethine compound formed by reaction of hydrazine and p-dimethylamine benzaldehyde with maximum absorption at 457 nm was the basis for the specific analytical method for hydrazine determination. The hydrazoic acid analysis was performed indirectly by its conversion into ferric azide complex with maximum absorption at 465 nm. The hydroxylamine detection was accomplished based on its selective oxidation to nitrous acid which is easily analyzed by the reaction with Griess reagent. The resulted azocompound gas a maximum absorption at 520 nm. The sensibility of 1,4x10 -6 M for U(IV) with 0,8% of precision, 1,6x10 -6 M for hydrazine with 0,8% of precision, 2,3x10 -6 M hydrazoic acid with 0,9% of precision and 2,5x10 -6 M for hydroxylamine with 0,8% of precision were achieved. The interference studies have shown that each reducing agent can be determined in the presence of each other without any interference. Uranium(VI) and plutonium have also shown no interference in these analysis. The established methods were adapted to run inside glove-boxes by using an optical fiber colorimetry and applied to process control of the CELESTE I installation. The results pointed out that the methods are reliable and safety in order to provide just-in-time information about process conditions. (author)

  15. Generation of gaseous tritium standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    The determination of aqueous and non-aqueous tritium in gaseous samples is one type of determination often requested of radioanalytical laboratories. This determination can be made by introducing the sample as a gas into a sampling train containing two silica gel beds separated by.a catalytic oxidizer bed. The first bed traps tritiated water. The sample then passes into and through the oxidizer bed where non-aqueous tritium containing species are oxidized to water and other products of combustion. The second silica gel bed then traps the newly formed tritiated water. Subsequently, silica gel is removed to plastic bottles, deionized water is added, and the mixture is permitted to equilibrate. The tritium content of the equilibrium mixture is then determined by conventional liquid scintillation counting (LSC). For many years, the moisture content of inert, gaseous samples has been determined using monitors which quantitatively electrolyze the moisture present after that moisture has been absorbed by phosphorous pentoxide or other absorbents. The electrochemical reaction is quantitative and definitive, and the energy consumed during electrolysis forms the basis of the continuous display of the moisture present. This report discusses the experimental evaluation of such a monitor as the basis for a technique for conversion of small quantities of SRMs of tritiated water ( 3 HOH) into gaseous tritium standards ( 3 HH)

  16. Di-hydroxyurea-a Promising Reducing Reagent for the U/Pu split in the PUREX process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taihong, Yan; Weifang, Zheng; Guoan, Ye; Yu, Zhang; Liang, Xian; Ying, Di; Xiaoyan, Bian [Department of Radiochemistry, China Institute of Atomic Energy - CIAE, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2009-06-15

    In the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by the Purex process, the separation of U and Pu is a major stage. This is commonly achieved by a redox process, in which a reducing agent (e.g. U(IV) or (FeII)) and a stabiliser (e.g. N{sub 2}H{sub 4} or NH{sub 2}SO{sub 3}H) are added to reduce extractable Pu{sup 4+} to un-extractable Pu{sup 3+}. The stabiliser prevents the nitrous acid catalysed re-oxidation of Pu(III) back to Pu(IV). One of the key objectives is to reduce both the number of solvent extraction cycles and the waste stream volumes [1]. One option for Advanced Purex flowsheets is to adopt a new salt-free reductant in the U/Pu split. Di-hydroxyurea(DHU)-a new Reducing reagent was synthesized with tri-associated solid phosgene (Bis(trichloromethyl)Carbonate) solved in dioxane and hydroxylamine hydrochloride solved in potassium acetate solution. The Reduction of Pu(IV) by DHU was investigated using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The reduction back-extraction behavior of Pu(IV) in 30%TBP /OK was firstly investigated under conditions of different temperature, different concentration of DHU and HNO{sub 3} and various phase contract time respectively.The results showed that Pu(IV) in organic phase can be stripped rapidly to aqueous phase by DHU. Simulating the 1B contactor of the Purex process by DHU with nitric acid solution as the stripping agent,the separation factors of uranium/plutonium can reach 2.1 10{sup 4}. This indicates that DHU is a promising salt free agent for uranium/plutonium separation. (authors)

  17. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant phaseout/deactivation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.; Thompson, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The decision to cease all US Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels was made on April 28, 1992. This study provides insight into and a comparison of the management, technical, compliance, and safety strategies for deactivating the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this study is to ensure that lessons-learned and future plans are coordinated between the two facilities

  18. Crescimento e índices de troca gasosa em plantas de pepino irrigadas com água enriquecida com CO2 Growth analysis and gaseous exchange in cucumber plants irrigated with carbon dioxide enriched water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathia A.L. Canizares

    2004-12-01

    physiological indices and gaseous exchange of leaves of Japanese cucumber plants. The experimental design was of randomized blocks, with four and five replications. The treatments consisted of the hybrids Hokuho and Tsuyataro, irrigated with water enriched or not with CO2, 1‰ in the first semester and 0,25‰ in the second. Dry mass weight and leaf area presented an exponential tendency. The beginning of mass production decrease on dry matter, 63 days after transplanting date (DAT, was not possible to be observed. The growth rate and relative growth rate response of hybrid Hokuho differed between treatments, however, for hybrid Tsuyataro the response was similar. The net assimilation rate reached the pending maxim in the phase of vegetative growth and flowering, and was reduced drastically after 20 DAT for hybrid Hokuho, and after the 35 DAT for hybrid Tsuyataro. The leaf area rate from both hybrids decreases lightly during the cultivation, without differences between enriched and non enriched water after 20 DAT. The CO2 assimilation transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and water use efficiency were similar among plants irrigated with enriched and non enriched water during the first semester. Already in the second semester, higher values were observed in plants irrigated with enriched water.

  19. Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanvo, Kondo

    2017-09-01

    Gaseous detectors have played a pivotal role as tracking devices in the field of particle physics experiments for the last fifty years. Recent advances in photolithography and micro processing techniques have enabled the transition from Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and Drift Chambers to a new family of gaseous detectors refer to as Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs). MPGDs combine the basic gas amplification principle with micro-structure printed circuits to provide detectors with excellent spatial and time resolution, high rate capability, low material budget and high radiation tolerance. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEMs) is a well-established MPGD technology invented by F. Sauli at CERN in 1997 and deployed various high energy physics (HEP) and nuclear NP experiment for tracking systems of current and future NP experiments. GEM detector combines an exceptional high rate capability (1 MHz / mm2) and robustness against harsh radiation environment with excellent position and timing resolution performances. Recent breakthroughs over the past decade have allowed the possibility for large area GEMs, making them cost effective and high-performance detector candidates to play pivotal role in current and future particle physics experiments. After a brief introduction of the basic principle of GEM technology, I will give a brief overview of the GEM detectors used in particle physics experiments over the past decades and especially in the NP community at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). I will follow by a review of state of the art of the new GEM development for the next generation of colliders such as Electron Ion Collider (EIC) or High Luminosity LHC and future Nuclear Physics experiments. I will conclude with a presentation of the CERN-based RD51 collaboration established in 2008 and its major achievements regarding technological developments and applications of MPGDs.

  20. Zirconium and technetium recovery and partitioning in the presence of actinides in modified Purex process for ATW program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzekun, E.G.; Fedorov, Y.S.; Galkin, B.Y.; Lyubtsev, R.I.; Mashkin, A.N.; Mishin, E.N.; Zilberman, B.Y.

    1994-01-01

    The modified Purex process flowsheet is based on combination of all irradiated materials, their joint dissolution and reprocessing as a NPP spent fuel solution with abnormal Pu content after addition of recycled depleted U concentrate. Some groups of long-lived radionuclides could be completely recovered and localized at the stage of extraction reprocessing using 30% TBP. Studies were conducted for 10 y to develop the process for recovery, concentration, and localization of U, Pu, Np, Tc, and Zr within 1st extraction cycle. Actinides are recovered from high-level raffinate of this cycle after evaporation and feed adjustment. Results in this report show that combined deep recovery of several elements from highly irradiated materials by TBP extraction, for further transmutation, is possible. Selective stripping of Zr from solvent phase containing U, Pu, Np, and Tc is quite effective. Development of the modified Purex process is not complete; main problem to be solved should be oxide separation from the loop and permissible storage duration before reprocessing and reuse in the loop

  1. Zirconium and technetium recovery and partitioning in the presence of actinides in modified Purex process for ATW program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzekun, E.G.; Fedorov, Y.S.; Galkin, B.Y.; Lyubtsev, R.I.; Mashkin, A.N.; Mishin, E.N.; Zilberman, B.Y. [Radievyj Inst., Leningrad (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The modified Purex process flowsheet is based on combination of all irradiated materials, their joint dissolution and reprocessing as a NPP spent fuel solution with abnormal Pu content after addition of recycled depleted U concentrate. Some groups of long-lived radionuclides could be completely recovered and localized at the stage of extraction reprocessing using 30% TBP. Studies were conducted for 10 y to develop the process for recovery, concentration, and localization of U, Pu, Np, Tc, and Zr within 1st extraction cycle. Actinides are recovered from high-level raffinate of this cycle after evaporation and feed adjustment. Results in this report show that combined deep recovery of several elements from highly irradiated materials by TBP extraction, for further transmutation, is possible. Selective stripping of Zr from solvent phase containing U, Pu, Np, and Tc is quite effective. Development of the modified Purex process is not complete; main problem to be solved should be oxide separation from the loop and permissible storage duration before reprocessing and reuse in the loop.

  2. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  3. Chemical-technology investigation of modified purex process for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, Annex 1; Prilog 1: Hemijsko-tehnolosko ispitivanje modifikovanog 'purex proces' za preradu isluzenog nuklearnog goriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolic, A; Stefanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-12-15

    The objective of the task in this year was to verify the first part of the modified purex process which covers the operation of the two most important extractors HA and HS. Special attention was paid to the fact that the testing results in laboratory conditions must be identical to the results in the industrial process. The experimental part of the task was divided in the following phases: preparation of the uranium solution; preparation of the equipment; testing of the uranium extraction and nitric acid; testing the decontamination of the organic phase; testing of plutonium extraction and HNO{sub 3}. A high number of control chemical and radiochemical analyses had to be completed, as well as a number of preliminary calculations, which are presented in this report.

  4. Radiolytical oxidation of gaseous iodine by beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, Teemu; Auvinen, Ari; Kekki, Tommi; Kotiluoto, Petri; Lyyraenen, Jussi; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2015-01-01

    Iodine is one of the most radiotoxic fission product released from fuel during a severe nuclear power plant accident. Within the containment building, iodine compounds can react e.g. on the painted surfaces and form gaseous organic iodides. In this study, it was found out that gaseous methyl iodide (CH 3 I) is oxidised when exposed to beta radiation in an oxygen containing atmosphere. As a result, nucleation of aerosol particles takes place and the formation of iodine oxide particles is suggested. These particles are highly hygroscopic. They take up water from the air humidity and iodine oxides dissolve within the droplets. In order to mitigate the possible source term, it is of interest to understand the effect of beta radiation on the speciation of iodine.

  5. Radiolytical oxidation of gaseous iodine by beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, Teemu; Auvinen, Ari; Kekki, Tommi; Kotiluoto, Petri; Lyyraenen, Jussi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Jokiniemi, Jorma [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Eastern Finland Univ., Kuopio (Finland)

    2015-07-01

    Iodine is one of the most radiotoxic fission product released from fuel during a severe nuclear power plant accident. Within the containment building, iodine compounds can react e.g. on the painted surfaces and form gaseous organic iodides. In this study, it was found out that gaseous methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}I) is oxidised when exposed to beta radiation in an oxygen containing atmosphere. As a result, nucleation of aerosol particles takes place and the formation of iodine oxide particles is suggested. These particles are highly hygroscopic. They take up water from the air humidity and iodine oxides dissolve within the droplets. In order to mitigate the possible source term, it is of interest to understand the effect of beta radiation on the speciation of iodine.

  6. Trace emissions from gaseous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA) was amended in 1990 to include the development of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) for certain stationary sources by November 2000. MACT emissions standards would affect process heaters and industrial boilers since combustion processes are a potential source for many air toxins. The author noted that one of the problems with MACT is the lack of a clear solid scientific footing which is needed to develop environmentally responsible regulations. In order to amend some of these deficiencies, a 4-year, $7 million research project on the origin and fate of trace emissions in the external combustion of gaseous hydrocarbons was undertaken in a collaborative effort between government, universities and industry. This collaborative project entitled the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF) Project 92-19 produced basic information and phenomenological understanding in two important areas, one basic and one applied. The specific objectives of the project were to measure emissions while operating different full-scale burners under various operating conditions and then to analyze the emission data to identify which operating conditions lead to low air toxic emissions. Another objective was to develop new chemical kinetic mechanisms and predictive models for the formation of air toxic species which would explain the origin and fate of these species in process heaters and industrial boilers. It was determined that a flame is a very effective reactor and that trace emissions from a typical gas-fired industry burner are very small. An unexpected finding was that trace emissions are not affected by hydrocarbon gaseous fuel composition, nor by the use of ultra low nitrous oxide burners. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Gaseous phase heat capacity of benzoic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, L.M.N.B.F.; Alves da Rocha, M.A.; Gomes, L.R.; Schröder, B.; Coutinho, J.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The gaseous phase heat capacity of benzoic acid (BA) was proven using the experimental technique called the "in vacuum sublimation/vaporization Calvet microcalorimetry drop method". To overcome known experimental shortfalls, the gaseous phase heat capacity of BA monomer was estimated by ab initio

  8. Strategy and current state of research on enhanced iodine separation during spent fuel reprocessing by the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devisme, F.; Juvenelle, A.; Touron, E.

    2001-01-01

    An enhanced separation process designed to recover and purify molecular iodine desorbed during dissolution is described in the context of 129 I management in the Purex process for transmutation or interim storage. It involves reducing acid scrubbing with hydroxyl-ammonium nitrate followed by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide to obtain selective desorption. The stoichiometry and kinetics are determined for each step and an experimental validation program is now in progress using a small pilot facility equipped with a scrubbing column. The technical feasibility of the process has already been demonstrated: room-temperature scrubbing with a HAN solution (0,5 mol.L -1 ) at a pH of about 5 results in 99% iodine trapping efficiency; the subsequent desorption yield is 99,5%. (author)

  9. Strategy and current state of research on enhanced iodine separation during spent fuel reprocessing by the Purex process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devisme, F.; Juvenelle, A.; Touron, E. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, DEN/DRCP, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2001-07-01

    An enhanced separation process designed to recover and purify molecular iodine desorbed during dissolution is described in the context of {sup 129}I management in the Purex process for transmutation or interim storage. It involves reducing acid scrubbing with hydroxyl-ammonium nitrate followed by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide to obtain selective desorption. The stoichiometry and kinetics are determined for each step and an experimental validation program is now in progress using a small pilot facility equipped with a scrubbing column. The technical feasibility of the process has already been demonstrated: room-temperature scrubbing with a HAN solution (0,5 mol.L{sup -1}) at a pH of about 5 results in 99% iodine trapping efficiency; the subsequent desorption yield is 99,5%. (author)

  10. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S. G.; Roberts, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst

  11. EXTRA·M: a computing code system for analysis of the Purex process with mixer settlers for reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachimori, Shoichi

    1994-03-01

    A computer code system EXTRA·M, for simulation of transient behavior of the solutes in a multistage countercurrent extraction process, was developed aiming to predict the distribution and chemical behaviors of actinide elements, i.e., U, Pu, Np, and of technetium in the Purex process of fuel reprocessing. The mathematical model is applicable to a complete mixing stagewise contactor such as mixer settler and to the Purex, with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) and nitric acid system. The main characteristics of the EXTRA·M are as follows; i) Calculation of distribution ratios of the solutes is based on numerical equations of which parameter values are to be determined by a best fit method with a number of experimental data. ii) Total of 18 solutes; U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(V), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(V), Np(VI), Tc(IV), Tc(V), Tc(VI), Tc(VII), Zr(IV), HNO 3 , hydrazine, hydroxylamine nitrate and nitrous acid, are treated and rate equations of total 40 chemical reactions involving these solutes are incorporated. iii) Instantaneous change of flow conditions, i.e., concentration of the solutes and flow rate of the feeding solutions, is contrived by computation. iv) Reflux or bypass mode calculation, in which an aqueous raffinate stream is transferred to the preceding bank or stage, is possible. The present report explains the concept, assumptions and characteristics of the model, the material balance equations including distribution and reaction rate equations and their solution method, and the usefulness of the model by showing some examples of the verification results. A description and source program of EXTRA·M1, as an example, are listed in the annex. (J.P.N.) 63 refs

  12. Release of gaseous tritium during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, H.; Hartmann, K.

    1983-01-01

    About 50% of the tritium put through an LWR reprocessing plant is obtained as tritium-bearing water, HTO. Gaseous tritium, HT has a radiotoxicity which is by 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of HTO. A possibility for the removal of HTO could therefore be its conversion into the gas phase with subsequent emission of the HT into the atmosphere. However, model computations which are, in part, supported by experimental data reveal that the radiation exposure caused by HT release is only by about one order of magnitude below that caused by HTO. This is being attributed to the relatively quick reoxidation of HT by soil bacteria. Two alternatives for producing HT from HTO (electrolysis; voloxidation with subsequent electrolysis) are presented and compared with the reference process of deep-well injection of HTO. The authors come to the conclusion that tritium removal by HT release into the atmosphere cannot be recommended at present under either radiological or economic aspects. (orig.) [de

  13. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    In a radioactive gaseous waste processing device, a dehumidifier in which a lot of hollow thread membranes are bundled and assembled is disposed instead of a dehumidifying cooling device and a dehumidifying tower. The dehumidifier comprises a main body, a great number of hollow thread membranes incorporated in the main body, a pair of fixing members for bundling and fixing both ends of the hollow thread membranes, a pair of caps for allowing the fixing members to pass through and fixing them on both ends of the main body, an off gas flowing pipe connected to one of the caps, a gas exhaustion pipe connected to the other end of the cap and a moisture removing pipeline connected to the main body. A flowrate control valve is connected to the moisture removing pipeline, and the other end of the moisture removing pipeline is connected between a main condensator and an air extraction device. Then, cooling and freezing devices using freon are no more necessary, and since the device uses the vacuum of the main condensator as a driving source and does not use dynamic equipments, labors for the maintenance is greatly reduced to improve economical property. The facilities are reduced in the size thereby enabling to use space effectively. (N.H.)

  14. Device for filtering gaseous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzel, M.

    1978-01-01

    The air filter system for gaseous radioactive substances consists of a vertical chamber with filter material (charcoal, e.g. impregnated). On one side of the chamber there is an inlet compartment and an outlet compartment. On the other side a guiding compartment turns the gas flow coming from the natural-air side through the lower part of filter chamber to the upper part of the filter. The gas flow leaves the upper part through the outlet conpartment as cleaned-air flow. The filter material may be filled into the chamber from above and drawn off below. For better utilization of the filter material the filter chamber is separated by means of a wall between the inlet and outlet compartment. This partition wall consist of two sheets arranged one above the other provided with slots which may be superposed in alignment. In this case filter material is tickling from the upper part of the chamber into the lower part avoiding to form a crater in the filter bed. (DG) [de

  15. Gas phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion process equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.; Neiswander, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    D ampersand D of the process facilities at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) will be an enormous task. The EBASCO estimate places the cost of D ampersand D of the GDP at the K-25 Site at approximately $7.5 billion. Of this sum, nearly $4 billion is associated with the construction and operation of decontamination facilities and the dismantlement and transport of contaminated process equipment to these facilities. In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The objective of gas phase decontamination is to employ a gaseous reagent to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to form volatile LJF6, which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The LTLT process permits the decontamination of the inside of gas-tight GDP process equipment at room temperature by substituting a long exposure to subatmospheric C1F for higher reaction rates at higher temperatures. This paper outlines the concept for applying LTLT gas phase decontamination, reports encouraging laboratory experiments, and presents the status of the design of a prototype mobile system. Plans for demonstrating the LTLT process on full-size gaseous diffusion equipment are also outlined briefly

  16. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1997-03-01

    This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support

  17. Sevoflurane improves gaseous exchange and exerts protective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sevoflurane improves gaseous exchange and exerts protective effects in ... Lung water content and cell count were estimated by standard protocols. ... It reversed LPS-induced oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increase in total antioxidant ...

  18. Purifying hydrocarbons in the gaseous stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1937-02-01

    Gaseous tar oils are subjected, at temperatures of 320 to 380/sup 0/C, to the action of a mixture of activated carbon mixed with powdered metal which removes the sulfur contamination from the substance to be purified.

  19. Automated sampling and control of gaseous simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ruoguan; Keyser, John

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we describe a method that automates the sampling and control of gaseous fluid simulations. Several recent approaches have provided techniques for artists to generate high-resolution simulations based on a low-resolution simulation

  20. The conditions of gaseous fuels development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Face to the actual situation of petrol and gas oil in France, the situation of gaseous fuels appears to be rather modest. However, the aim of gaseous fuels is not to totally supersede the liquid fuels. Such a situation would imply a complete overturn which has not been seriously considered yet. This short paper describes the essential conditions to promote the wider use of gaseous fuels: the intervention of public authorities to adopt a more advantageous tax policy in agreement with the ''Clean Air''law project, a suitable distribution network for gaseous fuels, a choice of vehicles consistent with the urban demand, the development of transformation kits of quality and of dual-fuel vehicles by the car manufacturers. (J.S.)

  1. 7th International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    James, David

    1994-01-01

    The Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, U. S. A. , on April 24-28, 1994. The symposium continued the interdisciplinary character and comprehensive approach of the preceding six symposia. Gaseous DielecIries VII is a detailed record of the symposium proceedings. It covers recent advances and developments in a wide range of basic, applied and industrial areas of gaseous dielectrics. It is hoped that Gaseous DielecIries VII will aid future research and development in, and encourage wider industrial use of, gaseous dielectrics. The Organizing Committee of the Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics consisted of G. Addis (U. S. A. ), L. G. Christophorou (U. S. A. ), F. Y. Chu (Canada), A. H. Cookson (U. S. A. ), O. Farish (U. K. ), I. Gallimberti (Italy) , A. Garscadden (U. S. A. ), D. R. James (U. S. A. ), E. Marode (France), T. Nitta (Japan), W. Pfeiffer (Germany), Y. Qiu (China), I. Sauers (U. S. A. ), R. J. Van Brunt (U. S. A. ), and W. Zaengl...

  2. A gaseous scintillation counter filled with He3 for neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, S.A.; Matveev, V.V.

    1962-01-01

    The paper describes a gas plant and gaseous scintillation counter, and gives the results of experiments on the recording and spectrometry of neutron beams using a gaseous scintillation counter filled with a mixture of 10% xenene and 90% helium-3 at an overall pressure of 20 ata. Data are given on the design of the gas plant, which makes it possible to operate the counter continuously over long periods of time, as well as providing the required gas mixtures at overall pressures of up to 60 atm and ensuring constant freedom of the gas from contamination. In addition, the paper presents the results of research on the counter's energy resolution and linearity at different energy levels and indicates its efficiency in gamma fields of intensity up to 3 r/h; the possibility of extending the working energy-range of gaseous scintillation counters filled with helium-3 is also considered. (author) [fr

  3. Study on radioactive release of gaseous and liquid effluents during normal operation of AP1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Quan; Zhou Jing; Liu Yu

    2014-01-01

    The gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of pressurized water reactors plant during normal operation are an important content of environmental impact assessment and play a significant role in the design of nuclear power plant. According to the design characters of AP1OOO radioactive waste management system and the study on the calculation method and the release pathways, the calculation model of the gaseous and liquid radioactive releases during normal operation for AP1OOO are established. Base on the established calculation model and the design parameters of AP1000, the expected value of gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of AP1OOO is calculated. The results of calculation are compared with the limits in GB 6249-2011 and explain the adder that is included tu account for anticipated operational occurrences, providing a reference for environmental impact assessment of pressurized water reactor. (authors)

  4. Vibration signature analysis of compressors in the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbarger, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous operation of several thousand axial-flow and centrifugal compressors is vital to the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment. Vibration signature analysis using a minicomputer-based Fast Fourier Transform Analyzer is being applied to the evaluation and surveillance of compressor performance at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Three areas of application include: (1) new blade design and prototype compressor evaluation; (2) corrective and preventive maintenance of machinery components; and (3) evaluation of machinery health. The present system is being used to monitor signals from accelerometers mounted on the load-bearing housings of 16 on-line compressors. These signals are transmitted by hard-wire to the analyzer for daily monitoring. A program for expansion of this system to monitor more than a thousand compressors and automation of the signature comparison process is planned for all three gaseous diffusion plants operated for the United States Energy Research and Development Administration. (auth)

  5. Combination RCRA groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX cribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    This document presents a groundwater quality assessment monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements for three RCRA sites in the Hanford Site's 200 East Area: 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 cribs (PUREX cribs). The objectives of this monitoring plan are to combine the three facilities into one groundwater quality assessment program and to assess the nature, extent, and rate of contaminant migration from these facilities. A groundwater quality assessment plan is proposed because at least one downgradient well in the existing monitoring well networks has concentrations of groundwater constituents indicating that the facilities have contributed to groundwater contamination. The proposed combined groundwater monitoring well network includes 11 existing near-field wells to monitor contamination in the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the PUREX cribs. Because groundwater contamination from these cribs is known to have migrated as far away as the 300 Area (more than 25 km from the PUREX cribs), the plan proposes to use results of groundwater analyses from 57 additional wells monitored to meet environmental monitoring requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 to supplement the near-field data. Assessments of data collected from these wells will help with a future decision of whether additional wells are needed

  6. Project C-018H, 242-A evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility Instrumentation and Control (I ampersand C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, A.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Collection System Instrumentation ampersand Control System for Project C-018H performs according to design. Specifically, this ATP is designed to verify the following overall system requirements: The input and outputs properly connected to the LCU terminal strips. The control system software conforms to the configuration specified by the logic diagrams, piping and instrumentation diagrams (P ampersand ID), and the LERF operating philosophy. Testing will be performed using actual signals. If actual signals are not available, then simulated signals will be used to complete the tests

  7. Electrical/instrumentation acceptance test report for Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant condensate treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compau, R.A. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This project is part of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The acceptance test procedure describes test methods for leak detection units, pump flow switches, pump level control valves, room air temperature monitor, leachate pump status contacts, basin pump status contacts, catch basin leak detector, leachate level monitors, and basin level monitors. These are all components of the C-018H Collection System

  8. Acceptance test procedure for C-018H, 242-A evaporator/PUREX plant process condensate treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation system function as required for this facility. Each company or organization participating in this ATP will designate personnel to assume the responsibilities and duties as defined herein for their respective roles

  9. Crescimento, trocas gasosas e potencial osmótico da bananeira-'Prata', submetida a diferentes doses de sódio e cálcio em solução nutritiva Growth, gaseous exchange and osmotic potential of banana 'Prata' plants, exposed to different concentrations of sodium and calcium in nutritive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUDMILA LAFETÁ DE MELO NEVES

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available O cálcio vem sendo utilizado com o intuito de incrementar tolerância a sais nas plantas, pois sabe-se que a salinidade restringe o crescimento e a produtividade de muitas culturas. Este estudo teve por objetivo avaliar os efeitos da aplicação de sódio e cálcio sobre o crescimento inicial, trocas gasosas e potencial osmótico da bananeira (Musa spp. 'Prata' (AAB. Foi utilizado o delineamento experimental em blocos casualizados, com arranjo fatorial 4 x 4 [ 4 doses de sódio ( 0; 5; 10; 15 mmol L-1 e 4 de cálcio ( 2; 4; 8; 12 mmol L-1] e 3 repetições. A emissão total de folhas e o potencial osmótico das plantas não foram influenciados pelos tratamentos. O aumento dos níveis de sódio na solução promoveu redução significativa na massa fresca da parte aérea, altura, área foliar, diâmetro do pseudocaule e massa seca das plantas. A presença de 5 mmol L-1 de Na na solução favoreceu as trocas gasosas. O aumento dos níveis de cálcio na solução promoveu a redução da massa fresca da parte aérea, altura e área foliar da bananeira-'Prata'.The Calcium has been used to increase salt tolerance in plants since salinity restricts growth and productivity in many crops. This study was conducted with the objective of evaluating the effects of sodium and calcium application on the initial growth, gaseous exchange and osmotic potential of banana (Musa spp. 'Prata' plants (AAB. The experimental layout was a 4 x 4 factorial with three replicates in a randomized complete block design. The factors tested were concentrations of sodium (0; 5; 10; 15 mmol L-1 and calcium (2; 4; 8; 12 mmol L-1. The total emition of leaves and the osmotic potential of the plants were not influenced by the treatments. However, the increase in concentrations of sodium in the nutritive solution resulted in significant reduction of the fresh weight of aerial plant parts, height and leaf area of the plants, diameter of the pseudostem, and dry weight of the plants. The

  10. The development and testing of the new flowsheets for the plutonium purification of the Purex process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugrov, K.V.; Korotaev, V.G.; Korchenkin, K.K.; Logunov, M.V.; Ludin, S.A.; Mashkin, A.N.; Melentev, A.B.; Samarina, N.S. [FSUE ' PAMayak' , Lenin st., 35, Ozersk 456780 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    In order to improve the extraction flowsheet of RT-1 Plant two versions of plutonium purification unit flowsheet were developed: a flowsheet with stabilization of Pu(IV)-Np(IV) valence pair and Pu, Np co-recovery, and a flowsheet with stabilization of Pu(IV)-Np(V) valence pair and Pu recovery. The task related to stabilization of the valence pair of the target components in the required state was solved with the use of reactants already applied at RT-1 Plant, namely, hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine nitrate and catalyst (Fe). Both flowsheets were adapted for the plant purification facility with minimum modifications of the equipment, and passed the full scale industrial testing. As a result of this work, reduction in volume and salt content of the raffinate was achieved. (authors)

  11. Gaseous NO2 effects on stomatal behavior, photosynthesis and respiration of hybrid poplar leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we used poplar as a model plant and investigated the effects of gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2, 4 microliter per liter) on stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, dark- and photorespiration of Populus alba x Populus berolinensis hybrid leaves using the photosynthesis system and scanning...

  12. Control of semivolatile radionuclides in gaseous effluents at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    An up-to-date review is presented of the subject, combining the results of laboratory studies on control of the most important semivolatile radionuclides in gaseous effluents at nuclear facilities and the results of operating experience in that area. Ruthenium is the most significant semivolatile contaminant in gaseous effluents at nuclear facilities. Volatilization of ruthenium can be reduced by various means, in particular by adding reductants. Volatilized ruthenium can be retained by adsorbents such as silica gel and ferric-oxide-based materials. Decontamination factors in the order of 10 3 have been obtained with these adsorbents under optimum conditions. Volatilized ruthenium can also be removed by other equipment such as condensers and scrubbers. Experience with high-level liquid waste solidification plants has shown that, in general, ruthenium volatilization is in the order of 10% or more unless special treatment is undertaken. There is little experience with ruthenium adsorbers in plants. Silica gel seems to have performed best, with ruthenium decontamination factors of about 10 2 to 10 3 . However, feed-to-stack ruthenium decontamination factors of 10 9 or more have been obtained even without ruthenium adsorbers. Other semivolatiles are relatively insignificant under normal conditions because of a low level of volatilization potential or mass or activity in the inventory. Moreover, owing to particulate formation, they can be easily removed without specific equipment

  13. Method of neptunium recovery into the product stream of the Purex second codecontamination step for LWR fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboya, T; Nemoto, S; Hoshino, T; Segawa, T [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1973-04-01

    The neptunium behavior in the second codecontamination step in Purex process of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation was experimentally studied, and the conditions for discharging neptunium in product stream were examined. Improved nitrous acid method was applied to the second codecontamination step. Nitrous acid (NaNO/sub 2/) was supplied to the 1st stage of extraction section at feed rate of 7.5 mM/hr, and hydrazine (hydrazine nitrate) was supplied to some stages near feed point at feed rate of 1.6 mM/hr, by using laboratory scale mixer-settlers having 6 ml of mixing volume and 17 ml of settling volume. Neptunium extraction behavior was analyzed by the code NEPTUN-I simulating neptunium concentration profile and by the code NEPTUN-II for calculating Np (V) and Np (VI) concentration. Batch experiments were performed for explaining the reduction reaction of Np (VI) in organic phase. After shaking the aqueous solution containing Np (VI) in 3 M nitric acid with the various volume ratios of TBP, both phases were separated, and the neptunium concentration was determined. In conclusion, the improved nitrous acid method was effective for the neptunium discharge in product stream when the flow ratio of organic phase to aqueous phase was increased to about three times.

  14. Demonstration of Minor Actinide separation from a genuine PUREX raffinate by TODGA/TBP and SANEX reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340 D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Chalmers University of Technology, Nuclear Chemistry, Deparment of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Gothenburg (Sweden); Christiansen, B.; Glatz, J.P.; Malmbeck, R.; Serrano-Purroy, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340 D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Modolo, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Energy Research, Safety Research and Reactor Technology, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Sorel, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique Valrho (CEA), DRCP/SCPS, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    A genuine High Active Raffinate was produced from small scale Purex reprocessing of a UO{sub 2} spent fuel solution and used as feed for a subsequent TODGA/TBP process. In this process, efficient recovery of the trivalent Minor Actinides (MA) actinides could be demonstrated using a hot cell set-up of 32 centrifugal contactor stages. The feed decontamination factors obtained for Am and Cm were in the range of 4.10{sup 4} which corresponds to a recovery of more than 99.99 % in the product fraction. Trivalent lanthanides and Y were co-extracted, otherwise only a small part of the Ru ended up in the product. The collected actinide/lanthanide fraction was later used as feed for a Sanex (separation of actinides from lanthanides) process based on the CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP ligand. Preliminary results show recoveries of more than 99.9 % of Am, Cm and less than 0.1 % of the major lanthanides in the product. (authors)

  15. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors have significant advantages as energy sources for closed-cycle power systems. The advantages arise from the removal of temperature limits associated with conventional reactor fuel elements, the wide variety of methods of extracting energy from fissioning gases, and inherent low fissile and fission product in-core inventory due to continuous fuel reprocessing. Example power cycles and their general performance characteristics are discussed. Efficiencies of gaseous fuel reactor systems are shown to be high with resulting minimal environmental effects. A technical overview of the NASA-funded research program in gaseous fuel reactors is described and results of recent tests of uranium hexafluoride (UF6)-fueled critical assemblies are presented.

  16. PIPEX - A model of a design concept for reprocessing plants with improved containment and surveillance features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    This paper explains that the PIPEX concept is essentially a reprocessing plant using the PUREX process but with in-built improved containment and surveillance features resulting in increased health protection and environmental safety as well as higher resistance to diversion of fissile material. The paper gives a general description of the design and operating philosophy of such a plant and goes on to examine the safeguards and safety principles and implications

  17. Solid–gaseous phase transformation of elemental contaminants during the gasification of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ying; Ameh, Abiba [Centre for Bioenergy & Resource Management, School of Energy, Environment & Agrifood, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Lei, Mei [Centre for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Duan, Lunbo [Key Laboratory of Energy Thermal Conversion and Control, Ministry of Education, School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Longhurst, Philip, E-mail: P.J.Longhurst@cranfield.ac.uk [Centre for Bioenergy & Resource Management, School of Energy, Environment & Agrifood, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Disposal of plant biomass removed from heavy metal contaminated land via gasification achieves significant volume reduction and can recover energy. However, these biomass often contain high concentrations of heavy metals leading to hot-corrosion of gasification facilities and toxic gaseous emissions. Therefore, it is of significant interest to gain a further understanding of the solid–gas phase transition of metal(loid)s during gasification. Detailed elemental analyses (C, H, O, N and key metal/metalloid elements) were performed on five plant species collected from a contaminated site. Using multi-phase equilibria modelling software (MTDATA), the analytical data allows modelling of the solid/gas transformation of metal(loid)s during gasification. Thermodynamic modelling based on chemical equilibrium calculations was carried out in this study to predict the fate of metal(loid) elements during typical gasification conditions and to show how these are influenced by metal(loid) composition in the biomass and operational conditions. As, Cd, Zn and Pb tend to transform to their gaseous forms at relatively low temperatures (< 1000 °C). Ni, Cu, Mn and Co converts to gaseous forms within the typical gasification temperature range of 1000–1200 °C. Whereas Cr, Al, Fe and Mg remain in solid phase at higher temperatures (> 1200 °C). Simulation of pressurised gasification conditions shows that higher pressures increase the temperature at which solid-to-gaseous phase transformations takes place. - Highlights: • Disposal of plants removed from metal contaminated land raises environmental concerns • Plant samples collected from a contaminated site are shown to contain heavy metals. • Gasification is suitable for plant disposal and its emission is modelled by MTDATA. • As, Cd, Zn and Pb are found in gaseous emissions at a low process temperature. • High pressure gasification can reduce heavy metal elements in process emission.

  18. Dynamical instability of a charged gaseous cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Mumtaz, Saadia

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss dynamical instability of a charged dissipative cylinder under radial oscillations. For this purpose, we follow the Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches to evaluate linearized perturbed equation of motion. We formulate perturbed pressure in terms of adiabatic index by applying the conservation of baryon numbers. A variational principle is established to determine characteristic frequencies of oscillation which define stability criteria for a gaseous cylinder. We compute the ranges of radii as well as adiabatic index for both charged and uncharged cases in Newtonian and post-Newtonian limits. We conclude that dynamical instability occurs in the presence of charge if the gaseous cylinder contracts to the radius R*.

  19. Entrapment process of radioactive gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagneraud, Francis; Gagneraud, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    Process for collecting chemically inert gaseous radioactive waste in melted substances, whereby the gaseous waste is injected under pressure in a molten substance to its saturation point followed by fast cooling. This substance is constituted of glass, ceramics, metallurgical drosses and slag masses in fusion. Its cooling is carried out by quenching by means of running water or a gas fluid, or by casting into vessels with great thermal inertia such as cast iron or similar, before recovery and confinement in receptacles for storage [fr

  20. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  1. Palladium behavior in the presence of irradiated diluent in the PUREX process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sio, S. de; Vigier, N. [AREVA NC/DOR/RDP, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Klur, I. [AREVA NC/DT/EP/P, La Hague (France); Tison, E. [AREVA NC/DT/EP/EL, La Hague (France); Bouyer, C.; Eysseric, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, /DEN/DRCP, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Lebeau, D.; Goutelard, F. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, /DEN/DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Sejourne, L. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, /DEN/DMN, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-07-01

    AREVA La Hague plants UP3 and UP2-800 started operations to reprocess spent nuclear fuel in 1990 and 1994 respectively. Aging equipment in these plants is a cause for concern as it could lead to process dysfunctions or production rate decrease. A few years ago, several columns had to be replaced in UP3-T4 plutonium purification facility because of clogging. Analyses revealed that TPH degradation products could be responsible for precipitating palladium compounds. 1 M NaOH solutions proved to be efficient to dissolve most of the precipitate. Therefore, several columns in both UP3 and UP2-800 are from now on washed periodically with 1 M NaOH solutions to avoid further clogging and to dissolve current precipitates. (authors)

  2. Estimation of radionuclide releases in atmosphere from Cernavoda NPP based on continuous gaseous effluent monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobric, E.; Murgoci, S.; Popescu, I.; Ibadula, R.

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous effluents from Cernavoda NPP is performed to assess the environmental impact of the plant operation. The results of the monitoring program are used to evaluate the population doses in order to ensure that the emissions of radionuclides in air are below regulatory limits and radiation doses are maintained ALARA. It complements, but is independent from the Operational Environmental Monitoring Program for Cernavoda NPP. Gaseous effluent monitors provide continuous indication of the radioactivity content in atmospheric emissions. Except for noble gases, these monitors also collect samples for later detailed analysis in the station Health Physics Laboratory. This paper presents the main equipment and the results of the gaseous effluents monitoring program in order to assess the impact of Cernavoda NPP operation and to predict the future releases as function of radionuclides concentrations in CANDU systems, based on the identified trends.(author)

  3. Behaviour of radioiodine in gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, P.J.

    1968-01-01

    Because of the different chemical forms in which radioiodine occurs in the gaseous state, it is important when designing efficient filters to know the chemical forms which may be present in the effluent gases when various operations are being carried out and to know the effect of different gaseous environments on the filtration efficiency. To obtain this information it is necessary to have available reliable means of characterizing different chemical forms and to sample gaseous effluents when these operations are being carried out. This paper describes the use for identifying molecular iodine of metallic screens in a multi-component sampling pack in different gaseous environments. Using multi-component sampling packs, the fractionation of iodine nuclides between different chemical forms was measured in the effluent gases escaping from an in-pile test loop in which the fuel was deliberately ruptured by restricting the flow of coolant. Sequential samples were taken for six hours after the rupture and it was possible to follow during this period the individual behaviours of 13 '1I, 133 I and 135 I. Simultaneous samples were also obtained of the noble gases in the effluent gas stream and of the iodine nuclides in the loop coolant. Similar experiments have been carried out with a view to characterizing the different chemical behaviour of radioiodine as it is released from a variety of operations in the nuclear industry including the cutting of fuel sections in metallurgical examination caves and an incinerator. (author)

  4. Attachment of gaseous fission products to aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, G.

    1985-01-01

    Accidents may occur in which the integrity of fuel cladding is breached and volatile fission products are released to the containment atmosphere. In order to assess the magnitude of the subsequent radiological hazard it is necessary to know the transport behaviour of such fission products. It is frequently assumed that the fission products remain in the gaseous phase. There is a possibility, however, that they may attach themselves to particles and hence substantially modify their transport properties. This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the conditions under which gaseous fission products may be attached to aerosol particles. Specific topics discussed are: the mass transfer of a gaseous fission product to an isolated aerosol particle in an infinite medium; the rate at which the concentration of fission products in the gas phase diminishes within a container as a result of deposition on a population of particles; and the distribution of deposited fission product between different particle sizes in a log-normal distribution. It is shown that, for a given mass, small particles are more efficient for fission product attachment, and that only small concentrations of such particles may be necessary to achieve rapid attachment. Conditions under which gaseous fission products are not attached to particles are also considered, viz, the competing processes of deposition onto the containment walls and onto aerosol particles, and the possibility of the removal of aerosols from the containment by various deposition processes, or agglomeration, before attachment takes place. (author)

  5. Respiratory system. Part 2: Gaseous exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLafferty, Ella; Johnstone, Carolyn; Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair

    This article, which isthe last in the life sciences series and the second of two articles on the respiratory system, describes gaseous exchange in the lungs, transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and internal and external respiration. The article concludes with a brief consideration of two conditions that affect gas exchange and transport: carbon monoxide poisoning and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. Technological aspects of gaseous pixel detectors fabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco Carballo, V.M.; Salm, Cora; Smits, Sander M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Melai, J.; Chefdeville, M.A.; van der Graaf, H.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated gaseous pixel detectors consisting of a metal punctured foil suspended in the order of 50μm over a pixel readout chip by means by SU-8 insulating pillars have been fabricated. SU-8 is used as sacrificial layer but metallization over uncrosslinked SU-8 presents adhesion and stress

  7. Separation of 90Sr from Purex high level waste and development of a 90Sr-90Y generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Chitnis, R.R.; Achuthan, P.V.; Kannan, R.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Balu, K.

    2000-04-01

    90 Y (T 1/2 =64.2 h) finds several applications in nuclear medicine. It is formed from the decay of 90 Sr which has a long half-life of 28.8 years. 90 Sr can be used as a long-lasting source for the production of carrier-free 90 Y. 90 Sr itself is abundantly available in high level waste (HLW) of PUREX origin. The present studies deal with the separation of pure 90 Sr from HLW and the subsequent separation of 90 Y from 90 Sr. Actinides and some of the fission products like lanthanides, zirconium, molybdenum and cesium were first removed from the HLW using methods based on solvent extraction and ion-exchange studied earlier in our laboratory. The resulting waste solution was used as a feed for the present process. The separation of 90 Sr from HLW was based on radiochemical method which involved a repeated scavenging with ferric hydroxide followed by strontium carbonate precipitation. The separation of 90 Y from 90 Sr was achieved by membrane separation technique. A compact generator is developed for this separation using a commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane, impregnated with indigenously synthesised 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (KSM-17). Generator system overcomes the drawbacks associated with conventional solvent extraction and ion-exchange based generators. The product is in chloride form and is suitable for complexation studies. After gaining an operating experience of ∼3 years in generating carrier-free 90 Y at 2 mCi level for initial studies in radiotherapeutic applications, the process was scaled up for the production of about 12 mCi of 90 Y to be used for animal studies before its application to patients. Radiochemical and chemical purity of the product was critically assayed by radiometry, ICP-AES, etc. The process is amenable for further scaling up. (author)

  8. Technical and economic aspects of new gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A. Jr.; O'Donnell, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    Work is well advanced on design and construction of the next major increment of U.S. uranium enrichment capacity. The plant will use the gaseous diffusion process to provide the required capacity and reliability at a competitive enrichment services cost. Gaseous diffusion technology is the base against which other processes are compared in order to assess their commercial viability. While it has generally been described as a mature technology with limited future development potential, work on design of the new U.S. plant has resulted in major improvement in plant design with corresponding decreases in plant capacity and operating costs. The paper describes major technological advances incorporated into the new plant design and their impact on enrichment costs. These include the effects of: - advanced barrier technology; - tandem compressor drive systems; - optimization of number of equipment sizes; - single level plant design; - development of rapid power level change capability; - electrical system simplification; - plant arrangement and layout. Resulting capital costs and projected enrichment costs are summarized. Enrichment costs are placed in the context of total nuclear fuel cycle costs. Trade-offs between uranium feed material quantities and enrichment plant tails assays are described, and optimization of this aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The effect on enrichment plant characteristics is described. Flexibility and capability of the new U.S. enrichment plant to meet these changing optimization conditions are described

  9. Separation of An(III) from PUREX raffinate as an innovative SANEX process based on a mixture of TODGA/TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sypula, Michal; Wilden, Andreas; Schreinemachers, Christian; Modolo, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Within the ACSEPT project, an innovative SANEX process based on TODGA/TBP for selective An(III) separation from PUREX raffinate was studied. Oxalic acid usually used for Zr complexation is considered a weak point. An investigation to substitute oxalic acid with a different masking agent was carried out. A new masking agent already studied in FZJ was applied and showed good complexation properties towards Zr and Pd. Re-investigation of the formula of the actinide stripping solution was also performed. Good separation of Ln over Am was obtained by means of DTPA and malic acid. Glycine appeared to be the strongest within the tested buffers. (authors)

  10. Evaluation of gaseous emissions produced in the tests on the demonstration plant for sludge drying and incineration; Valutazione delle emissioni gassose prodotte nelle prove sull'impianto dimostrativo di essiccamento e di incenerimento di fanghi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotito, V.; Spinosa, L.; Antonacci, R. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerca sulle Acque, Bari (Italy); Mininni, G. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerca sulle Acque, Rome (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    Incineration is a valid alternative to other more diffused disposal systems (agricultural use, landfill), when they cannot be applied due to high pollutants concentrations or other unforeseeable constraints. However, it can cause severe air pollution by inorganic (heavy metals) and organic (PAHs, PCDDs, PCDFs) pollutants, particulate, NO{sub x}, CO and acidic compounds; this fact has raised public concern about incineration and has hindered a wider application of this practice. Water Research Institute of Italian National Research Council realised a demonstration plant mainly consisting of a fluidized bed furnace, a rotary kiln furnace, a dryer with heat recovery section, particulate and acidic compounds removal apparatuses, and set up a research programme to demonstrate that incineration is a safe operation and can comply the relevant legislation, as far as organic and inorganic micropollutants are concerned. A total of 40 tests were carried out (30 with the fluidized bed furnace and 10 with rotary kiln one) treating dewatered sludges (in many cases with the addition of high chlorinated compounds and Cu salts) or dried ones, under different operating conditions (furnace temperature, after-burner temperature, chlorine concentration). Particulate concentrations, and consequently heavy metals concentrations, at the stack resulted in any case under legal limits. As far as conventional pollutants are concerned, only HCl and CO overcame sometimes standards, mainly due to temporary operating up-sets. PAHs concentration resulted quite constant, thus demonstrating that tests were operated in steady-state and satisfactory conditions. Also dioxins and furans overcame sometimes standards, but no correlation was found with more severe tests conditions; it happened when plant up-set conditions occurred. Operation resulted quite satisfactory, but dryer operation required constant operators attention. In rotary kiln furnace a build up of solidified ashes occurred in counter

  11. Assessment of Purex solvent cleanup methods using a mixer-settler system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-11-01

    A test system consisting of three mixer-settlers in series has been used to determine the usefulness of several possible aqueous scrub solutions for cleanup of TBP solvent in fuel reprocessing plants. The simulated solvent that was treated was nominally 0.1 mM zirconium, 0.2 mM uranium, 0.4 mM dibutyl phosphate, and 0.3 mM HNO 3 . Five aqueous scrub solutions - sodium carbonate/tartrate, hydroxylamine/tartaric acid, hydroxylamine/citric acid, hydrazine/oxalic acid, and LiOH/sucrose - were evaluated. The order of effectiveness of these solutions for removal of contaminants was: sodium carbonate/tartrate, hydrazine/oxalic acid, LiOH/sucrose, and the two hydroxylamine solutions. Interfacial crud, which was related to the presence of zirconium and DBP, was observed in all cases except the LiOH/sucrose solution. The recommended system would use sodium carbonate/tartrate. If sodium usage must be minimized, a hydroxylamine-containing scrub followed by a sodium carbonate/tartrate scrub is recommended. 13 references, 11 figures, 21 tables

  12. Calculation code of mass and heat transfer in a pulsed column for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Takeshi; Takahashi, Keiki

    1993-01-01

    A calculation code for extraction behavior analysis in a pulsed column employed at an extraction process of a reprocessing plant was developed. This code was also combined with our previously developed calculation code for axial temperature profiles in a pulsed column. The one-dimensional dispersion model was employed for both of the extraction behavior analysis and the axial temperature profile analysis. The reported values of the fluid characteristics coefficient, the transfer coefficient and the diffusivities in the pulsed column were used. The calculated concentration profiles of HNO 3 , U and Pu for the steady state have a good agreement with the reported experimental results. The concentration and temperature profiles were calculated under the operation conditions which induce the abnormal U extraction behavior, i.e. U extraction zone is moved to the bottom of the column. Thought there is slight difference between calculated and experimental value, it is appeared that our developed code can be applied to the simulation under the normal operation condition and the relatively slowly transient condition. Pu accumulation phenomena was analyzed with this code and the accumulation tendency is similar to the reported analysis results. (author)

  13. Behaviour of gaseous alkali compounds from coal gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nykaenen, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this project the behaviour of alkali compounds has been studied with a chemical equilibrium model. The goal is to evaluate the possibilities to remove the sodium and potassium compounds together with the fly ash particles by using a ceramic honeycomb filter. The studied processes include both CO 2 /O 2 - and air-blown gasification and combustion. The results show that the difference between the processes with flue gas recirculation and air-blown processes is small. This is due to that the equilibrium concentration of the dominant gaseous alkali compound, chloride, is more or less the same in both processes. This research project is closely connected to the EU-project coordinated by the Delft University of Technology (DUT). In that project alkali concentration of the fuel gas from a 1.6 MW pilot plant will be measured. During the next phase of this research the results from DUT will be compared with the results of this presentation. (author)

  14. Treatment and separation of radioactive fission products tritium, rare gases and iodine in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnez, H.

    1975-07-15

    Rare gases must be separated from the process off-gases of the head-end of the Purex and Thorex processes. To achieve high decontamination factors, the quantity of off-gas should be kept as low as possible. For rare gas separation, there are two possible methods of routing the off-gas: (a) the open flushing gas circuit, in which the purified off-gas (generally air) is passed off via the stack and (b) the closed circuit in which the off-gas (nitrogen or rare gases) is recycled to the dissolver after purification. Tritium must not be entrained into the second extraction cycle or be emitted with off-gases in the form of water vapor (HTO) or HT, but must remain completely in the aqueous phase. Most of the process water is recycled, as a result of which the tritium becomes concentrated in it. This tritiated water is then subjected to tritium rectification at a suitable point in the process. Iodine is very difficult to isolate to a small number of process stages. Present aim is to release the iodine in the dissolver stage into the off-gas, so as to prevent it being entrained into the extraction part. By the injection of hot nitrogen or water vapor into the dissolver or into iodine-containing condensates, all of the iodine is passed into the gaseous phase. Scrubbers can also be used together with iodine-containing condensates to adjust the scrubbing solution. Capital cost of separation plants account for 1 to 10 percent of the total cost of the reprocessing installation, and even more if a sophisticated tritium separation system is required. (DLC)

  15. Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors for Cryogenic Temperature Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2007-01-01

    There are several proposals and projects today for building LXe Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) for dark matter search. An important element of these TPCs are the photomultipliers operating either inside LXe or in vapors above the liquid. We have recently demonstrated that photosensitive gaseous detectors (wire type and hole-type) can operate perfectly well until temperatures of LN2. In this paper results of systematic studies of operation of the photosensitive version of these detectors (combined with reflective or semi-transparent CsI photocathodes) in the temperature interval of 300-150 K are presented. In particular, it was demonstrated that both sealed and flushed by a gas detectors could operate at a quite stable fashion in a year/time scale. Obtained results, in particular the long-term stability of photosensitive gaseous detectors, strongly indicate that they can be cheap and simple alternatives to photomultipliers or avalanche solid-state detectors in LXe TPC applications.

  16. Basic processes and trends in gaseous detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Almost a century after the invention of the proportional counter, a large research effort is still devoted to better understand the basic properties of gaseous detectors, and to improve their performances and reliability, particularly in view of use at the high radiation levels expected at LHC. In the first part of the lectures, after a brief introduction on underlying physical phenomena, I will review modern sophisticated computational tools, as well as some classic "back of the envelope" analytical methods, available today for estimating the general performances of gaseous detectors. In the second part, I will analyze in more detail problems specific to the use of detectors at high rates (space charge, discharges, aging), and describe the recent development of powerful and perhaps more reliable devices, particularly in the field of position-sensitive micro-pattern detectors.

  17. Secondary incinerator for radioactive gaseous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tadashi; Masuda, Takashi.

    1997-01-01

    A vessel incorporated with packings, in which at least either of the packings and the vessel is put to induction-heating by high frequency induction coils, is disposed in a flow channel of radioactive gaseous wastes exhausted from a radioactive waste incinerator. The packings include metals such as stainless pipes and electroconductive ceramics such as C-SiC ceramics. Since only electricity is used as an energy source, in the secondary incinerator for the radioactive gaseous wastes, it can be installed in a cell safely. In addition, if ceramics are used, there is no worry of deterioration of the incinerator due to organic materials, and essential functions are not lowered. (T.M.)

  18. Trends and new developments in gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069485

    2004-01-01

    Almost one century ago the method of particle detection with gaseous detectors was invented. Since then they have been exploited successfully in many experiments using a wide variety of different applications. The development is still going on today. The underlying working principles are today well understood and with the help of modern simulation techniques, new configurations can be easily examined and optimized before a first experimental test. Traditional wire chamber ensembles demonstrate that they are still up to date and are well prepared to meet also the challenges of LHC. Applications will be discussed using TPCs in high multiplicity environments with standard Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) as readout as well as drift tubes in a muon spectrometer for a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment. Triggered by the evolving printed circuit technology, a new generation of gaseous detectors with very high position resolution and rate capability has emerged. Two representatives (MICROMEGAS, GEM) have p...

  19. Polarization measurement for internal polarized gaseous targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhenyu; Ye Yunxiu; Lv Haijiang; Mao Yajun

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to internal polarized gaseous targets, polarization method, polarization measurement method and procedure. To get the total nuclear polarization of hydrogen atoms (including the polarization of the recombined hydrogen molecules) in the target cell, authors have measured the parameters relating to atomic polarization and polarized hydrogen atoms and molecules. The total polarization of the target during our measurement is P T =0.853 ± 0.036. (authors)

  20. Uranium enrichment export control guide: Gaseous diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-09-01

    This document was prepared to serve as a guide for export control officials in their interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws that relate to the Zangger International Trigger List for gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process components, equipment, and materials. Particular emphasis is focused on items that are especially designed or prepared since export controls are required for these by States that are party to the International Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

  1. A new gaseous gap conductance relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.; Yovanovich, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    A new relationship for predicting the gaseous gap conductance between the fuel and clad of a nuclear fuel rod is derived. This relationship is derived from purely analytical considerations and represents a departure from approaches taken in the past. A comparison between the predictions from this new relationship and experimental measurements is presented and the agreement is very good. Predictions can be generated relatively quickly with this relationship making it attractive for fuel pin analysis codes

  2. Growth of planetisimals in a gaseous ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourigan, K.

    1981-01-01

    The aggregation of planetesimals in a gaseous ring leads to the development of a dominant body amongst the planetesimal population. The presence of the gas in the form of a differentially rotating ring serves to constrain the orbits of the planetesimals and grains to within a thin toroidal region through the action of gas drag. This situation allows for the efficient aggregation of bodies and, as a result of the low resultant relative velocites, the minimization of collisional fragmentation effects

  3. 2 π gaseous flux proportional detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, E.A.; Costello, E.D.; Di Carlo, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    A counting system has been developed in order to measure carbon-14 samples obtained in the course of a study of a plasmapheresis treatment for diabetic children. The system is based on the use of a 2π gaseous flux proportional detector especially designed for the stated purpose. The detector is described and experiment results are given, determining the characteristic parameters which set up the working conditions. (Author) [es

  4. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  5. A Population Study of Gaseous Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiaras, A.; Waldmann, I. P.; Zingales, T.; Rocchetto, M.; Morello, G.; Damiano, M.; Karpouzas, K.; Tinetti, G.; McKemmish, L. K.; Tennyson, J.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2018-04-01

    We present here the analysis of 30 gaseous extrasolar planets, with temperatures between 600 and 2400 K and radii between 0.35 and 1.9 R Jup. The quality of the HST/WFC3 spatially scanned data combined with our specialized analysis tools allow us to study the largest and most self-consistent sample of exoplanetary transmission spectra to date and examine the collective behavior of warm and hot gaseous planets rather than isolated case studies. We define a new metric, the Atmospheric Detectability Index (ADI) to evaluate the statistical significance of an atmospheric detection and find statistically significant atmospheres in around 16 planets out of the 30 analyzed. For most of the Jupiters in our sample, we find the detectability of their atmospheres to be dependent on the planetary radius but not on the planetary mass. This indicates that planetary gravity plays a secondary role in the state of gaseous planetary atmospheres. We detect the presence of water vapour in all of the statistically detectable atmospheres, and we cannot rule out its presence in the atmospheres of the others. In addition, TiO and/or VO signatures are detected with 4σ confidence in WASP-76 b, and they are most likely present in WASP-121 b. We find no correlation between expected signal-to-noise and atmospheric detectability for most targets. This has important implications for future large-scale surveys.

  6. Partitioning of actinides from high active waste solution of Purex origin counter-current extraction studies using TBP and CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalkrishnan, V.; Wattal, P.K.; Ramanujam, A.; Murali, M.S.; Mathur, J.N.; Bauri, A.K.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2000-10-01

    A solvent extraction scheme has been formulated for the partitioning of actinides from Purex high level waste (HLW). The scheme is based on the results of earlier studies carried out with simulated waste solutions. In the present studies, the scheme was tested with high active waste (HAW) solution generated during the reprocessing of spent fuel from research reactors using laboratory scale mixer-settlers. The proposed process involved two-step extraction using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamolylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO). In the first step, uranium, neptunium and plutonium were removed from the waste using TBP as extractant. The minor actinides left in the raffinate were extracted using a mixture of CMPO and TBP in the second step. The results showed complete extraction of actinides from the waste solution. Plutonium and neptunium extracted in TBP, were stripped together using a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid in 2 M nitric acid medium, leaving uranium in the organic phase. Uranium can later be stripped using dilute nitric acid. Actinides extracted in CMPO-TBP phase were stripped using a mixture of formic acid, hydrazine, hydrate and citric acid. The stripping was quantitative in both the stripping runs. An additional extraction step for the preferential recovery of uranium, neptunium and plutonium from the waste solution using TBP is a modification over the conventional Truex process. Selective stripping of neptunium and plutonium from large quantities of uranium. The extraction of uranium using TBP eliminates the possibility of third phase and undesired loading of CMPO-TBP in the following step. Use of citrate-containing strippant allows the recovery of actinides from loaded CMPO-TBP mixture without causing any reflux of the actinides during stripping. The process has been developed with due consideration to minimising the generation of secondary wastes. The proposed strippants are effective even in presence of

  7. Computer-optimized γ-NDA geometries for uranium enrichment verification of gaseous UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichers, V.A.; Aaldijk, J.K.; Betue, P.A.C. de; Harry, R.J.S.

    1993-05-01

    An improved collimator pair of novel design tailored for deposit independent enrichment verification of gaseous UF 6 at low pressures in cascade-to-header pipes of small diameters in centrifuge enrichment plants is presented. The designs are adapted for use in a dual-geometry arrangement for simultaneous measurements with both detection geometries. The average measurement time with the dual-geometry arrangement is approximately half an hour for deposit-to-gas activity ratios as high as 20. (orig.)

  8. Community Visions for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormsbee, Lindell e [Civil Engineering, Univ. of KY; Kipp, James A [Univ. of KY, Kentucky water research Institute

    2011-09-01

    This report focuses on assessing community preferences for the future use of the PGDP site, given the site's pending closure by US DOE. The project approach fostered interaction and engagement with the public based on lessons learned at other complex DOE environmental cleanup sites and upon the integration of a number of principles and approaches to public engagement from the Project Team's local, state, regional and international public engagement experience. The results of the study provide the community with a record of the diversity of values and preferences related to the environmental cleanup and future use of the site.

  9. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site environmental report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.G.; Jett, T.G.

    1989-05-01

    Quantities of nonradiological chemical emissions are not included in this report this year. An addendum that will include the information will be published after the Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III report is issued on July 1, 1989. When the addendum is published, probably in late July, a summary of the SARA Title III 313 report will be included. The SARA report provides the community with the opportunity to lean about estimated quantities of certain toxic chemicals used at a facility that are routinely or accidentally released into the environment. The addendum that will be published after the SARA report will summarize the SARA report and is expected to include some additional ''large quantity'' chemicals used or stored at the facilities that are not required to be reported by SARA Title III but are known to be emitted from the facilities. The addendum will not be all inclusive but will provide emissions information on the major chemical emissions to the air, water, or land from processes at the facilities

  10. Breached cylinder incident at the Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelens, R.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    On June 16, 1990, during an inspection of valves on partially depleted product storage cylinders, a 14-ton partially depleted product cylinder was discovered breached. The cylinder had been placed in long-term storage in 1977 on the top row of Portsmouth`s (two rows high) storage area. The breach was observed when an inspector noticed a pile of green material along side of the cylinder. The breach was estimated to be approximately 8- inches wide and 16-inches long, and ran under the first stiffening ring of the cylinder. During the continuing inspection of the storage area, a second 14-ton product cylinder was discovered breached. This cylinder was stacked on the bottom row in the storage area in 1986. This breach was also located adjacent to a stiffening ring. This paper will discuss the contributing factors of the breaching of the cylinders, the immediate response, subsequent actions in support of the investigation, and corrective actions.

  11. On-line measurement of gaseous iodine species during a PWR severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykal, I.; Doizi, D. [CEA, DEN, Departement de Physico-chimie, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex, (France); Perrin, A. [CNRS-University of Paris Est and Paris 7, Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, 94010 Creteil, (France); Vincent, B. [University of Burgundy, Laboratoire de physique, CNRS UMR 5027, 9, Avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex, (France); Manceron, L. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, St-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, (France); Mejean, G. [University of Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique-CNRS UMR 5588, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres, (France); Ducros, G. [CEA Cadarache, CEA, DEN, Departement d' Etudes des Combustibles, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance cedex, (France)

    2015-07-01

    A long-range remote sensing of severe accidents in nuclear power plants can be obtained by monitoring the online emission of volatile fission products such as xenon, krypton, caesium and iodine. The nuclear accident in Fukushima was ranked at level 7 of the International Nuclear Event Scale by the NISA (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency) according to the importance of the radionuclide release and the off-site impact. Among volatile fission products, iodine species are of high concern, since they can be released under aerosols as well as gaseous forms. Four years after the Fukushima accident, the aerosol/gaseous partition is still not clear. Since the iodine gaseous forms are less efficiently trapped by the Filtered Containment Venting Systems than aerosol forms, it is of crucial importance to monitor them on-line during a nuclear accident, in order to improve the source term assessment in such a situation. Therefore, we propose to detect and quantify these iodine gaseous forms by the use of highly sensitive optical methods. (authors)

  12. IAEA decadal activities in the field of radioactive gaseous waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plumb, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    The IAEA has long recognized that gaseous waste management is vital in the design and safe operation of all nuclear facilities such that in the decade of the 1980's the IAEA program covered the important aspects of the entire field. The activities reviewed in this paper were marked at the outset by a comprehensive international symposium on the subject in February 1980 organized by the IAEA jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD when the detailed state-of-the-art was established in 43 papers. In the interim, experts have been convened in IAEA sponsored meetings to result in sixteen technical documents which included summaries of three substantial Co-ordinated Research Programs. Early IAEA activities paid particular attention to management of gas radionuclides which from a matured nuclear industry, could be judged to build-up to long-term sources of irradiation for regional and global populations. Mid-term ongoing activities in handling and retention of gaseous radionuclides arising from abnormal operations in nuclear power plants were given much emphasis following the Chernobyl accident. In the latter years the IAEA activities included detailed examinations of the design and operation of gas cleaning systems for the range of nuclear facilities. Technical reports on gaseous waste management were issued relating to high-level liquid waste conditioning plants (including control of semi-volatiles), nuclear power plants, low- and intermediate-level radioactive materials handling facilities and radioactive waste incinerators

  13. PWR-GALE, Radioactive Gaseous Release and Liquid Release from PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The PWR-GALE (Boiling Water Reactor Gaseous and Liquid Effluents) Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the release of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The calculations are based on data generated from operating reactors, field tests, laboratory tests, and plant-specific design considerations incorporated to reduce the quantity of radioactive materials that may be released to the environment. 2 - Method of solution: GALE calculates expected releases based on 1) standardized coolant activities derived from ANS Standards 18.1 Working Group recommendations, 2) release and transport mechanisms that result in the appearance of radioactive material in liquid and gaseous waste streams, 3) plant-specific design features used to reduce the quantities of radioactive materials ultimately released to the environs, and 4) information received on the operation of nuclear power plants. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The liquid release portion of GALE uses subroutines taken from the ORIGEN (CCC-217) to calculate radionuclide buildup and decay during collection, processing, and storage of liquid radwaste. Memory requirements for this part of the program are determined by the large nuclear data base accessed by these subroutines

  14. Method for separating gaseous mixtures of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimann, H.J.; Schuster, E.; Kersting, A.

    1976-01-01

    A gaseous mixture of isotopes is separated by laser excitation of the isotope mixture with a narrow band of wavelengths, molecularly exciting mainly the isotope to be separated and thereby promoting its reaction with its chemical partner which is excited in a separate chamber. The excited isotopes and the chemical partner are mixed, perhaps in a reaction chamber to which the two excited components are conducted by very short conduits. The improvement of this method is the physical separation of the isotope mixture and its partner during excitation. The reaction between HCl and the mixture of 238 UF 6 and 235 UF 6 is discussed

  15. Treatment of gaseous and airborne radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leichsenring, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    Gaseous and airborne radionuclides in the fuel cycle are retained in vessel off-gas filter systems and in the dissolver off-gas cleaning system. Those systems have to meet the regulatory requirements for both normal and accident conditions. From the solutions liquid aerosols are formed during liquid transfer (air lifts, steam jets) or by air sparging or by evaporation processes. During dissolution the volatile radionuclides i.e. 85 Kr, 129 I and 14 C are liberated and enter into the dissolver off-gas cleaning system. Flow sheets of different cleaning systems and their stage of development are described. (orig./RW)

  16. Progress in GEM-based gaseous photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Chechik, R; Breskin, Amos; Buzulutskov, A F; Guedes, G P; Mörmann, D; Singh, B K

    2003-01-01

    We discuss recent progress in gaseous photomultipliers (GPMTs) comprising UV-to-visible spectral range photocathodes (PCs) coupled to multiple Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM). The PCs may be either semitransparent or reflective ones directly deposited on the first-GEM surface. These detectors provide high gain, even in noble gases, are sensitive to single photons, have nanosecond time resolution, and offer good localization. The operation of CsI-based GPMTs in CF sub 4 opens new applications in Cherenkov detectors, where both the radiator and the photosensor operate in the same gas. The latest results on sealed visible-light detectors, combining bialkali PCs and Kapton-made GEMs are presented.

  17. Developments in gaseous core reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1979-01-01

    An effort to characterize the most promising concepts for large, central-station electrical generation was done under the auspices of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). The two leading candidates were identified from this effort: The Mixed-Flow Gaseous Core Reactor (MFGCR) and the Heterogeneous Gas Core Reactor (HGCR). Key advantages over other nuclear concepts are weighed against the disadvantages of an unproven technology and the cost-time for deployment to make a sound decision on RandD support for these promising reactor alternatives. 38 refs

  18. Purex diluent degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallent, O.K.; Mailen, J.C.; Pannell, K.D.

    1984-02-01

    The chemical degradation of normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) diluents both in the pure state and mixed with 30% tributyl phosphate (TBP) was investigated in a series of experiments. The results show that degradation of NPH in the TBP-NPH-HNO 3 system is consistent with the active chemical agent being a radical-like nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) molecule, not HNO 3 as such. Spectrophotometric, gas chromatographic, mass spectrographic, and titrimetric methods were used to identify the degradation products, which included alkane nitro and nitrate compounds, alcohols, unsaturated alcohols, nitro alcohols, nitro alkenes, ketones, and carboxylic acids. The degradation rate was found to increase with increases in the HNO 3 concentration and the temperature. The rate was decreased by argon sparging to remove NO 2 and by the addition of butanol, which probably acts as a NO 2 scavenger. 13 references, 11 figures

  19. Novel gaseous detectors for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielsson, M.; Fonte, P.; Francke, T.; Iacobaeus, C.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and successfully tested prototypes of two new types of gaseous detectors for medical imaging purposes. The first one is called the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID). It is oriented on monitoring and the precise alignment of the therapeutic cancer treatment beam (pulsed gamma radiation) with respect to the patient's tumor position. The latest will be determined from an X-ray image of the patient obtained in the time intervals between the gamma pulses. The detector is based on a 'sandwich' of hole-type gaseous detectors (GEM and glass microcapillary plates) with metallic gamma and X-ray converters coated with CsI layers. The second detector is an X-ray image scanner oriented on mammography and other radiographic applications. It is based on specially developed by us high rate RPCs that are able to operate at rates of 10 5 Hz/mm 2 with a position resolution better than 50 μm at 1 atm. The quality of the images obtained with the latest version of this device were in most cases more superior than those obtained from commercially available detectors

  20. Gaseous radiocarbon measurements of small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, M.; Szidat, S.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Wacker, L.

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a well-established method for samples containing carbon in the milligram range. However, the measurement of small samples containing less than 50 μg carbon often fails. It is difficult to graphitise these samples and the preparation is prone to contamination. To avoid graphitisation, a solution can be the direct measurement of carbon dioxide. The MICADAS, the smallest accelerator for radiocarbon dating in Zurich, is equipped with a hybrid Cs sputter ion source. It allows the measurement of both, graphite targets and gaseous CO 2 samples, without any rebuilding. This work presents experiences dealing with small samples containing 1-40 μg carbon. 500 unknown samples of different environmental research fields have been measured yet. Most of the samples were measured with the gas ion source. These data are compared with earlier measurements of small graphite samples. The performance of the two different techniques is discussed and main contributions to the blank determined. An analysis of blank and standard data measured within years allowed a quantification of the contamination, which was found to be of the order of 55 ng and 750 ng carbon (50 pMC) for the gaseous and the graphite samples, respectively. For quality control, a number of certified standards were measured using the gas ion source to demonstrate reliability of the data.