WorldWideScience

Sample records for pure superconducting niobium

  1. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  2. Structure and degeneracy of vortex lattice domains in pure superconducting niobium: A small-angle neutron scattering study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laver, M.; Bowell, C.J.; Forgan, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    High-purity niobium exhibits a surprisingly rich assortment of vortex lattice (VL) structures for fields applied parallel to a fourfold symmetry axis, with all observed VL phases made up of degenerate domains that spontaneously break some crystal symmetry. Yet a single regular hexagonal VL domain...

  3. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  4. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W; Kennedy, W L; Sagalovsky, L [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed. (Author) fig., 7 refs.

  5. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed

  6. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed. (Author) fig., 7 refs

  7. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  8. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed.

  9. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed.

  10. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA; Cameiro, Tadeu [McMurray, PA

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  11. Sample of superconducting wiring (Niobium Titanium)

    CERN Multimedia

    About NbTi cable: The cable consists of 36 strands of superconducting wire, each strand has a diameter of 0.825 mm and houses 6300 superconducting filaments of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti, a superconducting alloy). Each filament has a diameter of about 0.006 mm, i.e. 10 times smaller than a typical human hair. The filaments are embedded in a high-purity copper matrix. Copper is a normal conducting material. The filaments are in the superconductive state when the temperature is below about -263ºC (10.15 K). When the filaments leave the superconductive state, the copper acts as conductor transports the electrical current. Each strand of The NbTi cable (at superconducting state) has a current density of up to above 2000 A/mm2 at 9 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). A cable transport a current of about 13000 A at 10 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). About LHC superconducting wiring: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistan...

  12. Sample of superconducting wiring (Niobium Titanium)

    CERN Multimedia

    About NbTi cable: The cable consists of 36 strands of superconducting wire, each strand has a diameter of 0.825 mm and houses 6300 superconducting filaments of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti, a superconducting alloy). Each filament has a diameter of about 0.006 mm, i.e. 10 times smaller than a typical human hair. The filaments are embedded in a high-purity copper matrix. Copper is a normal conducting material. The filaments are in the superconductive state when the temperature is below about -263ºC (10.15 K). When the filaments leave the superconductive state, the copper acts as conductor transports the electrical current. Each strand of The NbTi cable (at superconducting state) has a current density of up to above 2000 A/mm2 at 9 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). A cable transport a current of about 13000 A at 10 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). About LHC superconducting wiring: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resista...

  13. Study on niobium carbide dispersed superconducting tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, H; Tachikawa, K [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Oh' asa, M [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1977-11-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) dispersed superconducting tapes have been fabricated by two metallurgical processes. In the first process, Ni-Nb-C alloys are directly arc melted and hot worked in air and the NbC phase is distributed in the form of fine discrete particles. In the second process, Ni-Nb and Ni-Nb-Cu alloys are arc melted, hot worked and subjected to solid-state carburization. NbC then precipitates along the grain boundaries, forming a network. The highest superconducting transition temperature attained is about 11 K. Taken together with the lattice parameter measurement, this indicates that NbC with a nearly perfect NaCl structure is formed in both processes. Measured values of the upper critical field, the critical current density and the volume fraction of the NbC phase are also discussed.

  14. A study on the effect of tantalum-impurity content on the superconducting properties of niobium materials used for making superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. B.; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Tiwari, M. K.; Lodha, G. S.; Myneni, G. R.

    2012-11-01

    Niobium materials in highly pure form are used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities. We present here a study of the superconducting properties of such niobium materials that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities after determining their tantalum-impurity contents using a synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Our results show that there is a small change in superconducting parameters such as TC,HC1 and HC2 when the tantalum-impurity content varies from ≈150 to ≈1300 ppm. In contrast, a buffered chemical polishing of the same niobium samples changes all these superconducting parameters more significantly. The implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed.

  15. A study on the effect of tantalum-impurity content on the superconducting properties of niobium materials used for making superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S B; Sharath Chandra, L S; Chattopadhyay, M K; Tiwari, M K; Lodha, G S; Myneni, G R

    2012-01-01

    Niobium materials in highly pure form are used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities. We present here a study of the superconducting properties of such niobium materials that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities after determining their tantalum-impurity contents using a synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Our results show that there is a small change in superconducting parameters such as T C ,H C1 and H C2 when the tantalum-impurity content varies from ≈150 to ≈1300 ppm. In contrast, a buffered chemical polishing of the same niobium samples changes all these superconducting parameters more significantly. The implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed. (paper)

  16. Development of high purity niobium material for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Koichi; Sakita, Kohei; Suzuki, Takafusa; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    For the superconducting niobium cavities, issues of thermal quench and field emission have to be solved to achieve a high field gradient (>25MV/m) for TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator). In order to overcome the quench, upgrading of thermal conductivity of niobium material at the low temperature is very important. On the reduction of the field emission not only dust particles but also defect, impurity and inhomogeneity should be considered. Therefore development of high purity niobium material is very important to solve these issues. This paper describes the our latest R and D for high purity niobium material. (author)

  17. Superconducting niobium cavities with high gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.; Saito, K.

    1992-01-01

    Present accelerator projects making use of superconducting cavity technology are constructed with design accelerating gradients E acc ranging between 5 MV/m and 8 MV/m and Q-values of several 10 9 . Future plans for upgrades of existing accelerators or for linear colliders call for gradients greater than 15 MV/m corresponding to peak surface electric fields above 30 MV/m. These demands challenge state-of-the-art production technology and require improvements in processing and handling of these cavities to overcome the major performance limitation of field emission loading. This paper reports on efforts to improve the performance of cavities made from niobium from different suppliers by using improved cleaning techniques after processing and ultrahigh vacuum annealing at temperatures of 1400 C. In single cell L-band cavities peak surface electric fields as high as 50 MV/m have been measured without significant field emission loading. (Author) 8 refs., fig

  18. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  19. Electrodeposition of some metals and niobium superconducting alloys from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, U.

    1978-01-01

    The major goal of this thesis was to study the feasibility of electrodeposition from molten fluorides of the pure elements niobium, aluminium, tin, germanium and silicon, and the niboium superconducting intermetallic compounds with these elements, and to prepare and study films of these materials in the form of coherent and uniform coatings. Decomposition potential measurements with a gold anode were carried out on the alkali fluoride solvent and the fluoride salt solutions of niobium, aluminum, tin, and germanium to provide important initial thermodynamic data. Attempts to codeposit niobium and aluminum invariably failed, niobium being the exclusive deposit in all cases. Codeposition of niobium--tin alloys was demonstrated. Of the four intermetallic compounds of the niobium--germanium system, three were obtained as single-phase coatings. The superconducting compound (A15 phase) was not successfully electrodeposited in a single-phase form. It was obtained, however, in phase-mixture coatings. Application of alternating square wave pulses produced substantial changes in the morphology of niobium deposits. Silicon electrocrystallization epitaxy (ECE) was demonstrated for the first time. Uniform, coherent, and well adherent coatings of polycrystalline Si with a grain diameter of up to 40 to 50 μm were plated onto nonalloying metal substrates, such as silver and tungsten.These processes offer some attractive features for both integrated circuit technology and silicon solar cell fabrication. Aluminum, tin, and germanium were also electrodeposited from molten fluorides

  20. Superconducting niobium in high rf magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.

    1988-01-01

    The benefit of superconducting cavities for accelerator applications depends on the field and Q/sub 0/ levels which can be achieved reliably in mass producible multicell accelerating structures. The presently observed field and Q/sub 0/ limitations are caused by anomalous loss mechanisms which are not correlated with the intrinsic properties of the pure superconductor but rather due to defects or contaminants on the superconducting surface. The ultimate performance levels of clean superconducting cavities built from pure Nb will be given by the rf critical field and the surface resistance of the superconductor. In the first part of this paper a short survey is given of the maximum surface magnetic fields achieved in single-cell cavities. The results of model calculations for the thermal breakdown induced by very small defects and for the transition to the defect free case is discussed in part 2. In the last chapter, a discussion is given for the rf critical field of Nb on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau Theory. It is shown that not only purity but also the homogeneity of the material should become important for the performance of superconducting Nb cavities at field levels beyond 100mT. Measurement results of the upper critical field for different grades of commercially available Nb sheet materials are given. 58 references, 20 figures, 1 table

  1. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs

  2. Parametrisation of the niobium thermal conductivity in the superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koechlin, F.; Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements of niobium sheets manufactured for deep-drawing of superconducting cavities have been gathered. Due to various histories of the niobium samples and a wide range of metal purities (35< RRR<1750) the data offer a large scatter of thermal conductivities. An attempt is made to obtain an analytical expression with realistic parameters for the thermal conductivity between 1.8 K and 9.25 K. The set of parameters deduced from a least square fit of experimental data is not very different from those yielded by the theory of superconducting metals, taken as a starting point. This should make possible to obtain a reasonable guess of the thermal conductivity of niobium in this temperature range, once the RRR and the past history of the metal samples have been determined. (author)

  3. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  4. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2-4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  5. The influence of chemical treatments on the superconducting properties of technical niobium materials and their effect on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S B; Sahni, V C; Myneni, G R

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a study of superconducting response in the niobium materials used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient (>25 MV m -1 ) superconducting radio frequency (SC-RF) cavities. These results clearly show that the typical surface chemical treatment deployed during the fabrication of SC-RF cavities affects the superconducting properties of pure niobium materials. Such SC-RF cavities operating at 2 K are often found to show anomalous RF losses, causing either a strong degradation of the quality factor or a thermal breakdown for cavity magnetic fields between 1 and 1.5 kOe. The results of our study suggest a correlation between the field for the first flux-line penetration in these chemically treated technical niobium materials and the reported onset field of anomalous losses in the SC-RF cavities.

  6. The influence of chemical treatments on the superconducting properties of technical niobium materials and their effect on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. B.; Myneni, G. R.; Sahni, V. C.

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of a study of superconducting response in the niobium materials used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient (>25 MV m-1) superconducting radio frequency (SC-RF) cavities. These results clearly show that the typical surface chemical treatment deployed during the fabrication of SC-RF cavities affects the superconducting properties of pure niobium materials. Such SC-RF cavities operating at 2 K are often found to show anomalous RF losses, causing either a strong degradation of the quality factor or a thermal breakdown for cavity magnetic fields between 1 and 1.5 kOe. The results of our study suggest a correlation between the field for the first flux-line penetration in these chemically treated technical niobium materials and the reported onset field of anomalous losses in the SC-RF cavities.

  7. Impurity dependence of superconductivity in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laa, C.

    1984-04-01

    Jump temperatures, the critical fields Hsubc and Hsubc 2 and specific heats were measured on niobium samples where the impurity content was systematically varied by loading with nitrogen. Quantities could thus be extrapolated to lattice perfection and absolute purity. Comparisons with theories were made and some parameters extracted. Agreement was found with Gorkov theory for small impurities. A new value of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter Ko was determined to be just above 1/sqrt2 which proves that niobium is an elementary Type II semiconductor. By comparisons with the BCS and the CLAC theory the values of the mean Fermi velocity, the London penetration depth, the BCS coherence length and the impurity parameter were extracted. (G.Q.)

  8. Surface analyses of electropolished niobium samples for superconducting radio frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Nishiwaki, M.; Saeki, T.; Sawabe, M.; Hayano, H.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities is sometimes limited by contaminations present on the cavity surface. In the recent years extensive research has been done to enhance the cavity performance by applying improved surface treatments such as mechanical grinding, electropolishing (EP), chemical polishing, tumbling, etc., followed by various rinsing methods such as ultrasonic pure water rinse, alcoholic rinse, high pressure water rinse, hydrogen per oxide rinse, etc. Although good cavity performance has been obtained lately by various post-EP cleaning methods, the detailed nature about the surface contaminants is still not fully characterized. Further efforts in this area are desired. Prior x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of EPed niobium samples treated with fresh EP acid, demonstrated that the surfaces were covered mainly with the niobium oxide (Nb 2 O 5 ) along with carbon, in addition a small quantity of sulfur and fluorine were also found in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. In this article, the authors present the analyses of surface contaminations for a series of EPed niobium samples located at various positions of a single cell niobium cavity followed by ultrapure water rinsing as well as our endeavor to understand the aging effect of EP acid solution in terms of contaminations presence at the inner surface of the cavity with the help of surface analytical tools such as XPS, SIMS, and scanning electron microscope at KEK.

  9. Surface analyses of electropolished niobium samples for superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Nishiwaki, M.; Saeki, T.; Sawabe, M.; Hayano, H.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S. [GUAS, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); KAKEN Inc., Hokota, Ibaraki 311-1416 (Japan); GUAS, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan) and KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    The performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities is sometimes limited by contaminations present on the cavity surface. In the recent years extensive research has been done to enhance the cavity performance by applying improved surface treatments such as mechanical grinding, electropolishing (EP), chemical polishing, tumbling, etc., followed by various rinsing methods such as ultrasonic pure water rinse, alcoholic rinse, high pressure water rinse, hydrogen per oxide rinse, etc. Although good cavity performance has been obtained lately by various post-EP cleaning methods, the detailed nature about the surface contaminants is still not fully characterized. Further efforts in this area are desired. Prior x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of EPed niobium samples treated with fresh EP acid, demonstrated that the surfaces were covered mainly with the niobium oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) along with carbon, in addition a small quantity of sulfur and fluorine were also found in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. In this article, the authors present the analyses of surface contaminations for a series of EPed niobium samples located at various positions of a single cell niobium cavity followed by ultrapure water rinsing as well as our endeavor to understand the aging effect of EP acid solution in terms of contaminations presence at the inner surface of the cavity with the help of surface analytical tools such as XPS, SIMS, and scanning electron microscope at KEK.

  10. Superconducting parameters of polycrystalline niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandyba, P.E.; Kolesnikov, D.P.; Tkachev, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The niobium semi-crystalline films, having a thickness of 200-5,050 A have been studied. The films have been produced by the electron-beam evaporation in the oilless vacuum and by the ionic plasma spraying with diode and triode methods. Determined have been the coherence length, the magnetic field penetration depth and the Ginsburg-andau parameter. An attempt is made to determine the electron states density of the Fermi surface

  11. Measurement of Microwave Parameters of a Superconducting Niobium Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaryan, N. S.; Baturitskii, M. A.; Budagov, Yu. A.; Demin, D. L.; Dem‧yanov, S. E.; Karpovich, V. A.; Kniga, V. V.; Krivosheev, R. M.; Lyubetskii, N. V.; Maksimov, S. I.; Pobol‧, I. L.; Rodionova, V. N.; Shirkov, G. D.; Shumeiko, N. M.; Yurevich, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a method for direct measurement of the amplitude-frequency characteristics and the Q factor of empty superconducting niobium radio frequency Tesla-type cavities. An automated measuring complex that permits recording the superconductivity effect and measuring high Q values has been developed. Measurements have been made of the Q factors of the investigated objects (the first domestic 1.3-GHz niobium cavities) at a level no lower than 0.1·109 (with a maximum value of 1.2·1010) and a level of relative losses lower than 130 dB (with a minimum factor of 139.7 dB) at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  12. Magnetization measurement of niobium for superconducting cavity material evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wake, Masayoshi; Saito, Kenji.

    1995-05-01

    A series of magnetization measurements on niobium materials for superconducting cavities was performed, and the method was found to be very useful for material evaluation. The effects of annealing, chemical polishing and machining were clearly observed by this method. The material quality and the processing of the material can be properly evaluated by measuring the magnetization. An observation of the Q-disease effect indicates the possibility of using this method for the studies beyond material evaluation. (J.P.N)

  13. Fabrication of superconducting niobium radio frequency structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgessner, J.; Amato, J.; Brawley, J.

    1983-01-01

    During the last several years a variety of superconducting radio frequency structures have been designed, fabricated and tested. The diverse structures and fabrication techniques are described. This paper is a description of the authors' experiences in this field

  14. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Paula, L A N; Furtado, S R; Aguiar, O D; N F Oliveira Jr, N F Oliveira Jr; Castro, P J; Barroso, J J

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q 0 ) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 10 5 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 10 12 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ∼ 10 −22 Hz −1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA)

  15. Physical Properties of Niobium and Specifications for Fabrication of Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine, C.; Foley, M.; Dhanaraj, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    It is important to distinguish among the properties of niobium, the ones that are related to the cavity's SRF performances, the formability of the material, and the mechanical behavior of the formed cavity. In general, the properties that dictate each of the above mentioned characteristics have a detrimental effect on one another and in order to preserve the superconducting properties without subduing the mechanical behavior, a balance has to be established. Depending on the applications, some parameters become less important and an understanding of the physical origin of the requirements might help in this optimization. SRF applications require high purity niobium (high RRR), but pure niobium is very soft from fabrication viewpoint. Moreover conventional fabrication techniques tend to override the effects of any metallurgical process meant to strengthen it. As those treatments dramatically affect the forming of the material they should be avoided. These unfavorable mechanical properties have to be accounted for in the design of the cavities rather than in the material specification. The aim of this paper is to review the significance of the important mechanical properties used to characterize niobium and to present the optimal range of values. Most of the following information deals with the specification of sheets for cell forming unless otherwise noted.

  16. Physical Properties of Niobium and Specifications for Fabrication of Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, C.; Foley, M.; Dhanaraj, N.

    2011-01-01

    It is important to distinguish among the properties of niobium, the ones that are related to the cavity's SRF performances, the formability of the material, and the mechanical behavior of the formed cavity. In general, the properties that dictate each of the above mentioned characteristics have a detrimental effect on one another and in order to preserve the superconducting properties without subduing the mechanical behavior, a balance has to be established. Depending on the applications, some parameters become less important and an understanding of the physical origin of the requirements might help in this optimization. SRF applications require high purity niobium (high RRR), but pure niobium is very soft from fabrication viewpoint. Moreover conventional fabrication techniques tend to override the effects of any metallurgical process meant to strengthen it. As those treatments dramatically affect the forming of the material they should be avoided. These unfavorable mechanical properties have to be accounted for in the design of the cavities rather than in the material specification. The aim of this paper is to review the significance of the important mechanical properties used to characterize niobium and to present the optimal range of values. Most of the following information deals with the specification of sheets for cell forming unless otherwise noted.

  17. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  18. Synthesis and superconducting properties of niobium germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlstrom, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    By carefully controlling temperature homogeneity during preparation of the Nb 3 Ge samples, homogeneous films have been prepared of high-T/sub c/Nb 3 Ge. Homogeneity is demonstrated by a sharp transition width (ΔT/sub c/ 6 amps/cm 2 which are the highest ever reported for any material at this temperature. The successful film synthesis has made it possible to study the superconducting properties of Nb 3 Ge. High quality A15 NbGe/(SiO/sub x/)/Pb tunnel juctions on electron beam codeposited oxygen-doped Nb 3 Ge have been fabricated. 2Δ/(k/sub B/T/sub c/ rises from the BCS limit in Ge-poor samples to become strong coupled (2Δk/sub B/T/sub c/ approx. 4.35) as stoichiometry is approached. The electron-phonon spectral function α 2 F(ω) and related microscopic parameters were obtained. As the T/sub c/ and gap increase, a movement of the lowest phonon branch to lower energies is observed with a resultant decrease in (ω 2 ). Thus lambda increases with T/sub c/ while (ω 2 ) decreases in agreement with the idea that mode softening is a major factor in the increase of T/sub c/ with approach to stoichiometry as previously found in Nb 3 Al by Kwo and Geballe

  19. Muon spin rotation studies of niobium for superconducting rf applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grassellino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigate superconducting properties of niobium samples via application of the muon spin rotation/relaxation (μSR technique. We employ for the first time the μSR technique to study samples that are cut out from large and small grain 1.5 GHz radio frequency (rf single cell niobium cavities. The rf test of these cavities was accompanied by full temperature mapping to characterize the rf losses in each of the samples. Results of the μSR measurements show that standard cavity surface treatments like mild baking and buffered chemical polishing performed on the studied samples affect their surface pinning strength. We find an interesting correlation between high field rf losses and field dependence of the sample magnetic volume fraction measured via μSR. The μSR line width observed in zero-field-μSR measurements matches the behavior of Nb samples doped with minute amounts of Ta or N impurities. A lower and an upper bound for the upper critical field H_{c2} of these cutouts is found.

  20. Calculation of the superconducting transition temperature in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlov, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    The author presents calculations of the superconducting transition temperature, T/sub c/, the electron-phonon coupling constant, lambda, and the spectral function, α 2 f(ω), for niobium. The author's calculations are based on an empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) band structure. Phonon linewidths are also given for longitudinal and transverse branches along different directions. The necessary electron-phonon matrix elements are evaluated using only the rigid-ion approximation by applying Green's theorem. The calculated value of T/sub c/ is 8.4 K which differs from the measured value by only 9%; the calculated lambda is 1.02. The spectral function and linewidths are compared to experimental and previous theoretical results

  1. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-01-01

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications

  2. Qualification of niobium materials for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications: View of a condensed matter physicist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. B.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    We address the issue of qualifications of the niobium materials to be used for superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity fabrications, from the point of view of a condensed matter physicist/materials scientist. We focus on the particular materials properties of niobium required for the functioning a SCRF cavity, and how to optimize the same properties for the best SCRF cavity performance in a reproducible manner. In this way the niobium materials will not necessarily be characterized by their purity alone, but in terms of those materials properties, which will define the limit of the SCRF cavity performance and also other related material properties, which will help to sustain this best SCRF cavity performance. Furthermore we point out the need of standardization of the post fabrication processing of the niobium-SCRF cavities, which does not impair the optimized superconducting and thermal properties of the starting niobium-materials required for the reproducible performance of the SCRF cavities according to the design values.

  3. Qualification of niobium materials for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications: View of a condensed matter physicist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S. B., E-mail: sbroy@rrcat.gov.in [Magnetic & Superconducting Materials Section, Materials & Advanced Accelerator Sciences Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Myneni, G. R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia (United States)

    2015-12-04

    We address the issue of qualifications of the niobium materials to be used for superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity fabrications, from the point of view of a condensed matter physicist/materials scientist. We focus on the particular materials properties of niobium required for the functioning a SCRF cavity, and how to optimize the same properties for the best SCRF cavity performance in a reproducible manner. In this way the niobium materials will not necessarily be characterized by their purity alone, but in terms of those materials properties, which will define the limit of the SCRF cavity performance and also other related material properties, which will help to sustain this best SCRF cavity performance. Furthermore we point out the need of standardization of the post fabrication processing of the niobium-SCRF cavities, which does not impair the optimized superconducting and thermal properties of the starting niobium-materials required for the reproducible performance of the SCRF cavities according to the design values.

  4. Qualification of niobium materials for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications: View of a condensed matter physicist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S. B.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    We address the issue of qualifications of the niobium materials to be used for superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity fabrications, from the point of view of a condensed matter physicist/materials scientist. We focus on the particular materials properties of niobium required for the functioning a SCRF cavity, and how to optimize the same properties for the best SCRF cavity performance in a reproducible manner. In this way the niobium materials will not necessarily be characterized by their purity alone, but in terms of those materials properties, which will define the limit of the SCRF cavity performance and also other related material properties, which will help to sustain this best SCRF cavity performance. Furthermore we point out the need of standardization of the post fabrication processing of the niobium-SCRF cavities, which does not impair the optimized superconducting and thermal properties of the starting niobium-materials required for the reproducible performance of the SCRF cavities according to the design values

  5. Effect of impurities in niobium on the growth of superconducting Nb/sub 3//Sn. [Al, Cu, Ge, Si, Sn, Zr impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekizawa, T

    1974-01-01

    In order to examine the possibility of reducing the heat treatment temperature in the manufacturing process of the superconducting intermetallic compounds wire or ribbon by the metallurgical bond method, tin cored specimens of niobium including a small amount of impurity (Al, Cu, Ge, Si, Sn and Zr) have been prepared, and the critical currents measured as a function of the heat treatment temperature and time. Experimental results are summarized as follows. (1) The effect of the impurity added into niobium is to stabilize the dislocation network cell structure in niobium, caused by the cold working, up to the forming temperature of Nb/sub 3/Sn. The stabilized dislocation network structure is considered to serve as diffusion pipes of the tin atom. As this diffusion (microscopic) is predominant over bulk diffusion (macroscopic), the cored specimen made of niobium including impurities has lower forming temperature of Nb/sub 3/Sn compared with the specimen made of pure niobium. (2) The critical current vs. heat treatment temperature characteristics show that the critical current peaks at 900/sup 0/C in the case of niobium including Si, while at 950/sup 0/C in the case of pure niobium. 6 references.

  6. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  7. Superconducting niobium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya, J.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Carrera 30 Numero 45-03, Bogota (Colombia); Huerta, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.mx; Escamilla, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2008-10-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) thin films were deposited under different configurations of the magnetic field using a magnetron sputtering system. The magnetic field configuration varied from balanced to unbalanced leading to different growth conditions and film properties. The aim of the paper was to identify correlations between deposition conditions, film properties and the electrical properties, specially the superconductive critical temperature (T{sub C}). The results suggested that there is a critical deposition condition, having an optimum ion-atom arrival ratio that promotes a well ordered and textured nanocrystalline structure (cubic phase) with the minimum residual stress and only under this condition a high critical temperature (16K) was obtained. Lower T{sub C} values around 12K were obtained for the NbN samples having a lower degree of structural perfection and texture, and a larger fraction of intergranular voids. On the other hand, analysis of valence-band spectra showed that the contribution of the Nb 4d states remained essentially constant while the higher T{sub C} was correlated to a higher contribution of the N 2p states.

  8. Superconducting niobium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaya, J.J.; Huerta, L.; Rodil, S.E.; Escamilla, R.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) thin films were deposited under different configurations of the magnetic field using a magnetron sputtering system. The magnetic field configuration varied from balanced to unbalanced leading to different growth conditions and film properties. The aim of the paper was to identify correlations between deposition conditions, film properties and the electrical properties, specially the superconductive critical temperature (T C ). The results suggested that there is a critical deposition condition, having an optimum ion-atom arrival ratio that promotes a well ordered and textured nanocrystalline structure (cubic phase) with the minimum residual stress and only under this condition a high critical temperature (16K) was obtained. Lower T C values around 12K were obtained for the NbN samples having a lower degree of structural perfection and texture, and a larger fraction of intergranular voids. On the other hand, analysis of valence-band spectra showed that the contribution of the Nb 4d states remained essentially constant while the higher T C was correlated to a higher contribution of the N 2p states

  9. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Denise C; Cooley, Lance D; Seidman, David N

    2013-01-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium–hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities. (paper)

  10. The effect of plasma etching on the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radjenović, B.; Radmilović-Radjenović, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this letter the evolution of the surface topography of a niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity caused by different plasma etching modes (isotropic and anisotropic) is studied by the three-dimensional level set method. The initial rough surface is generated starting from an experimental power spectral density. The time dependence of the rms roughness is analyzed and the growth exponential factors β are determined for two etching modes (isotropic and anisotropic) assuming that isotropic etching is a much more effective mechanism of smoothing. The obtained simulation results could be useful for optimizing the parameters of the etching processes needed to obtain high quality niobium surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavities.

  11. Suppression of hydride precipitates in niobium superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-10-01

    Niobium hydride is a suspected contributor to degraded niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity performance by Q slope and Q disease. The concentration and distribution of hydrogen atoms in niobium can be strongly affected by the cavity processing treatments. This study provides guidance for cavity processing based on density functional theory calculations of the properties of common processing impurity species—hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon—in the body-centered cubic (bcc) niobium lattice. We demonstrate that some fundamental properties are shared between the impurity atoms, such as anionic character in niobium. The strain field produced, however, by hydrogen atoms is both geometrically different and substantially weaker than the strain field produced by the other impurities. We focus on the interaction between oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the lattice, and demonstrate that the elastic interactions between these species and the bcc niobium lattice cause trapping of hydrogen and oxygen atoms by bcc niobium lattice vacancies. We also show that the attraction of oxygen to a lattice vacancy is substantially stronger than the attraction of hydrogen to the vacancy. Additionally, hydrogen dissolved in niobium tetrahedral interstitial sites can be trapped by oxygen, nitrogen and possibly carbon atoms dissolved in octahedral interstitial sites. These results indicate that the concentration of oxygen in the bcc lattice can have a strong impact on the ability of hydrogen to form detrimental phases. Based on our results and a literature survey, we propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature annealing step applied to niobium SRF cavities. We also recommend further examination of nitrogen and carbon in bcc niobium, and particularly the role that nitrogen can play in preventing detrimental hydride phase formation.

  12. An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

  13. An evolutionary yield function based on Barlat 2000 yield function for the superconducting niobium sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Payam; Pourboghrat, Farhang

    2011-08-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are widely used in high-energy physics to accelerate particle beams in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities is affected by the microstructure and purity of the niobium sheet, surface quality, geometry, etc. Following optimum strain paths in the forming of these cavities can significantly control these parameters. To select these strain paths, however, information about the mechanical behavior, microstructure, and formability of the niobium sheet is required. In this study the Barlat 2000 yield function has been used as a yield function for high purity niobium. Results from this study showed that, due to intrinsic behavior, it is necessary to evolve the anisotropic coefficients of Barlat's yield function in order to properly model the plastic behavior of the niobium sheet. The accuracy of the newly developed evolutionary yield function was verified by applying it to the modeling of the hydrostatic bulging of the niobium sheet. Also, in a separate attempt crystal plasticity finite element method was use to model the behavior of the polycrystalline niobium sheet with a particular initial texture.

  14. An evolutionary yield function based on Barlat 2000 yield function for the superconducting niobium sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbandi, Payam; Pourboghrat, Farhang

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are widely used in high-energy physics to accelerate particle beams in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities is affected by the microstructure and purity of the niobium sheet, surface quality, geometry, etc. Following optimum strain paths in the forming of these cavities can significantly control these parameters. To select these strain paths, however, information about the mechanical behavior, microstructure, and formability of the niobium sheet is required. In this study the Barlat 2000 yield function has been used as a yield function for high purity niobium. Results from this study showed that, due to intrinsic behavior, it is necessary to evolve the anisotropic coefficients of Barlat's yield function in order to properly model the plastic behavior of the niobium sheet. The accuracy of the newly developed evolutionary yield function was verified by applying it to the modeling of the hydrostatic bulging of the niobium sheet. Also, in a separate attempt crystal plasticity finite element method was use to model the behavior of the polycrystalline niobium sheet with a particular initial texture.

  15. Subharmonic energy-gap structure and heating effects in superconducting niobium point contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, K.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    1989-01-01

    We present experimental data of the temperature-dependent subharmonic energy-gap structure (SGS) in the current-voltage (I-V) curves of superconducting niobium point contacts. The observed SGS is modified by heating effects. We construct a model of the quasiparticle conductance of metallic...

  16. The HIE-ISOLDE Superconducting Cavities: Surface Treatment and Niobium Thin Film Coating

    CERN Document Server

    Lanza, G; Ferreira, L M A; Gustafsson, A E; Pasini, M; Trilhe, P; Palmieri, V

    2010-01-01

    CERN has designed and prepared new facilities for the surface treatment and niobium sputter coating of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting cavities. We describe here the design choices, as well as the results of the first surface treatments and test coatings.

  17. A New Vacuum Brazing Route for Niobium-316L Stainless Steel Transition Joints for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhay; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Bhatnagar, V. K.; Yedle, K.; Ram Sankar, P.; Sindal, B. K.; Kumar, K. V. A. N. P. S.; Singh, M. K.; Rai, S. K.; Bose, A.; Veerbhadraiah, T.; Ramteke, S.; Sridhar, R.; Mundra, G.; Joshi, S. C.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-02-01

    The paper describes a new approach for vacuum brazing of niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints for application in superconducting radiofrequency cavities. The study exploited good wettability of titanium-activated silver-base brazing alloy (CuSil-ABA®), along with nickel as a diffusion barrier, to suppress brittle Fe-Nb intermetallic formation, which is well reported during the established vacuum brazing practice using pure copper filler. The brazed specimens displayed no brittle intermetallic layers on any of its interfaces, but instead carried well-distributed intermetallic particles in the ductile matrix. The transition joints displayed room temperature tensile and shear strengths of 122-143 MPa and 80-113 MPa, respectively. The joints not only exhibited required hermeticity (helium leak rate high vacuum but also withstood twelve hour degassing heat treatment at 873 K (suppresses Q-disease in niobium cavities), without any noticeable degradation in the microstructure and the hermeticity. The joints retained their leak tightness even after undergoing ten thermal cycles between the room temperature and the liquid nitrogen temperature, thereby establishing their ability to withstand service-induced low cycle fatigue conditions. The study proposes a new lower temperature brazing route to form niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints, with improved microstructural characteristics and acceptable hermeticity and mechanical properties.

  18. Once upon a time, there was a brittle but superconducting niobium-tin…

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    The production of the new niobium-tin cables for the high-performance superconducting magnets of the HL-LHC is now in full swing at CERN.   The Rutherford cabling machine is operating in the superconducting laboratory, in Building 163. (Photo: Max Brice/CERN) Extraordinary research needs extraordinary machines: the upgrade project of the LHC, the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), has the goal of achieving instantaneous luminosities a factor of five larger than the LHC nominal value, and it relies on magnetic fields reaching the level of 12 Tesla. The superconducting niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti) used in the LHC magnets can only bear magnetic fields of up to 9-10 Tesla. Therefore, an alternative solution for the superconducting magnets materials was needed. The key innovative technology to develop superconducting magnets beyond 10 Tesla has been found in the niobium-tin (Nb3Sn)  compound. This compound was actually discovered in 1954, eight years before Nb-Ti, but when the LHC was built, ...

  19. Improvement and protection of niobium surface superconductivity by atomic layer deposition and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, T.; /IIT, Chicago /Argonne; Zasadzinski, J.; /IIT, Chicago; Moore, J.; Pellin, M.; Elam, J.; /Argonne; Cooley, L.; /Fermilab; Antoine, C.; /Saclay

    2008-11-01

    A method to treat the surface of Nb is described, which potentially can improve the performance of superconducting rf cavities. We present tunneling and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements at the surface of cavity-grade niobium samples coated with a 3 nm alumina overlayer deposited by atomic layer deposition. The coated samples baked in ultrahigh vacuum at low temperature degraded superconducting surface. However, at temperatures above 450 C, the tunneling conductance curves show significant improvements in the superconducting density of states compared with untreated surfaces.

  20. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  1. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Delayen, J.R.; Piller, C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed

  2. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2< v/c <0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of light ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive beam facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed

  3. Dependence of the microwave surface resistance of superconducting niobium on the magnitude of the rf field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanenko, A.; Grassellino, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2013-06-24

    Utilizing difference in temperature dependencies we decoupled Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and residual components of the microwave surface resistance of superconducting niobium at all rf fields up to B{sub rf}{approx}115 mT. We reveal that the residual resistance decreases with field at B{sub rf} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 40 mT and strongly increases in chemically treated niobium at B{sub rf}>80 mT. We find that BCS surface resistance is weakly dependent on field in the clean limit, whereas a strong and peculiar field dependence emerges after 120 Degree-Sign C vacuum baking.

  4. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W; Kedzie, M; Delayen, J R; Piller, C

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed.

  5. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion Linac.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-11-18

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2< v/c <0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of light ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive beam facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed.

  6. Investigation of niobium surface structure and composition for improvement of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenikhina, Yulia

    Nano-scale investigation of intrinsic properties of niobium near-surface is a key to control performance of niobium superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Mechanisms responsible for the performance limitations and their empirical remedies needs to be justified in order to reproducibly control fabrication of SRF cavities with desired characteristics. The high field Q-slope and mechanism behind its cure (120°C mild bake) were investigated by comparison of the samples cut out of the cavities with high and low dissipation regions. Material evolution during mild field Q-slope nitrogen treatment was characterized using the coupon samples as well as samples cut out of nitrogen treated cavity. Evaluation of niobium near-surface state after some typical and novel cavity treatments was accomplished. Various TEM techniques, SEM, XPS, AES, XRD were used for the structural and chemical characterization of niobium near-surface. Combination of thermometry and structural temperature-dependent comparison of the cavity cutouts with different dissipation characteristics revealed precipitation of niobium hydrides to be the reason for medium and high field Q-slopes. Step-by-step effect of the nitrogen treatment processing on niobium surface was studied by analytical and structural characterization of the cavity cutout and niobium samples, which were subject to the treatment. Low concentration nitrogen doping is proposed to explain the benefit of nitrogen treatment. Chemical characterization of niobium samples before and after various surface processing (Electropolishing (EP), 800°C bake, hydrofluoric acid (HF) rinsing) showed the differences that can help to reveal the microscopic effects behind these treatments as well as possible sources of surface contamination.

  7. Understanding Quality Factor Degradation in Superconducting Niobium Cavities at Low Microwave Field Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, A.; Schuster, D. I.

    2017-12-01

    In niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle acceleration, a decrease of the quality factor at lower fields—a so-called low field Q slope or LFQS—has been a long-standing unexplained effect. By extending the high Q measurement techniques to ultralow fields, we discover two previously unknown features of the effect: (i) saturation at rf fields lower than Eacc˜0.1 MV /m ; (ii) strong degradation enhancement by growing thicker niobium pentoxide. Our findings suggest that the LFQS may be caused by the two level systems in the natural niobium oxide on the inner cavity surface, thereby identifying a new source of residual resistance and providing guidance for potential nonaccelerator low-field applications of SRF cavities.

  8. Nitrogen and argon doping of niobium for superconducting radio frequency cavities: a pathway to highly efficient accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Sergatskov, D.; Melnychuk, O.; Trenikhina, Y.; Crawford, A.; Rowe, A.; Wong, M.; Khabiboulline, T.; Barkov, F.

    2013-10-01

    We report a surface treatment that systematically improves the quality factor of niobium radio frequency cavities beyond the expected limit for niobium. A combination of annealing in a partial pressure of nitrogen or argon gas and subsequent electropolishing of the niobium cavity surface leads to unprecedented low values of the microwave surface resistance, and an improvement in the efficiency of the accelerating structures up to a factor of 3, reducing the cryogenic load of superconducting cavities for both pulsed and continuous duty cycles. The field dependence of the surface resistance is reversed compared to standardly treated niobium.

  9. Niobium Nitride Thin Films and Multilayers for Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, William; Beringer, Douglas; Li, Zhaozhu; Clavero, Cesar; Lukaszew, Rosa

    2013-03-01

    Niobium nitride in thin film form has been considered for a number of applications including multi-layered coatings onto superconducting radio frequency cavities which have been proposed to overcome the fundamental accelerating gradient limit of ~50 MV/m in niobium based accelerators. In order to fulfill the latter application, the selected superconductor's thermodynamic critical field, HC, must be larger than that of niobium and separated from the Nb surface by an insulating layer in order to shield the Nb cavity from field penetration and thus allow higher field gradients. Thus, for the successful implementation of such multilayered stack it is important to consider not just the materials inherent properties but also how these properties may be affected in thin film geometry and also by the specific deposition techniques used. Here, we show the results of our correlated study of structure and superconducting properties in niobium nitride thin films and discuss the shielding exhibited in NbN/MgO/Nb multilayer samples beyond the lower critical field of Nb for the first time. This work was funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (HDTRA-10-1-0072).

  10. Structural and superconducting properties of sputter-deposited niobium films for applications in RF accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Peck, M A

    2000-01-01

    The present work presents the results of a systematic study of superconducting and structural properties of niobium films sputter deposited onto the inner walls of radiofrequency copper resonators. The measured superconducting quantities include the surface resistance, the critical temperature, the penetration depth and the upper and lower critical fields. In addition to films grown with different discharge gases (Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne and Ar-Ne mixtures) and to films grown on substrates prepared under different conditions, the study also includes massive niobium cavities. The surface resistance is analysed in terms of its dependence on the temperature and on the rf field amplitude and, when possible, compared to theoretical predictions. In general, good agreement with BCS theory is observed. All experimental results are presented in the form of a simple, but adequate parameterisation. The residual resistance is observed to be essentially uncorrelated with the other variables, but strongly dependent on the macroscop...

  11. Young's modulus of a copper-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductive wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.; Moulder, J.C.; Austin, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    Young's modulus was determined for a 0.6-mm-dia niobium-titanium superconductive wire. Two methods were used: continuous-wave-resonance and laser-pulse-excitation. Young's moduli were also determined for the components - copper and Nb-Ti - in both wire and bulk forms. Some mechanical-deformation effects on Young's modulus were also measured. From the component' elastic moduli, that of the composite was predicted accurately by a simple rule-of-mixtures relationship

  12. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Dhavale, Asavari S.; Dhakal, Pashupati; Polyanskii, Anatolii A.; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculat...

  13. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by TEM and EELS

    OpenAIRE

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; Zuo, J. -M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ~100nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride for...

  14. Superconducting accelerometer using niobium-on-sapphire rf resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    An accelerometer is described which uses a rf niobium-on-sapphire resonator as its sensor element. The accelerometer uses a magnetically levitated spool as a test mass and the spool modulates the inductance of the resonator; its position is servo controlled to maintain the resonator at the external rf excitation frequency. The accelerometer has high sensitivity over the full audio frequency range, but is optimized for frequencies between 100 Hz and 1 kHz, where the calculated displacement sensitivity approaches 10 -15 cm for a 1 Hz measurement bandwidth. The system noise sources are analyzed and possible improvements are discussed

  15. Surface ferromagnetism and superconducting properties of nanocrystalline niobium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipra, R.; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline δ-NbN x samples have been synthesized by reacting NbCl 5 and urea at three different temperatures. A comparison of their structural, magnetic, transport and thermal properties is reported in the present study. The size of the particles and their agglomeration extent increase with increasing reaction temperature. The sample prepared at 900 °C showed the highest superconducting transition temperature (T c ) of 16.2 K with a transition width, ∼1.8 K, as obtained from the resistivity measurement on cold-pressed bars. Above T c , magnetization measurements revealed the presence of surface ferromagnetism which coexists with superconductivity below T c . Heat capacity measurements confirm superconductivity with strong electron–phonon coupling constant. The sample prepared at 800 °C shows a lower T c (10 K) while that prepared at 700 °C exhibit no superconductivity down to the lowest temperature (3 K) measured. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of δ-NbN nanoparticles by urea nitridation of NbCl 5 . ► Superconducting transition temperature (T c ) is 16.2 K. ► Superconductivity and surface ferromagnetism coexist in the nanoparticles. ► Effect of size and agglomeration on the physical properties of nanoparticles

  16. The Influence of Grain Boundaries on the Properties of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Zu Hawn

    Grain boundaries (GBs) in niobium are multiply connected defects that may be responsible for significant performance degradation in superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. Magneto optical (MO) studies show that early flux penetration often occurs at GBs. One possible mechanism is that a locally reduced superconducting gap (Delta) at the GB reduces the depairing current density (Jb) and thus leads to a local reduction of the critical field. Alternatively vortices may penetrate the GB preferentially because of field enhancement at a GB groove, or for other reasons. In all these cases, the effect of high RF fields is to produce additional power dissipation, which in turn produces a reduction in quality factor (Q 0) and leads to a premature quench of the cavity. To further our understanding of the superconducting properties of SRF-quality Nb, we made extensive superconducting characterizations by magneto-optical imaging, which allowed assessment of the uniformity of properties on scales down to about 5 microm and by direct transport voltage-current methods in single and bi-crystals treated by standard cavity optimization treatments of BCP (buffered chemical treatment) and EP (electropolishing). We correlated these superconducting characterizations to microstructural properties using scanning laser and scanning electron microscopy and then thinned some samples to examine them at the nanometer scale using analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also developed special metallographic sample preparation techniques that allowed us to apply these experimental approaches to very soft superconducting RF niobium in the polished conditions characteristics of a real inner cavity surface. Using MO imaging, we found that GBs can preferentially admit flux penetration when the plane of a GB is aligned parallel to the vector of the external magnetic field. In DC transport in the superconducting state, we found preferential flux flow at the GB and could detect the

  17. Method of manufacturing a niobium-aluminum-germanium superconductive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.L.F.; Pickus, M.R.; Douglas, K.E.

    A method for manufacturing flexible Nb/sub 3/ (Al,Ge) multifilamentary superconductive material in which a sintered porous Nb compact is infiltrated with an Al-Ge alloy. It is deformed and heat treated in a series of steps at successively higher temperatures preferably below 1000/sup 0/C during the heat treatment, cladding material such as copper can be applied to facilitate a deformation step preceding the heat treatment and can remain in place through the heat treatment to serve as a temperature stabilizer for the superconductive material produced. These lower heat treatment temperatures favor formation of filaments with reduced grain size and with more grain boundaries which in turn increase the current-carrying capacity of the superconductive material.

  18. Evidence of preferential diffusion and segregation of impurities at grain boundaries in very pure niobium used for radiofrequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, C.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.; Berthier, B.; Tessier, E.; Trocelier, P.; Chevarier, A.; Chevarier, N.; Roux, B.

    1996-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Grain boundaries (GB) of titanified, heat treated and then etched niobium have been observed by the mean of the nuclear microprobe from the Laboratoire Pierre Sue at Saclay. The very small area of the probe allows to measure by PIXE 1 quantities of titanium as low as one monolayer at the GB. Indeed concentrations of titanium as high as some atomic percent were found on 6 μm etched samples, giving indication of a preferential diffusion and/or segregation at GB. Titanium was detectable also on 15 μm etched samples but was bellow the sensitivity of the microprobe for 35 μm etched samples. Moreover it was shown that not all boundaries were polluted with titanium, and that their behaviour was correlated with orientation. A discussion of the literature shows that all these facts are consistent with the behaviour of very pure metals. Segregation at GB is also known to influence dramatically the GB resistivity in metals and superconductors. For the latter, it has been shown that the GB resistivity can be responsible of occurrence of granular superconductivity phenomena. The presence of Ti deep into the Nb GB explains why a strong etching is needed after a purification heat treatment. Moreover, it has been shown that a heat treatment at lower temperature, although much longer in time, allows less deep diffusion of Ti and then needs a lighter etch. (author)

  19. Effects of argon implantation and vacuum annealing of the superconducting properties of single-crystal niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakirov, R.M.; Kuznetsov, V.P.; Shermergor, T.D.

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics of superconducting transition (Tsub(K), Hsub(perpendicular)) of monocrystalline niobium films on sapphire, irradiated by 35 keV Ar ions within 0.62x10 15 -5.6x10 16 ion/cm 2 dose range, are investigated. Introduction of argon atoms results in Tsub(K) decrease of films and rhosub(n), Hsub(perpendicular 0) and dHsub(perpendicular)/dT increase due to reduction of free path length of electrons. Shown is an essential difference in the behaviour of superconducting parameters of irradiated monocrystalline niobium films and films with niobium, dassol ved in the niobium lattice. Introduction of oxygen has been carried out by annealing of films in vacuum after their heating in the air

  20. Surface Characterization of Impurities in Superconducting Niobium for Radio Frequency (RF) Cavities used in Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Prateek

    Niobium (Nb) is the material of choice for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavities used in particle accelerators owing to its high critical temperature (Tc = 9.2 K) and critical magnetic field (≈ 200mT). However, niobium tends to harbor interstitial impurities such as H, C, O and N, which are detrimental to cavity performance. Since the magnetic field penetration depth (lambda) of niobium is 40nm, it is important to characterize these impurities using surface characterization techniques. Also, it is known that certain heat treatments improve cavity efficiency via interstitial impurity removal from the surface of niobium. Thus, a systematic study on the effect of these heat treatments on the surface impurity levels is needed. In this work, surface analysis of both heat treated and non heat treated (120°C-1400°C) large grain (single crystal) bulk niobium samples was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Impurity levels were compared on the surface using SIMS after various types of heat treatments expected to improve cavity performance, and the effect of these heat treatments on the surface impurities were examined. SIMS characterization of ion implanted standards of C, N, O, D showed that quantification of C, N and O impurities in Nb is achievable and indicated that H is very mobile in Nb. It was hence determined that quantification of H in Nb is not possible using SIMS due to its high diffusivity in Nb. However, a comparative study of the high temperature heat treated (600°C-1400°C) and non heat treated (control) samples revealed that hydrogen levels decreased by upto a factor of 100. This is attributed to the dissociation of the niobium surface oxide layer, which acts as a passivating film on the surface, and subsequent desorption of hydrogen. Reformation of this oxide layer on cool down disallows any re-absorption of hydrogen, indicating that the oxide acts as a surface barrier for

  1. Laser polishing of niobium for application to superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singaravelu, Senthil; Klopf, John Michael; Xu, Chen; Krafft, Geoffrey; Kelley, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities are at the heart of an increasing number of particle accelerators. Their performance is dominated by a several nanometer thick layer at the interior surface. Maximizing the smoothness of this surface is critical, and aggressive chemical treatments are now employed to this end. The authors describe laser-induced surface melting as an alternative 'greener' approach. Selection of laser parameters guided by modeling achieved melting that reduced the surface roughness from the fabrication process. The resulting topography was examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). Plots of power spectral density computed from the AFM data give further insight into the effect of laser melting on the topography of the mechanically polished (only) niobium

  2. Effect of low temperature baking on the RF properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2004-01-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some ''anomalous'' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' bake under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from ''anomalous'' losses (so-called ''Q-drop'') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37 K-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6 K-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models

  3. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  4. Laser Processing on the Surface of Niobium Superconducting Radio-Frequency Accelerator Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, Senthilraja; Klopf, Michael; Krafft, Geoffrey; Kelley, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting Radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are at the heart of an increasing number of particle accelerators.~ Their performance is dominated by a several nm thick layer at the interior surface. ~Maximizing its smoothness is found to be critical and aggressive chemical treatments are employed to this end.~ We describe laser-induced surface melting as an alternative ``greener'' approach.~ Modeling guided selection of parameters for irradiation with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.~ The resulting topography was examined by SEM, AFM and Stylus Profilometry.

  5. Preparation of niobium coated copper superconducting rf cavities for the large electron positron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Chiaveri, E.; Hilleret, N.; Minestrini, M.; Weingarten, W.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1980 development work has been carried out at CERN aiming at producing niobium coated superconducting RF cavities in the framework of the foreseen LEP energy upgrading above the initial 55 GeV. During 1987 a 4-cell LEP cavity without coupling ports has been successfully coated for the first time. Meanwhile, cathodes for coating the coupling ports were built and tested. The effort has been subsequently directed to preparing at least one (possibly 2) coated cavity(ies) to be installed in LEP during 1989. In this paper the various production steps of these cavities are reconsidered in view of industrial production

  6. Flux pinning by voids in surface-oxidized superconducting niobium and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meij, G.P. van der.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of flux pinning by small voids (roughly 10 nm) in the type II superconductors niobium and vanadium. These voids were created in rectangular foils (with typical dimensions of 30x3x0.2 mm) during an irradiation with fast neutrons in the High Flux Reactor at Petten at temperatures between 400 and 1000 0 C. The pinning force per unit volume is determined from the magnetic properties of the superconducting samples. The experiments were carried out in a slowly ramped magnetic field, as well as in a combination of a static and a much smaller alternating field. (Auth.)

  7. Superconducting pinning in BCC niobium-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, S.

    1981-01-01

    The structure dependence of critical current density J/sub c/ in superconducting alloys Nb--Zr and Nb--Ti was studied by means of x-ray analysis and tensile test. Experimental results indicate that, in the absence of second phase particles, annealing increases J/sub c/ in deformed alloys due to rearrangement of dislocations into cell structure and the cell walls are effective pinning centers for magnetic flux. In the precipitation process of second phase particles, new dislocations are formed due to the relaxation of coherent stress field. These new dislocations increases the dislocation density and the flux pinning ability of the cell walls, which in turn lead to a further increase of J/sub c/. The mechanism that causes precipitates to increase the current-carrying ability in Nb--Zr and Nb--Ti alloys is therefore the same as that of cold-work deformation

  8. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.; Wang, Shancai; Plucinski, Lukasz; Smith, Kevin E.; Nowell, Matthew M.

    2006-11-01

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is ±30% and that of the surface composition is ±5%.

  9. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States)]. E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org; Wang Shancai [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Plucinski, Lukasz [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Smith, Kevin E. [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Nowell, Matthew M. [EDAX TSL (United States)

    2006-11-30

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is {+-}30% and that of the surface composition is {+-}5%.

  10. Surface Studies of Niobium Chemically Polished Under Conditions for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavity Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian,H.; Reece, C.; Kelley, M.; Wang, S.; Plucinski, L.; Smith, K.; Nowell, M.

    2006-01-01

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is {+-}30% and that of the surface composition is {+-}5%.

  11. Development of L-band niobium superconducting RF cavities with high accelerating field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki; Kako, Eiji; Shishido, Toshio; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suzuki, Takafusa; Higuchi, Tamawo.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavity is a candidate for the TeV energy e + /e - linear collider of next generation if the accelerating field is improved to 25-30 MV/m and much cost down is achieved in cavity fabrication. Since 1990, KEK has continued R and D of L-band niobium superconducting cavities focusing on the high field issue. A serious problem like Q-degradation due to vacuum discharge came out on the way, however, it has been overcome and presently all of cavities which were annealed at 1400degC achieved the accelerating field of >25 MV/m with enough Qo value. Recent results on single cell cavities are described in this paper. (author)

  12. Physics and chemistry of niobium materials in the context of superconducting RF cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities excel over the normal conducting RF cavities in the long pulse or continuous wave high energy particle accelerations, and niobium (Nb) is currently the material of choice for fabrication of such SCRF cavities. However the accelerating gradients attained in the Nb SCRF cavities deployed in various high energy particle accelerators are significantly below the theoretical limit predicted by the superconducting properties of Nb. Thus it is very important to understand the physics and chemistry of Nb materials in some details so as to maximize the SCRF cavity performance. This abstract will discuss some issues which help in the development of high gradient and energy efficient Nb SCRF cavities in a cost effective manner. (author)

  13. Ga lithography in sputtered niobium for superconductive micro and nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, M. David; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Lewis, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrates the use of focused ion beam (FIB) implanted Ga as a lithographic mask for plasma etching of Nb films. Using a highly collimated Ga beam of a FIB, Nb is implanted 12 nm deep with a 14 nm thick Ga layer providing etch selectivity better than 15:1 with fluorine based etch chemistry. Implanted square test patterns, both 10 μm by 10 μm and 100 μm by 100 μm, demonstrate that doses above than 7.5 × 10 15  cm −2 at 30 kV provide adequate mask protection for a 205 nm thick, sputtered Nb film. The resolution of this dry lithographic technique is demonstrated by fabrication of nanowires 75 nm wide by 10 μm long connected to 50 μm wide contact pads. The residual resistance ratio of patterned Nb films was 3. The superconducting transition temperature (T c ) = 7.7 K was measured using a magnetic properties measurement system. This nanoscale, dry lithographic technique was extended to sputtered TiN and Ta here and could be used on other fluorine etched superconductors such as NbN, NbSi, and NbTi.

  14. Forming and welding of niobium for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgessner, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past two decades a variety of superconducting radio frequency structures have been designed, fabricated and tested, mostly in the pursuit of better and less costly particle accelerators. Over this period of time there has been an evolution in the fabrication processes as well as improvements in the test results. As in all technical endeavors, in the beginning fabrication was very difficult, but over the years developments in fabrication techniques have led to cheaper and improved structures in spite of the increases in the structures complexity. This paper, which describes fabrication techniques, includes the description of work performed at many other laboratories as well as at Cornell. The author wishes to apologize to other laboratories for omissions, of which there are surely many. As far as disagreement on technical conclusions this paper describes those methods which have been found to be most satisfactory at Cornell as determined by their facilities and certainly does not claim that these findings would be the same in all other laboratories. 16 references, 17 figures

  15. Superconducting transition and low-field magnetoresistance of a niobium single crystal at 4.2 deg. K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriot, G.

    1967-01-01

    We report the study of the electrical resistance of a niobium single crystal, at 4.2 deg. K, from the beginning of the superconductive transition to 80 kilo oersteds. Critical fieldsH c2 and H c3 have been determined. Influences on superconductive transition of current density, field-current angle, crystal orientation and magnetoresistance have been studied. Variation laws of low-field transverse and longitudinal magneto-resistances have been determined. (author) [fr

  16. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity β = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is Δf/f = 1.6 x 10 -6 E/sub a/ 2

  17. Evidence for preferential flux flow at the grain boundaries of superconducting RF-quality niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Lee, P. J.; Gurevich, A.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2018-04-01

    The question of whether grain boundaries (GBs) in niobium can be responsible for lowered operating field (B RF) or quality factor (Q 0) in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is still controversial. Here, we show by direct DC transport across planar GBs isolated from a slice of very large-grain SRF-quality Nb that vortices can preferentially flow along the grain boundary when the external magnetic field lies in the GB plane. However, increasing the misalignment between the GB plane and the external magnetic field vector markedly reduces preferential flux flow along the GB. Importantly, we find that preferential GB flux flow is more prominent for a buffered chemical polished than for an electropolished bi-crystal. The voltage-current characteristics of GBs are similar to those seen in low angle grain boundaries of high temperature superconductors where there is clear evidence of suppression of the superconducting order parameter at the GB. While local weakening of superconductivity at GBs in cuprates and pnictides is intrinsic, deterioration of current transparency of GBs in Nb appears to be extrinsic, since the polishing method clearly affect the local GB degradation. The dependence of preferential GB flux flow on important cavity preparation and experimental variables, particularly the final chemical treatment and the angle between the magnetic field and the GB plane, suggests two more reasons why real cavity performance can be so variable.

  18. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is ..delta..f/f = 1.6 x 10/sup -6/ E/sub a//sup 2/.

  19. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (∼120 °C) and high (∼800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ∼1 × 10(-5) Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ∼2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  20. Study of the surface resistance of superconducting niobium films at 1.5 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Campisi, I E; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Russo, R; Valente, A M

    1999-01-01

    A systematic study of superconducting properties of niobium films sputtered on the inner wall of radiofrequency cavities is presented. The measured quantities include in particular the response to 1.5 GHz microwaves, the critical temperature, the penetration depth and the magnetic penetration field. In addition to films grown in different gas discharges (Xe, Kr, Ar and Ar/Ne mixtures) and to films grown on substrates prepared under different conditions, the study also includes bulk niobium cavities. The surface resistance is analysed in terms of its dependence on temperature, on RF field and, when relevant, on the density of trapped fluxons. A simple parameterisation is found to give a good fit to the data. Once allowance for the presence of impurities and defects is made by means of a single parameter, the electron mean free path, good agreement with BCS theory is observed. The fluxon-induced losses are studied in detail and their dependence on RF field, on temperature and on the density of trapped fluxons i...

  1. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical niobium samples used for superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhavale, Asavari S.; Dhakal, Pashupati; Polyanskii, Anatolii A.; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2012-06-01

    We present the results from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low-temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data are analyzed using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples, favorable to lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  2. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  3. Properties of niobium superconducting bridges prepared by electron-beam lithography and ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, J.; Cha, W.; Gamo, K.; Namba, S.

    1979-01-01

    Niobium superconducting bridges having a variable-thickness geometry consisting of a thin narrow implanted region joining two much thicker bulk films have been fabricated. The temperature dependence of the critical current is described well by the static theory of Likharev and Yakobson. The direct current and alternate current Josephson effects were observed at temperatures above the transition temperature T'/sub c/ of the bridge. The magnetic field period of the ''diffraction pattern'' dependence on magnetic field is analyzed taking into account demagnetizing effects in an approximate way. This field period H/sub p/ is found as a function of the bridge width w and the length L for wide bridges (w/L>>1), i.e., H/sub p/= (Phi 0 /μ 0 )/ 2/sup 2/3/w/sup 5/3/L/sup 1/3/

  4. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical niobium samples used for superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhavale, Asavari S; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Polyanskii, Anatolii A

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low-temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data are analyzed using a modified critical state model. The critical current density J c and pinning force F p are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples, favorable to lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities. (paper)

  5. Three-dimensional simulations of the surface topography evolution of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović Branislav M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains results of the three-dimensional simulations of the surface topography evolution of the niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities during isotropic and anisotropic etching modes. The initial rough surface is determined from the experimental power spectral density. The simulation results based on the level set method reveal that the time dependence of the root mean square roughness obeys Family-Viscek scaling law. The growth exponential factors b are determined for both etching modes. Exponential factor for the isotropic etching is 100 times lower than that for the anisotropic etching mode reviling that the isotropic etching is very useful mechanism of the smoothing. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. O171037 i br. III45006

  6. Comparison of Deformation in High-Purity Single/Large Grain and Polycrystalline Niobium Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; Peter Kneisel

    2005-01-01

    The current approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Recently, a new technique was developed at Jefferson Laboratory that enables the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. To better understand the differences between SRF cavities fabricated out of fine-grained polycrystalline sheet in the standard manner and single crystal cavities fabricated by the new technique, two half-cells were produced according to the two different procedures and compared using a variety of analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning laser confocal microscopy, profilometry, and X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic orientations, texture, and residual stresses were determined in the samples before and after forming and this poster presents the results of this ongoing study

  7. Effect of mild baking on superconducting niobium cavities investigated by sequential nanoremoval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romanenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface nanostructure of niobium determines the performance of superconducting microwave cavities. Subtle variations in surface nanostructure lead to yet unexplained phenomena such as the dependence of the quality factor of these resonating structures on the magnitude of rf fields—an effect known as the “Q slopes”. Understanding and controlling the Q slopes is of great practical importance for particle accelerators. Here we investigate the mild baking effect—120°C vacuum baking for 48 hours—which strongly affects the Q slopes. We used a hydrofluoric acid rinse alternating with oxidation in water as a tool for stepwise material removal of about 2  nanometers/step from the surface of superconducting niobium cavities. Applying removal cycles on mild baked cavities and measuring the quality factor dependence on the rf fields after one or several such cycles allowed us to explore the distribution of lossy layers within the first several tens of nanometers from the surface. We found that a single HF rinse results in the increase of the cavity quality factor. The low field Q slope was shown to be mostly controlled by the material structure within the first six nanometers from the surface. The medium field Q slope evolution was fitted using linear (∝B peak surface magnetic field and quadratic (∝B^{2} terms in the surface resistance and it was found that best fits do not require the quadratic term. We found that about 10 nanometers of material removal are required to bring back the high field Q slope and about 20–50 nanometers to restore the onset field to the prebaking value.

  8. Investigation of the superconducting properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    Radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities are widely used to increase the energy of a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The maximum gradients of cavities made of bulk niobium have constantly improved over the last ten years and they are approaching the theoretical limit of the material. Nevertheless, rf tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q-drop"), characterized by a marked increase of the surface resistance at high rf fields, in absence of field emission. A low temperature "in-situ" baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied by several laboratories to reduce those losses and improve the cavity's quality factor. Several models have been proposed to explain the cause of the Q-drop and the baking effect. We investigated the effect of baking on niobium material parameters by measuring the temperature dependence of a cavity's surface impedance and comparing it with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer's theory of superconductivity. It was found that baking allows interstitial oxygen to diffuse from the surface deeper into the bulk. This produces a significant reduction of the normal electrons' mean free path, which causes an increase of the quality factor. The optimum baking parameters are 120°C for 24-48 h. We were also able to identify the origin of the Q-drop as due to a high magnetic field, rather then electric field, by measuring the quality factor of a cavity as function of the rf field in a resonant mode with only magnetic field present on the surface. With the aid of a thermometry system, we were able to localize the losses in the high magnetic field region. We measured the Q-drop in cavities which had undergone different treatments, such as anodization, electropolishing and post-purification, and with different metallurgical properties and we study the effectiveness of baking in each case. As a result, none of the models proposed so far can explain all the experimental observations. We

  9. Orientation-dependent forces between flux lines and crystal lattice in pure niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzhauser, W.

    1976-01-01

    Torque measurements were performed with cylindrical niobium crystals, due to the very small pinning of the high-purity material. A torque that tries to align the flux lines along special directions of the crystal lattice was studied

  10. Integrated Surface Topography Characterization of Variously Polished Niobium for Superconducting Particle Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Hui; Reece, Charles; Kelley, Michael; Ribeill, G.

    2009-01-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro-and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents flow. Interior surface chemical polishing (BCP/EP) to remove mechanical damage leaves surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely-used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is being used to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of EP is reported, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography.

  11. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q 0 -values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q 0 -value of 2 × 10 10 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. The performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching. (paper)

  12. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q 0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3-1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100-150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q 0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. The performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  13. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Ribeill, Guilhem; Xu, Chen; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  14. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hui; Ribeill, Guilhem; Xu Chen; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  15. Niobium Coatings for the HIE-ISOLDE QWR Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jecklin, N; Delaup, B; Ferreira, L; Mondino, I; Sublet, A; Therasse, M; Venturini Desolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy at ISOLDE) project is the upgrade of the existing ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line DEvice) facility at CERN, which is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics experiments. A new linear accelerator made of 20 ȕ=10.3% and 12 ȕ=6.3% quarter-wave resonators (QWR) superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities at 101 MHz will be built, and in a first phase two cryomodules of 5 high-ȕ cavities each are scheduled to accelerate first beams in 2015. The cavities are made of a copper substrate, with a sputter-coated superconductive niobium (Nb) layer, operated at 4.5 K with an accelerating field of 6 MV/m at 10W Radio-Frequency (RF) losses (Q=4.5· 108). In this paper we will discuss the baseline surface treatment and coating procedure which allows obtaining the required performance, as well as the steps undertaken in order to prepare series production of the required number of cavities guaranteeing their quality and functional...

  16. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    OpenAIRE

    D. B. Beringer; W. M. Roach; C. Clavero; C. E. Reece; R. A. Lukaszew

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ∼50  MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2162...

  17. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Zhao; G. Ciovati; T. R. Bieler

    2010-01-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical micro...

  18. Study into the mechanisms of hydrogen contamination of niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency cavities. Molecular dynamics studies for simulation of the hydrogen diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, B.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency cavities were chosen for most of the future particle accelerators. In the case of pure niobium cavities, several laboratories have observed degradation of superconducting properties related to the conditions of the cooling down process. This effect seems to stem from hydrogen contamination which occurs during surface treatments. With the aim to study the influence of different surface treatments on the hydrogen contamination depth concentration profiling of the near surface region (the first 200 nm) was first carried out by the classical ERDA technique with 30 nm depth resolution. In order to better localize hydrogen, the initial particle selecting device (Teflon foil) was replaced by an electromagnetic (ExB) filter improving then the depth resolution by a factor three. This study reveals an hydrogen segregation at the niobium surface. Such a result is in contradiction with the relative high experimental value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient given by the literature. To understand the trapping mechanism of hydrogen, a simulation by molecular dynamics of this impurity diffusion process was performed. This approach requires the knowledge of the interatomic potential. The potential parameters were fitted with static and dynamic tests. Nb-Nb interaction is based on many body potential. Nb-H is represented by two body potential. The Arrhenius diagram of the diffusion coefficient achieved by dynamic for a single crystal provides too small activation energy in comparison with experimental results. However, in presence of defects, a simulation proves a large increase of these values. It is only around 1000 K that the diffusion of hydrogen is not altered by defects. This conclusion confirms the experimental results concerning a good characteristic of superconducting cavities after thermal treatments. (orig.)

  19. A low energy muon spin rotation and point contact tunneling study of niobium films prepared for superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, Tobias; Calatroni, S.; Sublet, A.; Terenziani, G.; Prokscha, T.; Salman, Z.; Suter, A.; Proslier, T.; Zasadzinski, J.

    2017-12-01

    Point contact tunneling and low energy muon spin rotation are used to probe, on the same samples, the surface superconducting properties of micrometer thick niobium films deposited onto copper substrates using different sputtering techniques: diode, dc magnetron and HIPIMS. The combined results are compared to radio-frequency tests performances of RF cavities made with the same processes. Degraded surface superconducting properties are found to correlate to lower quality factors and stronger Q-slope. In addition, both techniques find evidence for surface paramagnetism on all samples and particularly on Nb films prepared by HIPIMS.

  20. Corrosion resistance of the substrates for the cryogenic gyroscope and electrodeposition of the superconductive niobium coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskiy, A. R.; Okunev, M. A.; Makarova, O. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of different materials with the niobium containing melt was investigated. As substrate materials the ceramics, beryllium and carbopyroceram were chosen. Several spherical ceramic and beryllium samples were coated with protective molybdenum and niobium films by magnetron sputtering and PVD, respectively. After the experiment (exposition time 10 min) the exfoliation of molybdenum film from ceramic samples was observed due to interaction of the substrate with the melt. The niobium protective coatings reacted with the melt with niobium oxide formation. The beryllium samples regardless of the shape and the presence of the protective films were dissolved in the niobium containing melt due to more negative electrode potential comparing with niobium one. The carbopyroceram samples were exposed in the melt during 3 and 12 h. It was found that the carbopyroceram not corrodes in the niobium containing melt. The optimal regimes for electrodeposition of smooth uniform niobium coatings with the thickness up to 50 μm on carbopyroceram spheres were found.

  1. Development of vertical electropolishing process applied on 1300 and 704 MHz superconducting niobium resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eozénou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An advanced setup for vertical electropolishing of superconducting radio-frequency niobium elliptical cavities has been installed at CEA Saclay. Cavities are vertically electropolished with circulating standard HF-HF-H_{2}SO_{4} electrolytes. Parameters such as voltage, cathode shape, acid flow, and temperature have been investigated. A low voltage (between 6 and 10 V depending on the cavity geometry, a high acid flow (25  L/min, and a low acid temperature (20° C are considered as promising parameters. Such a recipe has been tested on single-cell and nine-cell International Linear Collider (ILC as well as 704 MHz five-cell Super Proton Linac (SPL cavities. Single-cell cavities showed similar performances at 1.6 K being either vertically or horizontally electropolished. The applied baking process provides similar benefit. An asymmetric removal is observed with faster removal in the upper half-cells. Multicell cavities (nine-cell ILC and five-cell SPL cavities exhibit a standard Q_{0} value at low and medium accelerating fields though limited by power losses due to field emitted electrons.

  2. Effect of non-uniform surface resistance on the quality factor of superconducting niobium cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Weiwei; Lu, Xiangyang; Yang, Ziqin; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yujia

    2016-08-01

    The formula Rs = G /Q0 is commonly used in the calculation of the surface resistance of radio frequency niobium superconducting cavities. The applying of such equation is under the assumption that surface resistance is consistent over the cavity. However, the distribution of the magnetic field varies over the cavity. The magnetic field in the equator is much higher than that in the iris. According to Thermal Feedback Theory, it leads non-uniform distribution of the density of heat flux, which results in a different temperature distribution along the cavity inter surface. The BCS surface resistance, which depends largely on the temperature, is different in each local inner surface. In this paper, the effect of surface non-uniform resistance on the quality factor has been studied, through the calculation of Q0 in the original definition of it. The results show that it is necessary to consider the non-uniform distribution of magnetic field when the accelerating field is above 20 MV/m for TESLA cavities. Also, the effect of inhomogeneity of residual resistance on the quality factor is discussed. Its distribution barely affects the quality factor.

  3. Tunneling measurements in amorphous layers of superconducting transition metals: molybdenum, vanadium, and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roll, U.

    1981-01-01

    Tunneling experiments with amorphous Molybdenum and Vanadium layers are presented, showing no significant increase of the reduced energy gap 2δ(O)/kTsub(c)(δ) compared with the BCS-value, in contrast to all previous measurement on amorphous superconducting materials of simple s-p-metals, showing on enhanced electron-phonon-interaction. This fact may lead to the conclusion that the strong electron-phonon coupling is caused by the amorphous structure of the superconductor. The present results, however, indicate that the strong electron-phonon interaction cannot be explained only ba the amorphous structure of the superconductor. In the measurements of the second derivative d 2 U/dI 2 no phonon-induced structures have been observed for amorphous molybdenum, vanadium and niobium films. Apparently the phonon density of states F(#betta#) of amorphous transition metals has no structure, thus the longitudinal and transverse phonons cannot be identified in the measured (d 2 U/dI 2 )-curves. This particular behaviour of the amorphous transition metals in contrast to the simple s-p-metals may be interpreted by the strongly localized d-electrons. (orig./GG) [de

  4. Unprecedented quality factors at accelerating gradients up to 45 MVm-1 in niobium superconducting resonators via low temperature nitrogen infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Melnychuk, O. S.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Crawford, A. C.; Aderhold, S.; Bice, D.

    2017-09-01

    We report the finding of new surface treatments that permits one to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface ‘infusion’ conditions that systematically (a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; (b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have more than two times the state-of-the-art Q at 2 K for accelerating fields >35 MVm-1. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ˜45 MVm-1 are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.

  5. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Phillips, Larry; Valente, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  6. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardan Upadhyay, Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

    2011-09-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  7. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  8. Effect of low-temperature baking on the radio-frequency properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2004-01-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some 'anomalous' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low-temperature (100-150 deg. C) 'in situ' bake under ultrahigh vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from 'anomalous' losses (so-called 'Q drop') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth, and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with nuclear reaction analysis. The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper

  9. Effect of low-temperature baking on the radio-frequency properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2004-08-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low-temperature (100-150°C) "in situ" bake under ultrahigh vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q drop") without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37-280K and resonant frequency shift between 6-9.3K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth, and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with nuclear reaction analysis. The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper describes

  10. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Wang

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ∼140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ∼140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ∼140 MV

  11. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  12. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Tian, Hui; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  13. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, Charles; Tian, Hui; Kelley, Michael; Xu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  14. Ion implantation in superconducting niobium and Nb3 Sn thin films: adjustment of Josephson microbridges and SQUID devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robic, J.Y.; Piaguet, J.; Duret, D.; Veler, J.C.; Veran, J.L.; Zenatti, D.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of operation of Josephson junctions and SQUIDS are resumed. An ion implantation technique for the adjustment of the critical current is presented. High quality superconducting thin films were obtained by electron gun evaporation of niobium on heated substrates. Polycrystalline Nb 3 Sn was made by annealing (1000 K, 10 -6 Torr) a multilayer structure of successively evaporated niobium and thin films. Selected ions (helium, neon, argon) were implanted at doses ranging from 10 13 to 10 17 cm -2 . After implantation the critical temperature, the critical current and the normal resistivity were measured on special photoetched geometries. The variations of these electrical properties depend on the nuclear energy loss. The critical temperature of Nb 3 Sn is decreased by ion implantation and can be increased again by a new annealing. The parameters of the ion implantation were defined in order to obtain a critical temperature slightly higher than the operating temperature. The geometries of the microbridges and the implanted areas where then chosen to obtain appropriate criticals currents (approximately 10 μA) at the operating temperature. The obtained microbridges were used as junction elements in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID)

  15. The fundamental science of nitrogen-doping of niobium superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Daniel Alfred

    Doping of niobium superconducting RF cavities with impurities has been demonstrated to have the ability to significantly improve the cryogenic efficiency of the accelerating structures. Doping SRF cavities with nitrogen is a relatively simple additional step to cavity preparation that can make drastic improvements in a cavity's intrinsic quality factor, Q0. Nitrogen-doping consists of treating SRF cavities at high temperatures in a low nitrogen-atmosphere. This leads to two important effects: an improvement in Q0 at low fields, and the presence of an "anti-Q slope" in which the cryogenic efficiency of doped cavities actually improves at higher fields. After its initial discovery, nitrogen-doping showed real promise but many fundamental scientific questions remained about the process. Nitrogen-doped cavities consistently quenched at lower fields than un-doped cavities, cooling the cavities through their critical temperature slowly led to poor performance, and the mechanism behind the Q0 improvement was not well understood. This dissertation focuses on addressing these issues. Single-cell 1.3 GHz cavities were prepared with different nitrogen-dopings and their effects studied systematically. It was found that nitrogen-doping drastically lowers the mean free path of the RF penetration layer of the niobium, leading to a lowering of the temperature-dependent BCS resistance, RBCS, at low fields. Theoretical work to predict the anti-Q slope was compared with experimental results to more fundamentally understand the nature of the field dependence of RBCS. Nitrogen-doped cavities were found to have a much larger sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux than un-doped cavities. Fast cool downs with large spatial temperature gradients through Tc were found to more efficiently expel magnetic flux. The full dependence of this sensitivity to trapped magnetic flux was studied as a function of changing mean free path and found to be in good agreement with

  16. Determination of low-field critical parameters of superconducting niobium by small-angle neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, D.K.; Spooner, S.; Thorel, P.; Kerchner, H.R.

    1977-01-01

    The perfect double-crystal small-angle diffraction technique enables measurement of scattering angles to within 0.3 arc sec. accuracy. At a wavelength of 2.55 A, this provides a resolution of 3 x 10 -6 A -1 in the scattering vector. This technique has been used to study the anisotropic behavior of the critical parameters B 0 and H/sub c1/, characteristic of the first-order magnetic phase transition which occurs in low-kappa type-II superconductors. Magnetic fields were applied parallel to several crystal axes of a large single-crystal sphere of pure niobium, resulting in well-defined flux-line lattices (FLL). Measurement of the FLL cell area in the intermediate mixed state field region gives the equilibrium flux density B 0 , which results from an attractive interaction between fluxoids. In addition, field variation of the scattered neutron intensity allows measurement of the transition field between the mixed state and intermediate mixed state. This transition field is related to the lower critical field H/sub c1/ and enables its determination to a precision 0.2%. Data at T = 4.3 K display a small anisotropic effect of about 2% in B 0 and 1% in H/sub c1/. Although orientation effects of this magnitude are difficult to resolve by bulk measurements, the neutron data are in accord with magnetization data. Observations regarding the temperature dependence of these parameters also will be presented, and comparisons made with current theoretical models

  17. Method for producing superconductive wires of multifilaments which are encased in copper or a copper alloy and contain niobium and aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flukiger, R.

    1983-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing a superconductive wire of multifilaments having components comprising niobium and aluminum encased in copper or a copper alloy, wherein the multifilament configuration and the formation of a superconductive A15 phase are positively developed from the components disposed in a copper or copper alloy tube having an interior metallic coating serving as a diffusion barrier, by cold forming and subsequent heat treatment

  18. Baking effect on Niobium superconducting RF cavities and its physical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kneisel, P. [Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility, VA, (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Recently a very surprising phenomenon has been discovered at JLab and Saclay with chemically polished niobium cavities, which the baking during vacuum evacuation has benefits to improve the cavity performance: high Q and high gradient. We have confirmed the same effect on the electropolished niobium cavities. We have analyzed the temperature dependence of the surface resistance in order to understand this effect in the frame or BCS theory. In this paper these results will be presented. (author)

  19. Superconductivity and electronic structure of superpure niobium. 3. Magnetoconductivity and magnetic breakdown in large magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseevskij, N.E.; Nizhankovskij, V.I.; Bertel', K.-X.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been of electric conductivity and magnetoresistance of niobium monocrystals with various orientations in helium and hydrogen temperature regions in steady-state magnetic fields of up to 175 ke. At helium temperatures the resistance is shown to be proportional to the square of temperature. A significant longitudinal magnetoresistance of niobium has been established, depending on the sample orientation. Its initiation is attributed to the open nature of the niobium Fermi surface. As a result of studying the lateral magnetoresistance in fields of up to 92 ke, a stereographic projection of niobium open directions has been constructed. Open trajectories exist both in two-dimensional regions around the directions [100] and [111] and along the symmetry lines. Studies conducted in fields of up to 175 ke have revealed a magnetic break- own leading to the conversion of the open trajectories to the closed ones. A comprehensive picture of the magnetic break-down in niobium has been obtained, and on the basis of the coherent model an expression has been derived describing the impact of this break-down on the resistance. Comparison between experimental and theoretical dependences of the magnetoresistance on the field characteristics has provided the value of the break-down field H 0 =280 ke

  20. Impact of nitrogen doping of niobium superconducting cavities on the sensitivity of surface resistance to trapped magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Dan; Kaufman, John; Liepe, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac require hundreds of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium cavities operating in continuous wave mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0) to keep cryogenic losses within feasible limits. To reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping of niobium cavities has been selected as the cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1 × 1010, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here, we show that the sensitivity to RF losses from trapped magnetic field in a cavity's walls is strongly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120 °C baked cavities show a sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜0.6 and ˜0.8 nΩ/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a higher sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜1 to 5 nΩ/mG trapped. We show that this difference in sensitivities is directly related to the mean free path of the RF surface layer of the niobium: shorter mean free paths lead to less sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the dirty limit (ℓ ≪ ξ0), while longer mean free paths lead to lower sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the clean limit (ℓ ≫ ξ0). These experimental results are also shown to have good agreement with recent theoretical predictions for pinned vortex lines oscillating in RF fields.

  1. Development of low angle grain boundaries in lightly deformed superconducting niobium and their influence on hydride distribution and flux perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Wang, M.; Polyanskii, A. A.; Santosh, C.; Balachandran, S.; Compton, C.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Bieler, T. R.; Lee, P. J.

    2017-05-01

    This study shows that low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) can be created by small 5% strains in high purity (residual resistivity ratio ≥ 200) superconducting radio frequency (SRF)-grade single crystalline niobium (Nb) and that these boundaries act as hydrogen traps as indicated by the distribution of niobium hydrides (Nb1-xHx). Nb1-xHx is detrimental to SRF Nb cavities due to its normal conducting properties at cavity operating temperatures. By designing a single crystal tensile sample extracted from a large grain (>5 cm) Nb ingot slice for preferred slip on one slip plane, LAGBs and dense dislocation boundaries developed. With chemical surface treatments following standard SRF cavity fabrication practice, Nb1-xHx phases were densely precipitated at the LAGBs upon cryogenic cooling (8-10 K/min). Micro-crystallographic analysis confirmed heterogeneous hydride precipitation, which included significant hydrogen atom accumulation in LAGBs. Magneto-optical imaging analysis showed that these sites can then act as sites for both premature flux penetration and eventually flux trapping. However, this hydrogen related degradation at LAGBs did not completely disappear even after an 800 °C/2 h anneal typically used for hydrogen removal in SRF Nb cavities. These findings suggest that hydride precipitation at an LAGB is facilitated by a non-equilibrium concentration of vacancy-hydrogen (H) complexes aided by mechanical deformation and the hydride phase interferes with the recovery process under 800 °C annealing.

  2. Advances in high-field superconducting composites by addition of artificial pinning centres to niobium-titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, L.D.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1999-01-01

    Artificial pinning-centre (APC) niobium-titanium composites attain critical current density J c values higher than 4000 A mm -2 at 5 T, 4.2 K, surpassing the barrier reached by the conventional Nb-Ti composite process. At 2 T APC composites achieve more than double the J c of conventional composites, making them particularly well suited for low-field applications. On the other hand, APC composites are inferior to conventional composites at 8 T, due to weak high-field pinning and reduced upper critical field. This review discusses fabrication techniques, microstructural development and superconducting and flux-pinning properties of APC composites. Key elements and underlying issues for achieving higher J c are identified and discussed in terms of the current state of the art. (author)

  3. Production of Seamless Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities from Ultra-fine Grained Niobium, Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Crooks, Ph.D., P.E.

    2009-10-31

    The positron and electron linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) will require over 14,000, nine-cell, one meter length, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities [ILC Reference Design Report, 2007]. Manufacturing on this scale will benefit from more efficient fabrication methods. The current methods of fabricating SRF cavities involve deep drawing of the halves of each of the elliptical cells and joining them by high-vacuum, electron beam welding, with at least 19 circumferential welds per cavity. The welding is costly and has undesirable effects on the cavity surfaces, including grain-scale surface roughening at the weld seams. Hydroforming of seamless tubes avoids welding, but hydroforming of coarse-grained seamless tubes results in strain-induced surface roughening. Surface roughness limits accelerating fields, because asperities prematurely exceed the critical magnetic field and become normal conducting. This project explored the technical and economic feasibility of an improved processing method for seamless tubes for hydroforming. Severe deformation of bulk material was first used to produce a fine structure, followed by extrusion and flow-forming methods of tube making. Extrusion of the randomly oriented, fine-grained bulk material proceeded under largely steady-state conditions, and resulted in a uniform structure, which was found to be finer and more crystallographically random than standard (high purity) RRR niobium sheet metal. A 165 mm diameter billet of RRR grade niobium was processed into five, 150 mm I.D. tubes, each over 1.8 m in length, to meet the dimensions used by the DESY ILC hydroforming machine. Mechanical properties met specifications. Costs of prototype tube production were approximately twice the price of RRR niobium sheet, and are expected to be comparable with economies of scale. Hydroforming and superconducting testing will be pursued in subsequent collaborations with DESY and Fermilab. SRF Cavities are used to construct

  4. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  5. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  6. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nageshwar [Magnetic and Superconducting Materials Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, M.P. (India); Deo, M.N. [High Pressure & Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, S.B. [Magnetic and Superconducting Materials Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, M.P. (India)

    2016-09-11

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  7. Interaction at interface between superconducting yttrium ceramics and copper or niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, M.I.; Korzhov, V.P.; Medved', N.V.; Myshlyaeva, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Light metallography, scanning electron microscopy and local energy dispersion analysis have been used to study the interaction of Y-ceramics with copper and niobium. Samples in the form of wire of two types were employed, that is, consisting of ceramic core YBaCuO and Cu shell or a ceramic core YBaCuO and bimetallic Cu/Nb shell. The interaction of the ceramics with the shell metal began already at 500 deg with the formation at the interafaces Cu-YBaCuO of oxide layers containing ceramic elements, and in the ceramic core - nonsuperconducting phases. A thin Al-layer placed between the ceramics and the shell appreciably decreased the reactability of the ceramics with respect to copper and niobium

  8. The effect of diffusion couple tin content on the superconductivity of filamentary niobium tin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, I.L.

    1978-01-01

    The precision with which composites can be designed to meet magnet specifications is improved by considering the effect of non-equilibrium growth in the bronze niobium diffusion couples. Evidence is presented for the suggestion that high growth rates induce lattice microfaulting which reduced Tsub(c) and Hsub(c2) and gives a large gradient in grain size which reduces Jsub(c). (author)

  9. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, D. B.; Roach, W. M.; Clavero, C.; Reece, C. E.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ˜50MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2162264] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  10. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001 surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Beringer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ∼50  MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2162264] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  11. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beringer, D. B. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Roach, W. M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Clavero, C. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Reece, C. E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Lukaszew, R. A. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    2013-02-05

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ~500 MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [ Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 012511 (2006)] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  12. Niobium and tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Papp, John F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Niobium and tantalum are transition metals that are almost always found together in nature because they have very similar physical and chemical properties. Their properties of hardness, conductivity, and resistance to corrosion largely determine their primary uses today. The leading use of niobium (about 75 percent) is in the production of high-strength steel alloys used in pipelines, transportation infrastructure, and structural applications. Electronic capacitors are the leading use of tantalum for high-end applications, including cell phones, computer hard drives, and such implantable medical devices as pacemakers. Niobium and tantalum are considered critical and strategic metals based on the potential risks to their supply (because current production is restricted to only a few countries) and the significant effects that a restriction in supply would have on the defense, energy, high-tech industrial, and medical sectors.The average abundance of niobium and tantalum in bulk continental crust is relatively low—8.0 parts per million (ppm) niobium and 0.7 ppm tantalum. Their chemical characteristics, such as small ionic size and high electronic field strength, significantly reduce the potential for these elements to substitute for more common elements in rock-forming minerals and make niobium and tantalum essentially immobile in most aqueous solutions. Niobium and tantalum do not occur naturally as pure metals but are concentrated in a variety of relatively rare oxide and hydroxide minerals, as well as in a few rare silicate minerals. Niobium is primarily derived from the complex oxide minerals of the pyrochlore group ((Na,Ca,Ce)2(Nb,Ti,Ta)2(O,OH,F)7), which are found in some alkaline granite-syenite complexes (that is, igneous rocks containing sodium- or potassium-rich minerals and little or no quartz) and carbonatites (that is, igneous rocks that are more than 50 percent composed of primary carbonate minerals, by volume). Tantalum is derived mostly from the

  13. Flux pinning by voids in surface-oxidized superconducting niobium and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meij, G.P. van der.

    1984-03-01

    The volume pinning force in several niobium and vanadium samples with voids is determined at various temperatures. Reasonable agreement is found with the collective pinning theory of Larkin and Ovchinnikov above the field of maximum pinning, if the flux line lattice is assumed to be amorphous in this region and if the elementary pinning force is calculated from the quasi-classical theory of Thuneberg, Kurkijaervi, and Rainer. Also some history and relaxation effects are studied in an alternating field. A qualitative explanation is given in terms of flux line dislocations, which reduce the shear strength of the flux line lattice. (Auth.)

  14. Evidence of preferential diffusion and segregation of impurities at grain boundaries in very pure niobium used for radiofrequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, C.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.; Berthier, B.; Tessier, E.; Trocelier, P.; Chevarier, A.; Chevarier, N.; Roux, B.

    1996-04-01

    In order to overcome dissipation due to impurity segregation at grain boundary, niobium cavities are submitted to a purification annealing (1300 deg C ± 200 deg C under vacuum) during which titanium is evaporated onto the Nb surface. The resulting titanium layer acts as a solid state getter reacting with light impurities (H, C, N, O), thereby removing these impurities from the bulk of the niobium. Evidence of preferential titanium diffusion and segregation at grain boundaries has been studied using PIXE analysis induced by proton microbeam. (author)

  15. Critical current degradation in superconducting niobium-titanium alloys in external magnetic fields under loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojko, V.S.; Lazareva, M.B.; Starodubov, Ya.D.; Chernyj, O.V.; Gorbatenko, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of external magnetic fields on the stress at which the critical current starts to degrade (the degradation threshold σ 0 e ) under mechanical loads in superconducting Nb-Ti alloys is studied and a possible mechanism of realization of the effect observed is proposed.It is assumed that additional stresses on the transformation dislocation from the external magnetic fields are beneficial for the growth of martensite inclusions whose superconducting parameters (critical current density j k and critical temperature T k ) are lower then those in the initial material.The degradation threshold is studied experimentally in external magnetic fields H up to 7 T.The linear dependence σ 0 e (H) is observed.It is shown that external magnetic fields play an important role in the critical current degradation at the starting stages of deformation.This fact supports the assumption that the degradation of superconducting parameters under loading are due to the phenomenon of superelasticity,i.e. a reversible load-induced change in the martensite inclusions sizes rather than the reversible mechanical twinning.The results obtained are thought to be important to estimating superconducting solenoid stability in a wide range of magnetic fields

  16. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. The local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  17. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots” were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD, and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations. All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. The local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  18. Investigation of local losses as a function of material removal in a large-grain superconducting niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavity made of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) > 200 large-grain niobium has been investigated as a function of material removal, between 70 and 240 ?m, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP). Temperature maps of the cavity surface at 1.7 and 2.0 K were taken for each step of chemical etching and revealed localized losses (''hot-spots''), which contribute to the degradation of the cavity quality factor as a function of the RF surface field. It was found that the number of ''hot-spots'' decreased for larger material removal. Interestingly, the losses at the ''hot-spots'' at different locations evolved differently for successive material removal. The cavity achieved peak surface magnetic fields of about of 130 mT and was limited mostly by thermal quench. By measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance (Rs) at low field between 4.2 K and 1.7 K, the variation of material parameters such as the energy gap at 0 K, the residual resistance and the mean free path as a function of material removal could also be investigated. This contribution presents the results of the RF tests along with the temperature maps and the analysis of the losses caused by the ''hot-spots''

  19. Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rašković

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7  μm/min⁡ using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

  20. Unprecedented quality factors at accelerating gradients up to 45 MVm -1 in niobium superconducting resonators via low temperature nitrogen infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Melnychuk, O. S.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Crawford, A. C.; Aderhold, S.; Bice, D.

    2017-08-14

    We report the finding of new surface treatments that permit to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface infusion conditions that systematically a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have larger than two times the state of the art Q at 2K for accelerating fields > 35 MV/m. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ~ 45 MV/m are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.

  1. Probing the fundamental limit of niobium in high radiofrequency fields by dual mode excitation in superconducting radiofrequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari

    2011-01-01

    We have studied thermal breakdown in several multicell superconducting radiofrequency cavity by simultaneous excitation of two TM 010 passband modes. Unlike measurements done in the past, which indicated a clear thermal nature of the breakdown, our measurements present a more complex picture with interplay of both thermal and magnetic effects. JLab LG-1 that we studied was limited at 40.5 MV/m, corresponding to B peak = 173 mT, in 89 mode. Dual mode measurements on this quench indicate that this quench is not purely magnetic, and so we conclude that this field is not the fundamental limit in SRF cavities

  2. Niobium thin film deposition studies on copper surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. M. Roach, D. B. Beringer, J. R. Skuza, W. A. Oliver, C. Clavero, C. E. Reece, R. A. Lukaszew

    2012-06-01

    Thin film coatings have the potential to increase both the thermal efficiency and accelerating gradient in superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. However, before this potential can be realized, systematic studies on structure-property correlations in these thin films need to be carried out since the reduced geometry, combined with specific growth parameters, can modify the physical properties of the materials when compared to their bulk form. Here, we present our systematic studies of Nb thin films deposited onto Cu surfaces to clarify possible reasons for the limited success that this process exhibited in previous attempts. We compare these films with Nb grown on other surfaces. In particular, we study the crystal structure and surface morphology and their effect on superconducting properties, such as critical temperature and lower critical field. We found that higher deposition temperature leads to a sharper critical temperature transition, but also to increased roughness indicating that there are competing mechanisms that must be considered for further optimization.

  3. Niobium thin film deposition studies on copper surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.M.; Beringer, D.B.; Skuza, J.R.; Oliver, W.A.; Clavero, C.; Reece, C.E.; Lukaszew, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Thin film coatings have the potential to increase both the thermal efficiency and accelerating gradient in superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. However, before this potential can be realized, systematic studies on structure-property correlations in these thin films need to be carried out since the reduced geometry, combined with specific growth parameters, can modify the physical properties of the materials when compared to their bulk form. Here, we present our systematic studies of Nb thin films deposited onto Cu surfaces to clarify possible reasons for the limited success that this process exhibited in previous attempts. We compare these films with Nb grown on other surfaces. In particular, we study the crystal structure and surface morphology and their effect on superconducting properties, such as critical temperature and lower critical field. We found that higher deposition temperature leads to a sharper critical temperature transition, but also to increased roughness indicating that there are competing mechanisms that must be considered for further optimization.

  4. Niobium thin film deposition studies on copper surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    OpenAIRE

    W. M. Roach; D. B. Beringer; J. R. Skuza; W. A. Oliver; C. Clavero; C. E. Reece; R. A. Lukaszew

    2012-01-01

    Thin film coatings have the potential to increase both the thermal efficiency and accelerating gradient in superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. However, before this potential can be realized, systematic studies on structure-property correlations in these thin films need to be carried out since the reduced geometry, combined with specific growth parameters, can modify the physical properties of the materials when compared to their bulk form. Here, we present our systematic stu...

  5. Effects of strain on the superconducting properties of niobium-tin conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoard, R.W.

    1980-11-01

    Investigations were performed to ascertain additional information on the connection between the cubic to tetragonal martensitic phase transformation and the phenomenon of superconductivity in Nb 3 Sn. Of particular interest is the degradation of the critical parameters, such as T/sub c/, H/sub c2/, and J/sub c/, with mechanical straining of the superconductor. These studies yielded information that assisted in the derivation of the critical current-strain scaling laws mentioned above

  6. Superconducting transition and low-field magnetoresistance of a niobium single crystal at 4.2 deg. K; Transition supraconductrice et magnetoresistance en champ faible d'un echantillon monocristallin de niobium a 4.2 deg. K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perriot, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Service de physique du solide et de resonnance magnetique

    1967-01-01

    We report the study of the electrical resistance of a niobium single crystal, at 4.2 deg. K, from the beginning of the superconductive transition to 80 kilo oersteds. Critical fieldsH{sub c2} and H{sub c3} have been determined. Influences on superconductive transition of current density, field-current angle, crystal orientation and magnetoresistance have been studied. Variation laws of low-field transverse and longitudinal magneto-resistances have been determined. (author) [French] La variation de la resistance electrique d'un monocristal cylindrique de niobium a ete etudiee, a 4,2 deg. K, depuis le debut de la transition supraconductrice jusqu'a 80 kilooersteds. Les champs critiques H{sub c2} et H{sub c3} ont ete determines. On a etudie l'influence de la densite de courant, de l'angle champ-courant, de l'anisotropie cristalline et de la magnetoresistance sur la transition supraconductrice. Les lois de variation des magnetoresistances transversale et longitudinale ont ete determinees dans le domaine des champs faibles. (auteur)

  7. Superconducting transition and low-field magnetoresistance of a niobium single crystal at 4.2 deg. K; Transition supraconductrice et magnetoresistance en champ faible d'un echantillon monocristallin de niobium a 4.2 deg. K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perriot, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Service de physique du solide et de resonnance magnetique

    1967-01-01

    We report the study of the electrical resistance of a niobium single crystal, at 4.2 deg. K, from the beginning of the superconductive transition to 80 kilo oersteds. Critical fieldsH{sub c2} and H{sub c3} have been determined. Influences on superconductive transition of current density, field-current angle, crystal orientation and magnetoresistance have been studied. Variation laws of low-field transverse and longitudinal magneto-resistances have been determined. (author) [French] La variation de la resistance electrique d'un monocristal cylindrique de niobium a ete etudiee, a 4,2 deg. K, depuis le debut de la transition supraconductrice jusqu'a 80 kilooersteds. Les champs critiques H{sub c2} et H{sub c3} ont ete determines. On a etudie l'influence de la densite de courant, de l'angle champ-courant, de l'anisotropie cristalline et de la magnetoresistance sur la transition supraconductrice. Les lois de variation des magnetoresistances transversale et longitudinale ont ete determinees dans le domaine des champs faibles. (auteur)

  8. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trenikhina, Y., E-mail: yuliatr@fnal.gov [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Romanenko, A., E-mail: aroman@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Zasadzinski, J. F. [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ∼100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120 °C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800 °C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120 °C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120 °C bake.

  9. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ˜100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120 °C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800 °C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120 °C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120 °C bake.

  10. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ~100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120°C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800°C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120°C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120°C bake

  11. Experimental results in superconducting niobium resonators for high-brightness ion beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    Two niobium resonant cavities for high-brightness ion beam acceleration have been constructed and tested. The first was based on a coaxial quarter-wave geometry and was optimized for phase velocity β O = O.15. This cavity, which resonates at 400 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average (wall-to-wall) accelerating gradient of 12.9 MV/m under continuous-wave (cw) fields. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.4x10 8 was measured. The second was based on a coaxial half-wave geometry and was optimized for β O = 0.12. This cavity, which resonates at 355 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average accelerating gradient of 18.0 MV/m under cw fields. This is the highest average accelerating gradient achieved to date in low-velocity structures designed for cw operation. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.2 x 10 8 was measured

  12. Mechanical properties as an indicator of interstitials in niobium for superconducting accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricker, R. E., E-mail: richard.ricker@nist.gov; Pitchure, D. J., E-mail: david.pitchure@nist.gov [Materials Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, US (United States); Myneni, G. R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606, US (United States)

    2015-12-04

    A preliminary investigation was conducted into the feasibility of using simple mechanical properties experiments to evaluate interstitial impurity uptake from processing environments. Two types of tests were examined: tensile tests and complex modulus measurements using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). For the tensile tests, samples were cut from a single crystal of niobium, with the same orientation, and then prepared following different procedures. Significant differences were observed during tensile tests, with yielding strength and strain-to-failure clearly related to interstitial uptake. When the strain rate was reduced by an order of magnitude, the strain-to-failure was reduced by 18 % indicating that interstitial hydrogen is responsible for this behavior. For the complex modulus measurement, polycrystalline samples from different locations of two different ingots were examined at a frequency of 1.0 Hz while the temperature was increased at the rate of 1.0 °C per minute. Anaelastic peaks were found for C, N, and O in all samples, but the lower limit of the system did not allow for detection of a peak for H. It is concluded that mechanical properties could be developed as a measurement tool to guide the development of processing methods for producing reduced interstitial content material, but additional research, and uncertainty analysis, is required for these tools to be reliable in this application.

  13. Superconducting and normal state properties of niobium-potasium chloride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boysel, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The electrical resistivity, current-voltage characteristics, critical currents, and DC magnetic susceptibility of composites consisting of 50 μm grains of Nb randomly dispersed in a KCl medium were measured. Data were taken between 1.2K and 20K in magnetic fields from 0 to +- 5G. The resistivity and current-voltage characteristics were measured using a standard four-terminal AC technique with a voltage sensitivity of 1 to 2nV, and the magnetic susceptibility was measured using an rf SQUID magnetometer. We found that samples with rho/sub n/ 2 . For 0.1Ω-cm 10Ω-cm there was no superconducting transition. The susceptibility decreased slowly below the grain transition temperature T/sub infinity/ and even below T/sub c/ in samples which underwent resistive transitions. The shape of the resistive transitions and the kink structure in the I-V's require a phase coherent transition model to adequately describe them. However, the poor fit of the theory to our data, the existence of the voltage steps, and the changing susceptibility below the resistive transition indicate that sample disorder plays a more important role in the superconducting transition of composites than is currently accounted for by phase coherent transition theories

  14. Niobium thin film deposition studies on copper surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Roach

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin film coatings have the potential to increase both the thermal efficiency and accelerating gradient in superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. However, before this potential can be realized, systematic studies on structure-property correlations in these thin films need to be carried out since the reduced geometry, combined with specific growth parameters, can modify the physical properties of the materials when compared to their bulk form. Here, we present our systematic studies of Nb thin films deposited onto Cu surfaces to clarify possible reasons for the limited success that this process exhibited in previous attempts. We compare these films with Nb grown on other surfaces. In particular, we study the crystal structure and surface morphology and their effect on superconducting properties, such as critical temperature and lower critical field. We found that higher deposition temperature leads to a sharper critical temperature transition, but also to increased roughness indicating that there are competing mechanisms that must be considered for further optimization.

  15. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gurevich, Alexander V. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  16. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-01-01

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ∼1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR∼260 and RRR∼100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material

  17. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-01

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ˜1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR˜260 and RRR˜100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  18. Superconducting Fluctuations above T c and pair breaking parameters of two dimensional Niobium Nitride Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, B.; Ezaki, S.; Odou, T.; Makise, K.; Asano, T.

    2018-03-01

    Transport properties have been investigated for the epitaxial superconducting NbN thin films. We analysed the excess conductance σ’ ≡ σ(T) - σN by the sum of the Aslamazov-Larkin (AL) and Maki-Thompson (MT) terms for thermal fluctuations above T c, where the σN ≡1/R sq N is the normal state sheet conductance. We have found that the theoretical expression σ’theo (T) = σ’AL (T) + σ’MT (T,δ) can be well fitted to σ’exp (T) with use of the suitable value of the pair breaking parameter δ in the MT term relating to the inelastic scattering rate 1/τin(T) as δ = πħ/8k B Tτin. The rate 1/τin(T) given by the sum of 1/τfluc(T), 1/τe-e(T) and 1/τe-ph (T) is determined from the analysis of the magneto-conductance Δσ = σ(H) – σ(0) by the sum of AL, MT and the localization terms, where the first, second and third terms correspond to the rate due to the superconducting fluctuation effect, electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions, respectively. The R sq N dependence of δ is expressed by δ = δ0 + αR sq N, where the first term δ0 due to 1/τe-ph (T) and the second term due to the sum of 1/τfluc(T) and 1/τe-e(T). Although we obtained a reasonable value of Debye temperature ΘD ≈630 K from the δ0, the magnitude of the α is about 5 times larger than the theoretical value.

  19. Aging of the HF-H2SO4 electrolyte used for the electropolishing of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities: Origins and cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eozénou, F.; Berry, S.; Antoine, C.; Gasser, Y.; Charrier, J.-P.; Malki, B.

    2010-08-01

    Electropolishing (EP) in the HF-H2SO4 electrolyte is the most desirable surface treatment for niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities yet demonstrated, in terms of performance and surface finish. However, the efficiency of the electrolyte declines quickly with time (decrease in removal rate, deterioration of the niobium surface, increased sulfur generation). Previous studies at CEA Saclay have highlighted the impact of the water content in EP mixtures rather than the content of dissolved niobium. Knowledge of the electrochemical system was improved thanks to studies using a rotating disk electrode (RDE). Measurements with a RDE give precious information concerning mass transport of the different ionic groups present in the solution. The performed measurements prove that EP is controlled by the diffusion of fluorine ions and the value of the related diffusion coefficient DF- was estimated for different mixtures. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were also performed with different EP mixtures. Both volt ampere metric and EIS measurements prove the central role of fluorine during EP and show that EP mechanisms evolve with the aging of the bath. Another major problem related to electrolytes is the formation of impurities such as sulfur. We have proved that working at a reduced voltage of 5 V does not alter cavity performance and makes it possible to reduce the undesirable particulate contamination in electrolytes and to increase their lifetime.

  20. Aging of the HF-H_{2}SO_{4} electrolyte used for the electropolishing of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities: Origins and cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eozénou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Electropolishing (EP in the HF-H_{2}SO_{4} electrolyte is the most desirable surface treatment for niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities yet demonstrated, in terms of performance and surface finish. However, the efficiency of the electrolyte declines quickly with time (decrease in removal rate, deterioration of the niobium surface, increased sulfur generation. Previous studies at CEA Saclay have highlighted the impact of the water content in EP mixtures rather than the content of dissolved niobium. Knowledge of the electrochemical system was improved thanks to studies using a rotating disk electrode (RDE. Measurements with a RDE give precious information concerning mass transport of the different ionic groups present in the solution. The performed measurements prove that EP is controlled by the diffusion of fluorine ions and the value of the related diffusion coefficient D_{F-} was estimated for different mixtures. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements were also performed with different EP mixtures. Both volt ampere metric and EIS measurements prove the central role of fluorine during EP and show that EP mechanisms evolve with the aging of the bath. Another major problem related to electrolytes is the formation of impurities such as sulfur. We have proved that working at a reduced voltage of 5 V does not alter cavity performance and makes it possible to reduce the undesirable particulate contamination in electrolytes and to increase their lifetime.

  1. Evidence of preferential diffusion and segregation of impurities at grain boundaries in very pure niobium used for radiofrequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, C.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.; Chevarier, A.; Chevarier, N.; Roux, B.

    1996-01-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) of titaniferous, heat treated and then etched niobium have been observed by nuclear microprobe analysis. The very small area of the probe allows to measure by PIXE quantities of titanium as low as one monolayer at the GB. Concentrations of titanium as high as some atomic percent were found on 6 μm etched samples, giving indication of a preferential diffusion and/or segregation at GB. Titanium was detectable also on 15 μm etched samples but was bellow the sensitivity of the microprobe for 35 μm etched samples. (author)

  2. Fabrication and dc characteristics of small-area tantalum and niobium superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Face, D.W.; Prober, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the fabrication and dc electrical characteristics of small-area (1--6 μm 2 ) superconducting tunnel junctions with Ta or Nb base electrodes and Pb or Pb/sub 0.9/Bi/sub 0.1/ counterelectrodes. These junctions have very small subgap leakage currents, a ''sharp'' current rise at the sum-gap voltage, and show strong quantum effects when used as microwave mixers. The use of a low-energy (--150 eV) ion cleaning process and a novel step-defined fabrication process that eliminates photoresist processing after base electrode deposition are discussed. Tunnel barriers formed by dc glow discharge oxidation were the most successful. Tunnel barrier formation by thermal oxidation and ion-beam oxidation is also discussed. An oxidized Ta overlayer (--7 nm thick) was found to improve the characteristics of Nb-based junctions. The electrical characteristics of junctions with different electrode and barrier materials are presented and discussed in terms of the physical mechanisms that lead to excess subgap current and to a width of the current rise at the sum-gap voltage

  3. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria; Guimarães, Rogério Contato; Ribas, Rogério Marques; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins; Menezes, Andréia Duarte; Fridman, Daniel Pallos; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-01-01

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient

  4. Stabilized superconductive wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, R.N.; Wong, J.

    1976-01-01

    A stable, high field, high current conductor is produced by packing multiple, multi-layer rods of a bronze core and niobium or vanadium inner jacket and copper outer jacket into a pure copper tube or other means for forming a pure copper matrix, sealing, working the packed tube to a wire, and by diffusion, heat treating to form a type II superconducting, Beta-Wolfram structure, intermetallic compound as a layer within each of several filaments derived from the rods. The layer of Beta-Wolfram structure compound may be formed in less than 2 h of diffusion heat treatment in a thickness of 0.5--2μ

  5. Method for the manufacture of a superconductive Nb3Sn layer on a niobium surface for high frequency applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, H.

    1978-01-01

    A manufacturing method for depositing an Nb 3 Sn layer on a niobium surface for high frequency applications comprising developing a tin vapor atmosphere which also contains a highly volatile tin compound in the gaseous state, and holding the portions of the surface which are to be provided with the Nb 3 Sn layer at a temperature of between 900 0 and 1500 0 C for a predetermined period of time to form the Nb 3 Sn layer permitting niobium surfaces of any shape to be provided with Nb 3 Sn layers of high uniformity and quality

  6. THE NIOBIUM-THORIUM EUTECTIC ALLOY AS A HIGH-FIELD, HIGH-CURRENT SUPERCONDUCTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, H. E.; Rose, R. M.; Wulff, J.

    1963-03-15

    Niobium-thorium eutectic alloys having fine acicuiar microstructures were produced by fast cooling frorn a vacuum melt. Although the solidified material was normal, continuity between the superconducting niobium-rich phase, which was essentially pure niobium, was attained by plastic deformation at room temperature. The resulting wire was tested for critical current at 4.2 deg K, in transverse magnetic fields up to 82.5 kilogauss; at the highest field, critical current densities of slightly more than 10/sup 4/ amps per square centimeter were observed. The critical current density was independent of applied field from 20 kilogauss to the highest field used; the level of critical current density depended on diameter in a manner that suggested dependence on cold work. It was concluded that the cold work reduced the thickness of the needles of niobium below the superconducting penetration depth, and brought them sufficiently close together to allow the superconducting correlation to interconnect the niobium, in the manner suggested by Cooper; furthermore, the constant critical current region may possibly extend to considerably higher fields. (auth)

  7. Study of thermal phenomena in niobium superconducting cavities when stiffened by thermal spray coating; Etude des phenomenes thermiques dans les cavites acceleratrices supraconductrices en niobium rigidifiees par projection thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousson, S

    2000-02-01

    The first objective of this thesis is to study a new superconducting cavity stiffening method based on thermal spraying. The principle is to add on the cavity external walls a copper layer using the thermal spraying process. Several tests on samples allowed to measure the thermal and mechanical properties of the layers deposited by several different processes. Measurements performed on 3 and 1.3 GHz niobium cavities, before and after copper deposition, proved the interest and feasibility of the method. The study showed the need to have very dense layers (porosity reduced to the minimum in order to have good mechanical characteristics), and not oxidised (to reduce the coating thermal resistance). As a conclusion, the spraying process performed under controlled atmosphere seems to be the most suited for superconducting cavity stiffening. The tools and analysing methods which have been developed for this study allowed to investigate other phenomena involved in the cavity thermal stability, and particularly the quench, a phenomenon often studied but not in its dynamic. A model is proposed in this thesis to analyse the quench dynamic behaviour using only the fast RF signal measurement during a quench. It has been shown that the quench propagation velocity depends essentially on the accelerating field and the niobium thermal conductivity. A study on the thermometer response time used as diagnostics on cavities proved that the transients during a quench are not efficiently measured with Allen-Bradley sensors: for this application Cernox thermometers are to be preferred due to their lower time response. The development of a thermometer acquisition device for the 3 GHz cavities, used for the study on cavity stiffening, has been adapted for anomalous heating measurements on high gradient 1.3 GHz cavities. It has been possible to prove that anomalous RF losses are responsible of the quality factor degradation, that they are not localised in a small of the cavity, but

  8. Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tian, Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Corcoran, Sean [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop.' In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature (? 120 °C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.

  9. Commissioning and modification of the low temperature scanning polarization microscope (TTSPM) and imaging of the local magnetic flux density distribution in superconducting niobium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenzweig, Matthias Sebastian Peter

    2014-01-01

    possible to image the magnetization reversal process and thus the formation (or destruction) and the migration of an ''Interfacial Domain Wall'' (IDW) in such a Fe 1-x Tb x / vertical stroke Co/Pt vertical stroke n -heterostructure. Part II of the dissertation is about the magneto-optical imaging of superconducting Niobium coplanar microwave resonators as well as of a Niobium single crystal. By means of the magneto-optical images of the resonators, important findings about magnetic hysteresis effects in such coplanar microwave resonators could be achieved. It was also possible to confirm the results of transmission spectroscopy experiments on those coplanar resonators, which were performed in a previous dissertation of Daniel Bothner. Additionally, it was possible to show that initially inserted Abrikosov vortices can be almost completely removed from the coplanar resonators again by properly cycling the magnetic field. On the basis of magneto-optical images of a 2 mm thick Niobium single crystal, it was possible to observe dendritic avalanches in a superconducting bulk material for the first time. Here, the dendritic avalanches only appear in a very narrow temperature interval of about a tenth of a Kelvin below the critical temperature T c of the Niobium single crystal. Below this threshold temperature the magnetic flux penetrates nearly homogeneously into the single crystal. The observed dendritic avalanches in the bulk single crystal near T c have features which are identical to those seen in thin films at low temperatures caused by thermomagnetic instability. Therefore, one can conclude that the dendritic avalanches in the single crystal are formed in a thin superconducting layer at the surface of the single crystal, which can be formed under certain conditions near T c .

  10. Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanadham, C; Jayaprakash, D; Mishra, R L

    2003-01-01

    Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave copper R.F resonators, have been taken up in our laboratory, An ultra high vacuum system was made for this purpose. Niobium exhibits superconducting properties at liquid Helium temperature. A uniform coating of about 1.5 mu m of niobium on the internal surfaces of the copper resonant cavities is desired. Power dissipation in the resonators can be greatly reduced by making the internal surfaces of the R.F cavity super conducting. (author)

  11. Ultrasonic attenuation in the superconducting and intermediate states of pure and doped type I superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, K.D.; Singh, R.

    1982-01-01

    The attenuation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been measured in single crystals of indium (99.999%), indium doped with 0.003 at % of tin, and indium doped with 0.002 at % of bismuth in the intermediate and superconducting states over the frequency range 10--30 MHz. For the bismuth-doped indium specimen, measurements were taken for three different physical states, i.e., for three different dislocation densities, and for the indium and the tin-doped indium specimens, measurements were for one-physical state. For a particular measurement, the same physical state was maintained both in the intermediate and superconducting states. A temperature-dependent oscillatory behavior of the ultrasonic attenuation was observed in the intermediate state in all the three specimens, but in the superconducting state the oscillatory behavior was observed only in the bismuth-doped specimen. Two phases have been identified in the superconducting layers of the intermediate state and there is only one phase in the superconducting state of the bismuth-doped sample. The origin of the two phases in the intermediate state and that of the single phase in the superconducting state of the bismuth-doped sample are discussed. A qualitative explanation is presented for the occurrence of oscillatory attenuation in the intermediate state irrespective of the nature of the dopant and the selective occurrence of oscillatory attenuation in the superconducting state due to the nature of the dopant

  12. Critical current, pinning and resistive state of superconducting single-crystal niobium with different types of defect structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolenko, V.I.; Starodubov, Ya.D.

    2005-01-01

    Critical current pinning and resistive state of single crystal niobium of texture orientation are studied for different structural states obtained by rolling at 20 K by 42% and polishing the surface layers. It is found that the heterogeneous structures typical of the strained sample even after its thinning down to approx 10% display a lower current-carrying capability due to an increase of the thermomagnetic instability within the fragmented structure sections in the near-surface layers. For a homogeneous defect structure of the sample core with the density of equilibrium distributed dislocations of 1.3 centre dot 10 11 cm -2 , a correlation between the normal current density and the critical current density in the resistive state is found, in agreement with the concepts of flux creep due to the scatter of local values of J c

  13. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.W.B.; Noakes, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This book is an elementray introduction into superconductivity. The topics are the superconducting state, the magnetic properties of superconductors, type I superconductors, type II superconductors and a chapter on the superconductivity theory. (WL)

  14. The T-J model and superconductivity | Umo | Global Journal of Pure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The t-J model written in terms of Hubbard operators is studied with a view to contributing to the search for the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity in the cuprates. The method of irreducible Green function is used to obtain the spectrum of quasiparticles excitation and d-wave pairing gap function.

  15. Effect of low temperature baking in nitrogen on the performance of a niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Pashupati Dhakal; Santosh Chetri; Shreyas Balachandran; Peter J. Lee; Gianluigi Ciovati

    2018-01-01

    We report the rf performance of a single cell superconducting radiofrequency cavity after low temperature baking in a nitrogen environment. A significant increase in quality factor has been observed when the cavity was heat treated in the temperature range of 120–160 °C with a nitrogen partial pressure of ∼25  m Torr. This increase in quality factor as well as the Q-rise phenomenon (anti-Q-slope) is similar to those previously obtained with high temperature nitrogen doping as well as titanium...

  16. Effect of Low Temperature Baking in Nitrogen on the Performance of a Niobium Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Chetri, Santosh; Balachandran, Shreyas; Lee, Peter J.; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2017-01-01

    We report the rf performance of a single-cell superconducting radiofrequency cavity after low temperature baking in a nitrogen environment. A significant increase in quality factor has been observed when the cavity was heat treated in the temperature range of 120-160 {\\deg}C with a nitrogen partial pressure of ~25 mTorr. This increase in quality factor as well as the Q-rise phenomenon (anti-Q-slope) is similar to those previously obtained with high temperature nitrogen doping as well as titan...

  17. Effect of low temperature baking in nitrogen on the performance of a niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashupati Dhakal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the rf performance of a single cell superconducting radiofrequency cavity after low temperature baking in a nitrogen environment. A significant increase in quality factor has been observed when the cavity was heat treated in the temperature range of 120–160 °C with a nitrogen partial pressure of ∼25  m Torr. This increase in quality factor as well as the Q-rise phenomenon (anti-Q-slope is similar to those previously obtained with high temperature nitrogen doping as well as titanium doping. In this study, a cavity N_{2}-treated at 120 °C and at 140 °C showed no degradation in accelerating gradient, however the accelerating gradient was reduced by ∼25% with a 160 °C N_{2} treatment, compared to the baseline tests after electropolishing. Sample coupons treated in the same conditions as the cavity were analyzed by scanning electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a complex surface composition of Nb_{2}O_{5}, NbO and NbN_{(1−x}O_{x} within the rf penetration depth. Furthermore, magnetization measurements showed no significant change on bulk superconducting properties.

  18. Effect of low temperature baking in nitrogen on the performance of a niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Chetri, Santosh; Balachandran, Shreyas; Lee, Peter J.; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2018-03-01

    We report the rf performance of a single cell superconducting radiofrequency cavity after low temperature baking in a nitrogen environment. A significant increase in quality factor has been observed when the cavity was heat treated in the temperature range of 120 - 160 °C with a nitrogen partial pressure of ˜25 m Torr . This increase in quality factor as well as the Q -rise phenomenon (anti-Q -slope) is similar to those previously obtained with high temperature nitrogen doping as well as titanium doping. In this study, a cavity N2 -treated at 120 °C and at 140 °C showed no degradation in accelerating gradient, however the accelerating gradient was reduced by ˜25 % with a 160 °C N2 treatment, compared to the baseline tests after electropolishing. Sample coupons treated in the same conditions as the cavity were analyzed by scanning electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a complex surface composition of Nb2O5 , NbO and NbN(1 -x )Ox within the rf penetration depth. Furthermore, magnetization measurements showed no significant change on bulk superconducting properties.

  19. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  20. Surface preparation of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.

    1980-01-01

    Any discussion of surface preparation for superconducting rf-surfaces is certainly connected with the question what is the best recipe for achieving high Q-values and high break-down fields. Since the break-down in a cavity is not understood so far and because several mechanisms play a role, it also is not possible to give one recipe which always works. Nevertheless in the past certain preparation techniques for niobium surfaces have been developed and certain rules for preparation can be applied. In the following the to-days state of the art will be described and it is attempted to give a short description of the surface in conjunction with the methods of surface treatments, which generally can be applied to niobium cavities. (orig./WTR)

  1. Anomalous diffusion in niobium. Study of solute diffusion mechanism of iron in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablitzer, D.

    1977-01-01

    In order to explain anomalously high diffusion velocities observed for iron diffusion in niobium, the following parameters were measured: isotope effect, b factor (which expresses the effect of iron on niobium self-diffusion), self-diffusion coefficient of niobium, solute diffusion coefficient of iron in niobium. The results obtained show that neither pure vacancy models, nor diffusion in the lattice defects (dislocations, sub-boundaries, grain boundaries), nor pure interstitialy mechanisms, nor simple or cyclic exchange mechanisms agree with experiments. A mechanism is proposed which considers an equilibrium between substitution iron atoms and interstitial iron atoms. The diffusion of iron then occurs through interstitial vancancy pairs [fr

  2. Pure tension superconducting toroidal-field coil system design studies for the Argonne Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Purcell, J.R.; Demichele, D.W.; Turner, L.R.

    1975-11-01

    As part of the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (TEPR) design studies, a toroidal field (TF) coil system has been designed. NbTi was chosen as the most suitable superconductor and 8T was regarded as a practical peak field level in this study. The 16-coil design was chosen as a reasonable compromise between 2 percent field ripple and 3 m access gap. To minimize the coil structure and the bending moments on the conductor, a pure tension coil shape is necessary. A correct approach for determining the pure tension coil profile in a bumpy TF coil system is given. Verification of the pure tension coil by a three-dimensional stress analysis is presented. For coil quench protection, a series-connected scheme is proposed

  3. Investigation of in-house superconducting radio-frequency 9-cell cavity made of large grain niobium at KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmae, Takeshi; Umemori, Kensei; Yamanaka, Masashi; Watanabe, Yuichi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    The first in-house, 9-cell, superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of large grain Nb was fabricated at KEK. Some characteristic techniques were employed for the fabrication that were not used for fine grain (FG) Nb. Even though a penetrated hole was created during electron beam welding, it was successfully repaired and did not affect the cavity performance. The completed cavity then underwent vertical tests (VTs) via several surface treatment processes. A defect that caused quenches was found after a VT at 25 mm from the equator where the typical local grinding machine developed at KEK could not be utilized. A new local grinding machine using a 3D printer was thus developed for the first time, and it completely removed this defect. Finally, the cavity achieved a maximum Q0 value of 3.8 ×1010 and accelerating gradient of 38 MV/m. The obtained Q0 value is about 1.5 times higher than that for the KEK in-house FG cavity.

  4. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries

  5. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onnes, H.K.

    1988-01-01

    The author traces the development of superconductivity from 1911 to 1986. Some of the areas he explores are the Meissner Effect, theoretical developments, experimental developments, engineering achievements, research in superconducting magnets, and research in superconducting electronics. The article also mentions applications shown to be technically feasible, but not yet commercialized. High-temperature superconductivity may provide enough leverage to bring these applications to the marketplace

  6. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Mortensen, K.

    1988-12-01

    This report contains lecture notes of the basic lectures presented at the 1st Topsoee Summer School on Superconductivity held at Risoe National Laboratory, June 20-24, 1988. The following lecture notes are included: L.M. Falicov: 'Superconductivity: Phenomenology', A. Bohr and O. Ulfbeck: 'Quantal structure of superconductivity. Gauge angle', G. Aeppli: 'Muons, neutrons and superconductivity', N.F. Pedersen: 'The Josephson junction', C. Michel: 'Physicochemistry of high-T c superconductors', C. Laverick and J.K. Hulm: 'Manufacturing and application of superconducting wires', J. Clarke: 'SQUID concepts and systems'. (orig.) With 10 tabs., 128 figs., 219 refs

  7. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on superconductivity the absence of electrical resistance has always fascinated the mind of researchers with a promise of applications unachievable by conventional technologies. Since its discovery superconductivity has been posing many questions and challenges to solid state physics, quantum mechanics, chemistry and material science. Simulations arrived to superconductivity from particle physics, astrophysic, electronics, electrical engineering and so on. In seventy-five years the original promises of superconductivity were going to become reality: a microscopical theory gave to superconductivity the cloth of the science and the level of technological advances was getting higher and higher. High field superconducting magnets became commercially available, superconducting electronic devices were invented, high field accelerating gradients were obtained in superconductive cavities and superconducting particle detectors were under study. Other improvements came in a quiet progression when a tornado brought a revolution in the field: new materials had been discovered and superconductivity, from being a phenomenon relegated to the liquid Helium temperatures, became achievable over the liquid Nitrogen temperature. All the physics and the technological implications under superconductivity have to be considered ab initio

  8. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  9. Vortex lattices in superconducting niobium and skyrmion lattices in chiral MnSi. An investigation by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, Sebastian C.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we present a comprehensive small angle neutron scattering study of the vortex lattice (VL) in an ultra-pure Nb single crystal sample, characterized by a residual resistivity ratio of ∝ 10 4 . We systematically investigate the morphology of vortex structures with the magnetic field applied along a four-fold left angle 100 right angle axis. We succeed to deconvolute the general morphology of the VL and its orientation to three dominant mechanisms: First, non-local contributions, second, the transition between open and closed Fermi surface sheets and, third, the intermediate mixed state (IMS) between the Meissner and the Shubnikov phase. We present first time microscopic measurements of the intrinsic bulk VL tilt modulus c 44 by means of time resolved stroboscopic small angle neutron scattering in combination with a tailored magnetic field setup. In our study we find that the VL in Nb responds to an external force - in the form of a changed magnetic field - with an exponential relaxation. As expected, the relaxation process shows increasing VL stiffness with increasing magnetic field and reduced damping with increasing temperature. Besides this general trend, we observe a dramatic changeover of the relaxation process associated with the non-trivial VL morphology in the IMS and the crossover from attractive to repulsive vortex-vortex interaction. Furthermore we use small angle neutron scattering to establish the existence of a skyrmion lattice in the A-phase of MnSi. Due to a parallel alignment of the magnetic field with respect to the neutron beam, we are able to resolve the complete magnetic structure of the A-phase: The structure in the A-phase, reminiscent of a vortex lattice, consists of topological knots of the magnetization with particle-like properties, arranged in a regular six-fold lattice. The orientation of this lattice is strictly driven by the orientation of the applied magnetic field, regardless of the underlying crystal symmetry. The

  10. Vortex lattices in superconducting niobium and skyrmion lattices in chiral MnSi. An investigation by neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlbauer, Sebastian C

    2009-12-10

    In this thesis, we present a comprehensive small angle neutron scattering study of the vortex lattice (VL) in an ultra-pure Nb single crystal sample, characterized by a residual resistivity ratio of {proportional_to} 10{sup 4}. We systematically investigate the morphology of vortex structures with the magnetic field applied along a four-fold left angle 100 right angle axis. We succeed to deconvolute the general morphology of the VL and its orientation to three dominant mechanisms: First, non-local contributions, second, the transition between open and closed Fermi surface sheets and, third, the intermediate mixed state (IMS) between the Meissner and the Shubnikov phase. We present first time microscopic measurements of the intrinsic bulk VL tilt modulus c{sub 44} by means of time resolved stroboscopic small angle neutron scattering in combination with a tailored magnetic field setup. In our study we find that the VL in Nb responds to an external force - in the form of a changed magnetic field - with an exponential relaxation. As expected, the relaxation process shows increasing VL stiffness with increasing magnetic field and reduced damping with increasing temperature. Besides this general trend, we observe a dramatic changeover of the relaxation process associated with the non-trivial VL morphology in the IMS and the crossover from attractive to repulsive vortex-vortex interaction. Furthermore we use small angle neutron scattering to establish the existence of a skyrmion lattice in the A-phase of MnSi. Due to a parallel alignment of the magnetic field with respect to the neutron beam, we are able to resolve the complete magnetic structure of the A-phase: The structure in the A-phase, reminiscent of a vortex lattice, consists of topological knots of the magnetization with particle-like properties, arranged in a regular six-fold lattice. The orientation of this lattice is strictly driven by the orientation of the applied magnetic field, regardless of the underlying

  11. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakani, S.L.; Kakani, Shubhra

    2007-01-01

    The monograph provides readable introduction to the basics of superconductivity for beginners and experimentalists. For theorists, the monograph provides nice and brief description of the broad spectrum of experimental properties, theoretical concepts with all details, which theorists should learn, and provides a sound basis for students interested in studying superconducting theory at the microscopic level. Special chapter on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates is devoted

  12. HIP bonding between niobium/copper/stainless steel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Fujino, Takeo; Hitomi, Nobuteru; Saito, Kenji; Yamada, Masahiro; Shibuya, Junichi; Ota, Tomoko

    2000-01-01

    We have used niobium flanges for the niobium bulk superconducting RF cavities, however, they are expensive. Stainless steel flanges instead of the niobium flanges will be used in the future large scale production of sc cavities like the KEK/JAERI joint project. For a future R and D of the vacuum sealing related to the clean horizontal assembly method or development of cavities welded a helium vessel in the KEK/JAERI joint project, a converter section of niobium material to stainless steel is required. From these requirements we need to develop the converter. We have tried a HIP bonding method between niobium materials and stainless steel or copper material. It was made clear that the technology could offer an enough bonding strength even higher than niobium tensile strength in the joined surface between niobium and stainless steel or copper. (author)

  13. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruana, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Despite reports of new, high-temperature superconductive materials almost every day, participants at the First Congress on Superconductivity do not anticipate commercial applications with these materials soon. What many do envision is the discovery of superconducting materials that can function at much warmer, perhaps even room temperatures. Others hope superconductivity will usher in a new age of technology as semiconductors and transistors did. This article reviews what the speakers had to say at the four-day congress held in Houston last February. Several speakers voiced concern that the Reagan administration's apparent lack of interest in funding superconductivity research while other countries, notably Japan, continue to pour money into research and development could hamper America's international competitiveness

  14. Melt formed superconducting joint between superconducting tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.G.; Knudsen, B.A.; Rumaner, L.E.; Zaabala, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a superconducting joint between contiguous superconducting tapes having an inner laminate comprised of a parent-metal layer selected from the group niobium, tantalum, technetium, and vanadium, a superconductive intermetallic compound layer on the parent-metal layer, a reactive-metal layer that is capable of combining with the parent-metal and forming the superconductive intermetallic compound, the joint comprising: a continuous precipitate of the superconductive intermetallic compound fused to the tapes forming a continuous superconducting path between the tapes

  15. Niobium technological alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.; Dainesi, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The process-product matrix of Niobium is presented, through which the technological alternatives for Niobium are identified. It is shown that the three axes of Niobium application, steels, superalloys and metallic Niobium have a tendency to be economical by equivalent. The critical points where technological development of Niobium is needed are analyzed and results are presented on the following products: Nb 2 O 5 by volatilization, metalic Niobium, Niobium powder, bars and sheets, NbTi alloy, corrosion resistent Niobium alloys and superconductor cable and wires. (Author) [pt

  16. Study of low energy thermal constraints for a copper-plated niobium structure carried out by thermal projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassot, H.; Durante, M.; Thiebault, A.; Vernay, E.

    1999-06-01

    In the framework of T.T.F. (Tesla Test Facility), the international collaboration on research and development of superconducting cavities, a study of a new method of manufacturing cavities was launched, which consists in deposing a metal (copper) or an alloy by thermal projection on niobium cavities in order to stiffen them. Analytical and numerical calculations showed that when cooled this bi-material cavities behave very differently in comparison with classical pure niobium cavities and strong thermal constraints do occur in niobium as well as in copper. These strong constraints may have important consequences upon the functioning of superconducting cavities. In addition these constraints may induce in time cracks in materials and interfaces. In this paper an experiment for measuring constraints at the temperature of cavity operation, i.e., at the liquid helium temperature, is proposed in order to compare the measured constraints with the calculated constraints. The sample studied has a cylindrical shape, rather representative for the geometrical shape of cavities, but easier to handle than a prototype cavity. The experimental approach consists in carrying out two deformation measurements. The first one, is done on single material sample (niobium and copper) to establish the laws of compensation of the constraint gauges as a function of temperature. The other measurement establishes the global deformations of a bi-metallic tube (Nb-Cu) when the interior surface (niobium) and the external surface (porous copper) of the tube are cooled. From these deformation data the thermal constraints of the bi-metallic tube at low temperature have been derived. The implementation of the entire setup of the methods of measuring the constraints at low temperature constitutes a new development in the field of superconducting cavities. The experiments have also indicated certain further developments which should be achieved if the plastic deformations induced by the freezing regime

  17. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  19. High-speed automated NDT device for niobium plate using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oravecz, M.G.; Yu, B.Y.; Riney, K.; Kessler, L.W.; Padamsee, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a nondestructive testing (NDT) device which rapidly and automatically identifies defects throughout the volume of a 23.4 cm x 23.4 cm x 0.3 cm, pure niobium plate using Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope (SLAM), high-resolution, 60 MHz, ultrasonic images. A principle advantage of the SLAM technique is that it combines a video scan rate with a high scan density (130 lines/mm at 60 MHz). To automate the inspection system they integrated under computer control the following: the SLAM RS-170/330 video output, a computerized XY plate scanner, a real-time video digitizer/integrator, a computer algorithm for defect detection, a digital mass storage device, and a hardcopy output device. The key element was development of an efficient, reliable defect detection algorithm using a variance filter with a locally determined threshold. This algorithm is responsible for recognizing valid flaws in the midst of random texture. This texture was seen throughout the acoustic images and was caused by the niobium microstructure. The images, as analyzed, contained 128 x 120 pixels with 64 grey levels per pixel. This system allows economical inspection of the large quantities (eg. 100 tons) of material needed for future particle accelerators based on microwave superconductivity. Rapid nondestructive inspection of pure niobium sheet is required because current accelerator performance is largely limited by the quality of commercially available material. Previous work documented critical flaws that are detectable by SLAM techniques. 15 references, 9 figures

  20. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlikar, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Amongst the numerous scientific discoveries that the 20th century has to its credit, superconductivity stands out as an exceptional example of having retained its original dynamism and excitement even for more than 80 years after its discovery. It has proved itself to be a rich field by continually offering frontal challenges in both research and applications. Indeed, one finds that a majority of internationally renowned condensed matter theorists, at some point of their career, have found excitement in working in this important area. Superconductivity presents a unique example of having fetched Nobel awards as many as four times to date, and yet, interestingly enough, the field still remains open for new insights and discoveries which could undeniably be of immense technological value. 1 fig

  1. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book profiles the research activity of 42 companies in the superconductivity field, worldwide. It forms a unique and comprehensive directory to this emerging technology. For each research site, it details the various projects in progress, analyzes the level of activity, pinpoints applications and R and D areas, reviews strategies and provides complete contact information. It lists key individuals, offers international comparisons of government funding, reviews market forecasts and development timetables and features a bibliography of selected articles on the subject

  2. Manufacturing of the L band 9-cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Masanori; Ohkubo, Kohichi; Yamanaka, Toshiyuki; Kako, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Ono, Masaaki; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, L-band niobium superconducting cavities have been developed with collaboration between our company and National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). The manufacturing procedure and the performance of 9-cell superconducting cavity are presented. The maximum accelerating gradient of 12 MV/m was attained in a cold test. (author)

  3. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, L.; Carrillo, F.; Dietert, R.; Kotziapashis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Superconductors are materials which combine the property of zero electric resistance with the capability to exclude any adjacent magnetic field. This leads to many large scale applications such as the much publicized levitating train, generation of magnetic fields in MHD electric generators, and special medical diagnostic equipment. On a smaller-scale, superconductive materials could replace existing resistive connectors and decrease signal delays by reducing the RLC time constants. Thus, a computer could operate at much higher speeds, and consequently at lower power levels which would reduce the need for heat removal and allow closer spacing of circuitry. Although technical advances and proposed applications are constantly being published, it should be recognized that superconductivity is a slowly developing technology. It has taken scientists almost eighty years to learn what they now know about this material and its function. The present paper provides an overview of the historical development of superconductivity and describes some of the potential applications for this new technology as it pertains to the electronics industry

  4. Development of technology of high-purity compounds of tantalum and niobium with octanol use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorov, V.G.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Kopkov, V.K.; Baklanova, I.V.; Safonova, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of composition of solutions and extractant expenditure on tantalum and niobium distribution during extraction by octanol and purification of tantalum and niobium extracts from impurities was studied. Scheme was developed according to which samples of high-pure tantalum and niobium pentaoxides were prepared [ru

  5. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During 2007, a large amount of the work was centred on the ITER project and related tasks. The activities based on low-temperature superconducting (LTS) materials included the manufacture and qualification of ITER full-size conductors under relevant operating conditions, the design of conductors and magnets for the JT-60SA tokamak and the manufacture of the conductors for the European dipole facility. A preliminary study was also performed to develop a new test facility at ENEA in order to test long-length ITER or DEMO full-size conductors. Several studies on different superconducting materials were also started to create a more complete database of superconductor properties, and also for use in magnet design. In this context, an extensive measurement campaign on transport and magnetic properties was carried out on commercially available NbTi strands. Work was started on characterising MgB 2 wire and bulk samples to optimise their performance. In addition, an intense experimental study was started to clarify the effect of mechanical loads on the transport properties of multi-filamentary Nb 3 Sn strands with twisted or untwisted superconducting filaments. The experimental activity on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials was mainly focussed on the development and characterisation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-X (YBCO) based coated conductors. Several characteristics regarding YBCO deposition, current transport performance and tape manufacture were investigated. In the framework of chemical approaches for YBCO film growth, a new method, developed in collaboration with the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN), Romania, was studied to obtain YBCO film via chemical solution deposition, which modifies the well-assessed metallic organic deposition trifluoroacetate (MOD-TFA) approach. The results are promising in terms of critical current and film thickness values. YBCO properties in films with artificially added pinning sites were characterised in collaboration with

  6. Composite conductor containing superconductive wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, W.L.; Wong, J.

    1974-03-26

    A superconductor cable substitute made by coworking multiple rods of superconductive niobium--titanium or niobium--zirconium alloy with a common copper matrix to extend the copper and rods to form a final elongated product which has superconductive wires distributed in a reduced cross-section copper conductor with a complete metallurgical bond between the normal-conductive copper and the superconductor wires contained therein is described. The superconductor cable can be in the form of a tube.

  7. Superconductors made of niobium germanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns the superconductors and particularly the mass coatings of niobium germanide (Nb 3 Ge) exhibiting superconductor properties, as well as the compositions enabling them to be obtained, having transition temperatures of around 20 0 K or more. The invention proposes a composition of a material of the general formula Nb 3 Ge, containing from around 1 to around 10 at. % oxygen. Preferably, the material contains around 5 at. % of oxygen. The invention also proposes fabricated articles in which the compositions described above are associated with and joined to a metallic substrate. Hence, for instance, the present studies involving a superconducting power transmission line for direct current make it possible to envisage the use of conductors placed in a double envelope, enabling the superconducting element transmitting the current to be carried, whilst containing the cryogenic coolant. In this type of design, the coat of superconducting material surrounds a tube containing liquid helium or possibly liquid hydrogen if a sufficiently high superconduction transition temperature can be reached. The tube must be a good heat and electricity conductor in order to achieve good stability of the superconducting coating [fr

  8. Corrosion of niobium and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, T.L.; Webster, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium and niobium alloys are used in several corrosion-resistant applications, principally rocket and jet engines, nuclear reactors, sodium vapor highway lighting, and chemical-processing equipment. Niobium has many of the same properties of tantalum, its sister metal, but has one half the density of tantalum (see the article ''Corrosion of Tantalum'' in this Volume). A common property of niobium and tantalum is the interaction with the reactive elements hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon at temperatures above 300 0 C (570 0 F). These reactions will cause severe embrittlement. Consequently, at elevated temperatures, the metal must be protectively coated or used in vacuum or inert atmospheres. Niobium resists a wide variety of corrosive environments, including concentrated mineral acids, organic acids, liquid metals (particularly sodium and lithium), metal vapors, and molten salts

  9. Switching, storage, and erasure effects in a superconducting thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testardi, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    Thin niobium films can be switched from a superconducting to a resistive state permanently by application of a short electrical pulse. Application of a short pulse of opposite polarity returns the film to the superconducting state

  10. Prototype superconducting radio-frequency cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    This niobium superconducting cavity was part of the prototype stages for an upgrade to LEP, known as LEP-2. Superconducting cavities would eventually replace the traditional copper cavities and allow beam energies of 100 GeV.

  11. Influence of Ta Content in High Purity Niobium on Cavity Performance Preliminary Results*

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, P

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper* a program designed to study the influence of the residual tantalum content on the superconducting properties of pure niobium metal for RF cavities was outlined. The main rationale for this program was based on a potential cost reduction for high purity niobium, if a less strict limit on the chemical specification for Ta content, which is not significantly affecting the RRR–value, could be tolerated for high performance cavities. Four ingots with different Ta contents have been melted and transformed into sheets. In each manufacturing step the quality of the material has been monitored by employing chemical analysis, neutron activation analysis, thermal conductivity measurements and evaluation of the mechanical properties. The niobium sheets have been scanned for defects by an eddy current device. From three of the four ingots—Ta contents 100, 600 and 1,200 wppm—two single cell cavities each of the CEBAF variety have been fabricated and a series of tests on each ...

  12. Comparative cost study of the processes for producing niobium--tin (Nb3Sn) superconducting tapes for their application to power transmission lines. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-10-01

    This report considers the manufacture of superconducting Nb 3 Sn tapes for ac superconducting transmission cables. The 14 product examples studied are produced by processes involving solid-state diffusion of Sn and Nb and/or physical vapor deposition. Production of 80,000 km per year is assumed, sufficient for 100 km of 3 phase ac line. Results are summarized in a table entitled ''Variants of 6 mm wide Nb 3 Sn Superconducting Tapes with Economics of Manufacture.'' The table identifies the 14 product examples by method of manufacture; by the composition of the layers integrated into the tape; and by the final thickness of Nb used in 12 of the product examples. The estimated fixed capital for plant is listed for each product example together with the estimated costs of manufacture in cents per meter of tape. The total manufacturing cost given is the sum of the costs of raw materials, operating labor, depreciation and other overhead. The depreciation is calculated on a 10 year straight line basis. Stainless steel strip (304L) is used in 6 of the product examples. The final line in the table shows the ''selling price'' which will earn the equivalent of 20 percent p.a. on the total capital, fixed and working, employed at any time during an eleven-year plant life where depreciation is sum of year digits for a 10 year period, investment credit is 10 percent, and income tax is 48 percent. 13 tables, 21 figures

  13. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  14. A SRF niobium cylindrical cavity with a large silicon nitride niobium-coated membrane as one end-wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Castelli, Alessandro; Pate, Jacob; Thompson, Johnathon; Delmas, William; Sharping, Jay; Chiao, Raymond; Chiao Team; Sharping Team

    The development of large silicon nitride membranes and niobium film deposition techniques motivate new architectures in opto-mechanics and microwave devices that can exploit the extremely high Q's obtainable with superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities. We present a X-band SRF cylindrical cavity-membrane system in which one end-wall of the cavity is replaced by a niobium coated centimeter-sized silicon nitride membrane. We report moderately high Q factors above 10 million. Experimental results characterizing the system and potential future applications for such schemes in microwave devices and optomechanics are discussed.

  15. Voltage breakdown on niobium and copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, G.R.; Padamsee, H.; Betzwieser, J.C.; Liu, Y.G.; Rubin, K.H.R.; Shipman, J.E.; Ying, L.T.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that voltage breakdown in superconducting niobium RF cavities is in many ways similar to voltage breakdown on niobium cathodes in DC voltage gaps; most striking are the distinctive starburst patterns and craters that mark the site of voltage breakdown in both superconducting cavities and DC vacuum gaps. Therefore, we can learn much about RF breakdown from simpler, faster DC experiments. We have direct evidence, in the form of before'' and ''after'' pictures, that breakdown events caused by high surface electric fields occur with high probability at contaminant particles on surfaces. Although the pre-breakdown behavior (field emission) seems to depend mostly on the contaminant particles present and little on the substrate, the breakdown event itself is greatly affected by the substrate-niobium, heavily oxidized niobium, electropolished copper, and diamond-machined copper cathodes lead to different kinds of breakdown events. By studying DC voltage breakdown we hope to learn more details about the processes involved in the transition from field emission to catastrophic arcing and the cratering of the surface; as well as learning how to prevent breakdown, we would like to learn how to cause breakdown, which could be important when ''processing'' cavities to reduce field emission. (author)

  16. Today's markets for superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The worldwide market for superconductive products may exceed $1 billion in 1987. These products are expanding the frontiers of science, revolutionizing the art of medical diagnosis, and developing the energy technology of the future. In general, today's customers for superconductive equipment want the highest possible performance, almost regardless of cost. The products operate within a few degrees of absolute zero, and virtually all are fabricated from niobium or niobium alloys-so far the high-temperature superconductors discovered in 1986 and 1987 have had no impact on these markets. The industry shows potential and profound societal impact, even without the new materials

  17. Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    Research on superconductivity at ENEA is mainly devoted to projects related to the ITER magnet system. In this framework, ENEA has been strongly involved in the design, manufacturing and test campaigns of the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), which reached a world record in operating current (up to 80 kA). Further to this result, the activities in 2004 were devoted to optimising the ITER conductor performance. ENEA participated in the tasks launched by EFDA to define and produce industrial-scale advanced Nb3Sn strand to be used in manufacturing the ITER high-field central solenoid (CS) and toroidal field (TF) magnets. As well as contributing to the design of the new strand and the final conductor layout, ENEA will also perform characterisation tests, addressing in particular the influence of mechanical stress on the Nb3Sn performance. As a member of the international ITER-magnet testing group, ENEA plays a central role in the measurement campaigns and data analyses for each ITER-related conductor and coil. The next phase in the R and D of the ITER magnets will be their mechanical characterisation in order to define the fabrication route of the coils and structures. During 2004 the cryogenic measurement campaign on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by-pass diode stacks was completed. As the diode-test activity was the only LHC contract to be finished on schedule, the 'Centre Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire' (CERN) asked ENEA to participate in an international tender for the cold check of the current leads for the LHC magnets. The contract was obtained, and during 2004, the experimental setup was designed and realised and the data acquisition system was developed. The measurement campaign was successfully started at the end of 2004 and will be completed in 2006.

  18. Variation of Mechanical Properties of High RRR And Reactor Grade Niobium With Heat Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapati Myneni; H. Umezawa

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting rf cavities used as accelerating structures in particle accelerators are made from high purity niobium with residual resistance ratios greater than 250. Reactor grade niobium is also used to make wave-guide and/or end group components for these accelerating structures. The major impurities in this type of niobium are interstitially dissolved gases such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen in addition to carbon. After fabricating the niobium accelerating structures, they are subjected to heat treatments for several hours in vacuum at temperatures of up to 900 C for degassing hydrogen or up to 1400 C for improving the thermal conductivity of niobium considerably. These heat treatments are affecting the mechanical properties of niobium drastically. In this paper the variation of the mechanical properties of high purity and reactor grade niobium with heat treatments in a vacuum of {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr and temperatures from 600 C to 1250 C for periods of 10 to 6 hours are presented.

  19. Thermal transport properties of niobium and some niobium-based alloys from 80 to 1600 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J P; Graves, R S; Williams, R K [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1980-01-01

    The electric resistivity, rho, and Seebeck coefficient, S, of 99.8 at% niobium, and Nb-4.8 at% W, Nb-5 at% Mo, Nb-10 at% Mo, and Nb-2.4 at% Mo-2.4 at% Zr alloys were measured from 80 to 1600 K, and the thermal conductivity, lambda, of the niobium and the Nb-5 at% W alloy was measured from 80 to 1300 K. A technique is described for measuring rho and S of a specimen during radial-heat-flow measurements of lambda. The transport property results, which had uncertainties of +-0.4% for rho and +-1.4% for lambda, showed the influence of tungsten and molybdenum solutes on the transport properties of niobium and were used to obtain the electronic Lorenz function of pure niobium, which was found to approach the Sommerfeld value at high temperatures.

  20. Thermal transport properties of niobium and some niobium base alloys from 80 to 16000K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.P.; Graves, R.S.; Williams, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    The electrical resistivities and absolute Seebeck coefficients of 99.8 at. % niobium with a RRR of 36, Nb-4.8 at. % W, Nb-5 at. % Mo, Nb-10 at. % Mo, and Nb-2.4 at. % Mo-2.4 at. % Zr were measured from 80 to 1600 0 K, and the thermal conductivities of the niobium and Nb-5 at. % W were measured from 80 to 1300 0 K. A technique is described for measuring the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of a specimen during radial heat flow measurements of the thermal conductivity. The transport property results, which had uncertainties of +-0.4%for electrical resistivity and +-1.4% for thermal conductivity, showed the influence of tungsten and molybdenum solutes on the transport properties of niobium and were used to obtain the electronic Lorenz function of pure niobium, which was found to approach the Sommerfeld value at high temperatures

  1. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  2. Quench-age method for the fabrication of niobium--aluminum superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickus, M.R.; Ciardella, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A flexible Nb 3 Al superconducting wire is fabricated from a niobium-aluminum composite wire by heating to form a solid solution which is retained at room temperature as a metastable solid solution by quenching. The metastable solid solution is then transformed to the stable superconducting A-15 phase by low temperature aging. The transformation induced by aging can be controlled to yield either a multifilamentary or a solid A-15 core surrounded by ductile niobium

  3. Quench-age method for the fabrication of niobium-aluminum superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickus, Milton R.; Ciardella, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    A flexible Nb.sub.3 Al superconducting wire is fabricated from a niobium-aluminum composite wire by heating to form a solid solution which is retained at room temperature as a metastable solid solution by quenching. The metastable solid solution is then transformed to the stable superconducting A-15 phase by low temperature aging. The transformation induced by aging can be controlled to yield either a multifilamentary or a solid A-15 core surrounded by ductile niobium.

  4. HIP bonding for the different material between Niobium and Stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Saito, K.; Abe, K.; Fujino, T.; Hitomi, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In the future advanced cryomodule for superconducting RF cavities, a helium vessel made from titanium or stainless steel has to be welded directly to the niobium cavity wall in order to be simple structure. For that, we need a transformer from niobium to titanium or stainless steel. Stainless steel will have many benefits if the reliable bonding to the niobium is developed. We have tested the niobium/stainless steel bonding by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) with the heat shock between 1023K and 2K. The bonding interface was also observed by SEM. These test results will be presented. (author)

  5. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    59, No. 5. — journal of. November 2002 physics pp. 849–858. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC ... cryogenics facility, RF electronics development, facilities for fabricating niobium resonators indige- ... Prototype resonator was.

  6. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  7. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dhakal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q_{0} values of the order of 2×10^{10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B_{p} of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q_{0} value of (5±1×10^{10} at 2.0 K and B_{p}=90  mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  8. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, P.; Ciovati, G.; Myneni, G. R.; Gray, K. E.; Groll, N.; Maheshwari, P.; McRae, D. M.; Pike, R.; Proslier, T.; Stevie, F.; Walsh, R. P.; Yang, Q.; Zasadzinzki, J.

    2013-04-01

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800-1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q0 values of the order of 2×1010 at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (Bp) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q0 value of (5±1)×1010 at 2.0 K and Bp=90mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  9. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, P.; Ciovati, G.; Myneni, G. R.; Gray, K. E.; Groll, N.; Maheshwari, P.; McRae, D. M.; Pike, R.; Proslier, T.; Stevie, F.; Walsh, R. P.; Yang, Q.; Zasadzinzki, J.

    2013-04-01

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q{sub 0} values of the order of 2×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B{sub p}) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q{sub 0} value of (5±1)×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and B{sub p}=90mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  10. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  11. Diffusion of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusiewicz, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in niobium was investigated over the temperature range 148 to 500 degrees Kelvin, using measurements of the elastic after effect caused by long range diffusion (the Gorsky Effect). Relaxation curves for pure annealed niobium were generally not of the single exponential form expected from the Gorsky Effect theory, but were described well by a sum of two exponential curves with different amplitudes and relaxation times. The effects of oxygen and nitrogen interstitials on the diffusion were studied and were not in agreement with conventional trapping models. Deuterium and tritium diffusion in niobium were also studied, and a non-classical isotope effect was observed. Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in several Nb-Ta alloys were measured, and the diffusivity in all these alloys exhibited a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. Experimental results were compared to several models for diffusion and trapping. A model is presented which can account for the form of the relaxation curves observed in pure, annealed niobium

  12. Method of stabilizing Nb3Sn superconducting foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzliak, J.; Lences, P.; Allarova, H.

    1982-01-01

    The stabilization of niobium-tin Nb 3 Sn superconducting foils with copper is carried out by deposition or by diffusion in pure copper or in a tin bath containing different copper levels, with the surface etched or unetched. The foils are covered with a copper film at a temperature of 300 to 5O0 degC using a tin solder, spread on a copper, silver or nickel layer deposited on the foil surface from solutions for electroless plating. The bond between the surface of the superconducting foil and the electroless plated metal layer is annealed in a controlled atmosphere or in a vacuum at a temperature of 200 to 500 degC for over 20 to 60 minutes. The copper stabilization layer can also be produced electrolytically. (J.B.)

  13. Niobium ore OKA-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, H.F.; Bowman, W.S.

    1981-01-01

    A 287-kg sample of a niobium ore, OKA-1, from Oka, Quebec, was prepared as a compositional reference material. OKA-1 was ground to minus 74 μm, blended in one lot, tested for homogeneity by X-ray fluorescence and chemical methods and bottled in 200-g units. In a 'free-choice' round-robin analytical program, 22 laboratories contributed results for niobium in each of two bottles of OKA-1. A statistical analysis of the data gave a recommended value of 0.37 +- 0.01% for niobium

  14. Interlaboratory niobium dosimetry comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, P.

    1980-01-01

    For an interlaboratory comparison of neutron dosimetry using niobium the 93 sup(m)Nb activities of irradiated niobium monitors were measured. This work was performed to compare the applied techniques of dosimetry with Nb in different laboratories. The niobium monitors were irradiated in the fast breeder EBRII, USA and the BR2, Belgium. The monitors were dissolved and several samples were prepared. Their niobium contents were determined by the 94 Nb-count rates. since the original specific count rate was known. The KX radiations of the 93 sup(m)Nb of the samples and of a calibrated Nb-foil were compared. This foil was measured by PTB, Braunschweig and CBNM, Geel, which we additionally compared with the KX radiation of 88 Sr produced by a thin 88 Y source from a 88 Y-standard solution (PTB). (orig.) [de

  15. On niobium nitrilohalogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsyna, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    Niobium nitrilhalogenides of the general formula [MNH]sub(n) and [MNH 2 ]sub(n) have been synthesized and their properties investigated. The effect of the ligand nature on the properties, structure, and nature of the chemical bond in niobium nitrilhalogenides has been shown. With an increase of electron-donor properties of the ligands F 2 -800 cm -1 , NbNCl 2 -740 cm -1 , NbNBr 2 -720 cm -1 , NbNI-725 cm -1 )

  16. Catalytic applications of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, C.J.; England, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the potential uses of niobium, and its compounds, as catalysts in chemical processing. The word potential is deliberately chosen because in 1978 none of the world's twenty-five major catalysts (1) contained niobium. On the other hand, catalysts containing molybdenum and vanadium, neighbors of niobium in the periodic table, realized over 80 x 10 6 of sales in that same year. At the same time many of the patents for niobium catalysts cover applications in which niobium improves the activity of, or substitutes for, molybdenum based compounds. With favorable cost differentials and improvements in understanding, niobium may be able to replace molybdenum in some its traditional uses

  17. The influence of impurities on the recovery of radiation defects in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzold, J.

    1986-01-01

    Pure niobium and doped niobium are irradiated with electrons (3 MeV) at a temperature of 7-8 K. During annealing the influence of the different impurities and of their doping concentration on the recovery of the electric conductivity are investigated. (BHO)

  18. Hardening of niobium alloys at precrystallization annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.V.; Pustovalov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Niobium base alloys were investigated. It is shown that precrystallization annealing of niobium-molybdenum, niobium-vanadium and niobium-zirconium alloys elevates much more sufficiently their resistance to microplastic strains, than to macroplastic strains. Hardening effect differs sufficiently for different alloys. The maximal hardening is observed for niobium-vanadium alloys, the minimal one - for niobium-zirconium alloys

  19. Low noise niobium dc SQUID with a planar input coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, V. J.; van den Hamer, P.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1983-02-01

    A practical all-niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a niobium spiral input coil has been developed. The SQUID utilizes submicron Josephson junctions. The best intrinsic energy resolution obtained with a 1-nH SQUID is 4×10-32 J/Hz. A 20-turn 1.2-μH input coil is coupled to a 2.3-nH SQUID with an efficiency of 0.5. The energy resolution with respect to the coil is 1×10-30 J/Hz.

  20. Low noise niobium dc SQUID with a planar input coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Waal, V.J.; van den Hamer, P.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1983-02-15

    A practical all-niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a niobium spiral input coil has been developed. The SQUID utilizes submicron Josephson junctions. The best intrinsic energy resolution obtained with a 1-nH SQUID is 4 x 10/sup -32/ J/Hz. A 20-turn 1.2-..mu..H input coil is coupled to a 2.3-nH SQUID with an efficiency of 0.5. The energy resolution with respect to the coil is 1 x 10/sup -30/ J/Hz.

  1. Critical unpairing currents in narrow niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenzon, M.E.; Gubankov, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    Investigated are the dependences of critical currents of narrow ( with the width of W=0.5-15 μm) superconducting niobium films on temperature and a magnetic field. The proposed method of film production with the width of the 1μm order and with small edge inhomogeneities ((<=500 A) permitted to realize the Ginsburg-Landau unpairing currents in the wide range of temperatures. The correct comparison with the theory showed that the unpairing currents are observed if W(< or approximately) 2delta, where delta is the effective depth of the penetration of the perpendicular magnetic field

  2. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  3. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the construction of a superconducting linear accelerator as a booster to the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The LINAC will use superconducting niobium quarter wave resonators as the accelerating element. Construction of the linear accelerator has progressed ...

  4. Niobium in gray cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castello Branco, C.H.; Beckert, E.A.

    1984-03-01

    The potential for utilization of niobium in gray cast iron is appraised and reviewed. Experiments described in literature indicate that niobium provides structural refinement of the eutectic cells and also promotes pearlite formation. (Author) [pt

  5. Separation of niobium and tantalum by paper chromatography and their following spectrographic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroshkina, T.M.; Peres Sanfiel', F.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an investigation into the use of water-saturated furfural to separate niobium and tantalum in a 1:1 ratio by means of ascending paper chromatography. The influence of sulphuric acid, ammonium fluoride and hydrofluoric acid concentrations on the completeness of the niobium and tantalum separation was investigated, the extent of the separation being checked by a spectral method. The results indicate that the use of furfural creates favourable conditions for niobium and tantalum separation. The purest tantalum is obtained at concentrations of sulphuric acid 600 k/l, hydrofluoric acid 4.6% and ammonium fluoride 30 g/l. To obtain pure niobium the acid concentrations remain the same but the quantity of ammonium fluoride is doubled. The fluoride ion concentration has a significant effect on the completeness of niobium and tantalum separation. The variation coefficient for the niobium determination is 14%, for the tantalum determination 1O% (author)

  6. In-house L-band niobium single cell cavities at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Koizumi, Susumu; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Kako, Eiji; Shishido, Toshio

    1993-01-01

    For the TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) as an energy frontier accelerator of the next generation improving the performance of the niobium superconducting cavities is the most important issue and much reduction of fabrication cost of cavities is another key. Since manufacturing of niobium material requires hard techniques due to the easily oxidizable metal, fabrication of niobium cavities has been conducted in only companies providing enough equipments in Japan. KEK has accumulated the fabrication technics such as forming method by deep drawing, trimming, centering of beam tubes, electron beam welding and measurement of manufacturing error so on. We made in-house L-band single cell cavities using these technologies. In this paper we present these manufacturing of the niobium cavities and estimate the fabrication cost as exactly as possible. The manufacturing error is also described. (author)

  7. ROUGHNESS ANALYSIS OF VARIOUSLY POLISHED NIOBIUM SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeill, G.; Reece, C.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities have gained widespread use in accelerator systems. It has been shown that surface roughness is a determining factor in the cavities’ effi ciency and maximum accelerating potential achievable through this technology. Irregularities in the surface can lead to spot heating, undesirable local electrical fi eld enhancement and electron multipacting. Surface quality is typically ensured through the use of acid etching in a Buffered Chemical Polish (BCP) bath and electropolishing (EP). In this study, the effects of these techniques on surface morphology have been investigated in depth. The surface of niobium samples polished using different combinations of these techniques has been characterized through atomic force microscopy (AFM) and stylus profi lometry across a range of length scales. The surface morphology was analyzed using spectral techniques to determine roughness and characteristic dimensions. Experimentation has shown that this method is a valuable tool that provides quantitative information about surface roughness at different length scales. It has demonstrated that light BCP pretreatment and lower electrolyte temperature favors a smoother electropolish. These results will allow for the design of a superior polishing process for niobium SRF cavities and therefore increased accelerator operating effi ciency and power.

  8. Vitreous-enamel protective coatings for niobium and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobyakov, V.P.; Sedmale, G.P.; Tsimdin', R.A.; Sedmalis, U.Ya.; Tsetskhladze, D.L.; Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Sukhumi. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.)

    1988-01-01

    Vitreous-enanel coatings to protect niobium and niobium alloys, used in oxidizing media at temperatures up to 1000degC, from embrittlement are developed on the basis of Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -Ba vetrificating system. By means of microhardness measurement and IR-spectroscopy it is found, that at coating formation the intermediate ∼20 mkm width zone which prevents oxygen penetration in niobium is formed. Test of niobium pieces with ERS-1000 vitreous-enamel coating have shown, that coating provides niobium reliable protection in the air at 800degC and atmospheric pressure

  9. Method of removing niobium from uranium-niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, E.N.; Schlier, D.S.; Shinopulos, G.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of removing niobium from a uranium-niobium alloy. It comprises dissolving the uranium-niobium alloy metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing an acid selected from the group consisting of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid and fluoboric acid as a catalyst to provide a second aqueous solution, which includes uranium (U +4 ), acid radical ions, the acids insolubles including uranium oxides and niobium oxides; adding nitric acid to the insolubles to oxidize the niobium oxides to yield niobic acid and to complete the solubilization of any residual uranium; and separating the niobic acid from the nitric acid and solubilized uranium

  10. Influence of electropolishing and anodic oxidation on morphology, chemical composition and corrosion resistance of niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Maciej; Greń, Katarzyna [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Kukharenko, Andrey I. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, Mira Street 19, 620002 Yekaterinburg, Mira str. 19 (Russian Federation); Korotin, Danila M. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Michalska, Joanna [Faculty of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego Street 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland); Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Mosiałek, Michał [Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek Street 8, 30-239 Kraków (Poland); Żak, Jerzy [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Pamuła, Elżbieta [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza Avenue 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Kurmaev, Ernst Z. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Cholakh, Seif O. [Ural Federal University, Mira Street 19, 620002 Yekaterinburg, Mira str. 19 (Russian Federation); Simka, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.simka@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-09-01

    The work presents results of the studies performed on electropolishing of pure niobium in a bath that contained: sulphuric acid, hydrofluoric acid, ethylene glycol and acetanilide. After the electropolishing, the specimens were subjected to anodic passivation in a 1 mol dm{sup −3} phosphoric acid solution at various voltages. The surface morphology, thickness, roughness and chemical composition of the resulting oxide layers were analysed. Thusly prepared niobium samples were additionally investigated in terms of their corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution. The electropolished niobium surface was determined to be smooth and lustrous. The anodisation led to the growth of barrier-like oxide layers, which were enriched in phosphorus species. - Highlights: • Pure niobium was electropolished and subsequently anodised in a H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution. • Phosphorus was successfully introduced into the oxide layers after the treatment. • Corrosion resistance of niobium in Ringer's solution was improved after anodising.

  11. Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Hasan S.

    2014-10-01

    Superconducting cavities have been operating routinely in a variety of accelerators with a range of demanding applications. With the success of completed projects, niobium cavities have become an enabling technology, offering upgrade paths for existing facilities and pushing frontier accelerators for nuclear physics, high-energy physics, materials science, and the life sciences. With continued progress in basic understanding of radio-frequency superconductivity, the performance of cavities has steadily improved to approach theoretical capabilities.

  12. High critical temperature superconducting composite and fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubots, P.; Legat, D.

    1989-01-01

    The core comprises a high temperature superconducting sintered oxide coated with alumina or barium oxide covered with a first sheath in aluminum, a second sheath in niobium and a third sheath in copper [fr

  13. Niobium in steels and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakishev, N.P.; Tulin, N.A.; Pliner, Y.L.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented on the reserves and processing of niobium raw materials followed by brief review of the current status and long-range trends in the commercial usage of niobium and its compounds. A survey is made of the physical properties of niobium and its chemical reactions with elements of direct concern in the manufacture of ferroalloys, quality steels and other products. Niobium minerals and ores, along with common ore processing practices are described briefly. Attention is paid to Brazilian niobium ores, and to the Araxa deposit specifically. Some emphasis has been given to methods of processing lean niobium ores not easily amenable to simple concentration. A systematic review is presented of the techniques used in the production of niobium ferroalloys. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Superconducting magnet wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  15. Materials for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The ideal material for superconducting cavities should exhibit a high critical temperature, a high critical field, and, above all, a low surface resistance. Unfortunately, these requirements can be conflicting and a compromise has to be found. To date, most superconducting cavities for accelerators are made of niobium. The reasons for this choice are discussed. Thin films of other materials such as NbN, Nb 3 Sn, or even YBCO compounds can also be envisaged and are presently investigated in various laboratories. It is shown that their success will depend critically on the crystalline perfection of these films. (author)

  16. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of 95 Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire

  17. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of /sup 95/Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire.

  18. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  19. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  20. Magnetic Property in Large Array Niobium Antidot Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinghui, Chen; Hsiang-Hsi, Kung; Wei-Li, Lee; Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan Team

    2014-03-01

    In a superconducting ring, the total flux inside the ring is required to be an integer number of the flux quanta. Therefore, a supercurrent current can appear within the ring in order to satisfy this quantization rule, which gives rise to certain magnetic response. By using a special monolayer polymer/nanosphere hybrid we developed previously, we fabricated a series of superconducting niobium antidot thin films with different antidot diameters. The antidots form well-ordered triangular lattice with a lattice spacing about 200 nm and extend over an area larger than 1 cm2, which enables magnetic detections simply by a SQUID magnetometer. We observed magnetization oscillation with external magnetic field due to the supercurrent screening effect, where different features for large and small antidot thin films were found. Detailed size and temperature dependencies of the magnetization in niobium antidot nanostructures will be presented.

  1. Electrical and thermal properties of niobium-base cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidan, B.S.; Vlasov, A.S.; Alekseev, V.A.; Myl'nikova, T.S.; Ryzhkov, Yu.F.

    1979-01-01

    Behaviour of corundum-niobium cermets containing 16-70 vol.% metal was studied at low temperatures. It is found that the given materials are superconductors with Tsub(k) 6-7 K but their resistivity before their transfer into superconducting state is determined by the metal concentration and is found within 10 -2 -10 -4 Ohm. cm. The cermet heat conductivity is found to increase with the metal content

  2. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests

  3. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  4. Niobium-aluminum oxynitride prepared by ammonolysis of oxide precursor obtained through the citrate route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Shinichi; Ohashi, Yoshio; Masubuchi, Yuji; Takeda, Takashi; Motohashi, Teruki [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kikkawa, Shinichi, E-mail: kikkawa@eng.hokudai.ac.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2009-08-12

    Oxynitrides in the (Nb{sub 1-x}Al{sub x})(O,N) quaternary system were prepared by ammonolysis of oxide precursor obtained through the citrate route. The products at 1000 deg. C were a mixture of Nb(N,O) and NbN{sub 0.95} at the niobium end (x = 0) and amorphous Al(O,N) at the aluminum end (x = 1). A new cubic compound (A) appeared mixed with Nb(N,O) in the compositional range 0.1 <= x <= 0.4. Its almost pure product was obtained at x = 0.5. The X-ray diffraction pattern was rock salt type (Nb{sub 0.56}Al{sub 0.44})(O{sub 0.38}N{sub 0.37}square{sub 025}) in F{sub m-3m} with a = 0.43481(1) nm. The product showed superconductivity with T{sub c} = 15 K. Its crystallinity was much improved and its superconducting volume fraction increased to 32% after its thermal annealing at 1100 deg. C in evacuated sealed tube. A second cubic compound (B), rock salt type Nb[(O,N){sub 0.85}square{sub 0.15}] with a = 0.434 nm, was observed mixed with amorphous Al(O,N) in the as-prepared products of the range 0.6 <= x <= 0.9.

  5. Construction of a superconducting RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Crandall, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 194 MHz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Design details of a prototype niobium resonator, results of measurements on room temperature models, and construction status are discussed

  6. Construction of a superconducting RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Crandall, K.R. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 194 MHz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Design details of a prototype niobium resonator, results of measurements on room temperature models, and construction status are discussed.

  7. Electrical and electrochemical properties of niobium disulphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenda, J.; Bak, T.; Marzec, J. [Academy of Min. and Metall., Cracow (Poland). Dept. of Chem. of Solids

    1996-07-16

    The electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power measurements of NbS{sub 2} pure and electrochemically doped with lithium, Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2}, were done as a function of temperature (77 to 300 K). The high absolute values of conductivity and their dependence on temperature together with low absolute values of thermoelectric power and their linear increase with temperature indicate metallic properties of niobium disulphide. In case of Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2} the obtained values of electrical conductivity are significantly lower as compared with the starting NbS{sub 2}. The temperature dependence of the thermo-electric power of intercalated niobium disulphide also indicates that metallic properties get worse as the concentration of lithium increases. The modification of the electronic structure of NbS{sub 2} due to lithium intercalation was proposed. The character of the discharge curves in the electrochemical Li/Li{sup +}/Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2} systems was correlated with the electronic properties of niobium disulphide. (orig.) 11 refs.

  8. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  9. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  10. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  11. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  12. Formation and oxidation resistance of NbSi2 coatings on niobium by pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Song Lixin; Le Jun; Zhang Xiaowei; Pei Baogen; Hu Xingfang

    2005-01-01

    NbSi 2 coatings were formed on niobium by halide-activated pack cementation process. The as-coated niobium samples were oxidized in air up to 1723 K by thermogravimetry method. The surface and cross-sectional morphology, phase composition and element distribution of the NbSi 2 coatings before and after oxidation were characterized by SEM, XRD and EPMA. The results show that the as-formed coatings consist of single phase of hexagonal NbSi 2 and the oxidation resistance of pure niobium can be greatly improved by pack siliconizing. (orig.)

  13. Niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polupanova, L.I.; Volkova, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    General mineralogical-geochemical and analytical characteristics of niobium and tantalum are presented. Potentialities of any analytical methods for determining these elements in various geologic samples are estimated. The following specific techniques are described: neutron + activation determination of Ta, fluorescence X-radiometric determination of Nb and Ta, fluorescence X-ray spectral determination of Nb and Ta, spectrographic determination of Nb and Ta, gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta, their extraction-photometric determination with various reagents (crystal violet, rhodamine 6 Y, butylrhodamine B)

  14. Hydroforming SRF Three-cell Cavity from Seamless Niobium Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Masashi [KEK, Tsukuba; Dohmae, Takeshi [KEK, Tsukuba; Hocker, Andy [Fermilab; Inoue, Hitoshi [KEK, Tsukuba; Park, Gunn-Tae [KEK, Tsukuba; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos; Umemori, Kensei [KEK, Tsukuba

    2016-06-01

    We are developing the manufacturing method for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities by using a hydroforming instead of using conventional electron beam welding. We expect higher reliability and reduced cost with hydroforming. For successful hydroforming, high-purity seamless niobium tubes with good formability as well as advancing the hydroforming technique are necessary. Using a seamless niobium tube from ATI Wah Chang, we were able to successfully hydroform a 1.3 GHz three-cell TESLA-like cavity and obtained an Eacc of 32 MV/m. A barrel polishing process was omitted after the hydroforming. The vertical test was carried out with very rough inside surface. We got amazing and interesting result.

  15. Rapid radiochemical separation of zirconium-95 and niobium-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, D.M.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid method for the quantitative separation of 95 Zr and 95 Nb has been developed. The method is based on the ion flotation of cationic zirconium complex ions with sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) from niobium which is masked with hydrogen peroxide. The separation was applied to mixtures of 95 Zr and 95 Nb initially in oxalic acid solution and quantitative recoveries of the radiochemically pure radioisotopes were obtained. (orig.)

  16. Rapid radiochemical separation of zirconium-95 and niobium-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downey, D.M.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid method for the quantitative separation of /sup 95/Zr and /sup 95/Nb has been developed. The method is based on the ion flotation of cationic zirconium complex ions with sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) from niobium which is masked with hydrogen peroxide. The separation was applied to mixtures of /sup 95/Zr and /sup 95/Nb initially in oxalic acid solution and quantitative recoveries of the radiochemically pure radioisotopes were obtained.

  17. SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STOVALL, J.; NATH, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac is comprised of both normal and superconducting rf (SRF) accelerating structures. The SRF linac accelerates the beam from 186 to 1250 MeV through 117 elliptical, multi-cell niobium cavities. This paper describes the SRF linac architecture, physics design considerations, cavity commissioning, and the expected beam dynamics performance

  18. Behaviour of hydrogen in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Y.C.; Tang, C.H.; Chuang, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polycrystalline niobium was charged electrolytically with hydrogen at room temperature. The behaviour of hydrogen in niobium has been investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, and ion microprobe analysis. It is shown that, when the hydrogen content in niobium is low, hydride tends to form at the grain boundary. As the hydrogen content is increased, precipitation of hydrides with domain structure takes place in the grain. The habit plane of the hydride formed in the vicinity of the grain boundary has been determined by Laue X-ray back reflection technique to be (130)c and (111)c. The structure of the hydride formed on the surface of niobium after 6 h hydrogen charging at room temperature (c.d. 0.2 A/cm 2 ) has been established to be identical to that of NbHsub(0.89). (orig.) [de

  19. Morphology study of niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, R.P.P.; Panta, P.C.; Araujo, A.O. de; Bergmann, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Niobium pentoxide (Nb 2 O 5 ) has been studied due to physical properties and their use in obtaining electronic ceramics, optical lenses, pH sensors, special filters for TV receivers, among other applications. This study investigated the morphology of the niobium pentoxide obtained by hydrothermal synthesis from the precursor pentachloride niobium (NbCl 5 ), where the synthesis was carried out at a temperature of 150 and 200 °C for 130 min and the product obtained was calcined at temperatures 600, 800 and 1000 °C for 60 min. The following characterizations were performed for analysis of the material, among them, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for analysis of the crystal structure, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) for detecting the existing functional groups and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology of material. As a result, different morphologies were obtained and consequently different niobium pentoxide properties studied. (author)

  20. Niobium Titanium and Copper wire samples

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Two wire samples, both for carrying 13'000Amperes. I sample is copper. The other is the Niobium Titanium wiring used in the LHC magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair. The cables carry up to 12’500 amps and must withstand enormous electromagnetic forces. At full field, the force on one metre of magnet is comparable ...

  1. Strong Meissner screening change in superconducting radio frequency cavities due to mild baking

    OpenAIRE

    Romanenko, A.; Grassellino, A.; Barkov, F.; Suter, A.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate "hot" regions with anomalous high field dissipation in bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators by using low energy muon spin rotation (LE-$\\mu$SR) on corresponding cavity cutouts. We demonstrate that superconducting properties at the hot region are well described by the non-local Pippard/BCS model for niobium in the clean limit with a London penetration depth $\\lambda_\\mathrm{L} = 23 \\pm 2$ nm. In contrast, a cutout sample from the 120$^\\...

  2. Quenching experiments on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirtlich, I.A.; Schultz, H.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart

    1980-01-01

    High-purity niobium wire specimens have been quenched in superfluid helium from near the melting point in order to obtain information on vacancies in this material. The quenched-in resistivity Δsub(pQ) for a quench from 2600 K was very small (approximately 0.3 x 10 -12 Ω m) and near the limit of detection. It is assumed that large quenching losses are responsible for the small quenched-in resistance. From the experimental cooling curve estimates have been made for the formation and migration enthalpies (Hsub(1V)sup(F), Hsub(1V)sup(M)), where Hsub(1V)sup(M)+Hsub(1V)sup(F)=Qsub(1V)sup(SD)=3.62 ev. For Ssub(1V)sup(F), the formation entropy, two different values were assumed. (author)

  3. Etching of Niobium in an Argon-Chlorine Capacitively Coupled Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanov, Svetlana; Samolov, Ana; Upadhyay, Janardan; Peshl, Jeremy; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposava; Applied Materials, Varian Semiconductor Team; Old Dominion University Team

    2016-09-01

    Ion assisted etching of the inner surfaces of Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities requires control of incident ion energies and fluxes to achieve the desired etch rate and smooth surfaces. In this paper, we combine numerical simulation and experiment to investigate Ar /Cl2 capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) in cylindrical reactor geometry. Plasma simulations were done in the CRTRS 2D/3D code that self-consistently solves for CCP power deposition and electrostatic potential. The experimental results are used in combination with simulation predictions to understand the dependence of plasma parameters on the operating conditions. Using the model we were able to determine the ion current and flux at the Nb substrate. Our simulations indicate the relative importance of the current voltage phase shift and displacement current at different pressures and powers. For simulation and the experiment we have used a test structure with a pillbox cavity filled with niobium ring-type samples. The etch rate of these samples was measured. The probe measurements were combined with optical emission spectroscopy in pure Ar for validation of the model. The authors acknowledge Dr Shahid Rauf for developing the CRTRS code. Support DE-SC0014397.

  4. Method of making an improved superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.T.; Falco, C.M.; Kampwirth, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    An improved superconducting quantum interference device is made by sputtering a thin film of an alloy of three parts niobium to one part tin in a pattern comprising a closed loop with a narrow region, depositing a thin film of a radiation shield such as copper over the niobium-tin, scribing a narrow line in the copper over the narrow region, exposing the structure at the scribed line to radiation and removing the deposited copper

  5. Nb3Ge superconductive films grown with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigsbee, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    A superconductive film of Nb 3 Ge is produced by providing within a vacuum chamber a heated substrate and sources of niobium and germanium, reducing the pressure within the chamber to a residual pressure no greater than about 10 -5 mm Hg, introducing nitrogen into the resulting evacuated chamber in controlled amounts and vaporizing the niobium and germanium to deposit a film of Nb 3 Ge on the heated substrate

  6. Involvement of hydrogen-vacancy complexes in the baking effect of niobium cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Visentin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Baking is necessary to improve high accelerating gradient performances of superconducting niobium cavities. Ten years after this discovery in 1998, the understanding of this effect still resists a lot of theoretical explanations. For the first time, positron annihilation spectroscopy performed on niobium samples reveals the increase after baking of positrons trapped under the Nb surface. Presence of hydrogen-vacancy complexes and their dissociation by baking could both explain rf losses observed at high fields (Q drop and its cure (baking effect.

  7. High-Q, high gradient niobium-coated cavities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting cavities made by sputter-deposition of a thin niobium film onto copper have proven over the years to be a viable alternative to bulk niobium, the best example being the very successful operation of LEP at 200 GeV. It will be shown that this technology, investigated at 1.5 GHz by a dedicated R&D effort at CERN, can be developed to unprecedented performance, proving that no fundamental limitation prevents high quality factors to be maintained over a broad range of accelerating field.

  8. On possibility of fabrication of monolith composite materials on niobium carbide base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploshkin, V.V.; Ul'yanina, I.Yu.; Filonenko, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt was made to fabricate the composite material on niobium carbide base possessing the elevated heat resistance, erosion and chemical resistance in special media, as well as capable of withstanding sufficient thermal shocks. Powder of niobium carbide of 10 μm fraction was used as base material, the powder of pure copper of 10...12 μm fraction - as binder. It was shown that samples of composite mateiral on niobium carbide base fabricated by the method of hydrostatic pressing possessed the minimal porosity as compared to samples fabricated by usual methods of powder metallurgy. The basic phases of composite material-copper and niobium carbide - distribute uniformly over sample cross-section and don't interact with each other under any conditions. The fabricated composite material possesses sufficient thermal shock resistance and isn't subjected to brittle fracture

  9. Direct Flotation of Niobium Oxide Minerals from Carbonatite Niobium Ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiao

    Currently the recovery of niobium oxide minerals from carbonatite niobium ores relies on the use of non-selective cationic collectors. This leads to complicated process flowsheets involving multiple desliming and multiple reverse flotation stages, and low niobium recovery. In this research, anionic collectors that are capable of strong chemisorption on the niobium minerals were studied with the objective of directly floating the niobium oxide minerals from the carbonatite ores. In the flotation of both high purity minerals and Niobec ores, it was shown that the combination of hydroxamic acid and sodium metaphosphate was an effective reagent scheme for the direct flotation of niobium oxide from its ores. Batch flotation on the Niobec Mill Feed showed that over 95% of niobium oxide was recovered into a rougher concentrate that was less than 47% of the original feed mass. Preliminary cleaning tests showed that the reagent scheme could also be used to upgrade the rougher concentrate, although the depression of iron oxide minerals required further study. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurement results confirm that OHA (octyl hydroxamic acid) could chemisorb on pyrochlore surface while only physically adsorb on calcite, judging by the chemical shifts of electron binding energies in the elements in both OHA and the mineral surfaces. When hydroxamic acid was adsorbed on calcite surface, the binding energies of the N 1s electrons, at 400.3 eV, did not shift. However, after adsorption on pyrochlore, the N 1s binding energy peak split into two peaks, one at a binding energy of around 399 eV, representing chemically adsorbed OHA, the other at between 400 and 401 eV. The experimental data suggested a strong chemisorption of the OHA on pyrochlore surface in the form of a vertical head-on orientation of the OHA molecules so that the pyrochlore was strongly hydrophobized even at low OHA concentrations, followed by possibly randomly oriented physisorbed OHA molecules

  10. Superconducting radio frequency cavities: design, development and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, P.N.; Mistri, K.K.; Sonti, S.S.K.; Sacharias, J.; Raiand, A.; Kanjilal, D.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the development of superconducting niobium cavities has evoked a lot of interest among the accelerator physics community of India. Many laboratories are planning to develop superconducting niobium cavities for new accelerators and applications. Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) has been engaged in the indigenous development of niobium resonators for over a decade. During this period, several quarter wave resonators have been successfully built, tested and installed in the superconducting linac at IUAC. A new niobium low beta resonator for the High Current Injector (HCI) project has been designed, prototyped and tested. In addition to the in-house projects, IUAC is nearing completion of two niobium single spoke resonators (SSR1) for Fermi Lab, USA. Under the Indian Institutions and Fermi Lab Collaboration (IIFC), Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore and Inter-University Accelerator Centre have jointly developed TESLA-type 1.3 GHz single cell cavities which have achieved very high accelerating gradients. Buoyed by the success of this work, a 5-cell 1.3 GHz cavity with simple end tubes has been successfully built. This cavity is presently at Fermi Lab for 2 K tests. Recently, a 650 MHz, β=0.9 single cell cavity has also been successfully completed and is ready for cold tests. There are plans to develop a 650 MHz, β=0.6 single cell cavity in collaboration with VECC, Kolkata. This paper presents the status of the niobium cavities developed at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. (author)

  11. Synthesis of niobium nitride by pyrolysis of niobium pentachloride ammines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebtsova, O.M.; Shulga, Y.M.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates the conditions for the preparation of niobium nitride in the thermal decomposition of niobium nitride in the thermal decomposition of niobium pentachloride ammines. The synthesis of the ammines was accomplished by the reaction of powdered NbC1 5 with dry ammonia at 210 K. Thermography and x-ray diffraction, spectral, and chemical analyses were used to identify the ammonolysis products. It was established that the products of ammonolysis of NbC1 5 are a mixture of the x-ray-amorphous complex Nb (NH 2 ) /SUB 5-x/ - (NG 3 ) 3 CL 3 (x≅) and 2 moles of NH 4 C1. The steps in the thermal decomposition of this mixture were studied. The phase transition that is observed in the case of further vacuum heat treatment at 1100-1300 K is presented

  12. Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1996-01-01

    Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melt NaCl-KCl-K 2 CO 3 (5 mass %) in the temperature range of 973-1123 K has been studied. The products and niobium corrosion rate have been ascertained, depending on the temperature of melt and time of allowance. Potentials of niobium corrosion have been measured. Refs. 11, figs. 3, tabs. 2

  13. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Olivares-Navarrete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainless steel substrates and tissue culture plastic were also studied, in order to give comparative information. No toxic response was observed for any of the surfaces, indicating that the Nb coatings act as a biocompatible, bioinert material. Cell morphology was also studied by immune-fluorescence and the results confirmed the healthy state of the cells on the Nb surface. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coating shows that the film is polycrystalline with a body centered cubic structure. The surface composition and corrosion resistance of both the substrate and the Nb coating were also studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic tests. Water contact angle measurements showed that the Nb surface is more hydrophobic than the SS substrate.

  14. Field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Junginger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface resistance R_{S} of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied rf field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film induces heating of the inner cavity wall, resulting in a higher R_{S}. Introducing helium gas in the cavity, and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by less than 120 mK when R_{S} increases with E_{acc} by 100  nΩ. This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally, the effects of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for the current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered R_{S}.

  15. Spectrographic determination of niobium in uranium - niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbel, M.Y.; Lordello, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the spectrographic determination of niobium in uranium-niobium alloys in the concentration range 1-10% has been developed. The metallic sample is converted to oxide by calcination in a muffle furnace at 800 0 C for two hours. The standards are prepared synthetically by dry-mixing. One part of the sample or standard is added to nineteen parts of graphite powder and the mixture is excited in a DC arc. Hafnium has been used as internal standard. The precision of the method is + - 4.8%. (Author) [pt

  16. Mechanical strenght and niobium and niobium-base alloys substructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.; Andrade, A.H.P. de

    1986-01-01

    Niobium and some of its alloys have been used in several fields of technological applications such as the aerospace, chemical and nuclear industries. This is due to its excelent mechanical stringth at high temperatures and reasonable ductility at low temperatures. In this work, we review the main features of the relationship mechanical strength - substructure in niobium and its alloys, taking into account the presence of impurities, the influence of initial thermal and thermo - mechanical treatments as well as the irradiation by energetic particles. (Author) [pt

  17. XPS studies of nitrogen doping niobium used for accelerator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ziqin; Lu, Xiangyang; Tan, Weiwei; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yujia; He, Yuan; Zhou, Kui

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen doping study on niobium (Nb) samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities was carried out. The samples' surface treatment was attempted to replicate that of the Nb SRF cavities, which includes heavy electropolishing (EP), nitrogen doping and the subsequent EP with different amounts of material removal. The surface chemical composition of Nb samples with different post treatments has been studied by XPS. The chemical composition of Nb, O, C and N was presented before and after Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) etching. No signals of poorly superconducting nitrides NbNx was found on the surface of any doped Nb sample with the 2/6 recipe before GCIB etching. However, in the depth range greater than 30 nm, the content of N element is below the XPS detection precision scope even for the Nb sample directly after nitrogen doping treatment with the 2/6 recipe.

  18. State of the Art Power-in Tube Niobium-Tin Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godeke, A.; Ouden, A. Den; Nijhuis, A.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2008-06-01

    Powder-in-Tube (PIT) processed Niobium-Tin wires are commercially manufactured for nearly three decades and have demonstrated a combination of very high current density (presently up to 2500 A mm{sup -2} non-Cu at 12 T and 4.2 K) with fine (35 {micro}m), well separated filaments. We review the developments that have led to the present state of the art PIT Niobium-Tin wires, discuss the wire manufacturing and A15 formation processes, and describe typical superconducting performance in relation to magnetic field and strain. We further highlight successful applications of PIT wires and conclude with an outlook on possibilities for further improvements in the performance of PIT Niobium-Tin wires.

  19. Construction of a superconducting RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Givens, J.; Potter, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the development status of a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 194 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The length of the structure is 52 cm, and the vanes are modulated to enable tests with an ion beam. The construction of a prototype niobium resonator is described

  20. Investigation of hydrostatic extrusion and other deformation modes for the fabrication of multifilamentary niobium--tin superconductors by a powder metallurgy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, G.E.

    1977-06-01

    Various aspects of a powder metallurgy approach to fabricate filamentary niobium-tin superconducting wire were investigated. Difficulties occurred due to lack of complete tin infiltration of the sintered niobium rod, formation of intermetallics during infiltration, and both cladding and core fracture during mechanical reduction. The influence of sintering time, infiltration temperature, and deformation mode was investigated. Progress is reported on the clarification of the role of several of the important process parameters

  1. Rare-Earth Ions in Niobium-Based Devices as a Quantum Memory: Magneto-Optical Effects on Room Temperature Electrical Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    heterostructure can be used to implement cryogenic memory for superconducting digital computing. Our concept involves embedding rare-earth ions in...rare-earth neodymium by ion implantation in thin films of niobium and niobium-based heterostructure devices. We model the ion implantation process...the films and devices so they can properly designed and optimized for utility as quantum memory. We find that the magnetic field has a strong effect

  2. On niobium sputter coated cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnolds-Mayer, G.; Kaufmann, U.; Downar, H.

    1988-01-01

    To coat copper cavities with a thin film of niobium, facilities for electropolishing and sputter deposition have been installed at Dornier. Experiments have been performed on samples to optimize electropolishing and deposition parameters. In this paper, characteristics concerning surface properties, adhesion of the niobium film to the copper substrate, and film properties were studied on planar samples. A 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper was sputter coated twice. First rf measurements were performed in the temperature range from 300 K to 2 K

  3. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  4. Meissner effect in superconducting microtraps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the impact of the Meissner effect on magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms near superconducting microstructures. This task has been accomplished both theoretically and experimentally. The Meissner effect distorts the magnetic fields near superconducting surfaces, thus altering the parameters of magnetic microtraps. Both computer simulations and experimental measurements demonstrate that the Meissner effect shortens the distance between the magnetic microtrap and the superconducting surface, reduces the magnetic-field gradients and dramatically lowers the trap depth. A novel numerical method for calculating magnetic fields in atom chips with superconducting microstructures has been developed. This numerical method overcomes the geometrical limitations of other calculation techniques and can solve superconducting microstructures of arbitrary geometry. The numerical method has been used to calculate the parameters of magnetic microtraps in computer-simulated chips containing thin-film wires. Simulations were carried out for both the superconducting and the normal-conducting state, and the differences between the two cases were analyzed. Computer simulations have been contrasted with experimental measurements. The experimental apparatus generates a magnetic microtrap for ultracold Rubidium atoms near a superconducting Niobium wire of circular cross section. The design and construction of the apparatus has met the challenge of integrating the techniques for producing atomic quantum gases with the techniques for cooling solid bodies to cryogenic temperatures. By monitoring the position of the atom cloud, one can observe how the Meissner effect influences the magnetic microtrap. (orig.)

  5. Meissner effect in superconducting microtraps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, Daniel

    2009-04-30

    This thesis investigates the impact of the Meissner effect on magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms near superconducting microstructures. This task has been accomplished both theoretically and experimentally. The Meissner effect distorts the magnetic fields near superconducting surfaces, thus altering the parameters of magnetic microtraps. Both computer simulations and experimental measurements demonstrate that the Meissner effect shortens the distance between the magnetic microtrap and the superconducting surface, reduces the magnetic-field gradients and dramatically lowers the trap depth. A novel numerical method for calculating magnetic fields in atom chips with superconducting microstructures has been developed. This numerical method overcomes the geometrical limitations of other calculation techniques and can solve superconducting microstructures of arbitrary geometry. The numerical method has been used to calculate the parameters of magnetic microtraps in computer-simulated chips containing thin-film wires. Simulations were carried out for both the superconducting and the normal-conducting state, and the differences between the two cases were analyzed. Computer simulations have been contrasted with experimental measurements. The experimental apparatus generates a magnetic microtrap for ultracold Rubidium atoms near a superconducting Niobium wire of circular cross section. The design and construction of the apparatus has met the challenge of integrating the techniques for producing atomic quantum gases with the techniques for cooling solid bodies to cryogenic temperatures. By monitoring the position of the atom cloud, one can observe how the Meissner effect influences the magnetic microtrap. (orig.)

  6. Evidence of incomplete annealing at 800 °C and the effects of 120 °C baking on the crystal orientation and the surface superconducting properties of cold-worked and chemically polished Nb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Dzyuba, A.; Lee, P. J.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Cooley, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    High-purity niobium rods were cold-worked by wire-drawing, followed by various combinations of chemical polishing and high-vacuum baking at 120 °C or annealing at 800 °C in order to better understand changes to the surface superconducting properties resulting from typical superconducting radio-frequency cavity processing. AC susceptibility measurements revealed an enhanced upper transition Tc at ˜ 9.3-9.4 K in all samples that was stable through all annealing steps, a value significantly above the accepted Tc of 9.23 K for pure annealed niobium. Corresponding elevations were seen in the critical fields, the ratio of the surface critical field Hc3 to the bulk upper critical field Hc2 rising to 2.3, well above the Ginzburg-Landau value of 1.695. Orientation imaging revealed an extensive dislocation rich sub-grain structure in the as-drawn rods, a small reduction of the surface strain after baking at 120 °C, and a substantial but incomplete recrystallization near the surface after annealing at 800 °C. We interpret these changes in surface superconducting and structural properties to extensive changes in the near-surface interstitial contamination produced by baking and annealing and to synergistic interactions between H and surface O introduced during electropolishing and buffered chemical polishing.

  7. Effect of interstitial impurities on the field dependent microwave surface resistance of niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinello, M.; Grassellino, A.; Checchin, M.; Romanenko, A.; Melnychuk, O.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that the radio frequency surface resistance of niobium resonators is dramatically reduced when nitrogen impurities are dissolved as interstitial in the material. This effect is attributed to the lowering of the Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance with increasing accelerating field; however, the microscopic origin of this phenomenon is poorly understood. Meanwhile, an enhancement of the sensitivity to trapped magnetic field is typically observed for such cavities. In this paper, we conduct a systematic study on these different components contributing to the total surface resistance as a function of different levels of dissolved nitrogen, in comparison with standard surface treatments for niobium resonators. Adding these results together, we are able to show which is the optimum surface treatment that maximizes the Q-factor of superconducting niobium resonators as a function of expected trapped magnetic field in the cavity walls. These results also provide insights on the physics behind the change in the field dependence of the Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance, and of the trapped magnetic vortex induced losses in superconducting niobium resonators.

  8. Recent progress in large grain/single crystal high RRR niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; Peter Kneisel; Tadeu Carneiro; S.R. Agnew; F. Stevie

    2005-01-01

    High RRR bulk niobium Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavity technology is chosen for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The SRF community was convinced until now that fine grain polycrystalline RRR niobium sheets obtained via forging and cross rolling are essential for forming the SRF Cavities. However, it was recently discovered under a joint Reference Metals Company, Inc., - JLAB CRADA that large grain/single crystal RRR niobium sliced directly from ingots is highly ductile reaching 100 percent elongation. This discovery led to the successful fabrication of several SRF single and/or multi cell structures, formed with sliced RRR discs from the ingots, operating at 2.3, 1.5 and 1.3 GHz. This new exciting development is expected to offer high performance accelerator structures not only at reduced costs but also with simpler fabrication and processing conditions. As a result there is a renewed interest in the evaluation and understanding of the large grain and single crystal niobium with respect to their mechanical and physical properties as well as the oxidation behavior and the influence of impurities such as hydrogen and Ta. In this paper the results of many collaborative studies on large grain and single crystal high RRR niobium between JLAB, Universities and Industry are presented

  9. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed

  10. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed.

  11. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, E.; Gaballah, I.; Garcia, F.; Ferreira, S.; Ayala, J. N.; Hernandez, A.

    1999-01-01

    The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb 2 O 5 and Ta 2 O 5 by gas mixture (CL 2 +CO+N 2 ) between 380 and 1,000 degree centigree is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the partial pressure of Cl 2 and Co at temperatures below 650 degree centigree on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb 2 O 5 and Ta 2 O 5 , respectively. At temperatures above 650 degree centigree the Arrhenius diagram presents and anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCL 2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl 2 +CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl 2 +N 2 . The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides. (Author) 14 refs

  12. Effect of superconducting electrons on the energy splitting of tunneling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.C.; Granato, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    We consider the effect of superconducting electrons on the magnitude of the energy splitting of a tunneling system. A specific example is a hydrogen atom tunneling in niobium. We find that in this case the splitting is roughly 20% smaller in the normal state than in the superconducting state. This difference in the splitting should be observable in neutron scattering and ultrasonic measurements

  13. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denise Christine

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities---hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon---in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I present the beginning of a model to describe magnetic

  14. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise Christine [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  15. Preliminary Results from a Superconducting Photocathode Sample Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, Peter; Lipski, Andrzej; Sekutowicz, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Pure niobium has been proposed as a photocathode material and recently a successful test has been conducted with a niobium single cell cavity to extract photo-currents from the surface of this cavity. However, the quantum efficiency of niobium is ~2·10-4, whereas electrodeposited lead has a ~15 times higher quantum efficiency. We have designed and tested a photo-injector niobium cavity, which can be used to insert photo-cathodes made of different materials in the high electric field region of the cavity. Experiments have been conducted with niobium and lead, which show that neither the Q- values of the cavity nor the obtainable surface fields are significantly lowered. This paper reports about the results from these tests.

  16. Method of preparing composite superconducting wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhoeven, J. D.; Finnemore, D. K.; Gibson, E. D.; Ostenson, J. E.; Schmidt, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method of preparing composite multifilament superconducting wire of Nb 3 Sn in a copper matrix which eliminates the necessity of coating the drawn wire with tin. A generalized cylindrical billet of an alloy of copper containing at least 15 weight percent niobium, present in the copper as discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles, is provided with at least one longitudinal opening which is filled with tin to form a composite drawing rod. The drawing rod is then drawn to form a ductile composite multifilament wire containing a filament of tin. The ductile wire containing the tin can then be wound into magnet coils or other devices before heating to diffuse the tin through the wire to react with the niobium forming Nb 3 Sn. Also described is an improved method for making large billets of the copper-niobium alloy by consumable-arc casting

  17. First-principles approach for superconducting slabs and heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csire, Gabor [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-07-01

    We present a fully ab-initio method to calculate the transition temperature for superconducting slabs and heterostructures. In the case of thin superconductor layers the electron-phonon interaction may change significantly. Therefore we calculate the layer dependent phonon spectrum to determine the layer dependence of the electron-phonon coupling for such systems. The phonon spectrum is than coupled to the Kohn-Sham-Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation via the McMillan-Hopfield parameter, and it is solved self-consistently. The theory is applied to niobium slabs and niobium-gold heterostructures. Based on these calculations we investigate both the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on the thickness of superconducting slabs and the inverse proximity effect observed in thin superconducting heterostructures.

  18. Effect of residual gas on structural, electrical and mechanical properties of niobium films deposited by magnetron sputtering deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lanruo; Zhong, Yuan; Li, Jinjin; Cao, Wenhui; Zhong, Qing; Wang, Xueshen; Li, Xu

    2018-04-01

    Magnetron sputtering is an important method in the superconducting thin films deposition. The residual gas inside the vacuum chamber will directly affect the quality of the superconducting films. In this paper, niobium films are deposited by magnetron sputtering under different chamber residual gas conditions. The influence of baking and sputtering process on residual gas are studied as well. Surface morphology, electrical and mechanical properties of the films are analysed. The residual gas analysis result before the sputtering process could be regarded as a reference condition to achieve high quality superconducting thin films.

  19. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  20. A-15 superconducting composite wires and a method for making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suenaga, M.; Klamut, C. J.; Luhman, Th. S.

    1984-01-01

    A method for fabricating superconducting wires wherein a billet of copper containing filaments of niobium or vanadium is rolled to form a strip which is wrapped about a tin-alloy core to form a composite. The alloy is a tin-copper alloy for niobium filaments and a gallium-copper alloy for vanadium filaments. The composite is then drawn down to a desired wire size and heat treated. During the heat treatment process, The tin in the bronze reacts with the niobium to form the superconductor niobium tin. In the case where vanadium is used, the gallium in the gallium bronze reacts with the vanadium to form the superconductor vanadium gallium. This new process eliminates the costly annealing steps, external tin plating and drilling of bronze ingots required in a number of prior art processes

  1. The influence of oxygen admixture concentration on microdeformation behavior of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivantsov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    The microplasticity behavior of solid solutions Nb-O (relative residual deformations ε = 2 centre dot 10 -7 ...10 -4 ) in dependence on oxygen admixture concentration (C = 0,06...1,4 at.% O) was studied. The values of microplastic deformation parameters (precision elastic limit σ E , micro yield stress σ A and elastic module E) of pure niobium and solid solutions Nb-O were determinated. The empiric correlation of dependence σ E and σ A versus oxygen concentration were got. It was discussed the mechanism of oxygen admixture influence on stage nature of microflow and deformation hardening of niobium

  2. Mechanical Design and Fabrication Studies for SPL Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Capatina, O; Renaglia, T; Tardy, T; Valverde Alonso, N; Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s R&D programme on the Superconducting Proton Linac’s (SPL) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) elliptical cavities made from niobium sheets explores new mechanical design and consequently new fabrication methods, where several opportunities for improved optimization were identified. A stainless steel helium vessel is under design rather than a titanium helium vessel using an integrated brazed transition between Nb and the SS helium vessel. Different design and fabrication aspects were proposed and the results are discussed hereafter.

  3. Sorption of niobium on boreal forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederlund, Mervi; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The sorption of niobium (Nb) was investigated on humus and mineral soil samples taken from various depths of a four-metre deep forest soil pit on Olkiluoto Island, southwestern Finland. Mass distribution coefficients, K{sub d}, were determined in batch sorption tests. The steady state of Nb sorption was observed in the mineral soil samples already after one week of equilibration, and sorption decreased with depth from a very high value of 185000 mL/g at 0.7 m to 54000 mL/g at 3.4 m. The reason behind this decrease is probably the tenfold reduction in the specific surface area of the soil at the same depth range. Distribution coefficients were clearly lower in the humus layer (1000 mL/g). The K{sub d} values determined in pure water at a pH range of 4.7-6.5 were at a high level (above 55000 mL/g), but decreased dramatically above pH 6.5, corresponding to the change in the major Nb species from the neutral Nb(OH){sub 5} to the low-sorbing anionic Nb(OH){sub 6}{sup -} and Nb(OH){sub 7}{sup 2-}. However, the K{sub d} values in the model soil solution were in the slightly alkaline range an order of magnitude higher than in pure water, which is probably caused by the formation of calcium niobate surface precipitate or electrostatic interaction between surface-sorbed calcium and solute Nb. Among nine soil constituent minerals kaolinite performed best in retaining Nb in both pure water and model soil solution at pH 8, whereas potassium feldspar showed the poorest sorption. The K{sub d} value for kaolinite was above 500000 mL/g in both solutions, while the respective potassium feldspar values were in the range of 120-220 mL/g.

  4. NbN thin films for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, W. M.; Skuza, J. R.; Beringer, D. B.; Li, Z.; Clavero, C.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    NbN thin films have the potential to be incorporated into radio frequency cavities in a multilayer coating to overcome the fundamental field gradient limit of 50 MV m-1 for the bulk niobium based technology that is currently implemented in particle accelerators. In addition to having a larger critical field value than bulk niobium, NbN films develop smoother surfaces which are optimal for cavity performance and lead to fewer losses. Here, we present a study on the correlation of film deposition parameters, surface morphology, microstructure, transport properties and superconducting properties of NbN thin films. We have achieved films with bulk-like lattice parameters and superconducting transition temperatures. These NbN films have a lower surface roughness than similarly grown niobium films of comparable thickness. The potential application of NbN thin films in accelerator cavities is discussed.

  5. NbN thin films for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W M; Clavero, C; Lukaszew, R A; Skuza, J R; Beringer, D B; Li, Z

    2012-01-01

    NbN thin films have the potential to be incorporated into radio frequency cavities in a multilayer coating to overcome the fundamental field gradient limit of 50 MV m −1 for the bulk niobium based technology that is currently implemented in particle accelerators. In addition to having a larger critical field value than bulk niobium, NbN films develop smoother surfaces which are optimal for cavity performance and lead to fewer losses. Here, we present a study on the correlation of film deposition parameters, surface morphology, microstructure, transport properties and superconducting properties of NbN thin films. We have achieved films with bulk-like lattice parameters and superconducting transition temperatures. These NbN films have a lower surface roughness than similarly grown niobium films of comparable thickness. The potential application of NbN thin films in accelerator cavities is discussed. (paper)

  6. Characterization of Superconducting Cavities for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, Martina

    2013-01-01

    In this report the radiofrequency measurements done for the superconducting cavities developed at CERN for the HIE-ISOLDE project are analyzed. The purpose of this project is improve the energy of the REX-ISOLDE facility by means of a superconducting LINAC. In this way it will be possible to reach higher accelerating gradients, and so higher particle energies (up to 10MeV/u). At this purpose the Niobium thin film technology was preferred to the Niobium bulk technology because of the technical advantages like the higher thermal conductivity of Copper and the higher stiffness of the cavities which are less sentitive to mechanical vibrations. The Niobium coating is being optimized on test prototypes which are qualified by RF measurements at cold.

  7. Progress on Lead Photocathodes for Superconducting Injectors

    CERN Document Server

    Smedley, John; Langner, Jerzy; Lefferts, Richard; Lipski, Andrzej; Rao, Triveni; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Strzyzewski, P

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk, electroplated and vacuum deposited lead as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the wavelength of the incident light, from 310 nm to 190 nm. Quantum efficiencies of 0.3% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead-plated cathode is underway.

  8. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  9. Measurement of the high-field Q-drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; gurevich, alex

    2007-06-01

    The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio > 200) niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop”) of the cavity quality factor Q0(Bp) as the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100 – 140 C) “in-situ” baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180 °C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a post-purification treatment at 1250 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the

  10. Measurement of the high-field Q drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciovati

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio >200 niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop” of the cavity quality factor Q_{0}(B_{p} as the peak surface magnetic field (B_{p} exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100–140°C in situ baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm^{2} grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere, and baking in air up to 180°C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence, and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20–30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not reappear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120°C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180°C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with transmission electron microscope and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180°C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a postpurification treatment at 1250°C. A statistic of the position of the “hot spots” on the

  11. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  12. Tunneling study of SRF cavity-grade niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proslier, T.; Zasadzinski, J.; Cooley, L.; Pellin, M.; Norem, J.; Elam, J.; Antonine, C. Z.; Rimmer, R.; Kneisel, P.

    2009-01-01

    Niobium, with its very high H C1 , has been used in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for accelerator systems for 40 years with continual improvement. The quality factor of cavities (Q) is governed by the surface impedance R BCS , which depends on the quasiparticle gap, delta, and the superfluid density. Both of these parameters are seriously affected by surface imperfections (metallic phases, dissolved oxygen, magnetic impurities). Loss mechanism and surface treatments of Nb cavities found to improve the Q factor are still unsolved mysteries. We present here an overview of the capabilities of the point contact tunneling spectroscopy and Atomic layer deposition methods and how they can help understanding the High field Q-drop and the mild baking effect. Tunneling spectroscopy was performed on Nb pieces from the same processed material used to fabricate SRF cavities. Air exposed, electropolished Nb exhibited a surface superconducting gap Delta = 1.55 meV, characteristic of clean, bulk Nb, however the tunneling density of states (DOS) was broadened significantly. Nb pieces treated with the same mild baking used to improve the Q-slope in SRF cavities revealed a much sharper DOS. Good fits to the DOS are obtained using Shiba theory suggesting that magnetic scattering of quasiparticles is the origin of the degraded surface superconductivity and the Q-slope problem of Nb SRF cavities

  13. The effect of neutron irradiation on the recuperation and recristallization of the polycrystalline niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    Through the measurements in Transmission Electron Microscopy and Microhardness is studied the effect of fast neutron irradiation (E > or = 0,1 MeV) on the Recovery and Recrystallization in very pure grade Niobium. The range of temperature is 25 0 C - 1200 0 C for one hour. The sigmoidal curve of the Recovery in Niobium shows a initial increase in the microhardness in the range of temperature of 25 0 C - 300 0 C, who is related to the intersticial migration (impurity atoms) O, C and N to the dislocations and to the defects clusters produced by cold work and radiation. The Recrystallization in cold worked Niobium comes by subgrain growth (subgrains coalescence) and by strain induced grain boundary migration. The radiation with fast neutrons (O=1,3 x 10 18 nvt) acelerates the overall nucleation process of Recrystallization by about 150 0 C with respect to the only deformed Niobium. The activation energy for the Recrystallization process is obtained in both cases, in the rolling Niobium and in Nb deformed and irradiated by fast neutrons (1,2 x 10 17 nvt) [pt

  14. Interstitial relaxations due to hydrostatic stress in niobium--oxygen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, S.N.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the anelastic relaxation induced by hydrostatic stress in the range from ambient to 81 ksi were made for niobium--oxygen alloys. The anelastic responses, both for the pressurization and the pressure release experiments, were followed by measuring the relative length change between the oxygenated niobium sample and a pure niobium frame with a precision of about 2 A. The relaxation spectrum observed was shown to be made up of three distinct relaxations with unique relaxation times and strengths. The pressure dependence of the relaxation times gave the apparent activation volume for these relaxations of the order of 4 cm 3 /mole. The relaxations were observed to have relaxation strengths of the order of 10 -4 which were found to be independent of pressure up to 81 ksi. The relaxation times for these relaxations were found to occur in the same general temperature range as those for the Snoek relaxations of oxygen clusters in niobium. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times, however, gave activation energies of about 11 to 15 kcal/mole, as compared with roughly 27 to 29 kcal/mole for the Snoek relaxation of oxygen clusters in niobium. Several possible models for these relaxations were developed, however, none could predict the observed temperature dependence. The best interpretation of the data is that due to some anomalous competing relaxation the actual temperature dependence of these relaxations could not be observed. A completely self-consistent analysis is found which is based upon this assumption. (U.S.)

  15. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  16. Optical investigation of niobium properties: Electrical- and physical constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we report optical (reflectance) measurements and investigations of optical properties of electropolished (EP), buffered chemical polished (BCP), and as-received (AR) from vendor niobium (Nb) samples typically used for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Optical conductivity (σ(0), approximated near zero frequency) of EP (σ(0) ∼ 9 × 103 Ω-1 cm-1) sample is one order of magnitude higher than that of BCP (σ(0) ∼ 7 × 102 Ω-1 cm-1) and AR (σ(0) ∼ 3 × 102 Ω-1 cm-1) niobium samples. Furthermore, physical constants of electropolished Nb-SCRF materials such as concentration of conduction electrons (∼ 1.8 × 1022 electrons/cm3), average velocity (∼ 5.9 × 107 cm/s) of the electrons on the Fermi surface, and mean free path (∼ 0.53 nm) were also found to be considerably higher than that of the BCP and the AR samples. The depth of electric field penetration (in low frequency region) in the electropolished Nb sample (∼ 80 nm) is appreciably lesser than the BCP (∼ 450 nm) and the AR (∼ 400 nm) samples.

  17. Optimization of cathodic arc deposition and pulsed plasma melting techniques for growing smooth superconducting Pb photoemissive films for SRF injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietubyć, Robert; Lorkiewicz, Jerzy; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Smedley, John; Kosińska, Anna

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting photoinjectors have a potential to be the optimal solution for moderate and high current cw operating free electron lasers. For this application, a superconducting lead (Pb) cathode has been proposed to simplify the cathode integration into a 1.3 GHz, TESLA-type, 1.6-cell long purely superconducting gun cavity. In the proposed design, a lead film several micrometres thick is deposited onto a niobium plug attached to the cavity back wall. Traditional lead deposition techniques usually produce very non-uniform emission surfaces and often result in a poor adhesion of the layer. A pulsed plasma melting procedure reducing the non-uniformity of the lead photocathodes is presented. In order to determine the parameters optimal for this procedure, heat transfer from plasma to the film was first modelled to evaluate melting front penetration range and liquid state duration. The obtained results were verified by surface inspection of witness samples. The optimal procedure was used to prepare a photocathode plug, which was then tested in an electron gun. The quantum efficiency and the value of cavity quality factor have been found to satisfy the requirements for an injector of the European-XFEL facility.

  18. Niobium films produced by magnetron sputtering using an Ar-He mixture as discharge gas

    CERN Document Server

    Schucan, G M; Calatroni, Sergio

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting RF accelerating cavities have been produced at CERN by sputter-coating, with a thin niobium layer, cavities made of copper. In the present work, the discharge behaviour and niobium film properties have been investigated when part of the argon sputtering gas is replaced with helium. Helium is chosen because of its low mass, which reduces the energy lost by the niobium atoms colliding with the sputter gas atoms. The higher niobium atom energy should lead to higher adatom mobility on the substrate and, hence, to a larger grain size, a feature which is highly desirable to reduce the cavity surface resistance. It has been found that helium addition effectively helps to maintain the discharge at considerably lower argon pressures, via metastable-neutral ionisation and high secondary electron yield. However, a large amount of helium is trapped in the film, amount which is proportional to the helium partial pressure during the discharge, resulting in a reduction of both Residual Resistivity Ratio and ...

  19. Behaviour of solvent extraction of niobium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Cansheng; Huang Meixin; Zhang Xianzi; Zhang Chonghai

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of solvent extraction of niobium is discussed. The expractants, includding TBP, HDBP, H 2 MBP, TBP irradiated, HDEHP, TTA and Aliquat-7402, are used. The special influence of molybdenum and zirconium on solvent extraction of niobium and the extraction behaviur of niobium with TBP irradiated are described. The effect of fluorine and uranium in aqueous phase on extraction of niobium is mentioned. It is observed that the interfacial crud has not relevance to D Nb , but niobium-95 can be absorbed on it. The species of extractable niobium, extraction mechanism, and the reason brought niobum into organic phase are discussed. Finally, the idea of increasing decontamination factor for niobium is suggested

  20. Status of work on superconducting quarter wave resonators at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, S.

    1988-01-01

    A superconducting heavy ion linac is being proposed for the JAERI-tandem booster. For the accelerating structure of the tandem booster which ought to accelerate heavy ions of wide range of mass numbers, quarter wave resonator (QWR)s are suitable because of their wide ion-velocity acceptance. Ions of hydrogen to bismuth from the JAERI tandem can be accelerated by β = 0.1 QWRs. The excellent result of a niobium QWR at Argonne National Laboratory was a motive for the development of niobium QWRs. Further considerations on the design were required, because the Argonne's QWR did not have beam ports nor frequency tuners. As a result of considerations on these points, it has been decided to have an oval cylinder for the outer conductor. The prototype resonator has been built and tested. The fabrication techniques of explosive bonding, electron beam welding and heat treatment were found to be available in domestic companies in 1984. After obtaining niobium and niobium-clad-copper materials in 1985, the prototype resonator was built in 1985-86. Electro-polishing was done in their laboratory. Tests at 4.2 K have been repeated several times in combination of treatments of the niobium surface. The work is proceeding to the construction of a buncher and a prototype linac unit which are composed of superconducting QWRs. 4 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  1. The Resonance Integral of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrand, E; Lundgren, G

    1962-08-15

    The resonance integral of niobium has been studied by both pile oscillator and activation techniques. A value of 8.15b {+-} 0.65 b was obtained for the infinitely dilute integral. In addition, the variation of the resonance integral with foil thickness has been measured for thicknesses in the range 0.06 mm to 1.36 mm. A separate study of the half-life of the isomeric state in {sup 94}Nb yielded a value T{sub 1/2} = 6.30 - 0.03 m which is about 5 % lower than the value given in literature.

  2. Self-sputtering during ion precipitation and its influence on niobium film properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belevskij, V.P.; Gusev, I.V.

    1987-01-01

    Cathode sputtering of niobium films under conditions of vacuum condensation with simultaneous Nb + ion bombardment at energy of E n =(1.6...6.4)x10 -16 J is studied. Calculation of experimental values of the sputtering coefficient S Nb is performed with respect to the film thickness in the field of action of a niobium ion beam. Using the four-probe method in helium cryostats superconducting properties are studied and the film texture is determined by the X ray diffraction analysis. With the E n growth S Nb increases from 1.1 to 3.1. The best correspondence of the experimental dependence S Nb (E n ) is provided by the semiempirical formula of Yamamura Y. et al. The consequence of the S Nb increase is a sharp decrease of the effective condensation rate v eff . In case of niobium condensation at v eff m , where v m is the velocity of movement of a quasidiffusive boundary of impurities from the substrate according to the model of ion mixing developed by Carter G. and Armour D. suppresion of texture formation and deterioration of superconducting properties of superthin films (about 10 nm) is observed that results from ion mixing of the film and substrate materials on the interface. For such condensation conditions the substrate itself is the main source of impurities in the film

  3. Split ring resonator for the Argonne superconducting heavy ion booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A split-ring resonator for use in the ANL superconducting heavy-ion linac was constructed and is being tested. The electromagnetic characteristics of the 98-MHz device are the same as the unit described earlier, but the housing is formed of a new material consisting of niobium sheet explosively bonded to copper. The niobium provides the superconducting path and the copper conducts heat to a small area cooled by liquid helium. This arrangement greatly simplified the cryogenic system. Fabrication of the housing was relatively simple, with the result that costs have been reduced substantially. The mechanical stability of the resonator and the performance of the demountable superconducting joints are significantly better than for the earlier unit

  4. Split ring resonator for the Argonne superconducting heavy ion booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A split-ring resonator for use in the ANL superconducting heavy-ion linac was constructed and is being tested. The electromagnetic characteristics of the 98-MHz device are the same as the unit described earlier, but the housing is formed of a new material consisting of niobium sheet explosively bonded to copper. The niobium provides the superconducting path and the copper conducts heat to a small area cooled by liquid helium. This arrangement greatly simplified the cryogenic system. Fabrication of the housing was relatively simple, with the result that costs have been reduced substantially. The mechanical stability of the resonator and the performance of the demountable superconducting joints are significantly better than for the earlier unit.

  5. Ultimate Gradient Limitation in Niobium Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The present study is addressed to the theoretical description of the ultimate gradient limitation in SRF cavities. Our intent is to exploit experimental data to confirm models which provide feed-backs on how to improve the current state-of-art. New theoretical insight on the cavities limiting factor can be suitable to improve the quench field of N-doped cavities, and therefore to take advantage of high Q0 at high gradients.

  6. Characterization of superconducting multilayers samples

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, C Z; Berry, S; Bouat, S; Jacquot, J F; Villegier, J C; Lamura, G; Gurevich, A

    2009-01-01

    Best RF bulk niobium accelerating cavities have nearly reached their ultimate limits at rf equatorial magnetic field H  200 mT close to the thermodynamic critical field Hc. In 2006 Gurevich proposed to use nanoscale layers of superconducting materials with high values of Hc > HcNb for magnetic shielding of bulk niobium to increase the breakdown magnetic field inside SC RF cavities [1]. Depositing good quality layers inside a whole cavity is rather difficult but we have sputtered high quality samples by applying the technique used for the preparation of superconducting electronics circuits and characterized these samples by X-ray reflectivity, dc resistivity (PPMS) and dc magnetization (SQUID). Dc magnetization curves of a 250 nm thick Nb film have been measured, with and without a magnetron sputtered coating of a single or multiple stack of 15 nm MgO and 25 nm NbN layers. The Nb samples with/without the coating clearly exhibit different behaviors. Because SQUID measurements are influenced by edge an...

  7. Niobium stainless steel for implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, J.M.D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The materials that have often been used, during the last two or three decades, to carry out materials for implants are made according to the specifications: a)A.S.T.M. (F.55-76, F.56-76, F.138-76, F.139-76) stainless steel b)A.S.T.M. (F.75-76), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. c)A.S.T.M. (F.90-76), cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloys. d)A.S.T.M. (F.67-77), unalloyed titanium. e)A.S.T.M. (F.136-70), titanium alloys. It was the purpose of retaking them, toverify the niobium influence as alloy element in ANSI/ASTM F.55-76 classification stainless steels, usually for these materials elaboration. The problem by substituting molybdenum total or partially for niobium, by comparing the mechanical and corrosion properties, and biocompatibility is presented, by pointing out the variables of these substitutions, when we employ this new material to perform materials for implants. (Author) [pt

  8. Niobium Nb and tantalum Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining niobium and tantalum in various objects are described. Nb and Ta are separated with the aid of N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine by precipitating Nb(5) from a tartaric acid solution with subsequent precipitation of Ta from the filtrate. The gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta in steels is based on their quantitative separation from a diluted solution by way of hydrolysis with subsequent after-precipitation with phenylarsonic acid (in the absence of W). The gravimetric determination of Nb in the presence of W is carried out with the aid of Cupferron. To determine Nb in its carbide, Nb(5) reduced to Nb(3) is titrated with a solution of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 in the presence of phenyl-anthranilic acid. The photometric determination of Nb in tungsten-containing steels and in ores containing Ti, W, Mo and Cr is based on the rhodanide method. Nb is determined in alloys with Zr and Ti photometrically with the aid of 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcin and in alloyed steels with the aid of benzhydroxamic acid. The latter complex is extracted with chloroform. This method is used to determine Nb in rocks. The photometric determination of Ta in TiCl 4 is carried out with the aid of pyrogallol, in commercial niobium with the aid of methyl violet, and in steel with the aid of 4-(-pyridylazo)-resorcin. Also described is the polarographic determination of Nb in tantalum pentoxide

  9. Analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Chaoyue; Posen, Sam; Groll, Nickolas; Cook, Russell; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Hall, Daniel Leslie; Liepe, Matthias; Pellin, Michael; Zasadzinski, John; Proslier, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb3Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (Tc) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ˜2 μm thick Nb3Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb3Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low Tc regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb3Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators.

  10. Analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Chaoyue [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Posen, Sam; Hall, Daniel Leslie [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Groll, Nickolas; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Cook, Russell [Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Liepe, Matthias [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Pellin, Michael [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    We present an analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb{sub 3}Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (T{sub c}) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ∼2 μm thick Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb{sub 3}Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low T{sub c} regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb{sub 3}Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators.

  11. Analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Chaoyue; Posen, Sam; Hall, Daniel Leslie; Groll, Nickolas; Proslier, Thomas; Cook, Russell; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Liepe, Matthias; Pellin, Michael; Zasadzinski, John

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of Nb 3 Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb 3 Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (T c ) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ∼2 μm thick Nb 3 Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb 3 Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low T c regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb 3 Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators

  12. Fabrication and radio frequency test of large-area MgB2 films on niobium substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhimao; Guo, Xin; Welander, Paul B.; Yang, Can; Franzi, Matthew; Tantawi, Sami; Feng, Qingrong; Liu, Kexin

    2017-04-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is a promising candidate material for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities because of its higher transition temperature and critical field compared with niobium. To meet the demand of RF test devices, the fabrication of large-area MgB2 films on metal substrates is needed. In this work, high quality MgB2 films with 50 mm diameter were fabricated on niobium by using an improved HPCVD system at Peking University, and RF tests were carried out at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The transition temperature is approximately 39.6 K and the RF surface resistance is about 120 μΩ at 4 K and 11.4 GHz. The fabrication processes, surface morphology, DC superconducting properties and RF tests of these large-area MgB2 films are presented.

  13. Superconductivity - applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the following subjects: 1) Electronics and high-frequency technology, 2) Superconductors for energy technology, 3) Superconducting magnets and their applications, 4) Electric machinery, 5) Superconducting cables. (WBU) [de

  14. Observation of Stable Low Surface Resistance in Large-Grain Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, Shichun [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)/Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China)

    2016-05-01

    Low surface resistance, or high unloaded quality factor (Q0), superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are being pursued actively nowadays as their application in large-scale CW SRF accelerators can save capital and operational cost in cryogenics. There are different options in realization of such cavities. One of them is the large-grain (LG) niobium cavity. In this contribution, we present new experimental results in evaluation of LG niobium cavities cooled down in the presence of an external magnetic field. High Q0 values are achieved even with an ambient magnetic field of up to 100 mG. More over, it is observed that these high Q0 values are super-robust against repeated quench, literally not affected at all after the cavity being deliberately quenched for hundreds of times in the presence of an ambient magnetic field of up to 200 mG.

  15. Niobium thin film coating on a 500-MHz copper cavity by plasma deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haipeng Wang; Genfa Wu; H. Phillips; Robert Rimmer; Anne-Marie Valente; Andy Wu

    2005-05-16

    A system using an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma source for the deposition of a thin niobium film inside a copper cavity for superconducting accelerator applications has been designed and is being constructed. The system uses a 500-MHz copper cavity as both substrate and vacuum chamber. The ECR plasma will be created to produce direct niobium ion deposition. The central cylindrical grid is DC biased to control the deposition energy. This paper describes the design of several subcomponents including the vacuum chamber, RF supply, biasing grid and magnet coils. Operational parameters are compared between an operating sample deposition system and this system. Engineering work progress toward the first plasma creation will be reported here.

  16. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  17. Study of Thermocurrents in ILC cavities via measurements of the Seebeck Effect in niobium, titanium, and stainless steel thermocouples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, Victoria [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The goals of Fermilab’s Superconductivity and Radio Frequency Development Department are to engineer, fabricate, and improve superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities in the interest of advancing accelerator technology. Improvement includes exploring possible limitations on cavity performance and mitigating such impediments. This report focuses on investigating and measuring the Seebeck Effect observed in cavity constituents titanium, niobium, and stainless steel arranged in thermocouples. These junctions exist between cavities, helium jackets, and bellows, and their connection can produce a loop of electrical current and magnetic flux spontaneously during cooling. The experimental procedure and results are described and analyzed. Implications relating the results to cavity performance are discussed.

  18. The electrodeposition of niobium on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium on a tungsten substrate has been demonstrated by electrolysis of an alkali metal fluoride melt. The deposit produced was non-porous, coherent and formed a good bond to the substrate. (author)

  19. Polarography of niobium in hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrion, G.; Adler, F.; Andreas, B.

    1978-01-01

    Dependence between the limiting current and the concentration of niobium and hydrochloric acid has been investigated. With the decrease of niobium concentration the hydrolysis and condensation reactions proceed slower. The time dependence of condensation is shown using ethylene glycol which delays the condensation because of complexation of Nb(5). Hydroxylamine hydrochloride increases the limiting current by a kinetic effect by one order of magnitude which was observed clearly by cyclic voltammetry. Even small amounts of ethylene glycol suppress the kinetic effect. Polarographic determination of niobium in HCl as a supporting electrolyte is possible in concentration above 10 M only. Addition of ethylene glycol and hydroxylamine hydrochloride enables determination of small amounts of niobium in 4 M HCl. (author)

  20. Hydride Olefin complexes of tantalum and niobium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, Aan Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on low-valent tantalum and niobium hydride and alkyl complexes, particularly the dicyclopentadienyl tantalum hydride olefin complexes Cp2Ta(H)L (L=olefin). ... Zie: Summary

  1. Pure energy solutions - pure tomorrows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.

    2006-01-01

    HTC is an energy technology company whose mandate is to deliver 'Carbon Clear Solutions' to address the pending challenges the energy sector is facing in meeting the environmental impact of Greenhouse Gas emissions, and energy security. HTC will speak on its comprehensive suite of technologies including hydrogen production, CO 2 capture and CO 2 sequestration. HTC has patented technologies that produce H 2 from a broad variety of feedstocks such as Natural gas, Diesel, Gasoline, Bio-fuels i.e. ethanol, methanol and Coal Gasification. HTC Hydrogen reformation systems are unique in their method of delivering pure Hydrogen. Dry Reformation Reactor - New catalyst system designed to eliminate contamination problems (i.e. coking) while at the same time operate at a low temperature. Water Gas Shift Reactor - Plus - improved and redesigned catalyst that improves operating temperature and hydrogen production efficiency. Two stage catalyst reactor that provides near balance of the endothermic and exothermic reaction temperatures for efficient energy balance

  2. Mineral Resource of the Month: Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Niobium, also called columbium, is a transition metal with a very high melting point. It is in greatest demand in industrialized countries, like the United States, because of its defense-related uses in the aerospace, energy and transportation industries. Niobium is used mostly to make high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel and stainless steel. HSLA steels are used in large-diameter pipes for oil and natural gas pipelines and automobile wheels.

  3. Electron Beam Welding of a Depleted Uranium Alloy to Niobium Using a Calibrated Electron Beam Power Density Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; Terrill, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam test welds were made joining flat plates of commercially pure niobium to a uranium-6wt%Nb (binary) alloy. The welding parameters and joint design were specifically developed to minimize mixing of the niobium with the U-6%Nb alloy. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the precise power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines and/or to other facilities

  4. Plasma-assisted MOCVD growth of superconducting NbN thin films using Nb dialkylamide and Nb alkylimide precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Ott, A.W.; Chang, R.P.H.; Babcok, J.R.; Belot, J.A.; Metz, M.V.; Marks, T.J.; Lane, M.A.; Kannewurf, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    The first example of the use of metal-organic precursors for depositing NbN superconducting thin films is described. The study, which employed niobium(IV) and niobium(V) pulsed source precursors and hydrazine plasma as the nitrogen source, indicates that T c is highly dependent on the lattice parameters and level of oxygen impurities, which are in turn governed by growth and post-deposition annealing temperatures. (orig.)

  5. Superconducting TESLA cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aune

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of E_{acc}≥25 MV/m at a quality factor Q_{0}≥5×10^{9}. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF linac was set to the more moderate value of E_{acc}≥15 MV/m. In a first series of 27 industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} was measured to be 20.1±6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering from serious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTF cavities, additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular, an eddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusions and stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. The average gradient of these cavities at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} amounts to 25.0±3.2 MV/m with the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only a moderate improvement in production and preparation techniques will be needed to meet the ambitious TESLA goal with an adequate safety margin. In this paper we present a detailed description of the design, fabrication, and preparation of the TESLA Test Facility cavities and their associated components and report on cavity performance in test cryostats and with electron beam in the TTF linac. The ongoing research and development towards higher gradients is briefly addressed.

  6. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritic particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  7. Characterization of superconducting transmission line resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Jan; Summer, Philipp; Meier, Sebastian; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Schwarz, Manuel; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Krawczyk, Marta; Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Baust, Alexander; Xie, Edwar; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting transmission line resonators are widely used in circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments as quantum bus or storage devices. For these applications, long coherence times, which can be linked to the internal quality factor of the resonators, are crucial. Here, we show a systematic study of the internal quality factor of niobium thin film resonators. We analyze different cleaning methods and substrate parameters for coplanar waveguide as well as microstrip geometries. In addition, we investigate the impact of a niobium-aluminum interface which is necessary for galvanically coupled flux qubits made from aluminum. This interface can be avoided by fabricating the complete resonator-qubit structure using Al/AlO{sub x}/Al technology during fabrication.

  8. Status of the first batch of niobium resonator production for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potukuchi, P. N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the status and details of the costs of construction of niobium superconducting resonant cavities for a linear accelerator, presently being built as a booster for the 15 UD tandem Pelletron accelerator at the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The linear accelerator will have three cryostat modules, each holding eight quarter-wave resonators. Construction of a batch of ten resonators for the linac started at Argonne National Laboratory in May 1997. For production, all fabrication and all electron beam welding is being done through commercial vendors. Details of construction and present status of the project are presented

  9. Microwave study of magnetic field penetration parallel to thin niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grbic, M.S.; Janjusevic, D.; Pozek, M.; Dulcic, A.; Wagner, T.

    2007-01-01

    Complex conductivity of high quality niobium thin films has been investigated by microwave technique in parallel static magnetic field. For the 40 nm thick film no vortices can be formed and the microwave penetration is defined by the strength of the superconducting order parameter which varies with the applied magnetic field. 160 nm thick measured film allows formation of two rows of vortices. Microwave dissipiation is dominated by dynamics of vortices which is strongly affected by size effects. Results have been compared with the generalised models of complex conductivity for low-dimensional superconductor in mixed state following earlier considerations by other authors

  10. Improving the work function of the niobium surface of SRF cavities by plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Doleans, M.; Hannah, B.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C.; Stewart, S.; Mammosser, J.; Howell, M.; Saunders, J.; Degraff, B.; Kim, S.-H.

    2016-04-01

    An in situ plasma processing technique using chemically reactive oxygen plasma to remove hydrocarbons from superconducting radio frequency cavity surfaces at room temperature has been developed at the spallation neutron source, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To understand better the interaction between the plasma and niobium surface, surface studies on small samples were performed. In this article, we report the results from those surface studies. The results show that plasma processing removes hydrocarbons from top surface and improves the surface work function by 0.5-1.0 eV. Improving the work function of RF surface of cavities can help to improve their operational performance.

  11. Superconducting cavities developments efforts at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntambekar, A.; Bagre, M.; Dwivedi, J.; Shrivastava, P.; Mundra, G.; Joshi, S.C.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting RE cavities are the work-horse for many existing and proposed linear accelerators. Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) has initiated a comprehensive R and D program for development of Superconducting RF cavities suitable for high energy accelerator application like SNS and ADS. For the initial phase of technology demonstration several prototype 1.3 GHz single cell-cavities have been developed. The work began with development of prototype single cell cavities in aluminum and copper. This helped in development of cavity manufacturing process, proving various tooling and learning on various mechanical and RF qualification processes. The parts manufacturing was done at RRCAT and Electron beam welding was carried out at Indian industry. These cavities further served during commissioning trials for various cavity processing infrastructure being developed at RRCAT and are also a potential candidate for Niobium thin film deposition R and D. Based on the above experience, few single cell cavities were developed in fine grain niobium. The critical technology of forming and machining of niobium and the intermediate RF qualification were developed at RRCAT. The EB welding of bulk niobium cavities was carried out in collaboration with IUAC, New Delhi at their facility. As a next logical step efforts are now on for development of multicell cavities. The prototype dumbbells and end group made of aluminium, comprising of RF and HOM couplers ports have also been developed, with their LB welding done at Indian industry. In this paper we shall present the development efforts towards manufacturing of 1.3 GHz single cell cavities and their initial processing and qualification. (author)

  12. Kinetics and oxidation mechanisms of polycrystaline niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1979-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of annealed niobium was determined by thermogravimetric analysis between 450 and 800 0 C and for oxygen pressures varying from 20 to 700 mmHg. The oxidation kinetics of cold worked and/or irradiated niobium for temperatures between 500 and 700 0 C, with oxygen pressures varying from 100 to 300 mmHg. Was also determined. Using X-ray diffraction it was found that the oxide formed in the range of temperature and oxygen pressure considered in this research is γ-Nb 2 O 5 . Optical and scanning eletronic microscopy showed that for annealed niobium oxidized under 600 0 C there was formation of non-uniform oxide layers, containing cracks and pores, presenting very irregular metal/pentoxide interface. The presence of sub-oxide NbOsub(z) platelets was observed in this interface. This sub-oxide platelets where not observed in annealed oxidized niobium samples over 600 0 C; the oxide layers formed were compact. At 800 0 C and the beginning at 700 0 C the interfaces were quite regular. Through microhardness measurements for the metal near the metal/pentoxide interface, the formation of oxygen solid solution was found and the oxygen diffusion coefficient was calculated. The results showed that at 600 0 C the oxygen diffusion coefficient in cold worked niobium is three times larger than the value obtained for annealed niobium. The results suggest that the reaction between annealed niobium and oxygen undaer 600 0 C is controlled by reaction in interface where the oxide layers are not compacted, parcially due to Nb sub(z) platelets formation.(Author) [pt

  13. Niobium (V) doped bioceramics: evaluation of the hydrothermal route modified with citric acid and urea to obtain modified hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simomukay, E.; Souza, E.C.F. de; Antunes, S.R.M.; Borges, C.P.F.; Michel, M.D.; Antunes, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite (Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ; HA) has become a widely used ceramic material for bone reconstruction due to its biocompatibility with the bone tissue. This biocompatibility as well as other physical and chemical properties of the hydroxyapatite can be modified by the addition of different ions to its structure. Niobium (V) ion has not been commonly used in the hydroxyapatite synthesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of hydrothermal route in the niobium (V) doped hydroxyapatite synthesis. The route used the niobium ammonium oxalate (NH 4 H 2 [NbO(C 2 O 4 ) 3 ].3H 2 O) complex as a niobium (V) ion precursor. The addition of citric acid and urea in the hydrothermal route is used for the control of synthesis pH and precipitation rate. Pure sample and sample added with 5.3 ppm of niobium (V) ion were prepared. The coexistence of other phases besides the hydroxyapatite was not observed in any of the samples through the use of X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The FTIR technique revealed the presence of hydroxyapatite characteristic functional groups. The scanning electron microscopy analysis showed the formation of agglomerates composed of round particles, confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy technique. The X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic analysis detected the presence of niobium in the doped sample. The results showed that niobium (V) doped hydroxyapatite can be synthesized by means of hydrothermal route, which may be considered as huge potential for future application in bioceramics. (author)

  14. Hydrogen Contamination of Niobium Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viet Nguyen-Tuong; Lawrence Doolittle

    1993-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen is blamed for dramatic reductions in cavity Q's. Hydrogen concentration is difficult to measure, so there is a great deal of Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD) associated with the problem. This paper presents measurements of hydrogen concentration depth profiles, commenting on the pitfalls of the methods used and exploring how material handling can change the amount of hydrogen in pieces of niobium. Hydrogen analysis was performed by a forward scattering experiment with Helium used as the primary beam. This technique is variously known as FRES (Forward Recoil Elastic Scattering), FRS, HFS (Hydrogen Forward Scattering), and HRA (Hydrogen Recoil Analysis). Some measurements were also made using SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry). Both HFS and SIMS are capable of measuring a depth profile of Hydrogen. The primary difficulty in interpreting the results from these techniques is the presence of a surface peak which is due (at least in part) to contamination with either water or hydrocarbons. With HFS, the depth resolution is about 30 nm, and the maximum depth profiled is about 300 nm. (This 10-1 ratio is unusually low for ion beam techniques, and is a consequence of the compromises that must be made in the geometry of the experiment, surface roughness, and energy straggling in the absorber foil that must be used to filter out the forward scattered helium.) All the observed HFS spectra include a surface peak which includes both surface contamination and any real hydrogen uptake by the niobium surface. Some contamination occurs during the analysis. The vacuum in the analysis chamber is typically a few times 10(sup -6) torr, and some of the contamination is in the form of hydrocarbons from the pumping system. Hydrocarbons normally form a very thin (less than a monolayer) film which is in equilibrium between arrival rate and the evaporation rate. In the presence of the incoming ion beam, however, these hydrocarbons crack on the surface into non

  15. Superconductivity revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    While the macroscopic phenomenon of superconductivity is well known and in practical use worldwide in many industries, including MRIs in medical diagnostics, the current theoretical paradigm for superconductivity (BCS theory) suffers from a number of limitations, not the least of which is an adequate explanation of high temperature superconductivity. This book reviews the current theory and its limitations and suggests new ideas and approaches in addressing these issues. The central objective of the book is to develop a new, coherent, understandable theory of superconductivity directly based on molecular quantum mechanics.

  16. Superconducting inductive displacement detection of a microcantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a superconducting inductive technique to measure the displacement of a micromechanical resonator. In our scheme, a type I superconducting microsphere is attached to the free end of a microcantilever and approached to the loop of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometer. A local magnetic field as low as 100 μT, generated by a field coil concentric to the SQUID, enables detection of the cantilever thermomechanical noise at 4.2 K. The magnetomechanical coupling and the magnetic spring are in good agreement with image method calculations assuming pure Meissner effect. These measurements are relevant to recent proposals of quantum magnetomechanics experiments based on levitating superconducting microparticles.

  17. Florida State University superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, E.G.; Fox, J.D.; Frawley, A.D.; Allen, P.; Faragasso, J.; Smith, D.; Wright, L.

    1988-01-01

    As early as the fall of 1977 it was decided that the future research needs of their nuclear structure laboratory required an increase in energy capability to at least 8 MeV per nucleon for the lighter ions, and that these needs could be met by the installation of a 17 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. The chief problem with this proposal was the high cost. It became apparent that a far less expensive option was to construct a linear accelerator to boost the energy from their existing 9 MV tandem. The options open to them among linac boosters were well represented by the room temperature linac at Heidelberg and the superconducting Stony Brook and Argonne systems. By the Spring of 1979 it had been decided that both capital cost and electric power requirements favored a superconducting system. As regards the two superconducting resonator technologies - the Argonne niobium-copper or the Caltech-Stony Brook lead plated copper - the Argonne resonators, though more expensive to construct, had the advantages of more boost per resonator, greater durability of the superconducting surface and less stringent beam bunching requirements. In 1980 pilot funding from the State of Florida enabled the construction of a building addition to house the linac and a new target area, and the setting up of a small, three resonator, test booster. Major funding by the NSF for the laboratory upgrade started in 1984. With these funds they purchased their present helium liquefaction and transfer system and constructed three large cryostats, each housing four Argonne beta = 0.105 resonators and two superconducting solenoids. The last large cryostat was completed and installed on-line early this year and the linac was dedicated on March 20. Nuclear physics experiments using the whole linac began in early June. 4 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  18. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, G.; Rodil, S.E.; Arzate, H.; Muhl, S.; Olaya, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb 2 O 5 (a-Nb 2 O 5 ), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  19. Improving the work function of the niobium surface of SRF cavities by plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, P.V.; Doleans, M.; Hannah, B.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C.; Stewart, S.; Mammosser, J.; Howell, M.; Saunders, J.; Degraff, B.; Kim, S.-H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in situ plasma processing for SNS SRF cavities has been developed to remove hydrocarbons from cavity surface. • Reactive oxygen plasma is very effective to remove hydrocarbons from niobium top surface. • Reactive oxygen plasma processing increases the work function of niobium surface in the range of 0.5–1.0 eV. • It was observed that hydrocarbons can migrate at plasma cleaned top surface from near surface regions when waiting in vacuum at room temperature. • Multiple cycles of plasma processing with waiting periods in between was found beneficial to mitigate such hydrocarbons migration at plasma cleaned surface. - Abstract: An in situ plasma processing technique using chemically reactive oxygen plasma to remove hydrocarbons from superconducting radio frequency cavity surfaces at room temperature has been developed at the spallation neutron source, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To understand better the interaction between the plasma and niobium surface, surface studies on small samples were performed. In this article, we report the results from those surface studies. The results show that plasma processing removes hydrocarbons from top surface and improves the surface work function by 0.5–1.0 eV. Improving the work function of RF surface of cavities can help to improve their operational performance.

  20. On the field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The surface resistance Rs of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a thin niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied RF field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that due to the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film Rs is enhanced due to global heating of the inner cavity wall. Introducing helium gas in the cavity and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by only 60+/-60 mK when Rs increases with Eacc by 100 nOhm. This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally the effect of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered Rs.

  1. Magnesium diboride coated bulk niobium: a new approach to higher acceleration gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civale, Leonardo; Tan, Teng; Wolak, M.; Xi, Xiaoxing; Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    Bulk niobium Superconducting Radio-Frequency cavities are a leading accelerator technology. Their performance is limited by the cavity loss and maximum acceleration gradient, which are negatively affected by vortex penetration into the superconductor when the peak magnetic field at the cavity wall surface exceeds the vortex penetration field (Hvp). It has been proposed that coating the inner wall of an SRF cavity with superconducting thin films increases Hvp. In this work, we utilized Nb ellipsoids to simulate an inverse SRF cavity and investigate the effect of coating it with magnesium diboride layer on the vortex penetration field. A significant enhancement of Hvp was observed. At 2.8 K, Hvp increased from 2100 Oe for an uncoated Nb ellipsoid to 2700 Oe for a Nb ellipsoid coated with 200 nm thick MgB2 thin film. This finding creates a new route towards achieving higher acceleration gradient in SRF cavity accelerator beyond the theoretical limit of bulk Nb.

  2. Study of the surface resistance of niobium sputter-coated copper cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Campisi, I E; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Russo, R; Valente, A M

    1999-01-01

    A systematic study of the superconducting properties of niobium films deposited on the inner wall of copper radiofrequency cavities is presented. Films are grown by sputtering with different discharge gases (Xe, Kr, Ar and Ar/Ne mixtures) on substrates prepared under different conditions. The measured quantities include the surface resistance at 1.5 GHz, the critical temperature and the penetration depth. The surface resistance is analyzed in terms of its dependence on temperature, RF field and the density of trapped fluxons. Once allowance for electron scattering is made by means of a single mean free path parameter, good agreement with BCS theory is observed. The residual resistance is observed to be essentially noncorrelated with the superconducting properties, although influenced by specific coating conditions. On occasions, very low residual resistances, in the nano-ohm range, have been maintained over a broad range of RF field, indicating the absence of fundamental limitations specific to the film techn...

  3. Effect of the annealing temperature for the hydrogen Q-degradation on superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Tomoko; Sukenobu, Satoru; Tanabe, Yoshio; Onishi, Yoshimichi; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Yamazaki, Yoshishige

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen Q-degradation was studied in niobium superconducting cavities prepared by barrel polishing, and electropolishing without annealing, though a fast cooling down of cavities. Cavity performance with various annealing temperature were tested using a 1.3GHz single-cell cavity to compare the effects of annealing temperature for hydrogen Q-degradation. (author)

  4. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.D.; Bulmer, R.J.; Chaplin, M.R.; O'Connor, T.G.; Slack, D.S.; Wong, R.L.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Schultz, J.H.; Diatchenko, N.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics eXperiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three pairs of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (Nb 3 Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the LLNL/MIT/PPPL collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper. The majority of the design and all fabrication of the superconducting magnet system will be ,accomplished by industry, which will shortly be taking over the preliminary design. The magnet system is expected to be completed in early 2000

  5. Superconducting cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, A.; Funkenbusch, P.D.; Chang, G.C.S.; Burns, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Two distant classes of superconducting cermets can be distinguished, depending on whether or not a fully superconducting skeleton is established. Both types of cermets have been successfully fabricated using non-noble metals, with as high as 60wt% of the metal phase. The electrical, magnetic and mechanical behavior of these composites is discussed

  6. Application of RF Superconductivity to High-Current Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, the authors initiated a development program in Los Alamos for high-current superconducting proton-linac technology to build prototypes components of this linac to demonstrate the feasibility. The authors are building 700-MHz niobium cavities with elliptical shapes, as well as power couplers to transfer high RF power to these cavities. The cavities and power couplers will be integrated in cryostats as linac cryomodules. In this paper, they describe the linac design and the status of the development program

  7. Development of the L-band superconducting cavity system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, T.; Kakutani, N.; Sukenobu, S. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kanagawa (JP)] [and others

    2000-02-01

    R and D activities on superconducting cavities in 1998 at TOSHIBA are presented. An L-band single-cell niobium cavity with four ports on the beam pipes was fabricated in our company and tested at KEK. The cryostat and refrigerator system for the cavity were designed and fabricated. The cryostat installed the cavity was tested in low temperature. R and D of hydroforming to fabricate seamless cavities is also presented. (author)

  8. Development of the L-band superconducting cavity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, T.; Kakutani, N.; Sukenobu, S.

    2000-01-01

    R and D activities on superconducting cavities in 1998 at TOSHIBA are presented. An L-band single-cell niobium cavity with four ports on the beam pipes was fabricated in our company and tested at KEK. The cryostat and refrigerator system for the cavity were designed and fabricated. The cryostat installed the cavity was tested in low temperature. R and D of hydroforming to fabricate seamless cavities is also presented. (author)

  9. Study of niobium corrosion in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, S.H. de.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative study of niobium electrochemical behaviour in NaOH and KOH solution, with concentrations between 0,5 and 6,1M is presented. The studies were done through electrochemicals assays, consisting in the corrosion potential and anodic and cathodic polarization curves, complemented by loss of mass experiments. The niobium anodic behaviour in alkaline medium is characterized by passivation occurrence, with a stable film formation. The Na oH solution in alkaline medium are more corrosible to niobium than the KOH solution. The loss of mass assays showed that the corrosion velocit is more dependente of hydroxide concentration in KOH medium than the NaOH medium. (C.G.C.) [pt

  10. Josephson tunnel junctions in niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, Tapio.

    1976-12-01

    A method of fabricating stable Josephson tunnel junctions with reproducible characteristics is described. The junctions have a sandwich structure consisting of a vacuum evaporated niobium film, a niobium oxide layer produced by the glow discharge method and a lead film deposited by vacuum evaporation. Difficulties in producing thin-film Josephson junctions are discussed. Experimental results suggest that the lower critical field of the niobium film is the most essential parameter when evaluating the quality of these junctions. The dependence of the lower critical field on the film thickness and on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter of the film is studied analytically. Comparison with the properties of the evaporated films and with the previous calculations for bulk specimens shows that the presented model is applicable for most of the prepared samples. (author)

  11. Radioactivity analysis in niobium activation foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G.E.

    1995-06-01

    The motivation for this study was to measure and analyze the activity of six (6) niobium (Nb) foils (the x-rays from an internal transition in Nb-93m) and apply this information with previously obtained activation foil data. The niobium data was used to determine the epithermal to MeV range for the neutron spectrum and fluence. The foil activation data was re-evaluated in a spectrum analysis code (STAY`SL) to provide new estimates of the exposure at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF). The activity of the niobium foils was measured and analyzed at the University of Missouri-Columbia (UMC) under the direction of Professor William Miller. The spectrum analysis was performed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) by Professor Gary Mueller.

  12. Molding of L band niobium superconductor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Koizumi, Susumu [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A cavity to produce high accelerating electron field was developed. The L-band (1.3 GHz) niobium superconductor unit cell cavity was ellipsoid with {phi}217.3 mm outer diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and consisted of two pieces of half cell, two beam pipes and flange. A deep drawing process was adapted. In spite of the first trial manufacture, each good cavity was obtained. Characteristic properties of niobium materials, molding method of cavity, extension of sheet after molding, production of beam pipe, accuracy and the cost were explained. Niobium materials. showed tensile strength 15.6 kg/mm{sup 2}, load-carrying capacity 4.1 kg/mm{sup 2}, density 8.57, extension 42.5% and RRR (resistance residual ratio){>=}200. (S.Y.)

  13. Superconducting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Superconductivity has a long history of about 100 years. Over the past 50 years, progress in superconducting materials has been mainly in metallic superconductors, such as Nb, Nb-Ti and Nb 3 Sn, resulting in the creation of various application fields based on the superconducting technologies. High-T c superconductors, the first of which was discovered in 1986, have been changing the future vision of superconducting technology through the development of new application fields such as power cables. On basis of these trends, future prospects of superconductor technology up to 2040 are discussed. In this article from the viewpoints of material development and the applications of superconducting wires and electronic devices. (author)

  14. Characterization of high-purity niobium structures fabricated using the electron beam melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas Najera, Cesar Adrian

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) refers to the varied set of technologies utilized for the fabrication of complex 3D components from digital data in a layer-by-layer fashion. The use of these technologies promises to revolutionize the manufacturing industry. The electron beam melting (EBM) process has been utilized for the fabrication of fully dense near-net-shape components from various metallic materials. This process, catalogued as a powder bed fusion technology, consists of the deposition of thin layers (50 - 120microm) of metallic powder particles which are fused by the use of a high energy electron beam and has been commercialized by Swedish company Arcam AB. Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are key components that are used in linear accelerators and other light sources for studies of elemental physics. Currently, cavity fabrication is done by employing different forming processes including deep-drawing and spinning. In both of the latter techniques, a feedstock high-purity niobium sheet with a thickness ranging from 3-4 mm is mechanically deformed and shaped into the desired geometry. In this manner, half cavities are formed that are later joined by electron beam welding (EBW). The welding step causes variability in the shape of the cavity and can also introduce impurities at the surface of the weld interface. The processing route and the purity of niobium are also of utmost importance since the presence of impurities such as inclusions or defects can be detrimental for the SRF properties of cavities. The focus of this research was the use of the EBM process in the manufacture of high purity niobium parts with potential SRF applications. Reactor grade niobium was plasma atomized and used as the precursor material for fabrication using EBM. An Arcam A2 system was utilized for the fabrication. The system had all internal components of the fabrication chamber replaced and was cleaned to prevent contamination of niobium powder. A mini-vat, developed at

  15. Superconducting RF Cavities Past, Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    In the last two decades many laboratories around the world, notably Argonne (ANL), TJNAF (formerly CEBAF), CERN, DESY and KEK, decided to develop the technology of superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities. The aim was either to increase the accelerator energy or to save electrical consumption or both. This technology has been used extensively in the operating machines showing good performances and strong reliability. At present, the technology using bulk niobium (Nb) or Nb coated on copper (Cu) is mature enough to be applied for many different applications, such as synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron drivers. Results, R&D work and future projects will be presented with emphasis on application to linear accelerators.

  16. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  17. Vortex dynamics in ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, M.Z.; Adamus, Z. [Polish Acad Sci, Inst Phys, PL-02668 Warsaw, (Poland); Konczykowski, M. [CEA, DSM, DRECAM, Lab Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS-UMR 7642, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Zhu, L.Y.; Chien, C.L. [Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Phys and Astron, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The dependence of vortex dynamics on the geometry of magnetic domain pattern is studied in the superconducting/ferromagnetic bilayers, in which niobium is a superconductor, and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy serves as a ferromagnetic layer. Magnetic domain patterns with different density of domains per surface area and different domain size, w, are obtained for Co/Pt with different thickness of Pt. The dense patterns of domains with the size comparable to the magnetic penetration depth (w {>=} {lambda}) produce large vortex pinning and smooth vortex penetration, while less dense patterns with larger domains (w {>=}{>=} {lambda}) enhance pinning less effectively and result in flux jumps during flux motion. (authors)

  18. Niobium phosphates as an intermediate temperature proton conducting electrolyte for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede

    2012-01-01

    A new proton conductor based on niobium phosphates was synthesized using niobium pentoxide and phosphoric acid as precursors. The existence of hydroxyl groups in the phosphates was confirmed and found to be preserved after heat treatment at 500 °C or higher, contributing to an anhydrous proton co...... are of high interest as potential proton conducting electrolytes for fuel cells operational in an intermediate temperature range....... conductivity of 1.6 × 10−2 S cm−1 at 250 °C. The conductivity increased with water content in the atmosphere and reached 5.8 × 10−2 S cm−1 under pure water vapour at the same temperature. The conductivity showed good stability in the low water partial pressure range of up to 0.05 atm. The metal phosphates...

  19. Interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gariglio, S., E-mail: stefano.gariglio@unige.ch [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Gabay, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bat 510, Université Paris-Sud 11, Centre d’Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Triscone, J.-M. [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We discuss interfacial superconductivity, a field boosted by the discovery of the superconducting interface between LaAlO. • This system allows the electric field control and the on/off switching of the superconducting state. • We compare superconductivity at the interface and in bulk doped SrTiO. • We discuss the role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. • We briefly discuss superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments. • Recent observations of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} are presented. - Abstract: Low dimensional superconducting systems have been the subject of numerous studies for many years. In this article, we focus our attention on interfacial superconductivity, a field that has been boosted by the discovery of superconductivity at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}. We explore the properties of this amazing system that allows the electric field control and on/off switching of superconductivity. We discuss the similarities and differences between bulk doped SrTiO{sub 3} and the interface system and the possible role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. We also, more briefly, discuss interface superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments, and the recent observation of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3}.

  20. Liquid-film assisted formation of alumina/niobium interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sugar, Joshua D.; McKeown, Joseph T.; Marks, Robert A.; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2002-01-01

    Alumina has been joined at 1400 degrees C using niobium-based interlayers. Two different joining approaches were compared: solid-state diffusion bonding using a niobium foil as an interlayer, and liquid-film assisted bonding using a multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayer. In both cases, a 127-(mu)m thick niobium foil was used; =1.4-(mu)m or =3-(mu)m thick copper films flanked the niobium. Room-temperature four-point bend tests showed that the introduction of a copper film had a significa...

  1. Niobium-base grain refiner for aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Pontes, P. da; Robert, M.H.; Cupini, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    A new chemical grain refiner for aluminium has been developed, using inoculation of a niobium-base compound. When a bath of molten aluminium is inoculated whith this refiner, an intermetallic aluminium-niobium compound is formed which acts as a powerful nucleant, producing extremely fine structure comparable to those obtained by means of the traditional grain refiner based on titanium and boron. It was found that the refinement of the structure depends upon the weight percentage of the new refiner inoculated as well as the time of holding the bath after inoculation and before pouring, but mainly on the inoculating temperature. (Author) [pt

  2. Tool steel for cold worck niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenstein, H.

    1984-01-01

    A tool steel was designed so as to have a microstructure with the matrix similar a cold work tool steel of D series, containing a dispersion of Niobium carbides, with no intention of putting Niobium in solution on the matrix. The alloy was cast, forged and heat treated. The alloy was easily forged; the primary carbide morfology, after forging, was faceted, tending to equiaxed. The hardness obtained was equivalent to the maximum hardness of a D-3 sttel when quenched from any temperature between 950 0 C, and 1200 0 , showing a very small sensitivy to the quenching temperature. (Author) [pt

  3. Low field critical currents and ac losses of thin film niobium--tin superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a study of the low field critical current and ac loss properties of niobium-tin thin films and layered composites fabricated by electron-beam coevaporation are presented. Particular emphasis is placed upon determining the suitability of this material for use as a conductor in a superconducting power transmission line. Chapter I contains a summary of this work and its major results together with an introduction to the scientific and engineering concepts associated with a superconducting power transmission line. Chapter II is a discussion of the physics of current transport and the associated loss mechanisms in a type-II superconductor. Chapter III gives the details of the electron-beam coevaporation technique developed to fabricate the samples for this study. Also discussed in this chapter are the effects of the evaporation conditions on the growth morphology of the niobium-tin films. Chapter IV presents the details of the experimental techniques developed to measure the ac loss and critical current in these samples as a function of temperature. Chapter V shows the dependence of the critical current of these films and composites on temperature, magnetic field, and on the number of artificially introduced pinning centers in the layered composites. Experimental results are also presented concerning the stability of these conductors against flux jumps. Chapter VI is a discussion of the ac losses in these samples. Detailed comparisons are made between the measured loss and the predictions of the critical state model

  4. Improvements in or relating to the manufacture of superconducting members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.A.; Madsen, P.E.; Hills, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of superconducting members; more particularly of a superconducting member comprising a large number of fine superconductive filaments supported in an electrically conductive, non-superconductive matrix. The method embodies a superconductor of A 15 crystal structure having the general formula A 3 B (where A is a substrate metal (preferably niobium or vanadium) and B is one or more elements (e.g. tin, germanium) which when alloyed with A will form the superconductor). The method involves, as one step, forming an alloy of a carrier metal (e.g. copper) with the element B, and an essential condition of the method is that the phosphorus content of the alloy is less than 0.2 per cent by weight. (U.K.)

  5. Deposition of niobium plate on niobium-titanium from molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matychenko, Eh.S.; Shevyrev, A.A.; Stolyarova, L.A.; Sukhorzhevskaya, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    A possibility of using Nb-Ti alloys (50 and 34 mas.% of Ti) as substrates for deposition of niobium coating of chloride-fluoride and fluoride molten salts is studied. Corrosion behaviour of alloys indicates in the electrolytic bath within 970-1070 K interval, coating structure and state of coating-substrate boundary are investigated. Chloride-fluoride molten salt usefullness for making products with niobium coatings is shown

  6. Organic superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, D.

    1980-01-01

    We present the experimental evidences for the existence of a superconducting state in the Quasi One Dimensional organic conductor (TMTSF) 2 PF 6 . Superconductivity occuring at 1 K under 12 kbar is characterized by a zero resistance diamagnetic state. The anistropy of the upper critical field of this type II superconductor is consistent with the band structure anistropy. We present evidences for the existence of large superconducting precursor effects giving rise to a dominant paraconductive contribution below 40 K. We also discuss the anomalously large pressure dependence of T sb(s), which drops to 0.19 K under 24 kbar in terms of the current theories. (author)

  7. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain, E.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 by gas mixture (C12 + CO + N2 between 380 and 1,000 °C is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the pardal pressure of Cl2 and CO at temperatures below 650 °C on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb2Os and Ta2O5, respectively. At temperatures above 650°C the Arrhenius diagram presents an anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCl2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl2+CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl2 + N2. The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides.

    En este trabajo se estudia la cinética de carbocloruración del Nb2O5 y del Ta2O5 por la mezcla de gases (Cl2 + CO + N2 entre 380 y 1000°C. Se hace un cálculo de la energía libre estándar de carbocloruración y se dibujan los diagramas de equilibrio de fases. Se estudia la influencia del flujo de gas, la temperatura y la presión parcial de Cl2 y CO a temperaturas por debajo de 650°C sobre la velocidad de reacción. La energía de activación es aproximadamente 75 y 110 kJ/mol para el Nb2O5 y el Ta2O5, respectivamente. A temperaturas por encima de 650°C, el diagrama de Arrhenius presenta una anomalía que puede ser atribuida a la

  8. Dislocation morphology in deformed and irradiated niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.P.

    1977-06-01

    Niobium foils of moderate purity were examined for the morphology of dislocations or defect clusters in the deformed or neutron-irradiated state by transmission electron microscopy. New evidence has been found for the dissociation of screw dislocations into partials on the (211) slip plane according to the Crussard mechanism: (a/2) [111] → (a/3) [111] + (a/6) [111

  9. Growth of anodic films on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, M.A.B.; Bulhoes, L.O.S.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of the response of the galvanostatic growth of anodic films on niobium metal in aqueous solutions is shown. The first spark voltage showed a dependence upon value of current density that could be explained as the incorporation of anions into the film. (M.J.C.) [pt

  10. Review of tantalum and niobium alloy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the current state of niobium- and tantalum-base alloy production. The materials requirements, alloy compositions of interest, and production status are discussed. Finally, a list of developments needed to support the SP-100 program will be identified. A bibliography is included

  11. Intercalated compounds of niobium and tantalum dicalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wypych, F.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of niobium and tantalum lamellar compounds and its intercalated derivatives is described. The intercalated compounds with lithium, with alkaline metal and with metals of the first-row transition are studied, characterized by X-ray diffraction. (C.G.C.) [pt

  12. Superconductivity in nanostructured lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Anca; Bleiweiss, Michael; Amirzadeh, Jafar; Saygi, Salih; Dimofte, Andreea; Yin, Ming; Iqbal, Zafar; Datta, Timir

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional nanoscale structures of lead were fabricated by electrodeposition of pure lead into artificial porous opal. The size of the metallic regions was comparable to the superconducting coherence length of bulk lead. Tc as high as 7.36 K was observed, also d Tc/d H was 2.7 times smaller than in bulk lead. Many of the characteristics of these differ from bulk lead, a type I superconductor. Irreversibility line and magnetic relaxation rates ( S) were also studied. S( T) displayed two maxima, with a peak value about 10 times smaller than that of typical high- Tc superconductors.

  13. Advance in Vertical Buffered Electropolishing on Niobium for Particle Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, A.T.; Jin, S.; Mammosser, J.D.; Reece, C.E.; Rimmer, R.A.; Lin, L.; Lu, X.Y.; Zhao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Niobium (Nb) is the most popular material that has been employed for making superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in various particle accelerators over the last couple of decades. One of the most important steps in fabricating Nb SRF cavities is the final chemical removal of 150 μm of Nb from the inner surfaces of the SRF cavities. This is usually done by either buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP). Recently a new Nb surface treatment technique called buffered electropolishing (BEP) has been developed at Jefferson Lab. It has been demonstrated that BEP can produce the smoothest surface finish on Nb ever reported in the literature while realizing a Nb removal rate as high as 10 μm/min that is more than 25 and 5 times quicker than those of EP and BCP(112) respectively. In this contribution, recent advance in optimizing and understanding BEP treatment technique is reviewed. Latest results from RF measurements on BEP treated Nb single cell cavities by our unique vertical polishing system will be reported.

  14. Superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    This project has two goals: to design, build, and test a small superconducting linac to serve as an energy booster for heavy ions from an FN tandem electrostatic accelerator, and to investigate various aspects of superconducting rf technology. The main design features of the booster are described, a status report on various components (resonators, rf control system, linac control system, cryostats, buncher) is given, and plans for the near future are outlined. Investigations of superconducting-linac technology concern studies on materials and fabrication techniques, resonator diagnostic techniques, rf-phase control, beam dynamics computer programs, asymmetry in accelerating field, and surface-treatment techniques. The overall layout of the to-be-proposed ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System, is shown; the ATLAS would use superconducting technology to produce beams of 5 to 25 MeV/A. 6 figures

  15. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormann, R.; Loiseau, R.; Marcilhac, B.

    1989-01-01

    The invention concerns superconducting ceramics containing essentially barium, calcium and copper fluorinated oxides with close offset and onset temperatures around 97 K and 100 K and containing neither Y nor rare earth [fr

  16. Hole superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.; Marsiglio, F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors review recent work on a mechanism proposed to explain high T c superconductivity in oxides as well as superconductivity of conventional materials. It is based on pairing of hole carriers through their direct Coulomb interaction, and gives rise to superconductivity because of the momentum dependence of the repulsive interaction in the solid state environment. In the regime of parameters appropriate for high T c oxides this mechanism leads to characteristic signatures that should be experimentally verifiable. In the regime of conventional superconductors most of these signatures become unobservable, but the characteristic dependence of T c on band filling survives. New features discussed her include the demonstration that superconductivity can result from repulsive interactions even if the gap function does not change sign and the inclusion of a self-energy correction to the hole propagator that reduces the range of band filling where T c is not zero

  17. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM 010 caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 μs) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible

  18. Superconducted tour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-09-15

    Superconductivity - the dramatic drop in electrical resistance in certain materials at very low temperatures - has grown rapidly in importance over the past two or three decades to become a key technology for high energy particle accelerators. It was in this setting that a hundred students and 15 lecturers met in Hamburg in June for a week's course on superconductivity in particle accelerators, organized by the CERN Accelerator School and the nearby DESY Laboratory.

  19. Superconductivity: Phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falicov, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    This document discusses first the following topics: (a) The superconducting transition temperature; (b) Zero resistivity; (c) The Meissner effect; (d) The isotope effect; (e) Microwave and optical properties; and (f) The superconducting energy gap. Part II of this document investigates the Ginzburg-Landau equations by discussing: (a) The coherence length; (b) The penetration depth; (c) Flux quantization; (d) Magnetic-field dependence of the energy gap; (e) Quantum interference phenomena; and (f) The Josephson effect

  20. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, G., E-mail: enggiova@hotmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Facultad de Quimica, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Arzate, H. [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Olaya, J.J. [Unidad de Materiales, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Cra. 30 45-03 Bogota (Colombia)

    2011-01-15

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  1. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS-II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 · 10 10 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS-II.

  2. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS–II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 ∙ 1010 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS–II.

  3. Degradation of superconducting Nb/NbN films by atmospheric oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Michael David; Wolfley, Steven L.; Young, Travis Ryan; Monson, Todd; Pearce, Charles Joseph; Lewis, Rupert M.; Clark, Blythe; Brunke, Lyle Brent; Missert, Nancy A.

    2017-03-01

    Niobium and niobium nitride thin films are transitioning from fundamental research toward wafer scale manufacturing with technology drivers that include superconducting circuits and electronics, optical single photon detectors, logic, and memory. Successful microfabrication requires precise control over the properties of sputtered superconducting films, including oxidation. Previous work has demonstrated the mechanism in oxidation of Nb and how film structure could have deleterious effects upon the superconducting properties. This study provides an examination of atmospheric oxidation of NbN films. By examination of the room temperature sheet resistance of NbN bulk oxidation was identified and confirmed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. As a result, Meissner magnetic measurements confirmed the bulk oxidation not observed with simple cryogenic resistivity measurements.

  4. Non-uniform absorption of terahertz radiation on superconducting hot electron bolometer microbridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, W.; Zhang, W.; Zhong, J. Q.; Shi, S. C.; Delorme, Y.; Lefevre, R.; Feret, A.; Vacelet, T.

    2014-01-01

    We interpret the experimental observation of a frequency-dependence of superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixers by taking into account the non-uniform absorption of the terahertz radiation on the superconducting HEB microbridge. The radiation absorption is assumed to be proportional to the local surface resistance of the HEB microbridge, which is computed using the Mattis-Bardeen theory. With this assumption the dc and mixing characteristics of a superconducting niobium-nitride (NbN) HEB device have been modeled at frequencies below and above the equilibrium gap frequency of the NbN film

  5. Characterization of a dc SQUID based accelerometer circuit for a superconducting gravity gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharnweber, R.; Lumley, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A demonstrator set-up to test superconducting components has been designed and fabricated in order to characterize their functionality for use in a superconducting gravity gradiometer. The displacement of a freely oscillating levitated niobium proof mass in this acceleration transducer is measured inductively and read out by a direct current superconducting quantum interference device. It has been confirmed experimentally that the oscillation frequency depends on the current of the levitation magnet that is operated in persistent-current mode. The results allow us to establish testing and operational procedures that can be used in a more complex multichannel system to confirm functionality and to adjust the levitated proof mass. (author)

  6. Characterization of a dc SQUID based accelerometer circuit for a superconducting gravity gradiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharnweber, R.; Lumley, J.M. [Oxford Instruments, Scientific Research Division, Research Instruments (Cambridge), Newton House, Cambridge Business Park, Cowley Road, Cambridge CB4 4WZ (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    A demonstrator set-up to test superconducting components has been designed and fabricated in order to characterize their functionality for use in a superconducting gravity gradiometer. The displacement of a freely oscillating levitated niobium proof mass in this acceleration transducer is measured inductively and read out by a direct current superconducting quantum interference device. It has been confirmed experimentally that the oscillation frequency depends on the current of the levitation magnet that is operated in persistent-current mode. The results allow us to establish testing and operational procedures that can be used in a more complex multichannel system to confirm functionality and to adjust the levitated proof mass. (author)

  7. Experimental formation of a fractional vortex in a superconducting bi-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y.; Yamamori, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Nishio, T.; Arisawa, S.

    2018-05-01

    We report the experimental formation of a fractional vortex generated by using a thin superconducting bi-layer in the form of a niobium bi-layer, observed as a magnetic flux distribution image taken by a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope. Thus, we demonstrated that multi-component superconductivity can be realized by an s-wave conventional superconductor, because, in these superconductors, the magnetic flux is no longer quantized as it is destroyed by the existence of an inter-component phase soliton (i-soliton).

  8. Rehabilitation of pure alexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Ólafsdóttir, Rannveig Rós; Arendt, Ida-Marie

    2013-01-01

    that pure alexia was an easy target for rehabilitation efforts. We review the literature on rehabilitation of pure alexia from 1990 to the present, and find that patients differ widely on several dimensions like alexia severity, and associated deficits. Many patients reported to have pure alexia......-designed and controlled studies of rehabilitation of pure alexia....

  9. ECR plasma cleaning for superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Suehiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-02-01

    A superconducting linac has been operating well as a heavy ion energy booster of the tandem accelerator at JAERI since 1994. Forty superconducting quarter wave resonators are used in the linac. They have high performances in average. Some of them are, however, suffering from 'Q-disease' that has been caused by hydrogen absorption into niobium during electro-polishing and the precipitation of niobium-hydrides on the surface at the vicinity of about 120K during precooling. A method of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma cleaning was applied to spare resonator in order to investigate if it is useful as a curing method of Q-disease. ECR plasma was excited in the resonator by 2.45 GHz microwave in a magnetic field of about 87.5 mT. In the first preliminary experiments, hydrogen, helium, water and oxigen gases were investigated. Every case was done at a pressure of about 3x10{sup -3} Pa. The results show that apparent recovery from Q-disease was found with helium and oxigen gases. (author)

  10. A New Superconducting Wire for Future Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CARE/NED project has developed a new superconducting wire that can achieve very high currents (1400 amps) at high magnetic fields (12 teslas). Cross-section of the CARE/NED wire produced by SMI. As we prepare to enter a new phase of particle physics with the LHC, technological development is a continuous process to ensure the demands of future research are met. The next generation of colliders and upgrades of the present ones will require significantly larger magnetic fields for bending and focusing the particle beams. NED (Next European Dipole) is one of the projects taking on this challenge to push technology beyond the present limit (see: More about NED). The magnets in the LHC rely on niobium titanium (NbTi) as the superconducting material, with a maximum magnetic field of 8 to 10T (tesla). In order to exceed this limitation, a different material together with the corresponding technology needs to be developed. NED is assessing the suitability of niobium tin (Nb3Sn), which has the potential to at le...

  11. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2017-03-01

    Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order to investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q0(Bp) curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. These results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q0(Bp) .

  12. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashupati Dhakal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order to investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q_{0}(B_{p} curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. These results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q_{0}(B_{p}.

  13. The LHC Superconducting RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the largest high energy physics laboratory worldwide, is constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the existing 27 km circumference LEP (Large Electron Positron) collider tunnel. For the LHC, superconducting cavities, operating at 4.5 K, will provide the required acceleration field for ramping the beam energy up to 7 TeV and for keeping the colliding proton beams tightly bunched. Superconducting cavities were chosen, not only because of their high acceleration field leading to a small contribution to the machine impedance, but also because of their high stored energy which minimises the effects of periodic transient beam loading associated with the high beam intensity (0.5 A). There will be eight single-cell cavities per beam, each delivering 2 MV (5.3 MV/m) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industrial firms, using niobium on copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A complete cavity prototype assembly in...

  14. Note: Radio frequency surface impedance characterization system for superconducting samples at 7.5 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, B P; Reece, C E; Phillips, H L; Geng, R L; Wang, H; Marhauser, F; Kelley, M J

    2011-05-01

    A radio frequency (RF) surface impedance characterization (SIC) system that uses a novel sapphire-loaded niobium cavity operating at 7.5 GHz has been developed as a tool to measure the RF surface impedance of flat superconducting material samples. The SIC system can presently make direct calorimetric RF surface impedance measurements on the central 0.8 cm(2) area of 5 cm diameter disk samples from 2 to 20 K exposed to RF magnetic fields up to 14 mT. To illustrate system utility, we present first measurement results for a bulk niobium sample.

  15. Technological challenges in extractive metallurgy and refining of niobium, tantalum and preparation of their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirji, K.V.; Sheela; Saibaba, N.

    2016-01-01

    Manufacturing of refractory and reactive metals, their alloys and fabricated products has been always difficult due to their high affinity with atmospheric gases, stringent specifications and exhaustive quality requirements. In the field of development of these materials, Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), Hyderabad has been at the fore front in accepting the challenges for the advancement of technological growth. Extensive developments have been carried out during the last few decades in the field of niobium, tantalum, zirconium etc in the form of pure metal, their compounds and alloys. Over the period of time, efforts have been made for developing sophisticated facilities along with trained man power for manufacturing of critical items for which technical knowhow is not available either with private industries or any other organizations in the country. In the field of reactive metals, though general theory is well established, production is intriguing and requires expert handling on the field. At NFC, efforts were put towards industrial adoptability of the useful knowledge gained from lab scale to reliable production scale. Comprehensive study was conducted to systematically study the effects of various process parameters starting from ore to the metals and their alloys, equipment were modified for ease of operation with stress on recycling/reusing of the waste and handling of effluents. However scale of operation and therefore cost of production has been matter of concern in the field of tantalum and niobium. Electron beam refining is used for production of highly pure reactive and refractory metals like tantalum, niobium, zirconium etc. and their alloys under high vacuum. Special Materials Plant (SMP) at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad has developed processes for production of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, tantalum metal powder, tantalum anodes/capacitors, potassium tantalum fluoride, Nb thermit, Nb metal granules, RRR grade niobium, Nb base alloys such as Zr

  16. Study of niobium V compounds in nitric medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gue, J.-P.; Kikindai, Tivadar; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92

    1976-01-01

    Nitric solutions of niobium V were studied in the range of concentrations of 5.10 -6 M to 0,5.10 -3 M in niobium and 0,4 to 10N in nitric acid. Methods used were light scattering, electron microscopy, electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. It is shown that niobium was in a colloidal hydroxide form. Solvent extraction studies were performed with dibutyl phosphoric acid diluted in dodecane. It appears that floculation of the sol occurs for weak organic acid concentrations. But if the concentration increases, the precipitated niobium compound is redissolved in the organic phase [fr

  17. Degradation of ethyl alcohol on niobium hydraxide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'eva, M.A.; Maslova, E.S.; Artem'ev, Yu.M.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of niobium hydroxide were prepared from niobium(5) chloride solutions in anhydrous ethanol. Niobium hydroxide groups were applied on the surface of dispersed silica-airsilogel. Pulse microcatalytic method was used to reveal, that synthesized hydroxide catalysed ethanol decomposition at 573 K only along the direction of dehydration with formation of ethylene. Ethylene was also the main product of alcohol degradation on applied samples, and procedure of dehydration reactions was noticeable. Spectra of temperature programmed surface reactions demonstrate the similarity of acidic surface properties of these two types of samples. Hydroxide compounds of niobium and bismuth were tested for correlation. They were active during ethyl alcohol dehydrogenation

  18. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Roges

    2006-01-01

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data

  19. Niobium and hafnium grown on porous membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morant, C.; Marquez, F.; Campo, T.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report on a method for fabricating highly ordered nanostructures of niobium and hafnium metals by physical vapour deposition using two different templates: anodized aluminum oxide membranes (AAO) and zirconium onto AAO membranes (Zr/AAO). The growth mechanism of these metal nanostructures is clearly different depending on the material used as a template. A different morphology was obtained by using AAO or Zr/AAO templates: when the metal is deposited onto AAO membranes, nanospheres with ordered hexagonal regularity are obtained; however, when the metal is deposited onto a Zr/AAO template, highly ordered nanocones are formed. The experimental approach described in this work is simple and suitable for synthesizing nanospheres or nanoholes of niobium and hafnium metals in a highly ordered structure.

  20. Status of the SNS superconducting linac and future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho

    2008-01-01

    The use of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities in particle accelerator is becoming more widespread. Among the projects that make use of that technology is the Spallation Neutron Source, where H- ions are accelerated to about 1 GeV, mostly making use of niobium elliptical cavities. SNS generates neutrons by the spallation reaction with the accelerated short (about 700 ns) sub-bunches of protons, which will in turn allow probing structural and magnetic properties of new and existing materials. The SNS superconducting linac is the largest application of RF superconductivity to come on-line in the last decade and has been operating with beam for almost two years. As the first operational pulsed superconducting linac, many of the aspects of its performance were unknown and unpredictable. A lot of experiences and data have been gathered on the pulsed behavior of cavities and cryomodules at various repetition rates and at various temperatures during the commissioning of its components and beam operations. This experience is of great value in determining future optimizations of SNS as well in guiding in the design and operation of future pulsed superconducting linacs. The testing of the superconducting cavities, the operating experience with beam, the performance of the superconducting linac and the future plans will be presented.

  1. Defect studies of H+ implanted niobium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prochazka, I.; Čížek, J.; Havránek, Vladimír; Anwand, W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 645, SI1 (2015), s. 69-71 ISSN 0925-8388. [14th International Symposium on Metal-Hydrogen Systems (MH). Salford, 20.07.2014-25.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Niobium * Hydrogen * defects * Positron annihilation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  2. Hydrogen solubility in polycrystalline - and nonocrystalline niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.T.; Silva, J.R.G. da

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen solubility in polycrystalline and monocrystalline niobium was measured in the range 400 0 C to 1000 0 C at one atmosphere hydrogen partial pressure. The experimental technique consists of saturation of the solvent metal with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. It is presented solubility curves versus reciprocal of the absolute doping temperature, associated with their thermodynamical equation. (Author) [pt

  3. Superconducting cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blosser, H.G.; Johnson, D.A.; Burleigh, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Superconducting cyclotrons are particularly appropriate for acceleration of heavy ions. A review is given of design features of a superconducting cyclotron with energy 440 (Q 2 /A) MeV. A strong magnetic field (4.6 tesla average) leads to small physical size (extraction radius 65 cm) and low construction costs. Operating costs are also low. The design is based on established technology (from present cyclotrons and from large bubble chambers). Two laboratories (in Chalk River, Canada and in East Lansing, Michigan) are proceeding with construction of full-scale prototype components for such cyclotrons

  4. Structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvakkumar, R.; Hong, Sun Ig

    2015-09-01

    Niobium oxide nanocrystals were successfully synthesized employing the green synthesis method. Phase formation, microstructure and compositional properties of 1, 4 and 7 days incubation treated samples after calcinations at 450 °C were examined using X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence (PL), infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron microscopic characterizations. It was observed that phase formation of Nb2O5 nanocrystals was dependent upon the incubation period required to form stable metal oxides. The characteristic results clearly revealed that with increasing incubation and aging, the transformation of cubic, orthorhombic and monoclinic phases were observed. The uniform heating at room temperature (32 °C) and the ligation of niobium atoms due to higher phenolic constituents of utilized rambutan during aging processing plays a vital role in structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals. The defects over a period of incubation and the intensities of the PL spectra changing over a period of aging were related to the amount of the defects induced by the phase transition.

  5. Fatigue behavior of niobium--hydrogen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.W.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on room temperature fatigue behavior of niobium were investigated under both high frequency stress control and low frequency strain control conditions, in air. Hydrogen markedly improved the fatigue life in high frequency tests, while low frequency tests resulted in decreased fatigue life with increasing hydrogen content. Notches in hydrogen-charged alloys reduced high cycle life significantly but had little effect on low cycle tests. Fracture surfaces of annealed niobium mainly exhibited striations, with numerous cracks originating at troughs of striated bands in both stress and strain control tests. The fracture mode for alloys with hydrogen in solution was mixed, with striations interspersed with cleavage facets at high frequencies but generally cleavage steps at low frequencies. For the hydrided alloys, distinctive steps of mixed ductile-brittle appearance were revealed under high frequency conditions, but large cleavage facets only were observed for low frequency tests. The results are discussed in terms of the effects of hydrogen on the cyclic strain hardening rate, as well as on fatigue strength and ductility of niobium

  6. Heavy electron superconductivity: From 1K to 90K to ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pethick, C.J.; Pines, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the experimental results and physical arguments which led us to conclude that in heavy electron systems the physical mechanism responsible for superconductivity is an attractive interaction between the heavy electrons which results from the virtual exchange of antiferromagnetic f-electron moment fluctuations. In these systems, then, the superconductivity is of purely electronic origin; the phonon-induced interaction between electrons which leads to superconductivity in ordinary metals plays little or no role

  7. Review of progress in superconducting high-beta structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundelin, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    During the past two years, there has been substantial progress in superconducting high-beta cavities in a number of areas. Understanding of the Q-disease, which occurs when a cavity is held for prolonged periods near 100 K, has advanced, and techniques for mitigating this problem have improved. Progress has been made in the use of high peak power processing to suppress field emission. Cell geometries have improved to reduce the ratio of peak surface electric field to accelerating field, and trapped mode behavior has been found to permit use of nine cells for some applications. The operating experience base for cavities installed in accelerators has increased substantially, as has the performance experience base for industrially manufactured cavities, including both solid niobium and sputter-coated copper. Additional applications for superconducting cavities have been identified. Progress has been made toward the design and construction of a Tera-Electron-Volt Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) test bed. (author). 25 refs., 1 fig

  8. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruvalds, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermi liquid nesting in high temperature superconductors; optical properties of high temperature superconductors; Hall effect in superconducting La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 ; source of high transition temperatures; and prospects for new superconductors

  9. Superconducting transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting transformer having a winding arrangement that provides for current limitation when subjected to a current transient as well as more efficient utilization of radial spacing and winding insulation. Structural innovations disclosed include compressed conical shaped winding layers and a resistive matrix to promote rapid switching of current between parallel windings

  10. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-T c superconductor at low temperature

  11. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.

    1996-01-01

    Superconducting dipole magnets for high energy colliders are discussed. As an example, the magnets recently built for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are reviewed. Their technical performance and the cost for the industry-built production dipoles are given. The cost data is generalized in order to extrapolate the cost of magnets for a new machine

  12. Bipolar superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    A model of bipolaron superconductivity suggested by Soviet scientist Alexandrov A.S. and French scientist Ranninger is presentes in a popular way. It is noted that the bipolaron theory gives a good explanation of certain properties of new superconductors, high critical temperature, in particular

  13. Superconducting transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A three film superconducting tunneling device, analogous to a semiconductor transistor, is presented, including a theoretical description and experimental results showing a current gain of four. Much larger current gains are shown to be feasible. Such a development is particularly interesting because of its novelty and the striking analogies with the semiconductor junction transistor

  14. Radiation damages in superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, W.; Seibt, E.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation damage investigations of technical superconductors are reported and discussed with respect to their main properties like critical current jsub(c), transition temperature Tsub(c), upper critical field Bsub(c2), pinning and annealing behaviour. Ordered A15 type alloys (like Nb 3 Sn and V 3 Ga) show significant reductions of all critical parameters above a threshold of about 2x10 21 m -2 with 50 MeV deuterons corresponding to 2x10 22 neutrons/m 2 (Esub(n)>0.1 MeV). Pure metals and disordered B1 type alloys (like Nb or NbTi) show only a small linear decrease in critical parameters (except Bsub(c2) of niobium). Experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations. (author)

  15. Thin Film Approaches to the SRF Cavity Problem: Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Douglas B.

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities are responsible for the acceleration of charged particles to relativistic velocities in most modern linear accelerators, such as those employed at high-energy research facilities like Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory's CEBAF and the LHC at CERN. Recognizing SRF as primarily a surface phenomenon enables the possibility of applying thin films to the interior surface of SRF cavities, opening a formidable tool chest of opportunities by combining and designing materials that offer greater benefit. Thus, while improvements in radio frequency cavity design and refinements in cavity processing techniques have improved accelerator performance and efficiency - 1.5 GHz bulk niobium SRF cavities have achieved accelerating gradients in excess of 35 MV/m - there exist fundamental material bounds in bulk superconductors limiting the maximally sustained accelerating field gradient (approximately 45 MV/m for Niobium) where inevitable thermodynamic breakdown occurs. With state of the art niobium based cavity design fast approaching these theoretical limits, novel material innovations must be sought in order to realize next generation SRF cavities. One proposed method to improve SRF performance is to utilize thin film superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) multilayer structures to effectively magnetically screen a bulk superconducting layer such that it can operate at higher field gradients before suffering critically detrimental SRF losses. This dissertation focuses on the production and characterization of thin film superconductors for such SIS layers for radio-frequency applications.

  16. Theory of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisan, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up to the 1987 results on high temperature superconductivity. Contents: Phenomenological Theory of Superconductivity; Microscopic Theory of Superconductivity; Theory of Superconducting Alloys; Superconductors in a Magnetic Field; Superconductivity and Magnetic Order; Superconductivity in Quasi-One-Dimensional Systems; and Non-Conventional Superconductivity

  17. Mining, ore preparation and niobium alloys production at Araxa, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraiso, O.S.; Fuccio Junior, R. de; Betz, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed description of the worlds major niobium producer is presented covering mining, concentration by froth flotation, leaching, and production of ferro-alloys. The present exploration of the Araxa deposit, its ore preparation and production of ferro-niobium is described. (E.G.) [pt

  18. Diffusion of oxygen in niobium during bake-out

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Ruzinov, V

    2001-01-01

    Bake-outs at temperatures between 100 C and 150 C for a duration up to two days have become customary for optimising the performance of bulk niobium cavities. This treatment results in the diffusion of oxygen, originating from the surface oxide, into the niobium. The theoretical oxygen profile has been simulated using the diffusion equations, and compared with some experimental results.

  19. Processing of Niobium-Lined M240 Machine Gun Barrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Fig. 5 Finished niobium-lined M240 machine gun barrel with flash suppressor attached ..........11 Fig. 6 End of barrel 1 showing small amount of...the finished barrel is shown in Fig. 5. 11 Fig. 5 Finished niobium-lined M240 machine gun barrel with flash suppressor attached Firing tests

  20. MEASUREMENT OF RF LOSSES DUE TO TRAPPED FLUX IN A LARGE-GRAIN NIOBIUM CAVITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Alex Gurevich

    2008-01-01

    Trapped magnetic field in superconducting niobium is a well known cause of radio-frequency (RF) residual losses. In this contribution, we present the results of RF tests on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large grain niobium before and after allowing a fraction of the Earth's magnetic field to be trapped in the cavity during the cooldown below the critical temperature Tc. This experiment has been done on the cavity before and after a low temperature baking. Temperature mapping allowed us to determine the location of hot-spots with high losses and to measure their field dependence. The results show not only an increase of the low-field residual resistance, but also a larger increase of the surface resistance for intermediate RF field (higher ''medium field Qslope''), which depends on the amount of the trapped flux. These additional field-dependent losses can be described as losses of pinned vortices oscillating under the applied RF magnetic field

  1. NANO-SQUIDs based on niobium Dayem bridges for nanoscale applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, C; Esposito, E; Nappi, C; Ruggiero, B; Russo, M [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 80078 Pozzuoli (Napoli) (Italy); Vettoliere, A; Walke, P [Also Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); Silvestrini, P, E-mail: c.granata@cib.na.cnr.i [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Aversa(Caserta) (Italy)

    2010-06-01

    We report on the design, the fabrication and the performance of an integrated magnetic nano-sensor based on niobium dc-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) for nanoscale applications is presented. The nano-sensors are based on nanometric niobium constrictions (Dayem bridges) inserted in a square loop having a side length of 200 nm. Measurements of voltage-flux characteristic, flux to voltage transfer factor and noise performances are reported. In small signal mode, the sensors have shown a magnetic flux noise spectral density of 1.5 {mu}{Phi}{sub 0}/Hz{sup 1/2} corresponding to a spin sensitivity in unit of Bohr magneton of 60 spin/Hz{sup 1/2}. Supercurrent decay measurements of these devices are also reported. Such measurements provide useful information for applications which employ the SQUID as a trigger where the sensor works on the zero voltage state. The experimental data, have shown an intrinsic current fluctuation less than 0.2% of the critical current at liquid helium temperature, corresponding to an intrinsic sensor magnetic flux resolution of a few m{Phi}{sub 0}. In view of the nano-SQUID employments in the detection of small spin populations, the authors calculated the spin sensitivity and the magnetic response relative to the single spin, as a function of its position within the SQUID hole. The results show that the SQUID response depends strongly on the spin position.

  2. Multiwall carbon nanotube Josephson junctions with niobium contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallecchi, Emiliano

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is the investigation of dissipationless supercurrent in multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a controlled environment. The experimental observation of a dissipationless supercurrent in gated carbon nanotubes remains challenging because of its extreme sensitivity to the environment and to noise fluctuations. We address these issues by choosing niobium as a superconductor and by designing an optimized on chip electromagnetic environment. The environment is meant to reduce the suppression of the supercurrent and allows to disentangle the effects of thermal fluctuations from the intrinsic behavior of the junction. This is crucial for the extraction of the value critical current from the measured data. When the transparency of the contacts is high enough we observed a fully developed supercurrent and we found that it depends on the gate voltage in a resonant manner. In average the critical current increases when the gate is tuned more negative, reflecting the increase of the transparency of the contacts, while the resonant behavior is due to quantum interference effects. We measured the temperature dependence of the switching current and we analyzed the data with an extended RCSJ model that allow to extract the critical current from the experimental data. The measured critical currents are very high with respect to previous reports on gated devices. At positive gate voltage the contacts transparency is lowered and Coulomb blockade is observed. This allows to use Coulomb blockade measurements to further characterize the nanotube and to study the physics of a quantum dot coupled to superconducting leads. The last part of this thesis is dedicated to the measurements of a carbon nanotube Josephson junction in the Coulomb blockade regime. (orig.)

  3. Multiwall carbon nanotube Josephson junctions with niobium contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallecchi, Emiliano

    2009-02-17

    The main goal of this thesis is the investigation of dissipationless supercurrent in multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a controlled environment. The experimental observation of a dissipationless supercurrent in gated carbon nanotubes remains challenging because of its extreme sensitivity to the environment and to noise fluctuations. We address these issues by choosing niobium as a superconductor and by designing an optimized on chip electromagnetic environment. The environment is meant to reduce the suppression of the supercurrent and allows to disentangle the effects of thermal fluctuations from the intrinsic behavior of the junction. This is crucial for the extraction of the value critical current from the measured data. When the transparency of the contacts is high enough we observed a fully developed supercurrent and we found that it depends on the gate voltage in a resonant manner. In average the critical current increases when the gate is tuned more negative, reflecting the increase of the transparency of the contacts, while the resonant behavior is due to quantum interference effects. We measured the temperature dependence of the switching current and we analyzed the data with an extended RCSJ model that allow to extract the critical current from the experimental data. The measured critical currents are very high with respect to previous reports on gated devices. At positive gate voltage the contacts transparency is lowered and Coulomb blockade is observed. This allows to use Coulomb blockade measurements to further characterize the nanotube and to study the physics of a quantum dot coupled to superconducting leads. The last part of this thesis is dedicated to the measurements of a carbon nanotube Josephson junction in the Coulomb blockade regime. (orig.)

  4. Direct atomic absorption determination of silicon in metallic niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinova, Eh.S.; Guzeev, I.D.; Nedler, V.V.; Khokhrin, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration is being given to realization of the basic advantage of non-flame atomizer-analysis of directly solid samples-for silicon determination in niobium for the content of the first one of less than 1x10 -3 mass %. Analysis technique is described. Diagrams of the dependences of atomic silicon absorption in graphite cells of usual type as well as lined by tungsten carbide and atomic silicon absorption on the value of niobium weighed amount are presented. It is shown that Si determination in metallic niobium according to aqueous reference solutions results in understatement of results 2.4 times. The optimal conditions for Si determination in niobium are the following: 2400 deg C temperature, absence of carbon and oxygen. Different niobium specimens with the known silicon content were used as reference samples

  5. Etching mechanism of niobium in coaxial Ar/Cl2 radio frequency plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, J.; Im, Do; Popović, S.; Vušković, L.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Phillips, L.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the Ar/Cl 2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for the desired modification of inner surface of the three dimensional niobium (Nb) superconductive radio frequency cavities. Uniform mass removal in cylindrical shaped structures is a challenging task because the etch rate varies along the direction of gas flow. The study is performed in the asymmetric coaxial radio-frequency (rf) discharge with two identical Nb rings acting as a part of the outer electrode. The dependence of etch rate uniformity on pressure, rf power, dc bias, Cl 2 concentration, diameter of the inner electrode, temperature of the outer cylinder, and position of the samples in the structure is determined. To understand the plasma etching mechanisms, we have studied several factors that have important influence on the etch rate and uniformity, which include the plasma sheath potential, Nb surface temperature, and the gas flow rate

  6. High frequency study of a short niobium/lead alloy line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazuer, J.; Gilchrist, J.

    1974-01-01

    The resonant Q-factors of coaxial lines 1.42 m in length, consisting of fine niobium wires in superconducting tubes, have been studied. The lines are either open-circuited at each end or else short-circuited at each end. In either case the fundamental resonance and odd harmonics up to the ninth were observed. Various surface treatments of the wire made no appreciable difference to the Q value of the open-circuited lines. The short-circuited lines had much lower Q values due to imperfect short-circuiting contacts, and were used mainly to study the effect of a superposed direct current. This was appreciable even when the current was much smaller than the current that the wire would support without resistive transition. The additional high-frequency loss caused by the current was attributed to flux penetration. (author)

  7. PECVD SiO2 dielectric for niobium Josephson IC process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Nandakumar, V.; Murdock, B.; Hebert, D.

    1991-01-01

    PECVD SiO 2 dielectric has been evaluated as an insulator for a Nb-based, all-refractory Josephson integrated circuit process. First, the properties of PECVD SiO 2 films were measured and compared with those of evaporated SiO films. Second, the PECVD SiO 2 dielectric film was used in our Nb-based Josephson integrated circuit process. The main problem was found to be the deterioration of the critical temperature of the superconducting niobium adjacent to the SiO 2 . The cause and a solution of the problem were investigated. Finally, a Josephson integrated sampler circuit was fabricated and tested. This paper shows acceptable junction I-V characteristics and a measured time resolution of a 4.9 ps pulse in liquid helium

  8. Fluxon induced surface resistance and field emission in niobium films at 1.5 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    2001-01-01

    The surface resistance of superconducting niobium films induced by the presence of trapped magnetic flux, presumably in the form of a pinned fluxon lattice, is shown to be modified by the presence of a field emitting impurity or defect. The modification takes the form of an additional surface resistance proportional to the density of the fluxon lattice and increasing linearly with the amplitude of the microwave above a threshold significantly lower than the field emission threshold. Such an effect, a precursor of electron emission, is observed for the first time in a study using radiofrequency cavities operating at their fundamental 1.5 GHz frequency. The measured properties of the additional surface resistance severely constrain possible explanations of the observed effect. (23 refs).

  9. Etching mechanism of niobium in coaxial Ar/Cl2 radio frequency plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Janardan [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Im, Do [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Popovic, Svetozar [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Valente-Feliciano, Anne -Marie [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Phillips, H. Larry [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Vuskovic, Leposova [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    The understanding of the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for the desired modification of inner surface of the three dimensional niobium (Nb) superconductive radio frequency cavities. Uniform mass removal in cylindrical shaped structures is a challenging task because the etch rate varies along the direction of gas flow. The study is performed in the asymmetric coaxial radio-frequency (rf) discharge with two identical Nb rings acting as a part of the outer electrode. The dependence of etch rate uniformity on pressure, rf power, dc bias, Cl2 concentration, diameter of the inner electrode, temperature of the outer cylinder, and position of the samples in the structure is determined. Furthermore, to understand the plasma etching mechanisms, we have studied several factors that have important influence on the etch rate and uniformity, which include the plasma sheath potential, Nb surface temperature, and the gas flow rate.

  10. Investigations of Residual Stresses and Mechanical Properties of Single Crystal Niobium for SRF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Ricker, Richard E.

    2007-08-01

    This work investigates properties of large grained, high purity niobium with respect to the forming of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities from such large grained sheets. The yield stresses were examined using tensile specimens that were essentially single crystals in orientations evenly distributed in the standard projection triangle. No distinct yield anisotropy was found, however, vacuum annealing increased the yield strength by a factor 2…3. The deep drawing forming operation of the half cells raises the issues of elastic shape changes after the release of the forming tool (springback) and residual stresses, both of which are indicated to be negligible. This is a consequence of the low yield stress (sheet metal forming). However, the significant anisotropy of the transversal plastic strains after uniaxial deformation points to potentially critical thickness variations for large grained / single crystal half cells, thus raising the issue of controlling grain orientation or using single crystal sheet material.

  11. Fast fluence measurement for JOYO irradiation field using niobium dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikara

    2004-03-01

    Neutron fluence and spectrum are key parameters in various irradiation tests and material surveillance tests so they need to be evaluated accurately. The reactor dosimetry test has been conducted by the multiple foil activation method, and a niobium dosimeter has been developed for measurement of fast neutron fluence in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The inelastic scattering reaction of 93 Nb has a low threshold energy, about 30 keV, and the energy distribution of reaction cross section is similar to the displacement cross section for iron. Therefore, a niobium dosimeter is suitable for evaluation of the fast neutron fluence and the displacement per atom for iron. Moreover, a niobium dosimeter is suited to measure neutron fluence in long-term irradiation test because 93 Nb, which is produced by the reaction, has a long half-life (16.4 years). This study established a high precision measurement technique using the niobium reaction rate. The effect of self-absorption was decreased by the solution and evaporation to dryness of niobium dosimeter. The dosimeter weight was precisely measured using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This technique was applied to JOYO dosimetry. The fast neutron fluences (E > 0.1 MeV) found by measuring the reaction rate in the niobium dosimeter were compared with the values evaluated using the multiple foil activation method. The ratio of measured fast neutron fluences by means of niobium dosimeter and multiple foil activation method range from 0.97 to 1.03 and agree within the experimental uncertainty. The measurement errors of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeter range from 4.5% (fuel region) to 10.1% (in-vessel storage rack). As a result of this study, the high precision measurement of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeters was confirmed. The accuracy of fast reactor dosimetry will be improved by application of niobium dosimeters to the irradiation tests in the JOYO MK-III core. (author)

  12. Electron heating by photon-assisted tunneling in niobium terahertz mixers with integrated niobium titanium nitride striplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leone, B; Gao, [No Value; Klapwijk, TM; Jackson, BD; Laauwen, WM; de Lange, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe the gap voltage depression and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in pumped niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction with niobium titanium nitride tuning stripline by introducing an electron heating power contribution resulting from the photon-assisted tunneling

  13. Color superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-01-01

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken

  14. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  15. SCMS-1, Superconducting Magnet System for an MHD generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenkevich, V.B.; Kirenin, I.A.; Tovma, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The research and development effort connected with the building of the superconducting magnet systems for MHD generators at the Institute for High Temperatures of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences included the designing, fabrication and testing of the superconducting magnet system for an MHD generator (SCMS-1), producing a magnetic field up to 4 Tesla in a warm bore tube 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long (the nonuniformity of the magnetic field in the warm bore did not exceed +-5%. The superconducting magnet system is described. The design selected consisted of a dipole, saddle-form coil, wound around a tube. The cooling of the coils is of the external type with helium access to each layer of the winding. For winding of the superconducting magnet system a 49-strand cable was used consisting of 42 composition conductors, having a diameter of 0.3 mm each, containing six superconducting strands with a niobium-titanium alloy base (the superconducting strands were 70 microns in diameter), and seven copper conductors of the same diameter as the composite conductors. The cable is made monolithic with high purity indium and insulated with lavsan fiber. The cable diameter with insulation is 3.5 mm

  16. Superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  17. Evaluated nuclear-data file for niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Smith, D.L.; Howerton, R.J.

    1985-03-01

    A comprehensive evaluated nuclear-data file for elemental niobium is provided in the ENDF/B format. This file, extending over the energy range 10 -11 -20 MeV, is suitable for comprehensive neutronic calculations, particulary those dealing with fusion-energy systems. It also provides dosimetry information. Attention is given to the internal consistancy of the file, energy balance, and the quantitative specification of uncertainties. Comparisons are made with experimental data and previous evaluated files. The results of integral tests are described and remaining outstanding problem areas are cited. 107 refs

  18. Germanium-overcoated niobium Dayem bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdeman, L.B.; Peters, P.N.

    1976-01-01

    Overcoating constriction microbridges with semiconducting germanium provides additional thermal conductivity at liquid-helium temperatures to reduce the effects of self-heating in these Josephson junctions. Microwave-induced steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of an overcoated Dayem bridge fabricated in a 15-nm-thick niobium film; at 4.2 K (T/sub c/-T=2.6 K), at least 20 steps could be counted. No steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of the bridge prior to overcoating. In addition, the germanium overcoat can protect against electrical disturbances at room temperature

  19. Hydrogen in niobium-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.R.G. da; Cabral, F.A.O.; Florencio, O.

    1985-01-01

    High purity Nb-Ti polycrystalline alloys were doped with hydrogen in equilibrium with the gaseous atmosphere at a pressure of 80 torr. at different temperatures. The partial molar enthalpy and entropy of the hydrogen solution at high dilution, ΔH sup(-) 0 and ΔS sup(-) 0 , were calculated from the equilibrium solubility data. The ΔH sup(-) 0 values are compared with the electron screened proton model of metal-hydrogen solutions. The addition of titanium to niobium has the effect to increase the hydrogen solubility at a given equilibrium temperature. (Author) [pt

  20. Superconducting composites materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerjouan, P.; Boterel, F.; Lostec, J.; Bertot, J.P.; Haussonne, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developed in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ , by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. 8 refs.; 14 figs.; 9 tabs [fr